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Sample records for calmodulin

  1. Trifluoperazine binding to mutant calmodulins.

    PubMed

    Massom, L R; Lukas, T J; Persechini, A; Kretsinger, R H; Watterson, D M; Jarrett, H W

    1991-01-22

    Trifluoperazine (TFP) binding by 14 calmodulins, including 12 produced by site-directed mutagenesis, was determined. While vertebrate calmodulin binds 4.2 +/- 0.2 equiv of TFP, Escherichia coli expressed but unmutated calmodulins bind about 5.0 +/- 0.5 equiv of TFP. The cause for this difference is not known. The E. coli expressed proteins consist of two different series expressed from different calmodulin genes, CaMI and SYNCAM. The wild-type genes code for proteins that differ by nine conservative amino acid substitutions. Both these calmodulins bind 5 equiv of TFP with similar affinities, thus none of these conservative substitutions has any additional effect on TFP binding. Some altered calmodulins (deletion of EE83-84 or SEEE81-84, changing DEE118-120----KKK, M124----I,E120----K, or E82----K) have no appreciable effect on TFP binding. Other mutations affect either the binding of one TFP (deletion of E84) or about two TFP (changing E84----K, EEE82-84----KKK, E67----A, DEQ6-8----KKK, or E11----K). The mutations that affect TFP binding are localized to three regions of calmodulin: The amino-terminal alpha-helix, the central helix between the two globular ends of calmodulin, and a calcium-binding site in the second calcium-binding domain. The results are consistent with each of these regions either directly participating in drug binding or involved structurally in maintaining or inducing the correct conformation for TFP binding in the amino-terminal half of calmodulin.

  2. SK channels and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Adelman, John P

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ions are Nature's most widely used signaling mechanism, mediating communication between pathways at virtually every physiological level. Ion channels are no exception, as the activities of a wide range of ion channels are intricately shaped by fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Mirroring the importance and the breadth of Ca(2+) signaling, free Ca(2+) levels are tightly controlled, and a myriad of Ca(2+) binding proteins transduce Ca(2+) signals, each with its own nuance, comprising a constantly changing symphony of metabolic activity. The founding member of Ca(2+) binding proteins is calmodulin (CaM), a small, acidic, modular protein endowed with gymnastic-like flexibility and E-F hand motifs that chelate Ca(2+) ions. In this review, I will trace the history that led to the realization that CaM serves as the Ca(2+)-gating cue for SK channels, the experiments that revealed that CaM is an intrinsic subunit of SK channels, and itself a target of regulation. PMID:25942650

  3. Calcium calmodulin and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, B L; Walker, S W; Tomlinson, S

    1985-08-01

    As long ago as 1970, it was proposed that Ca2+ can act as a 'second messenger' like cAMP (Rasmussen & Nagata, 1979). The recognition that calmodulin is a major Ca2+ binding protein in non-muscle cells has prompted the suggestion that calmodulin may serve an analogous role for Ca2+ to that served by protein kinase for cAMP (Wang & Waisman, 1979), or at least to the regulatory subunit of the cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases. It is becoming clear that calmodulin probably does play a role in stimulus secretion coupling in endocrine cells. Nevertheless, some of the experimental approaches which have led to this rather tentative conclusion do induce some doubts, as we have attempted to indicate. Many of the pharmacological agents used in the studies cited in this review are not specific in their interaction with calmodulin. For example, the phenothiazines also inhibit phospholipid-sensitive protein kinase. The introduction of more specific drugs, such as the naphthalene sulphonamides, may lead to a clearer picture of the role of calmodulin in hormone secretion. Relationships probably exist between cyclic nucleotides, calcium, calmodulin, phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover and phospholipids in the overall control of the secretory process (see Fig. 1). There is considerable evidence that calcium is the primary internal signal initiating exocytosis of hormone from many glands. However, it appears that cyclic nucleotides can modulate the calcium signal either positively or negatively and it is possible that cAMP and calcium can separately activate secretion. The presence of both calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in the same tissue would appear to suggest either spatial or temporal control mechanisms or that (diagram; see text) the calcium requirement for calmodulin activation differs between the two enzymes. The true explanation is probably far more complex and involves perhaps as yet unknown factors that can differentially

  4. Role of Calmodulin in Cell Proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafouleas, J.

    1983-01-01

    Calmodulin levels were found to increase as cells enter plateau. The data suggest that the cells are exiting the cell cycle late in the G sub 1 phase, or that the calmodulin levels in plateau cells are uncoupled to progression into S phase in plateau cells. Upon release, calmodulin levels rapidly decrease. Following this decrease, there is a increase prior to S phase.

  5. Localization of calmodulin in rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, J F; Cheung, W Y; Wallace, R W; Huang, H L; Levine, S N; Steiner, A L

    1980-01-01

    The localization of calmodulin, a calcium-dependent modulator of many enzymes, was studied in rat liver, skeletal muscle, and adrenal slices. Calmodulin is found in liver cytoplasm, nucleus, and plasma membrane. Much of the cytoplasmic calmodulin is associated with glycogen particles presumably bound to enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism. Skeletal muscle calmodulin is found on the I-band, also associated with glycogen particles. Intermyofibrillar staining that is not glycogen associated is also observed. Calmodulin is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of adrenal cortex cells. Injection of corticotropin leads to a greatly increased localization of calmodulin in nuclei of the adrenal cortex. These observations suggest that one role of calmodulin may be the regulation of hormone effects on nuclear processes. Images PMID:6987650

  6. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  7. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  8. Developmental differences in posttranslational calmodulin methylation in pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-05-01

    A calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used to analyze the degree of lysine-115 methylation of pea calmodulin. Calmodulin was isolated from segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of {sup 3}H-methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The methylation of these calmodulin samples occurs specifically at lysine 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position were not methylated and competitively inhibited methylation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in NAD kinase activation by methylated and unmethylated calmodulins, raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation could affect calmodulin action.

  9. Rain-, wind-, and touch-induced expression of calmodulin and calmodulin-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Braam, J; Davis, R W

    1990-02-01

    In response to water spray, subirrigation, wind, touch, wounding, or darkness, Arabidopsis regulates the expression of at least four touch-induced (TCH) genes. Ten to thirty minutes after stimulation, mRNA levels increase up to 100-fold. Arabidopsis plants stimulated by touch develop shorter petioles and bolts. This developmental response is known as thigmomorphogenesis. TCH 1 cDNA encodes the putative Arabidopsis calmodulin differing in one amino acid from wheat calmodulin. Sequenced regions of TCH 2 and TCH 3 contain 44% and 70% amino acid identities to calmodulin, respectively. The regulation of this calmodulin-related gene family in Arabidopsis suggests that calcium ions and calmodulin are involved in transduction of signals from the environment, enabling plants to sense and respond to environmental changes.

  10. Regulation of RYR1 activity by Ca(2+) and calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodney, G. G.; Williams, B. Y.; Strasburg, G. M.; Beckingham, K.; Hamilton, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The skeletal muscle calcium release channel (RYR1) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that is regulated by another Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. The functional consequences of calmodulin's interaction with RYR1 are dependent on Ca(2+) concentration. At nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an activator, but at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an inhibitor of RYR1. This raises the question of whether the Ca(2+)-dependent effects of calmodulin on RYR1 function are due to Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin, RYR1, or both. To distinguish the effects of Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin from those of Ca(2+) binding to RYR1, a mutant calmodulin that cannot bind Ca(2+) was used to evaluate the effects of Ca(2+)-free calmodulin on Ca(2+)-bound RYR1. We demonstrate that Ca(2+)-free calmodulin enhances the affinity of RYR1 for Ca(2+) while Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin converts calmodulin from an activator to an inhibitor. Furthermore, Ca(2+) binding to RYR1 enhances its affinity for both Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin.

  11. Structure and dynamics of calmodulin in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Wriggers, W; Mehler, E; Pitici, F; Weinstein, H; Schulten, K

    1998-01-01

    To characterize the dynamic behavior of calmodulin in solution, we have carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Ca2+-loaded structure. The crystal structure of calmodulin was placed in a solvent sphere of radius 44 A, and 6 Cl- and 22 Na+ ions were included to neutralize the system and to model a 150 mM salt concentration. The total number of atoms was 32,867. During the 3-ns simulation, the structure exhibits large conformational changes on the nanosecond time scale. The central alpha-helix, which has been shown to unwind locally upon binding of calmodulin to target proteins, bends and unwinds near residue Arg74. We interpret this result as a preparative step in the more extensive structural transition observed in the "flexible linker" region 74-82 of the central helix upon complex formation. The major structural change is a reorientation of the two Ca2+-binding domains with respect to each other and a rearrangement of alpha-helices in the N-terminus domain that makes the hydrophobic target peptide binding site more accessible. This structural rearrangement brings the domains to a more favorable position for target binding, poised to achieve the orientation observed in the complex of calmodulin with myosin light-chain kinase. Analysis of solvent structure reveals an inhomogeneity in the mobility of water in the vicinity of the protein, which is attributable to the hydrophobic effect exerted by calmodulin's binding sites for target peptides. PMID:9545028

  12. Characterization of the secondary structure of calmodulin in complex with a calmodulin-binding domain peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, S.M.; Schneider, D.M.; Strobel, L.A.; Wand, A.J. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana ); Van Berkum, M.F.A.; Means, A.R. )

    1992-02-11

    The interaction between calcium-saturated chicken calmodulin and a peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding domain of the chicken smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase has been studied by multinuclear and multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance methods. Extensive {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonance assignments of calmodulin in the complex have been obtained from the analysis of two- and three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The assignment of calmodulin in the complex was facilitated by the use of selective labeling of the protein with {alpha}-{sup 15}N-labeled valine, alanine, lysine, leucine, and glycine. These provided reference points during the main-chain-directed analysis of three-dimensional spectra of complexes prepared with uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled calmodulin. The pattern of nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) seen among main-chain amide NH, C{sub {alpha}}H, and C{sub {beta}}H hydrogens indicates that the secondary structure of the globular domains of calmodulin in the complex closely corresponds to that observed in the calcium-saturated state of the protein in the absence of bound peptide. However, the backbone conformation of residues 76-84 adopts an extended chain conformation upon binding of the peptide in contrast to its helical conformation in the absence of peptide. A sufficient number of NOEs between the globular domains of calmodulin and the bound peptide have been found to indicate that the N- and C-terminal regions of the peptide interact with the C- and N-terminal domains of calmodulin, respectively. The significance of these results are discussed in terms of recently proposed models for the structure of calmodulin-peptide complexes.

  13. Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

  14. Calmodulin and calmodulin binding proteins in amphibian rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, S.; Yamazaki, A.; Bitensky, M.W.

    1987-03-24

    The calmodulin (CaM) content of fully intact frog rod outer segments (ROS) has been measured using radioimmunoassay. The molar ratio between rhodopsin and total CaM in ROS is 800:1. In the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/, the ROS membrane fraction contains only 4% of total ROS CaM. In contrast, in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, 15% of total ROS CaM is found in the membrane fraction. For half-maximal binding of CaM to CaM-depleted ROS membranes, 3 x 10/sup -7/ M Ca/sup 2 +/ is required. This CaM binding is inhibited by trifluoperazine. CaM binding proteins in the ROS membrane fraction are identified by using two different methods: the overlay method and the use of 3,3'-dithiobis(sulfosuccinimidyl propionate) (DTSSP), a bifunctional cross-linking reagent. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent CaM binding proteins with apparent molecular weights of 240,000, 140,000, 53,000, and 47,000 are detected in the ROS membrane fraction by the overlay method. Anomalous, Ca/sup 2 +/-independent CaM binding to rhodopsin is also detected with this method, and this CaM binding is inhibited by the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. With the bifunctional cross-linking reagent, DTSSP, three discrete proteins with molecular weights of 240,000, 53,000, and 47,000 are detected in the native ROS membrane fraction. CaM binding to rhodopsin is not detected with this method. These data suggest that both the Ca/sup 2 +/-independent binding of CaM to rhodopsin and the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of CaM to the M/sub r/ 140,000 protein represent binding of CaM to a site(s) which is (are) exposed only after denaturation. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent CaM binding in the cytoplasmic fraction is also evaluated with the overlay method. These data suggest that CaM and its binding proteins participate in the regulation of Ca/sup 2 +/-sensitive processes primarily on the ROS disk membranes.

  15. Metabolically sup 35 S-labeled recombinant calmodulin as a ligand for the detection of calmodulin-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Asselin, J.; Phaneuf, S.; Watterson, D.M.; Haiech, J. )

    1989-04-01

    We have developed a simplified procedure for the production of metabolically labeled calmodulin. We used bacterial clones (Escherichia coli) that were found to express VU-1 calmodulin, a calmodulin that is fully active with a variety of calmodulin-regulated enzymes. VU-1 calmodulin was labeled with sulfur-35 in bacteria maintained in a sulfur-free medium. Calmodulin was then purified by chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose. Under these conditions, the specific activity of the proteins was 150 to 400 cpm/fmol of calmodulin. To demonstrate the utility of this labeled VU-1 calmodulin, we examined the calmodulin-binding proteins in aortic myocyte preparation from Day 0 and Day 15 cultures by using both the gel and the nitrocellulose overlay protocols. The results showed that calmodulin-binding proteins are easily detected by the two procedures and that the profile of these target proteins changed in myocyte with time in culture. While most of these calmodulin-binding proteins have not been identified, the relative mobility on SDS-PAGE gels suggests that myosin light chain kinase (Mr approximately 137,000) was detected by these methods. We demonstrated here that the nitrocellulose overlay was faster than the gel overlay and that this technique can be useful for the study of calmodulin-binding proteins.

  16. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signal network in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    Various extracellular stimuli elicit specific calcium signatures that can be recognized by different calcium sensors. Calmodulin, the predominant calcium receptor, is one of the best-characterized calcium sensors in eukaryotes. In recent years, completion of the Arabidopsis genome project and advances in functional genomics have helped to identify and characterize numerous calmodulin-binding proteins in plants. There are some similarities in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling in plants and animals. However, plants possess multiple calmodulin genes and many calmodulin target proteins, including unique protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these proteins are likely to act as "hubs" during calcium signal transduction. Hence, a better understanding of the function of these calmodulin target proteins should help in deciphering the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signal network and its role in plant growth, development and response to environmental stimuli.

  17. Aquaporin 6 binds calmodulin in a calcium dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Rabaud, Nicole E.; Song, Linhua; Wang, Yiding; Agre, Peter; Yasui, Masato; Carbrey, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporin 6 (AQP6) is an anion channel that is expressed primarily in acid secreting α-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct. In addition, AQP6 anion channel permeability is gated by low pH. Inspection of the N-terminus of AQP6 revealed a putative calmodulin binding site. AQP6-expressing CHO-K1 cell lysates were mixed with calmodulin beads and AQP6 was pulled down in the presence of calcium. Mutagenesis of the N-terminal calmodulin binding site in full length mouse AQP6 resulted in a loss of calmodulin binding activity. Mouse and human AQP6 calmodulin binding site peptides bound dansyl-calmodulin with a dissociation constant of approximately 1 μM. The binding of AQP6 to calmodulin may be an important key to determining the physiological role of AQP6 in the kidney. PMID:19336226

  18. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  19. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Day, Danton H.; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer’s disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer’s disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer’s disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  20. Kv7 Channels Can Function without Constitutive Calmodulin Tethering

    PubMed Central

    Alberdi, Araitz; Alaimo, Alessandro; Etxeberría, Ainhoa; Fernández-Orth, Juncal; Zamalloa, Teresa; Roura-Ferrer, Meritxell; Villace, Patricia; Areso, Pilar; Casis, Oscar; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    M-channels are voltage-gated potassium channels composed of Kv7.2-7.5 subunits that serve as important regulators of neuronal excitability. Calmodulin binding is required for Kv7 channel function and mutations in Kv7.2 that disrupt calmodulin binding cause Benign Familial Neonatal Convulsions (BFNC), a dominantly inherited human epilepsy. On the basis that Kv7.2 mutants deficient in calmodulin binding are not functional, calmodulin has been defined as an auxiliary subunit of Kv7 channels. However, we have identified a presumably phosphomimetic mutation S511D that permits calmodulin-independent function. Thus, our data reveal that constitutive tethering of calmodulin is not required for Kv7 channel function. PMID:21980481

  1. Calcium-independent calmodulin requirement for endocytosis in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Kübler, E; Schimmöller, F; Riezman, H

    1994-01-01

    We have recently shown that actin and fimbrin are required for the internalization step of endocytosis in yeast. Using a yeast strain with a temperature-sensitive allele of CMD1, encoding calmodulin, we demonstrate that this protein is also required for this process. Calmodulin mutants that have lost their high-affinity calcium binding sites are, however, able to carry out endocytosis normally. A mutation in Myo2p, an unconventional myosin that is a possible target of calmodulin, did not inhibit endocytosis. The function of calmodulin in endocytosis seems to be specific among membrane trafficking events, because the calmodulin mutants are not defective for biogenesis of soluble vacuolar hydrolases nor invertase secretion. Calmodulin does not seem to play a major role in the post-internalization steps of the endocytic pathway in yeast. Images PMID:7988551

  2. Action of pinaverium bromide on calmodulin-regulated functions.

    PubMed

    Wuytack, F; De Schutter, G; Casteels, R

    1985-08-01

    Pinaverium bromide at concentrations below 10(-5) M did not inhibit calmodulin-dependent enzymes such as phosphodiesterase and the Ca transport ATPase of the plasma membrane. At higher concentrations the compound interacted with the stimulation of those enzymes by calmodulin and also inhibited the calmodulin-independent activity. A similar inhibitory action was observed for the NaK ATPase. It is concluded that the inhibitory action of pinaverium bromide on smooth muscle concentration at concentrations below 10(-5) M was due to its interaction with the voltage-dependent Ca channels and not to its interference with the calmodulin-dependent activation of the contractile proteins. PMID:2995077

  3. Decoding of calcium signal through calmodulin: calmodulin-binding proteins in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many abiotic and biotic stimuli such as heat, cold, drought, salt, light, wind, touch, wounding, symbionts and pathogens as well as growth, developmental and hormonal cues can quickly induce cytosolic calcium increases. Calmodulin, the most thoroughly studied calcium sensor, mediates interpretation...

  4. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  5. The Effect of Calcium on the Binding of Calmodulin to Calcium/Calmodulin Protein Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a follow-up laboratory experiment demonstrating the formation change when calcium binds to calmodulin. This conformation change allows this complex to bind to a target protein. Presents the necessary information to conduct the experiment and discusses the results. (YDS)

  6. Calmodulin binds to and inhibits the activity of phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) functions as a cytoplasmic ATP-generating glycolytic enzyme, a nuclear mediator in DNA replication and repair, a stimulator of Sendai virus transcription and an extracellular disulfide reductase in angiogenesis. Probing of a developmental expression library from Dictyostelium discoideum with radiolabelled calmodulin led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative calmodulin-binding protein (DdPGK) with 68% sequence similarity to human PGK. Dictyostelium, rabbit and yeast PGKs bound to calmodulin-agarose in a calcium-dependent manner while DdPGK constructs lacking the calmodulin-binding domain (209KPFLAILGGAKVSDKIKLIE228) failed to bind. The calmodulin-binding domain shows 80% identity between diverse organisms and is situated beside the hinge and within the ATP binding domain adjacent to nine mutations associated with PGK deficiency. Calmodulin addition inhibits yeast PGK activity in vitro while the calmodulin antagonist W-7 abrogates this inhibition. Together, these data suggest that PGK activity may be negatively regulated by calcium and calmodulin signalling in eukaryotic cells. PMID:15363631

  7. Multiple instance learning of Calmodulin binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Fayyaz ul Amir Afsar; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitously conserved protein that acts as a calcium sensor, and interacts with a large number of proteins. Detection of CaM binding proteins and their interaction sites experimentally requires a significant effort, so accurate methods for their prediction are important. Results: We present a novel algorithm (MI-1 SVM) for binding site prediction and evaluate its performance on a set of CaM-binding proteins extracted from the Calmodulin Target Database. Our approach directly models the problem of binding site prediction as a large-margin classification problem, and is able to take into account uncertainty in binding site location. We show that the proposed algorithm performs better than the standard SVM formulation, and illustrate its ability to recover known CaM binding motifs. A highly accurate cascaded classification approach using the proposed binding site prediction method to predict CaM binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana is also presented. Availability: Matlab code for training MI-1 SVM and the cascaded classification approach is available on request. Contact: fayyazafsar@gmail.com or asa@cs.colostate.edu PMID:22962461

  8. Calmodulin modulates H-Ras mediated Raf-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Moretó, Jemina; Lladó, Anna; Vidal-Quadras, Maite; Calvo, Maria; Pol, Albert; Enrich, Carlos; Tebar, Francesc

    2008-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that, in COS-1 cells, inhibition of calmodulin increases Ras-GTP levels although it decreases Raf-1 activity and consequently MAPK. The present study analyzes the role of calmodulin in the regulation of Raf-1. First we show, using FRET microscopy, that inhibition of Raf-1 was not a consequence of a decreased interaction between H-Ras and Raf-1. Besides, the analysis of the phosphorylation state of Raf-1 showed that calmodulin, through downstream PI3K, is essential to ensure the Ser338-Raf-1 phosphorylation, critical for Raf-1 activation. We also show that the expression of a dominant negative mutant of PI3K impairs the calmodulin-mediated Raf-1 activation; in addition, both calmodulin and PI3K inhibitors decrease phospho-Ser338 and Raf-1 activity from upstream active H-Ras (H-RasG12V) and this effect is dependent on endocytosis. Importantly, in H-Ras depleted COS-1 cells, calmodulin does not modulate MAPK activation. Altogether, the results suggest that calmodulin regulation of MAPK in COS-1 cells relies upon H-Ras control of Raf-1 activity and involves PI3K.

  9. Calcium/Calmodulin-Mediated Gravitropic Response in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a fundamental understanding of how calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is involved in gravity signal transduction in plants. During the period of support, significant progress was made in elucidating the role of calmodulin and its target proteins in gravitropism. This laboratory has made breakthroughs by cloning and characterizing genes that are involved in calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling. Some of these genes show altered expression under hypergravity and simulated microgravity conditions. A major advance was made in our attempts to understand gravity signal transduction by cloning and characterizing a catalase which requires calcium/calmodulin for its activation. Our results suggest that calcium/calmodulin have dual roles in regulating the level of hydrogen peroxide (H202), a signal molecule that plays a major role in gravitropism. It is well established that auxin plays a major role in gravitropism. Our results indicate that there is a 'cross-talk' between calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and auxin-mediated signal transduction. Auxin-regulated SAUR proteins that are involved in gravitropism bind to calmodulin in a calcium-dependent manner. A novel chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase was cloned and characterized and its role in gravity signal transduction was investigated. These studies have provided some answers to the fundamental questions about how signal molecules such as calcium, H202, and hormones such as auxin bring about the ultimate gravitropic response and the integral role of calmodulin in gravity signal transduction. This NASA-funded study has led to some spinoffs that have applications in solving agricultural problems. The Washington State University Research Foundation has obtained several patents related to this work.

  10. The Key Role of Calmodulin in KRAS-Driven Adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nussinov, Ruth; Muratcioglu, Serena; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Jang, Hyunbum; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2015-09-01

    KRAS4B is a highly oncogenic splice variant of the KRAS isoform. It is the only isoform associated with initiation of adenocarcinomas. Insight into why and how KRAS4B can mediate ductal adenocarcinomas, particularly of the pancreas, is vastly important for its therapeutics. Here we point out the overlooked critical role of calmodulin (CaM). Calmodulin selectively binds to GTP-bound K-Ras4B; but not to other Ras isoforms. Cell proliferation and growth require the MAPK (Raf/MEK/ERK) and PI3K/Akt pathways. We propose that Ca(2+)/calmodulin promote PI3Kα/Akt signaling, and suggest how. The elevated calcium levels clinically observed in adenocarcinomas may explain calmodulin's involvement in recruiting and stimulating PI3Kα through interaction with its n/cSH2 domains as well as K-Ras4B; importantly, it also explains why K-Ras4B specifically is a key player in ductal carcinomas, such as pancreatic (PDAC), colorectal (CRC), and lung cancers. We hypothesize that calmodulin recruits and helps activate PI3Kα at the membrane, and that this is the likely reason for Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependence in adenocarcinomas. Calmodulin can contribute to initiation/progression of ductal cancers via both PI3Kα/Akt and Raf/MEK/ERK pathways. Blocking the K-Ras4B/MAPK pathway and calmodulin/PI3Kα binding in a K-Ras4B/calmodulin/PI3Kα trimer could be a promising adenocarcinoma-specific therapeutic strategy.

  11. Dopamine binds calmodulin during autoregulation of dopaminergic D2 receptor signaling through CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex.

    PubMed

    Laoye, B J; Okurumeh, O A; Obagaye, O V; Olagunju, M O; Bankole, O O; Olubiyi, O O; Ogundele, O M

    2016-01-01

    The role of dopaminergic D2 receptor (D2R) autoregulation in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission cannot be overemphasized in cause and progression of disorders associated with complex behaviors. Although previous studies have shown that D2R is structurally and physiologically linked with calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKIIα), however, the role of calmodulin in the CaMKIIα complex in D2R regulation remains elusive. In this study, using structural biology modeling softwares (iGEMDOCK and CueMol), we have shown the interaction between D2R, CaMKIIα, calmodulin, and DA under varying conditions. The outcomes of this study suggest that CaMKIIα causes a change in DA binding affinity to the D2R receptive site while the detached DA binds to calmodulin to stop the activity of D2R in the D2R-dopaminergic D1 receptor (D1R) heteromer. Ultimately, we concluded that D2R autoregulates to stop its heteromeric combination with D1R. D2R interacts with D1R to facilitate calcium movement that activates calmodulin, then CaMKIIα. The CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex changes the affinity of DA-D2R causing DA to break free and bind with calmodulin. PMID:26446938

  12. Role of Calcium and Calmodulin in Plant Cell Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium and calmodulin in plant cell regulation is discussed. Experiments are done to discover the level of calcium in plants and animals. The effect of intracellular calcium on photosynthesis is discussed.

  13. Interaction of smooth muscle caldesmon with calmodulin mutants.

    PubMed

    Medvedeva, M V; Bushueva, T L; Shirinsky, V P; Lukas, T J; Watterson, D M; Gusev, N B

    1995-02-20

    The interaction of avian smooth muscle caldesmon with calmodulin (CaM) was investigated by studying the ability of selected mutant calmodulins to induce fluorescence changes in caldesmon. Different types of CaM mutants were used including point charge mutants, cluster mutations, and mutations which alter the calcium binding of CaM. The caldesmon binding properties were only slightly affected by E84K-CaM or by the double mutation E84Q/E120Q-CaM. Affinity of calmodulin to caldesmon was decreased 2-4 times by point mutation G33V-CaM, double mutation E84K/E120K-CaM, deletion of residues 82-84, and by cluster mutations DEE118-120-->KKK or EEE82-84-->KKK. Mutations of the first (E31A-CaM) and the second (E67A-CaM) calcium binding sites reduced the affinity of calmodulin to caldesmon by at least 5-fold; in addition these calmodulin mutants exhibited smaller changes in the fluorescence spectra of caldesmon. Simultaneous mutation of the two negatively charged clusters of calmodulin EEE82-84-->KKK and DEE118-120-->KKK resulted in a more than 15-fold decrease in the affinity of calmodulin for caldesmon. The data indicate that charged and uncharged amino acids in both halves of CaM play an important role in the binding of calmodulin to caldesmon, and that Ca2+ binding must be maintained in the amino-terminal sites for maximal interaction with caldesmon.

  14. Interaction of smooth muscle relaxant drugs with calmodulin and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Ronca-Testoni, S; Hrelia, S; Hakim, G; Rossi, C A

    1985-01-15

    Some smooth muscle relaxant drugs with an unknown mechanism of action have been tested for their interaction with calmodulin and with calmodulin-induced cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. The affinity of these drugs for calmodulin does not parallel their inhibitory effect on the calmodulin activation of PDE. The lack of parallelism could be due to a binding of the drugs to different sites on calmodulin; furthermore a binding of papaverine, octylonium bromide and felodipine to PDE molecule might also be considered to explain their inhibitory effect on PDE basal activity. The myolytic effect of octylonium bromide and pinaverium bromide may be due to their interaction with calmodulin-dependent systems. PMID:2981701

  15. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention. PMID:27040077

  16. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention.

  17. Pivoting between calmodulin lobes triggered by calcium in the Kv7.2/calmodulin complex.

    PubMed

    Alaimo, Alessandro; Alberdi, Araitz; Gomis-Perez, Carolina; Fernández-Orth, Juncal; Bernardo-Seisdedos, Ganeko; Malo, Covadonga; Millet, Oscar; Areso, Pilar; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Kv7.2 (KCNQ2) is the principal molecular component of the slow voltage gated M-channel, which strongly influences neuronal excitability. Calmodulin (CaM) binds to two intracellular C-terminal segments of Kv7.2 channels, helices A and B, and it is required for exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the molecular mechanisms by which CaM controls channel trafficking are currently unknown. Here we used two complementary approaches to explore the molecular events underlying the association between CaM and Kv7.2 and their regulation by Ca(2+). First, we performed a fluorometric assay using dansylated calmodulin (D-CaM) to characterize the interaction of its individual lobes to the Kv7.2 CaM binding site (Q2AB). Second, we explored the association of Q2AB with CaM by NMR spectroscopy, using (15)N-labeled CaM as a reporter. The combined data highlight the interdependency of the N- and C-lobes of CaM in the interaction with Q2AB, suggesting that when CaM binds Ca(2+) the binding interface pivots between the N-lobe whose interactions are dominated by helix B and the C-lobe where the predominant interaction is with helix A. In addition, Ca(2+) makes CaM binding to Q2AB more difficult and, reciprocally, the channel weakens the association of CaM with Ca(2+).

  18. Pivoting between Calmodulin Lobes Triggered by Calcium in the Kv7.2/Calmodulin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Alaimo, Alessandro; Alberdi, Araitz; Gomis-Perez, Carolina; Fernández-Orth, Juncal; Bernardo-Seisdedos, Ganeko; Malo, Covadonga; Millet, Oscar; Areso, Pilar; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Kv7.2 (KCNQ2) is the principal molecular component of the slow voltage gated M-channel, which strongly influences neuronal excitability. Calmodulin (CaM) binds to two intracellular C-terminal segments of Kv7.2 channels, helices A and B, and it is required for exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the molecular mechanisms by which CaM controls channel trafficking are currently unknown. Here we used two complementary approaches to explore the molecular events underlying the association between CaM and Kv7.2 and their regulation by Ca2+. First, we performed a fluorometric assay using dansylated calmodulin (D-CaM) to characterize the interaction of its individual lobes to the Kv7.2 CaM binding site (Q2AB). Second, we explored the association of Q2AB with CaM by NMR spectroscopy, using 15N-labeled CaM as a reporter. The combined data highlight the interdependency of the N- and C-lobes of CaM in the interaction with Q2AB, suggesting that when CaM binds Ca2+ the binding interface pivots between the N-lobe whose interactions are dominated by helix B and the C-lobe where the predominant interaction is with helix A. In addition, Ca2+ makes CaM binding to Q2AB more difficult and, reciprocally, the channel weakens the association of CaM with Ca2+. PMID:24489773

  19. Studies on a novel macrophage-specific calmodulin binding glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The murine macrophage-like cell line J774 and peritoneal exudate cells elicited with thioglycollate or starch contain a major calmodulin-binding protein which is absent in trifluoperazine-resistant variants of J774, resident peritoneal macrophages and these elicited with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, proteose peptone or Bacillus Clamette Guerin. Resident murine peritoneal cells maintained in tissue culture for 3 days begin to accumulate this protein as do human peripheral blood monocytes after 7 days of culture. A specific competitive displacement radioimmunoassay was developed using a rabbit antiserum raised to the partially purified calmodulin binding protein and (/sup 125/I) calmodulin covalently crosslinked to the principal calmodulin binding protein in the preparation. The radioimmunoassay confirmed the unique cellular distribution of this protein suggesting that it may be a marker for certain stages of macrophage differentiation. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared and one of these was used to further purify the protein by immunoaffinity chromatography. A protein of molecular weight 50,000 to 60,000 was isolated. It could be selectively adsorbed to wheat germ agglutinin agarose and subsequently eluted with N-acetyl glucosamine. This property plus its sensitivity to endoglycosidase F led to the conclusion that it is a glycoprotein. The cellular distribution, subcellular localization and evidence of glycosylation suggest that this protein may be a macrophage-specific receptor with a high affinity for calcium-calmodulin.

  20. Calcium and Calmodulin Localization in Gravitropically-responding Plant Organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    Antimonate staining procedures were used to detect calcium redistribution changes in corn roots. Results show that an asymmetric redistribution of Ca is induced by a gravitropic stimulus in roots as it is in shoots. Since this response occurs within 10 min, at least 5 min before any visible bending, it could play a role in the regulation of root gravitropism. Two different general approaches were used to localize calmodulin in plant tissue: radioimmunoassay of its content in tissue and in purified subcellular organelles, and immunocytochemical detection of it in roots and coleoptiles. Radioimmunoassay results indicate that calmodulin is present in large quantities in pllant cells and that it is specifically associated with mitochondria, etioplasts and nuclei. An assayed of an extract of soluble wall proteins revealed that over 1% of these proteins was calmodulin. Controls indicate that this calmodulin is not cytoplasmic in origin. A reaction product from anti-calmodulin was found mainly in the root cap cells, moderately in metazylem elements, in some cells in the stele surrounding metaxylem elements and in cortical cells.

  1. Acidic/IQ Motif Regulator of Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Putkey, John A.; Waxham, M. Neal; Gaertner, Tara R.; Brewer, Kari J.; Goldsmith, Michael; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Kleerekoper, Quinn K.

    2013-01-01

    The small IQ motif proteins PEP-19 (62 amino acids) and RC3 (78 amino acids) greatly accelerate the rates of Ca2+ binding to sites III and IV in the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM). We show here that PEP-19 decreases the degree of cooperativity of Ca2+ binding to sites III and IV, and we present a model showing that this could increase Ca2+ binding rate constants. Comparative sequence analysis showed that residues 28 to 58 from PEP-19 are conserved in other proteins. This region includes the IQ motif (amino acids 39–62), and an adjacent acidic cluster of amino acids (amino acids 28–40). A synthetic peptide spanning residues 28–62 faithfully mimics intact PEP-19 with respect to increasing the rates of Ca2+ association and dissociation, as well as binding preferentially to the C-domain of CaM. In contrast, a peptide encoding only the core IQ motif does not modulate Ca2+ binding, and binds to multiple sites on CaM. A peptide that includes only the acidic region does not bind to CaM. These results show that PEP-19 has a novel acidic/IQ CaM regulatory motif in which the IQ sequence provides a targeting function that allows binding of PEP-19 to CaM, whereas the acidic residues modify the nature of this interaction, and are essential for modulating Ca2+ binding to the C-domain of CaM. PMID:17991744

  2. Calcium/Calmodulin-Mediated Gravitropic Response in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Plant organs respond to different physical signals such as gravity, light and touch. Gravity gives plants proper orientation, resulting in the proper form that we take for granted; the roots grow down into soil and shoots grow towards the light. Under microgravity conditions, as in space, plant growth patterns lack a clear sense of direction. Calcium and calmodulin (CaM) play an important role in gravity signal transduction. However, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in gravity signal transduction are not clearly understood. The goal of this project was to gain a fundamental understanding of how calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is involved in gravity signal transduction in plants. During the grant period, significant progress was made in elucidating the role of calmodulin and its target proteins in gravitropism.

  3. Calmodulin Mutations Associated with Recurrent Cardiac Arrest in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Graf, Elisabeth; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Ovadia, Marc; Papagiannis, John; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Rathi, Subodh G.; Kunic, Jennifer D.; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Clark, Travis; Shaffer, Christian; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kääb, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Chazin, Walter J.; Schwartz, Peter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Life-threatening disorders of heart rhythm may arise during infancy and can result in the sudden and tragic death of a child. We performed exome sequencing on two unrelated infants presenting with recurrent cardiac arrest to discover a genetic cause. Methods and Results We ascertained two unrelated infants (probands) with recurrent cardiac arrest and dramatically prolonged QTc interval who were both born to healthy parents. The two parent-child trios were investigated using exome sequencing to search for de novo genetic variants. We then performed follow-up candidate gene screening on an independent cohort of 82 subjects with congenital long-QT syndrome without an identified genetic cause. Biochemical studies were performed to determine the functional consequences of mutations discovered in two genes encoding calmodulin. We discovered three heterozygous de novo mutations in either CALM1 or CALM2, two of the three human genes encoding calmodulin, in the two probands and in two additional subjects with recurrent cardiac arrest. All mutation carriers were infants who exhibited life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias combined variably with epilepsy and delayed neurodevelopment. Mutations altered residues in or adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain. Recombinant mutant calmodulins exhibited several fold reductions in calcium binding affinity. Conclusions Human calmodulin mutations disrupt calcium ion binding to the protein and are associated with a life-threatening condition in early infancy. Defects in calmodulin function will disrupt important calcium signaling events in heart affecting membrane ion channels, a plausible molecular mechanism for potentially deadly disturbances in heart rhythm during infancy. PMID:23388215

  4. Effects of opiates on synaptosomal calmodulin and calcium uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Hoss, W.; Formaniak, M.

    1983-02-01

    Acute opiate administration in vivo increases the level of cytoplasmic calmodulin in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. These synaptosomes do not, however, display decreased K/sup +/-stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake in vitro. Opiates affect neither cytoplasmic calmodulin nor Ca uptake after incubation of synaptosomes with the drugs in vitro. In contrast to the interpretation of electrophysiological data, these results suggest that the observed inhibition by opiates of the release of several transmitters may not be mediated by presynaptic opiate receptors that inhibit Ca uptake.

  5. Human neutrophil calmodulin-binding proteins: identification of the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, W.D.; Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The molecular events in linking neutrophil activation and ligand binding to specific membrane receptors are mediated in part by an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. One mechanism by which Ca/sup 2 +/ may trigger neutrophil activation is through Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin (CaM)-regulated proteins and enzymes. To determine which Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes may be present in the neutrophil, they have used Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-CaM to identify neutrophil CaM-binding proteins. Eleven proteins with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 13.5K bound /sup 125/I-CaM in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner. One predominant region of /sup 125/I-Cam binding was to a 59K protein; a protein with an identical mobility was labeled by an antisera against brain CaM-dependent phosphatase. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity, which was inhibited by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, was detected in a neutrophil extract; a radioimmunoassay for the phosphatase indicated that it was present in the extract at approximately 0.2 ..mu..g/mg protein. Most of the CaM-binding proteins, including the 59K protein, were rapidly degraded upon lysis of the neutrophil. There was a close correlation between the degradation of the 59K protein and the loss of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity in the neutrophil extract. Thus, human neutrophils contain numerous CaM-binding proteins which are presumably Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes and proteins; the 59K protein is a CaM-dependent phosphatase.

  6. Determinants in CaV1 Channels That Regulate the Ca2+ Sensitivity of Bound Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Halling, D. Brent; Georgiou, Dimitra K.; Black, D. J.; Yang, Guojun; Fallon, Jennifer L.; Quiocho, Florante A.; Pedersen, Steen E.; Hamilton, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    Calmodulin binds to IQ motifs in the α1 subunit of CaV1.1 and CaV1.2, but the affinities of calmodulin for the motif and for Ca2+ are higher when bound to CaV1.2 IQ. The CaV1.1 IQ and CaV1.2 IQ sequences differ by four amino acids. We determined the structure of calmodulin bound to CaV1.1 IQ and compared it with that of calmodulin bound to CaV1.2 IQ. Four methionines in Ca2+-calmodulin form a hydrophobic binding pocket for the peptide, but only one of the four nonconserved amino acids (His-1532 of CaV1.1 and Tyr-1675 of CaV1.2) contacts this calmodulin pocket. However, Tyr-1675 in CaV1.2 contributes only modestly to the higher affinity of this peptide for calmodulin; the other three amino acids in CaV1.2 contribute significantly to the difference in the Ca2+ affinity of the bound calmodulin despite having no direct contact with calmodulin. Those residues appear to allow an interaction with calmodulin with one lobe Ca2+-bound and one lobe Ca2+-free. Our data also provide evidence for lobe-lobe interactions in calmodulin bound to CaV1.2. PMID:19473981

  7. Calmodulin Promotes N-BAR Domain-Mediated Membrane Constriction and Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Myers, Margaret D; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Hicke, Linda; Payne, Gregory S

    2016-04-18

    Membrane remodeling by BAR (Bin, Amphiphysin, RVS) domain-containing proteins, such as endophilins and amphiphysins, is integral to the process of endocytosis. However, little is known about the regulation of endocytic BAR domain activity. We have identified an interaction between the yeast Rvs167 N-BAR domain and calmodulin. Calmodulin-binding mutants of Rvs167 exhibited defects in endocytic vesicle release. In vitro, calmodulin enhanced membrane tubulation and constriction by wild-type Rvs167 but not calmodulin-binding-defective mutants. A subset of mammalian N-BAR domains bound calmodulin, and co-expression of calmodulin with endophilin A2 potentiated tubulation in vivo. These studies reveal a conserved role for calmodulin in regulating the intrinsic membrane-sculpting activity of endocytic N-BAR domains.

  8. Target molecules of calmodulin on microtubules of Tetrahymena cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano-Ohnishi, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshio )

    1988-09-01

    In the course of an attempt to isolate the calmodulin-binding proteins (CaMBPs) from cilia of Tetrahymena, it was found that some CaMBPs tend to interact with axonemal microtubules. The present study demonstrates this interaction by cosedimentation experiments using in vitro polymerized Tetrahymena axonemal microtubules and Tetrahymena CaMBPs purified from axonemes by calmodulin affinity column chromatography. Analysis by the ({sup 125}I)calmodulin overlay method showed that at least three CaMBPs (M{sub r} 69, 45, and 37 kDa) cosediment with microtubules. Furthermore, without any addition of exogenous CaMBPs, microtubules purified after three cycles of temperature-dependent polymerization and depolymerization included the above CaMBPs and additional CaMBPs which could not cosediment with microtubules. From the results, the authors have classified these microtubule-associated CaMBPs into two groups: (i) CaMBPs which interact with microtubules only during polymerization, and (ii) CaMBPs which interact not only with microtubules during polymerization, but also with polymerized microtubules. These results suggest that the microtubule-associated CaMBPs, especially those of the latter group, are located on the surface of ciliary microtubules, and may become the target molecules of calmodulin at Ca{sup 2+}-triggered ciliary reversal.

  9. Ca(2+)/calmodulin regulates salicylic-acid-mediated plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Du, Liqun; Ali, Gul S; Simons, Kayla A; Hou, Jingguo; Yang, Tianbao; Reddy, A S N; Poovaiah, B W

    2009-02-26

    Intracellular calcium transients during plant-pathogen interactions are necessary early events leading to local and systemic acquired resistance. Salicylic acid, a critical messenger, is also required for both of these responses, but whether and how salicylic acid level is regulated by Ca(2+) signalling during plant-pathogen interaction is unclear. Here we report a mechanism connecting Ca(2+) signal to salicylic-acid-mediated immune response through calmodulin, AtSR1 (also known as CAMTA3), a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-binding transcription factor, and EDS1, an established regulator of salicylic acid level. Constitutive disease resistance and elevated levels of salicylic acid in loss-of-function alleles of Arabidopsis AtSR1 suggest that AtSR1 is a negative regulator of plant immunity. This was confirmed by epistasis analysis with mutants of compromised salicylic acid accumulation and disease resistance. We show that AtSR1 interacts with the promoter of EDS1 and represses its expression. Furthermore, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-binding to AtSR1 is required for suppression of plant defence, indicating a direct role for Ca(2+)/calmodulin in regulating the function of AtSR1. These results reveal a previously unknown regulatory mechanism linking Ca(2+) signalling to salicylic acid level.

  10. Mission CaMKIIγ: shuttle calmodulin from membrane to nucleus.

    PubMed

    Malik, Zulfiqar A; Stein, Ivar S; Navedo, Manuel F; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-10-01

    Neuronal plasticity depends on plasma membrane Ca(2+) influx, resulting in activity-dependent gene transcription. Calmodulin (CaM) activated by Ca(2+) initiates the nuclear events, but how CaM makes its way to the nucleus has remained elusive. Ma et al. now show that CaMKIIγ transports CaM from cell surface Ca(2+) channels to the nucleus.

  11. Involvement of calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins in plant responses to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Houqing; Xu, Luqin; Singh, Amarjeet; Wang, Huizhong; Du, Liqun; Poovaiah, B W

    2015-01-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration have been well recognized to act as cell signals coupling various environmental stimuli to appropriate physiological responses with accuracy and specificity in plants. Calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) are major Ca(2+) sensors, playing critical roles in interpreting encrypted Ca(2+) signals. Ca(2+)-loaded CaM/CMLs interact and regulate a broad spectrum of target proteins such as channels/pumps/antiporters for various ions, transcription factors, protein kinases, protein phosphatases, metabolic enzymes, and proteins with unknown biochemical functions. Many of the target proteins of CaM/CMLs directly or indirectly regulate plant responses to environmental stresses. Basic information about stimulus-induced Ca(2+) signal and overview of Ca(2+) signal perception and transduction are briefly discussed in the beginning of this review. How CaM/CMLs are involved in regulating plant responses to abiotic stresses are emphasized in this review. Exciting progress has been made in the past several years, such as the elucidation of Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated regulation of AtSR1/CAMTA3 and plant responses to chilling and freezing stresses, Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated regulation of CAT3, MAPK8 and MKP1 in homeostasis control of reactive oxygen species signals, discovery of CaM7 as a DNA-binding transcription factor regulating plant response to light signals. However, many key questions in Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated signaling warrant further investigation. Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated regulation of most of the known target proteins is presumed based on their interaction. The downstream targets of CMLs are mostly unknown, and how specificity of Ca(2+) signaling could be realized through the actions of CaM/CMLs and their target proteins is largely unknown. Future breakthroughs in Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated signaling will not only improve our understanding of how plants respond to environmental stresses, but also provide the knowledge base to

  12. Involvement of calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins in plant responses to abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Houqing; Xu, Luqin; Singh, Amarjeet; Wang, Huizhong; Du, Liqun; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2015-01-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration have been well recognized to act as cell signals coupling various environmental stimuli to appropriate physiological responses with accuracy and specificity in plants. Calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) are major Ca2+ sensors, playing critical roles in interpreting encrypted Ca2+ signals. Ca2+-loaded CaM/CMLs interact and regulate a broad spectrum of target proteins such as channels/pumps/antiporters for various ions, transcription factors, protein kinases, protein phosphatases, metabolic enzymes, and proteins with unknown biochemical functions. Many of the target proteins of CaM/CMLs directly or indirectly regulate plant responses to environmental stresses. Basic information about stimulus-induced Ca2+ signal and overview of Ca2+ signal perception and transduction are briefly discussed in the beginning of this review. How CaM/CMLs are involved in regulating plant responses to abiotic stresses are emphasized in this review. Exciting progress has been made in the past several years, such as the elucidation of Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of AtSR1/CAMTA3 and plant responses to chilling and freezing stresses, Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of CAT3, MAPK8 and MKP1 in homeostasis control of reactive oxygen species signals, discovery of CaM7 as a DNA-binding transcription factor regulating plant response to light signals. However, many key questions in Ca2+/CaM-mediated signaling warrant further investigation. Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of most of the known target proteins is presumed based on their interaction. The downstream targets of CMLs are mostly unknown, and how specificity of Ca2+ signaling could be realized through the actions of CaM/CMLs and their target proteins is largely unknown. Future breakthroughs in Ca2+/CaM-mediated signaling will not only improve our understanding of how plants respond to environmental stresses, but also provide the knowledge base to improve stress-tolerance of

  13. Identification of inducible calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase in the liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Iida, S; Ohshima, H; Oguchi, S; Hata, T; Suzuki, H; Kawasaki, H; Esumi, H

    1992-12-15

    A calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase was significantly induced in the liver of rats treated intravenously with heat-killed Propionibacterium acnes and 5 days later with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. The apparent calmodulin-dependent and -independent isozymes were separated by Mono Q column chromatography after their partial purification by 2',5'-ADP-agarose affinity chromatography. Both enzymes had a molecular weight of 125,000 as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and required NADPH, tetrahydrobiopterin, and dithiothreitol as cofactors. Their activities were completely inhibited by the specific nitric oxide synthase inhibitors NG-monomethyl-L-arginine and N omega-nitro-L-arginine at 80 and 800 microM, respectively. The peptide maps of these two isozymes with lysylendopeptidase and their reverse-phase column chromatographic profiles were indistinguishable. In the presence of bovine calmodulin, the purified calmodulin-dependent isozyme behaved as a calmodulin-independent isozyme on Mono Q column chromatography. The purified calmodulin-independent isozyme was converted to a calmodulin-dependent isozyme by EDTA and EGTA. Calmodulin blot analysis using 125I-calmodulin showed that the two isozymes bound calmodulin equally efficiently.

  14. Analysis of the state of posttranslational calmodulin methylation in developing pea plants. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-07-01

    A specific calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used in a radiometric assay to analyze the degree of methylation of lysine-115 in pea (Pisum sativum) plants. Calmodulin was isolated from dissected segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by incubation with the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of ({sup 3}H)methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. By this approach, the presence of unmethylated calmodulins were demonstrated in pea tissues, and the levels of methylation varied depending on the developmental state of the tissue tested. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments of both etiolated and green plants, and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The incorporation of methyl groups into these calmodulin samples appears to be specific for position 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position competitively inhibited methyl group incorporation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in the ability of methylated and unmethylated calmodulins to activate pea NAD kinase raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation of calmodulin could be another mechanism for regulating calmodulin activity.

  15. Cellular distribution of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins in Vicia faba L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, V.; Assmann, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-binding proteins within Vicia faba was investigated. Both CaM and CaM-binding proteins were found to be differentially distributed among organs, tissues, and protoplast types. CaM levels, on a per protein basis, were found to be the highest in leaf epidermis, containing 3-fold higher levels of CaM than in total leaf. Similarly, guard cell and epidermal cell protoplasts were also found to have higher levels of CaM than mesophyll cell protoplasts. 125I-CaM blot overlay assays were performed to qualitatively examine CaM-binding proteins in these protoplast types as well as in whole tissues and organs. CaM-binding proteins with Mr 52,000, 78,000, and 115,000 were common in all metabolically active plant parts. Unique CaM-binding protein bands were detected in guard cell protoplasts (Mr 39,000, 88,000), stems (Mr 45,000, 60,000, 64,000), and roots (Mr 62,000), suggesting the presence of specialized CaM-dependent processes in these cells and organs.

  16. Calmodulin binds to K-Ras, but not to H- or N-Ras, and modulates its downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Villalonga, P; López-Alcalá, C; Bosch, M; Chiloeches, A; Rocamora, N; Gil, J; Marais, R; Marshall, C J; Bachs, O; Agell, N

    2001-11-01

    Activation of Ras induces a variety of cellular responses depending on the specific effector activated and the intensity and amplitude of this activation. We have previously shown that calmodulin is an essential molecule in the down-regulation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellularly regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in cultured fibroblasts and that this is due at least in part to an inhibitory effect of calmodulin on Ras activation. Here we show that inhibition of calmodulin synergizes with diverse stimuli (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, bombesin, or fetal bovine serum) to induce ERK activation. Moreover, even in the absence of any added stimuli, activation of Ras by calmodulin inhibition was observed. To identify the calmodulin-binding protein involved in this process, calmodulin affinity chromatography was performed. We show that Ras and Raf from cellular lysates were able to bind to calmodulin. Furthermore, Ras binding to calmodulin was favored in lysates with large amounts of GTP-bound Ras, and it was Raf independent. Interestingly, only one of the Ras isoforms, K-RasB, was able to bind to calmodulin. Furthermore, calmodulin inhibition preferentially activated K-Ras. Interaction between calmodulin and K-RasB is direct and is inhibited by the calmodulin kinase II calmodulin-binding domain. Thus, GTP-bound K-RasB is a calmodulin-binding protein, and we suggest that this binding may be a key element in the modulation of Ras signaling.

  17. Does aluminum inhibit pollen germination via extracellular calmodulin?

    PubMed

    Ma, L G; Fan, Q S; Yu, Z Q; Zhou, H L; Zhang, F S; Sun, D Y

    2000-03-01

    The effect of aluminum (Al) on pollen germination and its mechanism of action were investigated. Pollen germination and pollen tube elongation were inhibited by Al at pH 4.5. This inhibitory effect was reversed by the addition of purified calmodulin (CaM), whereas neither the calcium binding-protein S-100 nor Al chelator citric acid at the same concentrations had any obvious effect on Al-inhibited pollen germination. The presence of either the membrane-impermeable CaM inhibitor anti-CaM antiserum or Ca2+ chelator EGTA completely suppressed the effect of exogenous CaM. These results indicate the involvement of extracellular calmodulin in the short-term effects of Al on pollen germination and pollen tube elongation.

  18. [Modulation of myometrium mitochondrial membrane potential by calmodulin antagonists].

    PubMed

    Shlykov, S H; Babich, L H; Ievtushenko, M Ie; Karakhim, S O; Kosterin, S O

    2014-01-01

    Influence of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was investigated using a flow cytometry method, confocal microscopy and fluorescent potential-sensitive probes TMRM and MTG. Influence of different concentrations of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was studied using flow cytometry method and a fraction of myometrium mitochondria of unpregnant rats. It was shown that 1-10 microM calmidazolium gradually reduced mitochondria membrane potential. At the same time 10-100 microM trifluoperazine influenced as follows: 10 microM--increased polarization, while 100 microM--caused almost complete depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. In experiments which were conducted with the use of confocal microscopy method and myometrium cells it was shown, that MTG addition to the incubation medium led to the appearance of fluorescence signal in a green range. Addition of the second probe (TMRM) resulted in the appearance of fluorescent signal in a red range. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization by 1 microM CCCP or 10 mM NaN3 was accompanied by the decline of "red" fluorescence intensity, "green" fluorescence was kept. The 10-15 minute incubation of myometrium cells in the presence 10 microM calmidazolium or 100 microM trifluoperazine was accompanied by almost complete decrease of the TMRM fluorescent signal. Thus, with the use of potential-sensitive fluorescent probes TMRM and MTG it was shown, that calmodulin antagonists modulate mitochondrial membrane potential of myometrium cells.

  19. Abnormal expression of the calmodulin gene in muscle from the dystrophic chicken

    SciTech Connect

    Hudecki, M.S.; Kibler, P.K.; Pollina, C.M.; Thacore, H.R.; Davis, P.J.; Davis, F.B.

    1986-05-29

    Compared to that of genetically-related normal chickens, pectoralis muscle from the dystrophic chicken contained increased calmodulin measured by radioimmunoassay. Determined by the dot blot procedure, expression of the calmodulin gene was enhanced in muscle from affected animals. The bioactivity of the gene product was normal. Together with previous studies reporting of increased sarcoplasmic calmodulin suggest the latter is a cellular response to defective Ca/sup 2 +/ transport at the level of cell efflux or intracellular organelle (sarcoplasmic reticulum) uptake.

  20. Calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins in cystic fibrosis and normal human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the possibility that a lesion in a calmodulin (CaM)-dependent regulatory mechanism may be involved in cystic fibrosis (CF). The level of CaM, CaM-binding proteins (CaM-BP) and a CaM-dependent phosphatase (CaM-Ptase) have been compared in cultured fibroblasts from CF patients versus age- and sex-matched control subjects. The CaM concentration, measured by radioimmunoassay, ranged from 0.20 to 0.76 ..mu..g/mg protein (n=8); there was no significant difference in the average CaM concentration from CF patients vs controls. Using Western blotting techniques with /sup 125/I-CaM, they detected at least ten distinct CaM-BPs in fibroblasts with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 37K; the only consistent difference between control and CF cell lines was in a 46.5K CaM-BP, which was depressed in all three CF samples. The 46.5 K CaM-BP was found only in the particulate fraction. A 59K CaM-BP was identified as a CaM-Ptase by its crossreactivity with an antibody against a brain CaM-Ptase. There was no significant difference in CaM-Ptase activity or in the amount of the phosphatase as determined by radioimmunoassay in CF vs. normal samples (n=8). Thus, the level of CaM as well as its various enzymes and proteins do not appear to be altered in CF fibroblasts except for a CaM-BP of 46.5K, the identity of which is currently being investigated.

  1. The binding of calmodulin to myelin basic protein and histone H2B.

    PubMed Central

    Grand, R J; Perry, S V

    1980-01-01

    1. A calmodulin-binding protein of apparent mol.wt. 19 000 has been purified from chicken gizzard. Similar proteins have been isolated from bovine uterus, rabbit skeletal muscle and rabbit liver. 2. These proteins migrated as an equimolar complex with bovine brain calmodulin on electroporesis on polyacrylamide gels in the presence of Ca2+ and 6M-urea. The complex was dissociated in the presence of EGTA. 2. The chicken gizzard calmodulin-binding protein has been shown to be identical with chicken erythrocyte histone H2B on the basis of partial amino acid sequence determination. 4. The calmodulin-binding proteins of apparent mol.wt. 22 000 isolated previously from bovine brain [Grand & Perry (1979) Biochem. J. 183, 285-295] has been shown, on the basis of partial amino-acid-sequence determination, to be identical with myelin basic protein. 5. The activation of bovine brain phosphodiesterase by calmodulin is inhibited by excess bovine uterus calmodulin-binding protein (histone H2B). 6. The phosphorylation of myelin basic protein by phosphorylase kinase is partially inhibited, whereas the phosphorylation of uterus calmodulin-binding protein (histone H2B) is unaffected by calmodulin or troponin C. 7. The subcellular distribution of myelin basic protein and calmodulin suggests that the two proteins do not exist as a complex in vivo. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6161607

  2. The calmodulin-binding domain of the mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Minami, Y; Kawasaki, H; Suzuki, K; Yahara, I

    1993-05-01

    The mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) and Ca(2+)-calmodulin were cross-linked at an equimolar ratio using a carbodiimide zero-length cross-linker. To identify the calmodulin-binding domain(s) of HSP90, CNBr-cleaved peptide fragments of HSP90 were mixed with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and cross-linked. Amino acid sequence determination revealed that an HSP90 alpha-derived peptide starting at the 486th amino acid residue was contained in the cross-linked products, which contains a calmodulin-binding motif (from Lys500 to Ile520). A similar motif is present also in HSP90 beta (from Lys491 to Val511). The synthetic peptides corresponding to these putative calmodulin-binding sequences were found to be cross-linked with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and to prevent the cross-linking of HSP90 and Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Both HSP90 alpha and HSP90 beta bind Ca2+. The HSP90 peptides bind HSP90 and thereby inhibit the binding of Ca2+. In addition, the HSP90 peptides augment the self-oligomerization of HSP90 induced at elevated temperatures. These results suggest that the calmodulin-binding domain of HSP90 might interact with another part of the same molecule and that Ca(2+)-calmodulin might modulate the structure and function of HSP90 through abolishing the intramolecular interaction. PMID:8486648

  3. Molecular mechanisms of calmodulin action on TRPV5 and modulation by parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Theun; Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Verkaart, Sjoerd; Schilderink, Nathalie; Felici, Marco; van der Hagen, Eline A E; Bindels, René J M; Vuister, Geerten W; Hoenderop, Joost G

    2011-07-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 (TRPV5) constitutes the apical entry gate for active Ca(2+) reabsorption in the kidney. Ca(2+) influx through TRPV5 induces rapid channel inactivation, preventing excessive Ca(2+) influx. This inactivation is mediated by the last ∼30 residues of the carboxy (C) terminus of the channel. Since the Ca(2+)-sensing protein calmodulin has been implicated in Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of several TRP channels, the potential role of calmodulin in TRPV5 function was investigated. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed a Ca(2+)-dependent interaction between calmodulin and a C-terminal fragment of TRPV5 (residues 696 to 729) in which one calmodulin binds two TRPV5 C termini. The TRPV5 residues involved in calmodulin binding were mutated to study the functional consequence of releasing calmodulin from the C terminus. The point mutants TRPV5-W702A and TRPV5-R706E, lacking calmodulin binding, displayed a strongly diminished Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation compared to wild-type TRPV5, as demonstrated by patch clamp analysis. Finally, parathyroid hormone (PTH) induced protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of residue T709, which diminished calmodulin binding to TRPV5 and thereby enhanced channel open probability. The TRPV5-W702A mutant exhibited a significantly increased channel open probability and was not further stimulated by PTH. Thus, calmodulin negatively modulates TRPV5 activity, which is reversed by PTH-mediated channel phosphorylation. PMID:21576356

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Calmodulin Action on TRPV5 and Modulation by Parathyroid Hormone▿†

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Theun; Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V.; Verkaart, Sjoerd; Schilderink, Nathalie; Felici, Marco; van der Hagen, Eline A. E.; Bindels, René J. M.; Vuister, Geerten W.; Hoenderop, Joost G.

    2011-01-01

    The epithelial Ca2+ channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 (TRPV5) constitutes the apical entry gate for active Ca2+ reabsorption in the kidney. Ca2+ influx through TRPV5 induces rapid channel inactivation, preventing excessive Ca2+ influx. This inactivation is mediated by the last ∼30 residues of the carboxy (C) terminus of the channel. Since the Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin has been implicated in Ca2+-dependent regulation of several TRP channels, the potential role of calmodulin in TRPV5 function was investigated. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed a Ca2+-dependent interaction between calmodulin and a C-terminal fragment of TRPV5 (residues 696 to 729) in which one calmodulin binds two TRPV5 C termini. The TRPV5 residues involved in calmodulin binding were mutated to study the functional consequence of releasing calmodulin from the C terminus. The point mutants TRPV5-W702A and TRPV5-R706E, lacking calmodulin binding, displayed a strongly diminished Ca2+-dependent inactivation compared to wild-type TRPV5, as demonstrated by patch clamp analysis. Finally, parathyroid hormone (PTH) induced protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of residue T709, which diminished calmodulin binding to TRPV5 and thereby enhanced channel open probability. The TRPV5-W702A mutant exhibited a significantly increased channel open probability and was not further stimulated by PTH. Thus, calmodulin negatively modulates TRPV5 activity, which is reversed by PTH-mediated channel phosphorylation. PMID:21576356

  5. Dual Regulation of a Chimeric Plant Serine/Threonine Kinase by Calcium and Calcium/Calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Ramachandiran, S.; Paranjape, V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene characterized by a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain was recently cloned from plants. The Escherichia coli-expressed CCaMK phosphorylates various protein and peptide substrates in a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent manner. The calmodulin-binding region of CCAMK has similarity to the calmodulin-binding region of the alpha-subunit of multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). CCaMK exhibits basal autophosphorylation at the threonine residue(s) (0.098 mol of P-32/mol) that is stimulated 3.4-fold by Ca(2+) (0.339 mol of P-32/mol), while calmodulin inhibits Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation to the basal level. A deletion mutant lacking the visinin-like domain did not show Ca(2+)-simulated autophosphorylation activity but retained Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity at a reduced level. Ca(2+)-dependent mobility shift assays using E.coli-expressed protein from residues 358-520 revealed that Ca(2+) binds to the visinin-like domain. Studies with site-directed mutants of the visinin-like domain indicated that EF-hands II and III are crucial for Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes in the visinin-like domain. Autophosphorylation of CCaMK increases Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity by about 5-fold, whereas it did not affect its C(2+)-independent activity. This report provides evidence for the existence of a protein kinase in plants that is modulated by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain in CCaMK adds an additional Ca(2+)-sensing mechanism not previously known to exist in the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling cascade in plants.

  6. Correlation between Calmodulin Activity and Gravitropic Sensitivity in Primary Roots of Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Stinemetz, Charles L.; Kuzmanoff, Konrad M.; Evans, Michael L.; Jarrett, Harry W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates a role for calcium and calmodulin in the gravitropic response of primary roots of maize (Zea mays, L.). We examined this possibility by testing the relationship between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in roots of the maize cultivars Merit and B73 × Missouri 17. Roots of the Merit cultivar require light to be gravitropically competent. The gravitropic response of the Missouri cultivar is independent of light. The occurrence of calmodulin in primary roots of these maize cultivars was tested by affinity gel chromatography followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with bovine brain calmodulin as standard. The distribution of calmodulin activity was measured using both the phosphodiesterase and NAD kinase assays for calmodulin. These assays were performed on whole tissue segments, crude extracts, and purified extracts. In light-grown seedlings of the Merit cultivar or in either dark- or light-grown seedlings of the Missouri cultivar, calmodulin activity per millimeter of root tissue was about 4-fold higher in the apical millimeter than in the subtending 3 millimeters. Calmodulin activity was very low in the apical millimeter of roots of dark-grown (gravitropically nonresponsive) seedlings of the Merit cultivar. Upon illumination, the calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter increased to a level comparable to that of light-grown seedlings and the roots became gravitropically competent. The time course of the development of gravitropic sensitivity following illumination paralleled the time course of the increase in calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter of the root. The results are consistent with the suggestion that calmodulin plays an important role in the gravitropic response of roots. Images Fig. 1 PMID:11539677

  7. Correlation between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Kuzmanoff, K. M.; Evans, M. L.; Jarrett, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates a role for calcium and calmodulin in the gravitropic response of primary roots of maize (Zea mays, L.). We examined this possibility by testing the relationship between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in roots of the maize cultivars Merit and B73 x Missouri 17. Roots of the Merit cultivar require light to the gravitropically competent. The gravitropic response of the Missouri cultivar is independent of light. The occurrence of calmodulin in primary roots of these maize cultivars was tested by affinity gel chromatography followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with bovine brain calmodulin as standard. The distribution of calmodulin activity was measured using both the phosphodiesterase and NAD kinase assays for calmodulin. These assays were performed on whole tissue segments, crude extracts, and purified extracts. In light-grown seedlings of the Merit cultivar or in either dark- or light-grown seedlings of the Missouri cultivar, calmodulin activity per millimeter of root tissue was about 4-fold higher in the apical millimeter than in the subtending 3 millimeters. Calmodulin activity was very low in the apical millimeter of roots of dark-grown (gravitropically nonresponsive) seedlings of the Merit cultivar. Upon illumination, the calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter increased to a level comparable to that of light-grown seedlings and the roots became gravitropically competent. The time course of the development of gravitropic sensitivity following illumination paralleled the time course of the increase in calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter of the root. The results are consistent with the suggestion that calmodulin plays an important role in the gravitropic response of roots.

  8. Nitric Oxide Synthases Reveal a Role for Calmodulin in Controlling Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Soud, Husam M.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    1993-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized within the immune, vascular, and nervous systems, where it acts as a wide-ranging mediator of mammalian physiology. The NO synthases (EC 1.14.13.39) isolated from neurons or endothelium are calmodulin dependent. Calmodulin binds reversibly to neuronal NO synthase in response to elevated Ca2+, triggering its NO production by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that calmodulin binding allows NADPH-derived electrons to pass onto the heme group of neuronal NO synthase. Calmodulin-triggered electron transfer to heme was independent of substrate binding, caused rapid enzymatic oxidation of NADPH in the presence of O_2, and was required for NO synthesis. An NO synthase isolated from cytokine-induced macrophages that contains tightly bound calmodulin catalyzed spontaneous electron transfer to its heme, consistent with bound calmodulin also enabling electron transfer within this isoform. Together, these results provide a basis for how calmodulin may regulate NO synthesis. The ability of calmodulin to trigger electron transfer within an enzyme is unexpected and represents an additional function for calcium-binding proteins in biology.

  9. Calmodulin Adopts an Extended Conformation when Interacting with L-Selectin in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Putkey, John A.; Li, Renhao

    2013-01-01

    Calmodulin, an intracellular calcium-binding protein, is thought to regulate ectodomain shedding of many membrane proteins, but the underlying molecular mechanism has remained unclear. Basing on a solution structure of calcium-loaded calmodulin in complex with a L-selectin fragment that contains a portion of its transmembrane domain, Gifford et al. (University of Calgary) recently suggested that calmodulin regulates L-selectin shedding by binding directly to a portion of the L-selectin transmembrane domain in a compact conformation. Using fluorescently labeled calmodulin, we show however that calmodulin adopts a distinctly different and much more extended conformation when it binds to the CLS peptide (i.e. the entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of L-selectin) reconstituted in the phosphatidylcholine liposome with micromolar dissociation constant and in a calcium-independent manner. Calmodulin adopts a similarly extended conformation in a ternary complex with the N-terminal FERM domain of moesin and CLS reconstituted in the phospholipid liposome that mimics the native membrane environment. These results indicate that calmodulin does not bind directly to the transmembrane domain of L-selectin. Understanding the association of calmodulin with L-selectin helps to shed light on the mechanisms underlying regulation of ectodomain shedding. PMID:23658780

  10. Calmodulin transduces Ca2+ oscillations into differential regulation of its target proteins.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Nikolai; Carey, Jannette; Linse, Sara

    2013-04-17

    Diverse physiological processes are regulated differentially by Ca(2+) oscillations through the common regulatory hub calmodulin. The capacity of calmodulin to combine specificity with promiscuity remains to be resolved. Here we propose a mechanism based on the molecular properties of calmodulin, its two domains with separate Ca(2+) binding affinities, and target exchange rates that depend on both target identity and Ca(2+) occupancy. The binding dynamics among Ca(2+), Mg(2+), calmodulin, and its targets were modeled with mass-action differential equations based on experimentally determined protein concentrations and rate constants. The model predicts that the activation of calcineurin and nitric oxide synthase depends nonmonotonically on Ca(2+)-oscillation frequency. Preferential activation reaches a maximum at a target-specific frequency. Differential activation arises from the accumulation of inactive calmodulin-target intermediate complexes between Ca(2+) transients. Their accumulation provides the system with hysteresis and favors activation of some targets at the expense of others. The generality of this result was tested by simulating 60 000 networks with two, four, or eight targets with concentrations and rate constants from experimentally determined ranges. Most networks exhibit differential activation that increases in magnitude with the number of targets. Moreover, differential activation increases with decreasing calmodulin concentration due to competition among targets. The results rationalize calmodulin signaling in terms of the network topology and the molecular properties of calmodulin.

  11. Functional analysis of calmodulin genes family during tomato fruit development and ripening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calmodulin as a ubiquitous calcium sensor can recognize the different developmental and/or stimulus-triggered calcium changes and modulate the functions of its target proteins involved in plant growth and development. However, it remains elusive for the functions of calmodulin for fleshy fruit devel...

  12. Touch-inducible genes for calmodulin and a calmodulin-related protein are located in tandem on a chromosome of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Hirano, M; Akama, K; Shimura, Y; Okada, K

    1995-10-01

    Genes for calmodulin and calmodulin-related proteins in Arabidopsis are up-regulated by a variety of physical stimuli, which include rain, wind and touch [Braam and Davis (1990) Cell 60: 357]. We have isolated five genes for calmodulin (AtCAL1, 2, 3, 5, 6) and one gene for a calmodulin-related protein (AtCAL4) from an Arabidopsis genomic library. Touch stimulus of Arabidopsis plants induces the accumulation of mRNA transcribed from AtCAL4 and AtCAL5, but not from the other isolated genes. The two touch-inducible genes are arrayed in tandem with a short intergenic region of 700 bp but they show different organ-specific patterns of expression.

  13. Calcium Binding to Calmodulin by Molecular Dynamics with Effective Polarization.

    PubMed

    Kohagen, Miriam; Lepšík, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-11-20

    Calcium represents a key biological signaling ion with the EF-hand loops being its most prevalent binding motif in proteins. We show using molecular dynamics simulations with umbrella sampling that including electronic polarization effects via ionic charge rescaling dramatically improves agreements with experiment in terms of the strength of calcium binding and structures of the calmodulin binding sites. The present study thus opens way to accurate calculations of interactions of calcium and other computationally difficult high-charge-density ions in biological contexts.

  14. Calmodulin inhibition: a possible predictor of metal-ion toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.W.; Turner, J.E.; Hsie, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    A correlation between CE/sub 50/, the metal-ion concentration which reduces the cloning efficiency of CHO cells by 50%, and IC/sub 50/, the metal-ion concentration that produces an inhibition of calmodulin activity of 50%, is reported for 10 divalent metal ions. It is thus suggested that IC/sub 50/ might be used as a predictor of metal-ion toxicity in CHO cells. Arguments are presented to support the extrapolation of these results to other pollutants and to other biological species.

  15. Evidence for a dissociable protein subunit required for calmodulin stimulation of brain adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, W A; Westcott, K R; LaPorte, D C; Storm, D R

    1979-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphatelyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] preparation that is not stimulated by NaF,5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate, or Ca2+.calmodulin has been isolated from bovine cerebral cortex by Affi-Gel Blue chromatography and calmodulin-Sepharose chromatography. Sensitivity to these effectors was restored by incubation of the adenylate cyclase preparation with detergent-solubilized protein from bovine cerebral cortex. Reconstitution of of Ca2+.calmodulin activation required the presence of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate. The factor required for restoration of Ca2+.calmodulin stimulation was sensitive to heat, trypsin digestion, and N-ethylmaleimide. These observations suggest that this adenylate cyclase activity requires the presence of one or more guanyl nucleotide binding subunits for calmodulin sensitivity. PMID:293663

  16. Anti-calmodulins and tricyclic adjuvants in pain therapy block the TRPV1 channel.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Zoltán; Jósvay, Katalin; Pecze, László; Letoha, Tamás; Babai, Norbert; Budai, Dénes; Otvös, Ferenc; Szalma, Sándor; Vizler, Csaba

    2007-06-20

    Ca(2+)-loaded calmodulin normally inhibits multiple Ca(2+)-channels upon dangerous elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and protects cells from Ca(2+)-cytotoxicity, so blocking of calmodulin should theoretically lead to uncontrolled elevation of intracellular Ca(2+). Paradoxically, classical anti-psychotic, anti-calmodulin drugs were noted here to inhibit Ca(2+)-uptake via the vanilloid inducible Ca(2+)-channel/inflamatory pain receptor 1 (TRPV1), which suggests that calmodulin inhibitors may block pore formation and Ca(2+) entry. Functional assays on TRPV1 expressing cells support direct, dose-dependent inhibition of vanilloid-induced (45)Ca(2+)-uptake at microM concentrations: calmidazolium (broad range) > or = trifluoperazine (narrow range) chlorpromazine/amitriptyline>fluphenazine>W-7 and W-13 (only partially). Most likely a short acidic domain at the pore loop of the channel orifice functions as binding site either for Ca(2+) or anti-calmodulin drugs. Camstatin, a selective peptide blocker of calmodulin, inhibits vanilloid-induced Ca(2+)-uptake in intact TRPV1(+) cells, and suggests an extracellular site of inhibition. TRPV1(+), inflammatory pain-conferring nociceptive neurons from sensory ganglia, were blocked by various anti-psychotic and anti-calmodulin drugs. Among them, calmidazolium, the most effective calmodulin agonist, blocked Ca(2+)-entry by a non-competitive kinetics, affecting the TRPV1 at a different site than the vanilloid binding pocket. Data suggest that various calmodulin antagonists dock to an extracellular site, not found in other Ca(2+)-channels. Calmodulin antagonist-evoked inhibition of TRPV1 and NMDA receptors/Ca(2+)-channels was validated by microiontophoresis of calmidazolium to laminectomised rat monitored with extracellular single unit recordings in vivo. These unexpected findings may explain empirically noted efficacy of clinical pain adjuvant therapy that justify efforts to develop hits into painkillers, selective to sensory Ca(2

  17. Biosensing with a Calmodulin-Functionalized Plasmonic Switch

    PubMed Central

    Hall, W. Paige; Modica, Justin; Anker, Jeffrey; Lin, Yao; Mrksich, Milan; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    The versatile optical and biological properties of a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor that responds to protein conformational changes are illustrated. The sensor detects conformational changes in a surface-bound construct of the calcium-sensitive protein calmodulin. Increases in calcium concentration induce a 0.96 nm red-shift in the spectral position of the LSPR extinction maximum (λmax). Addition of a calcium chelating agent forces the protein to return to its original conformation and is detected as a reversal of the λmax shift. As opposed to previous work, this work demonstrates that these conformational changes produce a detectable shift in λmax even in the absence of a protein label, with a signal:noise ratio near 500. In addition, the protein conformational changes reversibly switch both the wavelength and intensity of the resonance peak, representing an example of a bimodal plasmonic component that simultaneously relays two distinct forms of optical information. This highly versatile plasmonic device acts as a biological sensor, enabling the detection of calcium ions with a biologically-relevant limit of detection of 23 μM, as well as the detection of calmodulin-specific protein ligands. PMID:21280643

  18. Transgenic tobacco expressing a foreign calmodulin gene shows an enhanced production of active oxygen species.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, S A; Oh, S H; Roberts, D M

    1997-01-01

    A strategy for elucidating specific molecular targets of calcium and calmodulin in plant defense responses has been developed. We have used a dominant-acting calmodulin mutant (VU-3, Lys to Arg115) to investigate the oxidative burst and nicotinamide co-enzyme fluxes after various stimuli (cellulase, harpin, incompatible bacteria, osmotic and mechanical) that elicit plant defense responses in transgenic tobacco cell cultures. VU-3 calmodulin differs from endogenous plant calmodulin in that it cannot be methylated post-translationally, and as a result it hyperactivates calmodulin-dependent NAD kinase. Cells expressing VU-3 calmodulin exhibited a stronger active oxygen burst that occurred more rapidly than in normal control cells challenged with the same stimuli. Increases in NADPH level were also greater in VU-3 cells and coincided both in timing and magnitude with development of the active oxygen species (AOS) burst. These data show that calmodulin is a target of calcium fluxes in response to elicitor or environmental stress, and provide the first evidence that plant NAD kinase may be a downstream target which potentiates AOS production by altering NAD(H)/NADP(H) homeostasis. PMID:9135130

  19. Heparin blocks /sup 125/I-calmodulin internalization by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Roden, L.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-03-05

    /sup 125/I-Calmodulin is internalized by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) in a time, temperature and calcium dependent manner. Internalization of /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the osmotically sensitive space of BBV was distinguished from binding of the ligand to the outer BBV surface by examining the interaction of ligand and BBV at different medium osmolarities (300-1100 mosm), uptake was inversely proportional to medium osmolarity. Internalized /sup 125/I-calmodulin was intact and Western blots of solubilized BBV with /sup 125/I-calmodulin demonstrated the presence of several calmodulin-binding proteins of 143, 118, 50, 47.5, 46.5 and 35 kilodaltons which could represent potential intravesicular binding sites for the ligand. Heparin and the related glycosaminoglycan heparin sulfate both showed a dose-dependent inhibition (0.5-50 ..mu..g/ml) of /sup 125/I-calmodulin uptake by BBV, but other sulfated and nonsulfated glycosaminoglycans including chondroitin sulfates, keratan sulfate and hyaluronic acid showed little or no inhibitory effect. Desulfation of heparin virtually abolished the inhibition of uptake while depolymerization reduced it. Heparin did not block the binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to BBV proteins as assessed by Western blotting technique suggesting its effect was on internalization of the ligand rather than on its association with internal membrane proteins.

  20. Plant chimeric Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. Role of the neural visinin-like domain in regulating autophosphorylation and calmodulin affinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Cremo, C. R.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by a serine-threonine kinase domain, an autoinhibitory domain, a calmodulin-binding domain and a neural visinin-like domain with three EF-hands. The neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain at the C-terminal end of the CaM-binding domain makes CCaMK unique among all the known calmodulin-dependent kinases. Biological functions of the plant visinin-like proteins or visinin-like domains in plant proteins are not well known. Using EF-hand deletions in the visinin-like domain, we found that the visinin-like domain regulated Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK. To investigate the effects of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation on the interaction with calmodulin, the equilibrium binding constants of CCaMK were measured by fluorescence emission anisotropy using dansylated calmodulin. Binding was 8-fold tighter after Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. This shift in affinity did not occur in CCaMK deletion mutants lacking Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. A variable calmodulin affinity regulated by Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation mediated through the visinin-like domain is a new regulatory mechanism for CCaMK activation and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Our experiments demonstrate the existence of two functional molecular switches in a protein kinase regulating the kinase activity, namely a visinin-like domain acting as a Ca(2+)-triggered switch and a CaM-binding domain acting as an autophosphorylation-triggered molecular switch.

  1. Modulation of Calmodulin Lobes by Different Targets: An Allosteric Model with Hemiconcerted Conformational Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Massimo; Brun, Denis; Edelstein, Stuart J.; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin is a calcium-binding protein ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells, involved in numerous calcium-regulated biological phenomena, such as synaptic plasticity, muscle contraction, cell cycle, and circadian rhythms. It exibits a characteristic dumbell shape, with two globular domains (N- and C-terminal lobe) joined by a linker region. Each lobe can take alternative conformations, affected by the binding of calcium and target proteins. Calmodulin displays considerable functional flexibility due to its capability to bind different targets, often in a tissue-specific fashion. In various specific physiological environments (e.g. skeletal muscle, neuron dendritic spines) several targets compete for the same calmodulin pool, regulating its availability and affinity for calcium. In this work, we sought to understand the general principles underlying calmodulin modulation by different target proteins, and to account for simultaneous effects of multiple competing targets, thus enabling a more realistic simulation of calmodulin-dependent pathways. We built a mechanistic allosteric model of calmodulin, based on an hemiconcerted framework: each calmodulin lobe can exist in two conformations in thermodynamic equilibrium, with different affinities for calcium and different affinities for each target. Each lobe was allowed to switch conformation on its own. The model was parameterised and validated against experimental data from the literature. In spite of its simplicity, a two-state allosteric model was able to satisfactorily represent several sets of experiments, in particular the binding of calcium on intact and truncated calmodulin and the effect of different skMLCK peptides on calmodulin’s saturation curve. The model can also be readily extended to include multiple targets. We show that some targets stabilise the low calcium affinity T state while others stabilise the high affinity R state. Most of the effects produced by calmodulin targets can be explained as modulation

  2. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-01-01

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  3. Structural insights into neuronal K+ channel–calmodulin complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mruk, Karen; Shandilya, Shiven M.D.; Blaustein, Robert O.; Schiffer, Celia A.; Kobertz, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous intracellular calcium sensor that directly binds to and modulates a wide variety of ion channels. Despite the large repository of high-resolution structures of CaM bound to peptide fragments derived from ion channels, there is no structural information about CaM bound to a fully folded ion channel at the plasma membrane. To determine the location of CaM docked to a functioning KCNQ K+ channel, we developed an intracellular tethered blocker approach to measure distances between CaM residues and the ion-conducting pathway. Combining these distance restraints with structural bioinformatics, we generated an archetypal quaternary structural model of an ion channel–CaM complex in the open state. These models place CaM close to the cytoplasmic gate, where it is well positioned to modulate channel function. PMID:22869708

  4. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of the family of voltage-gated CaV1-2 channels comprises a prominent prototype for ion channel regulation, remarkable for its powerful Ca2+ sensing capabilities, deep in elegant mechanistic lessons, and rich in biological and therapeutic implications. This field thereby resides squarely at the epicenter of Ca2+ signaling biology, ion channel biophysics, and therapeutic advance. This review summarizes the historical development of ideas in this field, the scope and richly patterned organization of Ca2+ feedback behaviors encompassed by this system, and the long-standing challenges and recent developments in discerning a molecular basis for calmodulation. We conclude by highlighting the considerable synergy between mechanism, biological insight, and promising therapeutics. PMID:24863929

  5. Calmodulin-induced structural changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Persechini, Anthony; Tran, Quang-Kim; Black, D.J.; Gogol, Edward P.

    2013-01-01

    We have derived structures of intact calmodulin(CaM)-free and CaM-bound endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by reconstruction from cryo-electron micrographs. The CaM-free reconstruction is well fitted by the oxygenase domain dimer, but the reductase domains are not visible, suggesting they are mobile and thus delocalized. Additional protein is visible in the CaM-bound reconstruction, concentrated in volumes near two basic patches on each oxygenase domain. One of these corresponds with a presumptive docking site for the reductase domain FMN-binding module. The other is proposed to correspond with a docking site for CaM. A model is suggested in which CaM binding and docking position the reductase domains near the oxygenase domains and promote docking of the FMN-binding modules required for electron transfer. PMID:23266515

  6. Physico-chemical pathways in radioprotective action of calmodulin antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1996-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.9 Gy/s. The fluidity of membrane decreased with radiation dose and in the presence of calmodulin antagonists (CA) like chlorpromazine (CPZ), promethazine (PMZ) and trimeprazine (TMZ) it increased. Radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from membranes. This release was inhibited by CA mainly by CPZ and PMZ. Being Ca 2+ dependent, the changes in the activity of acetylcholine estrase (AchE) following irradiation was also studied. Radiation decreased the activity of AchE in dose dependent manner. Presence of CPZ and PMZ diminished the radiation induced inhibition of AchE but not in the presence of TMZ at the lower concentration tested. It is suggested that apart from scavenging of free radicals, CA perhaps exert their euxoic radioprotective effect through Ca 2+ dependent processes.

  7. Structural Analysis of a Calmodulin Variant from Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidiha, Mostafa; Ishida, Hiroaki; Sutherland, Cindy; Gifford, Jessica L.; Walsh, Michael P.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2013-01-01

    OsCaM61 is one of five calmodulins known to be present in Oryza sativa that relays the increase of cytosolic [Ca2+] to downstream targets. OsCaM61 bears a unique C-terminal extension with a prenylation site. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy we studied the behavior of the calmodulin (CaM) domain and the C-terminal extension of OsCaM61 in the absence and presence of Ca2+. NMR dynamics data for OsCaM61 indicate that the two lobes of the CaM domain act together unlike the independent behavior of the lobes seen in mammalian CaM and soybean CaM4. Also, data demonstrate that the positively charged nuclear localization signal region in the tail in apo-OsCaM61 is helical, whereas it becomes flexible in the Ca2+-saturated protein. The extra helix in apo-OsCaM61 provides additional interactions in the C-lobe and increases the structural stability of the closed apo conformation. This leads to a decrease in the Ca2+ binding affinity of EF-hands III and IV in OsCaM61. In Ca2+-OsCaM61, the basic nuclear localization signal cluster adopts an extended conformation, exposing the C-terminal extension for prenylation or enabling OsCaM61 to be transferred to the nucleus. Moreover, Ser172 and Ala173, residues in the tail, interact with different regions of the protein. These interactions affect the ability of OsCaM61 to activate different target proteins. Altogether, our data show that the tail is not simply a linker between the prenyl group and the protein but that it also provides a new regulatory mechanism that some plants have developed to fine-tune Ca2+ signaling events. PMID:24052265

  8. Calmodulin Affects Sensitization of Drosophila melanogaster Odorant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mukunda, Latha; Miazzi, Fabio; Sargsyan, Vardanush; Hansson, Bill S.; Wicher, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Flying insects have developed a remarkably sensitive olfactory system to detect faint and turbulent odor traces. This ability is linked to the olfactory receptors class of odorant receptors (ORs), occurring exclusively in winged insects. ORs form heteromeric complexes of an odorant specific receptor protein (OrX) and a highly conserved co-receptor protein (Orco). The ORs form ligand gated ion channels that are tuned by intracellular signaling systems. Repetitive subthreshold odor stimulation of olfactory sensory neurons sensitizes insect ORs. This OR sensitization process requires Orco activity. In the present study we first asked whether OR sensitization can be monitored with heterologously expressed OR proteins. Using electrophysiological and calcium imaging methods we demonstrate that D. melanogaster OR proteins expressed in CHO cells show sensitization upon repeated weak stimulation. This was found for OR channels formed by Orco as well as by Or22a or Or56a and Orco. Moreover, we show that inhibition of calmodulin (CaM) action on OR proteins, expressed in CHO cells, abolishes any sensitization. Finally, we investigated the sensitization phenomenon using an ex vivo preparation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) expressing Or22a inside the fly's antenna. Using calcium imaging, we observed sensitization in the dendrites as well as in the soma. Inhibition of calmodulin with W7 disrupted the sensitization within the outer dendritic shaft, whereas the sensitization remained in the other OSN compartments. Taken together, our results suggest that CaM action is involved in sensitizing the OR complex and that this mechanisms accounts for the sensitization in the outer dendrites, whereas further mechanisms contribute to the sensitization observed in the other OSN compartments. The use of heterologously expressed OR proteins appears to be suitable for further investigations on the mechanistic basis of OR sensitization, while investigations on native neurons are required

  9. Novel Calmodulin (CALM2) Mutations Associated with Congenital Arrhythmia Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Naomasa; Yagihara, Nobue; Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Roh, Michelle S.; Shigemizu, Daichi; Lichtner, Peter; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aiba, Takeshi; Homfray, Tessa; Behr, Elijah R.; Klug, Didier; Denjoy, Isabelle; Mastantuono, Elisa; Theisen, Daniel; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Naoto; Kimura, Akinori; Ozaki, Kouichi; Motomura, Hideki; Suda, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Schwartz, Peter J.; Meitinger, Thomas; Kääb, Stefan; Guicheney, Pascale; Shimizu, Wataru; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Chazin, Walter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as in congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) represent treatable causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and children. Recently, mutations in calmodulin (CALM1, CALM2) have been associated with severe forms of LQTS and CPVT, with life-threatening arrhythmias occurring very early in life. Additional mutation-positive cases are needed to discern genotype-phenotype correlations associated with calmodulin mutations. Methods and Results We employed conventional and next-generation sequencing approaches including exome analysis in genotype-negative LQTS probands. We identified five novel de novo missense mutations in CALM2 in three subjects with LQTS (p.N98S, p.N98I, p.D134H) and two subjects with clinical features of both LQTS and CPVT (p.D132E, p.Q136P). Age of onset of major symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest) ranged from 1–9 years. Three of five probands had cardiac arrest and one of these subjects did not survive. Although all probands had LQTS, two subjects also exhibited electrocardiographic features consistent with CPVT. The clinical severity among subjects in this series was generally less than that originally reported for CALM1 and CALM2 associated with recurrent cardiac arrest during infancy. Four of five probands responded to β-blocker therapy whereas one subject with mutation p.Q136P died suddenly during exertion despite this treatment. Mutations affect conserved residues located within calcium binding loops III (p.N98S, p.N98I) or IV (p.D132E, p.D134H, p.Q136P) and caused reduced calcium binding affinity. Conclusions CALM2 mutations can be associated with LQTS and with overlapping features of LQTS and CPVT. PMID:24917665

  10. Calmodulin is a major component of extruded trichocysts from Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Extruded trichocysts are composed of a family of proteins with molecular weights between 15,000 and 20,000. We have used heat treatment and affinity chromatography on fluphenazine-Sepharose to purify calmodulinlike proteins from whole cells and from extruded trichocysts. The purified protein from trichocysts is indistinguishable from that of whole cells; it is heat-stable, activates brain phosphodiesterase in a Ca++-dependent fashion, changes mobility on SDS polyacrylamide gels in the presence of Ca++, contains 1 mol of trimethyllysine/17 kdaltons, and has the amino acid composition characteristic of calmodulins. Calmodulin is a major component of purified, extruded trichocysts, of which it represents between 1 and 10% by mass. The other proteins of the trichocyst also resemble calmodulin in several properties. Possible roles for calmodulin in the Ca++-activated extrusion of trichocysts is discussed. PMID:6276412

  11. Structure-Based Systematic Isolation of Conditional-Lethal Mutations in the Single Yeast Calmodulin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Y.; Botstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Conditional-lethal mutations of the single calmodulin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been very difficult to isolate by random and systematic methods, despite the fact that deletions cause recessive lethality. We report here the isolation of numerous conditional-lethal mutants that were recovered by systematically altering phenylalanine residues. The phenylalanine residues of calmodulin were implicated in function both by structural studies of calmodulin bound to target peptides and by their extraordinary conservation in evolution. Seven single and 26 multiple Phe -> Ala mutations were constructed. Mutant phenotypes were examined in a haploid cmd1 disrupted strain under three conditions: single copy, low copy, and overexpressed. Whereas all but one of the single mutations caused no obvious phenotype, most of the multiple mutations caused obvious growth phenotypes. Five were lethal, 6 were lethal only in synthetic medium, 13 were temperature-sensitive lethal and 2 had no discernible phenotypic consequences. Overexpression of some of the mutant genes restored the phenotype to nearly wild type. Several temperature-sensitive calmodulin mutations were suppressed by elevated concentration of CaCl(2) in the medium. Mutant calmodulin protein was detected at normal levels in extracts of most of the lethal mutant cells, suggesting that the deleterious phenotypes were due to loss of the calmodulin function and not protein instability. Analysis of diploid strains heterozygous for all combinations of cmd1-ts alleles revealed four intragenic complementation groups. The contributions of individual phe->ala changes to mutant phenotypes support the idea of internal functional redundancy in the symmetrical calmodulin protein molecule. These results suggest that the several phenylalanine residues in calmodulin are required to different extents in different combinations in order to carry out each of the several essential tasks. PMID:7896089

  12. Calcium Regulation of Calmodulin Binding to and Dissociation from the Myo1c Regulatory Domain†

    PubMed Central

    Manceva, Slobodanka; Lin, Tianming; Pham, Huy; Lewis, John H.; Goldman, Yale E.; Ostap, E. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Myo1c is an unconventional myosin involved in cell signaling and membrane dynamics. Calcium binding to the regulatory-domain-associated calmodulin affects myo1c motor properties, but the kinetic details of this regulation are not fully understood. We performed actin gliding assays, ATPase measurements, fluorescence spectroscopy, and stopped-flow kinetics to determine the biochemical parameters that define the calmodulin-regulatory-domain interaction. We found calcium moderately increases the actin-activated ATPase activity, and completely inhibits actin gliding. Addition of exogenous calmodulin in the presence of calcium fully restores the actin gliding rate. A fluorescently labeled calmodulin mutant (N111C) binds to recombinant peptides containing the myo1c IQ motifs at a diffusion limited rate in the presence and absence of calcium. Measurements of calmodulin dissociation from the IQ motifs in the absence of calcium show that the calmodulin bound to the IQ motif adjacent to the motor domain (IQ1) has the slowest dissociation rate (0.0007 s−1), and the IQ motif adjacent to the tail domain (IQ3) has the fastest dissociation rate (0.5 s−1). When the complex is equilibrated with calcium, calmodulin dissociates most rapidly from IQ1 (60 s−1). However, this increased rate of dissociation is limited by a slow calcium-induced conformational change (3 s−1). Fluorescence anisotropy decay of fluorescently labeled N111C bound to myo1c did not depend appreciably on Ca2+. Our data suggest that the calmodulin bound to the IQ motif adjacent to the motor domain is rapidly exchangeable in the presence of calcium and is responsible for regulation of myo1c ATPase and motile activity. PMID:17910470

  13. A Novel Kinesin-Like Protein with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse developmental processes in plants through the action of calmodulin. A cDNA expression library from developing anthers of tobacco was screened with S-35-labeled calmodulin to isolate cDNAs encoding calmodulin-binding proteins. Among several clones isolated, a kinesin-like gene (TCK1) that encodes a calmodulin-binding kinesin-like protein was obtained. The TCK1 cDNA encodes a protein with 1265 amino acid residues. Its structural features are very similar to those of known kinesin heavy chains and kinesin-like proteins from plants and animals, with one distinct exception. Unlike other known kinesin-like proteins, TCK1 contains a calmodulin-binding domain which distinguishes it from all other known kinesin genes. Escherichia coli-expressed TCK1 binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In addition to the presence of a calmodulin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal, it also has a leucine zipper motif in the stalk region. The amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminal of TCK1 has striking homology with the mechanochemical motor domain of kinesins. The motor domain has ATPase activity that is stimulated by microtubules. Southern blot analysis revealed that TCK1 is coded by a single gene. Expression studies indicated that TCKI is expressed in all of the tissues tested. Its expression is highest in the stigma and anther, especially during the early stages of anther development. Our results suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin may play an important role in the function of this microtubule-associated motor protein and may be involved in the regulation of microtubule-based intracellular transport.

  14. Structurally homologous binding of plant calmodulin isoforms to the calmodulin-binding domain of vacuolar calcium-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Vogel, Hans J

    2004-02-27

    The discovery that plants contain multiple calmodulin (CaM) isoforms having variable sequence identity to mammalian CaM has sparked a flurry of new questions regarding the intracellular role of Ca(2+) regulation in plants. To date, the majority of research in this field has focused on the differential enzymatic regulation of various mammalian CaM-dependent enzymes by the different plant CaM isoforms. However, there is comparatively little information on the structural recognition of target enzymes found exclusively in plant cells. Here we have used a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopy, to study the interactions of the most conserved and most divergent CaM isoforms from soybean, SCaM-1, and SCaM-4, respectively, with a synthetic peptide derived from the CaM-binding domain of cauliflower vacuolar calcium-ATPase. Despite their sequence divergence, both SCaM-1 and SCaM-4 interact with the calcium-ATPase peptide in a similar calcium-dependent, stoichiometric manner, adopting an antiparallel binding orientation with an alpha-helical peptide. The single Trp residue is bound in a solvent-inaccessible hydrophobic pocket on the C-terminal domain of either protein. Thermodynamic analysis of these interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that the formation of each calcium-SCaM-calcium-ATPase peptide complex is driven by favorable binding enthalpy and is very similar to the binding of mammalian CaM to the CaM-binding domains of myosin light chain kinases and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I.

  15. Ca2+-calmodulin promotes survival of pheromone-induced growth arrest by activation of calcineurin and Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, M J; Geiser, J R; Davis, T N

    1996-01-01

    The cmd1-6 allele contains three mutations that block Ca2+ binding to calmodulin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that strains containing cmd1-6 lose viability during cell cycle arrest induced by the mating pheromone alpha-factor. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of alpha-factor for the calmodulin mutant is almost fivefold below the LD50 for a wild-type strain. The calmodulin mutants are not more sensitive to alpha-factor, as measured by activation of a pheromone-responsive reporter gene. Two observations indicate that activation of the Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin contributes to survival of pheromone-induced arrest. First, deletion of the gene encoding the calcineurin regulatory B subunit, CNB1, from a wild-type strain decreases the LD50 of alpha-factor but has no further effect on a cmd1-6 strain. Second, a dominant constitutive calcineurin mutant partially restores the ability of the cmd1-6 strain to survive exposure to alpha-factor. Activation of the Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) also contributes to survival, thus revealing a new function for this enzyme. Deletion of the CMK1 and CMK2 genes, which encode CaMK, decreases the LD50 of pheromone compared with that for a wild-type strain but again has no effect in a cmd1-6 strain. Furthermore, the LD50 of alpha-factor for a mutant in which the calcineurin and CaMK genes have been deleted is the same as that for the calmodulin mutant. Finally, the CaMK and calcineurin pathways appear to be independent since the ability of constitutive calcineurin to rescue a cmd1-6 strain is not blocked by deletion of the CaMK genes. PMID:8756641

  16. Identification and Characterization of the Interaction Site between cFLIPL and Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bingqian; Pellegrini, Maria; Mierke, Dale F.

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (cFLIP) has been reported in a number of tumor types. As an inactive procaspase-8 homologue, cFLIP is recruited to the intracellular assembly known as the Death Inducing Signaling Complex (DISC) where it inhibits apoptosis, leading to cancer cell proliferation. Here we characterize the molecular details of the interaction between cFLIPL and calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensing protein. By expressing the individual domains of cFLIPL, we demonstrate that the interaction with calmodulin is mediated by the N-terminal death effector domain (DED1) of cFLIPL. Additionally, we mapped the interaction to a specific region of the C-terminus of DED1, referred to as DED1 R4. By designing DED1/DED2 chimeric constructs in which the homologous R4 regions of the two domains were swapped, calmodulin binding properties were transferred to DED2 and removed from DED1. Furthermore, we show that the isolated DED1 R4 peptide binds to calmodulin and solve the structure of the peptide-protein complex using NMR and computational refinement. Finally, we demonstrate an interaction between cFLIPL and calmodulin in cancer cell lysates. In summary, our data implicate calmodulin as a potential player in DISC-mediated apoptosis and provide evidence for a specific interaction with the DED1 of cFLIPL. PMID:26529318

  17. CALMODULIN ANTAGONISTS EFFECT ON Ca2+ LEVEL IN THE MITOCHONDRIA AND CYTOPLASM OF MYOMETRIUM CELLS.

    PubMed

    Shlykov, S G; Babich, L G; Yevtushenko, M E; Karakhim, S O; Kosterin, S O

    2015-01-01

    It is known that Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of this cation exchange in mitochondria is carried out with participation of calmodulin. We had shown in a previous work using two experimental models: isolated mitochondria and intact myometrium cells, that calmodulin antagonists reduce the level of mitochondrial membrane polarization. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of calmodulin antagonists on the level of ionized Ca in mitochondria and cytoplasm of uterine smooth muscle cells using spectrofluorometry and confocal microscopy. It was shown that myometrium mitochondria, in the presence of ATP and MgCl2 in the incubation medium, accumulate Ca ions in the matrix. Incubation of mitochondria in the presence of CCCP inhibited cation accumulation, but did not cease it. Calmodulin antagonist such as trifluoperazine (100 μm) considerably increased the level of ionized Ca in the mitochondrial matrix. Preliminary incubation of mitochondria with 100 μM Ca2+, before adding trifluoperazine to the incubation medium, partly prevented influence of the latter on the cation level in the matrix. Incubation of myometrium cells (primary culture) with another calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium (10 μM was accompanied by depolarization of mitochondrial membrane and an increase in the concentration of ionized Ca in cytoplasm. Thus, using two models, namely, isolated mitochondria and intact myometrium cells, it has been shown that calmodulin antagonists cause depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and an increase of the ionized Ca concentration in both the mitochondrial matrix and the cell cytoplasm.

  18. N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide, a calmodulin antagonist, inhibits cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, H; Sasaki, Y; Tanaka, T; Endo, T; Ohno, S; Fujii, Y; Nagata, T

    1981-01-01

    N-(6-Aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) and its derivatives are putative calmodulin antagonists that bind to calmodulin and inhibit Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated enzyme activities. Autoradiographic studies using tritiated W-7 showed that this compound penetrates the cell membrane, is distributed mainly in the cytoplasm, and inhibits proliferation of Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells. Cytoplasmic [3H]W-7 was excluded completely within 6 hr after removal of [3H]W-7 from the culture medium. N-(6-aminohexyl)-1-naphthalenesulfonamide, an analogue of W-7 that interacts only weakly with calmodulin, proved to be a much weaker inhibitor of cell proliferation. CHO-K1 cells were synchronized by shaking during mitosis and then released into the cell cycle in the presence of 25 microM W-7 or 2.5 mM thymidine for 12 hr. Cell division was observed approximately 6 hr later. The results suggest that the effect of W-7 on cell proliferation might be through selective inhibition of the G1/S boundary phase, which is similar to the effect of excess thymidine. This pharmacological demonstration that cytoplasmic calmodulin is involved in cell proliferation is significant; W-7 and its derivatives may be useful tools for research on calmodulin and cell biology-related studies. Images PMID:6945588

  19. Calmodulin Gene Expression in Response to Mechanical Wounding and Botrytis cinerea Infection in Tomato Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Yang, Tianbao; Jurick, Wayne M.

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various plant physiological responses. To determine the functions of calmodulin in fleshy fruit, expression studies were performed on a family of six calmodulin genes (SlCaMs) in mature-green stage tomato fruit in response to mechanical injury and Botrytis cinerea infection. Both wounding and pathogen inoculation triggered expression of all those genes, with SlCaM2 being the most responsive one to both treatments. Furthermore, all calmodulin genes were upregulated by salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, two signaling molecules involved in plant immunity. In addition to SlCaM2, SlCaM1 was highly responsive to salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. However, SlCaM2 exhibited a more rapid and stronger response than SlCaM1. Overexpression of SlCaM2 in tomato fruit enhanced resistance to Botrytis-induced decay, whereas reducing its expression resulted in increased lesion development. These results indicate that calmodulin is a positive regulator of plant defense in fruit by activating defense pathways including salicylate- and jasmonate-signaling pathways, and SlCaM2 is the major calmodulin gene responsible for this event. PMID:27135512

  20. Synergetic Effect of Recoverin and Calmodulin on Regulation of Rhodopsin Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriev, Ilya I.; Senin, Ivan I.; Tikhomirova, Natalya K.; Komolov, Konstantin E.; Permyakov, Sergei E.; Zernii, Evgeni Yu.; Koch, Karl-Wilhelm; Philippov, Pavel P.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation of photoactivated rhodopsin by rhodopsin kinase (RK or GRK1), a first step of the phototransduction cascade turnoff, is under the control of Ca2+/recoverin. Here, we demonstrate that calmodulin, a ubiquitous Ca2+-sensor, can inhibit RK, though less effectively than recoverin does. We have utilized the surface plasmon resonance technology to map the calmodulin binding site in the RK molecule. Calmodulin does not interact with the recoverin-binding site within amino acid residues M1-S25 of the enzyme. Instead, the high affinity calmodulin binding site is localized within a stretch of amino acid residues V150-K175 in the N-terminal regulatory region of RK. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of calmodulin and recoverin on RK activity is synergetic, which is in agreement with the existence of separate binding sites for each Ca2+-sensing protein. The synergetic inhibition of RK by both Ca2+-sensors occurs over a broader range of Ca2+-concentration than by recoverin alone, indicating increased Ca2+-sensitivity of RK regulation in the presence of both Ca2+-sensors. Taken together, our data suggest that RK regulation by calmodulin in photoreceptor cells could complement the well-known inhibitory effect of recoverin on RK. PMID:22408603

  1. Calmodulin dissociation mediates desensitization of the cADPR-induced Ca2+ release mechanism.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Justyn M; Summerhill, Robin J; Fruen, Bradley R; Churchill, Grant C; Galione, Antony

    2002-12-10

    Ryanodine receptor (RyR) activation by cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is followed by homologous desensitization. Though poorly understood, this "switching off" process has provided a key experimental tool for determining the pathway through which cADPR mediates Ca(2+) release. Moreover, desensitization is likely to play an important role in shaping the complexities of Ca(2+) signaling involving cADPR, for example, localized release events and propagated waves. Using the sea urchin egg, we unmask a role of calmodulin, a component of the RyR complex and a key cofactor for cADPR activity, during RyR/cADPR desensitization. Recovery from desensitization in calmodulin-depleted purified endoplasmic reticulum (microsomes) is severely impaired compared to that in crude egg homogenates. An active, soluble factor, identified as calmodulin, is required to restore the capacity of microsomes to recover from desensitization. Calmodulin mediates recovery in a manner that tightly parallels its time course of association with the RyR. Conversely, direct measurement of calmodulin binding to microsomes reveals a loss of specific binding during cADPR, but not IP(3), desensitization. Our results support a mechanism in which cycles of calmodulin dissociation and reassociation to an endoplasmic reticulum protein, most likely the RyR itself, mediate RyR/cADPR desensitization and resensitization, respectively. PMID:12477390

  2. Involvement of Calcium and Calmodulin in Membrane Deterioration during Senescence of Pea Foliage.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Y Y; Sridhara, S; Thompson, J E

    1984-06-01

    The prospect that Ca(2+) promotes senescence by activating calmodulin has been examined using cut pea (Pisum sativum co Alaska) foliage as a model system. Senescence was induced by severing 17-day-old plants from their roots and maintaining them in aqueous test solutions in the dark for an additional 4 days. Treatment of the foliage with the Ca(2+) ionophore (A23187) during the senescence-induction period promoted a lateral phase separation of the bulk lipids in microsomal membranes indicating that internalization of Ca(2+) facilitates membrane deterioration. In addition, microsomal membranes from ionophore-treated tissue displayed an increased capacity to convert 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid to ethylene and an increased propensity to produce the superoxide anion (O(2) (tau)). Treatment of the tissue with fluphenazine during the senescence-induction period, which prevents binding of the Ca:Calmodulin complex to enzymes, delayed membrane deterioration as measured by these criteria. It also proved possible to simulate these in situ effects of the Ca(2+) ionophore on ethylene production and O(2) (tau) formation by treating microsomal membranes isolated from young tissue with phospholipase A(2) in the presence of Ca(2+) and calmodulin, and these effects of phospholipase A(2) and Ca:calmodulin were inhibited by calmodulin antagonists. The observations collectively suggest that internalized Ca(2+) promotes senescence by activating calmodulin, which in turn mediates the action of phospholipase A(2) on membranes.

  3. Calcium- and calmodulin-regulated breakdown of phospholipid by microsomal membranes from bean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Paliyath, G.; Thompson, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin in the regulation of phospholipid breakdown by microsomal membranes from bean cotyledons has been obtained by following the formation of radiolabeled degradation products from (U-/sup 14/C)phosphatidylcholine. Three membrane-associated enzymes were found to mediate the breakdown of (U-/sup 14/C) phosphatidylcholine, viz. phospholipase D phosphatidic acid phosphatase and lipolytic acyl hydrolase. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid phosphatase were both stimulated by physiological levels of free Ca/sup 2 +/, whereas lipolytic acyl hydrolase proved to be insensitive to Ca/sup 2 +/. Phospholipase D was unaffected by calmodulin, but the activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was additionally stimulated by nanomolar levels of calmodulin in the presence of 15 micromolar free Ca/sup 2 +/. Calmidazolium, a calmodulin antagonist, inhibited phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity at IC/sub 50/ values ranging from 10 to 15 micromolar. Thus, the Ca/sup 2 +/-induced stimulation of phosphatidic acid phosphatase appears to be mediated through calmodulin, whereas the effect of Ca/sup 2 +/ on phospholipase D is independent of calmodulin. The role of Ca/sup 2 +/ as a second messenger in the initiation of membrane lipid degradation is discussed.

  4. Impact of methionine oxidation on calmodulin structural dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Megan R.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J.; Olenek, Michael J.; Klein, Jennifer C.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • We measured the distance distribution between two spin labels on calmodulin by DEER. • Two structural states, open and closed, were resolved at both low and high Ca. • Ca shifted the equilibrium toward the open state by a factor of 13. • Methionine oxidation, simulated by glutamine substitution, decreased the Ca effect. • These results have important implications for aging in muscle and other tissues. - Abstract: We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron–electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous X-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM’s structural heterogeneity in solution: in both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ∼4 nm (closed) and another at ∼6 nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each

  5. Uptake and binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the interaction of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) using an experimental protocol which allows us to distinguish between ligand binding to the outside of the vesicles vs. uptake and possible binding to the vesicle interior. By examining the association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with BBV as a function of medium osmolarity (300-1100 mosm) to alter intravesicular space, virtually all ligand interaction with BBV was found to represent uptake of intact /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the intravesicular space. Uptake appeared specific by the following criteria: (1) it was largely calcium dependent (2) it was inhibited in a dose dependent fashion by calmodulin and the homologous protein troponin C, but not by unrelated proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome C, insulin) (3) it was inhibited by known calmodulin antagonists (calmidazolium, mellitin, trifluoperazine). Calmodulin uptake may be followed by binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to intravesicular BBV proteins; calmodulin-binding proteins in BBV with molecular weights of 143K, 118K, 50K, 47.5K, 46.5K and 35K were identified by Western blotting techniques. The specific association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated BBV is of interest in regard to the possible role of this calcium regulatory protein in the protein reabsorptive and ion transport functions of this renal tubular membrane fraction.

  6. Purification of F plasmid-encoded native TraC from Escherichia coli by affinity chromatography on calmodulin Sepharose.

    PubMed

    Hellstern, Simon; Mutzel, Rupert

    2016-06-01

    We have enriched several native bacterial proteins from Escherichia coli by chromatography on the immobilized eukaryotic Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. These bacterial proteins bound in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner to calmodulin, and were released by the addition of the Ca(2+)-chelator, EGTA, similar to many eukaryotic calmodulin-binding proteins. One of the bacterial proteins, F factor-encoded TraC, was purified to apparent homogeneity by an additional chromatographic step, anion exchange chromatography on MonoQ. Experiments with four chemically distinct calmodulin antagonists (R24571, Compound 48/80, melittin, and W7) showed that all of these substances inhibited the binding of purified TraC to calmodulin at effective concentrations comparable to those required for inhibiting in vitro binding of eukaryotic calmodulin-binding proteins. Three further bacterial proteins were identified as calmodulin-binding proteins: SecA, GlpD, and GlpC. We suggest that also these native bacterial proteins might be isolated by the unusual purification procedure including affinity chromatography on calmodulin Sepharose. Whether the identified proteins bind to, and are regulated by, putative bacterial calmodulin-like proteins in Escherichia coli remains to be established. PMID:26892535

  7. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of Ca2+ and calmodulin on phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins was studied. Secretory granules were incubated in a phosphorylation reaction mixture containing (32P)ATP and test reagents. The 32P-labeled proteins were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 32P content was visualized by autoradiography, and the relative intensities of specific bands were quantitated. When the reaction mixture contained EGTA and no added Ca2+, 32P was incorporated into two proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 13,000. When 10(-4) M Ca2+ was added without EGTA, two additional proteins (58,000 and 48,000 Mr) were phosphorylated, and the 13,000-Mr protein was absent. The addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin markedly enhanced the phosphorylation of the 58,000- and 48,000-Mr proteins and resulted in the phosphorylation of a major protein whose molecular weight (64,000 Mr) is identical to that of one of the calmodulin binding proteins located on the granule surface. Calmodulin had no effect on phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+ but was effective in the presence of calcium between 10 nM and 50 microM. Trifluoperazine and calmidazolium, calmodulin antagonists, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the calmodulin effect. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, a phorbol ester that activates protein kinase C, produced no increase in phosphorylation, and 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, had no effect. These results indicate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and endogenous substrates are present in islet secretory granules.

  8. A role for cysteine 3635 of RYR1 in redox modulation and calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Moore, C.; Zhang, J. Z.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca(2+) release channel (RYR1) increases its activity, produces intersubunit disulfide bonds, and blocks its interaction with calmodulin. Conversely, bound calmodulin protects RYR1 from the effects of oxidants (Zhang, J.-Z., Wu, Y., Williams, B. Y., Rodney, G., Mandel, F., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Am. J. Physiol. 276, Cell Physiol. C46-C53). In addition, calmodulin protects RYR1 from trypsin cleavage at amino acids 3630 and 3637 (Moore, C. P., Rodney, G., Zhang, J.-Z., Santacruz-Toloza, L., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 8532-8537). The sequence between these two tryptic sites is AVVACFR. Alkylation of RYR1 with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) blocks both (35)S-apocalmodulin binding and oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-linking. In the current work, we demonstrate that both cysteines needed for the oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-link are protected from alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide by bound calmodulin. We also show, using N-terminal amino acid sequencing together with analysis of the distribution of [(3)H]NEM labeling with each sequencing cycle, that cysteine 3635 of RYR1 is rapidly labeled by NEM and that this labeling is blocked by bound calmodulin. We propose that cysteine 3635 is located at an intersubunit contact site that is close to or within a calmodulin binding site. These findings suggest that calmodulin and oxidation modulate RYR1 activity by regulating intersubunit interactions in a mutually exclusive manner and that these interactions involve cysteine 3635.

  9. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Danton H.; Huber, Robert J.; Suarez, Andres

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin is present throughout growth and development in Dictyostelium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin localizes within the ECM during development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin inhibits cell proliferation and increases chemotaxis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin exists in eukaryotic microbes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin may be functionally as important as intracellular calmodulin. -- Abstract: The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan.

  10. The many structural faces of calmodulin: a multitasking molecular jackknife.

    PubMed

    Kursula, Petri

    2014-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly conserved protein and a crucial calcium sensor in eukaryotes. CaM is a regulator of hundreds of diverse target proteins. A wealth of studies has been carried out on the structure of CaM, both in the unliganded form and in complexes with target proteins and peptides. The outcome of these studies points toward a high propensity to attain various conformational states, depending on the binding partner. The purpose of this review is to provide examples of different conformations of CaM trapped in the crystal state. In addition, comparisons are made to corresponding studies in solution. The different CaM conformations in crystal structures are also compared based on the positions of the metal ions bound to their EF hands, in terms of distances, angles, and pseudo-torsion angles. Possible caveats and artifacts in CaM crystal structures are discussed, as well as the possibilities of trapping biologically relevant CaM conformations in the crystal state.

  11. Trifluoperazine regulation of calmodulin binding to Fas: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Di; Yan, Qi; Chen, Yabing; McDonald, Jay M; Song, Yuhua

    2011-08-01

    Death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) formation is a critical step in Fas-mediated signaling for apoptosis. Previous experiments have demonstrated that the calmodulin (CaM) antagonist, trifluoperazine (TFP) regulates CaM-Fas binding and affects Fas-mediated DISC formation. In this study, we investigated the anti-cooperative characteristics of TFP binding to CaM and the effect of TFP on the CaM-Fas interaction from both structural and thermodynamic perspectives using combined molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy analyses. We studied the interactions of different numbers of TFP molecules with CaM and explored the effects of the resulting conformational changes in CaM on CaM-Fas binding. Results from these analyses showed that the number of TFP molecules bound to CaM directly influenced α-helix formation and hydrogen bond occupancy within the α-helices of CaM, contributing to the conformational and motion changes in CaM. These changes affected CaM binding to Fas, resulting in secondary structural changes in Fas and conformational and motion changes of Fas in CaM-Fas complexes, potentially perturbing the recruitment of Fas-associated death domain for DISC formation. The computational results from this study reveal the structural and molecular mechanisms that underlie the role of the CaM antagonist, TFP, in regulation of CaM-Fas binding and Fas-mediated DISC formation in a concentration-dependent manner.

  12. Protein Ser/Thr phosphatases PPEF interact with calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Solov'eva, Olga V; Andreeva, Alexandra V; Bennett, Nelly

    2002-05-10

    Regulation of protein dephosphorylation by cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels and calmodulin (CaM) is well established and considered to be mediated solely by calcineurin. Yet, recent identification of protein phosphatases with EF-hand domains (PPEF/rdgC) point to the existence of another group of Ca(2+)-dependent protein phosphatases. We have recently hypothesised that PPEF/rdgC phosphatases might possess CaM-binding sites of the IQ-type in their N-terminal domains. We now employed yeast two-hybrid system and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to test this hypothesis. We found that entire human PPEF2 interacts with CaM in the in vivo tests and that its N-terminal domain binds to CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner with nanomolar affinity in vitro. The fragments corresponding to the second exons of PPEF1 and PPEF2, containing the IQ motifs, are sufficient for specific Ca(2+)-dependent interaction with CaM both in vivo and in vitro. These findings demonstrate the existence of mammalian CaM-binding protein Ser/Thr phosphatases distinct from calcineurin and suggest that the activity of PPEF phosphatases may be controlled by Ca(2+) in a dual way: via C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding domain and via interaction of the N-terminal domain with CaM.

  13. Calmodulin and Ca2+ control of voltage gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Yoder, Jesse B; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Amzel, L Mario

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the cytosolic portion of voltage activated sodium channels (CTNav) in complexes with calmodulin and other effectors in the presence and the absence of calcium provide information about the mechanisms by which these effectors regulate channel activity. The most studied of these complexes, those of Nav1.2 and Nav1.5, show details of the conformations and the specific contacts that are involved in channel regulation. Another voltage activated sodium channel, Nav1.4, shows significant calcium dependent inactivation, while its homolog Nav1.5 does not. The available structures shed light on the possible localization of the elements responsible for this effect. Mutations in the genes of these 3 Nav channels are associated with several disease conditions: Nav1.2, neurological conditions; Nav1.4, syndromes involving skeletal muscle; and Nav1.5, cardiac arrhythmias. Many of these disease-specific mutations are located at the interfaces involving CTNav and its effectors. PMID:26218606

  14. Conserved properties of individual Ca2+-binding sites in calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Halling, D. Brent; Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hall, Amelia W.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca2+-sensing protein that is highly conserved and ubiquitous in eukaryotes. In humans it is a locus of life-threatening cardiomyopathies. The primary function of CaM is to transduce Ca2+ concentration into cellular signals by binding to a wide range of target proteins in a Ca2+-dependent manner. We do not fully understand how CaM performs its role as a high-fidelity signal transducer for more than 300 target proteins, but diversity among its four Ca2+-binding sites, called EF-hands, may contribute to CaM’s functional versatility. We therefore looked at the conservation of CaM sequences over deep evolutionary time, focusing primarily on the four EF-hand motifs. Expanding on previous work, we found that CaM evolves slowly but that its evolutionary rate is substantially faster in fungi. We also found that the four EF-hands have distinguishing biophysical and structural properties that span eukaryotes. These results suggest that all eukaryotes require CaM to decode Ca2+ signals using four specialized EF-hands, each with specific, conserved traits. In addition, we provide an extensive map of sites associated with target proteins and with human disease and correlate these with evolutionary sequence diversity. Our comprehensive evolutionary analysis provides a basis for understanding the sequence space associated with CaM function and should help guide future work on the relationship between structure, function, and disease. PMID:26884197

  15. Cadmium inhibits brain calmodulin: In vitro and in vivo studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vig, P.J.S. ); Bhatia, M.; Gill, K.D.; Nath, R. )

    1989-10-01

    The toxic effects of divalent cations especially Cd{sup 2+}, are related to their chemical and physical characteristics viz. ion polarizability, electronic structure and the hard and soft characteristics. Cadmium ion, a hazardous environmental pollutant in areas in which cadmium nickel batteries are manufactured, accumulates in tissues such as kidney, liver, brain or bone with a very slow turnover and can cause pathophysiological disorders. Calmodulin (CaM), a Ca{sup 2+} binding protein is found in many if not most eukaryotic cells. The protein mediates the control of a large number of enzymes by Ca{sup 2+} fluxes and alterations in these fluxes have been postulated to be involved in steps leading to irreversible cell damage. The present study demonstrates an interaction of Cd{sup 2+} with CaM resulting in an impairment of CaM-dependent phosphodiesterase (PDE) stimulation in vitro. Biological activity of CaM is also affected in brain (cerebral cortex) of Cd-exposed rats in vivo.

  16. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  18. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  19. The Key Role of Calmodulin in KRAS-Driven Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Nussinov, Ruth; Muratcioglu, Serena; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Jang, Hyunbum; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B is a highly oncogenic Ras isoform and is the only isoform associated with initiation of adenocarcinomas. Mechanistic insight into why and how K-Ras4B mediates ductal adenocarcinomas, particularly of the pancreas, is vastly important for its therapeutics. The current review points out the overlooked but critical role of calmodulin (CaM) which selectively binds to GTP-bound K-Ras4B; but not to its isoforms. Cell proliferation and growth require the MAPK (Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK) and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. We propose how Ca2+/CaM promotes PI3K/Akt signaling and how Ca2+/CaM involvement explains enigmatic observations like the elevated calcium levels in adenocarcinomas. We hypothesize that CaM recruits and activates PI3K at the membrane, and that this is the likely reason for Ca2+/CaM-dependence in adenocarcinomas. CaM contributes to initiation and progression of many ductal cancers (e.g., pancreatic, colorectal, lung) via both PI3Kα/Akt and Raf/MEK/ERK pathways. Therefore, blocking the K-Ras/MAPK pathway and CaM/PI3Kα binding in a K-Ras4B/CaM/PI3Kα heterotrimeric complex has promising clinical potential as an adenocarcinoma-specific therapeutic strategy. PMID:26085527

  20. Calmodulin kinase II inhibition protects against structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Khoo, Michelle S C; Wu, Yuejin; Yang, Yingbo; Grueter, Chad E; Ni, Gemin; Price, Edward E; Thiel, William; Guatimosim, Silvia; Song, Long-Sheng; Madu, Ernest C; Shah, Anisha N; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Atkinson, James B; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Salama, Guy; Lederer, W J; Colbran, Roger J; Anderson, Mark E

    2005-04-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) stimulation increases cytosolic Ca(2+) to physiologically augment cardiac contraction, whereas excessive betaAR activation causes adverse cardiac remodeling, including myocardial hypertrophy, dilation and dysfunction, in individuals with myocardial infarction. The Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a recently identified downstream element of the betaAR-initiated signaling cascade that is linked to pathological myocardial remodeling and to regulation of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. We developed a genetic mouse model of cardiac CaMKII inhibition to test the role of CaMKII in betaAR signaling in vivo. Here we show CaMKII inhibition substantially prevented maladaptive remodeling from excessive betaAR stimulation and myocardial infarction, and induced balanced changes in excitation-contraction coupling that preserved baseline and betaAR-stimulated physiological increases in cardiac function. These findings mark CaMKII as a determinant of clinically important heart disease phenotypes, and suggest CaMKII inhibition can be a highly selective approach for targeting adverse myocardial remodeling linked to betaAR signaling.

  1. Human platelet calmodulin-binding proteins: identification and Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteolysis upon platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.W.; Tallant, E.A.; McManus, M.C.

    1987-05-19

    Calmodulin-binding proteins have been identified in human platelets by using Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-calmodulin. Ten distinct proteins of 245, 225, 175, 150, 90, 82 (2), 60, and 41 (2) kilodaltons (kDa) bound /sup 125/I-calmodulin in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner; the binding was blocked by ethylene glycol bis(..beta..-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), trifluoperazine, and nonradiolabeled calmodulin. Proteins of 225 and 90 kDa were labeled by antisera against myosin light chain kinase; 60- and 82-kDa proteins were labeled by antisera against the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase and caldesmon, respectively. The remaining calmodulin-binding proteins have not been identified. Calmodulin-binding proteins were degraded upon addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ to a platelet homogenate; the degradation could be blocked by either EGTA, leupeptin, or N-ethylmaleimide which suggests that the degradation was due to a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent protease. Activation of intact platelets by thrombin, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, and collagen under conditions which promote platelet aggregation also resulted in limited proteolysis of calmodulin-binding proteins including those labeled with antisera against myosin light chain kinase and the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase. Activation by the Ca/sup 2 +/ ionophores A23187 and ionomycin also promoted degradation of the calmodulin-binding proteins in the presence of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. The data indicate that limited proteolysis of Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes also occurs in the intact platelet and suggest that the proteolysis is triggered by an influx of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ associated with platelet aggregation.

  2. Effects of trifluoperazine on beta-adrenergic responses of rat papillary muscle: related to calmodulin?

    PubMed

    Aass, H; Skomedal, T; Osnes, J B

    1983-10-01

    The beta-adrenergic stimulation of cardiac contraction and relaxation is related to an augmented Ca++ oscillation mediated by cAMP. This Ca++ mobilization may secondarily involve calmodulin in a way modulating the mechanical responses. We tested this possibility by studying interferences of trifluoperazine (which is able to block Ca++-calmodulin) with beta-adrenergic responses in rat heart papillary muscles. Trifluoperazine up to 10(-5) mol/l did not change the basal function. 10(-5) mol/l trifluoperazine augmented the contractile response to isoprenaline above 10(-7) mol/l. The inotropic effects of isoprenaline below 10(-7) mol/l and of the partial beta-agonist prenalterol were not influenced by trifluoperazine. 10(-5) mol/l trifluoperazine attenuated the stimulation of initial relaxation by isoprenaline in the entire concentration range. Thus this beta-adrenergic response was more sensitive to trifluoperazine than the contractile response. But trifluoperazine only slightly and non-significantly attenuated the stimulation of initial relaxation by prenalterol. From experiments on broken cell preparations the present results can be explained in terms of calmodulin blockade and thus inhibition of Ca++ efflux across the sarcolemma and of Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Trifluoperazine effects unrelated to calmodulin can hardly account for the results. Thus a full beta-agonist can apparently mobilize enough Ca++ to activate calmodulin systems important for the final effects on the contraction-relaxation cycle.

  3. Nitric oxide synthase domain interfaces regulate electron transfer and calmodulin activation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian C; Underbakke, Eric S; Kulp, Daniel W; Schief, William R; Marletta, Michael A

    2013-09-17

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by NO synthase (NOS) participates in diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation, neurotransmission, and the innate immune response. Mammalian NOS isoforms are homodimers composed of two domains connected by an intervening calmodulin-binding region. The N-terminal oxidase domain binds heme and tetrahydrobiopterin and the arginine substrate. The C-terminal reductase domain binds FAD and FMN and the cosubstrate NADPH. Although several high-resolution structures of individual NOS domains have been reported, a structure of a NOS holoenzyme has remained elusive. Determination of the higher-order domain architecture of NOS is essential to elucidate the molecular underpinnings of NO formation. In particular, the pathway of electron transfer from FMN to heme, and the mechanism through which calmodulin activates this electron transfer, are largely unknown. In this report, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry was used to map critical NOS interaction surfaces. Direct interactions between the heme domain, the FMN subdomain, and calmodulin were observed. These interaction surfaces were confirmed by kinetic studies of site-specific interface mutants. Integration of the hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results with computational docking resulted in models of the NOS heme and FMN subdomain bound to calmodulin. These models suggest a pathway for electron transfer from FMN to heme and a mechanism for calmodulin activation of this critical step.

  4. Nitric oxide synthase domain interfaces regulate electron transfer and calmodulin activation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian C.; Underbakke, Eric S.; Kulp, Daniel W.; Schief, William R.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by NO synthase (NOS) participates in diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation, neurotransmission, and the innate immune response. Mammalian NOS isoforms are homodimers composed of two domains connected by an intervening calmodulin-binding region. The N-terminal oxidase domain binds heme and tetrahydrobiopterin and the arginine substrate. The C-terminal reductase domain binds FAD and FMN and the cosubstrate NADPH. Although several high-resolution structures of individual NOS domains have been reported, a structure of a NOS holoenzyme has remained elusive. Determination of the higher-order domain architecture of NOS is essential to elucidate the molecular underpinnings of NO formation. In particular, the pathway of electron transfer from FMN to heme, and the mechanism through which calmodulin activates this electron transfer, are largely unknown. In this report, hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry was used to map critical NOS interaction surfaces. Direct interactions between the heme domain, the FMN subdomain, and calmodulin were observed. These interaction surfaces were confirmed by kinetic studies of site-specific interface mutants. Integration of the hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results with computational docking resulted in models of the NOS heme and FMN subdomain bound to calmodulin. These models suggest a pathway for electron transfer from FMN to heme and a mechanism for calmodulin activation of this critical step. PMID:24003111

  5. Regulated expression of a calmodulin isoform alters growth and development in potato.

    PubMed

    Poovaiah, B W; Takezawa, D; An, G; Han, T J

    1996-01-01

    A transgene approach was taken to study the consequences of altered expression of a calmodulin isoform on plant growth and development. Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM1 to 8) have been isolated and characterized (Takezawa et al., 1995). Among the potato calmodulin isoforms studied, PCM1 differs from the other isoforms because of its unique amino acid substitutions. Transgenic potato plants were produced carrying sense construct of PCM1 fused to the CaMV 35S promoter. Transgenic plants showing a moderate increase in PCM1 mRNA exhibited strong apical dominance, produced elongated tubers, and were taller than the controls. Interestingly, the plants expressing the highest level of PCM1 mRNA did not form underground tubers. Instead, these transgenic plants produced aerial tubers when allowed to grow for longer periods. The expression of different calmodulin isoforms (PCM1, 5, 6, and 8) was studied in transgenic plants. Among the four potato calmodulin isoforms, only the expression of PCM1 mRNA was altered in transgenic plants, while the expression of other isoforms was not significantly altered. Western analysis revealed increased PCM1 protein in transgenic plants, indicating that the expression of both mRNA and protein are altered in transgenic plants. These results suggest that increasing the expression of PCM1 alters growth and development in potato plants.

  6. Calmodulin regulates dimerization, motility, and lipid binding of Leishmania myosin XXI.

    PubMed

    Batters, Christopher; Ellrich, Heike; Helbig, Constanze; Woodall, Katy Anna; Hundschell, Christian; Brack, Dario; Veigel, Claudia

    2014-01-14

    Myosin XXI is the only myosin expressed in Leishmania parasites. Although it is assumed that it performs a variety of motile functions, the motor's oligomerization states, cargo-binding, and motility are unknown. Here we show that binding of a single calmodulin causes the motor to adopt a monomeric state and to move actin filaments. In the absence of calmodulin, nonmotile dimers that cross-linked actin filaments were formed. Unexpectedly, structural analysis revealed that the dimerization domains include the calmodulin-binding neck region, essential for the generation of force and movement in myosins. Furthermore, monomeric myosin XXI bound to mixed liposomes, whereas the dimers did not. Lipid-binding sections overlapped with the dimerization domains, but also included a phox-homology domain in the converter region. We propose a mechanism of myosin regulation where dimerization, motility, and lipid binding are regulated by calmodulin. Although myosin-XXI dimers might act as nonmotile actin cross-linkers, the calmodulin-binding monomers might transport lipid cargo in the parasite. PMID:24379364

  7. The effects of weak extremely low frequency magnetic fields on calcium/calmodulin interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Hendee, S P; Faour, F A; Christensen, D A; Patrick, B; Durney, C H; Blumenthal, D K

    1996-01-01

    Mechanisms by which weak electromagnetic fields may affect biological systems are of current interest because of their potential health effects. Lednev has proposed an ion parametric resonance hypothesis (Lednev, 1991, Bioelectromagnetics, 12:71-75), which predicts that when the ac, frequency of a combined dc-ac magnetic field equals the cyclotron frequency of calcium, the affinity of calcium for calcium-binding proteins such as calmodulin will be markedly affected. The present study evaluated Lednev's theory using two independent systems, each sensitive to changes in the affinity of calcium for calmodulin. One of the systems used was the calcium/calmodulin-dependent activation of myosin light chain kinase, a system similar to that previously used by Lednev. The other system monitored optical changes in the binding of a fluorescent peptide to the calcium/calmodulin complex. Each system was exposed to a 20.9 microT static field superimposed on a 20.9 microT sinusoidal field over a narrow frequency range centered at 16 Hz, the cyclotron frequency of the unhydrated calcium ion. In contrast to Lednev's predictions, no significant effect of combined dc-ac magnetic fields on calcium/calmodulin interactions was indicated in either experimental system. PMID:8744329

  8. Calmodulin regulates dimerization, motility, and lipid binding of Leishmania myosin XXI

    PubMed Central

    Batters, Christopher; Ellrich, Heike; Helbig, Constanze; Woodall, Katy Anna; Hundschell, Christian; Brack, Dario; Veigel, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Myosin XXI is the only myosin expressed in Leishmania parasites. Although it is assumed that it performs a variety of motile functions, the motor’s oligomerization states, cargo-binding, and motility are unknown. Here we show that binding of a single calmodulin causes the motor to adopt a monomeric state and to move actin filaments. In the absence of calmodulin, nonmotile dimers that cross-linked actin filaments were formed. Unexpectedly, structural analysis revealed that the dimerization domains include the calmodulin-binding neck region, essential for the generation of force and movement in myosins. Furthermore, monomeric myosin XXI bound to mixed liposomes, whereas the dimers did not. Lipid-binding sections overlapped with the dimerization domains, but also included a phox-homology domain in the converter region. We propose a mechanism of myosin regulation where dimerization, motility, and lipid binding are regulated by calmodulin. Although myosin-XXI dimers might act as nonmotile actin cross-linkers, the calmodulin-binding monomers might transport lipid cargo in the parasite. PMID:24379364

  9. Molecular evolution of calmodulin-like domain protein kinases (CDPKs) in plants and protists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X S; Choi, J H

    2001-09-01

    Many genes for calmodulin-like domain protein kinases (CDPKs) have been identified in plants and Alveolate protists. To study the molecular evolution of the CDPK gene family, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of CDPK genomic sequences. Analysis of introns supports the phylogenetic analysis; CDPK genes with similar intron/exon structure are grouped together on the phylogenetic tree. Conserved introns support a monophyletic origin for plant CDPKs, CDPK-related kinases, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinases. Plant CDPKs divide into two major branches. Plant CDPK genes on one branch share common intron positions with protist CDPK genes. The introns shared between protist and plant CDPKs presumably originated before the divergence of plants from Alveolates. Additionally, the calmodulin-like domains of protist CDPKs have intron positions in common with animal and fungal calmodulin genes. These results, together with the presence of a highly conserved phase zero intron located precisely at the beginning of the calmodulin-like domain, suggest that the ancestral CDPK gene could have originated from the fusion of protein kinase and calmodulin genes facilitated by recombination of ancient introns.

  10. Effects of calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors on Ca uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum of saponin skinned caudal artery

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.A.; Silver, P.J.

    1986-03-05

    Calmodulin (CaM) stimulates plasma membrane transport in many cell types, however, its role in Ca regulation by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in smooth muscle has not been established. /sup 45/Ca uptake was studied in saponin skinned strips of rat caudal artery as a function of CaM and the CaM inhibitors, W-7, calmidazolium (CaMZ), and trifluoperazine (TFP). Although caudal artery strips lose approximately 30% of total tissue CaM during skinning, 0.3 - 2 ..mu..M CaM did not increase /sup 45/Ca uptake over a wide range of free Ca concentrations (10/sup -8/ - 10/sup -6/M). Neither W-7 nor CaMZ at concentration of 10/sup -4/ - 2 x 10/sup -4/M inhibited the MgATP-dependent Ca uptake. Ca uptake was not affected by 50 ..mu..M TFP but a significant inhibition was produced by 500 ..mu..M. Studies of the effects of TFP on /sup 45/Ca efflux indicated that TFP concentrations which inhibited Ca uptake also significantly increased the rate of Ca release. The results suggest that total Ca uptake in caudal artery depends mainly upon MgATP and is not modulated by exogenous CaM or affected by these CaM inhibitors. They cannot preclude that CaM may affect initial velocities or that the CaM inhibitors failed to reach active sites.

  11. Comparing the Calcium Binding Abilities of Two Soybean Calmodulins: Towards Understanding the Divergent Nature of Plant Calmodulins[W

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Jessica L.; Jamshidiha, Mostafa; Mo, Jeffrey; Ishida, Hiroaki; Vogel, Hans J.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that plants contain multiple calmodulin (CaM) isoforms of variable sequence identity to animal CaM suggested an additional level of sophistication in the intracellular role of calcium regulation in plants. Past research has focused on the ability of conserved or divergent plant CaM isoforms to activate both mammalian and plant protein targets. At present, however, not much is known about how these isoforms respond to the signal of an increased cytosolic calcium concentration. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy, we investigated the calcium binding properties of a conserved (CaM1) and a divergent (CaM4) CaM isoform from soybean (Glycine max). Both isoforms bind calcium with a semisequential pathway that favors the calcium binding EF-hands of the C-terminal lobe over those of the N-terminal lobe. From the measured dissociation constants, CaM4 binds calcium with a threefold greater affinity than CaM1 (Kd,Ca,mean of 5.0 versus 14.9 μM) but has a significantly reduced selectivity against the chemically similar magnesium cation that binds preferentially to EF-hand I of both isoforms. The implications of a potential magnesium/calcium competition on the activation of CaM1 and CaM4 are discussed in context with their ability to respond to stimulus-specific calcium signatures and their known physiological roles. PMID:24254124

  12. Calmodulin expression during Giardia intestinalis differentiation and identification of calmodulin-binding proteins during the trophozoite stage.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Magda E; Wasserman, Moisés

    2012-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is the primary sensor for calcium in the cell. It modulates various functions by activating CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). This study examined the calcium/CaM-dependent system in the ancient eukaryote Giardia intestinalis. A specific antibody against the parasite's CaM was developed; this protein's expression and location during different stages of the parasite's life cycle were analyzed. The results showed that it is a housekeeping protein which is possibly involved in the parasite's motility. No CaMBP has been identified in G. intestinalis to date. Pull-down assays were used for isolating proteins which specifically bind to CaM in a calcium-dependent way. Three of them were identified through mass spectrometry; they were GASP180, α-tubulin, and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK).The first two are cytoskeleton proteins, and the last one is an essential enzyme for glycolysis. The presence of binding sites was analyzed through bioinformatics in each protein sequence. This is the first report of a CaMBP in this organism; it is considered to be a very interesting differentiation model, indicating that CaM is involved at least in two vital processes: G. intestinalis motility and energetic metabolism.

  13. Altered calmodulin activity in fluphenazine-resistant mutant strains. Pleiotropic effect on development and cellular organization in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Kurn, N; Sela, B A

    1981-12-01

    Genetically altered calmodulin activity in spontaneously derived mutant strains, which were selected for resistance to the toxic effect of a specific inhibitor, the phenothiazine drug fluphenazine, is demonstrated. Partially purified calmodulin preparations from wild-type and fluphenazine-resistant strains of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, were tested for the ability to activate Ca2+-ATPase of the erythrocyte membranes, and the inhibition of this stimulatory activity by fluphenazine. Unlike the preparation obtained from wild-type cells, mutant calmodulin is shown to be insensitive to fluphenazine inhibition, in one case, and calmodulin from another strain was found to be inactive in vitro, i.e. it did not activate Ca2+-ATPase. The pleiotropic phenotype of the spontaneously derived mutant strains involved aberrant multicellular organization and hormone-independent commitment of the multipotent asexual reproductive cells, gonodia, to sexual development. These results clearly implicate calmodulin in the control of development and morphogenesis in this simple multicellular eukaryote. In addition, intracellular inhibition of calmodulin in wild-type cells is shown to block the morphogenic process of embryo inversion and to arrest motility. The availability of mutant calmodulin will facilitate further investigation of the role of this ubiquitous regulatory protein in the control of development and differentiation in multicellular eukarytes, as well as the fine structure/function relationship with regard to calmodulin modulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. PMID:6459931

  14. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-09-22

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between -295 to -300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  15. Loss of conformational stability in calmodulin upon methionine oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Yin, D H; Yao, Y; Sun, H; Qin, Z; Schöneich, C; Williams, T D; Squier, T C

    1998-01-01

    We have used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the secondary and tertiary structural consequences that result from oxidative modification of methionine residues in wheat germ calmodulin (CaM), and prevent activation of the plasma membrane Ca-ATPase. Using ESI-MS, we have measured rates of modification and molecular mass distributions of oxidatively modified CaM species (CaMox) resulting from exposure to H2O2. From these rates, we find that oxidative modification of methionine to the corresponding methionine sulfoxide does not predispose CaM to further oxidative modification. These results indicate that methionine oxidation results in no large-scale alterations in the tertiary structure of CaMox, because the rates of oxidative modification of individual methionines are directly related to their solvent exposure. Likewise, CD measurements indicate that methionine oxidation results in little change in the apparent alpha-helical content at 28 degrees C, and only a small (0.3 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1)) decrease in thermal stability, suggesting the disruption of a limited number of specific noncovalent interactions. Fluorescence lifetime, anisotropy, and quenching measurements of N-(1-pyrenyl)-maleimide (PMal) covalently bound to Cys26 indicate local structural changes around PMal in the amino-terminal domain in response to oxidative modification of methionine residues in the carboxyl-terminal domain. Because the opposing globular domains remain spatially distant in both native and oxidatively modified CaM, the oxidative modification of methionines in the carboxyl-terminal domain are suggested to modify the conformation of the amino-terminal domain through alterations in the structural features involving the interdomain central helix. The structural basis for the linkage between oxidative modification and these global conformational changes is discussed in terms of possible alterations in

  16. Regulation of Polycystin-1 Function by Calmodulin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Nicholas; Wang, Yidi; Kipp, Kevin R.; Liu, Guangyi; Benza, Jesse J.; Pletnev, Vladimir; Pavlov, Tengis S.; Staruschenko, Alexander; Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; Takahashi, Maki; Nauli, Surya M.; Weimbs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease that leads to progressive renal cyst growth and loss of renal function, and is caused by mutations in the genes encoding polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), respectively. The PC1/PC2 complex localizes to primary cilia and can act as a flow-dependent calcium channel in addition to numerous other signaling functions. The exact functions of the polycystins, their regulation and the purpose of the PC1/PC2 channel are still poorly understood. PC1 is an integral membrane protein with a large extracytoplasmic N-terminal domain and a short, ~200 amino acid C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Most proteins that interact with PC1 have been found to bind via the cytoplasmic tail. Here we report that the PC1 tail has homology to the regulatory domain of myosin heavy chain including a conserved calmodulin-binding motif. This motif binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Disruption of the CaM-binding motif in PC1 does not affect PC2 binding, cilia targeting, or signaling via heterotrimeric G-proteins or STAT3. However, disruption of CaM binding inhibits the PC1/PC2 calcium channel activity and the flow-dependent calcium response in kidney epithelial cells. Furthermore, expression of CaM-binding mutant PC1 disrupts cellular energy metabolism. These results suggest that critical functions of PC1 are regulated by its ability to sense cytosolic calcium levels via binding to CaM. PMID:27560828

  17. Characterization of Phospho-(Tyrosine)-Mimetic Calmodulin Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Stateva, Silviya R.; Salas, Valentina; Benaim, Gustavo; Menéndez, Margarita; Solís, Dolores; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) phosphorylated at different serine/threonine and tyrosine residues is known to exert differential regulatory effects on a variety of CaM-binding enzymes as compared to non-phosphorylated CaM. In this report we describe the preparation and characterization of a series of phospho-(Y)-mimetic CaM mutants in which either one or the two tyrosine residues present in CaM (Y99 and Y138) were substituted to aspartic acid or glutamic acid. It was expected that the negative charge of the respective carboxyl group of these amino acids mimics the negative charge of phosphate and reproduce the effects that distinct phospho-(Y)-CaM species may have on target proteins. We describe some physicochemical properties of these CaM mutants as compared to wild type CaM, after their expression in Escherichia coli and purification to homogeneity, including: i) changes in their electrophoretic mobility in the absence and presence of Ca2+; ii) ultraviolet (UV) light absorption spectra, far- and near-UV circular dichroism data; iii) thermal stability in the absence and presence of Ca2+; and iv) Tb3+-emitted fluorescence upon tyrosine excitation. We also describe some biochemical properties of these CaM mutants, such as their differential phosphorylation by the tyrosine kinase c-Src, and their action as compared to wild type CaM, on the activity of two CaM-dependent enzymes: cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) assayed in vitro. PMID:25830911

  18. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  19. Regulation of Polycystin-1 Function by Calmodulin Binding.

    PubMed

    Doerr, Nicholas; Wang, Yidi; Kipp, Kevin R; Liu, Guangyi; Benza, Jesse J; Pletnev, Vladimir; Pavlov, Tengis S; Staruschenko, Alexander; Mohieldin, Ashraf M; Takahashi, Maki; Nauli, Surya M; Weimbs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease that leads to progressive renal cyst growth and loss of renal function, and is caused by mutations in the genes encoding polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), respectively. The PC1/PC2 complex localizes to primary cilia and can act as a flow-dependent calcium channel in addition to numerous other signaling functions. The exact functions of the polycystins, their regulation and the purpose of the PC1/PC2 channel are still poorly understood. PC1 is an integral membrane protein with a large extracytoplasmic N-terminal domain and a short, ~200 amino acid C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Most proteins that interact with PC1 have been found to bind via the cytoplasmic tail. Here we report that the PC1 tail has homology to the regulatory domain of myosin heavy chain including a conserved calmodulin-binding motif. This motif binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Disruption of the CaM-binding motif in PC1 does not affect PC2 binding, cilia targeting, or signaling via heterotrimeric G-proteins or STAT3. However, disruption of CaM binding inhibits the PC1/PC2 calcium channel activity and the flow-dependent calcium response in kidney epithelial cells. Furthermore, expression of CaM-binding mutant PC1 disrupts cellular energy metabolism. These results suggest that critical functions of PC1 are regulated by its ability to sense cytosolic calcium levels via binding to CaM. PMID:27560828

  20. Cardiac calmodulin kinase: a potential target for drug design.

    PubMed

    Bányász, T; Szentandrássy, N; Tóth, A; Nánási, P P; Magyar, J; Chen-Izu, Y

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic strategy for cardiac arrhythmias has undergone a remarkable change during the last decades. Currently implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy is considered to be the most effective therapeutic method to treat malignant arrhythmias. Some even argue that there is no room for antiarrhythmic drug therapy in the age of implantable cardioverter defibrillators. However, in clinical practice, antiarrhythmic drug therapies are frequently needed, because implantable cardioverter defibrillators are not effective in certain types of arrhythmias (i.e. premature ventricular beats or atrial fibrillation). Furthermore, given the staggering cost of device therapy, it is economically imperative to develop alternative effective treatments. Cardiac ion channels are the target of a number of current treatment strategies, but therapies based on ion channel blockers only resulted in moderate success. Furthermore, these drugs are associated with an increased risk of proarrhythmia, systemic toxicity, and increased defibrillation threshold. In many cases, certain ion channel blockers were found to increase mortality. Other drug classes such as ßblockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists, and statins appear to have proven efficacy for reducing cardiac mortality. These facts forced researchers to shift the focus of their research to molecular targets that act upstream of ion channels. One of these potential targets is calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Several lines of evidence converge to suggest that CaMKII inhibition may provide an effective treatment strategy for heart diseases. (1) Recent studies have elucidated that CaMKII plays a key role in modulating cardiac function and regulating hypertrophy development. (2) CaMKII activity has been found elevated in the failing hearts from human patients and animal models. (3) Inhibition of CaMKII activity has been shown to mitigate hypertrophy, prevent functional remodeling and

  1. Matricellular signal transduction involving calmodulin in the social amoebozoan dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Huber, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum undergoes a developmental sequence wherein an extracellular matrix (ECM) sheath surrounds a group of differentiating cells. This sheath is comprised of proteins and carbohydrates, like the ECM of mammalian tissues. One of the characterized ECM proteins is the cysteine-rich, EGF-like (EGFL) repeat-containing, calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) CyrA. The first EGFL repeat of CyrA increases the rate of random cell motility and cyclic AMP-mediated chemotaxis. Processing of full-length CyrA (~63 kDa) releases two major EGFL repeat-containing fragments (~45 kDa and ~40 kDa) in an event that is developmentally regulated. Evidence for an EGFL repeat receptor also exists and downstream intracellular signaling pathways involving CaM, Ras, protein kinase A and vinculin B phosphorylation have been characterized. In total, these results identify CyrA as a true matricellular protein comparable in function to tenascin C and other matricellular proteins from mammalian cells. Insight into the regulation and processing of CyrA has also been revealed. CyrA is the first identified extracellular CaMBP in this eukaryotic microbe. In keeping with this, extracellular CaM (extCaM) has been shown to be present in the ECM sheath where it binds to CyrA and inhibits its cleavage to release the 45 kDa and 40 kDa EGFL repeat-containing fragments. The presence of extCaM and its role in regulating a matricellular protein during morphogenesis extends our understanding of CaM-mediated signal transduction in eukaryotes. PMID:24705101

  2. Calmodulin Suppresses Synaptotagmin-2 Transcription in Cortical Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Zhiping P.; Xu, Wei; Cao, Peng; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor protein that plays a pivotal role in regulating innumerable neuronal functions, including synaptic transmission. In cortical neurons, most neurotransmitter release is triggered by Ca2+ binding to synaptotagmin-1; however, a second delayed phase of release, referred to as asynchronous release, is triggered by Ca2+ binding to an unidentified secondary Ca2+ sensor. To test whether CaM could be the enigmatic Ca2+ sensor for asynchronous release, we now use in cultured neurons short hairpin RNAs that suppress expression of ∼70% of all neuronal CaM isoforms. Surprisingly, we found that in synaptotagmin-1 knock-out neurons, the CaM knockdown caused a paradoxical rescue of synchronous release, instead of a block of asynchronous release. Gene and protein expression studies revealed that both in wild-type and in synaptotagmin-1 knock-out neurons, the CaM knockdown altered expression of >200 genes, including that encoding synaptotagmin-2. Synaptotagmin-2 expression was increased several-fold by the CaM knockdown, which accounted for the paradoxical rescue of synchronous release in synaptotagmin-1 knock-out neurons by the CaM knockdown. Interestingly, the CaM knockdown primarily activated genes that are preferentially expressed in caudal brain regions, whereas it repressed genes in rostral brain regions. Consistent with this correlation, quantifications of protein levels in adult mice uncovered an inverse relationship of CaM and synaptotagmin-2 levels in mouse forebrain, brain stem, and spinal cord. Finally, we employed molecular replacement experiments using a knockdown rescue approach to show that Ca2+ binding to the C-lobe but not the N-lobe of CaM is required for suppression of synaptotagmin-2 expression in cortical neurons. Our data describe a previously unknown, Ca2+/CaM-dependent regulatory pathway that controls the expression of synaptic proteins in the rostral-caudal neuraxis. PMID:20729199

  3. Matricellular signal transduction involving calmodulin in the social amoebozoan dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Huber, Robert J

    2013-02-15

    The social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum undergoes a developmental sequence wherein an extracellular matrix (ECM) sheath surrounds a group of differentiating cells. This sheath is comprised of proteins and carbohydrates, like the ECM of mammalian tissues. One of the characterized ECM proteins is the cysteine-rich, EGF-like (EGFL) repeat-containing, calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) CyrA. The first EGFL repeat of CyrA increases the rate of random cell motility and cyclic AMP-mediated chemotaxis. Processing of full-length CyrA (~63 kDa) releases two major EGFL repeat-containing fragments (~45 kDa and ~40 kDa) in an event that is developmentally regulated. Evidence for an EGFL repeat receptor also exists and downstream intracellular signaling pathways involving CaM, Ras, protein kinase A and vinculin B phosphorylation have been characterized. In total, these results identify CyrA as a true matricellular protein comparable in function to tenascin C and other matricellular proteins from mammalian cells. Insight into the regulation and processing of CyrA has also been revealed. CyrA is the first identified extracellular CaMBP in this eukaryotic microbe. In keeping with this, extracellular CaM (extCaM) has been shown to be present in the ECM sheath where it binds to CyrA and inhibits its cleavage to release the 45 kDa and 40 kDa EGFL repeat-containing fragments. The presence of extCaM and its role in regulating a matricellular protein during morphogenesis extends our understanding of CaM-mediated signal transduction in eukaryotes.

  4. Bioorthogonal Chemoenzymatic Functionalization of Calmodulin for Bioconjugation Applications.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Chethana; Lo, Megan; Fraseur, Julia G; Tirrell, David A; Kinzer-Ursem, Tamara L

    2015-10-21

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a widely studied Ca(2+)-binding protein that is highly conserved across species and involved in many biological processes, including vesicle release, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. To facilitate biophysical studies of CaM, researchers have tagged and mutated CaM at various sites, enabling its conjugation to fluorophores, microarrays, and other reactive partners. However, previous attempts to add a reactive label to CaM for downstream studies have generally employed nonselective labeling methods or resulted in diminished CaM function. Here we report the first engineered CaM protein that undergoes site-specific and bioorthogonal labeling while retaining wild-type activity levels. By employing a chemoenzymatic labeling approach, we achieved selective and quantitative labeling of the engineered CaM protein with an N-terminal 12-azidododecanoic acid tag; notably, addition of the tag did not interfere with the ability of CaM to bind Ca(2+) or a partner protein. The specificity of our chemoenzymatic labeling approach also allowed for selective conjugation of CaM to reactive partners in bacterial cell lysates, without intermediate purification of the engineered protein. Additionally, we prepared CaM-affinity resins that were highly effective in purifying a representative CaM-binding protein, demonstrating that the engineered CaM remains active even after surface capture. Beyond studies of CaM and CaM-binding proteins, the protein engineering and surface capture methods described here should be translatable to other proteins and other bioconjugation applications. PMID:26431265

  5. Calmodulin Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism for Leishmania Identification and Typing.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Aracelis; Samudio, Franklyn; González, Kadir; Saldaña, Azael; Brandão, Adeilton; Calzada, Jose E

    2016-08-01

    A precise identification of Leishmania species involved in human infections has epidemiological and clinical importance. Herein, we describe a preliminary validation of a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay, based on the calmodulin intergenic spacer region, as a tool for detecting and typing Leishmania species. After calmodulin amplification, the enzyme HaeIII yielded a clear distinction between reference strains of Leishmania mexicana, Leishmania amazonensis, Leishmania infantum, Leishmania lainsoni, and the rest of the Viannia reference species analyzed. The closely related Viannia species: Leishmania braziliensis, Leishmania panamensis, and Leishmania guyanensis, are separated in a subsequent digestion step with different restriction enzymes. We have developed a more accessible molecular protocol for Leishmania identification/typing based on the exploitation of part of the calmodulin gene. This methodology has the potential to become an additional tool for Leishmania species characterization and taxonomy.

  6. Linked genes for calmodulin and E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Keeling, P J; Doherty-Kirby, A L; Teh, E M; Doolittle, W F

    1996-01-01

    In searching the genomes of early-diverging protists to study whether the possession of calmodulin is ancestral to all eukaryotes, the gene for calmodulin was identified in Trichomonas vaginalis. This flagellate is a member of the Parabasalia, one of the earliest lineages of recognized eukaryotes to have diverged. This sequence was used to isolate a homologous 1.250-kb fragment from the T. vaginalis genome by inverse polymerase chain reaction. This fragment was also completely sequenced and shown to contain the 3' end of the single-copy calmodulin gene and the 3' end of a gene encoding a protein with high similarity to E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, a family which has previously only been identified in animals, plants, and fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of 50 members of the E2 family distinguishes at least nine separate subfamilies one of which includes the T. vaginalis E2-homologue and an uncharacterized gene from yeast chromosome XII.

  7. Altered binding of /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin to a 46. 5-kilodalton protein in skin fibroblasts cultured from patients with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1987-02-01

    The levels of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins have been determined in cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and age- and sex-matched controls. Calmodulin ranged from 0.20 to 0.76 microgram/mg protein; there was no difference between calmodulin concentration in fibroblasts from CF patients and controls. Calmodulin-binding proteins of 230, 212, 204, 164, 139, 70, 59, 46.5, and 41 kD were identified. A protein with a mobility identical to the 59-kD calmodulin-binding protein was labeled by antiserum against calmodulin-dependent phosphatase. Although Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-dependent phosphatase activity was detected, there was no different in activity between control and CF fibroblasts or in the level of phosphatase protein as determined by radioimmunoassay. Lower amounts of /sup 125/I-calmodulin were bound to the 46.5-kD calmodulin-binding protein in CF fibroblasts as compared with controls. The 46.5-kD calmodulin-binding protein may be reduced in CF fibroblasts or its structure may be altered resulting in a reduced binding capacity and/or affinity for calmodulin and perhaps reflecting, either directly or indirectly, the genetic defect responsible for cystic fibrosis.

  8. Functional analysis of tomato calmodulin gene family during fruit development and ripening

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianbao; Peng, Hui; Bauchan, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin is a ubiquitous calcium sensor to recognize the different developmental and/or stimulus-triggered calcium changes and regulate plant growth and development. However, the function of calmodulin remains elusive for fleshy fruit development. We performed expression studies of a family of six calmodulin genes (SlCaMs) in tomato fruit. All calmodulins showed a double peak expression pattern. The first flat peak appeared at 10–30 days after anthesis, but their expression rapidly declined at mature green and breaker. Then a sharp and even higher peak came at turning/pink stages. Among six calmodulins, SlCaM1 had the highest expression during fruit enlargement, whereas SlCaM2 was the major calmodulin during fruit ripening. However, SlCaMs showed different patterns in three ripening mutants rin, Nor and Nr. In particular, at the stages corresponding to mature green and breaker, the expression levels of SlCaMs in those mutants were significantly higher than wild-type. Furthermore, SlCaMs, especially SlCaM2 were upregulated by ethylene. Transiently overexpressing SlCaM2 in mature green fruit delayed ripening, while reducing SlCaM2 expression accelerated ripening. Our results suggest that SlCaMs play double roles to regulate fruit ripening. Prior to the ethylene burst, the ethylene-independent repression of SlCaMs might be critical for fruit to initiate the ripening process. After the ethylene burst, SlCaMs could participate in the ethylene coordinated rapid ripening. PMID:26504554

  9. Ca2+ and Calmodulin Dynamics during Photopolarization in Fucus serratus Zygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Love, J.; Brownlee, C.; Trewavas, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    The role of Ca2+ in zygote polarization in fucoid algae (Fucus, Ascophyllum, and Pelvetia species) zygote polarization is controversial. Using a local source of Fucus serratus, we established that zygotes form a polar axis relative to unilateral light (photopolarization) between 8 and 14 h after fertilization (AF), and become committed to this polarity at approximately 15 to 18 h AF. We investigated the role of Ca2+, calmodulin, and actin during photopolarization by simultaneously exposing F. serratus zygotes to polarizing light and various inhibitors. Neither removal of Ca2+ from the culture medium or high concentrations of EGTA and LaCl3 had any effect on photopolarization. Bepridil, 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino) octyl ester, nifedipine, and verapamil, all of which block intracellular Ca2 release, reduced photopolarization from 75 to 30%. The calmodulin antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-L-naphthalenesulfonamide and trifluoperazine inhibited photopolarization in all zygotes, whereas N-(6-aminohexyl)-L-naphthalenesulfonamide had no effect. Cytochalasin B, cytochalasin D, and latrunculin B, all of which inhibit actin polymerization, had no effect on photopolarization, but arrested polar axis fixation. The role of calmodulin during polarization was investigated further. Calmodulin mRNA from the closely related brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera was cloned and the protein was expressed in bacteria. Photopolarization was enhanced following microinjections of this recombinant calmodulin into developing zygotes. Confocal imaging of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled recombinant calmodulin in photopolarized zygotes showed a homogenous signal distribution at 13 h AF, which localized to the presumptive rhizoid site at 15 h AF. PMID:12223805

  10. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca(2+)/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca(2+)/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca(2+) concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca(2+) range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca(2+) signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca(2+) regulation in anoctamin Cl(-) channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types.

  11. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  12. Evidence of a role for calmodulin in the regulation of calcium release from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, G.

    1986-01-14

    The effect of calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors on the Ca2+ release channel of heavy skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles was investigated. SR vesicles were passively loaded with 45Ca2+ in the presence of calmodulin and its inhibitors, followed by measurement of 45Ca2+ release rates by means of a rapid-quench-Millipore filtration method. Calmodulin at a concentration of 2-10 microM reduced 45Ca2+ efflux rates from passively loaded vesicles by a factor of 2-3 in media containing 10(-6)-10(-3) M Ca2+. At 10(-9) M Ca2+, calmodulin was without effect. 45Ca2+ release rates were varied 1000-fold (k1 approximately equal to 0.1-100 s-1) by using 10(-5) M Ca2+ with either Mg2+ or the ATP analogue adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-methylenetriphosphate) in the release medium. In all instances, a similar 2-3-fold reduction in release rates was observed. At 10(-5) M Ca2+, 45Ca2+ release was half-maximally inhibited by about 2 X 10(-7) M calmodulin, and this inhibition was reversible. Heavy SR vesicle fractions contained 0.1-02 micrograms of endogenous calmodulin/mg of vesicle protein. However, the calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine, calmidazolium, and compound 48/80 were without significant effect on 45Ca2+ release at concentrations which inhibit calmodulin-mediated reactions in other systems. Studies with actively loaded vesicles also suggested that heavy SR vesicles contain a Ca2+ permeation system that is inhibited by calmodulin.

  13. Calcium-dependent and -independent binding of soybean calmodulin isoforms to the calmodulin binding domain of tobacco MAPK phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Rainaldi, Mario; Yamniuk, Aaron P; Murase, Tomohiko; Vogel, Hans J

    2007-03-01

    The recent finding of an interaction between calmodulin (CaM) and the tobacco mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (NtMKP1) establishes an important connection between Ca(2+) signaling and the MAPK cascade, two of the most important signaling pathways in plant cells. Here we have used different biophysical techniques, including fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy as well as microcalorimetry, to characterize the binding of soybean CaM isoforms, SCaM-1 and -4, to synthetic peptides derived from the CaM binding domain of NtMKP1. We find that the actual CaM binding region is shorter than what had previously been suggested. Moreover, the peptide binds to the SCaM C-terminal domain even in the absence of free Ca(2+) with the single Trp residue of the NtMKP1 peptides buried in a solvent-inaccessible hydrophobic region. In the presence of Ca(2+), the peptides bind first to the C-terminal lobe of the SCaMs with a nanomolar affinity, and at higher peptide concentrations, a second peptide binds to the N-terminal domain with lower affinity. Thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that the formation of the peptide-bound complex with the Ca(2+)-loaded SCaMs is driven by favorable binding enthalpy due to a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Experiments with CaM proteolytic fragments showed that the two domains bind the peptide in an independent manner. To our knowledge, this is the first report providing direct evidence for sequential binding of two identical peptides of a target protein to CaM. Discussion of the potential biological role of this interaction motif is also provided.

  14. Characterization and identification of calmodulin and calmodulin binding proteins in hemocyte of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Sengprasert, Panjana; Amparyup, Piti; Tassanakajorn, Anchalee; Wongpanya, Ratree

    2015-06-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) sensor in all eukaryotic cells, is one of the well-known signaling proteins. Previously, CaM gene has shown a high transcriptional level in hemocyte of the pathogen infected shrimp, suggesting that shrimp CaM does not only regulate Ca(2+) metabolism, but is also involved in immune response cascade. In the present study, the CaM gene of shrimp Penaeus monodon was identified and the recombinant P.monodon CaM (rPmCaM) was produced and biochemically characterized. The identification of CaM-binding proteins was also performed. The PmCaM cDNA consisted of an open reading frame of 447 bp encoding for 149 amino acid residues with a calculated mass of 16,810 Da and an isoelectric point of 4.09. Tissue distribution showed that the PmCaM transcript was expressed in all examined tissues. The results of gel mobility shift assay, circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy all confirmed that the conformational changes of the rPmCaM were observed after the calcium binding. According to the gene silencing of PmCaM transcript levels, the shrimp's susceptibility to pathogenic Vibrio harveyi infection increased in comparison with that of the control groups. Protein pull-down assay and LC-MS/MS analysis were performed to identify rPmCaM-binding proteins involved in shrimp immune responses and transglutaminase, elongation factor 1-alpha, elongation factor 2 and actin were found. However, by computational analysis, only the first three proteins contained CaM-binding domain. These findings suggested that PmCaM may play an important role in regulation of shrimp immune system.

  15. Calmodulin and calmodulin kinase II mediate emergent bursting activity in the brainstem respiratory network (preBötzinger complex).

    PubMed

    Mironov, S L

    2013-04-01

    Emergence of persistent activity in networks can be controlled by intracellular signalling pathways but the mechanisms involved and their role are not yet fully explored. Using calcium imaging and patch-clamp we examined the rhythmic activity in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) in the lower brainstem that generates the respiratory motor output. In functionally intact acute slices brief hypoxia, electrical stimulation and activation of AMPA receptors transiently depressed bursting activity which then recovered with augmentation. The effects were abrogated after chelation of intracellular calcium, blockade of L-type calcium channels and inhibition of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM kinase (CaMKII). Rhythmic calcium transients and synaptic drive currents in preBötC neurons in the organotypic slices showed similar CaM- and CaMKII-dependent responses. The stimuli increased the amplitude of spontaneous and miniature excitatory synaptic currents indicating postsynaptic changes at glutamatergic synapses. In the acute and organotypic slices, CaM stimulated and ADP inhibited calcium-dependent TRPM4 channels and CaMKII augmented synaptic drive currents. Experimental data and simulations show the role of ADP and CaMKII in the control of bursting activity and its relation to intracellular signalling. I propose that CaMKII-mediated facilitation of glutamatergic transmission strengthens emergent synchronous activity within preBötC that is then maintained by periodic surges of calcium during the bursts. This may find implications in restoration and consolidation of autonomous activity in the respiratory disorders. PMID:23207595

  16. Ca2+/Calmodulin and Apo-Calmodulin Both Bind to and Enhance the Tyrosine Kinase Activity of c-Src

    PubMed Central

    Anguita, Estefanía; Benaim, Gustavo; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Src family non-receptor tyrosine kinases play a prominent role in multiple cellular processes, including: cell proliferation, differentiation, cell survival, stress response, and cell adhesion and migration, among others. And when deregulated by mutations, overexpression, and/or the arrival of faulty incoming signals, its hyperactivity contributes to the development of hematological and solid tumors. c-Src is a prototypical member of this family of kinases, which is highly regulated by a set of phosphorylation events. Other factor contributing to the regulation of Src activity appears to be mediated by the Ca2+ signal generated in cells by different effectors, where the Ca2+-receptor protein calmodulin (CaM) plays a key role. In this report we demonstrate that CaM directly interacts with Src in both Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent manners in vitro and in living cells, and that the CaM antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) inhibits the activation of this kinase induced by the upstream activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), in human carcinoma epidermoide A431 cells, and by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, in both A431 cells and human breast adenocarcinoma SK-BR-3 cells. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+/CaM complex strongly activates the auto-phosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity of c-Src toward exogenous substrates, but most relevantly and for the first time, we demonstrate that Ca2+-free CaM (apo-CaM) exerts a far higher activatory action on Src auto-phosphorylation and kinase activity toward exogenous substrates than the one exerted by the Ca2+/CaM complex. This suggests that a transient increase in the cytosolic concentration of free Ca2+ is not an absolute requirement for CaM-mediated activation of Src in living cells, and that a direct regulation of Src by apo-CaM could be inferred. PMID:26058065

  17. Differential regulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent enzymes by plant calmodulin isoforms and free Ca2+ concentration.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Johnson, J D; Walsh, M P; Van Lierop, J E; Sutherland, C; Xu, A; Snedden, W A; Kosk-Kosicka, D; Fromm, H; Narayanan, N; Cho, M J

    2000-08-15

    Multiple calmodulin (CaM) isoforms are expressed in plants, but their biochemical characteristics are not well resolved. Here we show the differential regulation exhibited by two soya bean CaM isoforms (SCaM-1 and SCaM-4) for the activation of five CaM-dependent enzymes, and the Ca(2+) dependence of their target enzyme activation. SCaM-1 activated myosin light-chain kinase as effectively as brain CaM (K(act) 1.8 and 1.7 nM respectively), but SCaM-4 produced no activation of this enzyme. Both CaM isoforms supported near maximal activation of CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaM KII), but SCaM-4 exhibited approx.12-fold higher K(act) than SCaM-1 for CaM KII phosphorylation of caldesmon. The SCaM isoforms showed differential activation of plant and animal Ca(2+)-ATPases. The plant Ca(2+)-ATPase was activated maximally by both isoforms, while the erythrocyte Ca(2+)-ATPase was activated only by SCaM-1. Plant glutamate decarboxylase was activated fully by SCaM-1, but SCaM-4 exhibited an approx. 4-fold increase in K(act) and an approx. 25% reduction in V(max). Importantly, SCaM isoforms showed a distinct Ca(2+) concentration requirement for target enzyme activation. SCaM-4 required 4-fold higher [Ca(2+)] for half-maximal activation of CaM KII, and 1.5-fold higher [Ca(2+)] for activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase than SCaM-1. Thus these plant CaM isoforms provide a mechanism by which a different subset of target enzymes could be activated or inhibited by the differential expression of these CaM isoforms or by differences in Ca(2+) transients.

  18. Impact of methionine oxidation on calmodulin structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Megan R; Thompson, Andrew R; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J; Olenek, Michael J; Klein, Jennifer C; Thomas, David D

    2015-01-01

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous X-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM's structural heterogeneity in solution: in both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ∼4nm (closed) and another at ∼6nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each population ranging from 1 to 3nm. Both mutations (M109Q and M124Q) decrease the effect of Ca on the structure of CaM, primarily by decreasing the closed-to-open equilibrium constant in the presence of Ca. We propose that Met oxidation alters CaM's functional interaction with its target proteins by perturbing this Ca-dependent structural shift. PMID:25478640

  19. Structural plasticity of calmodulin on the surface of CaF2 nanoparticles preserves its biological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astegno, Alessandra; Maresi, Elena; Marino, Valerio; Dominici, Paola; Pedroni, Marco; Piccinelli, Fabio; Dell'Orco, Daniele

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly used in biomedical applications and are especially attractive as biocompatible and biodegradable protein delivery systems. Herein, the interaction between biocompatible 25 nm CaF2 nanoparticles and the ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin has been investigated in order to assess the potential of these particles to serve as suitable surface protein carriers. Calmodulin is a multifunctional messenger protein that activates a wide variety of signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells by changing its conformation in a calcium-dependent manner. Isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism studies have shown that the interaction between calmodulin and CaF2 nanoparticles occurs with physiologically relevant affinity and that the binding process is fully reversible, occurring without significant alterations in protein secondary and tertiary structures. Experiments performed with a mutant form of calmodulin having an impaired Ca2+-binding ability in the C-terminal lobe suggest that the EF-hand Ca2+-binding motifs are directly involved in the binding of calmodulin to the CaF2 matrix. The residual capability of nanoparticle-bound calmodulin to function as a calcium sensor protein, binding to and altering the activity of a target protein, was successfully probed by biochemical assays. Even if efficiently carried by CaF2 nanoparticles, calmodulin may dissociate, thus retaining the ability to bind the peptide encompassing the putative C-terminal calmodulin-binding domain of glutamate decarboxylase and activate the enzyme. We conclude that the high flexibility and structural plasticity of calmodulin are responsible for the preservation of its function when bound in high amounts to a nanoparticle surface.Nanoparticles are increasingly used in biomedical applications and are especially attractive as biocompatible and biodegradable protein delivery systems. Herein, the interaction between biocompatible 25 nm CaF2 nanoparticles and the ubiquitous

  20. Involvement of calmodulin inhibition in analgesia induced with low doses of intrathecal trifluoperazine.

    PubMed

    Golbidi, Saeid; Moriuchi, Hiroshi; Irie, Tetsumi; Ghafghazi, Taghi; Hajhashemi, Valiollahe

    2002-02-01

    We examined which of the known properties of trifluoperazine, including calmodulin inhibition, are involved in its analgesic effect. Furthermore, we tried to find any possible interaction between opioidergic system and calmodulin inhibition-induced analgesia. Intrathecal trifluoperazine (1, 10, 100 microg) showed a biphasic effect in the formalin test; i.e., analgesia at relatively low doses (1, 10 microg) and hyperalgesia at a high dose (100 microg). No analgesic effects were observed after intrathecal injection of sulpiride (1, 10, 100 microg), atropine (0.1, 1, 10 microg), phentolamine (0.1, 1, 10 microg) and brompheniramine (0.1, 1, 10 microg). Meanwhile, intrathecal calmidazolium (10, 50, 250 microg) induced a dose-dependent analgesia. Histamine (1 microg), physostigmine (1 microg), bromocriptine (1 microg) and norepinephrine (1 microg) did not affect trifluoperazine-induced analgesia. Calcium (20 microg) attenuated the antinociceptive effect of trifluoperazine and inhibited the analgesic effect of calmidazolium. Finally, naloxone (2 mg/kg) decreased trifluoperazine-induced antinociception but did not have any effects on calmidazolium-induced analgesia. We concluded that calmodulin inhibition may be involved in the analgesia produced by trifluoperazine. With increasing doses of trifluoperazine, the algesic effect seems to overcome the analgesic effect. It is also suggested that the opioidergic system does not interact with calmodulin inhibition-induced analgesia even though this system has a possible role in trifluoperazine-induced analgesia.

  1. [Involvement of calmodulin in realization of vasoconstrictive effects of serotonin and norepinephrin].

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikova, L M; Avdonin, P V

    2012-01-01

    Possible involvement ofcalmodulin in adrenergic and serotoninergic regulation of vascular contractility has been studied. Calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine and W-13 suppress vasoconstriction of the rat aorta in response to norepinephrine, serotonin, and serotonin 5HT1A- and 5HT2A-receptor agonists (8-OH-DPAT and DOI, respectively) and do not affect the vasodilatory effect of 5HT1B-, 5HT2B-, and 5HT4-receptors. The force of aorta contraction in response to 8-OH-DPAT increases after the activation of calcium entry through voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. This effect is not related to non-specific activation of alpha1-adrenoceptors, since it is realized in the presence of prazosin. The inhibitor of calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase KN93 decreases the vasoconstrictive response in response to norepinephrine and serotonin by only 20%. Calmodulin inhibitors slightly decrease aortic constriction in response to endothelin-1, vasopressin, angiotensin II, and KCl. Trifluoperazine does not suppress vasoconstriction induced by the G-protein activator AlF4(-). It is assumed that the target of trifluoperazine and W-13 is calmodulin interacting directly with alpha1-adrenoceptors and serotonin 5HT1A- and 5HT2A-receptors.

  2. Microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis for the discovery and characterisation of calmodulin binding partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herling, Therese; Linse, Sara; Knowles, Tuomas

    2015-03-01

    Non-covalent and transient protein-ligand interactions are integral to cellular function and malfunction. Key steps in signalling and regulatory pathways rely on reversible non-covalent protein-protein binding or ion chelation. Here we present a microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis method for detecting and characterising protein-ligand interactions in solution. We apply this method to probe the binding equilibria of calmodulin, a central protein to calcium signalling pathways. In this study we characterise the specific binding of calmodulin to phosphorylase kinase, a known target, and creatine kinase, which we identify as a putative binding partner through a protein array screen and surface plasmon resonance experiments. We verify the interaction between calmodulin and creatine kinase in solution using free-flow electrophoresis and investigate the effect of calcium and sodium chloride on the calmodulin-ligand binding affinity in free solution without the presence of a potentially interfering surface. Our results demonstrate the general applicability of quantitative microfluidic electrophoresis to characterise binding equilibria between biomolecules in solution.

  3. Expression of calmodulin-related genes in lead-exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Sun; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Xie-Lai; Jiang, Su-Jun; Yuan, Hong

    2015-12-01

    The toxic metal lead is a widespread environmental polutant that can adversely affect human health. However, the underlying mechanisms of lead-induced toxicity are still largely unknown. The mechanism of lead toxicity was presumed to involve cross reaction between Pb(2+) and Ca(2+) with calmodulin dependent systems. The aim of the present study was thus to identify differential expression of calmodulin-related genes in the spleen of lead-exposed mice. We performed microarray analysis to identify differentially expressed genes. RNAs from spleen tissue of lead exposed animals (n=6) and controls (n=6) were converted to labeled cRNA and hybridized to Illumina mouse WG-6_v2_Bead Chip. Expression profiles were analyzed using Illumina BeadStudio Application. Real-time RT-PCR was conducted to validate the microarray data. By microarray analysis 5 calmodulin-related genes (MAP2K6, CAMKK2, CXCR4, PHKA2, MYLK) were found to be differently expressed in lead exposed compared with control mice (p<0.05). The results of Real-time RT-PCR showed that MAP2K6 and CAMKK2 were up-regulated and CXCR4 was down-regulated in lead exposure, but there were no significant differences in PHKA2 and MYLK expression between the lead exposed and control group. These results show that lead exposure produced significant changes in expression of a variety of genes in the spleen and can affect calmodulin-related gene expression. PMID:27486376

  4. Transient dissociation of polyribosomes and concurrent recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts in gravistimulated maize pulvini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilmann, I.; Shin, J.; Huang, J.; Perera, I. Y.; Davies, E.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of polyribosome abundance were studied in gravistimulated maize (Zea mays) stem pulvini. During the initial 15 min of gravistimulation, the amount of large polyribosomes transiently decreased. The transient decrease in polyribosome levels was accompanied by a transient decrease in polyribosome-associated mRNA. After 30 min of gravistimulation, the levels of polyribosomes and the amount of polyribosome-associated mRNA gradually increased over 24 h up to 3- to 4-fold of the initial value. Within 15 min of gravistimulation, total levels of transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were elevated 5-fold in maize pulvinus total RNA. Transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were recruited into polyribosomes within 15 min of gravistimulation. Over 4 h of gravistimulation, a gradual increase in the association of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts with polyribosomes was seen predominantly in the lower one-half of the maize pulvinus; the association of transcripts for vacuolar invertase with polyribosomes did not change over this period. Our results suggest that within 15 min of gravistimulation, the translation of the majority of transcripts associated with polyribosomes decreased, resembling a general stress response. Recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts into polyribosomes occurred predominantly in the lower pulvinus one-half during the first 4 h when the presentation time for gravistimulation in the maize pulvinus is not yet complete.

  5. Transient dissociation of polyribosomes and concurrent recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts in gravistimulated maize pulvini.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, I; Shin, J; Huang, J; Perera, I Y; Davies, E

    2001-11-01

    The dynamics of polyribosome abundance were studied in gravistimulated maize (Zea mays) stem pulvini. During the initial 15 min of gravistimulation, the amount of large polyribosomes transiently decreased. The transient decrease in polyribosome levels was accompanied by a transient decrease in polyribosome-associated mRNA. After 30 min of gravistimulation, the levels of polyribosomes and the amount of polyribosome-associated mRNA gradually increased over 24 h up to 3- to 4-fold of the initial value. Within 15 min of gravistimulation, total levels of transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were elevated 5-fold in maize pulvinus total RNA. Transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were recruited into polyribosomes within 15 min of gravistimulation. Over 4 h of gravistimulation, a gradual increase in the association of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts with polyribosomes was seen predominantly in the lower one-half of the maize pulvinus; the association of transcripts for vacuolar invertase with polyribosomes did not change over this period. Our results suggest that within 15 min of gravistimulation, the translation of the majority of transcripts associated with polyribosomes decreased, resembling a general stress response. Recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts into polyribosomes occurred predominantly in the lower pulvinus one-half during the first 4 h when the presentation time for gravistimulation in the maize pulvinus is not yet complete. PMID:11706198

  6. Absolute configuration of acremoxanthone C, a potent calmodulin inhibitor from Purpureocillium lilacinum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of an extract prepared from the culture medium and mycelium of Purpureocillium lilacinum allowed the isolation of two calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors, namely, acremoxanthone C (1) and acremonidin A (2). The absolute configuration of 1 was established as 2R, 3R, 1'S, 11'S, ...

  7. Dynamic modulation of ANO1/TMEM16A HCO3(-) permeability by Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinsei; Nam, Joo Hyun; Park, Hyun Woo; Oh, Uhtaek; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Lee, Min Goo

    2013-01-01

    Anoctamin 1 (ANO1)/transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A) is a calcium-activated anion channel that may play a role in HCO(3)(-) secretion in epithelial cells. Here, we report that the anion selectivity of ANO1 is dynamically regulated by the Ca(2+)/calmodulin complex. Whole-cell current measurements in HEK 293T cells indicated that ANO1 becomes highly permeable to HCO(3)(-) at high [Ca(2+)](i). Interestingly, this result was not observed in excised patches, indicating the involvement of cytosolic factors in this process. Further studies revealed that the direct association between ANO1 and calmodulin at high [Ca(2+)](i) is responsible for changes in anion permeability. Calmodulin physically interacted with ANO1 in a [Ca(2+)](i)-dependent manner, and addition of recombinant calmodulin to the cytosolic side of excised patches reversibly increased P(HCO3)/P(Cl). In addition, the high [Ca(2+)](i)-induced increase in HCO(3)(-) permeability was reproduced in mouse submandibular gland acinar cells, in which ANO1 plays a critical role in fluid secretion. These results indicate that the HCO(3)(-) permeability of ANO1 can be dynamically modulated and that ANO1 may play an important role in cellular HCO(3)(-) transport, especially in transepithelial HCO(3)(-) secretion.

  8. Control of Ca2+ Influx and Calmodulin Activation by SK-Channels in Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Thom; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    The key trigger for Hebbian synaptic plasticity is influx of Ca2+ into postsynaptic dendritic spines. The magnitude of [Ca2+] increase caused by NMDA-receptor (NMDAR) and voltage-gated Ca2+ -channel (VGCC) activation is thought to determine both the amplitude and direction of synaptic plasticity by differential activation of Ca2+ -sensitive enzymes such as calmodulin. Ca2+ influx is negatively regulated by Ca2+ -activated K+ channels (SK-channels) which are in turn inhibited by neuromodulators such as acetylcholine. However, the precise mechanisms by which SK-channels control the induction of synaptic plasticity remain unclear. Using a 3-dimensional model of Ca2+ and calmodulin dynamics within an idealised, but biophysically-plausible, dendritic spine, we show that SK-channels regulate calmodulin activation specifically during neuron-firing patterns associated with induction of spike timing-dependent plasticity. SK-channel activation and the subsequent reduction in Ca2+ influx through NMDARs and L-type VGCCs results in an order of magnitude decrease in calmodulin (CaM) activation, providing a mechanism for the effective gating of synaptic plasticity induction. This provides a common mechanism for the regulation of synaptic plasticity by neuromodulators. PMID:27232631

  9. Fast-Response Calmodulin-Based Fluorescent Indicators Reveal Rapid Intracellular Calcium Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Helassa, Nordine; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Conte, Ianina; Scaringi, John; Esposito, Elric; Bradley, Jonathan; Carter, Thomas; Ogden, David; Morad, Martin; Török, Katalin

    2015-11-03

    Faithful reporting of temporal patterns of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics requires the working range of indicators to match the signals. Current genetically encoded calmodulin-based fluorescent indicators are likely to distort fast Ca(2+) signals by apparent saturation and integration due to their limiting fluorescence rise and decay kinetics. A series of probes was engineered with a range of Ca(2+) affinities and accelerated kinetics by weakening the Ca(2+)-calmodulin-peptide interactions. At 37 °C, the GCaMP3-derived probe termed GCaMP3fast is 40-fold faster than GCaMP3 with Ca(2+) decay and rise times, t1/2, of 3.3 ms and 0.9 ms, respectively, making it the fastest to-date. GCaMP3fast revealed discreet transients with significantly faster Ca(2+) dynamics in neonatal cardiac myocytes than GCaMP6f. With 5-fold increased two-photon fluorescence cross-section for Ca(2+) at 940 nm, GCaMP3fast is suitable for deep tissue studies. The green fluorescent protein serves as a reporter providing important novel insights into the kinetic mechanism of target recognition by calmodulin. Our strategy to match the probe to the signal by tuning the affinity and hence the Ca(2+) kinetics of the indicator is applicable to the emerging new generations of calmodulin-based probes.

  10. Fast-Response Calmodulin-Based Fluorescent Indicators Reveal Rapid Intracellular Calcium Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Helassa, Nordine; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Conte, Ianina; Scaringi, John; Esposito, Elric; Bradley, Jonathan; Carter, Thomas; Ogden, David; Morad, Martin; Török, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Faithful reporting of temporal patterns of intracellular Ca2+ dynamics requires the working range of indicators to match the signals. Current genetically encoded calmodulin-based fluorescent indicators are likely to distort fast Ca2+ signals by apparent saturation and integration due to their limiting fluorescence rise and decay kinetics. A series of probes was engineered with a range of Ca2+ affinities and accelerated kinetics by weakening the Ca2+-calmodulin-peptide interactions. At 37 °C, the GCaMP3-derived probe termed GCaMP3fast is 40-fold faster than GCaMP3 with Ca2+ decay and rise times, t1/2, of 3.3 ms and 0.9 ms, respectively, making it the fastest to-date. GCaMP3fast revealed discreet transients with significantly faster Ca2+ dynamics in neonatal cardiac myocytes than GCaMP6f. With 5-fold increased two-photon fluorescence cross-section for Ca2+ at 940 nm, GCaMP3fast is suitable for deep tissue studies. The green fluorescent protein serves as a reporter providing important novel insights into the kinetic mechanism of target recognition by calmodulin. Our strategy to match the probe to the signal by tuning the affinity and hence the Ca2+ kinetics of the indicator is applicable to the emerging new generations of calmodulin-based probes. PMID:26527405

  11. Regulated Expression of a Calmodulin Isoform Alters Growth and Development in Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Takezawa, D.; An, G.; Han, T.-J.

    1996-01-01

    A transgene approach was taken to study the consequences of altered expression of a calmodutin iso-form on plant growth and development. Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM 1 to 8) have been isolated and characterized. Among the potato calmodulin isoforms studied, PCM 1 differs from the other isoforms because of its unique amino acid substitutions. Transgenic potato plants were produced carrying sense construct of PCM 1 fused to the CAMV 35S promoter. Transgenic plants showing a moderate increase in PCM 1 MRNA exhibited strong apical dominance, produced elongated tubers, and were taller than the controls. Interestingly, the plants expressing the highest level of PCM 1 MRNA did not form underground tubers. Instead, these transgenic plants produced aerial tubers when allowed to grow for longer periods. The expression of different calmodulin isoforms (PCM 1, 5, 6, and 8) was studied in transgenic plants. Among the four potato calmodulin isoforms, only the expression of PCM 1 MRNA was altered in transgenic plants, while the expression of other isoforms was not significantly altered. Western analysis revealed increased PCM 1 protein in transgenic plants, indicating that the expression of both MRNA and protein are altered in transgenic plants. These results suggest that increasing the expression of PCM 1 alters growth and development in potato plants.

  12. Inhibition of Acanthamoeba myosin I heavy chain kinase by Ca(2+)-calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Brzeska, H; Kulesza-Lipka, D; Korn, E D

    1992-11-25

    The actin-activated Mg(2+)-ATPase activity of Acanthamoeba myosins I depends on phosphorylation of their single heavy chains by myosin I heavy chain kinase. Kinase activity is enhanced > 50-fold by autophosphorylation at multiple sites. The rate of kinase autophosphorylation is increased approximately 20-fold by acidic phospholipids independent of the presence of Ca2+ and diglycerides. We show in this paper that Ca(2+)-calmodulin inhibits phospholipid-stimulated autophosphorylation of myosin I heavy chain kinase and hence also inhibits the catalytic activity of unphosphorylated kinase in the presence of phospholipid. Ca(2+)-calmodulin does not inhibit kinase activity in the absence of phospholipid. Micromolar Ca(2+)-calmodulin also inhibits binding of myosin I heavy chain kinase to phospholipid vesicles and purified plasma membranes. Proteolytic removal of a 7-kDa NH2-terminal segment from the 97-kDa kinase prevents binding of both calmodulin and phospholipid; therefore, we propose that they bind to the same or overlapping sites. These data provide a mechanism by which Ca2+ could inhibit the actin-activated Mg(2+)-ATPase activity of the myosin I isozymes in vivo and thus regulate myosin I-dependent motile activities. PMID:1331103

  13. Identification of a calmodulin-binding domain in Sema4D that regulates its exodomain shedding in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Peipei; Zeng, Zhao; Li, Qiang; Liu, Xiaohui; Xin, Xiaoran; Wannemacher, Kenneth M.; Ruan, Changgeng; Li, Renhao; Brass, Lawrence F.

    2013-01-01

    Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is a transmembrane protein that supports contact-dependent amplification of platelet activation by collagen before being gradually cleaved by the metalloprotease ADAM17, as we have previously shown. Cleavage releases a soluble 120-kDa exodomain fragment for which receptors exist on platelets and endothelial cells. Here we have examined the mechanism that regulates Sema4D exodomain cleavage. The results show that the membrane-proximal cytoplasmic domain of Sema4D contains a binding site for calmodulin within the polybasic region Arg762-Lys779. Coprecipitation studies show that Sema4D and calmodulin are associated in resting platelets, forming a complex that dissociates upon platelet activation by the agonists that trigger Sema4D cleavage. Inhibiting calmodulin with W7 or introducing a membrane-permeable peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding site is sufficient to trigger the dissociation of Sema4D from calmodulin and initiate cleavage. Conversely, deletion of the calmodulin-binding site causes constitutive shedding of Sema4D. These results show that (1) Sema4D is a calmodulin-binding protein with a site of interaction in its membrane-proximal cytoplasmic domain, (2) platelet agonists cause dissociation of the calmodulin–Sema4D complex, and (3) dissociation of the complex is sufficient to trigger ADAM17-dependent cleavage of Sema4D, releasing a bioactive fragment. PMID:23564909

  14. Apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin bind to the same region on the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C. P.; Rodney, G.; Zhang, J. Z.; Santacruz-Toloza, L.; Strasburg, G.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    The skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (RYR1) is regulated by calmodulin in both its Ca2+-free (apocalmodulin) and Ca2+-bound (Ca2+ calmodulin) states. Apocalmodulin is an activator of the channel, and Ca2+ calmodulin is an inhibitor of the channel. Both apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin binding sites on RYR1 are destroyed by a mild tryptic digestion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes, but calmodulin (either form), bound to RYR1 prior to tryptic digestion, protects both the apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin sites from tryptic destruction. The protected sites are after arginines 3630 and 3637 on RYR1. These studies suggest that both Ca2+ calmodulin and apocalmodulin bind to the same or overlapping regions on RYR1 and block access of trypsin to sites at amino acids 3630 and 3637. This sequence is part of a predicted Ca2+ CaM binding site of amino acids 3614-3642 [Takeshima, H., et al. (1989) Nature 339, 439-445].

  15. Cytoplasmic calcium gradients and calmodulin in the early development of the fucoid alga Pelvetia compressa.

    PubMed

    Pu, R; Robinson, K R

    1998-11-01

    The predicted existence of cytoplasmic Ca2+ gradients during the photopolarization of the zygotes of the brown algae, Pelvetia and Fucus, has proved to be difficult to establish, and the downstream targets of the putative gradients are not known. We have used quantitative microinjection of the long excitation wavelength Ca2+ indicator, Calcium Crimson, and of antibodies against calmodulin to investigate these matters in the zygotes and early embryos of Pelvetia. We found that there is a window of cytoplasmic Calcium Crimson concentration that gives an adequate signal above autofluorescence yet allows normal development of the zygotes. As Calcium Crimson is not a ratiometric indicator, we injected other zygotes with a Ca2+-insensitive dye, rhodamine B, and imaged the cells at the same time that Calcium Crimson-injected cells were imaged. Ratios were calculated by dividing the averaged pixel values of Calcium Crimson images by the averaged pixel values of corresponding rhodamine B images. By this method, we observed the formation of a cytoplasmic Ca2+ gradient within one hour of the exposure of the cells to unilateral blue light during the photosensitive period. The region of high Ca2+ was localized to and predictive of the site of future rhizoid formation. We validated this somewhat indirect method by applying it to the growing rhizoid, where the existence of a tip-localized Ca2+ gradient is well established. The method clearly revealed the known gradient. The injection of ungerminated zygotes with antibodies made against Dictyostelium calmodulin inhibited germination, and this inhibition was abolished if the calmodulin antibodies were coinjected with an excess of purified maize calmodulin. Likewise, the growth of the rhizoids was inhibited by calmodulin antibody injections. The fungus-derived calmodulin antagonist, ophiobolin A, which has previously been shown to be a potent inhibitor of germination, also inhibited rhizoidal growth. Our results provide evidence

  16. Specific anion effects on ATPase activity, calmodulin sensitivity, and solubilization of dynein ATPases.

    PubMed

    Blum, J J; Hayes, A

    1984-01-01

    The basal ATPase activity of 30S dynein, whether obtained by extraction of ciliary axonemes with a high (0.5 M NaCl) or low (1 mM Tris-0.1 mM EDTA) ionic strength buffer is increased by NaCl, NaNO3, and Na acetate, with NaNO3 causing the largest increase. The calmodulin-activated ATPase activity of 30S dynein is also increased by addition of NaCl, NaNO3, or Na acetate, but the effects are less pronounced than on basal activity, so that the calmodulin activation ratio (CAR) decreases to 1.0 as salt concentration increases to 0.2 M. These salts also reduce the CAR of 14S dynein ATPase to 1.0 but by strongly inhibiting the calmodulin-activated ATPase activity and only slightly inhibiting the basal activity. Sodium fluoride differs both quantitatively and qualitatively from the other three salts studied. It inhibits the ATPase activity of both 14S and 30S dyneins at concentrations below 5 mM and, by a stronger inhibition of the calmodulin-activated ATPase activities, reduces the CAR to 1.0. Na acetate does not inhibit axonemal ATPase, nor does it interfere with the drop in turbidity caused by ATP and extracts very little protein from the axonemes. NaCl and, especially, NaNO3, cause a slow decrease in A350 of an axonemal suspension and an inhibition of the turbidity response to ATP. NaF, at concentrations comparable to those that inhibit the ATPase activities of the solubilized dyneins, also inhibits axonemal ATPase activity and the turbidity response. Pretreatment of demembranated axonemes with a buffer containing 0.25 M sodium acetate for 5 min followed by extraction for 5 min with a buffer containing 0.5 M NaCl and resolution of the extracted dynein on a sucrose density gradient generally yields a 30S dynein that is activated by calmodulin in a heterogeneous manner, ie, the "light" 30S dynein ATPase fractions are more activated than the "heavy" 30S dynein fractions. These results demonstrate specific anion effects on the basal and calmodulin-activated dynein ATPase

  17. Quantitative analysis of the free energy coupling in the system calmodulin, calcium, smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase.

    PubMed

    Mamar-Bachi, A; Cox, J A

    1987-12-01

    Interactions between Ca2+, calmodulin and turkey gizzard myosin light chain kinase have been studied by equilibrium gel filtration and analyzed in terms of the theory of free energy coupling as formulated by Huang and King for calmodulin-regulated systems (Current Topics in Cellular Regulation 27, 1966-1971, 1985). Direct binding studies revealed that upon interaction with the enzyme, calmodulin acquires strong positive cooperativity in Ca2+-binding. The determination of the Ca2+-binding constants is inherently approximative due to the apparent homotropic cooperativity; therefore a statistical chi 2 analysis was carried out to delimit the formation-, and subsequently the stoichiometric Ca2+-binding constants. Whereas the first two stoichiometric Ca2+-binding constants of enzyme-bound CaM do not differ or are at the upmost 10-fold higher than those in free calmodulin, the third Ca2+ ion binds with an at least 70-fold and more likely 3000-fold higher affinity constant. The binding constant for the fourth Ca2+ is only 5-fold higher than the corresponding one in free calmodulin, thus creating a plateau at 3 bound Ca2+ in the isotherm. Direct binding of Ca2+-free calmodulin to myosin light chain kinase at 10(-7) M free Ca2+ yielded a l/l stoichiometry and an affinity constant of 2.2 x 10(5) M-1. It is thus anticipated that in resting smooth muscle ([Ca2+] less than or equal to 10(-7) M) more than half of the enzyme is bound to metal-free calmodulin. Analysis of the enzymatic activation of myosin light chain kinase at different concentrations of calmodulin and Ca2+ revealed that this Ca2+-free complex is inactive and that activation is concomitant with the formation of the enzyme.calmodulin.Ca3 complex.

  18. A novel target recognition revealed by calmodulin in complex with the basic helix--loop--helix transcription factor SEF2-1/E2-2.

    PubMed

    Larsson, G; Schleucher, J; Onions, J; Hermann, S; Grundström, T; Wijmenga, S S

    2001-01-01

    Calmodulin is the predominant intracellular receptor for Ca(2+) signals, mediating the regulation of numerous cellular processes. It can inhibit the DNA binding of basic helix--loop--helix transcription factors by a direct interaction of a novel type. To structurally characterize this novel calmodulin-target interaction, we decided to study the complex of calmodulin with a dimeric peptide corresponding to the DNA-binding domains of the dimeric basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor SEF2-1 (SEF2-1mp) using NMR. Here, we report that the stoichiometry of the calmodulin:SEF2-1mp complex is one dimeric peptide binding two calmodulin molecules. We also report the 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments and the secondary structure of calmodulin in this for NMR large (approximately 38 kD) complex, as well as the 1H assignments and secondary structure of SEF2-1mp. In addition, we determined the amide proton exchange rates of calmodulin and measured intermolecular calmodulin:SEF2-1mp and calmodulin:calmodulin NOE contacts. The isotope-filtered experiments show a large number of SEF2-1mp to calmodulin NOE contacts indicating that a tight complex is formed, which is confirmed by an intermolecular calmodulin:calmodulin NOE contact. The secondary structure and amide proton exchange data show that the binding does not occur via the classical wraparound binding mode. Instead, the data indicate that calmodulin interacts with SEF2-1mp in a more open conformation, although the hydrophobic surfaces of the N- and C-terminal domains still form the main interaction sites. Interactions involving charged residues are also identified in agreement with the known relatively high sensitivity of the binding to ionic strength. Finally, the peptide does not form an alpha-helix as in the classical wraparound binding mode. PMID:11266605

  19. Nucleomorphin. A novel, acidic, nuclear calmodulin-binding protein from dictyostelium that regulates nuclear number.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2002-05-31

    Probing of Dictyostelium discoideum cell extracts after SDS-PAGE using (35)S-recombinant calmodulin (CaM) as a probe has revealed approximately three-dozen Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding proteins. Here, we report the molecular cloning, expression, and subcellular localization of a gene encoding a novel calmodulin-binding protein (CaMBP); we have called nucleomorphin, from D. discoideum. A lambdaZAP cDNA expression library of cells from multicellular development was screened using a recombinant calmodulin probe ((35)S-VU1-CaM). The open reading frame of 1119 nucleotides encodes a polypeptide of 340 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 38.7 kDa and is constitutively expressed throughout the Dictyostelium life cycle. Nucleomorphin contains a highly acidic glutamic/aspartic acid inverted repeat (DEED) with significant similarity to the conserved nucleoplasmin domain and a putative transmembrane domain in the carboxyl-terminal region. Southern blotting reveals that nucleomorphin exists as a single copy gene. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-agarose we show that bacterially expressed nucleomorphin binds to bovine CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Amino-terminal fusion to the green fluorescence protein (GFP) showed that GFP-NumA localized to the nucleus as distinct arc-like patterns similar to heterochromatin regions. GFP-NumA lacking the acidic DEED repeat still showed arc-like accumulations at the nuclear periphery, but the number of nuclei in these cells was increased markedly compared with control cells. Cells expressing GFP-NumA lacking the transmembrane domain localized to the nuclear periphery but did not affect nuclear number or gross morphology. Nucleomorphin is the first nuclear CaMBP to be identified in Dictyostelium. Furthermore, these data present the first identification of a member of the nucleoplasmin family as a calmodulin-binding protein and suggest nucleomorphin has a role in nuclear structure in Dictyostelium. PMID:11919178

  20. Role of Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants. Progress report, FY91

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-12-31

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  1. Inhibitory effects of calmodulin antagonists on urinary enzyme excretion in rats after nephrotoxic doses of mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S.D. Jr.; Cox, J.L.; Giles, R.C. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    Prochlorperazine, a phenothiazine antiemetic, has been reported to protect rats against mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/)-induced nephrotoxicity. Mercuric ion and 12 other divalent metal ions of toxicologic importance inhibit the activity of calmodulin, a ubiquitous intracellular calcium receptor and regulatory protein, at physiologically relevant concentrations. Phenothiazines, including prochlorperazine, are reversible calmodulin antagonists, and as such they interact with divalent calcium at the level of calmodulin. It was of interest therefore to evaluate the comparative effects of several phenothiazines on HgCl/sub 2/-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

  2. Calmodulin mediates sulfur mustard toxicity in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Simbulan-Rosenthal, Cynthia M; Ray, Radharaman; Benton, Betty; Soeda, Emiko; Daher, Ahmad; Anderson, Dana; Smith, William J; Rosenthal, Dean S

    2006-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) causes blisters in the skin through a series of cellular changes that we are beginning to identify. We earlier demonstrated that SM toxicity is the result of induction of both death receptor and mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis in human keratinocytes (KC). Because of its importance in apoptosis in the skin, we tested whether calmodulin (CaM) mediates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway induced by SM. Of the three human CaM genes, the predominant form expressed in KC was CaM1. RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis revealed upregulation of CaM expression following SM treatment. To delineate the potential role of CaM1 in the regulation of SM-induced apoptosis, retroviral vectors expressing CaM1 RNA in the antisense (AS) orientation were used to transduce and derive stable CaM1 AS cells, which were then exposed to SM and subjected to immunoblot analysis for expression of apoptotic markers. Proteolytic activation of executioner caspases-3, -6, -7, and the upstream caspase-9, as well as caspase-mediated PARP cleavage were markedly inhibited by CaM1 AS expression. CaM1 AS depletion attenuated SM-induced, but not Fas-induced, proteolytic processing and activation of caspase-3. Whereas control KC exhibited a marked increase in apoptotic nuclear fragmentation after SM, CaM1 AS cells exhibited normal nuclear morphology up to 48h after SM, indicating that suppression of apoptosis in CaM1 AS cells increases survival and does not shift to a necrotic death. CaM has been shown to activate the phosphatase calcineurin, which can induce apoptosis by Bad dephosphorylation. Interestingly, whereas SM-treated CaM1-depleted KC expressed the phosphorylated non-apoptotic sequestered form of Bad, Bad was present in the hypophosphorylated apoptotic form in SM-exposed control KC. To determine if pharmacological CaM inhibitors could attenuate SM-induced apoptosis via Bad dephosphorylation, KC were pretreated with the CaM-specific antagonist W-13 or its less active structural

  3. Calmodulin as a major calcium buffer shaping vesicular release and short-term synaptic plasticity: facilitation through buffer dislocation.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, Yulia; Volynski, Kirill E

    2015-01-01

    Action potential-dependent release of synaptic vesicles and short-term synaptic plasticity are dynamically regulated by the endogenous Ca(2+) buffers that shape [Ca(2+)] profiles within a presynaptic bouton. Calmodulin is one of the most abundant presynaptic proteins and it binds Ca(2+) faster than any other characterized endogenous neuronal Ca(2+) buffer. Direct effects of calmodulin on fast presynaptic Ca(2+) dynamics and vesicular release however have not been studied in detail. Using experimentally constrained three-dimensional diffusion modeling of Ca(2+) influx-exocytosis coupling at small excitatory synapses we show that, at physiologically relevant concentrations, Ca(2+) buffering by calmodulin plays a dominant role in inhibiting vesicular release and in modulating short-term synaptic plasticity. We also propose a novel and potentially powerful mechanism for short-term facilitation based on Ca(2+)-dependent dynamic dislocation of calmodulin molecules from the plasma membrane within the active zone. PMID:26190970

  4. Quantitative model of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalas, Stefan

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a key element in the calcium second messenger cascades that lead to long term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength. In this thesis, I have constructed kinetic models of activation of CaMKII and measured some of the unknown parameters of the model. I used the models to elucidate mechanisms of activation of CaMKII and to study the kinetics of its activation under conditions similar to those in dendritic spines.In chapter 2, I developed a new experimental method to rapidly stop the autophosphorylation reaction. I used this method to measure the catalytic turnover number of CaMKII. To quantitatively characterize CaMKII atophosphorylation in nonsaturating calcium, I also measured the autophosphorylation turnover number when CaMKII is activated by calmodulin mutants that can bind calcium ions only in either the amino or the carboxyl lobes.Previous models of CaMKII activation assumed that binding of calmodulins to individual CaMKII subunits is independent and that autophosphorylation occurs within a ring of 6 subunits. However, a recent structure of CaMKII suggests that pairs of subunits cooperate in binding calmodulin and raises the possibility that the autophosphorylation occurs within pairs of subunits. In chapter 3, I constructed a model in which CaMKII subunits cooperate in binding calmodulin. This model reconciled previous experimental results from the literature that appeared contradictory. In chapter 4, I constructed two models for CaMKII autophosphorylation, in which autophosphorylation can occur either in rings or pairs, and used them to design experiments aimed at differentiating between these possibilities. Previously published measurements and the measurements that I performed are more consistent with autophosphorylation occurring within pairs.In chapter 5, I constructed a model for simultaneous interactions among calcium, calmodulin, and CaMKII, and I used an automatic parameter search algorithm

  5. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress disrupts calcium binding on calmodulin: More evidence for oxidative stress in vitiligo

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, K.U. . E-mail: k.schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, N.C.J.; Zothner, C.; Abou Elloof, M.M.; Wood, J.M.

    2007-08-17

    Patients with acute vitiligo have low epidermal catalase expression/activities and accumulate 10{sup -3} M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. One consequence of this severe oxidative stress is an altered calcium homeostasis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Here, we show decreased epidermal calmodulin expression in acute vitiligo. Since 10{sup -3}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidises methionine and tryptophan residues in proteins, we examined calcium binding to calmodulin in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} utilising {sup 45}calcium. The results showed that all four calcium atoms exchanged per molecule of calmodulin. Since oxidised calmodulin looses its ability to activate calcium ATPase, enzyme activities were followed in full skin biopsies from lesional skin of patients with acute vitiligo (n = 6) and healthy controls (n = 6). The results yielded a 4-fold decrease of ATPase activities in the patients. Computer simulation of native and oxidised calmodulin confirmed the loss of all four calcium ions from their specific EF-hand domains. Taken together H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation affects calcium binding in calmodulin leading to perturbed calcium homeostasis and perturbed L-phenylalanine-uptake in the epidermis of acute vitiligo.

  7. The cytoskeletal system of nucleated erythrocytes. II. presence of a high molecular weight calmodulin-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Calmodulin was detected in dogfish erythrocyte lysates by means of phosphodiesterase activation. Anucleate dogfish erythrocyte cytoskeletons bound calmodulin. Binding of calmodulin was calcium- dependent, concentration-dependent, and saturable. Cytoskeletons consisted of a marginal band of microtubules containing primarily tubulin, and trans-marginal band material containing actin and spectrinlike proteins. Dogfish erythrocyte ghosts and cytoskeletons were found to contain a calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding protein, CBP, by two independent techniques: (a) 125I-calmodulin binding to cytoskeletal proteins separated by SDS PAGE, and (b) in situ azidocalmodulin binding in whole anucleate ghosts and cytoskeletons. CBP, with an apparent molecular weight of 245,000, co-migrated with the upper band of human and dogfish erythrocyte spectrin. CBP was present in anucleate ghosts devoid of marginal bands and absent from isolated marginal bands. CBP therefore appears to be localized in the trans- marginal band material and not in the marginal band. Similarities between CBP and high molecular weight calmodulin-binding proteins from mammalian species are discussed. PMID:6890556

  8. Affinity selection of chemically modified proteins: role of lysyl residues in the binding of calmodulin to calcineurin

    SciTech Connect

    Manalan, A.S.; Klee, C.B.

    1987-03-10

    In affinity selection, calcineurin selects from a population of randomly modified calmodulins those species with which it prefers to interact. The method shows that acetylation of lysines affects calmodulin so as to interfere with its ability to interact with calcineurin. Monoacetylation of any lysine of calmodulin reduces its affinity for calcineurin by 5-10-fold. Multiple acetylations amplify the loss of affinity; none of the modifications are incompatible with activity. The lack of selective of calcineurin against any particular modified lysine indicates that the loss of affinity reflects changes induced by the removal of the charged groups and suggests an important role for electrostatic interactions in the cooperative structural transitions which calmodulin undergoes upon binding its target proteins or calcium. In the presence of calcineurin, a large and specific decrease in the rate of acetylation of Lys-75 and -148 of calmodulin is observed. The reactivity of the same residues is greatly increased in the presence of calcium alone. Their reactivity changes in opposite directions in response to calcium-induced or calcineurin-induced structural changes. The reactivity of other residues such as Lys-21, decreased in the presence of calcineurin but not calcium, is also affected by a conformational change which is induced specifically by calcineurin. Radiolabelled calmodulin was purified by HPLC.

  9. The potent antiplasmodial calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine inhibits plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Cavagnino, Andrea; Rossi, Franca; Rizzi, Menico

    2011-12-01

    Due to their critical involvement in the execution of the malaria parasite developmental pattern both in the mosquito vector and in the human host, Plasmodium calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are considered promising candidates for the development of new tools to block malaria transmission. We report here that the phenothiazine trifluoperazine non-competitively inhibits Plasmodium falciparum CDPK4 in the micromolar range while other calmodulin antagonists only marginally affect the enzyme activity, and we propose the inhibition mechanism. Our results demonstrate that selective enzyme inhibition is achievable by targeting its calmodulin-like domain. This observation could be exploited for the discovery of innovative phenothiazine-based CDPK inhibitors of potential medical interest.

  10. Calmodulin-binding domains in Alzheimer's disease proteins: extending the calcium hypothesis.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Myre, Michael A

    2004-08-01

    The calcium hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) invokes the disruption of calcium signaling as the underlying cause of neuronal dysfunction and ultimately apoptosis. As a primary calcium signal transducer, calmodulin (CaM) responds to cytosolic calcium fluxes by binding to and regulating the activity of target CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Ca(2+)-dependent CaMBPs primarily contain domains (CaMBDs) that can be classified into motifs based upon variations on the basic amphiphilic alpha-helix domain involving conserved hydrophobic residues at positions 1-10, 1-14 or 1-16. In contrast, an IQ or IQ-like domain often mediates Ca(2+)-independent CaM-binding. Based on these attributes, a search for CaMBDs reveals that many of the proteins intimately linked to AD may be calmodulin-binding proteins, opening new avenues for research on this devastating disease. PMID:15249195

  11. Calmodulin-binding transcription activators and perspectives for applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun; Du, Liqun; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, a novel family of calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTAs) has been reported in various species. The CAMTAs share a conserved domain organization, with a CG-1 DNA-binding domain, a transcription factor immunoglobulin domain, several ankyrin repeats, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a varying number of IQ motifs. CAMTAs participate in transcriptional regulation by recognizing and binding to a specific cis-element: (G/A/C)CGCG(C/G/T). Plants suffer from the environmental challenges, including abiotic and biotic stresses. Investigations in various plant species indicate a broad range of CAMTA functions involved in developmental regulation, environmental stress response, and hormone cross talk. In this review, we focus on the expression patterns and biological functions of CAMTAs to explore their probable applications in biotechnology. Furthermore, the identification and phylogenetic analysis of CAMTAs in crops could open new perspectives for enhancing stress tolerance, which could lead to improved crop production.

  12. Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 mediates biotic defense responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Galon, Yael; Nave, Roy; Boyce, Joy M; Nachmias, Dikla; Knight, Marc R; Fromm, Hillel

    2008-03-19

    Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 (also called SR1) is a calmodulin-binding transcription factor in Arabidopsis. Two homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants (camta3-1, camta3-2) showed enhanced spontaneous lesions. Transcriptome analysis of both mutants revealed 6 genes with attenuated expression and 99 genes with elevated expression. Of the latter, 32 genes are related to defense against pathogens (e.g. WRKY33, PR1 and chitinase). Propagation of a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea were attenuated in both mutants. Moreover, both mutants accumulated high levels of H2O2. We suggest that CAMTA3 regulates the expression of a set of genes involved in biotic defense responses.

  13. Distribution of calmodulin in corn seedlings - Immunocytochemical localization in coleoptiles and root apices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Immunofluorescence techniques have been used to study the distribution of calmodulin in several tissues in etiolated corn (Zea mays, var. Bear Hybrid) seedlings. Uniform staining was seen in the background cytoplasm of most cell types. Cell walls and vacuoles were not stained. In coleoptile mesophyll cells the nucleoplasm of most nuclei was stained as was the stroma of most amyloplasts. The lumen border of mature tracheary elements in coleoptiles also stained. In the rootcap the most intensely stained regions were the cytoplasms of columella cells and of the outermost cells enmeshed in the layer of secreted slime. Nuclei in the rootcap cells did not stain distinctly, but those in all cell types of the root meristem did. Also in the root meristem, the cytoplasm of metaxylem elements stained brightly. These results are compared and contrasted with previous data on the localization of calmodulin in pea root apices and epicotyls and discussed in relation to current hypotheses on mechanisms of gravitropism.

  14. Three Ways to Die Suddenly: Do They All Require Calcium Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death occurs due to a limited number of pathological events. The heart can beat too fast or too slow to maintain adequate cardiac output or the heart can rupture. Here we survey recent evidence that excessive activation of calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by three core neurohumoral pathways or by oxidant stress can lead to sudden cardiac death due to sinus node dysfunction and bradycardia, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, and cardiac rupture. PMID:25125731

  15. Possible role for calmodulin in insulin release. Studies with trifluoperazine in rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Y; Wollheim, C B; Siegel, E; Sharp, G W

    1980-09-01

    The role of calmodulin in insulin secretion from rat pancreatic islets has been examined by the use of trifluoperazine, an inhibitor of calmodulin-Ca++-directed functions. It was found that 30 microM trifluoperazine caused 50% inhibition, and 100 microM, up to 73% inhibition of 16.7 mM glucose-stimulated insulin release. 100 microM trifluoperazine caused a similar inhibition of 10 mM glyceraldehyde-stimulated release. Therefore, the site of action of trifluoperazine in glucose stimulus-secretion coupling appears to be after the trioses. As trifluoperazine had no effect upon insulin release stimulated by 1 mM 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, the inhibitory effect of trifluoperazine appears to be rather specific. Further, the process of exocytosis per se is not affected. It was also found that although trifluoperazine inhibited the effect of glucose to stimulate insulin release, it did not affect the synergism between glucose and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine to potentiate insulin release. It may be concluded that trifluoperazine selectively inhibits one part of the mechanism by which glucose stimulates insulin release. Calmodulin plays a role in the stimulation of insulin release by glucose at a site between metabolism of trioses and elevation of cytosol Ca++, but is not involved in the final process of exocytosis.

  16. Calcium transport in vesicles from carrot cells: Stimulation by calmodulin and phosphatidylserine. [Daucus carota cv. Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Wenling Hsieh; Sze, Heven )

    1991-05-01

    The transport properties of Ca-pumping ATPases from carrot (Daucus carota cv. Danvers) tissue culture cells were studied. ATP dependent Ca transport in vesicles that comigrated with an ER marker, was stimulated 3-4 fold by calmodulin. Cyclopiazonic acid (a specific inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase) partially inhibited oxalate-stimulated Ca transport activity; however, it had little or not effect on calmodulin-stimulated Ca uptake. The results suggested the presence of two types of Ca ATPases, and ER- and a plasma membrane-type. Incubation of membranes with (gamma{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the formation of a single acyl ({sup 32}P) phosphoprotein of 120 kDa. Formation of this phosphoprotein was dependent on Ca, and enhanced by La {sup 3+}, characteristic of the plasma membrane CaATPase. Acidic phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, stimulated Ca transport, similar to their effect on the erythrocyte plasma membrane CaATPase. These results would indicate that the calmodulin-stimulated Ca transport originated in large part from a plasma membrane-type Ca pump of 120 kDa.

  17. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize.

    PubMed

    Stinemetz, C L; Hasenstein, K H; Young, L M; Evans, M L

    1992-11-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism. PMID:11537498

  18. Identification of a calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase in the endoplasmic reticulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, B.; Ichida, A.; Wang, Y.; Gens, J. S.; Pickard, B. G.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    A unique subfamily of calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-ATPases was recently identified in plants. In contrast to the most closely related pumps in animals, plasma membrane-type Ca2+-ATPases, members of this new subfamily are distinguished by a calmodulin-regulated autoinhibitor located at the N-terminal instead of a C-terminal end. In addition, at least some isoforms appear to reside in non-plasma membrane locations. To begin delineating their functions, we investigated the subcellular localization of isoform ACA2p (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2 protein) in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ACA2p resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In buoyant density sucrose gradients performed with and without Mg2+, ACA2p cofractionated with an ER membrane marker and a typical "ER-type" Ca2+-ATPase, ACA3p/ECA1p. To visualize its subcellular localization, ACA2p was tagged with a green fluorescence protein at its C terminus (ACA2-GFPp) and expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. We collected fluorescence images from live root cells using confocal and computational optical-sectioning microscopy. ACA2-GFPp appeared as a fluorescent reticulum, consistent with an ER location. In addition, we observed strong fluorescence around the nuclei of mature epidermal cells, which is consistent with the hypothesis that ACA2p may also function in the nuclear envelope. An ER location makes ACA2p distinct from all other calmodulin-regulated pumps identified in plants or animals.

  19. Calcium-sensitive MRI contrast agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Shusteff, Maxim; Fam, Peter; Jasanoff, Alan

    2006-10-01

    We describe a family of calcium indicators for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), formed by combining a powerful iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast mechanism with the versatile calcium-sensing protein calmodulin and its targets. Calcium-dependent protein-protein interactions drive particle clustering and produce up to 5-fold changes in T2 relaxivity, an indication of the sensors' potency. A variant based on conjugates of wild-type calmodulin and the peptide M13 reports concentration changes near 1 microM Ca(2+), suitable for detection of elevated intracellular calcium levels. The midpoint and cooperativity of the response can be tuned by mutating the protein domains that actuate the sensor. Robust MRI signal changes are achieved even at nanomolar particle concentrations (<1 microM in calmodulin) that are unlikely to buffer calcium levels. When combined with technologies for cellular delivery of nanoparticulate agents, these sensors and their derivatives may be useful for functional molecular imaging of biological signaling networks in live, opaque specimens.

  20. Calcium-sensitive MRI contrast agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Shusteff, Maxim; Fam, Peter; Jasanoff, Alan

    2006-01-01

    We describe a family of calcium indicators for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), formed by combining a powerful iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast mechanism with the versatile calcium-sensing protein calmodulin and its targets. Calcium-dependent protein–protein interactions drive particle clustering and produce up to 5-fold changes in T2 relaxivity, an indication of the sensors' potency. A variant based on conjugates of wild-type calmodulin and the peptide M13 reports concentration changes near 1 μM Ca2+, suitable for detection of elevated intracellular calcium levels. The midpoint and cooperativity of the response can be tuned by mutating the protein domains that actuate the sensor. Robust MRI signal changes are achieved even at nanomolar particle concentrations (<1 μM in calmodulin) that are unlikely to buffer calcium levels. When combined with technologies for cellular delivery of nanoparticulate agents, these sensors and their derivatives may be useful for functional molecular imaging of biological signaling networks in live, opaque specimens. PMID:17003117

  1. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  2. Modulation of radiation induced lipid peroxidation by phospholipase A 2 and calmodulin antagonists: Relevance to detoxification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1995-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with 0.9 Gy s -1. Lipid peroxidation initiated by ionizing radiation was enhanced by phospholipase A 2, and required both phospholipase A 2 and GSH-peroxidase for consecutive action to convert fatty acid peroxides into corresponding alcohols. The ability of phospholipase A 2 to enhance lipid peroxidation was increased in presence of Ca 2+. However, in combination, phospholipase A 2 and GSH-peroxidase were effective in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. These findings show that free fatty acid peroxides considerably increase the peroxidation. Calmodulin antagonists inhibit lipid peroxidation and decrease the radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from the membranes. Our results suggest the importance of Ca 2+ dependent phospholipase A 2 in detoxification of fatty acid peroxides in the membranes. It is quite possible that scavenging of free radicals by calmodulin antagonists lower the formation of hydroperoxides, resulting in the decrease in activity of phospholipase A 2. Alternatively, decrease in Ca 2+ release due to the calmodulin antagonists might have affected the activity of phospholipase A 2. Our observations might be of considerable significance in the understanding of post irradiation effect on biological membranes.

  3. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  4. Interaction of calmodulin with L-selectin at the membrane interface: Implication on the regulation of L-selectin shedding

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Putkey, John A.; Li, Renhao

    2011-01-01

    The calmodulin hypothesis of ectodomain shedding stipulates that calmodulin, an intracellular Ca2+-dependent regulatory protein, associates with the cytoplasmic domain of L-selectin to regulate ectodomain shedding of L-selectin on the other side of the plasma membrane. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism, we have characterized the interactions of calmodulin with two peptides derived from human L-selectin. The peptide ARR18 corresponds to the entire cytoplasmic domain of L-selectin (residues Ala317–Tyr334 in the mature protein), and CLS corresponds to residues Lys280–Tyr334, which contains the entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of L-selectin. Monitoring the interaction by fluorescence spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques, we found that calmodulin can bind to ARR18 in aqueous solutions or the L-selectin cytoplasmic domain of CLS reconstituted in the phosphatidylcholine bilayer, both with an affinity of approximate 2 μM. The association is calcium-independent, dynamic and involves both lobes of calmodulin. In a phospholipid bilayer, the positively charged L-selectin cytoplasmic domain of CLS is associated with anionic phosphatidylserine lipids at the membrane interface through electrostatic interactions. Under conditions where the phosphatidylserine content mimics that in the inner leaflet of the cell plasma membrane, the interaction between calmodulin and CLS becomes undetectable. These results suggest that the association of calmodulin with L-selectin in the cell can be influenced by the membrane bilayer, and that anionic lipids may modulate ectodomain shedding of transmembrane receptors. PMID:21664913

  5. Kinetic analysis reveals differences in the binding mechanism of calmodulin and calmodulin-like protein to the IQ motifs of myosin-10.

    PubMed

    Caride, Ariel J; Bennett, Richard D; Strehler, Emanuel E

    2010-09-21

    Myo10 is an unconventional myosin with important functions in filopodial motility, cell migration, and cell adhesion. The neck region of Myo10 contains three IQ motifs that bind calmodulin (CaM) or the tissue-restricted calmodulin-like protein (CLP) as light chains. However, little is known about the mechanism of light chain binding to the IQ motifs in Myo10. Binding of CaM and CLP to each IQ motif was assessed by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis and by stopped-flow experiments using fluorescence-labeled CaM and CLP. Although the binding kinetics are different in each case, there are similarities in the mechanism of binding of CaM and CLP to IQ1 and IQ2: for both IQ motifs Ca(2+) increased the binding affinity, mainly by increasing the rate of the forward steps. The general kinetic mechanism comprises a two-step process, which in some cases may involve the binding of a second IQ motif with lower affinity. For IQ3, however, the kinetics of CaM binding is very different from that of CLP. In both cases, binding in the absence of Ca(2+) is poor, and addition of Ca(2+) decreases the K(d) to below 10 nM. However, while the CaM binding kinetics are complex and best fitted by a multistep model, binding of CLP is fitted by a relatively simple two-step model. The results show that, in keeping with growing structural evidence, complexes between CaM or CaM-like myosin light chains and IQ motifs are highly diverse and depend on the specific sequence of the particular IQ motif as well as the light chain.

  6. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Identification of a regulatory autophosphorylation site adjacent to the inhibitory and calmodulin-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Schworer, C M; Colbran, R J; Keefer, J R; Soderling, T R

    1988-09-25

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM-kinase II) autophosphorylated under limiting conditions (7 microM [gamma-32P]ATP, 500 microM magnesium acetate, 4 degrees C) was analyzed by CNBr cleavage and peptide mapping to determine the site of autophosphorylation that brings about transition of the kinase to the Ca2+-independent form. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (C3) revealed one major CN-Br 32P-peptide (CB1) that eluted at about 6% propanol. This peptide contained [32P]threonine, but almost no [32P]serine, and migrated as a single band (Mr = 3000-3500) in polyacrylamide gels run in the presence of urea and sodium dodecyl sulfate. The properties of CB1 were compared to the properties of a 26-residue synthetic peptide containing the CaM-binding and inhibitory domains as well as a consensus phosphorylation sequence (-Arg-Gln-Glu-Thr-) of rat brain CaM-kinase II (residues 282-307 and 283-308 of the alpha and beta subunits, respectively). CB1 and the synthetic peptide comigrated in urea/sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, co-eluted from reverse phase HPLC (C3 and C18) and from Sephadex G-50, and exhibited Ca2+-dependent calmodulin-binding properties. When the two peptides were subjected to automated Edman sequence analysis, both exhibited a burst of 32P release at cycle 5, which is consistent with the expected amino-terminal sequence of the two peptides, i.e. His-Arg-Gln-Glu-Thr(PO4)-. These findings indicate that autophosphorylation of Thr286 (alpha subunit) and Thr287 (beta subunit) is responsible for transition of CaM-kinase II to the Ca2+-independent form. PMID:3417668

  7. Mechanisms of involvement in calmodulin in regulation of affinity for Ca/sup 2 +/ and maximum activity of Ca pump of erythrocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, S.N.; Pokudin, N.I.; Sitozhevskii, A.V.

    1986-06-20

    The activity of the Ca pump of inside-out vesicles of human erythrocyte membranes was studied using /sup 45/Ca and membrane filters. It was found that trifluoperazine completely inhibits the increase in the maximum activity of the Ca pump caused by the addition of calmodulin and has no effect on the calmodulin-stimulated increase in the affinity of the Ca pump for Ca/sup 2 +/. A comparison of characteristic curves of the calmodulin-stimulated components of the activity of the Ca pump, inhibited and not inhibited by trifluoperazine, and the fluorescence intensity of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine in the presence of calmodulin showed that the mechanisms of action of calmodulin on the maximum activity of the Ca pump and its affinity for Ca/sup 2 +/ differ significantly. In the first case the activation was due to the Ca-calmodulin complex and in the second to the calcium-free form of calmodulin. This conclusion is supported by data on the dependence of the activity of the Ca pump on the calmodulin concentration at low and saturating Ca/sup 2 +/ concentrations as well as by the results obtained in the case of moderate treatment of the membranes with trypsin.

  8. Nervous control of ciliary beating by Cl(-), Ca(2+) and calmodulin in Tritonia diomedea.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Owen M; Willows, A O Dennis

    2006-07-01

    In vertebrates, motile cilia line airways, oviducts and ventricles. Invertebrate cilia often control feeding, swimming and crawling, or gliding. Yet control and coordination of ciliary beating remains poorly understood. Evidence from the nudibranch mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, suggests that locomotory ciliated epithelial cells may be under direct electrical control. Here we report that depolarization of ciliated pedal epithelial (CPE) cells increases ciliary beating frequency (CBF), and elicits CBF increases similar to those caused by dopamine and the neuropeptide, TPep-NLS. Further, four CBF stimulants (zero external Cl(-), depolarization, dopamine and TPep-NLS) depend on a common mode of action, viz. Ca(2+) influx, possibly through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, and can be blocked by nifedipine. Ca(2+) influx alone, however, does not provide all the internal Ca(2+) necessary for CBF change. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) channel-gated internal stores are also necessary for CBF excitation. Caffeine can stimulate CBF and is sensitive to the presence of the RyR blocker dantrolene. Dantrolene also reduces CBF excitation induced by dopamine and TPep-NLS. Finally, W-7 and calmidazolium both block CBF excitation by caffeine and dopamine, and W-7 is effective at blocking TPep-NLS excitation. The effects of calmidazolium and W-7 suggest a role for Ca(2+)-calmodulin in regulating CBF, either directly or via Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent kinases or phosphodiesterases. From these results we hypothesize dopamine and TPep-NLS induce depolarization-driven Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+) release from internal stores that activates Ca(2+)-calmodulin, thereby increasing CBF. PMID:16809467

  9. Catalase activity is modulated by calcium and calmodulin in detached mature leaves of sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Afiyanti, Mufidah; Chen, Hsien-Jung

    2014-01-15

    Catalase (CAT) functions as one of the key enzymes in the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and affects the H2O2 homeostasis in plants. In sweet potato, a major catalase isoform was detected, and total catalase activity showed the highest level in mature leaves (L3) compared to immature (L1) and completely yellow, senescent leaves (L5). The major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity were strongly suppressed by ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). This inhibition could be specifically and significantly mitigated in mature L3 leaves by exogenous CaCl2, but not MgCl2 or CoCl2. EGTA also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Furthermore, chlorpromazine (CPZ), a calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor, drastically suppressed the major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity, and this suppression was alleviated by exogenous sweet potato calmodulin (SPCAM) fusion protein in L3 leaves. CPZ also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Protein blot hybridization showed that both anti-catalase SPCAT1 and anti-calmodulin SPCAM antibodies detect a band at the same position, which corresponds to the activity of the major catalase isoform from unboiled, but not boiled crude protein extract of L3 leaves. An inverse correlation between the major catalase isoform/total enzymatic activity and the H2O2 level was also observed. These data suggest that sweet potato CAT activity is modulated by CaCl2 and SPCAM, and plays an important role in H2O2 homeostasis in mature leaves. Association of SPCAM with the major CAT isoform is required and regulates the in-gel CAT activity band.

  10. Autophosphorylation-dependent inactivation of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by the presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain unlike other known calmodulin- dependent kinases. Ca(2+)-Binding to the visinin-like domain leads to autophosphorylation and changes in the affinity for calmodulin [Sathyanarayanan P.V., Cremo C.R. & Poovaiah B.W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422]. Here, we report that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK results in time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. This time-dependent loss of activity or self-inactivation due to autophosphorylation is also dependent on reaction pH and ATP concentration. Inactivation of the enzyme resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme due to self-association. Specifically, autophosphorylation in the presence of 200 microm ATP at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme with a 33% loss in enzyme activity. Under similar conditions at pH 6.5, the enzyme lost 67% of its activity and at pH 8.5, 84% enzyme activity was lost. Furthermore, autophosphorylation at either acidic or alkaline reaction pH lead to the formation of a sedimentable enzyme. Transmission electron microscopic studies on autophosphorylated kinase revealed particles that clustered into branched complexes. The autophosphorylation of wild-type kinase in the presence of AMP-PNP (an unhydrolyzable ATP analog) or the autophosphorylation-site mutant, T267A, did not show formation of branched complexes under the electron microscope. Autophosphorylation- dependent self-inactivation may be a mechanism of modulating the signal transduction pathway mediated by CCaMK.

  11. Resveratrol increases nitric oxide production in the rat thick ascending limb via Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Vicente, Agustin; Cabral, Pablo D; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    The thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle reabsorbs 30% of the NaCl filtered through the glomerulus. Nitric oxide (NO) produced by NO synthase 3 (NOS3) inhibits NaCl absorption by this segment. Resveratrol, a polyphenol, has beneficial cardiovascular and renal effects, many of which are mediated by NO. Resveratrol increases intracellular Ca2+ (Cai) and AMP kinase (AMPK) and NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activities, all of which could activate NO production. We hypothesized that resveratrol stimulates NO production by thick ascending limbs via a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent mechanism. To test this, the effect of resveratrol on NO bioavailability was measured in thick ascending limb suspensions. Cai was measured in single perfused thick ascending limbs. SIRT1 activity and expression were measured in thick ascending limb lysates. Resveratrol (100 µM) increased NO bioavailability in thick ascending limb suspensions by 1.3±0.2 AFU/mg/min (p<0.03). The NOS inhibitor L-NAME blunted resveratrol-stimulated NO bioavailability by 96±11% (p<0.03). The superoxide scavenger tempol had no effect. Resveratrol elevated Cai from 48±7 to 135±24 nM (p<0.01) in single tubules. In Ca2+-free media, the resveratrol-induced increase in NO was blunted by 60±20% (p<0.05) and the rise in Cai reduced by 80%. Calmodulin inhibition prevented the resveratrol-induced increase in NO (p<0.002). AMPK inhibition had no effect. Resveratrol did not increase SIRT1 activity. We conclude that resveratrol increases NO production in thick ascending limbs via a Ca2+/calmodulin dependent mechanism, and SIRT1 and AMPK do not participate. Resveratrol-stimulated NO production in thick ascending limbs may account for part of its beneficial effects.

  12. Resveratrol increases nitric oxide production in the rat thick ascending limb via Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Vicente, Agustin; Cabral, Pablo D; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    The thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle reabsorbs 30% of the NaCl filtered through the glomerulus. Nitric oxide (NO) produced by NO synthase 3 (NOS3) inhibits NaCl absorption by this segment. Resveratrol, a polyphenol, has beneficial cardiovascular and renal effects, many of which are mediated by NO. Resveratrol increases intracellular Ca2+ (Cai) and AMP kinase (AMPK) and NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activities, all of which could activate NO production. We hypothesized that resveratrol stimulates NO production by thick ascending limbs via a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent mechanism. To test this, the effect of resveratrol on NO bioavailability was measured in thick ascending limb suspensions. Cai was measured in single perfused thick ascending limbs. SIRT1 activity and expression were measured in thick ascending limb lysates. Resveratrol (100 µM) increased NO bioavailability in thick ascending limb suspensions by 1.3±0.2 AFU/mg/min (p<0.03). The NOS inhibitor L-NAME blunted resveratrol-stimulated NO bioavailability by 96±11% (p<0.03). The superoxide scavenger tempol had no effect. Resveratrol elevated Cai from 48±7 to 135±24 nM (p<0.01) in single tubules. In Ca2+-free media, the resveratrol-induced increase in NO was blunted by 60±20% (p<0.05) and the rise in Cai reduced by 80%. Calmodulin inhibition prevented the resveratrol-induced increase in NO (p<0.002). AMPK inhibition had no effect. Resveratrol did not increase SIRT1 activity. We conclude that resveratrol increases NO production in thick ascending limbs via a Ca2+/calmodulin dependent mechanism, and SIRT1 and AMPK do not participate. Resveratrol-stimulated NO production in thick ascending limbs may account for part of its beneficial effects. PMID:25314136

  13. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  14. MIPS: a calmodulin-binding protein of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Huiyue; Zang, Xiaonan; Gong, Le; Sun, Hengyi; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2014-08-01

    To study the Ca(2+)/Calmodulin (CaM) signal transduction pathway of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat stress, myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS), a calmodulin-binding protein, was isolated using the yeast two-hybrid system. cDNA and DNA sequences of mips were cloned from G. lemaneiformis by using 5'RACE and genome walking procedures. The MIPS DNA sequence was 2,067 nucleotides long, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,623 nucleotides with no intron. The mips ORF was predicted to encode 540 amino acids, which included the conserved MIPS domain and was 61-67 % similar to that of other species. After analyzing the amino acid sequence of MIPS, the CaM-Binding Domain (CaMBD) was inferred to be at a site spanning from amino acid 212 to amino acid 236. The yeast two-hybrid results proved that MIPS can interact with CaM and that MIPS is a type of calmodulin-binding protein. Next, the expression of CaM and MIPS in wild-type G. lemaneiformis and a heat-tolerant G. lemaneiformis cultivar, "981," were analyzed using real-time PCR under a heat shock of 32 °C. The expression level displayed a cyclical upward trend. Compared with wild type, the CaM expression levels of cultivar 981 were higher, which might directly relate to its resistance to high temperatures. This paper indicates that MIPS and CaM may play important roles in the high-temperature resistance of G. lemaneiformis.

  15. Exome Analyses of Long QT Syndrome Reveal Candidate Pathogenic Mutations in Calmodulin-Interacting Genes.

    PubMed

    Shigemizu, Daichi; Aiba, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Ozaki, Kouichi; Miya, Fuyuki; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Shimizu, Wataru; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an arrhythmogenic disorder that can lead to sudden death. To date, mutations in 15 LQTS-susceptibility genes have been implicated. However, the genetic cause for approximately 20% of LQTS patients remains elusive. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing analyses on 59 LQTS and 61 unaffected individuals in 35 families and 138 unrelated LQTS cases, after genetic screening of known LQTS genes. Our systematic analysis of familial cases and subsequent verification by Sanger sequencing identified 92 candidate mutations in 88 genes for 23 of the 35 families (65.7%): these included eleven de novo, five recessive (two homozygous and three compound heterozygous) and seventy-three dominant mutations. Although no novel commonly mutated gene was identified other than known LQTS genes, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analyses revealed ten new pathogenic candidates that directly or indirectly interact with proteins encoded by known LQTS genes. Furthermore, candidate gene based association studies using an independent set of 138 unrelated LQTS cases and 587 controls identified an additional novel candidate. Together, mutations in these new candidates and known genes explained 37.1% of the LQTS families (13 in 35). Moreover, half of the newly identified candidates directly interact with calmodulin (5 in 11; comparison with all genes; p=0.042). Subsequent variant analysis in the independent set of 138 cases identified 16 variants in the 11 genes, of which 14 were in calmodulin-interacting genes (87.5%). These results suggest an important role of calmodulin and its interacting proteins in the pathogenesis of LQTS. PMID:26132555

  16. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  17. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y T; Feldman, L J

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  18. [Study of the calmodulin-dependent regulation of calcium adenosine triphosphatase of erythrocyte membranes in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Malaia, L T; Petruniaka, V V; Rudyk, Iu S

    1991-01-01

    The inhibitor calmodulin (R 24571) was examined for effects on the activity of red blood cell Ca-ATPases in patients with coronary heart disease during the treatment with nitrates, beta-blockers and calcium antagonists. The maximum activity of Ca-ATPase was measured in the erythrocytes perforated with saponine in the presence of endogenous regulators at a concentration of Ca2+ of 3-5 microM. Patients with high and low Ca-ATPase activity were identified. In the control group R24571 failed to affect Ca-ATPase activity. In patients, the calmodulin inhibitor caused both Ca-ATPase activation and inhibition. The effects of R 24571 correlated with the severity of the patients' condition. In effective therapy, the action of the calmodulin inhibitor became lower on Ca-ATPase activity. It was concluded that there was Ca-ATPase regulation imbalance in patients with coronary heart diseases. PMID:1838226

  19. Postsynaptic long-term enhancement (LTE) by dopamine may be mediated by Ca2+ and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Mochida, S; Libet, B

    1990-04-01

    Long-term enhancement (LTE), of postsynaptic slow depolarizing responses to a muscarinic agonist (MCh), follows a brief exposure of the rabbit superior cervical ganglion to another transmitter, dopamine (DA). Either reduction of external Ca2+ (to 1.0 mM or 0.2 mM) or presence of a specific calmodulin antagonist (calmidazolium at 5 microM) blocked DA induction of this LTE. However, unlike LTP in hippocampus, induction of LTE is not mediated by depolarization-dependent influx of Ca2+.

  20. Calmodulin 4 is dispensable for epidermal barrier formation and wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Juliane C; Kalinin, Alexandr; Bible, Paul W; Morasso, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-mediated signals play important roles in epidermal barrier formation, skin homoeostasis and wound repair. Calmodulin 4 (Calm4) is a small, Ca2+ -binding protein with strong expression in suprabasal keratinocytes. In mice, Calm4 first appears in the skin at the time of barrier formation, and its expression increases in response to epidermal barrier challenges. In this study, we report the generation of Calm4 knockout mice and provide evidence that Calm4 is dispensable for epidermal barrier formation, maintenance and repair. PMID:25316000

  1. A calcium/calmodulin-regulated member of the receptor-like kinase family confers cold tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianbao; Chaudhuri, Shubho; Yang, Lihua; Du, Liqun; Poovaiah, B W

    2010-03-01

    Cold is a limiting environmental factor that adversely affects plant growth and productivity. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is believed to play a pivotal role in plant response to cold stress, but its exact role is not clearly understood. Here, we report that CRLK1, a novel calcium/calmodulin-regulated receptor-like kinase, is crucial for cold tolerance in plants. CRLK1 has two calmodulin-binding sites with different affinities as follows: one located at residues 369-390 with a K(d) of 25 nm, and the other located at residues 28-112 with a K(d) of 160 nm. Calcium/calmodulin stimulated the kinase activity, but the addition of chlorpromazine, a calmodulin antagonist, blocked its stimulation. CRLK1 is mainly localized in the plasma membrane, and its expression is stimulated by cold and hydrogen peroxide treatments. Under normal growth conditions, there is no noticeable phenotypic difference between wild-type and crlk1 knock-out mutant plants. However, as compared with wild-type plants, the crlk1 knock-out mutants exhibited an increased sensitivity to chilling and freezing temperatures. Northern analysis showed that the induction of cold-responsive genes, including CBF1, RD29A, COR15a, and KIN1 in crlk1 mutants, is delayed as compared with wild-type plants. These results indicate that CRLK1 is a positive regulator of cold tolerance in plants. Furthermore, our results suggest that CRLK1 plays a role in bridging calcium/calmodulin signaling and cold signaling.

  2. Chimeric plant calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase gene with a neural visinin-like calcium-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Patil, S; Takezawa, D; Poovaiah, B W

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca2+ and Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca(2+)-binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca(2+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approximately 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, 45Ca-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca2+. The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca2+ signaling in plants. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7761420

  3. Binding of calmodulin changes the calcineurin regulatory region to a less dynamic conformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Cuiping; Zhang, Junting; Zheng, Ye; Xu, Hongbing; Yu, Shaoning

    2015-08-01

    Calcineurin (CN) is a Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) activated serine/threonine phosphatase, and its regulatory region (CNRR) plays a critical role in the coupling of Ca(2+) signals to cellular responses. Ca(2+)/CaM binds to the CNRR, resulting in a conformational change that removes an autoinhibitory domain (CN467-486) from the active site of the phosphatase and activates the enzyme. However, almost the entire regulatory region (CN374-521) is not visible in the electron density maps of reported structures. In this study, we produced separate CN fragments corresponding to the CNRR (CNRR381-521, CN residues 381-521) and determined the binding affinity of CNRR381-521 for Ca(2+)/CaM using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The structural change in CNRR381-521 induced by Ca(2+)/CaM binding was also investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results indicate that Ca(2+)/CaM binding to CNRR381-521 is an exothermic reaction with a dissociation constant of 2.0×10(-6) M. Binding of calmodulin changes the calcineurin regulatory region to a less dynamic conformation. PMID:25956027

  4. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-01-01

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca[sup ++] as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca[sup ++]/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  5. Isolation of Hybridomas for Golgi-associated Proteins and a Plant Calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmanoff, K. M.; Ray, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    The demonstration of a role for calcium in the mechanism of the gravitropic response indicates a role for calmodulin. Localization studies indicate that plant cell walls have a high content of calmodulin which suggests a regulatory role for CaM in both gravitropic curvature and auxin-induced growth. Auxin regulation of cell wall loosening and elongation is the basis for most models of this phenomenon. Auxin treatment of pea stem tissue rapidly increases the ctivity of Golgi-localized B-1,4-glucan synthase (GS), an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of wall xyloglucan which apparently constitutes the substrate for the wall loosening process. In order to determine whether auxin stimulates GS activity either by modulation of existing enzyme or induces de novo formation of Golgi glucan synthase, a study was undertaken to isolate and quantitate glucan synthase. This enzyme appears to be an integral protein of the Golgi membrane and has resisted isolation with retention of activity. The production of monoclonal antibody for glucan synthase was undertaken due to the inability to isolate GS by standard detergent/liposome techniques.

  6. Multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase is necessary for nuclear envelope breakdown

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The role of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) in nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB) was investigated in sea urchin eggs. The eggs contain a 56-kD polypeptide which appears to be a homologue of neuronal CaM kinase. For example, it undergoes Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent autophosphorylation that converts it to a Ca2(+)-independent species, a hallmark of multifunctional CaM kinase. It is homologous to the alpha subunit of rat brain CaM kinase. Autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation by the sea urchin egg kinase are inhibited in vitro by CaMK(273-302), a synthetic peptide corresponding to the autoinhibitory domain of the neuronal CaM kinase. This peptide inhibited NEB when microinjected into sea urchin eggs. Only one mAb to the neuronal enzyme immunoprecipitated the 56-kD polypeptide. Only this antibody blocked or significantly delayed NEB when microinjected into sea urchin eggs. These results suggest that sea urchin eggs contain multifunctional CaM kinase, and that this enzyme is involved in the control of NEB during mitotic division. PMID:2229172

  7. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the interaction of melatonin with calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Adrián G.; Estrin, Darío A.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.; McCormick, John E.; Martin, Stephen R.; Pastore, Annalisa; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R.; Martorana, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Pineal hormone melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is thought to modulate the calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway either by changing intracellular Ca2+ concentration via activation of its G-protein–coupled membrane receptors, or through a direct interaction with calmodulin (CaM). The present work studies the direct interaction of melatonin with intact calcium-saturated CaM both experimentally, by fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and theoretically, by molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the interaction is calcium-dependent. The affinity, as obtained from monitoring 15N and 1H chemical shift changes for a melatonin titration, is weak (in the millimolar range) and comparable for the N- and C-terminal domains. Partial replacement of diamagnetic Ca2+ by paramagnetic Tb3+ allowed the measurement of interdomain NMR pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings, indicating that each domain movement in the complex is not correlated with the other one. Molecular dynamics simulations allow us to follow the dynamics of melatonin in the binding pocket of CaM. Overall, this study provides an example of how a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches can shed light on a weakly interacting system of biological and pharmacological significance. PMID:15498938

  8. Calmodulin-Mediated Signal Transduction Pathways in Arabidopsis Are Fine-Tuned by Methylation[W

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Joydeep; Magnani, Roberta; Nair, Meera; Dirk, Lynnette M.; DeBolt, Seth; Maiti, Indu B.; Houtz, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Calmodulin N-methyltransferase (CaM KMT) is an evolutionarily conserved enzyme in eukaryotes that transfers three methyl groups to a highly conserved lysyl residue at position 115 in calmodulin (CaM). We sought to elucidate whether the methylation status of CaM plays a role in CaM-mediated signaling pathways by gene expression analyses of CaM KMT and phenotypic characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana lines wherein CaM KMT was overexpressed (OX), partially silenced, or knocked out. CaM KMT was expressed in discreet spatial and tissue-specific patterns, most notably in root tips, floral buds, stamens, apical meristems, and germinating seeds. Analysis of transgenic plants with genetic dysfunction in CaM KMT revealed a link between the methylation status of CaM and root length. Plants with suppressed CaM methylation had longer roots and CaM KMT OX lines had shorter roots than wild type (Columbia-0). CaM KMT was also found to influence the root radial developmental program. Protein microarray analyses revealed a number of proteins with specificity for methylated forms of CaM, providing candidate functional intermediates between the observed phenotypes and the target pathways. This work demonstrates that the functionality of the large CaM family in plants is fine-tuned by an overarching methylation mechanism. PMID:24285794

  9. Drosophila calmodulin mutants with specific defects in the musculature or in the nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Sullivan, Kathleen M C; Beckingham, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    We have studied lethal mutations in the single calmodulin gene (Cam) of Drosophila to gain insight into the in vivo functions of this important calcium sensor. As a result of maternal calmodulin (CaM) in the mature egg, lethality is delayed until the postembryonic stages. Prior to death in the first larval instar, Cam nulls show a striking behavioral abnormality (spontaneous backward movement) whereas a mutation, Cam7, that results in a single amino acid change (V91G) produces a very different phenotype: short indented pupal cases and pupal death with head eversion defects. We show here that the null behavioral phenotype originates in the nervous system and involves a CaM function that requires calcium binding to all four sites of the protein. Further, backward movement can be induced in hypomorphic mutants by exposure to high light levels. In contrast, the V91G mutation specifically affects the musculature and causes abnormal calcium release in response to depolarization of the muscles. Genetic interaction studies suggest that failed regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor, is the major defect underlying the Cam7 phenotype. PMID:14668380

  10. Calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, kinases, and transcriptional corepressors involved in T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun O.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The second messenger calcium plays an essential role in mediating the TCR signaling pathway leading to cytokine production and T cell clonal expansion. The immunosuppressive drugs cyclosproin A (CsA) and FK506 have served both as therapeutic agents and as molecular probes for unraveling the protein phosphatase calcineurin as a rate-limiting enzyme involved in the transmission of calcium signal from the cytosol into the nucleus to reprogram gene expression. The use of mouse knockout models has helped to verify and further elucidate the functions of different isoforms of calcineurin in both helper T cell activation and thymocyte development. In addition to calcineurin, three other classes of calmodulin-binding proteins have also been shown to play important roles in calcium signaling in T cells. Thus, Cabin1 and class II HDACs have been found to constitute a novel calcium-signaling module in conjunction with the transcription factor myocyte enhance factor family and the transcriptional coactivator p300 to suppress and activate cytokine gene transcription in a calcium-dependent manner. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) II and IV were also shown to play negative and positive regulatory functions, respectively, in TCR-mediated cytokine production. The crosstalks among these and other signal transducers in T cells form an extensive non-linear signaling network that dictates the final outcome of the TCR signaling pathway. PMID:19290928

  11. Crystal Structure of Calmodulin Binding Domain of Orai1 in Complex with Ca2+•Calmodulin Displays a Unique Binding Mode*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanshun; Zheng, Xunhai; Mueller, Geoffrey A.; Sobhany, Mack; DeRose, Eugene F.; Zhang, Yingpei; London, Robert E.; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    Orai1 is a plasma membrane protein that in its tetrameric form is responsible for calcium influx from the extracellular environment into the cytosol in response to interaction with the Ca2+-depletion sensor STIM1. This is followed by a fast Ca2+·calmodulin (CaM)-dependent inhibition, resulting from CaM binding to an Orai1 region called the calmodulin binding domain (CMBD). The interaction between Orai1 and CaM at the atomic level remains unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a CaM·Orai1-CMBD complex showing one CMBD bound to the C-terminal lobe of CaM, differing from other CaM-target protein complexes, in which both N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM (CaM-N and CaM-C) are involved in target binding. Orai1-CMBD binds CaM-C mainly through hydrophobic interactions, primarily involving residue Trp76 of Orai1-CMBD, which interacts with the hydrophobic pocket of CaM-C. However, NMR data, isothermal titration calorimetry data, and pulldown assays indicated that CaM-N and CaM-C both can bind Orai1-CMBD, with CaM-N having ∼4 times weaker affinity than CaM-C. Pulldown assays of a Orai1-CMBD(W76E) mutant, gel filtration chromatography data, and NOE signals indicated that CaM-N and CaM-C can each bind one Orai1-CMBD. Thus our studies support an unusual, extended 1:2 binding mode of CaM to Orai1-CMBDs, and quantify the affinity of Orai1 for CaM. We propose a two-step mechanism for CaM-dependent Orai1 inactivation initiated by binding of the C-lobe of CaM to the CMBD of one Orai1 followed by the binding of the N-lobe of CaM to the CMBD of a neighboring Orai1. PMID:23109337

  12. Possible role of calmodulin in renin secretion from isolated rat kidneys and renal cells: studies with trifluoperazine.

    PubMed

    Fray, J C; Lush, D J; Share, D S; Valentine, A N

    1983-10-01

    Trifluoperazine, an inhibitor of calmodulin and calmodulin-directed secretion, was used to examine a possible role of calmodulin in renin secretion from isolated perfused kidneys and renal cortical cells. In isolated perfused kidneys trifluoperazine stimulated basal renin secretion in a dose-dependent manner, with 10 microM causing no stimulation and 50 microM causing 167% increase. Trifluoperazine potentiated the elevated renin secretion induced by isoprenaline and low Ca in isolated kidneys. In renal cortical cells trifluoperazine increased basal renin secretion and potentiated the secretion induced by Ca omission. Cells homogenized immediately after 1 h exposure to trifluoperazine had a substantial reduction in soluble renin without any effect on the change in granular renin. In the absence of trifluoperazine, soluble renin increased with O Ca and decreased with 1.5 mM-Ca. It is concluded that trifluoperazine stimulates renin secretion by a cellular mechanism possibly at the level of the juxtaglomerular cell. It is suggested that the role of trifluoperazine, and by inference calmodulin, in the secretion of renin may be quite different from its role in secretion of several other substances.

  13. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B is responsible for its specific interactions with Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Nolet, Ryan P.; Calvert, Richard J.; Anderson, Lucy M.; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    K-Ras4B belongs to the family of p21 Ras GTPases, which play an important role in cell proliferation, survival and motility. The p21 Ras proteins such as K-Ras4B, K-Ras4A, H-Ras, and N-Ras, share 85% sequence homology and activate very similar signaling pathways. Only the C-terminal hypervariable regions differ significantly. A growing body of literature demonstrates that each Ras isoform possesses unique functions in normal physiological processes as well as in pathogenesis. One of the central questions in the field of Ras biology is how these very similar proteins achieve such remarkable specificity in protein-protein interactions that regulate signal transduction pathways. Here we explore specific binding of K-Ras4B to calmodulin. Using NMR techniques and isothermal titration calorimetry we demonstrate that the hypervariable region of K-Ras contributes in a major way to the interaction with calmodulin while the catalytic domain of K-Ras4B provides a way to control the interaction by nucleotide binding. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B binds specifically to the C-terminal domain of Ca2+-loaded calmodulin with micromolar affinity, while the GTP-γ-S loaded catalytic domain of K-Ras4B may interact with the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. PMID:19583261

  14. Alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation is required for memory consolidation-specific transcription.

    PubMed

    von Hertzen, Laura S J; Giese, K Peter

    2005-08-22

    Autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II switches the kinase into an autonomous activity mode. This molecular switch is important for hippocampal long-term memory formation, which requires de novo gene transcription and protein synthesis. Here, we have studied whether auto-phosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is required for gene transcription induced in the hippocampus by contextual fear conditioning. We have shown that upregulation of a nonassociative transcript, the serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase-1 messenger RNA, is normal in alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation-deficient mutant mice, whereas upregulation of an associative transcript, the nerve growth factor-inducible gene B messenger RNA, is impaired. Thus, we suggest that autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is a biochemical switch that regulates association-specific consolidation processes. PMID:16056150

  15. A protein/peptide assay using peptide-resin adduct: application to the calmodulin/RS20 complex.

    PubMed

    Guimard, L; Afshar, M; Haiech, J; Calas, B

    1994-08-15

    To obtain equilibrium and kinetic constants of a protein/peptide complex, we have developed a rapid procedure which uses peptides specifically linked to a resin. With this peptide-resin adduct, bound and free 125I-labeled protein could be easily separated by simple centrifugation. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated with the calmodulin/RS20 complex, where RS20 is the putative calmodulin binding peptide of the smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK). In addition to the wild-type calmodulin (SYNCAM) expressed in Escherichia coli, we also examined calmodulin mutants with charge reversals called SYNCAM12A (DEE 118-120-->KKK) and SYNCAM18A (EEE 82-84-->KKK and DEE 118-120-->KKK). The kinetic analysis of the interaction between SYNCAM and RS20 associated with titration experiments allowed us to measure dissociation constants (KD) in the range of 10(-9) M, in good agreement with previously published data. Moreover, the binding assays showed that SYN-CAM18A did not interact with RS20, whereas SYN-CAM12A did with a KD around 10(-8) M. The lack of binding of SYNCAM18A to RS20 provides an explanation for the lack of smMLCK activation by SYNCAM18A. Altogether, these results demonstrate that peptide-resin can be used as a tool for separating bound from free protein, thus enabling a rapid and reliable quantification of the protein/peptide interaction.

  16. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B is responsible for its specific interactions with calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sherwin J; Nolet, Ryan P; Calvert, Richard J; Anderson, Lucy M; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2009-08-18

    K-Ras4B belongs to the family of p21 Ras GTPases, which play an important role in cell proliferation, survival, and motility. The p21 Ras proteins, such as K-Ras4B, K-Ras4A, H-Ras, and N-Ras, share 85% sequence homology and activate very similar signaling pathways. Only the C-terminal hypervariable regions differ significantly. A growing body of literature demonstrates that each Ras isoform possesses unique functions in normal physiological processes as well as in pathogenesis. One of the central questions in the field of Ras biology is how these very similar proteins achieve such remarkable specificity in protein-protein interactions that regulate signal transduction pathways. Here we explore specific binding of K-Ras4B to calmodulin. Using NMR techniques and isothermal titration calorimetry, we demonstrate that the hypervariable region of K-Ras4B contributes in a major way to the interaction with calmodulin, while the catalytic domain of K-Ras4B provides a way to control the interaction by nucleotide binding. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B binds specifically to the C-terminal domain of Ca(2+)-loaded calmodulin with micromolar affinity, while the GTP-gamma-S-loaded catalytic domain of K-Ras4B may interact with the N-terminal domain of calmodulin.

  17. SPLICE VARIANT SPECIFIC UPREGULATIONOF CA+2/CALMODULIN DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE 1G BY PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides induce neurotoxicity in mammals by interfering with ion channel function in excitable neuronal membranes. Previous work demonstrated dose-dependent increases in expression of Ca+2/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (Camk1g) mRNA following acute deltameth...

  18. The C-terminal 165 amino acids of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase confer Ca2+/calmodulin sensitivity on the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, T; Takeyasu, K

    1995-01-01

    The C-terminal 165 amino acids of the rat brain plasma membrane (PM) Ca(2+)-ATPase II containing the calmodulin binding auto-inhibitory domain was connected to the C-terminus of the ouabain sensitive chicken Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit. Expression of this chimeric molecule in ouabain resistant mouse L cells was assured by the high-affinity binding of [3H]ouabain. In the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin, this chimeric molecule exhibited ouabain inhibitable Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity; the putative chimeric ATPase activity was absent in the absence of Ca2+/calmodulin and activated by Ca2+/calmodulin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, this chimeric molecule could bind monoclonal IgG 5 specific to the chicken Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit only in the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin, suggesting that the epitope for IgG 5 in this chimera is masked in the absence of Ca2+/calmodulin and uncovered in their presence. These results propose a direct interaction between the calmodulin binding auto-inhibitory domain of the PM Ca(2+)-ATPase and the specific regions of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit that are structurally homologous to the PM Ca(2+)-ATPase. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed several possible regions within the Na+,K(+)-ATPase that might interact with the auto-inhibitory domain of the PM Ca(2+)-ATPase. Images PMID:7828596

  19. Interaction of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase with a homolog of eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    A chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was previously cloned and characterized in this laboratory. To investigate the biological functions of CCaMK, the yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with CCaMK. One of the cDNA clones obtained from the screening (LlEF-1alpha1) has high similarity with the eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha). CCaMK phosphorylated LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The phosphorylation site for CCaMK (Thr-257) was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, Thr-257 is located in the putative tRNA-binding region of LlEF-1alpha1. An isoform of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) phosphorylated multiple sites of LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-dependent but calmodulin-independent manner. Unlike CDPK, CCaMK phosphorylated only one site, and this site is different from CDPK phosphorylation sites. This suggests that the phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by these two kinases may have different functional significance. Although the phosphorylation of LlEF-1alpha1 by CCaMK is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, in vitro binding assays revealed that CCaMK binds to LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-independent manner. This was further substantiated by coimmunoprecipitation of CCaMK and EF-1alpha using the protein extract from lily anthers. Dissociation of CCaMK from EF-1alpha by Ca2+ and phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by CCaMK in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner suggests that these interactions may play a role in regulating the biological functions of EF-1alpha.

  20. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  1. Hydrophobic Peptides Affect Binding of Calmodulin and Ca2+ as Explored by H/D Amide Exchange and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sperry, Justin B.; Huang, Richard Y-C.; Zhu, Mei M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous intracellular sensor protein, binds Ca2+ and interacts with various targets as part of signal transduction. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/DX) and a high resolution PLIMSTEX (Protein-Ligand Interactions by Mass Spectrometry, Titration, and H/D Exchange) protocol, we examined five different states of calmodulin: calcium-free, calcium-loaded, and three states of calcium-loaded in the presence of either melittin, mastoparan, or skeletal myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK). When CaM binds Ca2+, the extent of HDX decreased, consistent with the protein becoming stabilized upon binding. Furthermore, Ca2+-saturated calmodulin exhibits increased protection when bound to the peptides, forming high affinity complexes. The protocol reveals significant changes in EF hands 1, 3, and 4 with saturating levels of Ca2+. Titration of the protein using PLIMSTEX provides the binding affinity of Ca2+ to calmodulin within previously reported values. The affinities of calmodulin to Ca2+ increase by factors of 300 and 1000 in the presence of melittin and mastoparan, respectively. A modified PLIMSTEX protocol whereby the protein is digested to component peptides gives a region-specific titration. The titration data taken in this way show a decrease in the root mean square fit of the residuals, indicating a better fit of the data. The global H/D exchange results and those obtained in a region-specific way provide new insight into the Ca2+-binding properties of this well-studied protein. PMID:21765646

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Calcium- and Phosphorylation-dependentCalmodulin Complexes in Mammalian Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Wang, Daojing

    2006-05-26

    Protein conformational changes due to cofactor binding (e.g. metal ions, heme) and/or posttranslational modifications (e.g. phosphorylation) modulate dynamic protein complexes. Calmodulin (CaM) plays an essential role in regulating calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) signaling and homeostasis. No systematic approach on the identification of phosphorylation-dependent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM binding proteins has been published. Herein, we report a proteome-wide study of phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins from mammalian cells. This method, termed 'Dynamic Phosphoprotein Complex Trapping', 'DPPC Trapping' for short, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays. The basic strategy is to drastically shift the equilibrium towards endogenous phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr at the global scale by inhibiting corresponding phosphatases in vivo. The phosphorylation-dependent calmodulin-binding proteins are then trapped in vitro in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. Finally, the isolated calmodulin-binding proteins are separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by LC/MS/MS. In parallel, the phosphorylation-dependent binding is visualized by silver staining and/or Western blotting. Using this method, we selectively identified over 120 CaM-associated proteins including many previously uncharacterized. We verified ubiquitin-protein ligase EDD1, inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (IP{sub 3}R1), and ATP-dependent RNA helicase DEAD box protein 3 (DDX3), as phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins. To demonstrate the utilities of our method in understanding biological pathways, we showed that pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 in vivo by staurosporine-sensitive kinase(s), but not by PKA/PKG/PKC, significantly reduced the affinity of its Ca{sup 2+}-dependent CaM binding. However, pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 did not substantially affect its Ca{sup 2+}-independent CaM binding. We further showed that phosphatase PP1, but not PP2A or PP2B, plays a critical role in

  3. Role of coated vesicles, microfilaments, and calmodulin in receptor- mediated endocytosis by cultured B lymphoblastoid cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Cell surface receptor IgM molecules of cultured human lymlphoblastoid cells (WiL2) patch and redistribute into a cap over the Golgi region of the cell after treatment with multivalent anti-IgM antibodies. During and after the redistribution, ligand-receptor clusters are endocytosed into coated pits and coated vesicles. Morphometric analysis of the distribution of ferritin-labeled ligand at EM resolution reveals the following sequence of events in the endocytosis of cell surface IgM: (a) binding of the multivalent ligand in a diffuse cell surface distribution, (b) clustering of the ligand-receptor complexes, (c) recruitment of clathrin coats to the cytoplasmic surface of the cell membrane opposite ligand-receptor clusters, (d) assembly and (e) internalization of coated vesicles, and (f) delivery of label into a large vesicular compartment, presumably partly lysosomal. Most of the labeled ligand enters this pathway. The recruitment of clathrin coats to the membrane opposite ligand-receptor clusters is sensitive to the calmodulin-directed drug Stelazine (trifluoperazine dihydrochloride). In addition, Stelazine inhibits an alternate pathway of endocytosis that does not involve coated vesicle formation. The actin-directed drug dihydrocytochalasin B has no effect on the recruitment of clathrin to the ligand-receptor clusters and the formation of coated pits and little effect on the alternate pathway, but this drug does interfere with subsequent coated vesicle formation and it inhibits capping. Cortical microfilaments that decorate with heavy meromyosin with constant polarity are observed in association with the coated regions of the plasma membrane and with coated vesicles. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of a coated vesicle preparation isolated from WiL2 cells demonstrates that the major polypeptides in the fraction are a 175-kdalton component that comigrates with calf brain clathrin, a 42- kdalton component that comigrates with rabbit muscle actin and a

  4. A continuous spectrophotometric assay for the activation of plant NAD kinase by calmodulin, calcium(II), and europium(III) ions.

    PubMed

    Amann, B T; Mulqueen, P; Horrocks, W D

    1992-12-01

    A continuous spectrophotometric assay has been developed to quantify the calmodulin, calcium(II) ion, and europium(III) ion dependence of the activation of NAD kinase from pea seedlings. Experimental enzyme activation data are compared with the theoretical curves for the binding of calcium(II) ions to the individual calcium binding sites of calmodulin. These results indicate that the binding of three calcium(II) ions is necessary for activation of plant NAD kinase. Further studies demonstrate that europium(III) ions can replace calcium(II) ions in calmodulin with retention of its ability to activate NAD kinase.

  5. Molecular dynamics studies on the effect of trifluoperazine in the Ca 2+ binding process of calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun Sung; Kang, Nam Sook; Jhon, Mu Shik

    1996-06-01

    A detailed investigation of the binding of trifluoperazine (TFP) to calmodulin (CAM) can give information on the loop-selectivity of the first Ca 2+ binding and determination of Ca 2+ cooperativity in the N-terminal domain. This information has been obtained by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations. By using interactive computer graphics, seven models for CAM are constructed according to sequential Ca 2+ occupancy and TFP occupancy. Analysis of the resulting structure shows that the binding site of the first Ca 2+ in the N-terminal domain is EFII rather than EFI. Electrostatic interactions between each Ca 2+ and its opposite loop play an important role in the cooperativity. TFP increases the Ca 2+ affinity and Ca 2+ cooperativity, and TFP prefers to bind to CAM with three rather than four bound Ca 2+ ions.

  6. Quantitation of chlorpromazine-bound calmodulin during chlorpromazine inhibition of gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.; Biro, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM), controls the activity of a plasma membrane localized ATPase in plants which serves to pump calcium out of cells. Recent data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of this pump is one of the early steps necessary for gravitropism. Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a CaM antagonist, reversibly inhibits gravitropism in oat coleoptiles at concentrations which permit normal growth rates. C-14-labeled CPZ was used to photo-affinity label endogenous CaM in vivo to learn whether the drug is actually binding to some portion of endogenous CaM when it inhibits gravitropism. Under conditions in which CPZ inhibits gravitropism for over an hour, at least 11% of the CaM in gravitropically stimulated coleoptiles is bound to CPZ. In a given CPZ experiment the degree of inhibition of gravitropism correlates well with the amount of CaM bound to CPZ.

  7. Genotyping species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex by PCR-RFLP of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2014-04-01

    Sporotrichosis is one of the most common subcutaneous mycosis in Latin America and is caused by 4 pathogenic thermodimorphic fungi in the genus Sporothrix. From both therapeutic and epidemiological perspectives, it is essential to identify the causative agents down to the species level. Traditional parameters may overlap among closely related species, and we propose polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) as an alternative approach. In the present study, the calmodulin gene was amplified and digested with HhaI to yield 5 different electrophoretic patterns representing all medically important Sporothrix species: Sporothrix brasiliensis, Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto, Sporothrix globosa, and Sporothrix luriei. The PCR-RFLP protocol described here is a simple and inexpensive method and is highly suitable for accurate routine genotyping of relevant Sporothrix species.

  8. Assembly and Calcium Binding Properties of Quantum Dot-Calmodulin Calcium Sensor.

    PubMed

    Eun, Su-yong; Nguyen-ta, Kim; Yoo, Hoon; Silva, Gabriel A; Kim, Soon-jong

    2016-02-01

    We have developed the first nanoengineered quantum dot molecular complex designed to measure changes of calcium ion (Ca2+) concentration at high spatial and temporal resolutions in real time. The sensor is ratiometric and composed of three components: a quantum dot (QD) emitting at 620 nm as a fluorescence donor, an organic dye (Alexa Fluor 647) as a fluorescence acceptor, and a calmodulin-M13 (CaM-M13) protein part as a calcium sensing component. In this work, we have determined the maximal number of CaM-M13 required for saturating a single QD particle to be approximately 16. The dissociation constant, Kd of the QD-based calcium ion sensor was also estimated to be around 30 microM. PMID:27433729

  9. The Ca(2+)/Calmodulin/CaMKK2 Axis: Nature's Metabolic CaMshaft.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, Kathrina L; Means, Anthony R; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an essential ligand that binds its primary intracellular receptor calmodulin (CaM) to trigger a variety of downstream processes and pathways. Central to the actions of Ca(2+)/CaM is the activation of a highly conserved Ca(2+)/CaM kinase (CaMK) cascade that amplifies Ca(2+) signals through a series of subsequent phosphorylation events. Proper regulation of Ca(2+) flux is necessary for whole-body metabolism and disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis has been linked to various metabolic diseases. Here we provide a synthesis of recent advances that highlight the roles of the Ca(2+)/CaMK axis in key metabolic tissues. An appreciation of this information is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent signaling contributes to metabolic homeostasis and disease.

  10. Calcium and Calmodulin-Mediated Regulation of Gene Expression in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Chul; Chung, Woo Sik; Yun, Dae-Jin; Cho, Moo Je

    2009-01-01

    Sessile plants have developed a very delicate system to sense diverse kinds of endogenous developmental cues and exogenous environmental stimuli by using a simple Ca2+ ion. Calmodulin (CaM) is the predominant Ca2+ sensor and plays a crucial role in decoding the Ca2+ signatures into proper cellular responses in various cellular compartments in eukaryotes. A growing body of evidence points to the importance of Ca2+ and CaM in the regulation of the transcriptional process during plant responses to endogenous and exogenous stimuli. Here, we review recent progress in the identification of transcriptional regulators modulated by Ca2+ and CaM and in the assessment of their functional significance during plant signal transduction in response to biotic and abiotic stresses and developmental cues. PMID:19529824

  11. Allosteric mechanism of water channel gating by Ca2+–calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Reichow, Steve L.; Clemens, Daniel M.; Freites, J. Alfredo; Németh-Cahalan, Karin L.; Heyden, Matthias; Tobias, Douglas J.; Hall, James E.; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a universal regulatory protein that communicates the presence of calcium to its molecular targets and correspondingly modulates their function. This key signaling protein is important for controlling the activity of hundreds of membrane channels and transporters. However, our understanding of the structural mechanisms driving CaM regulation of full-length membrane proteins has remained elusive. In this study, we determined the pseudo-atomic structure of full-length mammalian aquaporin-0 (AQP0, Bos Taurus) in complex with CaM using electron microscopy to understand how this signaling protein modulates water channel function. Molecular dynamics and functional mutation studies reveal how CaM binding inhibits AQP0 water permeability by allosterically closing the cytoplasmic gate of AQP0. Our mechanistic model provides new insight, only possible in the context of the fully assembled channel, into how CaM regulates multimeric channels by facilitating cooperativity between adjacent subunits. PMID:23893133

  12. PEP-19, an Intrinsically Disordered Regulator of Calmodulin Signaling*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kleerekoper, Quinn K.; Putkey, John A.

    2009-01-01

    PEP-19 is a small calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein that greatly increases the rates of association and dissociation of Ca2+ from the C-domain of CaM, an effect that is mediated by an acidic/IQ sequence in PEP-19. We show here using NMR that PEP-19 is an intrinsically disordered protein, but with residual structure localized to its acidic/IQ motif. We also show that the kon and koff rates for binding PEP-19 to apo-CaM are at least 50-fold slower than for binding to Ca2+-CaM. These data indicate that intrinsic disorder confers plasticity that allows PEP-19 to bind to either apo- or Ca2+-CaM via different structural modes, and that complex formation may be facilitated by conformational selection of residual structure in the acidic/IQ sequence. PMID:19106096

  13. Interaction between p68 RNA helicase and Ca2+-calmodulin promotes cell migration and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haizhen; Gao, Xueliang; Yang, Jenny J.; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Summary p68 RNA helicase is a prototypical RNA helicase. Here we present evidence to show that, by interacting with Ca-calmodulin (CaM), p68 plays a role in cancer metastasis and cell migration. A peptide fragment that spans the IQ motif of p68 strongly inhibits cancer metastasis in two different animal models. The peptide interrupts p68 and CaM interaction and inhibits cell migration. Our results demonstrate that the p68-CaM interaction is essential for the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia in migrating cells. p68 interacts with microtubules in the presence of CaM. Our experiments show that interaction with microtubules stimulates p68 ATPase activity. Further, microtubule gliding assays demonstrate that p68, in the presence of CaM, can function as a microtubule motor. This motor activity may allow p68 to transport CaM to the leading edge of migrating cells. PMID:23322042

  14. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Bokhovchuk, Fedir M; Vuister, Geerten W

    2012-06-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal C-terminal fragment of the channels (de Groot et al. in Mol Cell Biol 31:2845-2853, 12). Here, we investigate this binding in detail and find significant differences between TRPV5 and TRPV6. We also identify and characterize in vitro four other CaM binding fragments of TRPV5/6, which likely are also involved in TRPV5/6 channel regulation. The five CaM binding sites display diversity in binding modes, binding stoichiometries and binding affinities, which may fine-tune the response of the channels to varying Ca(2+)-concentrations. PMID:22354706

  15. A pollen-specific calmodulin-binding protein, NPG1, interacts with putative pectate lyases

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung-Bong; Golovkin, Maxim; Reddy, Anireddy S. N.

    2014-01-01

    Previous genetic studies have revealed that a pollen-specific calmodulin-binding protein, No Pollen Germination 1 (NPG1), is required for pollen germination. However, its mode of action is unknown. Here we report direct interaction of NPG1 with pectate lyase-like proteins (PLLs). A truncated form of AtNPG1 lacking the N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat 1 (TPR1) failed to interact with PLLs, suggesting that it is essential for NPG1 interaction with PLLs. Localization studies with AtNPG1 fused to a fluorescent reporter driven by its native promoter revealed its presence in the cytosol and cell wall of the pollen grain and the growing pollen tube of plasmolyzed pollen. Together, our data suggest that the function of NPG1 in regulating pollen germination is mediated through its interaction with PLLs, which may modify the pollen cell wall and regulate pollen tube emergence and growth. PMID:24919580

  16. Interaction of a plant pseudo-response regulator with a calmodulin-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Perochon, Alexandre; Dieterle, Stefan; Pouzet, Cecile; Aldon, Didier; Galaud, Jean-Philippe

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} The pseudo-response regulator PRR2 specifically binds CML9, a calmodulin-like protein {yields} The interaction is confirmed in plant cell nuclei {yields} The interaction requires an intact PRR2 protein. -- Abstract: Calmodulin (CaM) plays a crucial role in the regulation of diverse cellular processes by modulating the activities of numerous target proteins. Plants possess an extended CaM family including numerous CaM-like proteins (CMLs), most of which appear to be unique to plants. We previously demonstrated a role for CML9 in abiotic stress tolerance and seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. We report here the isolation of PRR2, a pseudo-response regulator as a CML9 interacting protein by screening an expression library prepared from Arabidopsis seedlings with CML9 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid system. PRR2 is similar to the response regulators of the two-component system, but lacks the invariant residue required for phosphorylation by which response regulators switch their output response, suggesting the existence of alternative regulatory mechanisms. PRR2 was found to bind CML9 and closely related CMLs but not a canonical CaM. Mapping analyses indicate that an almost complete form of PRR2 is required for interaction with CML9, suggesting a recognition mode different from the classical CaM-target peptide complex. PRR2 contains several features that are typical of transcription factors, including a GARP DNA recognition domain, a Pro-rich region and a Golden C-terminal box. PRR2 and CML9 as fusion proteins with fluorescent tags co-localized in the nucleus of plant cells, and their interaction in the nuclear compartment was validated in planta by using a fluorophore-tagged protein interaction assay. These findings suggest that binding of PRR2 to CML9 may be an important mechanism to modulate the physiological role of this transcription factor in plants.

  17. Parvulin 17-catalyzed Tubulin Polymerization Is Regulated by Calmodulin in a Calcium-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Schmidt, Andreas; Manns, Annika; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Jahreis, Günther; Lin, Yi-Jan; Schulze, Bianca; Masch, Antonia; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Recently we have shown that the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase parvulin 17 (Par17) interacts with tubulin in a GTP-dependent manner, thereby promoting the formation of microtubules. Microtubule assembly is regulated by Ca(2+)-loaded calmodulin (Ca(2+)/CaM) both in the intact cell and under in vitro conditions via direct interaction with microtubule-associated proteins. Here we provide the first evidence that Ca(2+)/CaM interacts also with Par17 in a physiologically relevant way, thus preventing Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. In contrast, parvulin 14 (Par14), which lacks only the first 25 N-terminal residues of the Par17 sequence, does not interact with Ca(2+)/CaM, indicating that this interaction is exclusive for Par17. Pulldown experiments and chemical shift perturbation analysis with (15)N-labeled Par17 furthermore confirmed that calmodulin (CaM) interacts in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner with the Par17 N terminus. The reverse experiment with (15)N-labeled Ca(2+)/CaM demonstrated that the N-terminal Par17 segment binds to both CaM lobes simultaneously, indicating that Ca(2+)/CaM undergoes a conformational change to form a binding channel between its two lobes, apparently similar to the structure of the CaM-smMLCK(796-815) complex. In vitro tubulin polymerization assays furthermore showed that Ca(2+)/CaM completely suppresses Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. The results imply that Ca(2+)/CaM binding to the N-terminal segment of Par17 causes steric hindrance of the Par17 active site, thus interfering with the Par17/tubulin interaction. This Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated control of Par17-assisted microtubule assembly may provide a mechanism that couples Ca(2+) signaling with microtubule function.

  18. Effects of calcium-BAPTA buffers and the calmodulin antagonist W-7 on mouse egg activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Lefevre, L; Ducibella, T; Schultz, R M; Kopf, G S

    1996-12-15

    Results of numerous experiments indicate that the transient rise in intracellular Ca2+ following sperm-egg fusion is essential for the subsequent events that constitute egg activation. Some events of egg activation, e.g., cortical granule exocytosis, however, appear more sensitive to intracellular Ca2+ than other events, e.g., cell cycle resumption. To examine if specific events of egg activation have different thresholds for Ca2+, we manipulated buffered intracellular Ca2+ concentrations by microinjecting Ca2+-BAPTA buffers and then examined the effect on the cortical granule exocytosis, recruitment of maternal mRNAs, and cell cycle resumption. We find that whereas cortical granule exocytosis occurs over a narrow threshold range of injected free Ca2+ concentrations between 0.5 and 1.0 microM, recruitment of maternal mRNAs is only partially stimulated at injected free Ca2+ concentrations of 2.5 microM, and no evidence for cell cycle resumption was observed (up to 2.5 microM Ca2+). Although the Ca2+- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, is implicated in aspects of egg activation, calmodulin is also a potential target for the transient increase in Ca2+ that occurs following fertilization. Whereas incubation of eggs in the presence of the calmodulin antagonist W-7 followed by insemination does not block cortical granule exocytosis, cell cycle resumption, as assessed by the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, a decrease in histone H1 kinase activity and the time course for the emission of the second polar body are significantly delayed/inhibited.

  19. Parvulin 17-catalyzed Tubulin Polymerization Is Regulated by Calmodulin in a Calcium-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Schmidt, Andreas; Manns, Annika; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Jahreis, Günther; Lin, Yi-Jan; Schulze, Bianca; Masch, Antonia; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recently we have shown that the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase parvulin 17 (Par17) interacts with tubulin in a GTP-dependent manner, thereby promoting the formation of microtubules. Microtubule assembly is regulated by Ca2+-loaded calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) both in the intact cell and under in vitro conditions via direct interaction with microtubule-associated proteins. Here we provide the first evidence that Ca2+/CaM interacts also with Par17 in a physiologically relevant way, thus preventing Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. In contrast, parvulin 14 (Par14), which lacks only the first 25 N-terminal residues of the Par17 sequence, does not interact with Ca2+/CaM, indicating that this interaction is exclusive for Par17. Pulldown experiments and chemical shift perturbation analysis with 15N-labeled Par17 furthermore confirmed that calmodulin (CaM) interacts in a Ca2+-dependent manner with the Par17 N terminus. The reverse experiment with 15N-labeled Ca2+/CaM demonstrated that the N-terminal Par17 segment binds to both CaM lobes simultaneously, indicating that Ca2+/CaM undergoes a conformational change to form a binding channel between its two lobes, apparently similar to the structure of the CaM-smMLCK796–815 complex. In vitro tubulin polymerization assays furthermore showed that Ca2+/CaM completely suppresses Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. The results imply that Ca2+/CaM binding to the N-terminal segment of Par17 causes steric hindrance of the Par17 active site, thus interfering with the Par17/tubulin interaction. This Ca2+/CaM-mediated control of Par17-assisted microtubule assembly may provide a mechanism that couples Ca2+ signaling with microtubule function. PMID:25940090

  20. Allosteric activation of Bordetella pertussis adenylyl cyclase by calmodulin: molecular dynamics and mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Selwa, Edithe; Davi, Marilyne; Chenal, Alexandre; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Ladant, Daniel; Malliavin, Thérèse E

    2014-07-25

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) toxin is an essential toxin that allows Bordetella pertussis to invade eukaryotic cells, where it is activated after binding to calmodulin (CaM). Based on the crystal structure of the AC catalytic domain in complex with the C-terminal half of CaM (C-CaM), our previous molecular dynamics simulations (Selwa, E., Laine, E., and Malliavin, T. (2012) Differential role of calmodulin and calcium ions in the stabilization of the catalytic domain of adenyl cyclase CyaA from Bordetella pertussis. Proteins 80, 1028–1040) suggested that three residues (i.e. Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360)) might be important for stabilizing the AC/CaM interaction. These residues belong to a loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC, which is located at the interface between CaM and the AC catalytic loop. In the present study, we conducted the in silico and in vitro characterization of three AC variants, where one (Asn(347); ACm1A), two (Arg(338) and Asp(360); ACm2A), or three residues (Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360); ACm3A) were substituted with Ala. Biochemical studies showed that the affinities of ACm1A and ACm2A for CaM were not affected significantly, whereas that of ACm3A was reduced dramatically. To understand the effects of these modifications, molecular dynamics simulations were performed based on the modified proteins. The molecular dynamics trajectories recorded for the ACm3AC-CaM complex showed that the calcium-binding loops of C-CaM exhibited large fluctuations, which could be related to the weakened interaction between ACm3A and its activator. Overall, our results suggest that the loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC is crucial during CaM binding for stabilizing the AC catalytic loop in an active configuration.

  1. Autonomous CaMKII requires further stimulation by Ca2+/calmodulin for enhancing synaptic strength

    PubMed Central

    Barcomb, Kelsey; Buard, Isabelle; Coultrap, Steven J.; Kulbe, Jacqueline R.; O'Leary, Heather; Benke, Timothy A.; Bayer, K. Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark feature of Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is generation of autonomous (Ca2+-independent) activity by T286 autophosphorylation. Biochemical studies have shown that “autonomous” CaMKII is ∼5-fold further stimulated by Ca2+/CaM, but demonstration of a physiological function for such regulation within cells has remained elusive. In this study, CaMKII-induced enhancement of synaptic strength in rat hippocampal neurons required both autonomous activity and further stimulation. Synaptic strength was decreased by CaMKIIα knockdown and rescued by reexpression, but not by mutants impaired for autonomy (T286A) or binding to NMDA-type glutamate receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B; formerly NR2B; I205K). Full rescue was seen with constitutively autonomous mutants (T286D), but only if they could be further stimulated (additional T305/306A mutation), and not with two other mutations that additionally impair Ca2+/CaM binding. Compared to rescue with wild-type CaMKII, the CaM-binding-impaired mutants even had reduced synaptic strength. One of these mutants (T305/306D) mimicked an inhibitory autophosphorylation of CaMKII, whereas the other one (Δstim) abolished CaM binding without introducing charged residues. Inhibitory T305/306 autophosphorylation also reduced GluN2B binding, but this effect was independent of reduced Ca2+/CaM binding and was not mimicked by T305/306D mutation. Thus, even autonomous CaMKII activity must be further stimulated by Ca2+/CaM for enhancement of synaptic strength.—Barcomb, K., Buard, I., Coultrap, S. J., Kulbe, J. R., O'Leary, H., Benke, T. A., Bayer, K. U. Autonomous CaMKII requires further stimulation by Ca2+/calmodulin for enhancing synaptic strength. PMID:24843070

  2. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Debanne, Dominique; Alcaraz, Gisele

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  3. Changes in the Levels of Calmodulin and of a Calmodulin Inhibitor in the Early Phases of Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) Seed Germination: Effects of Aba and Fusicoccin.

    PubMed

    Cocucci, M; Negrini, N

    1988-11-01

    An inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin (Cam)-dependent brain phosphodiesterase was present in the soluble fraction of embryo axes from ungerminated radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seeds. This inhibitor is a Ca(2+)-dependent, Cam-binding protein; in fact: (a) its effect was strongly reduced by treatment with proteases; (b) the inhibition was counteracted by Cam but not by Ca(2+); (c) on gel filtration in the presence of Ca(2+), Cam co-chromatographed with the inhibitor. The inhibitor is heat stable and positively charged at pH 7.5. During early phases of germination, the fresh weight and the levels of DNA and RNA of embryo axes increased, the level of the inhibitor decreased, and the level of Cam increased. Abscisic acid (ABA) inhibited germination, the decrease of inhibitor, and the increase of Cam. Fusicoccin (FC) stimulated the increase in fresh weight but not the increase in the RNA and DNA levels; in this condition, the inhibitor level decreased and the increase in Cam level was higher than in the control. In the presence of both ABA and FC, there was an increase in fresh weight not accompanied by an increase in DNA and RNA levels; Cam increased and, on a fresh weight basis, reached the value of the control. These results indicate that the Ca(2+)-Cam system was activated in early germination of radish seeds by an increase in Cam and a decrease in the inhibitor levels, that FC, probably through the activation of membrane functions, increased Cam level, and that the ABA inhibition on germination was not mediated by the Ca(2+)-Cam system.

  4. Analysis of a soluble calmodulin binding protein from fava bean roots: identification of glutamate decarboxylase as a calmodulin-activated enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ling, V; Snedden, W A; Shelp, B J; Assmann, S M

    1994-08-01

    The identity of a soluble 62-kD Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding protein (CaM-BP) from fava bean seedlings was determined. Using 125I-CaM overlay assays, a class of soluble CaM-BPs was detected in extracts of tissues comprising the axis of 1.5-week-old seedlings, excluding the root tip and emergent leaves. The size of these CaM-BPs was not uniform within all parts of the plant; the apparent molecular masses were 62 kD in roots, 60 kD in stems, and 64 kD in nodules. The root 62-kD CaM-BP was purified, and internal microsequence analysis was performed on the protein. A tryptic peptide derived from the CaM-BP consisted of a 13-residue sequence corresponding to a highly conserved region of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the alpha-decarboxylation of glutamate to form the stress-related metabolite gamma-aminobutyrate. Activity assays of partially purified, desalted, root GAD revealed a 50% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+, a 100% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+ plus 100 nM CaM, and no appreciable stimulation by CaM in the absence of added Ca2+. The demonstration that plant GAD is a Ca(2+)-CaM-stimulated enzyme provides a model in which stress-linked metabolism is modulated by a Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathway.

  5. Analysis of a soluble calmodulin binding protein from fava bean roots: identification of glutamate decarboxylase as a calmodulin-activated enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ling, V; Snedden, W A; Shelp, B J; Assmann, S M

    1994-08-01

    The identity of a soluble 62-kD Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding protein (CaM-BP) from fava bean seedlings was determined. Using 125I-CaM overlay assays, a class of soluble CaM-BPs was detected in extracts of tissues comprising the axis of 1.5-week-old seedlings, excluding the root tip and emergent leaves. The size of these CaM-BPs was not uniform within all parts of the plant; the apparent molecular masses were 62 kD in roots, 60 kD in stems, and 64 kD in nodules. The root 62-kD CaM-BP was purified, and internal microsequence analysis was performed on the protein. A tryptic peptide derived from the CaM-BP consisted of a 13-residue sequence corresponding to a highly conserved region of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the alpha-decarboxylation of glutamate to form the stress-related metabolite gamma-aminobutyrate. Activity assays of partially purified, desalted, root GAD revealed a 50% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+, a 100% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+ plus 100 nM CaM, and no appreciable stimulation by CaM in the absence of added Ca2+. The demonstration that plant GAD is a Ca(2+)-CaM-stimulated enzyme provides a model in which stress-linked metabolism is modulated by a Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathway. PMID:7919983

  6. Analysis of a soluble calmodulin binding protein from fava bean roots: identification of glutamate decarboxylase as a calmodulin-activated enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, V; Snedden, W A; Shelp, B J; Assmann, S M

    1994-01-01

    The identity of a soluble 62-kD Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding protein (CaM-BP) from fava bean seedlings was determined. Using 125I-CaM overlay assays, a class of soluble CaM-BPs was detected in extracts of tissues comprising the axis of 1.5-week-old seedlings, excluding the root tip and emergent leaves. The size of these CaM-BPs was not uniform within all parts of the plant; the apparent molecular masses were 62 kD in roots, 60 kD in stems, and 64 kD in nodules. The root 62-kD CaM-BP was purified, and internal microsequence analysis was performed on the protein. A tryptic peptide derived from the CaM-BP consisted of a 13-residue sequence corresponding to a highly conserved region of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the alpha-decarboxylation of glutamate to form the stress-related metabolite gamma-aminobutyrate. Activity assays of partially purified, desalted, root GAD revealed a 50% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+, a 100% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+ plus 100 nM CaM, and no appreciable stimulation by CaM in the absence of added Ca2+. The demonstration that plant GAD is a Ca(2+)-CaM-stimulated enzyme provides a model in which stress-linked metabolism is modulated by a Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathway. PMID:7919983

  7. Calmodulin and calcium interplay in the modulation of TRPC5 channel activity. Identification of a novel C-terminal domain for calcium/calmodulin-mediated facilitation.

    PubMed

    Ordaz, Benito; Tang, Jisen; Xiao, Rui; Salgado, Alfonso; Sampieri, Alicia; Zhu, Michael X; Vaca, Luis

    2005-09-01

    TRPC5 forms Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channels important for neurite outgrowth and growth cone morphology of hippocampal neurons. Here we studied the activation of mouse TRPC5 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary and human embryonic kidney 293 cells by agonist stimulation of several receptors that couple to the phosphoinositide signaling cascade and the role of calmodulin (CaM) on the activation. We showed that exogenous application of 10 microM CaM through patch pipette accelerated the agonist-induced channel activation by 2.8-fold, with the time constant for half-activation reduced from 4.25 +/- 0.4 to 1.56 +/- 0.85 min. We identified a novel CaM-binding site located at the C terminus of TRPC5, 95 amino acids downstream from the previously determined common CaM/IP3R-binding (CIRB) domain for all TRPC proteins. Deletion of the novel CaM-binding site attenuated the acceleration in channel activation induced by CaM. However, disruption of the CIRB domain from TRPC5 rendered the channel irresponsive to agonist stimulation without affecting the cell surface expression of the channel protein. Furthermore, we showed that high (>5 microM) intracellular free Ca2+ inhibited the current density without affecting the time course of TRPC5 activation by receptor agonists. These results demonstrated that intracellular Ca2+ has dual and opposite effects on the activation of TRPC5. The novel CaM-binding site is important for the Ca2+/CaM-mediated facilitation, whereas the CIRB domain is critical for the overall response of receptor-induced TRPC5 channel activation.

  8. Neurite outgrowth of neuroblastoma cells overexpressing alpha and beta isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-effects of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, T; Yoshimura, Y; Nomura, T; Fujii, M; Sugiura, H

    1998-06-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) is one of the most abundant protein kinases in the brain and has a broad substrate specificity [M.K. Bennett, N.E. Erondu, M.B. Kennedy, Purification and characterization of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase that is highly concentrated in brain, J. Biol. Chem. 258 (1983) 12735-12744 [1]; J.R. Goldenring, B. Gonzalez, J.S. McGuire, Jr., R.J. DeLorenzo, Purification and characterization of a calmodulin-dependent kinase from rat brain cytosol able to phosphorylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, J. Biol. Chem. 258 (1983) 12632-12640 [4]; M.B. Kennedy, P. Greengard, Two calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, which are highly concentrated in brain, phosphorylate protein I at distinct sites, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78 (1981) 1293-1297 [10]; T. Yamauchi, H. Fujisawa, Evidence for three distinct forms of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases from rat brain, FEBS Lett. 116 (1980) 141-144 [20]; T. Yamauchi, H. Fujisawa, Purification and characterization of the brain calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (kinase II), which is involved in the activation of tryptophan 5-monooxygenase, Eur. J. Biochem. 132 (1983) 15-21 [21

  9. [The structure and phosphorus or potassium deficiency induced expression of a calmodulin-like protein gene in Arabidopsis].

    PubMed

    Duan, Rui-Jun; Yi, Ke-Ke; Wu, Ping

    2005-10-01

    According to our previous microarray analysis, we found a putative calmodulin gene related to Pi deficiency and designated AtPsiCaM (Arabidopsis Pi-starvation-induced CaM). Results of structural analysis indicate that AtPsiCaM has three conserved EF-hands motif and belongs to calmodulin-like proteins family (Figs. 1-3). Northern blot analysis revealed that this gene could be induced by potassium and phosphate deficiency and not by potassium deficiency or high salinity (Fig. 4). The results of RT-PCR and GUS histochemical staining assays of the AtPsiCaM promoter::GUS transgenic plants showed that this gene can be expressed in all tissues to different expression levels (Figs. 5, 6). PMID:16222095

  10. Effect of inhibitors of auxin transport and of calmodulin on a gravisensing-dependent current in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Some characteristics of the gravity sensing mechanism in maize root caps were investigated using a bioelectric current as an indicator of gravity sensing. This technique involves the measurement of a change in the current density which arises at the columella region coincidently with the presentation time. Two inhibitors of auxin transport, triiodobenzoic acid and naphthylphthalamic acid, blocked gravitropic curvature but not the change in current density. Two inhibitors of calmodulin activity, compound 48/80 and calmidazolium, blocked both curvature and gravity-induced current. The results suggest that auxin transport is not a component of gravity sensing in the root cap. By contrast, the results suggest that calmodulin plays an intrinsic role in gravity sensing.

  11. Calmodulin regulates current density and frequency-dependent inhibition of sodium channel Nav1.8 in DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Sung; Hudmon, Andy; Waxman, Stephen G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D

    2006-07-01

    Sodium channel Nav1.8 produces a slowly inactivating, tetrodotoxin-resistant current, characterized by recovery from inactivation with fast and slow components, and contributes a substantial fraction of the current underlying the depolarizing phase of the action potential of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Nav1.8 C-terminus carries a conserved calmodulin-binding isoleucine-glutamine (IQ) motif. We show here that calmodulin coimmunoprecipitates with endogenous Nav1.8 channels from native DRG, suggesting that the two proteins can interact in vivo. Treatment of native DRG neurons with a calmodulin-binding peptide (CBP) reduced the current density of Nav1.8 by nearly 65%, without changing voltage dependency of activation or steady-state inactivation. To investigate the functional role of CaM binding to the IQ motif in the Nav1.8 C-terminus, the IQ dipeptide was substituted by DE; we show that this impairs the binding of CaM to the IQ motif. Mutant Nav1.8IQ/DE channels produce currents with roughly 50% amplitude, but with unchanged voltage dependency of activation and inactivation when expressed in DRG neurons from Nav1.8-null mice. We also show that blocking the interaction of CaM and Nav1.8 using CBP or the IQ/DE substitution causes a buildup of inactivated channels and, in the case of the IQ/DE mutation, stimulation even at a low frequency of 0.1 Hz significantly enhances the frequency-dependent inhibition of the Nav1.8 current. This study presents, for the first time, evidence that calmodulin associates with a sodium channel, Nav1.8, in native neurons, and demonstrates a regulation of Nav1.8 currents that can significantly affect electrogenesis of DRG neurons in which Nav1.8 is normally expressed. PMID:16598065

  12. The calmodulin-binding transcription activator CAMTA1 is required for long-term memory formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bas-Orth, Carlos; Tan, Yan-Wei; Oliveira, Ana M M; Bengtson, C Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2016-06-01

    The formation of long-term memory requires signaling from the synapse to the nucleus to mediate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. Synapse-to-nucleus communication is initiated by influx of calcium ions through synaptic NMDA receptors and/or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and involves the activation of transcription factors by calcium/calmodulin signaling in the nucleus. Recent studies have drawn attention to a new family of transcriptional regulators, the so-called calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) proteins. CAMTAs are expressed at particularly high levels in the mouse and human brain, and we reasoned that, as calmodulin-binding transcription factors, CAMTAs may regulate the formation of long-term memory by coupling synaptic activity and calcium/calmodulin signaling to memory-related transcriptional responses. This hypothesis is supported by genetic studies that reported a correlation between Camta gene polymorphisms or mutations and cognitive capability in humans. Here, we show that acute knockdown of CAMTA1, but not CAMTA2, in the hippocampus of adult mice results in impaired performance in two memory tests, contextual fear conditioning and object-place recognition test. Short-term memory and neuronal morphology were not affected by CAMTA knockdown. Gene expression profiling in the hippocampus of control and CAMTA knockdown mice revealed a number of putative CAMTA1 target genes related to synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. Patch clamp recordings in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures provided further evidence for CAMTA1-dependent changes in electrophysiological properties. In summary, our study provides experimental evidence that confirms previous human genetic studies and establishes CAMTA1 as a regulator of long-term memory formation.

  13. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13405.001 PMID:26949248

  14. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. PMID:26949248

  15. The Plasma Membrane Ca(2+) ATPase: Purification by Calmodulin Affinity Chromatography, and Reconstitution of the Purified Protein.

    PubMed

    Niggli, Verena; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases (PMCA pumps) are key regulators of cytosolic Ca(2+) in eukaryotes. They extrude Ca(2+) from the cytosol, using the energy of ATP hydrolysis and operate as Ca(2+)-H(+) exchangers. They are activated by the Ca(2+)-binding protein calmodulin, by acidic phospholipids and by other mechanisms, among them kinase-mediated phosphorylation. Isolation of the PMCA in pure and active form is essential for the analysis of its structure and function. In this chapter, the purification of the pump, as first achieved from erythrocyte plasma membranes by calmodulin-affinity chromatography, is described in detail. The reversible, high-affinity, Ca(2+)-dependent interaction of the pump with calmodulin is the basis of the procedure. Either phospholipids or glycerol have to be present in the isolation buffers to keep the pump active during the isolation procedure. After the isolation of the PMCA pump from human erythrocytes the pump was purified from other cell types, e.g., heart sarcolemma, plant microsomal fractions, and cells that express it ectopically. The reconstitution of the purified pump into phospholipid vesicles using the cholate dialysis method will also be described. It allows studies of transport mechanism and of regulation of pump activity. The purified pump can be stored in the reconstituted form for several days at 4 °C with little loss of activity, but it rapidly loses activity when stored in the detergent-solubilized form. PMID:26695022

  16. Cloning and expression of a pivotal calcium metabolism regulator: calmodulin involved in shell formation from pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata).

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Cen; Zhang, Yong; Gu, Mianzhi; Zhang, Rongqing

    2004-07-01

    The shells of bivalves are mainly composed of calcium carbonate, a product of calcium metabolism. In the process of shell formation, the uptake, transport and recruitment of calcium ion are highly regulated and involved in many factors. Among these regulatory factors, calmodulin (CaM), a pivotal multifunction regulator of calcium metabolism in nearly all organisms, is thought to play an important role in the calcium metabolism involved in shell formation. In this study, a full-length CaM cDNA was isolated from the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata). The oyster calmodulin encodes a 16.8 kDa protein which shares high similarity with vertebrate calmodulin. The oyster CaM mRNA shows the highest level of expression in the gill, a key organ involved in calcium uptake in oyster calcium metabolism. In situ hybridization results revealed that oyster CaM mRNA is expressed at the folds and the outer epithelial cells of the dorsal region of the mantle, suggesting that CaM is involved in regulation of calcium transport and secretion. Oyster CaM also showed a typical Ca2+ dependent electrophoretic shift characterization and calcium binding activity. Taken together, we have identified and characterized a pivotal calcium metabolism regulator of the oyster that may play an important role in regulation of calcium uptake, transport and secretion in the process of shell formation.

  17. The novel murine calmodulin-binding protein Sha1 disrupts mitotic spindle and replication checkpoint functions in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Craig, R; Norbury, C

    1998-12-18

    Entry into mitosis is normally blocked in eukaryotic cells that have not completed replicative DNA synthesis; this 'S-M' checkpoint control is fundamental to the maintenance of genomic integrity. Mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe defective in the S-M checkpoint fail to arrest the cell cycle when DNA replication is inhibited and hence attempt mitosis and cell division with unreplicated chromosomes, resulting in the 'cut' phenotype. In an attempt to identify conserved molecules involved in the S-M checkpoint we have screened a regulatable murine cDNA library in S. pombe and have identified cDNAs that induce the cut phenotype in cells arrested in S phase by hydroxyurea. One such cDNA encodes a novel protein with multiple calmodulin-binding motifs that, in addition to its effects on the S-M checkpoint, perturbed mitotic spindle functions, although spindle pole duplication was apparently normal. Both aspects of the phenotype induced by this cDNA product, which we term Sha1 (for spindle and hydroxyurea checkpoint abnormal), were suppressed by simultaneous overexpression of calmodulin. Sha1 is structurally related to the product of the Drosophila gene abnormal spindle (asp). These data suggest that calmodulin-binding protein(s) are important in the co-ordination of mitotic spindle functions with mitotic entry in fission yeast, and probably also in multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:9819352

  18. Characterization of the microtubule-binding activity of kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein from Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ke; Cui, Liuqing; Jiang, Haili; Yang, Lu; Xue, Lexun

    2013-12-01

    Although the C-terminal motor and the N-terminal myosin-like domains of KCBP in Dunaliella salina (DsKCBP) are implicated in interaction with the microtubules, its microtubule binding property has not been addressed. It has been shown that several calmodulin isoforms suppress the microtubule binding activity of KCBP, but whether the calmodulin-like protein (CLP) has this ability remains unknown. The results of our previous study showed that there are two microtubule binding sites in DsKCBP, motor domain at the C-terminus and MyTH4-FREM at the N-terminus. In the present study, MyTH4, without the companion of FERM, was identified as the minimal domain responsible for interaction with the microtubules in the N-terminal of DsKCBP. CLP interacted with the calmodulin-binding domain of DsKCBP in the presence of Ca(2+), and inhibited the microtubule-binding activity of motor domain but not MyTH4 domain. Furthermore, MyTH4 domain in the N-terminus of DsKCBP was responsible for binding to the microtubules, and had 10-fold weaker affinity to the microtubules than the motor domain.

  19. NRIP is newly identified as a Z-disc protein, activating calmodulin signaling for skeletal muscle contraction and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Hsiung; Chen, Wen-Pin; Yan, Wan-Lun; Huang, Yuan-Chun; Chang, Szu-Wei; Fu, Wen-Mei; Su, Ming-Jai; Yu, I-Shing; Tsai, Tzung-Chieh; Yan, Yu-Ting; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Chen, Show-Li

    2015-11-15

    Nuclear receptor interaction protein (NRIP, also known as DCAF6 and IQWD1) is a Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin-binding protein. In this study, we newly identify NRIP as a Z-disc protein in skeletal muscle. NRIP-knockout mice were generated and found to have reduced muscle strength, susceptibility to fatigue and impaired adaptive exercise performance. The mechanisms of NRIP-regulated muscle contraction depend on NRIP being downstream of Ca(2+) signaling, where it stimulates activation of both 'calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1' (CaN-NFATc1; also known as NFATC1) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) through interaction with calmodulin (CaM), resulting in the induction of mitochondrial activity and the expression of genes encoding the slow class of myosin, and in the regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis through the internal Ca(2+) stores of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, NRIP-knockout mice have a delayed regenerative capacity. The amount of NRIP can be enhanced after muscle injury and is responsible for muscle regeneration, which is associated with the increased expression of myogenin, desmin and embryonic myosin heavy chain during myogenesis, as well as for myotube formation. In conclusion, NRIP is a novel Z-disc protein that is important for skeletal muscle strength and regenerative capacity.

  20. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca2+ leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes [Hamada et al., 2009]. The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca2+ spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca2+ events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional sites to activate HT program. PMID

  1. S100A1 Protein Does Not Compete with Calmodulin for Ryanodine Receptor Binding but Structurally Alters the Ryanodine Receptor·Calmodulin Complex.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Robyn T; Nitu, Florentin R; Rohde, David; Most, Patrick; Bers, Donald M; Thomas, David D; Cornea, Razvan L

    2016-07-22

    S100A1 has been suggested as a therapeutic agent to enhance myocyte Ca(2+) cycling in heart failure, but its molecular mode of action is poorly understood. Using FRET, we tested the hypothesis that S100A1 directly competes with calmodulin (CaM) for binding to intact, functional ryanodine receptors type I (RyR1) and II (RyR2) from skeletal and cardiac muscle, respectively. Our FRET readout provides an index of acceptor-labeled CaM binding near donor-labeled FKBP (FK506-binding protein 12.6) on the cytoplasmic domain of RyR in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. S100A1 (0.01-400 μm) partially inhibited FRET (i.e. CaM binding), with Ki > 10 μm, for both RyR1 and RyR2. The high [S100A1] required for partial effects on FRET indicates a lack of competition by S100A1 on CaM/RyR binding under normal physiological conditions. High-resolution analysis of time-resolved FRET detects two structural states of RyR-bound CaM, which respond to [Ca(2+)] and are isoform-specific. The distribution of these structural states was perturbed only by high micromolar [S100A1], which promoted a shift of bound CaM to a lower FRET orientation (without altering the amount of CaM bound to RyR). Thus, high micromolar S100A1 does alter the CaM/RyR interaction, without involving competition. Nevertheless, submicromolar S100A1 can alter RyR function, an effect that is influenced by both [Ca(2+)] and [CaM]. We conclude that CaM and S100A1 can concurrently bind to and functionally modulate RyR1 and RyR2, but this does not involve direct competition at the RyR CaM binding site. PMID:27226555

  2. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2010-05-28

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca{sup 2+} leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes (Hamada et al., 2009 ). The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca{sup 2+} spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca{sup 2+} events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional

  3. Oxidation of Ryanodine Receptor (RyR) and Calmodulin enhance Ca release and pathologically alter RyR structure and Calmodulin affinity

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Tetsuro; Yang, Yi; Uchinoumi, Hitoshi; Thomas, David D.; Chen-Izu, Ye; Kato, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Yano, Masafumi; Cornea, Razvan L.; Bers, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress may contribute to cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) dysfunction in heart failure (HF) and arrhythmias. Altered RyR2 domain-domain interaction (domain unzipping) and calmodulin (CaM) binding affinity are allosterically coupled indices of RyR2 conformation. In HF RyR2 exhibits reduced CaM binding, increased domain unzipping and greater SR Ca leak, and dantrolene can reverse these changes. However, effects of oxidative stress on RyR2 conformation and leak in myocytes are poorly understood. We used fluorescent CaM, FKBP12.6, and domain-peptide biosensor (F-DPc10) to measure, directly in cardiac myocytes, (1) RyR2 activation by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidation, (2) RyR2 conformation change caused by oxidation, (3) CaM-RyR2 and FK506-binding protein (FKBP12.6)-RyR2 interaction upon oxidation, and (4) whether dantrolene affects 1–3. H2O2 was used to mimic oxidative stress. H2O2 significantly increased the frequency of Ca2+ sparks and spontaneous Ca2+ waves, and dantrolene almost completely blocked these effects. H2O2 pretreatment significantly reduced CaM-RyR2 binding, but had no effect on FKBP12.6-RyR2 binding. Dantrolene restored CaM-RyR2 binding but had no effect on intracellular and RyR2 oxidation levels. H2O2 also accelerated F-DPc10-RyR2 association while dantrolene slowed it. Thus, H2O2 causes conformational changes (sensed by CaM and DPc10 binding) associated with Ca leak, and dantrolene reverses these RyR2 effects. In conclusion, in cardiomyocytes, H2O2 treatment markedly reduces the CaM-RyR2 affinity, has no effect on FKBP12.6-RyR2 affinity, and causes domain unzipping. Dantrolene can correct domain unzipping, restore CaM-RyR2 affinity, and quiet pathological RyR2 channel gating. F-DPc10 and CaM are useful biosensors of a pathophysiological RyR2 state. PMID:26092277

  4. A pollen-specific novel calmodulin-binding protein with tetratricopeptide repeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safadi, F.; Reddy, V. S.; Reddy, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium is essential for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. A large body of information has established a link between elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) at the pollen tube tip and its growth. Since the action of Ca(2+) is primarily mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM), identification of CaM-binding proteins in pollen should provide insights into the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, a CaM-binding protein from maize pollen (maize pollen calmodulin-binding protein, MPCBP) was isolated in a protein-protein interaction-based screening using (35)S-labeled CaM as a probe. MPCBP has a molecular mass of about 72 kDa and contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) suggesting that it is a member of the TPR family of proteins. MPCBP protein shares a high sequence identity with two hypothetical TPR-containing proteins from Arabidopsis. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-Sepharose binding, we show that the bacterially expressed MPCBP binds to bovine CaM and three CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To map the CaM-binding domain several truncated versions of the MPCBP were expressed in bacteria and tested for their ability to bind CaM. Based on these studies, the CaM-binding domain was mapped to an 18-amino acid stretch between the first and second TPR regions. Gel and fluorescence shift assays performed with CaM and a CaM-binding synthetic peptide further confirmed MPCBP binding to CaM. Western, Northern, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis have shown that MPCBP expression is specific to pollen. MPCBP was detected in both soluble and microsomal proteins. Immunoblots showed the presence of MPCBP in mature and germinating pollen. Pollen-specific expression of MPCBP, its CaM-binding properties, and the presence of TPR motifs suggest a role for this protein in Ca(2+)-regulated events during pollen germination and growth.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a novel calmodulin-binding protein from potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Anireddy S N.; Day, Irene S.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Safadi, Farida; Reddy, Vaka S.; Golovkin, Maxim; Harnly, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    Tuberization in potato is controlled by hormonal and environmental signals. Ca(2+), an important intracellular messenger, and calmodulin (CaM), one of the primary Ca(2+) sensors, have been implicated in controlling diverse cellular processes in plants including tuberization. The regulation of cellular processes by CaM involves its interaction with other proteins. To understand the role of Ca(2+)/CaM in tuberization, we have screened an expression library prepared from developing tubers with biotinylated CaM. This screening resulted in isolation of a cDNA encoding a novel CaM-binding protein (potato calmodulin-binding protein (PCBP)). Ca(2+)-dependent binding of the cDNA-encoded protein to CaM is confirmed by (35)S-labeled CaM. The full-length cDNA is 5 kb long and encodes a protein of 1309 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed significant similarity with a hypothetical protein from another plant, Arabidopsis. However, no homologs of PCBP are found in nonplant systems, suggesting that it is likely to be specific to plants. Using truncated versions of the protein and a synthetic peptide in CaM binding assays we mapped the CaM-binding region to a 20-amino acid stretch (residues 1216-1237). The bacterially expressed protein containing the CaM-binding domain interacted with three CaM isoforms (CaM2, CaM4, and CaM6). PCBP is encoded by a single gene and is expressed differentially in the tissues tested. The expression of CaM, PCBP, and another CaM-binding protein is similar in different tissues and organs. The predicted protein contained seven putative nuclear localization signals and several strong PEST motifs. Fusion of the N-terminal region of the protein containing six of the seven nuclear localization signals to the reporter gene beta-glucuronidase targeted the reporter gene to the nucleus, suggesting a nuclear role for PCBP.

  6. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  7. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana calmodulin7 and insight into its mode of DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Mazumder, Mohit; Gupta, Nisha; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca(2+) sensor that participates in several cellular signaling cascades by interacting with various targets, including DNA. It has been shown that Arabidopsis thaliana CaM7 (AtCaM7) interacts with Z-box DNA and functions as a transcription factor [Kushwaha R et al. (2008) Plant Cell 20, 1747-1759; Abbas N et al. (2014) Plant Cell 26, 1036-1052]. The crystal structure of AtCaM7, and a model of the AtCAM7-Z-box complex suggest that Arg-127 determines the DNA-binding ability by forming crucial interactions with the guanine base. We validated the model using biolayer interferometry, which confirmed that AtCaM7 interacts with Z-box DNA with high affinity. In contrast, the AtCaM2/3/5 isoform does not show any binding, although it differs from AtCaM7 by only a single residue. PMID:27500568

  8. Calmodulin physically interacts with the erythropoietin receptor and enhances Jak2-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Masahide; Iiyama, Mitsuko; Miura, Osamu . E-mail: miura.hema@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-09-23

    Stimulation of the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) induces a transient increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} level as well as activation of the Jak2 tyrosine kinase to stimulate various downstream signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that the universal Ca{sup 2+} receptor calmodulin (CaM) binds EpoR in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner in vitro. Binding studies using various EpoR mutants in hematopoietic cells showed that CaM binds the membrane-proximal 65-amino-acid cytoplasmic region (amino acids 258-312) of EpoR that is critical for activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling. Structurally unrelated CaM antagonists, W-13 and CMZ, inhibited activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling pathways, whereas W-12, a W-13 analog, did not show any significant inhibitory effect. Moreover, overexpression of CaM augmented Epo-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the EpoR. W-13, but not W-12, also inhibited Epo-induced proliferation and survival. Together, these results indicate that CaM binds to the membrane-proximal EpoR cytoplasmic region and plays an essential role in activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling.

  9. Cloning and analysis of calmodulin gene from Porphyra yezoensis Ueda (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengqiang; Mao, Yunxiang; Zhuang, Yunyun; Kong, Fanna; Sui, Zhenghong

    2009-09-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of signal transduction and anti-desiccation mechanisms of Porphyra yezoensis, cDNA and its genomic sequence of Calmodulin gene (CaM) was cloned by the technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the analysis of P. yezoensis ESTs from dbEST database. The result shows that the full-length cDNA of CaM consists of 603 bps including an ORF encoding for 151 amino acids and a terminate codon UGA, while the length of genomic sequence is 1231 bps including 2 exons and 1 intron. The average GC content of the coding region is 58.77%, while the GC content of the third position of this gene is as high as 82.23%. Four Ca2+ binding sites (EF-hand) are found in this gene. The predicted molecular mass of the deduced peptide is 16688.72 Da and the pI is 4.222. By aligning with known CaM genes, the similarity of CaM gene sequence with homologous genes in Chlamydomonas incerta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is 72.7% and 72.2% respectively, and the similarity of the deduced amino acid sequence of CaM gene with homologous genes in C. incerta and C. reinhardtii are both 71.5%. This is the first report on CaM from a species of Rhodophyta.

  10. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults. PMID:25789177

  11. Revealing Two-State Protein-Protein Interaction of Calmodulin by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ruchuan; Hu, Dehong; Tan, Xin; Lu, H PETER.

    2006-08-09

    We report a single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and polarization study of conformational dynamics of calmodulin (CaM) interacting with a target peptide, C28W of 28 amino-acid oligomer. The C28W peptide represents the essential binding sequence domain of the Ca-ATPase protein interacting with CaM, which is important in cellular signaling for the regulation of energy in metabolism. However, the mechanism of the CaM-C28W recognition complex formation is still unclear. The amino-terminal (N-terminal) domain of the CaM was labeled with a fluorescein-based arsenical hairpin binder (F1AsH) that enables our unambiguously probing the CaM N-terminal target-binding domain motions at a millisecond timescale without convolution of the probe-dye random motions. By analyzing the distribution of FRET efficiency between F1AsH labeled CaM and Texas Red labeled C28W and the polarization fluctuation dynamics and distributions of the CaM N-terminal domain, we reveal slow (at sub-second time scale) binding-unbinding motions of the N-terminal domain of the CaM in CaM-C28W complexes, which is a strong evidence of a two-state binding interaction of CaM-mediated cell signaling.

  12. Revealing Two-State Protein-Protein Interactions of Calmodulin by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ruchuan; Hu, Dehong; Tan, Xin; Lu, H. Peter

    2006-08-01

    We report a single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and polarization study of conformational dynamics of calmodulin (CaM) interacting with a target peptide, C28W of a 28 amino acid oligomer. The C28W peptide represents the essential binding sequence domain of the Ca-ATPase protein interacting with CaM, which is important in cellular signaling for the regulation of energy in metabolism. However, the mechanism of the CaM/C28W recognition complex formation is still unclear. The amino-terminal (N-terminal) domain of the CaM was labeled with a fluorescein-based arsenical hairpin binder (FlAsH) that enables our unambiguous probing of the CaM N-terminal target-binding domain motions on a millisecond time scale without convolution of the probe-dye random motions. Finally, by analyzing the distribution of FRET efficiency between FlAsH labeled CaM and Texas Red labeled C28W and the polarization fluctuation dynamics and distributions of the CaM N-terminal domain, we reveal binding-unbinding motions of the N-terminal domain of the CaM in CaM/C28W complexes, which is strong evidence of a two-state binding interaction of CaM-mediated cell signaling.

  13. Structural Basis for the Recognition of Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 2 Kinase by Calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwangwoon; Alphonse, Sébastien; Piserchio, Andrea; Tavares, Clint D J; Giles, David H; Wellmann, Rebecca M; Dalby, Kevin N; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2016-09-01

    Binding of Ca(2+)-loaded calmodulin (CaM) activates eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF-2K) that phosphorylates eEF-2, its only known cellular target, leading to a decrease in global protein synthesis. Here, using an eEF-2K-derived peptide (eEF-2KCBD) that encodes the region necessary for its CaM-mediated activation, we provide a structural basis for their interaction. The striking feature of this association is the absence of Ca(2+) from the CaM C-lobe sites, even under high Ca(2+) conditions. eEF-2KCBD engages CaM largely through the C lobe of the latter in an anti-parallel 1-5-8 hydrophobic mode reinforced by a pair of unique electrostatic contacts. Sparse interactions of eEF-2KCBD with the CaM N lobe results in persisting inter-lobe mobility. A conserved eEF-2K residue (W85) anchors it to CaM by inserting into a deep hydrophobic cavity within the CaM C lobe. Mutation of this residue (W85S) substantially weakens interactions between full-length eEF-2K and CaM in vitro and reduces eEF-2 phosphorylation in cells. PMID:27499441

  14. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  15. Calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase 2 - a novel therapeutic target for gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Syed, Nazia; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Raja, Remya; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini; Pinto, Sneha M; Manda, Srikanth Srinivas; Renuse, Santosh; Manju, HC; Zameer, Mohammed Abdul Lateef; Sharma, Jyoti; Brait, Mariana; Srikumar, Kotteazeth; Roa, Juan Carlos; Vijaya Kumar, M; Kumar, KV Veerendra; Prasad, TS Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal malignancies and is associated with poor prognosis. Exploring alterations in the proteomic landscape of gastric cancer is likely to provide potential biomarkers for early detection and molecules for targeted therapeutic intervention. Using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis, we identified 22 proteins that were overexpressed and 17 proteins that were downregulated in gastric tumor tissues as compared to the adjacent normal tissue. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CAMKK2) was found to be 7-fold overexpressed in gastric tumor tissues. Immunohistochemical labeling of tumor tissue microarrays for validation of CAMKK2 overexpression revealed that it was indeed overexpressed in 94% (92 of 98) of gastric cancer cases. Silencing of CAMKK2 using siRNA significantly reduced cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that CAMKK2 signals in gastric cancer through AMPK activation and suggest that CAMKK2 could be a novel therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:25756516

  16. Structural Environment and Stability of the Complexes Formed Between Calmodulin and Actinyl Ions.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, Florian; Safi, Samir; Jeanson, Aurélie; Martinez-Baez, Ernesto; Roques, Jérôme; Berthomieu, Catherine; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Simoni, Éric

    2016-03-21

    Because of their presence in the nuclear fuel cycle, neptunium and uranium are two actinides of main interest in case of internal contamination. Complexation of U(VI) and Np(V) by the target protein calmodulin (CaM(WT)) was therefore studied herein. Both actinides have two axial oxygen atoms, which, charge aside, makes them very similar structurally wise. This work combines spectroscopy and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Structural characterization was performed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the L(III)-edge for each studied actinide. Models for the binding site of the protein were developed and then refined by using DFT to fit the obtained experimental EXAFS data. The effect of hydrolysis was also considered for both actinides (the uranyl experiment was performed at pH 3 and 6, while the neptunyl experiment was conducted at pH 7 and 9). The effect of the pH variation was apparent on the coordination sphere of the uranyl complexes, while the neptunyl complex characteristics remained stable under both studied conditions. The DFT calculations showed that at near physiological pH the complex formed by CaM(WT) with the neptunium ion is more stable than the one formed with uranyl. PMID:26954703

  17. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  18. Coping with Stresses: Roles of Calcium- and Calcium/Calmodulin-Regulated Gene Expression[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anireddy S.N.; Ali, Gul S.; Celesnik, Helena; Day, Irene S.

    2011-01-01

    Abiotic and biotic stresses are major limiting factors of crop yields and cause billions of dollars of losses annually around the world. It is hoped that understanding at the molecular level how plants respond to adverse conditions and adapt to a changing environment will help in developing plants that can better cope with stresses. Acquisition of stress tolerance requires orchestration of a multitude of biochemical and physiological changes, and most of these depend on changes in gene expression. Research during the last two decades has established that different stresses cause signal-specific changes in cellular Ca2+ level, which functions as a messenger in modulating diverse physiological processes that are important for stress adaptation. In recent years, many Ca2+ and Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) binding transcription factors (TFs) have been identified in plants. Functional analyses of some of these TFs indicate that they play key roles in stress signaling pathways. Here, we review recent progress in this area with emphasis on the roles of Ca2+- and Ca2+/CaM-regulated transcription in stress responses. We will discuss emerging paradigms in the field, highlight the areas that need further investigation, and present some promising novel high-throughput tools to address Ca2+-regulated transcriptional networks. PMID:21642548

  19. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Love, Nick R; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD(+) kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms.

  20. Calmodulin regulation of TMEM16A and 16B Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; Colecraft, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels encoded by TMEM16A and 16B are important for regulating epithelial mucus secretion, cardiac and neuronal excitability, smooth muscle contraction, olfactory transduction, and cell proliferation. Whether and how the ubiquitous Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin (CaM) regulates the activity of TMEM16A and 16B channels has been controversial and the subject of an ongoing debate. Recently, using a bioengineering approach termed ChIMP (Channel Inactivation induced by Membrane-tethering of an associated Protein) we argued that Ca(2+)-free CaM (apoCaM) is pre-associated with functioning TMEM16A and 16B channel complexes in live cells. Further, the pre-associated apoCaM mediates Ca(2+)-dependent sensitization of activation (CDSA) and Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI) of some TMEM16A splice variants. In this review, we discuss these findings in the context of previous and recent results relating to Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of TMEM16A/16B channels and the putative role of CaM. We further discuss potential future directions for these nascent ideas on apoCaM regulation of TMEM16A/16B channels, noting that such future efforts will benefit greatly from the pioneering work of Dr. David T. Yue and colleagues on CaM regulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels.

  1. mRNA expression profiles of calmodulin and liver receptor homolog-1 genes in chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z-C; Xiao, L-H; Wang, Y; Chen, S-Y; Yang, Z-Q; Zhao, X-L; Zhu, Q; Liu, Y-P

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CALM), a calcium-binding protein, is expressed in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis; it plays a pivotal role in the reproductive system by regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone signaling. Downstream of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal signaling pathways, liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) is involved in female gonadal hormone synthesis. In the chicken, although the two genes are known to be associated with reproductive traits, the interaction between gonadotropins and gonadal steroids remains unclear. We used quantitative real-time PCR to quantify the tissular (hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary, liver, kidney, oviduct, heart) and ontogenetic (12, 18, 32, and 45 weeks) mRNA expression profiles of CALM and LRH-1 in Erlang Mountainous chickens to determine their roles in the endocrine control of fertility, and compared these profiles with expression in Roman chickens. We found that the relative expressions of CALM and LRH-1 genes had the highest levels in the pituitary and ovary at 32 weeks. The expression level of CALM mRNA in the pituitary of Roman chickens was significantly higher than that in Erlang Mountainous chickens at 32 and 45 weeks, while the LRH-1 transcript level in the ovaries of Roman chickens was significantly lower than that of Erlang Mountainous chickens at 32 and 45 weeks. In summary, the transcript levels of CALM and LRH-1 genes are associated with chicken reproductive traits; in addition, we found that the CALM gene is the key regulator in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal signaling network.

  2. An unconventional calmodulin-anchoring site within the AB module of Kv7.2 channels.

    PubMed

    Gomis-Perez, Carolina; Alaimo, Alessandro; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Alberdi, Araitz; Aivar-Mateo, Paloma; Bernardo-Seisdedos, Ganeko; Malo, Covadonga; Areso, Pilar; Felipe, Antonio; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2015-08-15

    Calmodulin (CaM) binding to the AB module is crucial for multiple mechanisms governing the function of Kv7.2 (also known as KCNQ2) K(+) channel subunits, which mediate one of the main components of the non-inactivating K(+) M-current, a key controller of neuronal excitability. Structural analysis indicates that the CaM N-lobe engages with helix B, whereas the C-lobe anchors to the IQ site within helix A. Here, we report the identification of a new site between helices A and B that assists in CaM binding whose sequence is reminiscent of the TW helix within the CaM C-lobe anchoring site of SK2 K(+) channels (also known as KCNN2). Mutations that disrupt CaM binding within the TW site, helix B or helix A yield functional channels, whereas no function is observed when the TW site and helix A, or the TW site and helix B are mutated simultaneously. Our data indicate that the TW site is dispensable for function, contributes to the stabilization of the CaM-Kv7.2 complex and becomes essential when docking to either helix A or when helix B is perturbed.

  3. The ever changing moods of calmodulin: how structural plasticity entails transductional adaptability.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Alvaro; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Bernardo-Seisdedos, Ganeko; Alaimo, Alessandro; Agirre, Jon; Alberdi, Araitz; Gomis-Perez, Carolina; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Ambrosino, Paolo; Malo, Covadonga; Areso, Pilar

    2014-07-29

    The exceptional versatility of calmodulin (CaM) three-dimensional arrangement is reflected in the growing number of structural models of CaM/protein complexes currently available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) database, revealing a great diversity of conformations, domain organization, and structural responses to Ca(2+). Understanding CaM binding is complicated by the diversity of target proteins sequences. Data mining of the structures shows that one face of each of the eight CaM helices can contribute to binding, with little overall difference between the Ca(2+) loaded N- and C-lobes and a clear prevalence of the C-lobe low Ca(2+) conditions. The structures reveal a remarkable variety of configurations where CaM binds its targets in a preferred orientation that can be reversed and where CaM rotates upon Ca(2+) binding, suggesting a highly dynamic metastable relation between CaM and its targets. Recent advances in structure-function studies and the discovery of CaM mutations being responsible for human diseases, besides expanding the role of CaM in human pathophysiology, are opening new exciting avenues for the understanding of the how CaM decodes Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent signals.

  4. Calmodulin Involvement in Stress-Activated Nuclear Localization of Albumin in JB6 Epithelial Cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas J.; Negash, Sewite; Smallwood, Heather S.; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Thrall, Brian D.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2004-06-15

    We report that in response to oxidative stress, albumin is translocated to the nucleus where it binds in concert with known transcription factors to an antioxidant response element (ARE), which controls the expression of glutathione-S-transferase and other antioxidant enzymes, functioning to mediate adaptive cellular responses. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this adaptive cell response, we have identified linkages between calcium signaling and the nuclear translocation of albumin in JB6 epithelial cells. Under resting conditions, albumin and the calcium regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM), co-immunoprecipitate using antibodies against either protein, indicating a tight association. Calcium activation of CaM disrupts the association between CaM and albumin, suggesting that transient increases in cytosolic calcium levels function to mobilize intracellular albumin to facilitate its translocation into the nucleus. Likewise, nuclear translocation of albumin is induced by exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide or a phorbol ester, indicating a functional linkage between reactive oxygen species, calcium, and PKC-signaling pathways. Inclusion of an antioxidant enzyme (i.e., superoxide dismutase) blocks nuclear translocation, suggesting that the oxidation of sensitive proteins functions to coordinate the adaptive cellular response. These results suggest that elevated calcium transients, and associated increases in reactive oxygen species, contribute to adaptive cellular responses through the mobilization and nuclear translocation of cellular albumin to mediate the transcriptional regulation of antioxidant responsive elements.

  5. Distinguishing Unfolding and Functional Conformational Transitions of Calmodulin Using Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Squier, Thomas C.; Spiro, Thomas

    2014-06-14

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous moderator protein for calcium signaling in all eukaryotic cells. This small calcium-binding protein exhibits a broad range of structural transitions, including domain opening and folding-unfolding, that allow it to recognize a wide variety of binding partners in vivo. While the static structures of CaM associated with its various binding activities are fairly well known, it has been challenging to examine the dynamics of transition between these structures in real-time, due to a lack of suitable spectroscopic probes of CaM structure. In this paper, we examine the potential of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy for clarifying the nature of structural transitions in CaM. We find that the UVRR spectral change (with 229 nm excitation) due to thermal unfolding of CaM is qualitatively different from that associated with opening of the C-terminal domain in response to Ca2+ binding. This spectral difference is entirely due to differences in teritary contacts at the inter-domain tyrosine residue Tyr138, toward which other spectroscopic methods are not sensitive. We conclude that UVRR is ideally suited to identifying the different types of structural transitions in CaM and other proteins with conformation-sensitive tyrosine residues, opening a path to time-resolved studies of CaM dynamics using Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: A multifunctional enzyme and potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-05-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) belongs to the serine/threonine protein kinase family, and is primarily involved in transcriptional regulation in lymphocytes, neurons and male germ cells. CAMKIV operates the signaling cascade and regulates activity of several transcription activators by phosphorylation, which in turn plays pivotal roles in immune response, inflammation and memory consolidation. In this review, we tried to focus on different aspects of CAMKIV to understand the significance of this protein in the biological system. This enzyme is associated with varieties of disorders such as cerebral hypoxia, azoospermia, endometrial and ovarian cancer, systemic lupus, etc., and hence it is considered as a potential therapeutic target. Structure of CAMKIV is comprised of five distinct domains in which kinase domain is responsible for enzyme activity. CAMKIV is involved in varieties of cellular functions such as regulation of gene expression, T-cell maturation, regulation of survival phase of dendritic cells, bone growth and metabolism, memory consolidation, sperm motility, regulation of microtubule dynamics, cell-cycle progression and apoptosis. In this review, we performed an extensive analysis on structure, function and regulation of CAMKIV and associated diseases. PMID:26773169

  7. Calcium-dependent interaction of calmodulin with human 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes.

    PubMed

    Behnen, Petra; Davis, Elizabeth; Delaney, Erin; Frohm, Birgitta; Bauer, Mikael; Cedervall, Tommy; O'Connell, David; Åkerfeldt, Karin S; Linse, Sara

    2012-08-28

    Ribosomes are the protein factories of every living cell. The process of protein translation is highly complex and tightly regulated by a large number of diverse RNAs and proteins. Earlier studies indicate that Ca(2+) plays a role in protein translation. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous Ca(2+)-binding protein, regulates a large number of proteins participating in many signaling pathways. Several 40S and 60S ribosomal proteins have been identified to interact with CaM, and here, we report that CaM binds with high affinity to 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. No binding is observed in buffer with 6 mM Mg(2+) and 1 mM EGTA that chelates Ca(2+), suggesting high specificity of the CaM-ribosome interaction dependent on the Ca(2+) induced conformational change of CaM. The interactions between CaM and ribosomes are inhibited by synthetic peptides comprising putative CaM-binding sites in ribosomal proteins S2 and L14. Using a cell-free in vitro translation system, we further found that these synthetic peptides are potent inhibitors of protein synthesis. Our results identify an involvement of CaM in the translational activity of ribosomes.

  8. A Bridging Interaction Allows Calmodulin to Activate NO Synthase through a Bi-modal Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, Jesús; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Durra, Deborah; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) activates the nitric-oxide synthases (NOS) by a mechanism that is not completely understood. A recent crystal structure showed that bound CaM engages in a bridging interaction with the NOS FMN subdomain. We investigated its importance in neuronal NOS (nNOS) by mutating the two residues that primarily create the bridging interaction (Arg752 in the FMN subdomain and Glu47 in CaM). Mutations designed to completely destroy the bridging interaction prevented bound CaM from increasing electron flux through the FMN subdomain and diminished the FMN-to-heme electron transfer by 90%, whereas mutations that partly preserve the interaction had intermediate effects. The bridging interaction appeared to control FMN subdomain interactions with both its electron donor (NADPH-FAD subdomain) and electron acceptor (heme domain) partner subdomains in nNOS. We conclude that the Arg752–Glu47 bridging interaction is the main feature that enables CaM to activate nNOS. The mechanism is bi-modal and links a single structural aspect of CaM binding to specific changes in nNOS protein conformational and electron transfer properties that are essential for catalysis. PMID:20529840

  9. A bridging interaction allows calmodulin to activate NO synthase through a bi-modal mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Jesús; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Durra, Deborah; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2010-08-20

    Calmodulin (CaM) activates the nitric-oxide synthases (NOS) by a mechanism that is not completely understood. A recent crystal structure showed that bound CaM engages in a bridging interaction with the NOS FMN subdomain. We investigated its importance in neuronal NOS (nNOS) by mutating the two residues that primarily create the bridging interaction (Arg(752) in the FMN subdomain and Glu(47) in CaM). Mutations designed to completely destroy the bridging interaction prevented bound CaM from increasing electron flux through the FMN subdomain and diminished the FMN-to-heme electron transfer by 90%, whereas mutations that partly preserve the interaction had intermediate effects. The bridging interaction appeared to control FMN subdomain interactions with both its electron donor (NADPH-FAD subdomain) and electron acceptor (heme domain) partner subdomains in nNOS. We conclude that the Arg(752)-Glu(47) bridging interaction is the main feature that enables CaM to activate nNOS. The mechanism is bi-modal and links a single structural aspect of CaM binding to specific changes in nNOS protein conformational and electron transfer properties that are essential for catalysis. PMID:20529840

  10. Calmodulin-controlled spatial decoding of oscillatory Ca2+ signals by calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sohum; Aye-Han, Nwe-Nwe; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Oldach, Laurel; Gorshkov, Kirill; Zhang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Calcineurin is responsible for mediating a wide variety of cellular processes in response to dynamic calcium (Ca2+) signals, yet the precise mechanisms involved in the spatiotemporal control of calcineurin signaling are poorly understood. Here, we use genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors to directly probe the role of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations in modulating calcineurin activity dynamics in insulin-secreting MIN6 β-cells. We show that Ca2+ oscillations induce distinct temporal patterns of calcineurin activity in the cytosol and plasma membrane vs at the ER and mitochondria in these cells. Furthermore, we found that these differential calcineurin activity patterns are determined by variations in the subcellular distribution of calmodulin (CaM), indicating that CaM plays an active role in shaping both the spatial and temporal aspects of calcineurin signaling. Together, our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms by which oscillatory signals are decoded to generate specific functional outputs within different cellular compartments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03765.001 PMID:25056880

  11. New isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Z L; Ikebe, M

    1994-01-01

    Four novel isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) were found in rat aorta smooth muscle. Two of them were related to gamma-isoform of brain CaM kinase II (gamma-a). Differences in the primary structure of these isoforms were located in the variable region. One of them (gamma-b) contained 23 unique amino acid residues, whereas the other (gamma-c) did not contain this sequence. Both isoforms lacked the two segments (Val-316 to Gln-337 and Lys-353 to Leu-362) present in gamma-a. The DNA sequence of these gamma-isoforms except the variable region was exactly the same, suggesting that they are produced by alternative splicing. Another two isoforms were related to the delta-isoform of brain CaM kinase II (delta-a). delta-b contained a unique 11-residue sequence in the variable region whereas delta-c did not. As found for gamma-isoforms, the sequence analysis suggested that the three delta-isoforms are also produced by alternative splicing. Analysis of RNA by reverse transcription PCR confirmed the existence of specific messages for gamma-b, delta-a and delta-b. The variety of isoforms of CaM kinase II suggest that each isoform may play a specialized role in cell regulation. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8172610

  12. Calmodulin binds a highly extended HIV-1 MA protein that refolds upon its release.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James E; Chow, John Y H; Jeffries, Cy M; Kwan, Ann H; Duff, Anthony P; Hamilton, William A; Trewhella, Jill

    2012-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) expression is upregulated upon HIV-1 infection and interacts with proteins involved in viral processing, including the multifunctional HIV-1 MA protein. We present here the results of studies utilizing small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation that, when considered in the light of earlier fluorescence and NMR data, show CaM binds MA in an extended open-clamp conformation via interactions with two tryptophans that are widely spaced in sequence and space. The interaction requires a disruption of the MA tertiary fold such that MA becomes highly extended in a long snakelike conformation. The CaM-MA interface is extensive, covering ~70% of the length of the MA such that regions known to be important in MA interactions with critical binding partners would be impacted. The CaM conformation is semiextended and as such is distinct from the classical CaM-collapse about short α-helical targets. NMR data show that upon dissociation of the CaM-MA complex, either by the removal of Ca(2+) or increasing ionic strength, MA reforms its native tertiary contacts. Thus, we observe a high level of structural plasticity in MA that may facilitate regulation of its activities via intracellular Ca(2+)-signaling during viral processing. PMID:22947870

  13. Noncanonical binding of calmodulin to aquaporin-0: implications for channel regulation.

    PubMed

    Reichow, Steve L; Gonen, Tamir

    2008-09-10

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of ubiquitous membrane channels that conduct water across cell membranes. AQPs form homotetramers containing four functional and independent water pores. Aquaporin-0 (AQP0) is expressed in the eye lens, where its water permeability is regulated by calmodulin (CaM). Here we use a combination of biochemical methods and NMR spectroscopy to probe the interaction between AQP0 and CaM. We show that CaM binds the AQP0 C-terminal domain in a calcium-dependent manner. We demonstrate that only two CaM molecules bind a single AQP0 tetramer in a noncanonical fashion, suggesting a form of cooperativity between AQP0 monomers. Based on these results, we derive a structural model of the AQP0/CaM complex, which suggests CaM may be inhibitory to channel permeability by capping the vestibules of two monomers within the AQP0 tetramer. Finally, phosphorylation within AQP0's CaM binding domain inhibits the AQP0/CaM interaction, suggesting a temporal regulatory mechanism for complex formation. PMID:18786401

  14. The Cotton Kinesin-Like Calmodulin-Binding Protein Associates with Cortical Microtubles in Cotton Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Preuss, Mary L.; Delmar, Deborah P.; Liu, Bo

    2003-05-01

    Microtubules in interphase plant cells form a cortical array, which is critical for plant cell morphogenesis. Genetic studies imply that the minus end-directed microtubule motor kinesin-like calmodulin-binding protein (KCBP) plays a role in trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis. However, it was not clear whether this motor interacted with interphase microtubules. In cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers, cortical microtubules undergo dramatic reorganization during fiber development. In this study, cDNA clones of the cotton KCBP homolog GhKCBP were isolated from a cotton fiber-specific cDNA library. During cotton fiber development from 10 to 21 DPA, the GhKCBP protein level gradually decreases. By immunofluorescence, GhKCBP was detected as puncta along cortical microtubules in fiber cells of different developmental stages. Thus the results provide evidence that GhKCBP plays a role in interphase cell growth likely by interacting with cortical microtubules. In contrast to fibers, in dividing cells of cotton, GhKCBP localized to the nucleus, the microtubule preprophase band, mitotic spindle, and the phragmoplast. Therefore KCBP likely exerts multiple roles in cell division and cell growth in flowering plants.

  15. [Gene expression and activity regulation of two calmodulin binding protein kinases in tobacco seedling].

    PubMed

    Hua, Wei; Li, Rong-Jun; Liang, Shu-Ping; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2005-06-01

    Two different calmodulin-binding protein kinase cDNAs (NtCBK1/2) have been isolated from tobacco. To understand the CBK protein activity regulation, we compared the activity regulation of NtCBK1 and NtCBK2 by pH, Mg(2+) concentration and Na(+) concentration. We found the autophosphorylation of NtCBK1/2 reached the maximum in pH 7.5 and 8 respectively; Mg(2+) and Na(+) shown different effects on the activity of NtCBKs, high and low Mg(2+) concentrations both inhibited the activity of NtCBKs, but Na+ had little effect on the kinase activity. In addition, to obtain further insight about the physiological roles of individual NtCBKs, we detected the expression profiles of CBKs. The results revealed different patterns of expression of NtCBK1 and NtCBK2. Both are largely expressed in leaf and flower; but in stem and root, NtCBK1 gene had stronger expression than NtCBK2. NtCBK2 expression was induced by GA treatment, while NtCBK1 expression remained unchanged under GA treatment. Expression of both NtCBK1 and NtCBK2 increased in response to salt stress, the former to a greater extent, and both expressions did not change under high/low temperature, drought, NAA and ABA treatments.

  16. Reversible intracellular translocation of KRas but not HRas in hippocampal neurons regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Fivaz, Marc; Meyer, Tobias

    2005-08-01

    The Ras/MAPK pathway regulates synaptic plasticity and cell survival in neurons of the central nervous system. Here, we show that KRas, but not HRas, acutely translocates from the plasma membrane (PM) to the Golgi complex and early/recycling endosomes in response to neuronal activity. Translocation is reversible and mediated by the polybasic-prenyl membrane targeting motif of KRas. We provide evidence that KRas translocation occurs through sequestration of the polybasic-prenyl motif by Ca2+/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) and subsequent release of KRas from the PM, in a process reminiscent of GDP dissociation inhibitor-mediated membrane recycling of Rab and Rho GTPases. KRas translocation was accompanied by partial intracellular redistribution of its activity. We conclude that the polybasic-prenyl motif acts as a Ca2+/CaM-regulated molecular switch that controls PM concentration of KRas and redistributes its activity to internal sites. Our data thus define a novel signaling mechanism that differentially regulates KRas and HRas localization and activity in neurons.

  17. Modulation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway by Ca(2+), and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Agell, Neus; Bachs, Oriol; Rocamora, Nati; Villalonga, Priam

    2002-08-01

    Ras activation induces a variety of cellular responses that depend on the specific activated effector, the intensity and amplitude of its activation, and the cellular type. Transient activation followed by a sustained but low signal of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway is a common feature of cell proliferation in many systems. On the contrary, sustained, high activation is linked with either senescence or apoptosis in fibroblasts and to differentiation in neurones and PC12 cells. The temporal regulation of the pathway is relevant and not only depends on the specific receptor activated but also on the presence of diverse modulators of the pathway. We review here evidence showing that calcium (Ca(2+)) and calmodulin (CaM) are able to regulate the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs) as Ras-GRF and CaM-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) positively modulate ERK1/2 activation induced by either NGF or membrane depolarisation in neurones. In fibroblasts, CaM binding to EGF receptor and K-Ras(B) may be involved in the downregulation of the pathway after its activation, allowing a proliferative signalling.

  18. Ca2+/calmodulin binds and dissociates K-RasB from membrane.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Ranjinder S; Clough, Richard R; Bhullar, Rajinder P

    2003-05-16

    We have investigated the interaction of calmodulin (CaM) with Ras-p21 and the significance of this association. All Ras-p21 isoforms tested (H-, K-, and N-Ras) were detected in the particulate fraction of human platelets and MCF-7 cells, a human breast cancer cell line. In MCF-7 cells, H- and N-Ras were also detected in the cytosolic fraction. K-RasB from platelet and MCF-7 cell lysates was found to bind CaM in a Ca2+ -dependent but GTPgammaS-independent manner. The yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that K-RasB binds to CaM in vivo. Incubation of isolated membranes from platelet and MCF-7 cells with CaM caused dissociation of only K-RasB from membranes in a Ca2+ -dependent manner. CaM antagonist, W7, inhibited dissociation of K-RasB. Addition of platelet or MCF-7 cytosol alone to isolated platelet membranes did not cause dissociation of K-RasB and only addition of exogenous CaM caused dissociation. The results suggest a potential role for Ca2+/CaM in the regulation of K-RasB function.

  19. Conservation of Ca2+/Calmodulin Regulation across Na and Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Yang, Philemon S.; Niu, Jacqueline; Yang, Wanjun; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, David T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+channels comprise distinct ion-channel superfamilies, yet the carboxy tails of these channels exhibit high homology hinting at a long-shared and purposeful module. For different Ca2+ channels, carboxyl-tail inter actions with calmodulin do elaborate robust and similar forms of Ca2+ regulation. However, Na channels have only shown subtler Ca2+modulation that differs among reports, challenging attempts at unified understanding. Here, by rapid Ca2+photoreleaseon to Na channels, we reset this view of Na channel regulation. For cardiac muscle channels (NaV1.5), reported effects from which most mechanistic proposals derive, we observe no Ca2+modulation. Conversely, for skeletal-muscle channels (NaV1.4), we uncover fast Ca2+ regulation eerily similar to that of Ca2+ channels. Channel opathic myotonia mutations halve NaV1.4 Ca2+ regulation, and transplanting the NaV1.4 carboxy tail onto Ca2+ channels recapitulates Ca2+ regulation. Thus we argue for the persistence and physiological relevance of an ancient Ca2+ regulatory module across Na and Ca2+ channels. PMID:24949975

  20. Defective calmodulin-dependent rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish sensory hair cell mutants.

    PubMed

    Seiler, C; Nicolson, T

    1999-11-15

    Vertebrate mechanosensory hair cells contain a narrow "pericuticular" zone which is densely populated with small vesicles between the cuticular plate and cellular junctions near the apical surface. The presence of many cytoplasmic vesicles suggests that the apical surface of hair cells has a high turnover rate. The significance of intense membrane trafficking at the apical surface is not known. Using a marker of endocytosis, the styryl dye FM1-43, this report shows that rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells is calcium and calmodulin dependent and is partially blocked by the presence of amiloride and dihydrostreptomycin, known inhibitors of mechanotransduction channels. As seen in lateral line hair cells, sensory hair cells within the larval otic capsule also exhibit rapid apical endocytosis. Defects in internalization of the dye in both lateral line and inner ear hair cells were found in five zebrafish auditory/vestibular mutants: sputnik, mariner, orbiter, mercury, and skylab. In addition, lateral line hair cells in these mutants were not sensitive to prolonged exposure to streptomycin, which is toxic to hair cells. The presence of endocytic defects in the majority of zebrafish mechanosensory mutants points to a important role of apical endocytosis in hair cell function. PMID:10526320

  1. Novel role of calmodulin in regulating protein transport to mitochondria in a unicellular eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Aich, Abhishek; Shaha, Chandrima

    2013-11-01

    Lower eukaryotes like the kinetoplastid parasites are good models to study evolution of cellular pathways during steps to eukaryogenesis. In this study, a kinetoplastid parasite, Leishmania donovani, was used to understand the process of mitochondrial translocation of a nucleus-encoded mitochondrial protein, the mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase (mTXNPx). We report the presence of an N-terminal cleavable mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) validated through deletion and grafting experiments. We also establish a novel finding of calmodulin (CaM) binding to the MTS of mTXNPx through specific residues. Mutation of CaM binding residues, keeping intact the residues involved in mitochondrial targeting and biochemical inhibition of CaM activity both in vitro and in vivo, prevented mitochondrial translocation. Through reconstituted import assays, we demonstrate obstruction of mitochondrial translocation either in the absence of CaM or Ca(2+) or in the presence of CaM inhibitors. We also demonstrate the prevention of temperature-driven mTXNPx aggregation in the presence of CaM. These findings establish the idea that CaM is required for the transport of the protein to mitochondria through maintenance of translocation competence posttranslation. PMID:24043313

  2. Biomineralization: functions of calmodulin-like protein in the shell formation of pearl oyster.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenguang; Fang, Zi; Ma, Zhuojun; Deng, Jinye; Li, Shuo; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2007-09-01

    Calmodulin-like protein (CaLP) was believed to be involved in the shell formation of pearl oyster. However, no further study of this protein was ever performed. In this study, the in vitro crystallization experiment showed that CaLP can modify the morphology of calcite. In addition, aragonite crystals can be induced in the mixture of CaLP and a nacre protein (at 16 kDa), which was detected and purified from the EDTA-soluble matrix of nacre. These results agreed with that of immunohistological staining in which CaLP was detected not only in the organic layer sandwiched between nacre (aragonite) and the prismatic layer (calcite), but also around the prisms of the prismatic layer. Take together, we concluded that (1) CaLP, as a component of the organic layer, can induce the nucleation of aragonite through binding with the 16-kDa protein, and (2) CaLP may regulate the growth of calcite in the prismatic layer.

  3. The Association Study of Calmodulin 1 Gene Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Zuchao; Qiu, Guixing

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Idiopathic scoliosis is the most common pediatric spinal deformity affecting 1% to 3% of the population, and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) accounts for approximately 80% of these cases; however, the etiology and pathogenesis of AIS are still uncertain. The current study aims to identify the relationship between calmodulin 1 (CALM1) gene and AIS predisposition, to identify the relationship between the genotypes of the SNPs and the clinical phenotypes of AIS. Methods. 146 AIS patients and 146 healthy controls were enrolled into this case-control study. 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) candidates in CALM1 gene were selected to determine the relationship between CALM1 gene and AIS predisposition. Case-only study was performed to determine the effects of these variants on the severity of the condition. Results. Three SNPs from 12 candidates were found to be associated with AIS predisposition. The ORs were observed as 0.549 (95% CI 0.3519–0.8579, P = 0.0079), 0.549 (95% CI 0.3519–0.8579, P = 0.0079), and 1.6139 (95% CI 1.0576–2.4634, P = 0.0257) for rs2300496, rs2300500, and rs3231718, respectively. There was no statistical difference between main curve, severity, and genotype distributions of all of 12 SNPs. Conclusion. Genetic variants of CALM1 gene are associated with AIS susceptibility. PMID:24551838

  4. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IV Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Keizo; Tanda, Koichi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kasahara, Jiro; Nakao, Kazuki; Katsuki, Motoya; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Toyama, Keiko; Adachi, Minami; Umeda, Masahiro; Araki, Tsutomu; Fukunaga, Kohji; Kondo, Hisatake; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) is a protein kinase that activates the transcription factor CREB, the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein. CREB is a key transcription factor in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. To elucidate the behavioral effects of CaMKIV deficiency, we subjected CaMKIV knockout (CaMKIV KO) mice to a battery of behavioral tests. CaMKIV KO had no significant effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination, social interaction, pain sensitivity, prepulse inhibition, attention, or depression-like behavior. Consistent with previous reports, CaMKIV KO mice exhibited impaired retention in a fear conditioning test 28 days after training. In contrast, however, CaMKIV KO mice did not show any testing performance deficits in passive avoidance, one of the most commonly used fear memory paradigms, 28 days after training, suggesting that remote fear memory is intact. CaMKIV KO mice exhibited intact spatial reference memory learning in the Barnes circular maze, and normal spatial working memory in an eight-arm radial maze. CaMKIV KO mice also showed mildly decreased anxiety-like behavior, suggesting that CaMKIV is involved in regulating emotional behavior. These findings indicate that CaMKIV might not be essential for fear memory or spatial memory, although it is possible that the activities of other neural mechanisms or signaling pathways compensate for the CaMKIV deficiency. PMID:20209163

  5. Calmodulin has the Potential to Function as a Ca2+-Dependent Adaptor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Rainaldi, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a versatile Ca2+-binding protein that regulates the activity of numerous effector proteins in response to Ca2+ signals. Several CaM-dependent regulatory mechanisms have been identified, including autoinhibitory domain displacement, sequestration of a ligand-binding site, active site reorganization, and target protein dimerization. We recently showed that the N- and C-lobes of animal and plant CaM isoforms could independently and sequentially bind to target peptides derived from the CaM-binding domain of Nicotiana tabacum mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (NtMKP1), to form a 2:1 peptide:CaM complex. This suggests that CaM might facilitate the dimerization of NtMKP1, although the dimerization mechanism is distinct from the previously described simultaneous binding of other target peptides to CaM. The independent and sequential binding of the NtMKP1 peptides to CaM also suggests an alternative plausible scenario in which the C-lobe of CaM remains tethered to NtMKP1, and the N-lobe is free to recruit a second target protein to the complex, such as an NtMKP1 target. Thus, we hypothesize that CaM may be capable of functioning as a Ca2+-dependent adaptor or recruiter protein. PMID:19704657

  6. Responses of plant calmodulin to endocytosis induced by rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Cheng, Mengzhu; Chu, Yunxia; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, David D Y; Huang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Qing

    2016-07-01

    The wide application of rare earth elements (REEs) have led to their diffusion and accumulation in the environment. The activation of endocytosis is the primary response of plant cells to REEs. Calmodulin (CaM), as an important substance in calcium (Ca) signaling systems, regulating almost all of the physiological activities in plants, such as cellular metabolism, cell growth and division. However, the response of CaM to endocytosis activated by REEs remains unknown. By using immunofluorescence labeling and a confocal laser scanning microscope, we found that trivalent lanthanum [La(III)], an REE ion, affected the expression of CaM in endocytosis. Using circular dichroism, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and computer simulations, we demonstrated that a low concentration of La(III) could interact with extracellular CaM by electrostatic attraction and was then bound to two Ca-binding sites of CaM, making the molecular structure more compact and orderly, whereas a high concentration of La(III) could be coordinated with cytoplasmic CaM or bound to other Ca-binding sites, making the molecular structure more loose and disorderly. Our results provide a reference for revealing the action mechanisms of REEs in plant cells.

  7. Identification of high-affinity calmodulin-binding proteins in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, R.M.; Dedman, J.R.; Shenolikar, S.

    1987-03-01

    The Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent binding of (/sup 125/I) calmodulin (CaM) to hepatic proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was utilized to identify CaM binding or acceptor proteins or CAPs. Two proteins of apparent molecular weight of 60,000 (CAP-60) and 45,000 (CAP-45) comprised > 80% of the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent CaM binding in rat liver cytosol. CAP-60 and CAP-45 were partially purified by a variety of chromatographic steps, including affinity chromatography on CaM Sepharose. CAP-60 possessed a native molecular size of 400,000, indicating it to be the CaM-binding subunit of a larger oligomeric complex. In contrast, CAP-45 was monomeric as judged by gel filtration. Neither CAP-60 nor CAP-45 possessed chromatographic properties consistent with known CaM-dependent enzymes reported in the literature. Two-dimensional peptide mapping provided convincing evidence that CAP-60 and CAP-45 were unrelated to other well-characterized CAPs, namely Ca/sup 2 +/ (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II, calcineurin, or the CaM-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The relative abundance and high affinity for CaM could suggest that these novel target proteins, CAP-60 and CAP-45, represent a dominant pathway for CaM action in the mammalian liver.

  8. Distribution of calmodulin in pea seedlings: immunocytochemical localization in plumules and root apices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.; Hardison, L.

    1986-01-01

    Immunofluorescence techniques have been used to study the distribution of calmodulin in several tissues in young etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings. A fairly uniform staining was seen in the nucleoplasm and background cytoplasm of most cell types. Cell walls and nucleoli were not stained. In addition, patterned staining reactions were seen in many cells. In cells of the plumule, punctate staining of the cytoplasm was common, and in part this stain appeared to be associated with the plastids. A very distinctive staining of amyloplasts was seen in the columella of the root cap. Staining associated with cytoskeletal elements could be shown in division stages. By metaphase, staining of the spindle region was quite evident. In epidermal cells of the stem and along the underside of the leaf there was an intense staining of the vacuolar contents. Guard cells lacked this vacuolar stain. Vacuolar staining was sometimes seen in cells of the stele, but the most distinctive pattern in the stele was associated with young conducting cells of the xylem. These staining patterns are consistent with the idea that the interactions of plastids and the cytoskeletal may be one of the Ca(2+)-mediated steps in the response of plants to environmental stimuli. Nuclear functions may also be controlled, at least in part, by Ca2+.

  9. Selective Nitration of Tyr(99) in Calmodulin as a Marker of Cellular Conditions of Oxidative Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S. ); Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Bartlett, Ryan K.; Urbauer, Ramona J.; Williams, Todd D.; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Squier, Thomas C. )

    2003-01-01

    We examined the possible role of methionines as oxidant scavengers that prevent the peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosines within calmodulin (CaM). We used mass spectrometry to investigate the reactivity of peroxynitrite with CaM at physiological pH. The possible role of methionines in scavenging peroxynitrite(ONOO-)was assessed in wild-type CaM and following substitution of all nine methionines in CaM with leucines. We find that peroxynitrite selectively nitrates Tyr-99 at physiological pH resulting in the formation of between 0.05 and 0.25 mol of nitrotyrosine/mol of CaM when the added molar ratio of peroxynitrite per CaM was varied between 2.5 and 15. In wild-type CaM there is a corresponding oxidation of between 0.8 and 2.8 mol of methionine to form methionine sulfoxide. However, following site-directed substitution of all nine methionines in wild-type CaM with leucines, the extent of nitration by peroxynitrite was unchanged. These results indicate that Tyr-99 is readily nitrated by perioxynitrite and that methionine side chains do not function as an antioxidant in scavenging perioxynitrite. Thus, separate reactive species are involved in the oxidation of

  10. Capping of the N-terminus of PSD-95 by calmodulin triggers its postsynaptic release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Matt, Lucas; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Malik, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Park, Deborah K; Renieri, Alessandra; Ames, James B; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-06-17

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is a central element of the postsynaptic architecture of glutamatergic synapses. PSD-95 mediates postsynaptic localization of AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors and plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. PSD-95 is released from postsynaptic membranes in response to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA receptors. Here, we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) binds at the N-terminus of PSD-95. Our NMR structure reveals that both lobes of CaM collapse onto a helical structure of PSD-95 formed at its N-terminus (residues 1-16). This N-terminal capping of PSD-95 by CaM blocks palmitoylation of C3 and C5, which is required for postsynaptic PSD-95 targeting and the binding of CDKL5, a kinase important for synapse stability. CaM forms extensive hydrophobic contacts with Y12 of PSD-95. The PSD-95 mutant Y12E strongly impairs binding to CaM and Ca(2+)-induced release of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane in dendritic spines. Our data indicate that CaM binding to PSD-95 serves to block palmitoylation of PSD-95, which in turn promotes Ca(2+)-induced dissociation of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane.

  11. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in methamphetamine-induced neural damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xufeng; Xing, Jingjing; Jiang, Lei; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Sun, Hao; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an illicit drug, is widely abused in many parts of the world. Mounting evidence shows that METH exposure contributes to neurotoxicity, particularly for the monoaminergic neurons. However, to date, only a few studies have tried to unravel the mechanisms involved in METH-induced non-monoaminergic neural damage. Therefore, in the present study, we tried to explore the mechanisms for METH-induced neural damage in cortical neurons. Our results showed that METH significantly increased intracellular [Ca(2) (+) ]i in Ca(2) (+) -containing solution rather than Ca(2) (+) -free solution. Moreover, METH also upregulated calmodulin (CaM) expression and activated CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Significantly, METH-induced neural damage can be partially retarded by CaM antagonist W7 as well as CaMKII blocker KN93. In addition, L-type Ca(2) (+) channel was also proved to be involved in METH-induced cell damage, as nifedipine, the L-type Ca(2) (+) channel-specific inhibitor, markedly attenuated METH-induced neural damage. Collectively, our results suggest that Ca(2) (+) -CaM-CaMKII is involved in METH-mediated neurotoxicity, and it might suggest a potential target for the development of therapeutic strategies for METH abuse. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Glucocorticoid interactions with ethanol effects on synaptic plasma membranes: influence on [125I]calmodulin binding.

    PubMed

    Sze, P Y

    1996-02-01

    Ca(++)-dependent binding of calmodulin (CaM) to brain synaptic plasma membranes is known to be inhibited by ethanol and stimulated by glucocorticoids. These opposite neurochemical actions between ethanol and the steroids in vitro are consistent with glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol-induced sedation reported to occur in vivo. The present study was undertaken to characterize the interactions of corticosterone with ethanol effects on [125I]CaM binding in synaptic plasma membranes. From the shift of concentration-response curves when corticosterone and ethanol were present in combination, the interaction between steroid stimulation and ethanol inhibition occurred in an additive relationship over the range of their effective concentrations. From Scatchard analyses, ethanol-induced decrease in membrane affinity for [125I]CaM was antagonized by steroid-induced increase in the membrane affinity, indicating that the convergent event in their interaction was the alteration of membrane affinity for CaM. Glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol inhibition of [125I]CaM binding exhibited a high degree of steroid specificity; steroids with glucocorticoid activity including cortisol, dexamethasone and triamcinolone were effective, whereas gonadal steroids and excitatory neuroactive steroid metabolites were ineffective. The demonstration that glucocorticoids antagonized the inhibition of CaM binding by ethanol provides support for the hypothesis that these steroids are among the endogenous factors that modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol.

  13. Structural analysis of calmodulin binding to ion channels demonstrates the role of its plasticity in regulation.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Bokhovchuk, Fedir M; Bate, Neil; Bindels, René J M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Vuister, Geerten W

    2013-11-01

    The Ca²⁺-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) is a well-known regulator of ion-channel activity. Consequently, the Protein Data Bank contains many structures of CaM in complex with different fragments of ion channels that together display a variety of binding modes. In addition to the canonical interaction, in which CaM engages its target with both its domains, many of the ion-channel-CaM complexes demonstrate alternative non-canonical binding modes that depend on the target and experimental conditions. Based on these findings, several mechanisms of ion-channel regulation by CaM have been proposed, all exploiting its plasticity and flexibility in interacting with its targets. In this review, we focus on complexes of CaM with either the voltage-gated calcium channels; the voltage-gated sodium channels or the small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, for which both structural and functional data are available. For each channel, the functional relevance of these structural data and possible mechanism of calcium-dependent (in)activation and/or facilitation are discussed in detail. PMID:23609407

  14. Involvement of specific calmodulin isoforms in salicylic acid-independent activation of plant disease resistance responses.

    PubMed

    Heo, W D; Lee, S H; Kim, M C; Kim, J C; Chung, W S; Chun, H J; Lee, K J; Park, C Y; Park, H C; Choi, J Y; Cho, M J

    1999-01-19

    The Ca2+ signal is essential for the activation of plant defense responses, but downstream components of the signaling pathway are still poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that specific calmodulin (CaM) isoforms are activated by infection or pathogen-derived elicitors and participate in Ca2+-mediated induction of plant disease resistance responses. Soybean CaM (SCaM)-4 and SCaM-5 genes, which encode for divergent CaM isoforms, were induced within 30 min by a fungal elicitor or pathogen, whereas other SCaM genes encoding highly conserved CaM isoforms did not show such response. This pathogen-triggered induction of these genes specifically depended on the increase of intracellular Ca2+ level. Constitutive expression of SCaM-4 and SCaM-5 in transgenic tobacco plants triggered spontaneous induction of lesions and induces an array of systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-associated genes. Surprisingly, these transgenic plants have normal levels of endogenous salicylic acid (SA). Furthermore, coexpression of nahG gene did not block the induction of SAR-associated genes in these transgenic plants, indicating that SA is not involved in the SAR gene induction mediated by SCaM-4 or SCaM-5. The transgenic plants exhibit enhanced resistance to a wide spectrum of virulent and avirulent pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and virus. These results suggest that specific CaM isoforms are components of a SA-independent signal transduction chain leading to disease resistance.

  15. Calmodulin kinase II is involved in voltage-dependent facilitation of the L-type Cav1.2 calcium channel: Identification of the phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Seong; Karl, Rosi; Moosmang, Sven; Lenhardt, Peter; Klugbauer, Norbert; Hofmann, Franz; Kleppisch, Thomas; Welling, Andrea

    2006-09-01

    Calcium-dependent facilitation of L-type calcium channels has been reported to depend on the function of calmodulin kinase II. In contrast, the mechanism for voltage-dependent facilitation is not clear. In HEK 293 cells expressing Ca(v)1.2, Ca(v)beta2a, and calmodulin kinase II, the calcium current measured at +30 mV was facilitated up to 1.5-fold by a 200-ms-long prepulse to +160 mV. This voltage-dependent facilitation was prevented by the calmodulin kinase II inhibitors KN93 and the autocamtide-2-related peptide. In cells expressing the Ca(v)1.2 mutation I1649E, a residue critical for the binding of Ca2+-bound calmodulin, facilitation was also abolished. Calmodulin kinase II was coimmunoprecipitated with the Ca(v)1.2 channel from murine heart and HEK 293 cells expressing Ca(v)1.2 and calmodulinkinase II. The precipitated Ca(v)1.2 channel was phosphorylated in the presence of calmodulin and Ca2+. Fifteen putative calmodulin kinase II phosphorylation sites were identified mostly in the carboxyl-terminal tail of Ca(v)1.2. Neither truncation at amino acid 1728 nor changing the II-III loop serines 808 and 888 to alanines affected facilitation of the calcium current. In contrast, facilitation was decreased by the single mutations S1512A and S1570A and abolished by the double mutation S1512A/S1570A. These serines flank the carboxyl-terminal EF-hand motif. Immunoprecipitation of calmodulin kinase II with the Ca(v)1.2 channel was not affected by the mutation S1512A/S1570A. The phosphorylation of the Ca(v)1.2 protein was strongly decreased in the S1512A/S1570A double mutant. These results suggest that voltage-dependent facilitation of the Ca(v)1.2 channel depends on the phosphorylation of Ser1512/Ser1570 by calmodulin kinase II. PMID:16820363

  16. Phosphorylation of S344 in the calmodulin-binding domain negatively affects CCaMK function during bacterial and fungal symbioses.

    PubMed

    Routray, Pratyush; Miller, J Benjamin; Du, Liqun; Oldroyd, Giles; Poovaiah, B W

    2013-10-01

    Calcium and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) plays a critical role in the signaling pathway that establishes root nodule symbiosis and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Calcium-dependent autophosphorylation is central to the regulation of CCaMK, and this has been shown to promote calmodulin binding. Here, we report a regulatory mechanism of Medicago truncatula CCaMK (MtCCaMK) through autophosphorylation of S344 in the calmodulin-binding/autoinhibitory domain. The phospho-ablative mutation S344A did not have significant effect on its kinase activities, and supports root nodule symbiosis and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, indicating that phosphorylation at this position is not required for establishment of symbioses. The phospho-mimic mutation S344D show drastically reduced calmodulin-stimulated substrate phosphorylation, and this coincides with a compromised interaction with calmodulin and its interacting partner, IPD3. Functional complementation tests revealed that the S344D mutation blocked root nodule symbiosis and reduced the mycorrhizal association. Furthermore, S344D was shown to suppress the spontaneous nodulation associated with a gain-of-function mutant of MtCCaMK (T271A), revealing that phosphorylation at S344 of MtCCaMK is adequate for shutting down its activity, and is epistatic over previously identified T271 autophosphorylation. These results reveal a mechanism that enables CCaMK to 'turn off' its function through autophosphorylation.

  17. Calmodulin inhibition regulates morphological and functional changes related to the actin cytoskeleton in pure microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Melinda; Dulka, Karolina; Gulya, Karoly

    2016-01-01

    The roles of calmodulin (CaM), a multifunctional intracellular calcium receptor protein, as concerns selected morphological and functional characteristics of pure microglial cells derived from mixed primary cultures from embryonal forebrains of rats, were investigated through use of the CaM antagonists calmidazolium (CALMID) and trifluoperazine (TFP). The intracellular localization of the CaM protein relative to phalloidin, a bicyclic heptapeptide that binds only to filamentous actin, and the ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1), a microglia-specific actin-binding protein, was determined by immunocytochemistry, with quantitative analysis by immunoblotting. In unchallenged and untreated (control) microglia, high concentrations of CaM protein were found mainly perinuclearly in ameboid microglia, while the cell cortex had a smaller CaM content that diminished progressively deeper into the branches in the ramified microglia. The amounts and intracellular distributions of both Iba1 and CaM proteins were altered after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in activated microglia. CALMID and TFP exerted different, sometimes opposing, effects on many morphological, cytoskeletal and functional characteristics of the microglial cells. They affected the CaM and Iba1 protein expressions and their intracellular localizations differently, inhibited cell proliferation, viability and fluid-phase phagocytosis to different degrees both in unchallenged and in LPS-treated (immunologically challenged) cells, and differentially affected the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in the microglial cell cortex, influencing lamellipodia, filopodia and podosome formation. In summary, these CaM antagonists altered different aspects of filamentous actin-based cell morphology and related functions with variable efficacy, which could be important in deciphering the roles of CaM in regulating microglial functions in health and disease.

  18. Human platelet calmodulin-binding proteins: Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteolysis upon platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.W.; Tallant, E.A.; McManus, M.C.

    1986-05-01

    Calmodulin (CaM)-binding proteins have been identified in human platelets using Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-CaM. Ten distinct proteins with molecular weights of 245, 225K, 175K, 150K, 90K, 82K(2), 60K and 41K(2) bound /sup 125/I-CaM in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner; the binding was blocked by both trifluoperazine and nonradiolabeled CaM. The 225K and 90K proteins were labeled by antisera against myosin light chain kinase (MLCK); the 60K and one of the 82K proteins were identified as the CaM-dependent phosphatase and caldesmon. The remaining proteins have not yet been identified. Most of the CaM-binding proteins were degraded upon addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ to a platelet homogenate; the degradation could be blocked by either EGTA, leupeptin or N-ethyl-maleimide which suggests that it was due to a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent protease. Activation of intact platelets by thrombin, ADP, collagen and the Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophores A23187 and ionomycin under conditions which promote platelet aggregation (i.e. stirring with extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/) also resulted in limited proteolysis of CaM-binding proteins including those labeled with anti-MLCK and the phosphatase. Many Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes have been shown to be irreversibly activated in vitro by limited proteolysis. Their data indicates that limited proteolysis also occurs in vivo; under certain conditions proteolysis may be an important physiological mechanism for irreversibly activating Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes.

  19. Allosteric effects of the antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine on the energetics of calcium binding by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Feldkamp, Michael D; O'Donnell, Susan E; Yu, Liping; Shea, Madeline A

    2010-08-01

    Trifluoperazine (TFP; Stelazine) is an antagonist of calmodulin (CaM), an essential regulator of calcium-dependent signal transduction. Reports differ regarding whether, or where, TFP binds to apo CaM. Three crystallographic structures (1CTR, 1A29, and 1LIN) show TFP bound to (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM in ratios of 1, 2, or 4 TFP per CaM. In all of these, CaM domains adopt the "open" conformation seen in CaM-kinase complexes having increased calcium affinity. Most reports suggest TFP also increases calcium affinity of CaM. To compare TFP binding to apo CaM and (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM and explore differential effects on the N- and C-domains of CaM, stoichiometric TFP titrations of CaM were monitored by (15)N-HSQC NMR. Two TFP bound to apo CaM, whereas four bound to (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM. In both cases, the preferred site was in the C-domain. During the titrations, biphasic responses for some resonances suggested intersite interactions. TFP-binding sites in apo CaM appeared distinct from those in (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM. In equilibrium calcium titrations at defined ratios of TFP:CaM, TFP reduced calcium affinity at most levels tested; this is similar to the effect of many IQ-motifs on CaM. However, at the highest level tested, TFP raised the calcium affinity of the N-domain of CaM. A model of conformational switching is proposed to explain how TFP can exert opposing allosteric effects on calcium affinity by binding to different sites in the "closed," "semi-open," and "open" domains of CaM. In physiological processes, apo CaM, as well as (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM, needs to be considered a potential target of drug action.

  20. Essential Role of Calmodulin in RyR Inhibition by Dantrolene.

    PubMed

    Oo, Ye Win; Gomez-Hurtado, Nieves; Walweel, Kafa; van Helden, Dirk F; Imtiaz, Mohammad S; Knollmann, Bjorn C; Laver, Derek R

    2015-07-01

    Dantrolene is the first line therapy of malignant hyperthermia. Animal studies suggest that dantrolene also protects against heart failure and arrhythmias caused by spontaneous Ca(2+) release. Although dantrolene inhibits Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal and cardiac muscle preparations, its mechanism of action has remained controversial, because dantrolene does not inhibit single ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels in lipid bilayers. Here we test the hypothesis that calmodulin (CaM), a physiologic RyR binding partner that is lost during incorporation into lipid bilayers, is required for dantrolene inhibition of RyR channels. In single channel recordings (100 nM cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)] + 2 mM ATP), dantrolene caused inhibition of RyR1 (rabbit skeletal muscle) and RyR2 (sheep) with a maximal inhibition of Po (Emax) to 52 ± 4% of control only after adding physiologic [CaM] = 100 nM. Dantrolene inhibited RyR2 with an IC50 of 0.16 ± 0.03 µM. Mutant N98S-CaM facilitated dantrolene inhibition with an IC50 = 5.9 ± 0.3 nM. In mouse cardiomyocytes, dantrolene had no effect on cardiac Ca(2+) release in the absence of CaM, but reduced Ca(2+) wave frequency (IC50 = 0.42 ± 0.18 µM, Emax = 47 ± 4%) and amplitude (IC50 = 0.19 ± 0.04 µM, Emax = 66 ± 4%) in the presence of 100 nM CaM. We conclude that CaM is essential for dantrolene inhibition of RyR1 and RyR2. Its absence explains why dantrolene inhibition of single RyR channels has not been previously observed. PMID:25920678

  1. Abiotic stress responses in plants: roles of calmodulin-regulated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Virdi, Amardeep S.; Singh, Supreet; Singh, Prabhjeet

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular changes in calcium ions (Ca2+) in response to different biotic and abiotic stimuli are detected by various sensor proteins in the plant cell. Calmodulin (CaM) is one of the most extensively studied Ca2+-sensing proteins and has been shown to be involved in transduction of Ca2+ signals. After interacting with Ca2+, CaM undergoes conformational change and influences the activities of a diverse range of CaM-binding proteins. A number of CaM-binding proteins have also been implicated in stress responses in plants, highlighting the central role played by CaM in adaptation to adverse environmental conditions. Stress adaptation in plants is a highly complex and multigenic response. Identification and characterization of CaM-modulated proteins in relation to different abiotic stresses could, therefore, prove to be essential for a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Various studies have revealed involvement of CaM in regulation of metal ions uptake, generation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of transcription factors such as CAMTA3, GTL1, and WRKY39. Activities of several kinases and phosphatases have also been shown to be modulated by CaM, thus providing further versatility to stress-associated signal transduction pathways. The results obtained from contemporary studies are consistent with the proposed role of CaM as an integrator of different stress signaling pathways, which allows plants to maintain homeostasis between different cellular processes. In this review, we have attempted to present the current state of understanding of the role of CaM in modulating different stress-regulated proteins and its implications in augmenting abiotic stress tolerance in plants. PMID:26528296

  2. Structure-function of the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, Andy; Schulman, Howard

    2002-06-15

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous mediator of Ca2+-linked signalling that phosphorylates a wide range of substrates to co-ordinate and regulate Ca2+-mediated alterations in cellular function. The transmission of information by the kinase from extracellular stimuli and the intracellular Ca2+ rise is not passive. Rather, its multimeric structure and autoregulation enable this enzyme to participate actively in the sensitivity, timing and location of its action. CaMKII can: (i) be activated in a Ca2+-spike frequency-dependent manner; (ii) become independent of its initial Ca2+/CaM activators; and (iii) undergo a 'molecular switch-like' behaviour, which is crucial for certain forms of learning and memory. CaMKII is derived from a family of four homologous but distinct genes, with over 30 alternatively spliced isoforms described at present. These isoforms possess diverse developmental and anatomical expression patterns, as well as subcellular localization. Six independent catalytic/autoregulatory domains are connected by a narrow stalk-like appendage to each hexameric ring within the dodecameric structure. Ca2+/CaM binding activates the enzyme by disinhibiting the autoregulatory domain; this process initiates an intra-holoenzyme autophosphorylation reaction that induces complex changes in the enzyme's sensitivity to Ca2+/CaM, including the generation of Ca2+/CaM-independent (autonomous) activity and marked increase in affinity for CaM. The role of CaMKII in Ca2+ signal transduction is shaped by its autoregulation, isoenzymic type and subcellular localization. The molecular determinants and mechanisms producing these processes are discussed as they relate to the structure-function of this multifunctional protein kinase. PMID:11931644

  3. Sequential changes in trace metal, metallothionein and calmodulin concentrations in healing skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Lansdown, A B; Sampson, B; Rowe, A

    1999-10-01

    Metalloenzymes have an important role in repair and regenerative processes in skin wounds. Demands for different enzymes vary according to the phase in the healing cascade and constituent events. Sequential changes in the concentrations of calcium, copper, magnesium and zinc were studied in the incisional wound model in the rat over a 10 d period. Copper levels remained low (< 10 microg/g dry weight) throughout, but calcium, magnesium and zinc increased from wounding and peaked at about 5 d at a time of high inflammation, granulation tissue formation and epidermal cell proliferation. Metal concentrations declined to normal by 7 d when inflammation had regressed, re-epithelialisation of the wound site was complete and the 'normalisation' phase had commenced. Although the wound was overtly healed by 10 d, the epidermis was still moderately hyperplastic. In view of competitive binding of trace metals at membrane receptors and carrier proteins, the ratios or balance between these trace metals was examined and the significance is discussed. Using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated increases in metallothionein immunoreactivity as an indication of zinc and copper activity in the papillary dermis and in basal epidermal cells near the wound margin 1-5 d after wounding. This is consistent with metalloenzyme requirements in inflammation and fibrogenesis. Calmodulin, a major cytosolic calcium binding protein was highest in maturing keratinocytes and in sebaceous gland cells of normal skin; it was notably more abundant in the epidermis near the wound margin and in re-epithelialising areas at a time when local calcium levels were highest. PMID:10580852

  4. Molecular evolution of the multiple calmodulin-like cal genes in C. elegans and in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Karabinos, Anton

    2016-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a major EF hand containing intracellular calcium receptor in animals and plants; however, eukaryotes also express a number of related CaM-like proteins. We have previously characterized an embryonic phenotype of the single Caenorhabditis elegans CaM gene cmd-1, reported no visible RNAi phenotype for the four related cal-1 to cal-4 genes and started tissue-specific expression analyses of these proteins. In the present study, we analyzed evolutionary aspects of the previously reported CAL-1 to CAL-4 proteins, along with the four new CAL-5 to CAL-8 sequences retrieved from the worm database. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that all C. elegans CAL proteins arose from a CaM ancestor through repeated gene duplications, fusions and sequence divergence. The same holds, also, for the variable N-terminal extensions of the CAL-1 to CAL-4 proteins, which have evolved from the CaM-like core domain. We found 97 CAL homologs in different nematode clades and also detected two CAL-7-related sequences outside the nematodes. Moreover, the C. elegans-specific cal-6 gene, representing the most CaM-related sequence found in nematodes so far, harbours many deletions, insertions and sequence substitutions and is predicted, therefore, to be non-functional. These analyses provide an insight into a complex and dynamic origin of the multiple CAL genes in C. elegans and in nematodes and represent also a basis for further functional studies of these CaM-related sequences in nematodes. PMID:27558386

  5. Cooperativity between calmodulin-binding sites in Kv7.2 channels.

    PubMed

    Alaimo, Alessandro; Alberdi, Araitz; Gomis-Perez, Carolina; Fernández-Orth, Juncal; Gómez-Posada, Juan Camilo; Areso, Pilar; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Among the multiple roles assigned to calmodulin (CaM), controlling the surface expression of Kv7.2 channels by binding to two discontinuous sites is a unique property of this Ca(2+) binding protein. Mutations that interfere with CaM binding or the sequestering of CaM prevent this M-channel component from exiting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which reduces M-current density in hippocampal neurons, enhancing excitability and offering a rational mechanism to explain some forms of benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC). Previously, we identified a mutation (S511D) that impedes CaM binding while allowing the channel to exit the ER, hinting that CaM binding may not be strictly required for Kv7.2 channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Alternatively, this interaction with CaM might escape detection and, indeed, we now show that the S511D mutant contains functional CaM-binding sites that are not detected by classical biochemical techniques. Surface expression and function is rescued by CaM, suggesting that free CaM in HEK293 cells is limiting and reinforcing the hypothesis that CaM binding is required for ER exit. Within the CaM-binding domain formed by two sites (helix A and helix B), we show that CaM binds to helix B with higher apparent affinity than helix A, both in the presence and absence of Ca(2+), and that the two sites cooperate. Hence, CaM can bridge two binding domains, anchoring helix A of one subunit to helix B of another subunit, in this way influencing the function of Kv7.2 channels.

  6. Sequential changes in trace metal, metallothionein and calmodulin concentrations in healing skin wounds

    PubMed Central

    LANSDOWN, A. B. G.; SAMPSON, B.; ROWE, A.

    1999-01-01

    Metalloenzymes have an important role in repair and regenerative processes in skin wounds. Demands for different enzymes vary according to the phase in the healing cascade and constituent events. Sequential changes in the concentrations of calcium, copper, magnesium and zinc were studied in the incisional wound model in the rat over a 10 d period. Copper levels remained low (<10 μg/g dry weight) throughout, but calcium, magnesium and zinc increased from wounding and peaked at about 5 d at a time of high inflammation, granulation tissue formation and epidermal cell proliferation. Metal concentrations declined to normal by 7 d when inflammation had regressed, re-epithelialisation of the wound site was complete and the ‘normalisation’ phase had commenced. Although the wound was overtly healed by 10 d, the epidermis was still moderately hyperplastic. In view of competitive binding of trace metals at membrane receptors and carrier proteins, the ratios or balance between these trace metals was examined and the significance is discussed. Using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated increases in metallothionein immunoreactivity as an indication of zinc and copper activity in the papillary dermis and in basal epidermal cells near the wound margin 1–5 d after wounding. This is consistent with metalloenzyme requirements in inflammation and fibrogenesis. Calmodulin, a major cytosolic calcium binding protein was highest in maturing keratinocytes and in sebaceous gland cells of normal skin; it was notably more abundant in the epidermis near the wound margin and in re-epithelialising areas at a time when local calcium levels were highest. PMID:10580852

  7. Effects of Ureaplasma diversum on bovine oviductal explants: quantitative measurement using a calmodulin assay.

    PubMed Central

    Smits, B; Rosendal, S; Ruhnke, H L; Plante, C; O'Brien, P J; Miller, R B

    1994-01-01

    Calmodulin (CAM) acts as an intracellular regulator of calcium, an important mediator of many cell processes. We used the CAM assay and electron microscopy to investigate the effects of Ureaplasma diversum on bovine oviductal explants obtained aseptically from slaughtered cows. A stock suspension of U. diversum (treated specimens) and sterile broth (controls) was added to replicates of cultured explants and incubated at 38 degrees C in an atmosphere of 5.5% CO2 for 48 hours. Explants were examined for ciliary activity, extracellular CAM loss, and for histological and ultrastructural changes. Explants and their culture media were examined for changes in CAM concentration. All experiments were replicated three times. In addition, U. diversum, medium and broth were assayed for CAM content. The concentrations of CAM in explants and media changed significantly (p < 0.05) in samples which were inoculated with U. diversum when compared to controls. The controls and infected specimens did not differ histologically or ultrastructurally, but U. diversum was seen to be closely associated with infected explant tissue. In view of this close affinity it is assumed the loss of CAM from the oviductal cells was causally related, but this was not proven. The failure to show cell membrane injury on light and electron microscopic examination was probably related to the short duration of the experiment and may only point out the sensitivity of the CAM assay in detecting early cell membrane injury. Compromise in characteristics of the medium to support both, the viability of oviductal cells and U. diversum limited the experimental time to 48 hours.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:8004536

  8. Selective nitration of Tyr99 in calmodulin as a marker of cellular conditions of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Heather S; Galeva, Nadezhda A; Bartlett, Ryan K; Urbauer, Ramona J Bieber; Williams, Todd D; Urbauer, Jeffrey L; Squier, Thomas C

    2003-01-01

    We examined the possible role of methionines as oxidant scavengers that prevent the peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosines within calmodulin (CaM). We used mass spectrometry to investigate the reactivity of peroxynitrite with CaM at physiological pH. The possible role of methionines in scavenging peroxynitrite (ONOO-) was assessed in wild-type CaM and following substitution of all nine methionines in CaM with leucines. We find that peroxynitrite selectively nitrates Tyr99 at physiological pH, resulting in the formation of between 0.05 and 0.25 mol of nitrotyrosine/mol of CaM when the added molar ratio of peroxynitrite per CaM was varied between 2.5 and 1.5. In wild-type CaM there is a corresponding oxidation of between 0.8 and 2.8 mol of methionine to form methionine sulfoxide. However, following site-directed substitution of all nine methionines in wild-type CaM with leucines, the extent of nitration by peroxynitrite was unchanged. These results indicate that Tyr99 is readily nitrated by peroxynitrite and that methionine side chains do not function as an antioxidant in scavenging peroxynitrite. Thus, separate reactive species are involved in the oxidation of methionine and nitration of Tyr99 whose relative concentrations are determined by solution conditions. The sensitivity of Tyr99 in CaM to nitration suggests that CaM-dependent signaling pathways are sensitive to peroxynitrite formation and that nitration of CaM represents a cellular marker of peroxynitrite-induced changes in cellular function. PMID:12693036

  9. Calmodulin is a stress and immune response gene in Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Jia, Zirui; Li, Xuejing; Geng, Xuyun; Sun, Jinsheng

    2014-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a multifunctional calcium sensor protein that participates in various cellular processes under normal, stress and pathological conditions. In crabs, however, the involvement of CaM in response to environmental stress and immune challenges has not been revealed yet. In the present study, a CaM cDNA (EsCaM) was identified from Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis and its mRNA expression patterns in response to ambient (salinity and pH) stress and immune challenges was examined. EsCaM encodes a 149-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 16.8 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.09. In unstimulated healthy E. sinensis, EsCaM mRNA transcript was detected in all tested tissues with predominant expression in hepatopancreas and the lowest expression in haemocytes. Ambient salinity (15‰ and 30‰ salinities) and pH (pH 6 and 8.5) stress significantly altered EsCaM mRNA expression in gill, hepatopancreas, haemocytes, intestine and muscle in Chinese mitten crab. In addition, EsCaM gene expression was significantly and rapidly induced as early as 2 h after LPS and Poly(I:C) immune stimulations in haemocytes in vitro. Furthermore, EsCaM expression was significantly up-regulated in E. sinensis haemocytes, gill, hepatopancreas, intestine and muscle in response to Edwardsiella tarda and Vibrio anguillarum challenges. Collectively, our findings suggest that EsCaM is an important stress and immune response gene in Chinese mitten crab.

  10. Designing Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Shift Populations of the Conformational States of Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Aykut, Ayse Ozlem; Atilgan, Ali Rana; Atilgan, Canan

    2013-01-01

    We elucidate the mechanisms that lead to population shifts in the conformational states of calcium-loaded calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM). We design extensive molecular dynamics simulations to classify the effects that are responsible for adopting occupied conformations available in the ensemble of NMR structures. Electrostatic interactions amongst the different regions of the protein and with its vicinal water are herein mediated by lowering the ionic strength or the pH. Amino acid E31, which is one of the few charged residues whose ionization state is highly sensitive to pH differences in the physiological range, proves to be distinctive in its control of population shifts. E31A mutation at low ionic strength results in a distinct change from an extended to a compact Ca2+-CaM conformation within tens of nanoseconds, that otherwise occur on the time scales of microseconds. The kinked linker found in this particular compact form is observed in many of the target-bound forms of Ca2+-CaM, increasing the binding affinity. This mutation is unique in controlling C-lobe dynamics by affecting the fluctuations between the EF-hand motif helices. We also monitor the effect of the ionic strength on the conformational multiplicity of Ca2+-CaM. By lowering the ionic strength, the tendency of nonspecific anions in water to accumulate near the protein surface increases, especially in the vicinity of the linker. The change in the distribution of ions in the vicinal layer of water allows N- and C- lobes to span a wide variety of relative orientations that are otherwise not observed at physiological ionic strength. E31 protonation restores the conformations associated with physiological environmental conditions even at low ionic strength. PMID:24339763

  11. Calmodulin kinase II is required for fight or flight sinoatrial node physiology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Chen, Biyi; Koval, Olha M; Singh, Madhu V; Guan, Xiaoqun; Hund, Thomas J; Kutschke, William; Sarma, Satyam; Grumbach, Isabella M; Wehrens, Xander H T; Mohler, Peter J; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2009-04-01

    The best understood "fight or flight" mechanism for increasing heart rate (HR) involves activation of a cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel (HCN4) by beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) agonist stimulation. HCN4 conducts an inward "pacemaker" current (I(f)) that increases the sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cell membrane diastolic depolarization rate (DDR), leading to faster SAN action potential generation. Surprisingly, HCN4 knockout mice were recently shown to retain physiological HR increases with isoproterenol (ISO), suggesting that other I(f)-independent pathways are critical to SAN fight or flight responses. The multifunctional Ca(2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a downstream signal in the betaAR pathway that activates Ca(2+) homeostatic proteins in ventricular myocardium. Mice with genetic, myocardial and SAN cell CaMKII inhibition have significantly slower HRs than controls during stress, leading us to hypothesize that CaMKII actions on SAN Ca(2+) homeostasis are critical for betaAR agonist responses in SAN. Here we show that CaMKII mediates ISO HR increases by targeting SAN cell Ca(2+) homeostasis. CaMKII inhibition prevents ISO effects on SAN Ca(2+) uptake and release from intracellular sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores that are necessary for increasing DDR. CaMKII inhibition has no effect on the ISO response in SAN cells when SR Ca(2+) release is disabled and CaMKII inhibition is only effective at slowing HRs during betaAR stimulation. These studies show the tightly coupled, but previously unanticipated, relationship of CaMKII to the betaAR pathway in fight or flight physiology and establish CaMKII as a critical signaling molecule for physiological HR responses to catecholamines.

  12. Mutation of Tyr138 disrupts the structural coupling between the opposing domains in vertebrate calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Yin, D; Coffeen, L A; Shea, M A; Squier, T C

    2001-08-14

    We have used circular dichroism and frequency-domain fluorescence spectroscopy to determine how the site-specific substitution of Tyr138 with either Phe138 or Gln138 affects the structural coupling between the opposing domains of calmodulin (CaM). A double mutant was constructed involving conservative substitution of Tyr99 --> Trp99 and Leu69 --> Cys69 to assess the structural coupling between the opposing domains, as previously described [Sun, H., Yin, D., and Squier, T. C. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 12266-12279]. Trp99 acts as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor in distance measurements to probe the conformation of the central helix. Cys69 provides a reactive group for the covalent attachment of 5-((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS), which functions as a FRET acceptor and permits the measurement of the rotational dynamics of the amino-terminal domain. These CaM mutants demonstrate normal calcium-dependent gel-mobility shifts and changes in their near-UV CD spectra, have similar secondary structures to wild-type CaM following calcium activation, and retain the ability to fully activate the plasma membrane Ca-ATPase. The global folds, therefore, of both the carboxyl- and amino-terminal domains in these CaM mutants are similar to that of wild-type CaM. However, in comparison to wild-type CaM, the substitution of Tyr138 with either Phe138 or Gln138 results in (i) alterations in the average spatial separation and increases in the conformational heterogeneity between the opposing globular domains and (ii) the independent rotational dynamics of the amino-terminal domain. These results indicate that alterations in either the hydrogen bond between Tyr138 and Glu82 or contact interactions between aromatic amino acid side chains have the potential to initiate the structural collapse of CaM normally associated with target protein binding and activation.

  13. Calcium-dependent structural coupling between opposing globular domains of calmodulin involves the central helix.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Yin, D; Squier, T C

    1999-09-21

    We have used fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the average structure and extent of conformational heterogeneity associated with the central helix in calmodulin (CaM), a sequence that contributes to calcium binding sites 2 and 3 and connects the amino- and carboxyl-terminal globular domains. Using site-directed mutagenesis, a double mutant was constructed involving conservative substitution of Tyr(99) --> Trp(99) and Leu(69) --> Cys(69) with no significant effect on the secondary structure of CaM. These mutation sites are at opposite ends of the central helix. Trp(99) acts as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor in distance measurements of the conformation of the central helix. Cys(69) provides a reactive group for the covalent attachment of the FRET acceptor 5-((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS). AEDANS-modified CaM fully activates the plasma membrane (PM) Ca-ATPase, indicating that the native structure is retained following site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. We find that the average spatial separation between Trp(99) and AEDANS covalently bound to Cys(69) decreases by approximately 7 +/- 2 A upon calcium binding. However, irrespective of calcium binding, there is little change in the conformational heterogeneity associated with the central helix under physiologically relevant conditions (i.e., pH 7.5, 0.1 M KCl). These results indicate that calcium activation alters the spatial arrangement of the opposing globular domains between two defined conformations. In contrast, under conditions of low ionic strength or pH the structure of CaM is altered and the conformational heterogeneity of the central helix is decreased upon calcium activation. These results suggest the presence of important ionizable groups that affect the structure of the central helix, which may play an important role in mediating the ability of CaM to rapidly bind and activate target proteins.

  14. Intra- and Interdomain Effects Due to Mutation of Calcium-binding Sites in Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liang-Wen; Kleerekoper, Quinn K.; Wang, Xu; Putkey, John A.

    2010-01-01

    The IQ-motif protein PEP-19, binds to the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM) with significantly different kon and koff rates in the presence and absence of Ca2+, which could play a role in defining the levels of free CaM during Ca2+ transients. The initial goal of the current study was to determine whether Ca2+ binding to sites III or IV in the C-domain of CaM was responsible for affecting the kinetics of binding PEP-19. EF-hand Ca2+-binding sites were selectively inactivated by the common strategy of changing Asp to Ala at the X-coordination position. Although Ca2+ binding to both sites III and IV appeared necessary for native-like interactions with PEP-19, the data also indicated that the mutations caused undesirable structural alterations as evidenced by significant changes in amide chemical shifts for apoCaM. Mutations in the C-domain also affected chemical shifts in the unmodified N-domain, and altered the Ca2+ binding properties of the N-domain. Conversion of Asp93 to Ala caused the greatest structural perturbations, possibly due to the loss of stabilizing hydrogen bonds between the side chain of Asp93 and backbone amides in apo loop III. Thus, although these mutations inhibit binding of Ca2+, the mutated CaM may not be able to support potentially important native-like activity of the apoprotein. This should be taken into account when designing CaM mutants for expression in cell culture. PMID:20048169

  15. A channelopathy mechanism revealed by direct calmodulin activation of TrpV4

    PubMed Central

    Loukin, Stephen H.; Teng, Jinfeng; Kung, Ching

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM) regulates varieties of ion channels, including Transient Receptor Potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TrpV4). It has previously been proposed that internal Ca2+ increases TrpV4 activity through Ca2+-CaM binding to a C-terminal Ca2+-CaM binding domain (CBD). We confirmed this model by directly presenting Ca2+-CaM protein to membrane patches excised from TrpV4-expressing oocytes. Over 50 TRPV4 mutations are now known to cause heritable skeletal dysplasia (SD) and other diseases in human. We have previously examined 14 SD alleles and found them to all have gain-of-function effects, with the gain of constitutive open probability paralleling disease severity. Among the 14 SD alleles examined, E797K and P799L are located immediate upstream of the CBD. They not only have increase basal activity, but, unlike the wild-type or other SD-mutant channels examined, they were greatly reduced in their response to Ca2+-CaM. Deleting a 10-residue upstream peptide (Δ795–804) that covers the two SD mutant sites resulted in strong constitutive activity and the complete lack of Ca2+-CaM response. We propose that the region immediately upstream of CBD is an autoinhibitory domain that maintains the closed state through electrostatic interactions, and adjacent detachable Ca2+-CaM binding to CBD sterically interferes with this autoinhibition. This work further supports the notion that TrpV4 mutations cause SD by constitutive leakage. However, the closed conformation is likely destabilized by various mutations by different mechanisms, including the permanent removal of an autoinhibition documented here. PMID:26170305

  16. Structural Insights into the M-Channel Proximal C-Terminus/Calmodulin Complex.

    PubMed

    Strulovich, Roi; Tobelaim, William Sam; Attali, Bernard; Hirsch, Joel A

    2016-09-27

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) channel family, comprising voltage-gated potassium channels, plays major roles in fine-tuning cellular excitability by reducing firing frequency and controlling repolarization. Kv7 channels have a unique intracellular C-terminal (CT) domain bound constitutively by calmodulin (CaM). This domain plays key functions in channel tetramerization, trafficking, and gating. CaM binds to the proximal CT, comprising helices A and B. Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 are expressed in neural tissues. Together, they form the heterotetrameric M channel. We characterized Kv7.2, Kv7.3, and chimeric Kv7.3 helix A-Kv7.2 helix B (Q3A-Q2B) proximal CT/CaM complexes by solution methods at various Ca(2+)concentrations and determined them all to have a 1:1 stoichiometry. We then determined the crystal structure of the Q3A-Q2B/CaM complex at high Ca(2+) concentration to 2.0 Å resolution. CaM hugs the antiparallel coiled coil of helices A and B, braced together by an additional helix. The structure displays a hybrid apo-Ca(2+) CaM conformation even though four Ca(2+) ions are bound. Our results pinpoint unique interactions enabling the possible intersubunit pairing of Kv7.3 helix A and Kv7.2 helix B while underlining the potential importance of Kv7.3 helix A's role in stabilizing channel oligomerization. Also, the structure can be used to rationalize various channelopathic mutants. Functional testing of the chimeric channel found it to have a voltage-dependence similar to the M channel, thereby demonstrating helix A's importance in imparting gating properties.

  17. A new multigene family encoding calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding membrane proteins of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Saimi, Y; Kung, C

    1999-04-29

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) regulates various physiological processes in a wide variety of organisms, metazoa and protists alike. To better understand Ca2+/CaM-dependent processes, particularly those with membrane-associated components, we studied Ca2+/CaM-binding membrane proteins in Paramecium tetraurelia, a unicellular model system. A CaM-binding protein, PCM1 (Paramecium CaM-binding membrane-bound protein), from a detergent-solubilized ciliary membrane fraction was identified and purified through Ca2+-dependent CaM-affinity chromatography. PCM1 has an apparent molecular mass of approx. 65kDa. It binds radiolabeled CaM in blot overlay assays and binds to CaM-affinity columns, both only in the presence of 10 microM or higher Ca2+. Three peptide sequences from PCM1 were obtained, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern hybridization experiments were designed accordingly, leading to a partial cDNA clone for PCM1 and the discovery of three homologs: PCM2, PCM3 and PCM4. Amino acid sequences predicted by the full-length coding sequence for PCM3 and partial genes for PCM1, PCM2 and PCM4 are very similar (approx. 85% amino-acid identities). Their sequences indicate that they are hitherto novel proteins with beta/gamma-crystallin domains, cysteine-rich regions and potential CaM-binding domains. These protein motifs are suggested to mediate protein-protein interaction important for Ca2+/CaM signal transduction event(s) through the PCM family of proteins.

  18. Crystallographic analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana BAG5-calmodulin protein complex.

    PubMed

    Cui, Boyang; Fang, Shasha; Xing, Yangfei; Shen, Yuequan; Yang, Xue

    2015-07-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana BAG5 (AtBAG5) belongs to the plant BAG (Bcl-2-associated athanogene) family that performs diverse functions ranging from growth and development to abiotic stress and senescence. BAG family members can act as nucleotide-exchange factors for heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) through binding of their evolutionarily conserved BAG domains to the Hsp70 ATPase domain, and thus may be involved in the regulation of chaperone-mediated protein folding in plants. AtBAG5 is distinguished from other family members by the presence of a unique IQ motif adjacent to the BAG domain; this motif is specific for calmodulin (CaM) binding, indicating a potential role in the plant calcium signalling pathway. To provide a better understanding of the IQ motif-mediated interaction between AtBAG5 and CaM, the two proteins were expressed and purified separately and then co-crystallized together. Diffraction-quality crystals of the complex were grown using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique from a condition consisting of 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5, 2.5 M ammonium sulfate. The crystals belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 64.56, b = 74.89, c = 117.09 Å. X-ray diffraction data were recorded to a resolution of 2.5 Å from a single crystal using synchrotron radiation. Assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, a Matthews coefficient of 2.44 Å(3) Da(-1) was calculated, corresponding to a solvent content of approximately 50%. PMID:26144232

  19. Calmodulin binds to maize lipid transfer protein and modulates its lipids binding ability.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuifeng; Xie, Wanqin; Bai, Wenyan; Li, Zhenpeng; Zhao, Yulong; Liu, Hua

    2008-11-01

    Although plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (ns-LTPs) are characterized by their ability to bind and transfer a broad range of hydrophobic ligands in vitro, their biological functions in vivo remain unclear. Recently, it has been proposed that ns-LTPs may play a key role in plant defense mechanisms, particularly during the induction of systemic acquired resistance, however, very little is known about the regulation in this process. We report that the binding of maize non-specific lipid transfer protein (Zm-LTP) to calmodulin (CaM) is in a calcium-independent manner. To better understand the interaction mechanism between Zm-LTP and CaM, the CaM-binding site of Zm-LTP was mapped to the region of amino acids 46-60. Point mutations indicate that four amino acid residues, R46, R47, K54 and R58, in this region are crucial for binding. Furthermore, we tested the effects of CaM on the lipid-binding activity of Zm-LTP in the presence of Ca(2+), EGTA, N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide and trifluoperazine respectively. We also investigated the structural features of CaM-binding motifs in LTPs from different species and strong differences were observed. Taken together, our results suggest that the interaction with CaM could be a common feature of plant LTPs. The identification and characterization of CaM-binding domain of LTPs should provide new insights into the mechanism by which the physiological functions of LTPs are regulated.

  20. Localization and function of calmodulin in live-cells of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaochun; Song, Yiju; Cao, Jinling; Wang, Gang; Wei, Hua; Xu, Xushi; Lu, Ling

    2010-03-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a small, eukaryotic protein that reversibly binds Ca(2+). Study of CaM localization in genetically tractable organisms has yielded many insights into CaM function. Here, we described the dynamic localization of Aspergillus nidulans CaM (AnCaM) in live-cells by using recombination strains with homologous, single cross-over insertions at the target gene which placed the GFP fused copy under the inducible alcA promoter and the RFP-CaM integration under the native cam promoter. We found that the localization of CaM fusion was quite dynamic throughout the hypha and was concentrated to the active growing sites during germination, hyphal growth, cytokinesis and conidiation. The depletion of CaM by alcA promoter repression induced the explicit abnormalities of germlings with the swollen germ tubes. In addition, the position of highly concentrated GFP-CaM in the extreme apex seemed to determine the hyphal orientation. These data collectively suggest that CaM is constantly required for new hyphal growth. In contrast to this constant accumulation at the apex, GFP-CaM was only transiently localized at septum sites during cytokinesis. Notably, depletion of CaM caused the defect of septation with a completely blocked septum formation indicating that the transient CaM accumulation at the septum site is essential for septation. Moreover, the normal localization of CaM at a hyphal tip required the presence of the functional actin cytoskeleton and the motor protein KipA, which is indispensable for positioning Spitzenkörper. This is the first report of CaM localization and function in live-cells by the site-specific homologous integration in filamentous fungi.

  1. Solution Structure of Calmodulin Bound to the Binding Domain of the HIV-1 Matrix Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Vlach, Jiri; Samal, Alexandra B.; Saad, Jamil S.

    2014-01-01

    Subcellular distribution of calmodulin (CaM) in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-infected cells is distinct from that observed in uninfected cells. CaM co-localizes and interacts with the HIV-1 Gag protein in the cytosol of infected cells. Although it has been shown that binding of Gag to CaM is mediated by the matrix (MA) domain, the structural details of this interaction are not known. We have recently shown that binding of CaM to MA induces a conformational change that triggers myristate exposure, and that the CaM-binding domain of MA is confined to a region spanning residues 8–43 (MA-(8–43)). Here, we present the NMR structure of CaM bound to MA-(8–43). Our data revealed that MA-(8–43), which contains a novel CaM-binding motif, binds to CaM in an antiparallel mode with the N-terminal helix (α1) anchored to the CaM C-terminal lobe, and the C-terminal helix (α2) of MA-(8–43) bound to the N-terminal lobe of CaM. The CaM protein preserves a semiextended conformation. Binding of MA-(8–43) to CaM is mediated by numerous hydrophobic interactions and stabilized by favorable electrostatic contacts. Our structural data are consistent with the findings that CaM induces unfolding of the MA protein to have access to helices α1 and α2. It is noteworthy that several MA residues involved in CaM binding have been previously implicated in membrane binding, envelope incorporation, and particle production. The present findings may ultimately help in identification of the functional role of CaM in HIV-1 replication. PMID:24500712

  2. Improvement of myocardial function by trifluoperazine, a calmodulin antagonist, after acute coronary artery occlusion and coronary revascularization.

    PubMed

    Otani, H; Engelman, R M; Rousou, J A; Breyer, R H; Clement, R; Prasad, R; Klar, J; Das, D K

    1989-02-01

    Activation of an intracellular calcium-calmodulin complex may play an important role in myocardial injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion. Trifluoperazine, a calmodulin antagonist, was used before ischemia to enhance myocardial preservation by preventing intracellular calcium accumulation. The experimental model used an isolated in situ pig heart (19 control animals and 15 trifluoperazine-treated animals) subjected to occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 60 minutes followed by 60 minutes of hypothermic potassium crystalloid cardioplegic arrest and 60 minutes of reperfusion. Myocardial segmental function measured by ultrasonic crystals showed that active systolic segment shortening was abolished in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery after 60 minutes of occlusion irrespective of the treatment, whereas that not in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery increased by about 15% in both groups of animals. Restoration of systolic segment shortening in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery 60 minutes after reperfusion was 12% and 42% of baseline levels in untreated and trifluoperazine-treated animals, respectively (p less than 0.01). This improvement in segmental function by trifluoperazine was reflected in significantly (p less than 0.05) better global myocardial contractility and compliance and in significantly (p less than 0.01) greater total coronary blood flow and myocardial oxygen consumption. Trifluoperazine also increased myocardial creatine phosphate content in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery (p less than 0.01) during reperfusion, and creatine kinase release was reduced (p less than 0.05). Our results suggest that trifluoperazine improved regional myocardial function after acute occlusion of the left anterior descending artery and reperfusion and that global cardiac performance was thereby improved. The beneficial effects of trifluoperazine may be exerted by

  3. Engineering of a novel Ca{sup 2+}-regulated kinesin molecular motor using a calmodulin dimer linker

    SciTech Connect

    Shishido, Hideki; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Engineered kinesin-M13 and calmodulin involving single cysteine were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaM mutant was cross-linked to dimer by bifunctional thiol reactive reagent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinesin-M13 was dimerized via CaM dimer in the presence of calcium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Function of the engineered kinesin was regulated by a Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin dimer linker. -- Abstract: The kinesin-microtubule system holds great promise as a molecular shuttle device within biochips. However, one current barrier is that such shuttles do not have 'on-off' control of their movement. Here we report the development of a novel molecular motor powered by an accelerator and brake system, using a kinesin monomer and a calmodulin (CaM) dimer. The kinesin monomer, K355, was fused with a CaM target peptide (M13 peptide) at the C-terminal part of the neck region (K355-M13). We also prepared CaM dimers using CaM mutants (Q3C), (R86C), or (A147C) and crosslinkers that react with cysteine residues. Following induction of K355-M13 dimerization with CaM dimers, we measured K355-M13 motility and found that it can be reversibly regulated in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. We also found that velocities of K355-M13 varied depending on the type and crosslink position of the CaM dimer used; crosslink length also had a moderate effect on motility. These results suggest Ca{sup 2+}-dependent dimerization of K355-M13 could be used as a novel molecular shuttle, equipped with an accelerator and brake system, for biochip applications.

  4. Activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase involves intramolecular binding of a calmodulin-like regulatory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. F.; Teyton, L.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are regulated by a C-terminal calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD). The CaM-LD is connected to the kinase by a short junction sequence which contains a pseudosubstrate autoinhibitor. To understand how the CaM-LD regulates a CDPK, a recombinant CDPK (isoform CPK-1 from Arabidopsis, accession no. L14771) was made as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We show here that a truncated CDPK lacking a CaM-LD (e.g. mutant delta NC-26H) can be activated by exogenous calmodulin or an isolated CaM-LD (Kact approximately 2 microM). We propose that Ca2+ activation of a CDPK normally occurs through intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to the junction. When the junction and CaM-LD are made as two separate polypeptides, the CaM-LD can bind the junction in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion with a dissociation constant (KD) of 6 x 10(-6) M, as determined by kinetic binding analyses. When the junction and CaM-LD are tethered in a single polypeptide (e.g. in protein JC-1), their ability to engage in bimolecular binding is suppressed (e.g. the tethered CaM-LD cannot bind a separate junction). A mutation which disrupts the putative CaM-LD binding sequence (e.g. substitution LRV-1444 to DLPG) appears to block intramolecular binding, as indicated by the restored ability of a tethered CaM-LD to engage in bimolecular binding. This mutation, in the context of a full-length enzyme (mutant KJM46H), appears to block Ca2+ activation. Thus, a disruption of intramolecular binding correlates with a disruption of the Ca2+ activation mechanism. CDPKs provide the first example of a member of the calmodulin superfamily where a target binding sequence is located within the same polypeptide.

  5. Cyclic nucleotide–gated channels, calmodulin, adenylyl cyclase, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II are required for late, but not early, long-term memory formation in the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee Apis mellifera, olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM) are formed upon multiple-trial conditioning: an early phase (e-LTM) which depends on translation from already available mRNA, and a late phase (l-LTM) which requires de novo transcription and translation. Here we combined olfactory PER conditioning and neuropharmacological inhibition and studied the involvement of the NO–cGMP pathway, and of specific molecules, such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNG), calmodulin (CaM), adenylyl cyclase (AC), and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), in the formation of olfactory LTM in bees. We show that in addition to NO–cGMP and cAMP–PKA, CNG channels, CaM, AC, and CaMKII also participate in the formation of a l-LTM (72-h post-conditioning) that is specific for the learned odor. Importantly, the same molecules are dispensable for olfactory learning and for the formation of both MTM (in the minute and hour range) and e-LTM (24-h post-conditioning), thus suggesting that the signaling pathways leading to l-LTM or e-LTM involve different molecular actors. PMID:24741108

  6. Calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine attenuates the development and expression of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiang-Feng; Lu, Ying; Zhang, Pan; Liang, Jian-Hui

    2004-02-23

    The effect of trifluoperazine, a calmodulin inhibitor, on morphine-induced conditioned place preference was examined in rats. Morphine (5, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) produced significant place preference for the drug-associated place. Trifluoperazine significantly suppressed the development as well as the expression of morphine-induced place preference in a dose-dependent manner, but it neither produced place preference or aversion, nor affected locomotor activity. Injection of 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg apomorphine, a dopamine receptor agonist, did not alter the inhibition by trifluoperazine of morphine-induced place preference. Verapamil, at the dose that failed to change the place preference induced by morphine, enhanced the inhibition by trifluoperazine of morphine-induced place preference. These findings provide the first demonstration that trifluoperazine attenuates morphine-induced conditioned place preference in rats. The action of trifluoperazine might be produced through its inhibition of calmodulin, but is probably not related to dopamine receptor blockade.

  7. The calmodulin inhibitor and antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine inhibits voltage-dependent K+ channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Da Hye; Son, Youn Kyoung; Li, Hongliang; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Jung, Won-Kyo; Kim, Han Sol; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Won Sun

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of the calmodulin inhibitor and antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine on voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels. Kv currents were recorded by whole-cell configuration of patch clamp in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells. The amplitudes of Kv currents were reduced by trifluoperazine in a concentration-dependent manner, with an apparent IC50 value of 1.58±0.48 μM. The rate constants of association and dissociation by trifluoperazine were 3.73±0.33 μM(-1) s(-1) and 5.84±1.41 s(-1), respectively. Application of trifluoperazine caused a positive shift in the activation curve but had no significant effect on the inactivation curve. Furthermore, trifluoperazine provoked use-dependent inhibition of the Kv current under train pulses (1 or 2 Hz). These findings suggest that trifluoperazine interacts with Kv current in a closed state and inhibits Kv current in the open state in a time- and use-dependent manner, regardless of its function as a calmodulin inhibitor and antipsychotic drug.

  8. Rat vas deferens SERCA2 is modulated by Ca2+/calmodulin protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J.B.R.; Muzi-Filho, H.; Valverde, R.H.F.; Quintas, L.E.M.; Noel, F.; Einicker-Lamas, M.; Cunha, V.M.N.

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ pumps are important players in smooth muscle contraction. Nevertheless, little information is available about these pumps in the vas deferens. We have determined which subtype of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform (SERCA) is expressed in rat vas deferens (RVD) and its modulation by calmodulin (CaM)-dependent mechanisms. The thapsigargin-sensitive Ca2+-ATPase from a membrane fraction containing the highest SERCA levels in the RVD homogenate has the same molecular mass (∼115 kDa) as that of SERCA2 from the rat cerebellum. It has a very high affinity for Ca2+ (Ca0.5 = 780 nM) and a low sensitivity to vanadate (IC50 = 41 µM). These facts indicate that SERCA2 is present in the RVD. Immunoblotting for CaM and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) showed the expression of these two regulatory proteins. Ca2+ and CaM increased serine-phosphorylated residues of the 115-kDa protein, indicating the involvement of CaMKII in the regulatory phosphorylation of SERCA2. Phosphorylation is accompanied by an 8-fold increase of thapsigargin-sensitive Ca2+ accumulation in the lumen of vesicles derived from these membranes. These data establish that SERCA2 in the RVD is modulated by Ca2+ and CaM, possibly via CaMKII, in a process that results in stimulation of Ca2+ pumping activity. PMID:23558856

  9. Role of Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants. Progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-12-31

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca{sup ++} as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca{sup ++}/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  10. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y T; Hidaka, H; Feldman, L J

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  11. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  12. Yeast has homologs (CNA1 and CNA2 gene products) of mammalian calcineurin, a calmodulin-regulated phosphoprotein phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, M S; Kunisawa, R; Kaim, D; Thorner, J

    1991-01-01

    Calcineurin, or phosphoprotein phosphatase type 2B (PP2B), is a calmodulin-regulated phosphoprotein phosphatase. We isolated a gene encoding a yeast PP2B homolog (CNA1) by screening a yeast genomic DNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11, first with 125I-labeled yeast calmodulin and then with a human cDNA encoding the catalytic (or A) subunit of calcineurin. The predicted CNA1 gene product is 54% identical to its mammalian counterpart. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with oligonucleotide primers based on sequences conserved between CNA1 and mammalian PP2B genes, we isolated a second gene, CNA2. CNA2 is identical to PP2Bw, a partial cDNA clone previously described by others as originating from rabbit brain tissue. Our findings demonstrate that a unicellular eukaryote contains phosphoprotein phosphatases of the 2B class. Haploid cells containing a single cna1 or cna2 null mutation, or both mutations, were viable. MATa cna1 cna2 double mutants were more sensitive than wild-type cells or either single mutant to growth arrest induced by the mating pheromone alpha factor and failed to resume growth during continuous exposure to alpha factor. Thus, calcineurin action antagonizes the mating-pheromone response pathway. Images PMID:1651503

  13. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV mediates acute nicotine-induced antinociception in acute thermal pain tests

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kia J.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    Calcium activated second messengers such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II have been implicated in drug-induced antinociception. The less abundant calcium activated second messenger, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), mediates emotional responses to pain and tolerance to morphine analgesia; however its role in nicotine-mediated antinociception is currently unknown. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of CaMKIV in the acute effects of nicotine, primarily acute nicotine- induced antinociception. CaMKIV knockout (−/−), heterozygote (+/−), and wild-type (+/+) mice were injected with various doses of nicotine and evaluated in a battery of tests, including the tail-flick and hot-plate tests for antinociception, body temperature, and locomotor activity. Our results show a genotype-dependent reduction in tail-flick and hot- plate latency in CaMKIV (+/−) and (−/−) mice after acute nicotine treatment, while no difference was observed between genotypes in the body temperature and locomotor activity assessments. The results of this study support a role for CaMKIV in acute nicotine-induced spinal and supraspinal pain mechanisms, and further implicate involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms in drug-induced antinociception. PMID:24196027

  14. Deletion of the calmodulin-binding domain of Grb7 impairs cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and migration

    SciTech Connect

    García-Palmero, Irene; Villalobo, Antonio

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein. •Deleting the CaM-binding site impairs cell attachment and migration. •CaM antagonists inhibit Grb7-mediated cell migration. •We conclude that CaM controls Grb7-mediated cell migration. -- Abstract: The adaptor Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein that participates in signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and the control of angiogenesis, and plays a significant role in tumor growth, its metastatic spread and tumor-associated neo-vasculature formation. In this report we show that deletion of the CaM-binding site of Grb7, located in the proximal region of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, impairs cell migration, cell attachment to the extracellular matrix, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton occurring during this process. Moreover, we show that the cell-permeable CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) and N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-13) both retard the migration of cells expressing wild type Grb7, but not the migration of cells expressing the mutant protein lacking the CaM-binding site (Grb7Δ), underscoring the proactive role of CaM binding to Grb7 during this process.

  15. Structural insights into Ca2+-calmodulin regulation of Plectin 1a-integrin β4 interaction in hemidesmosomes.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Geun; Kostan, Julius; Drepper, Friedel; Knapp, Bettina; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Konarev, Petr V; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Wiche, Gerhard; Gregor, Martin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Warscheid, Bettina; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2015-03-01

    The mechanical stability of epithelial cells, which protect organisms from harmful external factors, is maintained by hemidesmosomes via the interaction between plectin 1a (P1a) and integrin α6β4. Binding of calcium-calmodulin (Ca(2+)-CaM) to P1a together with phosphorylation of integrin β4 disrupts this complex, resulting in disassembly of hemidesmosomes. We present structures of the P1a actin binding domain either in complex with the N-ter lobe of Ca(2+)-CaM or with the first pair of integrin β4 fibronectin domains. Ca(2+)-CaM binds to the N-ter isoform-specific tail of P1a in a unique manner, via its N-ter lobe in an extended conformation. Structural, cell biology, and biochemical studies suggest the following model: binding of Ca(2+)-CaM to an intrinsically disordered N-ter segment of plectin converts it to an α helix, which repositions calmodulin to displace integrin β4 by steric repulsion. This model could serve as a blueprint for studies aimed at understanding how Ca(2+)-CaM or EF-hand motifs regulate F-actin-based cytoskeleton. PMID:25703379

  16. In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in Avena sativa L. coleoptiles: effects of Ca2+, calmodulin antagonists, and auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veluthambi, K.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylations in oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile segments were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In vitro phosphorylation of several polypeptides was distinctly promoted at 1 to 15 micromolar free Ca2+ concentrations. Ca2(+)-stimulated phosphorylation was markedly reduced by trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, and naphthalene sulfonamide (W7). Two polypeptides were phosphorylated both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, but the patterns of phosphorylation of several other polypeptides were different under the two conditions indicating that the in vivo phosphorylation pattern of proteins is not truly reflected by in vitro phosphorylation studies. Trifluoperazine, W7, or ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + calcium ionophore A23187 treatments resulted in reduced levels of in vivo protein phosphorylation of both control and auxin-treated coleoptile segments. Analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis following in vivo phosphorylation revealed auxin-dependent changes of certain polypeptides. A general inhibition of phosphorylation by calmodulin antagonists suggested that both control and auxin-treated coleoptiles exhibited Ca2+, and calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in vivo.

  17. Molecular and biochemical evidence for the involvement of calcium/calmodulin in auxin action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    The use of (35)S-labeled calmodulin (CaM) to screen a corn root cDNA expression library has led to the isolation of a CaM-binding protein, encoded by a cDNA with sequence similarity to small auxin up RNAs (SAURs), a class of early auxin-responsive genes. The cDNA designated as ZmSAUR1 (Zea mays SAURs) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified by CaM affinity chromatography. The CaM binding assay revealed that the recombinant protein binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion analysis revealed that the CaM binding site was located at the NH(2)-terminal domain. A synthetic peptide of amino acids 20-45, corresponding to the potential CaM binding region, was used for calcium-dependent mobility shift assays. The synthetic peptide formed a stable complex with CaM only in the presence of calcium. The CaM affinity assay indicated that ZmSAUR1 binds to CaM with high affinity (K(d) approximately 15 nM) in a calcium-dependent manner. Comparison of the NH(2)-terminal portions of all of the characterized SAURs revealed that they all contain a stretch of the basic alpha-amphiphilic helix similar to the CaM binding region of ZmSAUR1. CaM binds to the two synthetic peptides from the NH(2)-terminal regions of Arabidopsis SAUR-AC1 and soybean 10A5, suggesting that this is a general phenomenon for all SAURs. Northern analysis was carried out using the total RNA isolated from auxin-treated corn coleoptile segments. ZmSAUR1 gene expression began within 10 min, increased rapidly between 10 and 60 min, and peaked around 60 min after 10 microM alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid treatment. These results indicate that ZmSAUR1 is an early auxin-responsive gene. The CaM antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride inhibited the auxin-induced cell elongation but not the auxin-induced expression of ZmSAUR1. This suggests that calcium/CaM do not regulate ZmSAUR1 at the transcriptional level. CaM binding to ZmSAUR1 in a calcium

  18. Driving Calmodulin Protein towards Conformational Shift by Changing Ionization States of Select Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, Sunita; Rana Atilgan, Ali; Atilgan, Canan

    2012-12-01

    Proteins are complex systems made up of many conformational sub-states which are mainly determined by the folded structure. External factors such as solvent type, temperature, pH and ionic strength play a very important role in the conformations sampled by proteins. Here we study the conformational multiplicity of calmodulin (CaM) which is a protein that plays an important role in calcium signaling pathways in the eukaryotic cells. CaM can bind to a variety of other proteins or small organic compounds, and mediates different physiological processes by activating various enzymes. Binding of calcium ions and proteins or small organic molecules to CaM induces large conformational changes that are distinct to each interacting partner. In particular, we discuss the effect of pH variation on the conformations of CaM. By using the pKa values of the charged residues as a basis to assign protonation states, the conformational changes induced in CaM by reducing the pH are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Our current view suggests that at high pH, barrier crossing to the compact form is prevented by repulsive electrostatic interactions between the two lobes. At reduced pH, not only is barrier crossing facilitated by protonation of residues, but also conformations which are on average more compact are attained. The latter are in accordance with the fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiment results of other workers. The key events leading to the conformational change from the open to the compact conformation are (i) formation of a salt bridge between the N-lobe and the linker, stabilizing their relative motions, (ii) bending of the C-lobe towards the N-lobe, leading to a lowering of the interaction energy between the two-lobes, (iii) formation of a hydrophobic patch between the two lobes, further stabilizing the bent conformation by reducing the entropic cost of the compact form, (iv) sharing of a Ca+2 ion between the two lobes.

  19. Isolation and characterization of Dictyostelium thymidine kinase 1 as a calmodulin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Wagler, Stephanie; Myre, Michael A

    2005-06-17

    Probing of a cDNA expression library from multicellular development of Dictyostelium discoideum using a recombinant radiolabelled calmodulin probe (35S-VU1-CaM) led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative CaM-binding protein (CaMBP). The cDNA contained an open reading frame of 951 bp encoding a 227aa polypeptide (25.5 kDa). Sequence comparisons led to highly significant matches with cytosolic thymidine kinases (TK1; EC 2.7.1.21) from a diverse number of species including humans (7e-56; 59% Identities; 75% Positives) indicating that the encoded protein is D. discoideum TK1 (DdTK1; ThyB). DdTK1 has not been previously characterized in this organism. In keeping with its sequence similarity with DdTK1, antibodies against humanTK1 recognize DdTK1, which is expressed during growth but decreases in amount after starvation. A CaM-binding domain (CaMBD; 20GKTTELIRRIKRFNFANKKC30) was identified and wild type DdTK1 plus two constructs (DdTK deltaC36, DdTK deltaC75) possessing the domain were shown to bind CaM in vitro but only in the presence of calcium while a construct (DdTK deltaN72) lacking the region failed to bind to CaM. Thus, DdTK1 is a Ca2+-dependent CaMBP. Sequence alignments against TK1 from vertebrates to viruses show that CaM-binding region is highly conserved. The identified CaMBD overlaps the ATP-binding (P-loop) domain suggesting CaM might affect the activity of this kinase. Recombinant DdTK is enzymatically active and showed stimulation by CaM (113+/-0.5%) an in vitro enhancement that was prevented by co-addition of the CaM antagonists W7 (91.2+/-0.8%) and W13 (96.6+/-0.6%). The discovery that TK1 from D. discoideum, and possibly other species including humans and a large number of human viruses, is a Ca2+-dependent CaMBP opens up new avenues for research on this medically relevant protein. PMID:15883042

  20. Association between human erythrocyte calmodulin and the cytoplasmic surface of human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Agre, P; Gardner, K; Bennett, V

    1983-05-25

    This report describes Ca2+-dependent binding of 125I-labeled calmodulin (125I-CaM) to erythrocyte membranes and identification of two new CaM-binding proteins. Erythrocyte CaM labeled with 125I-Bolton Hunter reagent fully activated erythrocyte (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase. 125I-CaM bound to CaM depleted membranes in a Ca2+-dependent manner with a Ka of 6 x 10(-8) M Ca2+ and maximum binding at 4 x 10(-7) M Ca2+. Only the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane bound 125I-CaM. Binding was inhibited by unlabeled CaM and by trifluoperazine. Reduction of the free Ca2+ concentration or addition of trifluoperazine caused a slow reversal of binding. Nanomolar 125I-CaM required several hours to reach binding equilibrium, but the rate was much faster at higher concentrations. Scatchard plots of binding were curvilinear, and a class of high affinity sites was identified with a KD of 0.5 nM and estimated capacity of 400 sites per cell equivalent for inside-out vesicles (IOVs). The high affinity sites of IOVs most likely correspond to Ca2+ transporter since: (a) Ka of activation of (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase and KD for binding were nearly identical, and (b) partial digestion of IOVs with alpha-chymotrypsin produced activation of the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase with loss of the high affinity sites. 125I-CaM bound in solution to a class of binding proteins (KD approximately 55 nM, 7.3 pmol per mg of ghost protein) which were extracted from ghosts by low ionic strength incubation. Soluble binding proteins were covalently cross-linked to 125I-CaM with Lomant's reagent, and 2 bands of 8,000 and 40,000 Mr (Mr of CaM subtracted) and spectrin dimer were observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. The 8,000 and 40,000 Mr proteins represent a previously unrecognized class of CaM-binding sites which may mediate unexplained Ca2+-induced effects in the erythrocyte.

  1. The Merck Frosst Award Lecture 1994. Calmodulin: a versatile calcium mediator protein.

    PubMed

    Vogel, H J

    1994-01-01

    The level of intracellular calcium is strictly regulated in all cells. In a resting cell, the [Ca2+] is < or = 10(-7) M and during activation it rises to approximately 10(-6) M. Calmodulin (CaM) is the secondary messenger protein that has to translate this modest rise in intracellular calcium into a physiological response in all eukaryotic cells. CaM can activate almost 30 different target systems, including smooth muscle contraction, protein kinases and phosphatases, nitric oxide synthases, and calcium-extruding pumps. It is an acidic protein of 148 amino acids with four helix-loop-helix calcium-binding domains and it has a characteristic dumbbell shape in the crystal structure. In this review I discuss which features of CaM allow it to be such a universal and versatile calcium regulator. First of all, the positive cooperative calcium binding to all four binding sites of CaM in the presence of a target protein allows the protein to act effectively during a calcium transient. Secondly, the high Met content of two hydrophobic surface patches on the two domains of CaM creates a flexible and pliable, yet sticky, interaction surface that does not place high demands on the specificity of the interaction. Consequently, calcium-CaM can bind effectively to the CaM-binding domains of all its target proteins, despite their lack of amino acid sequence homology; their only common feature is that they are hydrophobic basic peptides that have a propensity to form an alpha-helix. CaM's capacity to recognize its CaM-binding domains is further enhanced by its third crucial feature, the intrinsic flexibility of the central linker region; this allows the two domains of CaM to slide over the surface of the alpha-helical bound peptide, to find their most favourable binding orientation. In this review I have also presented selected examples of a variety of experimental techniques that have contributed to our understanding of this unique multitasking protein. These include studies with

  2. Calmodulin Methyltransferase Is Required for Growth, Muscle Strength, Somatosensory Development and Brain Function.

    PubMed

    Haziza, Sitvanit; Magnani, Roberta; Lan, Dima; Keinan, Omer; Saada, Ann; Hershkovitz, Eli; Yanay, Nurit; Cohen, Yoram; Nevo, Yoram; Houtz, Robert L; Sheffield, Val C; Golan, Hava; Parvari, Ruti

    2015-08-01

    Calmodulin lysine methyl transferase (CaM KMT) is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved from plants to vertebrates. CaM is frequently trimethylated at Lys-115, however, the role of CaM methylation in vertebrates has not been studied. CaM KMT was found to be homozygously deleted in the 2P21 deletion syndrome that includes 4 genes. These patients present with cystinuria, severe intellectual disabilities, hypotonia, mitochondrial disease and facial dysmorphism. Two siblings with deletion of three of the genes included in the 2P21 deletion syndrome presented with cystinuria, hypotonia, a mild/moderate mental retardation and a respiratory chain complex IV deficiency. To be able to attribute the functional significance of the methylation of CaM in the mouse and the contribution of CaM KMT to the clinical presentation of the 2p21deletion patients, we produced a mouse model lacking only CaM KMT with deletion borders as in the human 2p21deletion syndrome. No compensatory activity for CaM methylation was found. Impairment of complexes I and IV, and less significantly III, of the mitochondrial respiratory chain was more pronounced in the brain than in muscle. CaM KMT is essential for normal body growth and somatosensory development, as well as for the proper functioning of the adult mouse brain. Developmental delay was demonstrated for somatosensory function and for complex behavior, which involved both basal motor function and motivation. The mutant mice also had deficits in motor learning, complex coordination and learning of aversive stimuli. The mouse model contributes to the evaluation of the role of methylated CaM. CaM methylation appears to have a role in growth, muscle strength, somatosensory development and brain function. The current study has clinical implications for human patients. Patients presenting slow growth and muscle weakness that could result from a mitochondrial impairment and mental retardation should be considered for sequence analysis of the Ca

  3. Orai1 pore residues control CRAC channel inactivation independently of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Franklin M; Yen, Michelle; Lewis, Richard S

    2016-02-01

    Ca(2+) entry through CRAC channels causes fast Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI). Previous mutagenesis studies have implicated Orai1 residues W76 and Y80 in CDI through their role in binding calmodulin (CaM), in agreement with the crystal structure of Ca(2+)-CaM bound to an Orai1 N-terminal peptide. However, a subsequent Drosophila melanogaster Orai crystal structure raises concerns about this model, as the side chains of W76 and Y80 are predicted to face the pore lumen and create a steric clash between bound CaM and other Orai1 pore helices. We further tested the functional role of CaM using several dominant-negative CaM mutants, none of which affected CDI. Given this evidence against a role for pretethered CaM, we altered side-chain volume and charge at the Y80 and W76 positions to better understand their roles in CDI. Small side chain volume had different effects at the two positions: it accelerated CDI at position Y80 but reduced the extent of CDI at position W76. Positive charges at Y80 and W76 permitted partial CDI with accelerated kinetics, whereas introducing negative charge at any of five consecutive pore-lining residues (W76, Y80, R83, K87, or R91) completely eliminated CDI. Noise analysis of Orai1 Y80E and Y80K currents indicated that reductions in CDI for these mutations could not be accounted for by changes in unitary current or open probability. The sensitivity of CDI to negative charge introduced into the pore suggested a possible role for anion binding in the pore. However, although Cl(-) modulated the kinetics and extent of CDI, we found no evidence that CDI requires any single diffusible cytosolic anion. Together, our results argue against a CDI mechanism involving CaM binding to W76 and Y80, and instead support a model in which Orai1 residues Y80 and W76 enable conformational changes within the pore, leading to CRAC channel inactivation. PMID:26809793

  4. Identification of the Calmodulin-Binding Domains of Fas Death Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bliss J.; Samal, Alexandra B.; Vlach, Jiri; Fernandez, Timothy F.; Brooke, Dewey; Prevelige, Peter E.; Saad, Jamil S.

    2016-01-01

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by binding of a Fas ligand to the ectodomain of the surface death receptor Fas protein. Subsequently, the intracellular death domain of Fas (FasDD) and that of the Fas-associated protein (FADD) interact to form the core of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), a crucial step for activation of caspases that induce cell death. Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM) is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells and specifically interacts with FasDD to regulate the apoptotic/survival signaling pathway. Inhibition of CaM activity in DISC stimulates apoptosis significantly. We have recently shown that CaM forms a ternary complex with FasDD (2:1 CaM:FasDD). However, the molecular mechanism by which CaM binds to two distinct FasDD motifs is not fully understood. Here, we employed mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), biophysical, and biochemical methods to identify the binding regions of FasDD and provide a molecular basis for the role of CaM in Fas–mediated apoptosis. Proteolytic digestion and mass spectrometry data revealed that peptides spanning residues 209–239 (Fas-Pep1) and 251–288 (Fas-Pep2) constitute the two CaM-binding regions of FasDD. To determine the molecular mechanism of interaction, we have characterized the binding of recombinant/synthetic Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 peptides with CaM. Our data show that both peptides engage the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM simultaneously. Binding of Fas-Pep1 to CaM is entropically driven while that of Fas-Pep2 to CaM is enthalpically driven, indicating that a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces contribute to the stabilization of the FasDD–CaM complex. Our data suggest that because Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 are involved in extensive intermolecular contacts with the death domain of FADD, binding of CaM to these regions may hinder its ability to bind to FADD, thus greatly inhibiting the initiation of apoptotic signaling

  5. Calmodulin Methyltransferase Is Required for Growth, Muscle Strength, Somatosensory Development and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Haziza, Sitvanit; Magnani, Roberta; Lan, Dima; Keinan, Omer; Saada, Ann; Hershkovitz, Eli; Yanay, Nurit; Cohen, Yoram; Nevo, Yoram; Houtz, Robert L.; Sheffield, Val C.; Golan, Hava; Parvari, Ruti

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin lysine methyl transferase (CaM KMT) is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved from plants to vertebrates. CaM is frequently trimethylated at Lys-115, however, the role of CaM methylation in vertebrates has not been studied. CaM KMT was found to be homozygously deleted in the 2P21 deletion syndrome that includes 4 genes. These patients present with cystinuria, severe intellectual disabilities, hypotonia, mitochondrial disease and facial dysmorphism. Two siblings with deletion of three of the genes included in the 2P21 deletion syndrome presented with cystinuria, hypotonia, a mild/moderate mental retardation and a respiratory chain complex IV deficiency. To be able to attribute the functional significance of the methylation of CaM in the mouse and the contribution of CaM KMT to the clinical presentation of the 2p21deletion patients, we produced a mouse model lacking only CaM KMT with deletion borders as in the human 2p21deletion syndrome. No compensatory activity for CaM methylation was found. Impairment of complexes I and IV, and less significantly III, of the mitochondrial respiratory chain was more pronounced in the brain than in muscle. CaM KMT is essential for normal body growth and somatosensory development, as well as for the proper functioning of the adult mouse brain. Developmental delay was demonstrated for somatosensory function and for complex behavior, which involved both basal motor function and motivation. The mutant mice also had deficits in motor learning, complex coordination and learning of aversive stimuli. The mouse model contributes to the evaluation of the role of methylated CaM. CaM methylation appears to have a role in growth, muscle strength, somatosensory development and brain function. The current study has clinical implications for human patients. Patients presenting slow growth and muscle weakness that could result from a mitochondrial impairment and mental retardation should be considered for sequence analysis of the Ca

  6. Characterization of Calmodulin-Free Murine Inducible Nitric-Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Latika; Panda, Koustubh

    2015-01-01

    Nitric-Oxide Synthase (NOS), that produces the biological signal molecule Nitric-Oxide (NO), exists in three different isoforms called, neuronal (nNOS), endothelial (eNOS) and inducible (iNOS). All NOS isoforms require post-translational interaction with the calcium-binding protein, calmodulin (CaM) for manifesting their catalytic activity. However, CaM has been suggested to control the translational assembly of the enzyme as well, particularly in helping its inducible isoform, iNOS assume a stable, heme-replete, dimeric and active form. Expression of recombinant murine iNOS in E.coli in the absence of CaM has been previously shown to give extremely poor yield of the enzyme which was claimed to be absolutely heme-free, devoid of flavins, completely monomeric and catalytically inactive when compared to the heme-replete, active, dimeric iNOS, generated through co-expression with CaM. In contrast, we found that although iNOS expressed without CaM does produce significantly low amounts of the CaM-free enzyme, the iNOS thus produced, is not completely devoid of heme and is neither entirely monomeric nor absolutely bereft of catalytic activity as reported before. In fact, iNOS synthesized in the absence of CaM undergoes compromised heme incorporation resulting in extremely poor dimerization and activity compared to its counterpart co-expressed with CaM. Moreover, such CaM-free iNOS has similar flavin content and reductase activity as iNOS co-expressed with CaM, suggesting that CaM may not be as much required for the functional assembly of the iNOS reductase domain as its oxygenase domain. LC-MS/MS-based peptide mapping of the CaM-free iNOS confirmed that it had the same full-length sequence as the CaM-replete iNOS. Isothermal calorimetric measurements also revealed high affinity for CaM binding in the CaM-free iNOS and thus the possible presence of a CaM-binding domain. Thus CaM is essential but not indispensible for the assembly of iNOS and such CaM-free iNOS may help

  7. The effects of mercuric chloride on calmodulin-mediated Ca sup 2+ transport in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, G.G.; Oelsner, D.; Anderson, C.R.; Pearce, C.J.; Wallin, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    We have shown previously that mercuric chloride (HgCl2) inhibits in vitro vasopressin release from the isolated rat neurohypophysis with maximum inhibition occurring with 0.5 mM HgCl2. Associated with the inhibition of hormone release is an increase in 45Ca+2 uptake, an increase in cytosolic 45Ca+2, and a reduction of 45Ca+2 accumulation by mitochondria in the intact gland. In the present series of studies, the effect of HgCl2 on calmodulin (CM) function in neural tissue preparations is reported. Mercuric chloride (0.5 mM) reduced 45Ca+2 binding to CM purified from bovine neurohypophyses by 20% and inhibited endogenous CM-stimulated Ca,Mg-ATPase activity from rat brain mitochondria in a dose-dependent fashion. Ca,Mg-ATPase activity was inhibited by 50 and 80% with 0.5 and 5.0 mM HgCl2, respectively. CM-stimulation of Ca,Mg-ATPase activity was inhibited by calmidazolium (CMZ) with maximal inhibition seen with 0.1 mM CMZ. Reversibility of the HgCl2 interaction with CM was demonstrated using CM-stimulated phosphodiesterase (PDEase) activity from rat brain. HgCl2 inhibited both basal and CM-stimulated PDEase activity in a dose-dependent manner with maximum inhibition occurring with 1.0 mM HgCl2. Preexposure of CM to an inhibitory concentration (1.0 mM) of HgCl2 resulted in no loss of stimulatory PDEase enzyme activity. From these results, we conclude that HgCl2 reversibly interferes with 45Ca+2 binding to CM and also inhibits CM-regulated Ca+2 pumping enzyme systems in the neurohypophysis. The inhibition of vasopressin release from the intact gland in the presence of HgCl2 thus, may be associated with a disruption of calcium in the neurohypophysis.

  8. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Changsoo; Choi, Eunmi; Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shin, Dong Chun; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Joung, Boyoung

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague–Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0 ± 14.0 to 142.1 ± 18.4 ms (p = 0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/ml for 30 min, n = 5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p = 0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5 mmol/L, n = 3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/ml for 20 min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5 mmol/L, n = 5), nifedipine (10 μmol/L, n = 5), and active Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1 μmol/L, n = 5), but not by thapsigargin (200 nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10 μmol/L, n = 5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1 μmol/L, n = 5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5 μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► The ambient PM consistently prolonged repolarization. ► The ambient PM induced triggered activity and ventricular arrhythmia. ► These effects were prevented by antioxidants, I{sub CaL} blockade and CaMKII blockade. ► The ambient PM can induce

  9. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Enslen, H; Tokumitsu, H; Stork, P J; Davis, R J; Soderling, T R

    1996-01-01

    Membrane depolarization of NG108 cells gives rapid (< 5 min) activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaM-KIV), as well as activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). To investigate whether the Ca2+-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38) might be mediated by the CaM kinase cascade, we have transfected PC12 cells, which lack CaM-KIV, with constitutively active mutants of CaM kinase kinase and/or CaM-KIV (CaM-KKc and CaM-KIVc, respectively). In the absence of depolarization, CaM-KKc transfection had no effect on Elk-dependent transcription of a luciferase reporter gene, whereas CaM-KIVc alone or in combination with CaM-KKc gave 7- to 10-fold and 60- to 80-fold stimulations, respectively, which were blocked by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase cotransfection. When epitope-tagged constructs of MAP kinases were co-transfected with CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc, the immunoprecipitated MAP kinases were activated 2-fold (ERK-2) and 7- to 10-fold (JNK-1 and p38). The JNK and p38 pathways were further investigated using specific c-Jun or ATF2-dependent transcriptional assays. We found that c-Jun/ATF2-dependent transcriptions were enhanced 7- to 10-fold by CaM-KIVc and 20- to 30-fold by CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc. In the case of the Jun-dependent transcription, this effect was not due to direct phosphorylation of c-Jun by activated CaM-KIV, since transcription was blocked by a dominant-negative JNK and by two MAP kinase phosphatases. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (Thr196) in CaM-KIV, which mediates its activation by CaM-KIV kinase, prevented activation of Elk-1, c-Jun, and ATF2 by the CaM kinase cascade. These results establish a new Ca2+-dependent mechanism for regulating MAP kinase pathways and resultant transcription. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855261

  10. Structural investigation into the differential target enzyme regulation displayed by plant calmodulin isoforms.

    PubMed

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Vogel, Hans J

    2005-03-01

    The conserved calmodulin (CaM) isoform SCaM-1 and the divergent SCaM-4 from soybean bind to many of the same target enzymes, but differentially activate or competitively inhibit them. Class 1 target enzymes are activated by both calcium (Ca(2+))-bound SCaM-1 (Ca(2+)-SCaM-1) and Ca(2+)-bound SCaM-4 (Ca(2+)-SCaM-4), while class 2 enzymes are activated by Ca(2+)-SCaM-1 but competitively inhibited by Ca(2+)-SCaM-4, and class 3 enzymes are activated by Ca(2+)-SCaM-4 but competitively inhibited by Ca(2+)-SCaM-1. To determine whether these differences can be attributed to unique interactions with the CaM-binding domains (CaMBD) of these enzymes, we have studied the binding of each protein to peptides derived from the CaMBD of a representative target enzyme from each of these three classes. Using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry, we demonstrate that the N- and C-domains of either Ca(2+)-SCaM bind to each peptide to form structurally compact complexes driven by the burial of hydrophobic surfaces. Interestingly, the interactions with the CaMBD peptides from classes 1 and 2 are similar for the two proteins; however, binding to the peptide from class 3 is structurally and thermodynamically distinct for Ca(2+)-SCaM-1 and -4. We also demonstrate that both calcium-free SCaM-1 (apo-SCaM-1) and calcium-free SCaM-4 (apo-SCaM-4) bind to the CaMBD from cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and that the interactions are similar to each other and to the interactions with apo-mammalian CaM. Therefore, the apo-SCaMs are also capable of binding to the same target enzymes, which could provide an additional mechanism for CaM-dependent signaling in plants.

  11. Differential activation of NAD kinase by plant calmodulin isoforms. The critical role of domain I.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Seo, H Y; Kim, J C; Heo, W D; Chung, W S; Lee, K J; Kim, M C; Cheong, Y H; Choi, J Y; Lim, C O; Cho, M J

    1997-04-01

    NAD kinase is a Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent enzyme capable of converting cellular NAD to NADP. The enzyme purified from pea seedlings can be activated by highly conserved soybean CaM, SCaM-1, but not by the divergent soybean CaM isoform, SCaM-4 (Lee, S. H., Kim, J. C., Lee, M. S., Heo, W. D., Seo, H. Y., Yoon, H. W., Hong, J. C., Lee, S. Y., Bahk, J. D., Hwang, I., and Cho, M. J. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 21806-21812). To determine which domains were responsible for this differential activation of NAD kinase, a series of chimeric SCaMs were generated by exchanging functional domains between SCaM-4 and SCaM-1. SCaM-4111, a chimeric SCaM-1 that contains the first domain of SCaM-4, was severely impaired (only 40% of maximal) in its ability to activate NAD kinase. SCaM-1444, a chimeric SCaM-4 that contains the first domain of SCaM-1 exhibited nearly full ( approximately 70%) activation of NAD kinase. Only chimeras containing domain I of SCaM-1 produced greater than half-maximal activation of NAD kinase. To define the amino acid residue(s) in domain I that were responsible for this differential activation, seven single residue substitution mutants of SCaM-1 were generated and tested for NAD kinase activation. Among these mutants, only K30E and G40D showed greatly reduced NAD kinase activation. Also a double residue substitution mutant, K30E/G40D, containing these two mutations in combination was severely impaired in its NAD kinase-activating potential, reaching only 20% of maximal activation. Furthermore, a triple mutation, K30E/M36I/G40D, completely abolished NAD kinase activation. Thus, our data suggest that domain I of CaM plays a key role in the differential activation of NAD kinase exhibited by SCaM-1 and SCaM-4. Further, the residues Lys30 and Glu40 of SCaM-1 are critical for this function.

  12. Purification and partial characterization of a novel calcium-binding protein from Bacillus cereus T spores and inhibition of germination by calmodulin antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding protein has been purified from the dormant spores of Bacillus cereus T. B. cereus T spores were extensively washed, broken, and heated at 90{degree}C for 2 min. Using calcium-dependent hydrophobic interaction chromatography plus DEAE-cellulose and hydroxylapatite columns, a single protein was obtained which possessed calcium-binding capacity and some characteristics of calmodulin. This heat-stable protein was retained by hydrophobic matrices or a calmodulin antagonist in a calcium-dependent manner. The crude spore extract displaced bovine brain calmodulin from its antibody in a radioimmunoassay and the immunoreactive specific activity of the partially purified fraction which eluted from phenyl-Sepharose was ca. 200-fold greater than the crude spore extract. Purity of this protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyarcylamide gel electrophoresis and reversed-phase HPLC. Calcium-binding ability was verified with a competitive calcium binding assay using Chelex-100 resin and {sup 45}Ca autoradiography. SDS-PAGE and amino acid composition indicated the molecular weight of the protein was 24-kDa. The effects of two calmodulin antagonists, trifluoperazine (TFP) and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) on L-alanine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus T spores were examined by measuring commitment to germination, loss of heat resistance, release of calcium, decrease in optical density at 660 nm and phase-contrast microscopy.

  13. Isolation, characterization, and bioinformatic analysis of calmodulin-binding protein cmbB reveals a novel tandem IP22 repeat common to many Dictyostelium and Mimivirus proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Suhre, Karsten; Myre, Michael A; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Chavez, Sara E

    2006-08-01

    A novel calmodulin-binding protein cmbB from Dictyostelium discoideum is encoded in a single gene. Northern analysis reveals two cmbB transcripts first detectable at 4 h during multicellular development. Western blotting detects an approximately 46.6 kDa protein. Sequence analysis and calmodulin-agarose binding studies identified a "classic" calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding domain (179IPKSLRSLFLGKGYNQPLEF198) but structural analyses suggest binding may not involve classic alpha-helical calmodulin-binding. The cmbB protein is comprised of tandem repeats of a newly identified IP22 motif ([I,L]Pxxhxxhxhxxxhxxxhxxxx; where h = any hydrophobic amino acid) that is highly conserved and a more precise representation of the FNIP repeat. At least eight Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus proteins and over 100 Dictyostelium proteins contain tandem arrays of the IP22 motif and its variants. cmbB also shares structural homology to YopM, from the plague bacterium Yersenia pestis. PMID:16777069

  14. Molecular characterization of a calmodulin gene, VcCaM1, that is differentially expressed under aluminum stress in highbush blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calmodulin (CaM), a small acidic protein, is one of the best characterized Ca2+ sensors in eukaryotes. This Ca2+-regulated protein plays a critical role in decoding and transducing environmental stress signals by activating specific targets. Many environmental stresses elicit changes in intracellu...

  15. Intraterminal injection of synapsin I or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alters neurotransmitter release at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; McGuinness, T L; Leonard, C S; Sugimori, M; Greengard, P

    1985-01-01

    Synapsin I and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II were pressure-injected into the preterminal digit of the squid giant synapse to test directly the possible regulation of neurotransmitter release by these substances. Neurotransmitter release was determined by measuring the amplitude, rate of rise, and latency of the postsynaptic potential generated in response to presynaptic depolarizing steps under voltage clamp conditions. Injection of dephosphosynapsin I decreased the amplitude and rate of rise of the postsynaptic potential, whereas injection of either phosphosynapsin I or heat-treated dephosphosynapsin I was without effect. Conversely, injection of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which phosphorylates synapsin I on site II, increased the rate of rise and amplitude and decreased the latency of the postsynaptic potential. The effects of these proteins were observed without any detectable change in the initial phase of the presynaptic calcium current. A synapsin I-like protein and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II were demonstrated by biochemical and immunochemical techniques to be present in squid nervous tissue. The data support the hypothesis that synapsin I regulates the availability of synaptic vesicles for release; we propose that calcium entry into the nerve terminal activates calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which phosphorylates synapsin I on site II, dissociating it from the vesicles and thereby removing a constraint in the release process. Images PMID:2859595

  16. An ion-current mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia with defects in the primary structure and post-translational N-methylation of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen-Friedman, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    My work on pantophobiac A{sup 2} (pntA{sup 2}), a behavioral mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia, suggest that the Ca{sup ++}-binding protein calmodulin (CaM), and post-translation N-methylation of CaM, are important for Ca{sup ++}-related ion-current function. Calmodulin from wild-type Paramecium has two sites of lysine-N-methylation. Both of these sites are almost fully methylated in vivo; thus wild-type calmodulin is a poor substrate for N-methylation in vitro. In contrast, pntA/{sup 2} CaM can be heavily N-methylated in vitro, suggesting that the mutant calmodulin is under-methylated in vivo. Amino-acid composition analysis showed that CaM lysine 115 is undermethylated in pntA{sup 2}. Once pntA{sup 2} CaM is N-methylated, the (methyl-{sup 3}H) group does not turn over in either wild-type or pntA{sup 2} cytoplasmic fractions. The methylating enzymes in pntA{sup 2} high-speed supernatant fractions are active, but may be less robust than those of the wild type, suggesting a possible control of these enzymes by CaM.

  17. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  18. Differential trace labeling of calmodulin: investigation of binding sites and conformational states by individual lysine reactivities. Effects of beta-endorphin, trifluoperazine, and ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Giedroc, D.P.; Sinha, S.K.; Brew, K.; Puett, D.

    1985-11-05

    The CaS -dependent association of beta-endorphin and trifluoperazine with porcine testis calmodulin, as well as the effects of removing CaS by ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) treatment, were investigated by the procedure of differential kinetic labeling. This technique permitted determination of the relative rates of acylation of each of the epsilon-amino groups of the seven lysyl residues on calmodulin by (TH)acetic anhydride under the different conditions. In all cases, less than 0.52 mol of lysyl residue/mol of calmodulin was modified, thus ensuring that the labeling pattern reflects the microenvironments of these groups in the native protein. Lysines 75 and 94 were found to be the most reactive amino groups in CaS -saturated calmodulin. In the presence of CaS and under conditions where beta-endorphin and calmodulin were present at a molar ratio of 2.5:1, the amino groups of lysines 75 and 148 were significantly reduced in reactivity compared to calmodulin alone. At equimolar concentrations of peptides and proteins, essentially the same result was obtained except that the magnitudes of the perturbation of these two lysines were less pronounced. With trifluoperazine, at a molar ratio to calmodulin of 2.5:1, significant perturbations of lysines 75 and 148, as well as Lys 77, were also found. These results further substantiate previous observations of a commonality between phenothiazine and peptide binding sites on calmodulin. Lastly, an intriguing difference in CaS -mediated reactivities between lysines 75 and 77 of calmodulin is demonstrated. In the CaS -saturated form of the protein, both lysines are part of the long connecting helix between the two homologous halves of the protein.

  19. Calmodulin activation of an endoplasmic reticulum-located calcium pump involves an interaction with the N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Harper, J. F.; Liang, F.; Sze, H.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how calmodulin regulates a unique subfamily of Ca(2+) pumps found in plants, we examined the kinetic properties of isoform ACA2 identified in Arabidopsis. A recombinant ACA2 was expressed in a yeast K616 mutant deficient in two endogenous Ca(2+) pumps. Orthovanadate-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) transport into vesicles isolated from transformants demonstrated that ACA2 is a Ca(2+) pump. Ca(2+) pumping by the full-length protein (ACA2-1) was 4- to 10-fold lower than that of the N-terminal truncated ACA2-2 (Delta2-80), indicating that the N-terminal domain normally acts to inhibit the pump. An inhibitory sequence (IC(50) = 4 microM) was localized to a region within valine-20 to leucine-44, because a peptide corresponding to this sequence lowered the V(max) and increased the K(m) for Ca(2+) of the constitutively active ACA2-2 to values comparable to the full-length pump. The peptide also blocked the activity (IC(50) = 7 microM) of a Ca(2+) pump (AtECA1) belonging to a second family of Ca(2+) pumps. This inhibitory sequence appears to overlap with a calmodulin-binding site in ACA2, previously mapped between aspartate-19 and arginine-36 (J.F. Harper, B. Hong, I. Hwang, H.Q. Guo, R. Stoddard, J.F. Huang, M.G. Palmgren, H. Sze inverted question mark1998 J Biol Chem 273: 1099-1106). These results support a model in which the pump is kept "unactivated" by an intramolecular interaction between an autoinhibitory sequence located between residues 20 and 44 and a site in the Ca(2+) pump core that is highly conserved between different Ca(2+) pump families. Results further support a model in which activation occurs as a result of Ca(2+)-induced binding of calmodulin to a site overlapping or immediately adjacent to the autoinhibitory sequence.

  20. Characterization of calmodulin-Fas death domain interaction: an integrated experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Fancy, Romone M; Wang, Lingyun; Napier, Tiara; Lin, Jiabei; Jing, Gu; Lucius, Aaron L; McDonald, Jay M; Zhou, Tong; Song, Yuhua

    2014-04-29

    The Fas death receptor-activated death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) regulates apoptosis in many normal and cancer cells. Qualitative biochemical experiments demonstrate that calmodulin (CaM) binds to the death domain of Fas. The interaction between CaM and Fas regulates Fas-mediated DISC formation. A quantitative understanding of the interaction between CaM and Fas is important for the optimal design of antagonists for CaM or Fas to regulate the CaM-Fas interaction, thus modulating Fas-mediated DISC formation and apoptosis. The V254N mutation of the Fas death domain (Fas DD) is analogous to an identified mutant allele of Fas in lpr-cg mice that have a deficiency in Fas-mediated apoptosis. In this study, the interactions of CaM with the Fas DD wild type (Fas DD WT) and with the Fas DD V254N mutant were characterized using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. ITC results reveal an endothermic binding characteristic and an entropy-driven interaction of CaM with Fas DD WT or with Fas DD V254N. The Fas DD V254N mutation decreased the association constant (Ka) for CaM-Fas DD binding from (1.79 ± 0.20) × 10(6) to (0.88 ± 0.14) × 10(6) M(-1) and slightly increased a standard state Gibbs free energy (ΔG°) for CaM-Fas DD binding from -8.87 ± 0.07 to -8.43 ± 0.10 kcal/mol. CD secondary structure analysis and MD simulation results did not show significant secondary structural changes of the Fas DD caused by the V254N mutation. The conformational and dynamical motion analyses, the analyses of hydrogen bond formation within the CaM binding region, the contact numbers of each residue, and the electrostatic potential for the CaM binding region based on MD simulations demonstrated changes caused by the Fas DD V254N mutation. These changes caused by the Fas DD V254N mutation could affect the van der Waals interactions and electrostatic interactions between CaM and Fas DD, thereby affecting

  1. A Top-Down LC-FTICR MS-Based Strategy for Characterizing Oxidized Calmodulin in Activated Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lourette, Natacha M.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Wu, Si; Robinson, Errol W.; Squier, Thomas C.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2010-06-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based approach for monitoring time dependent changes in the degree of nitration and oxidation of intact calmodulin (CaM) has been used to resolve approximately 500 CaM oxiforms. Tentative identifications of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) such as oxidation or nitration have been assigned by combining tryptic peptide information (generated from bottom-up analyses) with online collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) at the intact protein level. The reduction in abundance and diversity of oxidatively modified CaM (i.e. nitrated tyrosines and oxidized methionines) induced by macrophage activation has been explored and semi-quantified for different oxidation degrees of CaM (i.e. no oxidation, moderate and high oxidation). This work demonstrates the power of top-down approach to identify hundreds of combinations of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) for single protein target such as CaM.

  2. Solution structure of the calmodulin-like C-terminal domain of Entamoeba α-actinin2.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Göran; Persson, Cecilia; Mayzel, Maxim; Hedenström, Mattias; Backman, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Cell motility is dependent on a dynamic meshwork of actin filaments that is remodelled continuously. A large number of associated proteins that are severs, cross-links, or caps the filament ends have been identified and the actin cross-linker α-actinin has been implied in several important cellular processes. In Entamoeba histolytica, the etiological agent of human amoebiasis, α-actinin is believed to be required for infection. To better understand the role of α-actinin in the infectious process we have determined the solution structure of the C-terminal calmodulin-like domain using NMR. The final structure ensemble of the apo form shows two lobes, that both resemble other pairs of calcium-binding EF-hand motifs, connected with a mobile linker. PMID:26800385

  3. Uncoupling PIP2-calmodulin regulation of Kv7.2 channels by an assembly destabilizing epileptogenic mutation.

    PubMed

    Alberdi, Araitz; Gomis-Perez, Carolina; Bernardo-Seisdedos, Ganeko; Alaimo, Alessandro; Malo, Covadonga; Aldaregia, Juncal; Lopez-Robles, Carlos; Areso, Pilar; Butz, Elisabeth; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2015-11-01

    We show that the combination of an intracellular bi-partite calmodulin (CaM)-binding site and a distant assembly region affect how an ion channel is regulated by a membrane lipid. Our data reveal that regulation by phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate (PIP2) and stabilization of assembled Kv7.2 subunits by intracellular coiled-coil regions far from the membrane are coupled molecular processes. Live-cell fluorescence energy transfer measurements and direct binding studies indicate that remote coiled-coil formation creates conditions for different CaM interaction modes, each conferring different PIP2 dependency to Kv7.2 channels. Disruption of coiled-coil formation by epilepsy-causing mutation decreases apparent CaM-binding affinity and interrupts CaM influence on PIP2 sensitivity.

  4. Nuclear and axonal localization of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type Gr in rat cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, K F; Ohmstede, C A; Fisher, R S; Sahyoun, N

    1991-01-01

    The granule cell-enriched Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase-Gr) is a recently discovered neuron-specific enzyme. The kinase avidly phosphorylates synapsin I and contains a polyglutamate sequence, which suggests an association with chromatin as well. A possible role in synapsin I phosphorylation and in nuclear Ca2+ signaling was supported by immunochemical and ultrastructural examination of CaM kinase-Gr distribution. CaM kinase-Gr immunoreactivity was present in the molecular and granule cell layers of the rat cerebellum. This pattern corresponded to the occurrence of the enzyme in the granule cell axons and nuclei, respectively. Immunoblots confirmed these findings. Thus, CaM kinase-Gr may mediate and coordinate Ca2(+)-signaling within different subcellular compartments. Images PMID:2011593

  5. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIγ enhances stem-like traits and tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongfang; Zhou, You; Zhang, Chenchen; Yang, Yiming; Yang, Ying; Xu, Haiyan; Xu, Rongzhen; Wang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Highly tumorigenic stem-like cells, considered tumor-initiating cells (TICs), are the main cause of lung cancer initiation, relapse, and drug resistance. In this study, we identified that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIγ (CaMKIIγ) was aberrantly expressed in highly tumorigenic stem-like lung cancer cells, and was also correlated with poor prognosis in human lung cancer. Functionally, CaMKIIγ enhanced stem-like traits and the tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells in an Akt- and β-catenin-dependent manner. In addition, we found that CaMKIIγ upregulated Oct4 expression via Akt-mediated histone acetylation. Taken together, our findings reveal a critical role of CaMKIIγ in regulating the stemness and tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells and offer a promising therapeutic target for TICs. PMID:25965829

  6. Expression, purification, and characterization of proteins from high-quality combinatorial libraries of the mammalian calmodulin central linker.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Luke H; Bricken, Michael L; Randle, Charlotte

    2011-02-01

    Combinatorial libraries offer an attractive approach towards exploring protein sequence, structure and function. Although several strategies introduce sequence diversity, the likelihood of identifying proteins with novel functions is increased when the library of genes encodes for folded and soluble structures. Here we present the first application of the binary patterning approach of combinatorial protein library design to the unique central linker region of the highly-conserved protein, calmodulin (CaM). We show that this high-quality approach translates very well to the CaM protein scaffold: all library members over-express and are functionally diverse, having a range of conformations in the presence and absence of calcium as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Collectively, these data support that the binary patterning approach, when applied to the highly-conserved protein fold, can yield large collections of folded, soluble and highly-expressible proteins.

  7. Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IV Promotes Interplay of Proteins in Chromatoid Body of Male Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guishuan; Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Yuan; Huang, Hefeng; Sun, Fei

    2015-07-16

    The chromatoid body is a granule-like structure of male germ cells, containing many proteins and RNAs, and is important for spermatogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms for the formation and function of the chromatoid body are still elusive. Here, we report that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) accumulates in the chromatoid body by immunofluorescence staining, indicating that CaMKIV is a new component of the chromatoid body. Furthermore, we find that CaMKIV can interplay with the other components of the chromatoid body by immunoprecipitation: mouse VASA homologue (MVH), mouse homologue of PIWI, PIWIL1 (MIWI), and kinesin KIF17b. Importantly, interplay between KIF17b and MVH or MIWI can be potentially regulated by CaMKIV. These results imply that CaMKIV plays a role in maintenance the structure of chromatoid body by regulating the associations of proteins in it.

  8. Differential calmodulin-modulatory and electron transfer properties of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mu compared to the alpha variant.

    PubMed

    Panda, Satya P; Li, Wenbing; Venkatakrishnan, Priya; Chen, Li; Astashkin, Andrei V; Masters, Bettie Sue S; Feng, Changjian; Roman, Linda J

    2013-12-11

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase μ (nNOSμ) contains 34 additional residues in an autoregulatory element compared to nNOSα. Cytochrome c and flavin reductions in the absence of calmodulin (CaM) were faster in nNOSμ than nNOSα, while rates in the presence of CaM were smaller. The magnitude of stimulation by CaM is thus notably lower in nNOSμ. No difference in NO production was observed, while electron transfer between the FMN and heme moieties and formation of an inhibitory ferrous-nitrosyl complex were slower in nNOSμ. Thus, the insert affects electron transfer rates, modulation of electron flow by CaM, and heme-nitrosyl complex formation. PMID:24211446

  9. Differential Calmodulin-Modulatory and Electron Transfer Properties of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Mu Compared to the Alpha Variant

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Satya P.; Li, Wenbing; Venkatakrishnan, Priya; Chen, Li; Astashkin, Andrei V.; Masters, Bettie Sue S.; Feng, Changjian; Roman, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase μ (nNOSμ) contains 34 additional residues in an autoregulatory element compared to nNOSα. Cytochrome c and flavin reductions in the absence of calmodulin (CaM) were faster in nNOSμ than nNOSα, while rates in the presence of CaM were smaller. The magnitude of stimulation by CaM is thus notably lower in nNOSμ. No difference in NO production was observed, while electron transfer between the FMN and heme moieties and formation of an inhibitory ferrous-nitrosyl complex were slower in nNOSμ. Thus, the insert affects electron transfer rates, modulation of electron flow by CaM, and heme-nitrosyl complex formation. PMID:24211446

  10. Trifluoperazine, a calmodulin inhibitor, blocks secretion in cultured chromaffin cells at a step distal from calcium entry.

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, R L; Côté, A; Trifaró, J M

    1982-01-01

    Trifluoperazine, a calmodulin antagonist, inhibited the secretory response of cultured bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cells to acetylcholine (10(-4) M) or a depolarizing concentration of [K+] (56 mM KCl) in a dose-related fashion. The ID50s of this effect were 2 x 10(-7) M and 2.2 x 10(-6) M for acetylcholine and high [K+], respectively. A decrease in external [Ca2+] concentration of the incubation medium from 4.4 to 0.275 mM resulted in an increase in the percentage of inhibition produced by trifluoperazine on the acetylcholine-evoked secretory response from 20.7 to 96.5%, respectively. However, trifluoperazine inhibited the acetylcholine-evoked catecholamine output by a similar absolute magnitude for all [Ca2+] concentrations tested with the exception of 4.4 mM [Ca2+]. Trifluoperazine, unlike the [Ca2+] channel blocker Ni2+, in concentrations (10(-6)-10(-5) M) that were found to inhibit significantly [K+]-induced amine output did not modify [K+]-induced 45Ca uptake or 45Ca efflux. However, trifluoperazine at a concentration of 2.5 x 10(-5) M was found to produce a small decrease in the 45Ca efflux curve and a decrease in the [K+]-evoked 45Ca uptake of 30 +/- 14% (n = 6). In addition, 2.5 x 10(-6) M trifluoperazine, a concentration which was found to suppress high [K+]-induced amine release by 64 +/- 5%, did not inhibit the 45Ca2+-Ca2+ exchange mechanism. These results demonstrate that trifluoperazine, an antipsychotic agent with anticalmodulin activity, blocks catecholamine release from cultured chromaffin cells at a step distal from calcium entry and, consequently, suggests a role for calmodulin in the secretory process of these cells.

  11. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia. PMID:19000924

  12. Protein kinase C phosphorylates a recently identified membrane skeleton-associated calmodulin-binding protein in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ling, E; Gardner, K; Bennett, V

    1986-10-25

    A membrane skeleton-associated protein with calmodulin-binding activity recently has been purified and characterized from human erythrocytes (Gardner, K. and Bennett, V. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 1339-1348). This new protein (CaM-BP103/97) has now been identified as a major substrate for protein kinase C in erythrocytes since phosphorylation of both of its subunits (Mr = 103,000 and 97,000) is elevated 3-15-fold in the presence of the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol beta-acetate (TPA), under the following conditions: ghost membranes incubated with protein kinase C purified from rat brain, ghost membranes from erythrocytes pretreated with TPA, and intact erythrocytes metabolically labeled with 32PO4 and stimulated by TPA. The sites of phosphorylation of this protein by exogenous and endogenous protein kinase C are identical since two-dimensional 32P-peptide maps of both subunits labeled by either endogenous or exogenous enzyme are indistinguishable. Each subunit of CaM-BP103/97 accepts up to 3 mol of phosphate/polypeptide chain. In the presence of low calcium concentrations and in the absence of cytosol, the phosphorylation of CaM-BP103/97 is, on a molar basis, equal to or greater than that of proteins 4.1 and 4.9. As a target for both calmodulin and protein kinase C, CaM-BP103/97 is likely to play a key role in the effect of calcium on erythrocyte membrane shape and stability.

  13. The identification and characterization of a noncontinuous calmodulin-binding site in noninactivating voltage-dependent KCNQ potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Yus-Najera, Eva; Santana-Castro, Irene; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2002-08-01

    We show here that in a yeast two-hybrid assay calmodulin (CaM) interacts with the intracellular C-terminal region of several members of the KCNQ family of potassium channels. CaM co-immunoprecipitates with KCNQ2, KCNQ3, or KCNQ5 subunits better in the absence than in the presence of Ca2+. Moreover, in two-hybrid assays where it is possible to detect interactions with apo-CaM but not with Ca2+-bound calmodulin, we localized the CaM-binding site to a region that is predicted to contain two alpha-helices (A and B). These two helices encompass approximately 85 amino acids, and in KCNQ2 they are separated by a dispensable stretch of approximately 130 amino acids. Within this CaM-binding domain, we found an IQ-like CaM-binding motif in helix A and two overlapping consensus 1-5-10 CaM-binding motifs in helix B. Point mutations in helix A or B were capable of abolishing CaM binding in the two-hybrid assay. Moreover, glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins containing helices A and B were capable of binding to CaM, indicating that the interaction with KCNQ channels is direct. Full-length CaM (both N and C lobes) and a functional EF-1 hand were required for these interactions to occur. These observations suggest that apo-CaM is bound to neuronal KCNQ channels at low resting Ca2+ levels and that this interaction is disturbed when the [Ca2+] is raised. Thus, we propose that CaM acts as a mediator in the Ca2+-dependent modulation of KCNQ channels. PMID:12032157

  14. Induction of Ca2+-calmodulin signaling by hard-surface contact primes Colletotrichum gloeosporioides conidia to germinate and form appressoria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y K; Li, D; Kolattukudy, P E

    1998-10-01

    Hard-surface contact primes the conidia of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides to respond to plant surface waxes and a fruit-ripening hormone, ethylene, to germinate and form the appressoria required for infection of the host. Our efforts to elucidate the molecular events in the early phase of the hard-surface contact found that EGTA (5 mM) and U73122 (16 nM), an inhibitor of phospholipase C, inhibited (50%) germination and appressorium formation. Measurements of calmodulin (CaM) transcripts with a CaM cDNA we cloned from C. gloeosporioides showed that CaM was induced by hard-surface contact maximally at 2 h and then declined; ethephon enhanced this induction. The CaM antagonist, compound 48/80, completely inhibited conidial germination and appressorium formation at a concentration of 3 microM, implying that CaM is involved in this process. A putative CaM kinase (CaMK) cDNA of C. gloeosporioides was cloned with transcripts from hard-surface-treated conidia. A selective inhibitor of CaMK, KN93 (20 microM), inhibited (50%) germination and appressorium formation, blocked melanization, and caused the formation of abnormal appressoria. Scytalone, an intermediate in melanin synthesis, reversed the inhibition of melanization but did not restore appressorium formation. The phosphorylation of 18- and 43-kDa proteins induced by hard-surface contact and ethephon was inhibited by the treatment with KN93. These results strongly suggest that hard-surface contact induces Ca2+-calmodulin signaling that primes the conidia to respond to host signals by germination and differentiation into appressoria.

  15. Identification of calmodulin isoform-specific binding peptides from a phage-displayed random 22-mer peptide library.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Young; Lee, Sang Hyoung; Park, Chan Young; Heo, Won Do; Kim, Jong Cheol; Kim, Min Chul; Chung, Woo Sik; Moon, Byeong Cheol; Cheong, Yong Hwa; Kim, Cha Young; Yoo, Jae Hyuk; Koo, Ja Choon; Ok, Hyun Mi; Chi, Seung-Wook; Ryu, Seong-Eon; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lim, Chae Oh; Cho, Moo Je

    2002-06-14

    Plants express numerous calmodulin (CaM) isoforms that exhibit differential activation or inhibition of CaM-dependent enzymes in vitro; however, their specificities toward target enzyme/protein binding are uncertain. A random peptide library displaying a 22-mer peptide on a bacteriophage surface was constructed to screen peptides that specifically bind to plant CaM isoforms (soybean calmodulin (ScaM)-1 and SCaM-4 were used in this study) in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The deduced amino acid sequence analyses of the respective 80 phage clones that were independently isolated via affinity panning revealed that SCaM isoforms require distinct amino acid sequences for optimal binding. SCaM-1-binding peptides conform to a 1-5-10 ((FILVW)XXX(FILV) XXXX(FILVW)) motif (where X denotes any amino acid), whereas SCaM-4-binding peptide sequences conform to a 1-8-14 ((FILVW)XXXXXX(FAILVW)XXXXX(FILVW)) motif. These motifs are classified based on the positions of conserved hydrophobic residues. To examine their binding properties further, two representative peptides from each of the SCaM isoform-binding sequences were synthesized and analyzed via gel mobility shift assays, Trp fluorescent spectra analyses, and phosphodiesterase competitive inhibition experiments. The results of these studies suggest that SCaM isoforms possess different binding sequences for optimal target interaction, which therefore may provide a molecular basis for CaM isoform-specific function in plants. Furthermore, the isolated peptide sequences may serve not only as useful CaM-binding sequence references but also as potential reagents for studying CaM isoform-specific function in vivo.

  16. A brain-specific Ca sup 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase-Gr) is regulated by autophosphorylation. Relevance to neuronal Ca sup 2+ signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Frangakis, M.V.; Ohmstede, C.A.; Sahyoun, N. )

    1991-06-15

    A neuronal Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase-Gr) undergoes autophosphorylation on a serine residue(s) in response to Ca2+ and calmodulin. Phosphate incorporation leads to the formation of a Ca(2+)-independent (autonomous) activity state, as well as potentiation of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent response. The autonomous enzyme activity of the phosphorylated enzyme {approximately} equals the Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated activity of the unphosphorylated enzyme, but displays diminished affinity toward ATP and the synthetic substrate, syntide-2. The Km(app) for ATP and syntide-2 increased 4.3- and 1.7-fold, respectively. Further activation of the autonomous enzyme by Ca2+/calmodulin yields a marked increase in the affinity for ATP and peptide substrate such that the Km(app) for ATP and syntide-2 decreased by 14- and 8-fold, respectively. Both autophosphorylation and the addition of Ca2+/calmodulin are required to produce the maximum level of enzyme activation and to increase substrate affinity. Unlike Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II that is dephosphorylated by the Mg(2+)-independent phosphoprotein phosphatases 1 and 2A, CaM kinase-Gr is dephosphorylated by a Mg(2+)-dependent phosphoprotein phosphatase that may be related to the type 2C enzyme. Dephosphorylation of CaM kinase-Gr reverses the effects of autophosphorylation on enzyme activity. A comparison between the autophosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions of CaM kinase-Gr and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II provides useful insights into the operation of Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switches.

  17. Vitellogenesis in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster: antagonists demonstrate that the PLC, IP3/DAG, PK-C pathway is triggered by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Brubaker-Purkey, Bethany J; Woodruff, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster M. (Diptera: Drosophilidae), a phospholipase-C to proteininase-C signal cascade leads to the endocytic uptake of yolk precursor molecules. The data suggest that D. melanogaster has a phospholipase-C/proteinkinase-C signaling pathway similar to that previously shown to be required for vitellogenesis in the milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus Dallas (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae). Calmodulin, derived from epithelial cells and transported to the oocytes via gap junctions, may trigger this pathway. To investigate this, a series of known antagonists to various elements of the pathway were used. W-7 (which prevents calmodulin binding to phospholipase-C), U-73122 (which prevents activation of phospholipase-C), verapamil (which blocks Ca(2+) release by IP3), HAG (which blocks diacylglycerol), and staurosporine (which inactivates proteinkinase-C) were each shown to inhibit endocytosis, thereby blocking formation of nascent yolk spheres. PMID:24228869

  18. Studies on the mechanism of cell elongation in Blepharisma japonicum: 3. Cytoplasmic calcium ions may correlate to cell elongation in calmodulin-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Ishida, M; Shigenaka, Y; Suzaki, T; Taneda, K

    1991-02-22

    Among many heterotrichous ciliates, Blepharisma japonicum especially demonstrates negative phototaxis in response to light stimulation, which is attributed to be caused by swimming acceleration accompanied by cell elongation and ciliary reversal. When Blepharisma cells were treated with 0.1 mM EGTA, cell elongation gradually decreased in its degree as the adaptation time lapsed. Calmodulin inhibitors such as W-7 (10(-5) M) and chlorpromazine (10(-5) M) inhibited cell elongation. These results suggest that a rise in cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) concentration might cause cell elongation through the Ca-calmodulin system. On the other hand, Ca(2+)-channel blockers (La(3+), Co(2+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+) and verapamil) did not inhibit cell elongation. Ca2+ localization examined by calcium pyroantimonate cytochemistry suggests that Ca(2+) ions required for cell elongation might be supplied from the vacuoles located in the cortical region of the cell instead of Ca(2+) influx from the surrounding medium.

  19. Vitellogenesis in the Fruit Fly, Drosophila melanogaster: Antagonists Demonstrate that the PLC, IP3/DAG, PK-C Pathway is Triggered by Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker-Purkey, Bethany J.; Woodruff, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster M. (Diptera: Drosophilidae), a phospholipase-C to proteininase-C signal cascade leads to the endocytic uptake of yolk precursor molecules. The data suggest that D. melanogaster has a phospholipase-C/proteinkinase-C signaling pathway similar to that previously shown to be required for vitellogenesis in the milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus Dallas (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae). Calmodulin, derived from epithelial cells and transported to the oocytes via gap junctions, may trigger this pathway. To investigate this, a series of known antagonists to various elements of the pathway were used. W-7 (which prevents calmodulin binding to phospholipase-C), U-73122 (which prevents activation of phospholipase-C), verapamil (which blocks Ca2+ release by IP3), HAG (which blocks diacylglycerol), and staurosporine (which inactivates proteinkinase-C) were each shown to inhibit endocytosis, thereby blocking formation of nascent yolk spheres. PMID:24228869

  20. Application of Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy to the Analysis of the Interaction Between the Estrogen Receptor Alpha and Coactivators: The Case of Calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Miclet, Emeric; Bourgoin-Voillard, Sandrine; Byrne, Cillian; Jacquot, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor α ligand-binding domain (ERα-LBD) binds the natural hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) to induce transcription and cell proliferation. This process occurs with the contribution of protein and peptide partners (also called coactivators) that can modulate the structure of ERα, and therefore its specificity of action. As with most transcription factors, ERα exhibits a high content of α helix, making it difficult to routinely run spectroscopic studies capable of deciphering the secondary structure of the different partners under binding conditions. Ca(2+)-calmodulin, a protein also highly structured in α-helix, is a key coactivator for ERα activity. Here, we show how circular dichroism can be used to study the interaction of ERα with Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Our approach allows the determination not only of the conformational changes induced upon complex formation but also the dissociation constant (K d) of this interaction. PMID:26585140

  1. Phosphorylation and activation of nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI)

    SciTech Connect

    Onouchi, Takashi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Kameshita, Isamu

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaMKP-N/PPM1E underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proteolysis was effectively inhibited by the proteasome inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ser-480 of zebrafish CaMKP-N was phosphorylated by cytosolic CaMKI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation-mimic mutants of CaMKP-N showed enhanced activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results suggest that CaMKP-N is regulated by CaMKI. -- Abstract: Nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) is an enzyme that dephosphorylates and downregulates multifunctional Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) as well as AMP-dependent protein kinase. In our previous study, we found that zebrafish CaMKP-N (zCaMKP-N) underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol in a proteasome inhibitor-sensitive manner. In the present study, we found that zCaMKP-N is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser-480. When zCaMKP-N was incubated with the activated CaMKI, time-dependent phosphorylation of the enzyme was observed. This phosphorylation was significantly reduced when Ser-480 was replaced by Ala, suggesting that CaMKI phosphorylates Ser-480 of zCaMKP-N. Phosphorylation-mimic mutants, S480D and S480E, showed higher phosphatase activities than those of wild type and S480A mutant in solution-based phosphatase assay using various substrates. Furthermore, autophosphorylation of CaMKII after ionomycin treatment was more severely attenuated in Neuro2a cells when CaMKII was cotransfected with the phosphorylation-mimic mutant of zCaMKP-N than with the wild-type or non-phosphorylatable zCaMKP-N. These results strongly suggest that phosphorylation of zCaMKP-N at Ser-480 by CaMKI activates CaMKP-N catalytic activity and thereby downregulates multifunctional CaMKs in the cytosol.

  2. [Calmodulin inhibitors suppress a calcium signal from serotonin receptors in smooth muscle cells and remove the vasoconstrictive response upon intravenous introduction of serotonin].

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikova, L M; Zharkikh, I L; Avdonin, P V

    2013-01-01

    Comparative study of the effect of calmodulin inhibitors (trifluoperazine, W-12, and W-13) and the TRPVI channel blocker (capsazepine) on receptor-dependent calcium exchange in smooth muscle cells of the rat aorta and on the contractility of the isolated aorta was conducted. It was determined that trifluoperazine almost completely removes an increase in the concentration of calcium ions in the cytoplasm of smooth muscle cells (isolated from the rat aorta) and smooth muscle cells of the A7r5 line in response to serotonin and does not influence the cell response to vasopressin and angiotensin II. W-12 and W-13 also do not reduce calcium ion concentration increase (induced by vasopressin and angiotensin II) but reduces by two times its rise in response to serotonin. It was found that the efficiency of calcium exchange suppression by calmodulin inhibitors correlates with the intensity at which they inhibit the contractile response of the aorta on the effect of serotonin. It was detected that the inhibiting effect of calmodulin blockers on calcium exchange in smooth muscle cells and the contractility of the rat isolated aorta during the activation of serotonin vasoconstrictive receptors are realized by a TRPV1-independent mechanism. It was demonstrated in experiments in vivo that trifluoperazine does not influence hypotensive reaction in rats (normally observed in response to intravenous serotonin introduction), but removes the hypertensive effect of this neurotransmitter in rats after chronic introduction of dexamethasone. The results obtained confirm the hypothesis (that we previously stated) about the direct involvement of calmodulin in signal transmission from vasoconstrictive serotonin receptors.

  3. Intramolecular activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase is disrupted by insertions in the tether that connects the calmodulin-like domain to the kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitart, V.; Christodoulou, J.; Huang, J. F.; Chazin, W. J.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) have a calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD) tethered to the C-terminal end of the kinase. Activation is proposed to involve intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to a junction sequence that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase domain. Consistent with this model, a truncated CDPK (DeltaNC) in which the CaM-LD has been deleted can be activated in a bimolecular interaction with an isolated CaM-LD or calmodulin, similar to the activation of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) by calmodulin. Here we provide genetic evidence that this bimolecular activation requires a nine-residue binding segment from F436 to I444 (numbers correspond to CPK-1 accession number L14771). Two mutations at either end of this core segment (F436/A and VI444/AA) severely disrupted bimolecular activation, whereas flanking mutations had only minor effects. Intramolecular activation of a full-length kinase was also disrupted by a VI444/AA mutation, but surprisingly not by a F436/A mutation (at the N-terminal end of the binding site). Interestingly, intramolecular but not bimolecular activation was disrupted by insertion mutations placed immediately downstream of I444. To show that mutant enzymes were not misfolded, latent kinase activity was stimulated through binding of an antijunction antibody. Results here support a model of intramolecular activation in which the tether (A445 to G455) that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase provides an important structural constraint and is not just a simple flexible connection.

  4. Proteolytic footprinting titrations for estimating ligand-binding constants and detecting pathways of conformational switching of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Shea, M A; Sorensen, B R; Pedigo, S; Verhoeven, A S

    2000-01-01

    To dissect the chemical basis for interactions controlling regulatory properties of macromolecular assemblies, it is essential to explore experimentally the linkage between ligand binding, conformational change, and subunit assembly. There are many advantages to using techniques that will probe the occupancy of individual binding sites or monitor conformational responses of individual residues, as described here. Proteolytic footprinting titrations may be used to infer binding free energies for ligands interacting with multiple sites or domains and to detect otherwise unrecognized "silent" interdomain interactions. Microgram quantities of pure protein are required, which is low relative to the hundreds of milligrams needed for comparable discontinuous equilibirum titrations monitored by NMR. By running comparative studies with several proteases, it is easy to determine whether resulting titration curves are consistent, independent of the protease used and therefore representative of the structural response of the protein to ligand binding or other differences in solution conditions (pH, salt, temperature). The results from multiple techniques (e.g., NMR, fluorescence, and footprinting) applied to aliquots from the same discontinuous titration may be compared easily to test for consistency. Classic methods for determining thermodynamic and kinetic properties of calcium binding to calmodulin include filter binding and equilibrium or flow dialysis (employing the isotope 45Ca), spectroscopic studies of stopped-flow fluorescence, calorimetry, and direct ion titrations. A cautionary note is that many different sets of microscopic data would be consistent with a single set of macroscopic constants determined by classic methods. This was well illustrated in Fig. 9. Thus, while it is important to compare results with those obtained by classic binding methods, they are, by definition, incapable of resolving the microscopic constants of interest. Thus, there is only one

  5. Structural Insights into the Calcium-Mediated Allosteric Transition in the C-Terminal Domain of Calmodulin from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kukic, Predrag; Lundström, Patrik; Camilloni, Carlo; Evenäs, Johan; Akke, Mikael; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-12

    Calmodulin is a two-domain signaling protein that becomes activated upon binding cooperatively two pairs of calcium ions, leading to large-scale conformational changes that expose its binding site. Despite significant advances in understanding the structural biology of calmodulin functions, the mechanistic details of the conformational transition between closed and open states have remained unclear. To investigate this transition, we used a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on the Ca(2+)-saturated E140Q C-terminal domain variant. Using chemical shift restraints in replica-averaged metadynamics simulations, we obtained a high-resolution structural ensemble consisting of two conformational states and validated such an ensemble against three independent experimental data sets, namely, interproton nuclear Overhauser enhancements, (15)N order parameters, and chemical shift differences between the exchanging states. Through a detailed analysis of this structural ensemble and of the corresponding statistical weights, we characterized a calcium-mediated conformational transition whereby the coordination of Ca(2+) by just one oxygen of the bidentate ligand E140 triggers a concerted movement of the two EF-hands that exposes the target binding site. This analysis provides atomistic insights into a possible Ca(2+)-mediated activation mechanism of calmodulin that cannot be achieved from static structures alone or from ensemble NMR measurements of the transition between conformations.

  6. Insulin receptor autophosphorylation in BC/sub 3/H-1 whole cell assays is inhibited by the specific calmodulin inhibitors calmidazolium and W-7

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, T.P.; Pollet, R.I.

    1987-05-01

    Recent reports suggest the involvement of Ca/sup + +/ and the Ca/sup + +/ binding protein calmodulin in the insulin stimulated receptor tyrosine kinase activity in cell free (adipocyte) phosphorylation systems. Working with the insulin-responsive well characterized muscle cell line BC/sub 3/H-1, they have investigated the effects of calmodulin antagonists on insulin receptor phosphorylation in cultured intact cells. BC/sub 3/H-1 myocytes were grown to confluency (10-12 days) then exposed to media containing /sup 32/P-orthophosphate for 24 hours (100 mCi/ml). Insulin treatment stimulated the phosphorylation of a 95K protein which is immunoprecipitable with antireceptor antibodies indicating insulin-induced phosphorylation of the insulin receptor beta subunit in vivo. This phosphorylation occurs rapidly within 30 minutes at physiologic insulin concentrations at 37/sup 0/C. Phosphorylation can also be stimulated by the B-10 anti-insulin receptor antibody (1:500). Pretreatment of cells for 30 min with 1uM calmidazolium (R24571) and 10nM W-7 (n-(6-AminoHexyl)-s-chloro-1-naphalenesulfonamide) each significantly inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation. This would suggest that calmodulin may play a role in mediation of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity in the BC/sub 3/H-1 myocyte.

  7. Recognition of β–Calcineurin by the Domains of Calmodulin: Thermodynamic and Structural Evidence for Distinct Roles †

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Susan E.; Yu, Liping; Fowler, Andrew; Shea, Madeline A.

    2010-01-01

    Calcineurin (CaN, PP2B, PPP3), a heterodimeric Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent Ser/Thr phosphatase, regulates swimming in Paramecia, stress responses in yeast, and T-cell activation and cardiac hypertrophy in humans. Calcium binding to CaNB (the regulatory subunit) triggers conformational change in CaNA (the catalytic subunit). Two isoforms of CaNA (α, β) are both abundant in brain and heart and activated by calcium-saturated calmodulin (CaM). The individual contribution of each domain of CaM to regulation of calcineurin is not known. Hydrodynamic analyses of (Ca2+)4-CaM1-148 bound to βCaNp, a peptide representing its CaM-binding domain, indicated a 1:1 stoichiometry. βCaNp binding to CaM increased the affinity of calcium for the N- and C-domains equally, thus preserving intrinsic domain differences, and the preference of calcium for sites III and IV. The equilibrium constants for individual calcium-saturated CaM domains dissociating from βCaNp were ~1 μM. A limiting Kd ≤ 1 nM was measured directly for full-length CaM, while thermodynamic linkage analysis indicated that it was approximately 1 pM. βCaNp binding to 15N-(Ca2+)4-CaM1-148 monitored by 15N/1HN HSQC NMR showed that association perturbed the N-domain of CaM more than its C-domain. NMR resonance assignments of CaM and βCaNp, and interpretation of intermolecular NOEs observed in the 13C-edited and 12C-14N-filtered 3D NOESY spectrum indicated anti-parallel binding. The sole aromatic residue (Phe) located near the βCaNp C-terminus was in close contact with several residues of the N-domain of CaM outside the hydrophobic cleft. These structural and thermodynamic properties would permit the domains of CaM to have distinct physiological roles in regulating activation of βCaN. PMID:21287611

  8. Promotion of granule cell survival by high K+ or excitatory amino acid treatment and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Hack, N; Hidaka, H; Wakefield, M J; Balázs, R

    1993-11-01

    Cerebellar granule cells in culture develop survival requirements which can be met either by chronic membrane depolarization (25 mM K+) or by stimulation of ionotropic excitatory amino acid receptors. We observed previously that this trophic effect is mediated via Ca2+ influx, either through dihydropyridine-sensitive, voltage-dependent calcium channels (activated directly by high K+ or indirectly by kainate) or through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-linked ion channels. Steps after Ca2+ entry in the transduction cascade mediating the survival-supporting effect of high K+ and excitatory amino acids have now been examined. Using protein kinase inhibitors (H-7, polymixin B and gangliosides), and modulating protein kinase C activity by treatment with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, we obtained evidence against the involvement of protein kinase C and cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases in the transduction cascade. On the other hand, calmidazolium (employed as a calmodulin inhibitor) counteracted the trophic effect of elevated K+ with high potency (IC50 0.3 microM), which exceeded by approximately 10-fold the potency for the blockade by the drug of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. The potency of calmidazolium in interfering with the N-methyl-D-aspartate rescue of cells was also much higher in comparison with the inhibition of 45Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-linked channels. Our results indicated that after calmodulin the next step in the trophic effects involves Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity. KN-62, a fairly specific antagonist of this enzyme, compromised elevated K+ or excitatory amino acid-supported cell survival with high potency (IC50 2.5 microM). In the relevant concentration range, KN-62 had little or no effect on Ca2+ entry through either voltage- or N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-gated channels. Combining information on the toxic action of glutamate in "mature" granule cells with the

  9. Calmodulin Gene Family in Potato: Developmental and Touch-Induced Expression of the mRNA Encoding a Novel Isoform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Liu, Z. H.; An, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM1 to 8) were isolated and characterized. Sequence comparisons of different genes revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence of PCM1 had several unique substitutions, especially in the fourth Ca(2+)-binding area. The expression patterns of different genes were studied by northern analysis using the 3'-untranslated regions as probes. The expression of PCM1, 5, and 8 was highest in the stolon tip and it decreased during tuber development. The expression of PCM6 did not vary much in the tissues tested, except in the leaves, where the expression was lower; whereas, the expression of PCM4 was very low in all the tissues. The expression of PCM2 and PCM3 was not detected in any of the tissues tested. Among these genes, only PCM1 showed increased expression following touch stimulation. To study the regulation of PCM1, transgenic potato plants carrying the PCM1 promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were produced. GUS expression was found to be developmentally regulated and touch-responsive, indicating a positive correlation between the expression of PCM1 and GUS mRNAs. These results suggest that the 5'-flanking region of PCM1 controls developmental and touch-induced expression. X-Gluc staining patterns revealed that GUS localization is high in meristematic tissues such as the stem apex, stolon tip, and vascular regions.

  10. Calmodulin binding to glutamate decarboxylase is required for regulation of glutamate and GABA metabolism and normal development in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, G; Lev-Yadun, S; Fridmann, Y; Arazi, T; Katsnelson, H; Zik, M; Fromm, H

    1996-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the decarboxylation of glutamate to CO2 and gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA). GAD is ubiquitous in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but only plant GAD has been shown to bind calmodulin (CaM). Here, we assess the role of the GAD CaM-binding domain in vivo. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing a mutant petunia GAD lacking the CaM-binding domain (GADdeltaC plants) exhibit severe morphological abnormalities, such as short stems, in which cortex parenchyma cells fail to elongate, associated with extremely high GABA and low glutamate levels. The morphology of transgenic plants expressing the full-length GAD (GAD plants) is indistinguishable from that of wild-type (WT) plants. In WT and GAD plant extracts, GAD activity is inhibited by EGTA and by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, and is associated with a CaM-containing protein complex of approximately 500 kDa. In contrast, GADdeltaC plants lack normal GAD complexes, and GAD activity in their extracts is not affected by EGTA and trifluoperazine. We conclude that CaM binding to GAD is essential for the regulation of GABA and glutamate metabolism, and that regulation of GAD activity is necessary for normal plant development. This study is the first to demonstrate an in vivo function for CaM binding to a target protein in plants. Images PMID:8670800

  11. Calmodulin binding to glutamate decarboxylase is required for regulation of glutamate and GABA metabolism and normal development in plants.

    PubMed

    Baum, G; Lev-Yadun, S; Fridmann, Y; Arazi, T; Katsnelson, H; Zik, M; Fromm, H

    1996-06-17

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the decarboxylation of glutamate to CO2 and gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA). GAD is ubiquitous in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but only plant GAD has been shown to bind calmodulin (CaM). Here, we assess the role of the GAD CaM-binding domain in vivo. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing a mutant petunia GAD lacking the CaM-binding domain (GADdeltaC plants) exhibit severe morphological abnormalities, such as short stems, in which cortex parenchyma cells fail to elongate, associated with extremely high GABA and low glutamate levels. The morphology of transgenic plants expressing the full-length GAD (GAD plants) is indistinguishable from that of wild-type (WT) plants. In WT and GAD plant extracts, GAD activity is inhibited by EGTA and by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, and is associated with a CaM-containing protein complex of approximately 500 kDa. In contrast, GADdeltaC plants lack normal GAD complexes, and GAD activity in their extracts is not affected by EGTA and trifluoperazine. We conclude that CaM binding to GAD is essential for the regulation of GABA and glutamate metabolism, and that regulation of GAD activity is necessary for normal plant development. This study is the first to demonstrate an in vivo function for CaM binding to a target protein in plants.

  12. Pavlovian fear conditioning regulates Thr286 autophosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II at lateral amygdala synapses.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sarina M; Farb, Claudia R; Bauer, Elizabeth P; LeDoux, Joseph E; Schafe, Glenn E

    2004-03-31

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a critical role in synaptic plasticity and memory formation in a variety of learning systems and species. The present experiments examined the role of CaMKII in the circuitry underlying pavlovian fear conditioning. First, we reveal by immunocytochemical and tract-tracing methods that alphaCaMKII is postsynaptic to auditory thalamic inputs and colocalized with the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, we show that fear conditioning results in an increase of the autophosphorylated (active) form of alphaCaMKII in lateral amygdala (LA) spines. Next, we demonstrate that intra-amygdala infusion of a CaMK inhibitor, 1-[NO-bis-1,5-isoquinolinesulfonyl]-N-methyl-l-tyrosyl-4-phenylpiperazine, KN-62, dose-dependently impairs the acquisition, but not the expression, of auditory and contextual fear conditioning. Finally, in electrophysiological experiments, we demonstrate that an NMDA receptor-dependent form of long-term potentiation at thalamic input synapses to the LA is impaired by bath application of KN-62 in vitro. Together, the results of these experiments provide the first comprehensive view of the role of CaMKII in the amygdala during fear conditioning.

  13. Identification of a calmodulin-binding site within the domain I of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Campuzano, Camila; Sánchez, Jorge; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Real, M Dolores; Rausell, Carolina; Sánchez, Jorge

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin is a coleopteran specific toxin highly active against Colorado Potato Beetle (CPB).We have recently shown that Cry3Aa toxin is proteolytically cleaved by CPB midgut membrane associated metalloproteases and that this cleavage is inhibited by ADAM metalloprotease inhibitors. In the present study, we investigated whether the Cry3Aa toxin is a calmodulin (CaM) binding protein, as it is the case of several different ADAM shedding substrates. In pull-down assays using agarose beads conjugated with CaM, we demonstrated that Cry3Aa toxin specifically binds to CaM in a calcium-independent manner. Furthermore, we used gel shift assays and (1)H NMR spectra to demonstrate that CaM binds to a 16-amino acid synthetic peptide corresponding to residues N256-V271 within the domain I of Cry3Aa toxin. Finally, to investigate whether CaM has any effect on Cry3Aa toxin CPB midgut membrane associated proteolysis, cleavage assays were performed in the presence of the CaM-specific inhibitor trifluoperazine. We showed that trifluoperazine significantly increased Cry3Aa toxin proteolysis and also decreased Cry3Aa larval toxicity. PMID:22836907

  14. Different Roles of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Domains in Calmodulin for Activation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lübker, Carolin; Dove, Stefan; Tang, Wei-Jen; Urbauer, Ramona J. Bieber; Moskovitz, Jackob; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Seifert, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis adenylyl cyclase toxin edema factor (EF) is one component of the anthrax toxin and is essential for establishing anthrax disease. EF activation by the eukaryotic Ca2+-sensor calmodulin (CaM) leads to massive cAMP production resulting in edema. cAMP also inhibits the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase, thus reducing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) used for host defense in activated neutrophils and thereby facilitating bacterial growth. Methionine (Met) residues in CaM, important for interactions between CaM and its binding partners, can be oxidized by ROS. We investigated the impact of site-specific oxidation of Met in CaM on EF activation using thirteen CaM-mutants (CaM-mut) with Met to leucine (Leu) substitutions. EF activation shows high resistance to oxidative modifications in CaM. An intact structure in the C-terminal region of oxidized CaM is sufficient for major EF activation despite altered secondary structure in the N-terminal region associated with Met oxidation. The secondary structures of CaM-mut were determined and described in previous studies from our group. Thus, excess cAMP production and the associated impairment of host defence may be afforded even under oxidative conditions in activated neutrophils. PMID:26184312

  15. Calcium-calmodulin does not alter the anion permeability of the mouse TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yawei; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-07-01

    The transmembrane protein TMEM16A forms a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel that is permeable to many anions, including SCN(-), I(-), Br(-), Cl(-), and HCO3 (-), and has been implicated in various physiological functions. Indeed, controlling anion permeation through the TMEM16A channel pore may be critical in regulating the pH of exocrine fluids such as the pancreatic juice. The anion permeability of the TMEM16A channel pore has recently been reported to be modulated by Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaCaM), such that the pore of the CaCaM-bound channel shows a reduced ability to discriminate between anions as measured by a shift of the reversal potential under bi-ionic conditions. Here, using a mouse TMEM16A clone that contains the two previously identified putative CaM-binding motifs, we were unable to demonstrate such CaCaM-dependent changes in the bi-ionic potential. We confirmed the activity of CaCaM used in our study by showing CaCaM modulation of the olfactory cyclic nucleotide-gated channel. We suspect that the different bi-ionic potentials that were obtained previously from whole-cell recordings in low and high intracellular [Ca(2+)] may result from different degrees of bi-ionic potential shift secondary to a series resistance problem, an ion accumulation effect, or both.

  16. S-Nitrosylation Induces Both Autonomous Activation and Inhibition of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II δ*

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Jeffrey R.; Nichols, C. Blake; Uchinoumi, Hitoshi; Stein, Matthew L.; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    NO is known to modulate calcium handling and cellular signaling in the myocardium, but key targets for NO in the heart remain unidentified. Recent reports have implied that NO can activate calcium/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in neurons and the heart. Here we use our novel sensor of CaMKII activation, Camui, to monitor changes in the conformation and activation of cardiac CaMKII (CaMKIIδ) activity after treatment with the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). We demonstrate that exposure to NO after Ca2+/CaM binding to CaMKIIδ results in autonomous kinase activation, which is abolished by mutation of the Cys-290 site. However, exposure of CaMKIIδ to GSNO prior to Ca2+/CaM exposure strongly suppresses kinase activation and conformational change by Ca2+/CaM. This NO-induced inhibition was ablated by mutation of the Cys-273 site. We found parallel effects of GSNO on CaM/CaMKIIδ binding and CaMKIIδ-dependent ryanodine receptor activation in adult cardiac myocytes. We conclude that NO can play a dual role in regulating cardiac CaMKIIδ activity. PMID:26316536

  17. The NMDA Receptor NR1 C1 Region Bound to Calmodulin: Structural Insights into Functional Differences between Homologous Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ataman, Zeynep Akyol; Gakhar, Lokesh; Sorensen, Brenda R.; Hell, Johannes W.; Shea, Madeline A.

    2008-09-17

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates tetrameric N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) by binding tightly to the C0 and C1 regions of its NR1 subunit. A crystal structure (2HQW; 1.96 {angstrom}) of calcium-saturated CaM bound to NR1C1 (peptide spanning 875-898) showed that NR1 S890, whose phosphorylation regulates membrane localization, was solvent protected, whereas the endoplasmic reticulum retention motif was solvent exposed. NR1 F880 filled the CaM C-domain pocket, whereas T886 was closest to the N-domain pocket. This 1-7 pattern was most similar to that in the CaM-MARCKS complex. Comparison of CaM-ligand wrap-around conformations identified a core tetrad of CaM C-domain residues (FLMM{sub C}) that contacted all ligands consistently. An identical tetrad of N-domain residues (FLMM{sub N}) made variable sets of contacts with ligands. This CaM-NR1C1 structure provides a foundation for designing mutants to test the role of CaM in NR1 trafficking as well as insights into how the homologous CaM domains have different roles in molecular recognition.

  18. Activation protein 1-dependent transcriptional activation of interleukin 2 gene by Ca2+/calmodulin kinase type IV/Gr

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) type IV/Gr is selectively expressed in T lymphocytes and is activated after signaling via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), indicating that it mediates some of the Ca(2+)-dependent transcriptional events that follow TCR engagement. Here we show that CaMKIV/Gr induces the transcription factor activation protein 1 (AP-1) alone or in synergy with T cell mitogens and with the p21ras oncoprotein. CaMKIV/ Gr signaling is associated with transcriptional activation of c-fos but is independent of p21ras or calcineurin. AP-1 is an integral component of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcriptional complex, which is required for interleukin 2 gene expression in T cells. We demonstrate that CaMKIV/Gr reconstitutes the capacity of the cytosolic component of NFAT to direct transcription from NFAT sites in non-T cells. These results reveal a central role for CaMKIV/Gr as a Ca(2+)-regulated activator of gene transcription in T lymphocytes. PMID:8691123

  19. Subcellular distribution of 65,000 calmodulin-binding protein (p65) and synaptophysin (p38) in adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Fournier, S; Novas, M L; Trifaró, J M

    1989-10-01

    Both neuronal and endocrine cells contain secretory vesicles that store and release neurotransmitters and peptides. Neuronal cells release their secretory material from both small synaptic vesicles and large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs), whereas endocrine cells release secretory products from LDCVs. Neuronal small synaptic vesicles are known to express three integral membrane proteins: 65,000 calmodulin-binding protein (65-CMBP) (p65), synaptophysin (p38), and SV2. A controversial question surrounding these three proteins is whether they are present in LDCV membranes of endocrine and neuronal cells. Sucrose density centrifugation of adrenal medulla was performed to study and compare the subcellular distribution of two of these small synaptic vesicle proteins (65-CMBP and synaptophysin). Subsequent immunoblotting and 125I-Protein A binding experiments performed on the fractions obtained from sucrose gradients showed that 65-CMBP was present in fractions corresponding to granule membranes and intact chromaffin granules. Similar immunoblotting and 125I-Protein A binding experiments with synaptophysin antibodies showed that this protein was also present in intact granules and granule membrane fractions. However, an additional membrane component, equilibrating near the upper portion of the sucrose gradient, also showed strong immunoreactivity with anti-synaptophysin and high 125I-Protein A binding activity. In addition, immunoblotting experiments on purified plasma and granule membranes demonstrated that 65-CMBP was a component of both membranes, whereas synaptophysin was only present in granule membranes. Thus, there appears to be a different subcellular localization between 65-CMBP and synaptophysin in the chromaffin cell.

  20. Structure and calcium-binding studies of calmodulin-like domain of human non-muscle α-actinin-1

    PubMed Central

    Drmota Prebil, Sara; Slapšak, Urška; Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Puž, Vid; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Anrather, Dorothea; Hartl, Markus; Backman, Lars; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The activity of several cytosolic proteins critically depends on the concentration of calcium ions. One important intracellular calcium-sensing protein is α-actinin-1, the major actin crosslinking protein in focal adhesions and stress fibers. The actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 has been proposed to be negatively regulated by calcium, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, we determined the first high-resolution NMR structure of its functional calmodulin-like domain (CaMD) in calcium-bound and calcium-free form. These structures reveal that in the absence of calcium, CaMD displays a conformationally flexible ensemble that undergoes a structural change upon calcium binding, leading to limited rotation of the N- and C-terminal lobes around the connecting linker and consequent stabilization of the calcium-loaded structure. Mutagenesis experiments, coupled with mass-spectrometry and isothermal calorimetry data designed to validate the calcium binding stoichiometry and binding site, showed that human non-muscle α-actinin-1 binds a single calcium ion within the N-terminal lobe. Finally, based on our structural data and analogy with other α-actinins, we provide a structural model of regulation of the actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 where calcium induced structural stabilisation causes fastening of the juxtaposed actin binding domain, leading to impaired capacity to crosslink actin. PMID:27272015

  1. Structure guided design of potential inhibitors of human calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV containing pyrimidine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Jameel, Ehtesham; Hoda, Nasimul; Shandilya, Ashutosh; Khan, Parvez; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Jayaram, B; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-02-01

    Calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) belongs to the serine/threonine protein kinase family and considered as an encouraging target for the development of novel anticancer agents. The interaction and binding behavior of three designed inhibitors of human CAMKIV, containing pyrimidine scaffold, was monitored by in vitro fluorescence titration and molecular docking calculations under physiological condition. In silico docking studies were performed to screen several compounds containing pyrimidine scaffold against CAMKIV. Molecular docking calculation predicted the binding of these ligands in active-site cavity of the CAMKIV structure correlating such interactions with a probable inhibition mechanism. Finally, three active pyrimidine substituted compounds (molecules 1-3) have been successfully synthesized and characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR. Molecule 3 is showing very high binding-affinity for the CAMKIV, with a binding constant of 2.2×10(8), M(-1) (±0.20). All three compounds are nontoxic to HEK293 cells up to 50 μM. The cell proliferation inhibition study showed that the molecule 3 has lowest IC50 value (46±1.08 μM). The theoretical and experimental observations are significantly correlated. This study reveals some important observations to generate an improved pyrimidine based compound that holds promise as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26783179

  2. Mutation of the Arabidopsis calmodulin-like protein CML37 deregulates the jasmonate pathway and enhances susceptibility to herbivory.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Sandra S; Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Heyer, Monika; Reichelt, Michael; Bender, Kyle W; Snedden, Wayne A; Boland, Wilhelm; Mithöfer, Axel

    2014-12-01

    Throughout their life, plants are challenged by various abiotic and biotic stress factors. Among those are attacks from herbivorous insects. The molecular mechanisms underlying the detection of herbivores and the subsequent signal transduction are not well understood. As a second messenger, fluxes in intracellular Ca(2+) levels play a key role in mediating stress response pathways. Ca(2+) signals are decoded by Ca(2+) sensor proteins such as calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs). Here, we demonstrate that recombinant CML37 behaves like a Ca(2+) sensor in vitro and, in Arabidopsis, AtCML37 is induced by mechanical wounding as well as by infestation with larvae of the generalist lepidopteran herbivore Spodoptera littoralis. Loss of function of CML37 led to a better feeding performance of larvae suggesting that CML37 is a positive defense regulator. No herbivory-induced changes in secondary metabolites such as glucosinolates or flavonoids were detected in cml37 plants, although a significant reduction in the accumulation of jasmonates was observed, due to reduced expression of JAR1 mRNA and cellular enzyme activity. Consequently, the expression of jasmonate-responsive genes was reduced as well. Summarizing, our results suggest that the Ca(2+) sensor protein, CML37, functions as a positive regulator in Ca(2+) signaling during herbivory, connecting Ca(2+) and jasmonate signaling.

  3. Development of a new Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin antagonist and its anti-proliferative activity against colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Joong Sup; Lee, Jiyong; Kim, Kyung Noo; Kwon, Ho Jeong . E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr

    2007-08-03

    We previously identified a cellular target of a cell cycle inhibitor HBC as Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin (Ca{sup 2+}/CaM) through chemical genetics approach. Using the mechanism-based drug design, we developed a new Ca{sup 2+}/CaM antagonists based on the structure of HBC. The compound, (4-{l_brace}3,5-bis-[2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-vinyl]-4,5-dihydro-pyrazol-1-yl {r_brace}-phenyl)-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-yl)-methanone (referred as HBCP), binds to Ca{sup 2+}/CaM in vitro and inhibits the proliferation of HCT15 colon cancer cells. HBCP induced sustained phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and subsequently activated p21{sup WAF1} expression in HCT15 cells. Moreover, HBCP reversibly induced the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest in the cells. These data demonstrate that HBCP is a new potent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM antagonist and can be applied for CaM related therapeutic uses.

  4. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization. PMID:27703977

  5. The Neuronal Calcium Sensor Protein Acrocalcin: A Potential Target of Calmodulin Regulation during Development in the Coral Acropora millepora

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Bermudez, Alejandro; Miller, David J.; Sprungala, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    To understand the calcium-mediated signalling pathways underlying settlement and metamorphosis in the Scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, a predicted protein set derived from larval cDNAs was scanned for the presence of EF-hand domains (Pfam Id: PF00036). This approach led to the identification of a canonical calmodulin (AmCaM) protein and an uncharacterised member of the Neuronal Calcium Sensor (NCS) family of proteins known here as Acrocalcin (AmAC). While AmCaM transcripts were present throughout development, AmAC transcripts were not detected prior to gastrulation, after which relatively constant mRNA levels were detected until metamorphosis and settlement. The AmAC protein contains an internal CaM-binding site and was shown to interact in vitro with AmCaM. These results are consistent with the idea that AmAC is a target of AmCaM in vivo, suggesting that this interaction may regulate calcium-dependent processes during the development of Acropora millepora. PMID:23284743

  6. Calmodulin-like protein CML37 is a positive regulator of ABA during drought stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Sandra S; Reichelt, Michael; Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Plants need to adapt to various stress factors originating from the environment. Signal transduction pathways connecting the recognition of environmental cues and the initiation of appropriate downstream responses in plants often involve intracellular Ca(2+) concentration changes. These changes must be deciphered into specific cellular signals. Calmodulin-like proteins, CMLs, act as Ca(2+) sensors in plants and are known to be involved in various stress reactions. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis 2 different CMLs, AtCML37 and AtCML42 are antagonistically involved in drought stress response. Whereas a CML37 knock-out line, cml37, was highly susceptible to drought stress, CML42 knockout line, cml42, showed no obvious effect compared to wild type (WT) plants. Accordingly, the analysis of the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) revealed a significant reduction of ABA upon drought stress in cml37 plants, while in cml42 plants an increase of ABA was detected. Summarizing, our results show that both CML37 and CML42 are involved in drought stress response but show antagonistic effects.

  7. 2D FT-ICR MS of Calmodulin: A Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floris, Federico; van Agthoven, Maria; Chiron, Lionel; Soulby, Andrew J.; Wootton, Christopher A.; Lam, Yuko P. Y.; Barrow, Mark P.; Delsuc, Marc-André; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (2D FT-ICR MS) allows data-independent fragmentation of all ions in a sample and correlation of fragment ions to their precursors through the modulation of precursor ion cyclotron radii prior to fragmentation. Previous results show that implementation of 2D FT-ICR MS with infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) has turned this method into a useful analytical tool. In this work, IRMPD tandem mass spectrometry of calmodulin (CaM) has been performed both in one-dimensional and two-dimensional FT-ICR MS using a top-down and bottom-up approach. 2D IRMPD FT-ICR MS is used to achieve extensive inter-residue bond cleavage and assignment for CaM, using its unique features for fragment identification in a less time- and sample-consuming experiment than doing the same thing using sequential MS/MS experiments.

  8. Diabetes mellitus affects activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha in rat trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Jerić, Milka; Vuica, Ana; Borić, Matija; Puljak, Livia; Jeličić Kadić, Antonia; Grković, Ivica; Filipović, Natalija

    2015-01-01

    The activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CaMKIIα) may play a critical role in the modulation of nociceptor activity and plasticity of primary sensory trigeminal neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunoreactivity of phosphorylated CaMKIIα (pCaMKIIα) in subpopulations of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons in rat models of early diabetes type 1 (dm1) and 2 (dm2). DM1 model was induced with intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected streptozotocin (STZ) (55mg/kg). DM2 rats were fed with the high fat diet (HFD) for 2 weeks and then received 35mg/kg of STZ i.p. Two weeks and 2 months after the STZ-diabetes induction, rats were sacrificed and immunohistochemical analysis for detection of pCaMKIIα immunoreactivity and double immunofluorescence labelling with isolectin (IB4) was performed. Increased intensity of pCaMKIIα immunofluorescence, restricted to IB4-negative small-diameter neurons, was seen in TG neurons two months after STZ-DM1 induction. DM1 model, as well as the obesity (control dm2 groups) resulted in neuronal impaired growth while dm2 model led to neuron hypertrophy in TG. Observed changes may play a critical role in the modulation of nociceptor activity and plasticity of primary sensory trigeminal neurons. In future, innovative strategies for modulation of CaMKIIα activity in specific subpopulations of neurons could be a novel approach in therapy of diabetic trigeminal neuropathy.

  9. Graded Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent coupling of voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Rose E; Moreno, Claudia M; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Navedo, Manuel F; Santana, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    In the heart, reliable activation of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the plateau of the ventricular action potential requires synchronous opening of multiple CaV1.2 channels. Yet the mechanisms that coordinate this simultaneous opening during every heartbeat are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CaV1.2 channels form clusters that undergo dynamic, reciprocal, allosteric interactions. This ‘functional coupling’ facilitates Ca2+ influx by increasing activation of adjoined channels and occurs through C-terminal-to-C-terminal interactions. These interactions are initiated by binding of incoming Ca2+ to calmodulin (CaM) and proceed through Ca2+/CaM binding to the CaV1.2 pre-IQ domain. Coupling fades as [Ca2+]i decreases, but persists longer than the current that evoked it, providing evidence for ‘molecular memory’. Our findings suggest a model for CaV1.2 channel gating and Ca2+-influx amplification that unifies diverse observations about Ca2+ signaling in the heart, and challenges the long-held view that voltage-gated channels open and close independently. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05608.001 PMID:25714924

  10. A highly sensitive immunosensor for calmodulin assay based on enhanced biocatalyzed precipitation adopting a dual-layered enzyme strategy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Liu, Kai; Sun, Qianqian; Lin, Bin; Lu, Danqin; Xu, Zhiai; Hu, Chen; Fan, Guangjian; Zhang, Shengping; Wang, Chuangui; Zhang, Wen

    2014-06-15

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous protein in eukaryotic cells, and it plays an important role in cancer progression. In this paper, a highly sensitive immunosensor adopting a dual-layered enzyme strategy was proposed for electrochemical detection of CaM. This immunosensor was constructed by introducing honeycomb-like mesoporous carbon (HMPC) as a sensor platform to sequentially immobilize antibody (Ab1), CaM and a multi-functionalized label. The label (HRP-PAupc-Ab1) was synthesized by covalently binding Ab1 and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to poly(acrylic acid)-functionalized Au popcorn (PAupc) nanoparticles. A novel dual-layered enzyme strategy was employed by incubating HRP-secondary antibody (HRP-Ab2) onto the label surface and the enhanced biocatalyzed precipitation was therefore induced. This immunosensor exhibited satisfactory analytical performances for CaM detection with a linear response ranging from 5.0 pg mL(-1) to 100 ng mL(-1) and a detection limit of 1.5 pg mL(-1). The immunosensor has also been successfully applied to the CaM analysis in two cancer cells (HepG2 and MCF-7) with high sensitivity, which has shown great potency for cancer study. PMID:24508817

  11. Phosphorylation of vanilloid receptor 1 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II regulates its vanilloid binding.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jooyoung; Shin, Jae Soo; Lee, Soon-Youl; Hwang, Sun Wook; Koo, Jaeyeon; Cho, Hawon; Oh, Uhtaek

    2004-02-20

    Vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1), a capsaicin receptor, is known to play a major role in mediating inflammatory thermal nociception. Although the physiological role and biophysical properties of VR1 are known, the mechanism of its activation by ligands is poorly understood. Here we show that VR1 must be phosphorylated by Ca2+-calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII) before its activation by capsaicin. In contrast, the dephosphorylation of VR1 by calcineurin leads to a desensitization of the receptor. Moreover, point mutations in VR1 at two putative consensus sites for CaMKII failed to elicit capsaicin-sensitive currents and caused a concomitant reduction in VR1 phosphorylation in vivo. Such mutants also lost their high affinity binding with [3H]resiniferatoxin, a potent capsaicin receptor agonist. We conclude that the dynamic balance between the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the VR1 channel by CaMKII and calcineurin, respectively, controls the activation/desensitization states by regulating VR1 binding. Furthermore, because sensitization by protein kinase A and C converge at these sites, phosphorylation stress in the cell appears to control a wide range of excitabilities in response to various adverse stimuli.

  12. Purification method for recombinant proteins based on a fusion between the target protein and the C-terminus of calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Deo, Sapna K.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) was used as an affinity tail to facilitate the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a model target protein. The protein GFP was fused to the C-terminus of CaM, and a factor Xa cleavage site was introduced between the two proteins. A CaM-GFP fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and purified on a phenothiazine-derivatized silica column. CaM binds to the phenothiazine on the column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion and it was, therefore, used as an affinity tail for the purification of GFP. The fusion protein bound to the affinity column was then subjected to a proteolytic digestion with factor Xa. Pure GFP was eluted with a Ca(2+)-containing buffer, while CaM was eluted later with a buffer containing the Ca(2+)-chelating agent EGTA. The purity of the isolated GFP was verified by SDS-PAGE, and the fluorescence properties of the purified GFP were characterized.

  13. The prenylation status of a novel plant calmodulin directs plasma membrane or nuclear localization of the protein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Concepción, M; Yalovsky, S; Zik, M; Fromm, H; Gruissem, W

    1999-04-01

    Post-translational attachment of isoprenyl groups to conserved cysteine residues at the C-terminus of a number of regulatory proteins is important for their function and subcellular localization. We have identified a novel calmodulin, CaM53, with an extended C-terminal basic domain and a CTIL CaaX-box motif which are required for efficient prenylation of the protein in vitro and in vivo. Ectopic expression of wild-type CaM53 or a non-prenylated mutant protein in plants causes distinct morphological changes. Prenylated CaM53 associates with the plasma membrane, but the non-prenylated mutant protein localizes to the nucleus, indicating a dual role for the C-terminal domain. The subcellular localization of CaM53 can be altered by a block in isoprenoid biosynthesis or sugar depletion, suggesting that CaM53 activates different targets in response to metabolic changes. Thus, prenylation of CaM53 appears to be a novel mechanism by which plant cells can coordinate Ca2+ signaling with changes in metabolic activities.

  14. Two isoforms of glutamate decarboxylase in Arabidopsis are regulated by calcium/calmodulin and differ in organ distribution.

    PubMed

    Zik, M; Arazi, T; Snedden, W A; Fromm, H

    1998-08-01

    The nucleotide sequences of cDNAs encoding two isoforms of Arabidopsis glutamate decarboxylase, designated GAD1 (57.1 kDa) and GAD2 (56.1 kDa) and sharing 82% identical amino acid sequences, were determined. The recombinant proteins bound [35S] calmodulin (CaM) in the presence of calcium, and a region of 30-32 amino acids from the C-terminal of each isoform was sufficient for CaM binding when fused to glutathione S-transferase. Full-length GAD1 and GAD2 were expressed in Sf9 insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus vectors. Recombinant proteins were partially purified by CaM affinity chromatography and were found to exhibit glutamate decarboxylase activity, which was dependent on the presence of Ca2+/CaM at pH 7.3. Southern hybridizations with GAD gene-specific probes suggest that Arabidopsis possesses one gene related to GAD1 and one to GAD2. Northern hybridization and western blot analysis revealed that GAD1 was expressed only in roots and GAD2 in roots, leaves, inflorescence stems and flowers. Our study provides the first evidence for the occurrence of multiple functional Ca2+/CaM-regulated GAD gene products in a single plant, suggesting that regulation of Arabidopsis GAD activity involves modulation of isoform-specific gene expression and stimulation of the catalytic activity of GAD by calcium signalling via CaM.

  15. Structural Properties of Human CaMKII Ca2+ /Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II using X-ray Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumeng Melody; McSpadden, Ethan; Kuriyan, John; Department of Molecular; Cell Biology; Department of Chemistry Team

    To this day, human memory storage remains a mystery as we can at most describe the process vaguely on a cellular level. Switch-like properties of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II make it a leading candidate in understanding the molecular basis of human memory. The protein crystal was placed in the beam of a synchrotron source and the x-ray crystallography data was collected as reflections on a diffraction pattern that undergo Fourier transform to obtain the electron density. We observed two drastic differences from our solved structure at 2.75Å to a similar construct of the mouse CaMKII association domain. Firstly, our structure is a 6-fold symmetric dodecamer, whereas the previously published construct was a 7-fold symmetric tetradecamer. This suggests the association domain of human CaMKII is a dynamic structure that is triggered subunit exchange process. Secondly, in our structure the N-terminal tag is docked as an additional beta-strand on an uncapped beta-sheet present in each association domain protomer. This is concrete evidence of the involvement of the polypeptide docking site in the molecular mechanism underlining subunit exchange. In the future, we would like to selectively inhibit the exchange process while not disrupting the other functionalities of CaMKII.

  16. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein-dependent protein synthesis is regulated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Coleen M; Nozaki, Naohito; Shigeri, Yasushi; Soderling, Thomas R

    2004-06-01

    Phosphorylation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein (CPEB) regulates protein synthesis in hippocampal dendrites. CPEB binds the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of cytoplasmic mRNAs and, when phosphorylated, initiates mRNA polyadenylation and translation. We report that, of the protein kinases activated in the hippocampus during synaptic plasticity, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) robustly phosphorylated the regulatory site (threonine 171) in CPEB in vitro. In postsynaptic density fractions or hippocampal neurons, CPEB phosphorylation increased when CaMKII was activated. These increases in CPEB phosphorylation were attenuated by a specific peptide inhibitor of CaMKII and by the general CaM-kinase inhibitor KN-93. Inhibitors of protein phosphatase 1 increased basal CPEB phosphorylation in neurons; this was also attenuated by a CaM-kinase inhibitor. To determine whether CaM-kinase activity regulates CPEB-dependent mRNA translation, hippocampal neurons were transfected with luciferase fused to a 3' UTR containing CPE-binding elements. Depolarization of neurons stimulated synthesis of luciferase; this was abrogated by inhibitors of protein synthesis, mRNA polyadenylation, and CaMKII. These results demonstrate that CPEB phosphorylation and translation are regulated by CaMKII activity and provide a possible mechanism for how dendritic protein synthesis in the hippocampus may be stimulated during synaptic plasticity.

  17. Neuronal calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II mediates nicotine reward in the conditioned place preference test in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Muldoon, Pretal P; Walters, Carrie; Damaj, Mohamad Imad

    2016-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated the involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms, in particular the abundant calcium-activated kinase, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), in behaviors associated with nicotine dependence in mice. Behavioral and biochemical studies have shown that CaMKII is involved in acute and chronic nicotine behaviors and nicotine withdrawal; however, evidence of a role for CaMKII in nicotine reward is lacking. Thus, the goal of the current study was to examine the role of CaMKII in nicotine reward. Using pharmacological and genetic tools, we tested nicotine conditioned place preference (CPP) in C57Bl/6 mice after administration of CaMKII antagonists and in α-CaMKII wild-type (+/+) and heterozygote (±) mice. CaMKII antagonists blocked expression of nicotine CPP, and the preference score was significantly reduced in α-CaMKII ± mice compared with their +/+ counterparts. Further, we assessed CaMKII activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus after nicotine CPP and found significant increases in CaMKII activity in the mouse VTA and NAc that were blocked by CaMKII antagonists. The findings from this study show that CaMKII mediates nicotine reward and suggest that increases in CaMKII activity in the VTA and NAc are relevant to nicotine reward behaviors.

  18. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase Kinase α Is Expressed by Monocytic Cells and Regulates the Activation Profile

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Christopher B.; Deszo, Eric L.; Hartman, Matthew E.; York, Jason M.; Kelley, Keith W.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are capable of assuming numerous phenotypes in order to adapt to endogenous and exogenous challenges but many of the factors that regulate this process are still unknown. We report that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase α (CaMKKα) is expressed in human monocytic cells and demonstrate that its inhibition blocks type-II monocytic cell activation and promotes classical activation. Affinity chromatography with paramagnetic beads isolated an approximately 50 kDa protein from nuclear lysates of U937 human monocytic cells activated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). This protein was identified as CaMKKα by mass spectrometry and Western analysis. The function of CaMKKα in monocyte activation was examined using the CaMKKα inhibitors (STO-609 and forskolin) and siRNA knockdown. Inhibition of CaMKKα, enhanced PMA-dependent CD86 expression and reduced CD11b expression. In addition, inhibition was associated with decreased translocation of CaMKKα to the nucleus. Finally, to further examine monocyte activation profiles, TNFα and IL-10 secretion were studied. CaMKKα inhibition attenuated PMA-dependent IL-10 production and enhanced TNFα production indicating a shift from type-II to classical monocyte activation. Taken together, these findings indicate an important new role for CaMKKα in the differentiation of monocytic cells. PMID:18270593

  19. Calcium-dependent association of a protein complex with the lymphocyte plasma membrane: probable identity with calmodulin-calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    A protein complex is shown to participate in a calcium-dependent association with plasma membranes purified either from pig mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes or from human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Plasma membranes prepared in the presence of calcium possess this complex; those prepared in the absence of calcium (5 mM EGTA) do not. The complex associates itself with the inner cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane. This complex is referred to as the "acidic protein band" because of its location during migration upon alkaline-urea gel electrophoresis. The complex dissociates from the plasma membrane during electrophoresis on 8-M urea gels, irrespective of calcium levels during electrophoresis; at intermediate urea concentrations (4-6 M), the complex is not dissociated in the presence of calcium. Upon purification of the acidic protein band, SDS acrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and radioimmunoassay techniques suggest that the acidic protein band is composed of at least four peptides (designated 68K, 59K, 20K, 20K): two of these (68K, 20K) are immunopositive for calcineurin and one (20K) is immunopositive for calmodulin. Immunoblots of urea gels also indicate that the calcineurin heavy chain (68K) can also appear at three different locations on the urea gel. Patches and caps induced in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by fluorescein-conjugated goat anti-human IgG are not coincident with the location of calcineurin, which remains distributed throughout the cell. PMID:2989299

  20. Characterization of a Ca/sup 2 +/, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase which is able to phosphorylate native and protease cleaved purified hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Z.H.; Stonik, J.A.; Brewer, H.B. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have extensively purified a low molecular weight Ca/sup 2 +/, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase from rat brain cytosol. This kinase (M/sub r/ 120,000) is able to phosphorylate both native and soluble purified HMG-CoA reductase. The concomitant inactivation and phosphorylation of purified HMG-CoA reductase was completely dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin. Incubation of phosphorylated /sup 32/P-HMG-CoA reductase was associated with the loss of /sup 32/P-radioactivity and reactivation of inactive enzyme. Maximal phosphorylation of purified HMG-CoA reductase involved the introduction of approximately 0.5 mol phosphate/53,000 enzyme fragment. The apparent Km for purified HMG-CoA reductase was .045 mg/ml. Microsomal native HMG-CoA reductase (M/sub r/ 100,000) was also phosphorylated and inactivated following incubation with calmodulin stimulated kinase, calmodulin, Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg-ATP; dephosphorylation (reactivation) was catalyzed by the phosphoprotein phosphatase. The isolation and characterization of the M/sub r/ 120,000 calmodulin-binding enzyme complex provides additional insights into the mechanisms of the Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent regulation of HMG-CoA reductase phosphorylation. Based on these data and the authors previous in vitro and in vivo studies, they now propose that HMG-CoA reductase activity is modulated by three separate kinase systems.

  1. Backbone dynamics of a symmetric calmodulin dimer in complex with the calmodulin-binding domain of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor SEF2-1/E2-2: a highly dynamic complex.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Göran; Schleucher, Jürgen; Onions, Jacqueline; Hermann, Stefan; Grundström, Thomas; Wijmenga, Sybren S

    2005-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) interacts specifically as a dimer with some dimeric basic-Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors via a novel high affinity binding mode. Here we report a study of the backbone dynamics by (15)N-spin relaxation on the CaM dimer in complex with a dimeric peptide that mimics the CaM binding region of the bHLH transcription factor SEF2-1. The relaxation data were measured at multiple magnetic fields, and analyzed in a model-free manner using in-house written software designed to detect nanosecond internal motion. Besides picosecond motions, all residues also experience internal motion with an effective correlation time of approximately 2.5 ns with squared order parameter (S(2)) of approximately 0.75. Hydrodynamic calculations suggest that this can be attributed to motions of the N- and C-terminal domains of the CaM dimer in the complex. Moreover, residues with significant exchange broadening are found. They are clustered in the CaM:SEF2-1mp binding interface, the CaM:CaM dimer interface, and in the flexible helix connecting the CaM N- and C-terminal domains, and have similar exchange times (approximately 50 micros), suggesting a cooperative mechanism probably caused by protein:protein interactions. The dynamic features presented here support the conclusion that the conformationally heterogeneous bHLH mimicking peptide trapped inside the CaM dimer exchanges between different binding sites on both nanosecond and microsecond timescales. Nature has thus found a way to specifically recognize a relatively ill-fitting target. This novel mode of target-specific binding, which neither belongs to lock-and-key nor induced-fit binding, is characterized by dimerization and continuous exchange between multiple flexible binding alternatives. PMID:15894636

  2. Primary structure and cellular localization of chicken brain myosin-V (p190), an unconventional myosin with calmodulin light chains

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Recent biochemical studies of p190, a calmodulin (CM)-binding protein purified from vertebrate brain, have demonstrated that this protein, purified as a complex with bound CM, shares a number of properties with myosins (Espindola, F. S., E. M. Espreafico, M. V. Coelho, A. R. Martins, F. R. C. Costa, M. S. Mooseker, and R. E. Larson. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 118:359-368). To determine whether or not p190 was a member of the myosin family of proteins, a set of overlapping cDNAs encoding the full-length protein sequence of chicken brain p190 was isolated and sequenced. Verification that the deduced primary structure was that of p190 was demonstrated through microsequence analysis of a cyanogen bromide peptide generated from chick brain p190. The deduced primary structure of chicken brain p190 revealed that this 1,830-amino acid (aa) 212,509-D) protein is a member of a novel structural class of unconventional myosins that includes the gene products encoded by the dilute locus of mouse and the MYO2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have named the p190-CM complex "myosin-V" based on the results of a detailed sequence comparison of the head domains of 29 myosin heavy chains (hc), which has revealed that this myosin, based on head structure, is the fifth of six distinct structural classes of myosin to be described thus far. Like the presumed products of the mouse dilute and yeast MYO2 genes, the head domain of chicken myosin-V hc (aa 1-764) is linked to a "neck" domain (aa 765-909) consisting of six tandem repeats of an approximately 23-aa "IQ-motif." All known myosins contain at least one such motif at their head-tail junctions; these IQ-motifs may function as calmodulin or light chain binding sites. The tail domain of chicken myosin-V consists of an initial 511 aa predicted to form several segments of coiled-coil alpha helix followed by a terminal 410-aa globular domain (aa, 1,421-1,830). Interestingly, a portion of the tail domain (aa, 1,094-1,830) shares 58% amino acid

  3. Opposing orientations of the anti-psychotic drug trifluoperazine selected by alternate conformations of M144 in calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Feldkamp, Michael D; Gakhar, Lokesh; Pandey, Nisha; Shea, Madeline A

    2015-05-01

    The anti-psychotic drug trifluoperazine (TFP) is an antagonist observed to bind to calcium-saturated calmodulin ((Ca(2+) )4 -CaM) at ratios of 1:1 (1CTR), 2:1 (1A29), and 4:1 (1LIN). Each structure contains one TFP bound in the hydrophobic cleft of the C-domain of CaM. However, the orientation of the trifluoromethyl (CF3 ) moiety differs among them: it is buried in the C-domain cleft of 1A29 and 1LIN, but protrudes from 1CTR. We report a 2.0 Å resolution crystallographic structure (4RJD) of TFP bound to the (Ca(2+) )-saturated C-domain of CaM (CaMC ). The asymmetric unit contains two molecules of (Ca(2+) )2 -CaMC . Chain backbones were nearly identical, but the orientation of TFP in the cleft of Chain A matched 1A29/1LIN, while TFP bound to Chain B matched 1CTR. This was accommodated by a flip of the M144 sidechain and small changes in sidechains of M109 and M145. Docking simulations suggested that the rotamer conformation of M144 determined the orientation of TFP within the cleft of (Ca(2+) )2 -CaMC . Chains A and B show that the open cleft of (Ca(2+) )2 -CaMC is promiscuous in accepting TFP in reversed directions under the same crystallization conditions. Observing multiple orientations of an antagonist bound to a single protein highlights the challenge of designing highly specific pharmaceuticals, and may have importance for QSAR of other CF3 -containing drugs such as fluoxetine (anti-depressant) or efavirenz (reverse transcriptase inhibitor). This study emphasizes that a single structure of a complex represents an energetically accessible state, but does not necessarily show the full range of energetically equivalent states.

  4. Clinical modulation of doxorubicin resistance by the calmodulin-inhibitor, trifluoperazine: a phase I/II trial.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Bukowski, R M; Budd, G T; Purvis, J; Weick, J K; Shepard, K; Midha, K K; Ganapathi, R

    1988-05-01

    Drug resistance to chemotherapy agents such as doxorubicin appears to be an important cause of therapeutic failure in cancer treatment. Based on preclinical information demonstrating that the phenothiazine calmodulin-inhibitor trifluoperazine can enhance retention and cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in resistant cells, a phase I/II trial of the combination was performed to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of trifluoperazine that could be administered with doxorubicin. Patients with intrinsic (no previous response) and acquired (previous response with relapse) doxorubicin resistance were eligible. Doxorubicin was administered as a 96-hour continuous infusion (60 mg/m2) on days 2 through 5. Trifluoperazine was administered in divided doses orally on days 1 through 6, with dose escalation from 20 to 100 mg/d. Thirty-six patients were evaluable. The MTD of trifluoperazine was 60 mg/d, with dose-limiting toxicity being extrapyramidal side effects. No alteration of doxorubicin toxicity was observed. Seven of the 36 patients responded (one complete response [CR], six partial responses [PR]), with seven of 21 patients having acquired resistance, and zero of 15 with intrinsic resistance demonstrating responses. Doxorubicin plasma levels were not affected by trifluoperazine, and the maximal trifluoperazine plasma levels achieved were 129.83 ng/mL. This trial demonstrates the combination of trifluoperazine and doxorubicin is well tolerated, and the schedule recommended for phase II trials is doxorubicin, 60 mg/m2 (continuous infusion) days 2 through 5, and trifluoperazine, 15 mg four times per day orally days 1 through 6. Continued investigation of this combination is indicated for patients with acquired doxorubicin resistance.

  5. Calmodulin activation of the Ca2+ pump revealed by fluorescent chelator dyes in human red blood cell ghosts

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Ca2+ transport in red blood cell ghosts was monitored with fura2 or quin2 incorporated as the free acid during resealing. This is the first report of active transport monitored by the fluorescent intensity of the chelator dyes fura2 (5-50 microM) or quin2 (250 microM) in hemoglobin-depleted ghosts. Since there are no intracellular compartments in ghosts and the intracellular concentrations of all assay chelator substances including calmodulin (CaM), the dyes, and ATP could be set, the intracellular concentrations of free and total Ca [( Cafree]i and [Catotal]i) could be calculated during the transport. Ghosts prepared with or without CaM rapidly extruded Ca2+ to a steady- state concentration of 60-100 nM. A 10(4)-fold gradient for Ca2+ was routinely produced in medium containing 1 mM Ca2+. During active Ca2+ extrusion, d[Cafree]i/dt was a second order function of [Cafree]i and was independent of the dye concentration, whereas d[Catotal]i/dt increased as a first order function of both the [Cafree]i and the concentration of the Ca:dye complex. CaM (5 microM) increased d[Catotal]i/dt by 400% at 1 microM [Cafree]i, while d[Cafree]i/dt increased by only 25%. From a series of experiments we conclude that chelated forms of Ca2+ serve as substrates for the pump under permissive control of the [Cafree]i, and this dual effect may explain cooperativity. Free Ca2+ is extruded, and probably also Ca2+ bound to CaM or other chelators, while CaM and the chelators are retained in the cell. PMID:1371307

  6. Gene Expression Profile of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IIα in Rat's Hippocampus during Morphine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Amiri, Shahin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) which is highly expressed in the hippocampus is known to play a pivotal role in reward-related memories and morphine dependence. Methods In the present study, repeated morphine injections once daily for 7 days was done to induce morphine tolerance in male Wistar rats, after which gene expression profile of α-isoform of CaMKII (CaMKIIα) in the hippocampus was evaluated upon discontinuation of morphine injection over 21 days of morphine withdrawal. Control groups received saline for 7 consecutive days. For gene expression study, rats’ brains were removed and the hippocampus was dissected in separate groups on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 since discontinuation of of morphine injection. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was used to evaluate the gene expression profile. Results Tolerance to morphine was verified by a significant decrease in morphine analgesia in a hotplate test on day 8 (one day after the final repeated morphine injections). Results showed that gene expression of CaMKIIα at mRNA level on day 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 of morphine withdrawal was significantly altered as compared to the saline control group. Post hoc Tukey's test revealed a significantly enhanced CaMKIIα gene expression on day 14. Discussion It can be concluded that CaMKIIα gene expression during repeated injections of morphine is increased and this increase continues up to 14 days of withdrawal then settles at a new set point. Therefore, the strong morphine reward-related memory in morphine abstinent animals may, at least partly be attributed to, the up-regulation of CaMKIIα in the hippocampus over 14 days of morphine withdrawal. PMID:25337341

  7. Cloning and Characterization of Two NAD Kinases from Arabidopsis. Identification of a Calmodulin Binding Isoform1[w

    PubMed Central

    Turner, William L.; Waller, Jeffrey C.; Vanderbeld, Barb; Snedden, Wayne A.

    2004-01-01

    NAD kinase (NADK; ATP:NAD 2′-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.23), an enzyme found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, generates the important pyridine nucleotide NADP from substrates ATP and NAD. The role of NADKs in plants is poorly understood, and cDNAs encoding plant NADKs have not previously been described to our knowledge. We have cloned two cDNAs from Arabidopsis predicted to encode NADK isoforms, designated NADK1 and NADK2, respectively. Expressed as recombinant proteins in bacteria, both NADK1 and NADK2 were catalytically active, thereby confirming their identity as NADKs. Transcripts for both isoforms were detected in all tissues examined and throughout development. Although the predicted catalytic regions for NADK1 and NADK2 show sequence similarity to NADKs from other organisms, NADK2 possesses a large N-terminal extension that appears to be unique to plants. Using recombinant glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins and calmodulin (CaM)-affinity chromatography, we delineated a Ca2+-dependent CaM-binding domain to a 45-residue region within the N-terminal extension of NADK2. Although recombinant NADK2 was not responsive to CaM in vitro, immunoblot analysis suggests that native NADK2 is a CaM-binding protein. In Arabidopsis crude extracts, CaM-dependent NADK activity was much greater than CaM-independent activity throughout development, particularly in young seedlings. A native CaM-dependent NADK was partially purified from Arabidopsis seedlings (KmNAD = 0.20 mM, KmMg2+−ATP = 0.17 mM). The enzyme was fully activated by conserved CaM (S0.5 = 2.2 nm) in the presence of calcium but displayed differential responsiveness to eight CaM-like Arabidopsis proteins. Possible roles for NADKs in plants are discussed in light of our observations. PMID:15247403

  8. Regulation of plant immunity through ubiquitin-mediated modulation of Ca(2+) -calmodulin-AtSR1/CAMTA3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Du, Liqun; Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun; Poovaiah, B W

    2014-04-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration are essential signals for activation of plant immunity. It has also been reported that Ca(2+) signals suppress salicylic acid-mediated plant defense through AtSR1/CAMTA3, a member of the Ca(2+) /calmodulin-regulated transcription factor family that is conserved in multicellular eukaryotes. How plants overcome this negative regulation to mount an effective defense response during a stage of intracellular Ca(2+) surge is unclear. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of an important component of ubiquitin ligase, and the associated AtSR1 turnover. The AtSR1 interaction protein 1 (SR1IP1) was identified by CytoTrap two-hybrid screening. The loss-of-function mutant of SR1IP1 is more susceptible to bacterial pathogens, and over-expression of SR1IP1 confers enhanced resistance, indicating that SR1IP1 acts as a positive regulator of plant defense. SR1IP1 and AtSR1 act in the same signaling pathway to regulate plant immunity. SR1IP1 contains the structural features of a substrate adaptor in cullin 3-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, and was shown to serve as a substrate adaptor that recruits AtSR1 for ubiquitination and degradation when plants are challenged with pathogens. Hence, SR1IP1 positively regulates plant immunity by removing the defense suppressor AtSR1. These findings provide a mechanistic insight into how Ca(2+) -mediated actions are coordinated to achieve effective plant immunity.

  9. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of the recognition of the S100-binding peptides TRTK12 and p53 by calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Wafer, Lucas N; Tzul, Franco O; Pandharipande, Pranav P; McCallum, Scott A; Makhatadze, George I

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a multifunctional messenger protein that activates a wide variety of signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells in a calcium-dependent manner. CaM has been proposed to be functionally distinct from the S100 proteins, a related family of eukaryotic calcium-binding proteins. Previously, it was demonstrated that peptides derived from the actin-capping protein, TRTK12, and the tumor-suppressor protein, p53, interact with multiple members of the S100 proteins. To test the specificity of these peptides, they were screened using isothermal titration calorimetry against 16 members of the human S100 protein family, as well as CaM, which served as a negative control. Interestingly, both the TRTK12 and p53 peptides were found to interact with CaM. These interactions were further confirmed by both fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. These peptides have distinct sequences from the known CaM target sequences. The TRTK12 peptide was found to independently interact with both CaM domains and bind with a stoichiometry of 2:1 and dissociations constants Kd,C-term = 2 ± 1 µM and Kd,N-term = 14 ± 1 µM. In contrast, the p53 peptide was found to interact only with the C-terminal domain of CaM, Kd,C-term =2 ± 1 µM, 25°C. Using NMR spectroscopy, the locations of the peptide binding sites were mapped onto the structure of CaM. The binding sites for both peptides were found to overlap with the binding interface for previously identified targets on both domains of CaM. This study demonstrates the plasticity of CaM in target binding and may suggest a possible overlap in target specificity between CaM and the S100 proteins. PMID:24947426

  10. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  11. Effects of 39 Compounds on Calmodulin-Regulated Adenylyl Cyclases AC1 and Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lübker, Carolin; Seifert, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) catalyze the conversion of ATP into the second messenger cAMP. Membranous AC1 (AC1) is involved in processes of memory and learning and in muscle pain. The AC toxin edema factor (EF) of Bacillus anthracis is involved in the development of anthrax. Both ACs are stimulated by the eukaryotic Ca2+-sensor calmodulin (CaM). The CaM-AC interaction could constitute a potential target to enhance or impair the AC activity of AC1 and EF to intervene in above (patho)physiological mechanisms. Thus, we analyzed the impact of 39 compounds including typical CaM-inhibitors, an anticonvulsant, an anticholinergic, antidepressants, antipsychotics and Ca2+-antagonists on CaM-stimulated catalytic activity of AC1 and EF. Compounds were tested at 10 μM, i.e., a concentration that can be reached therapeutically for certain antidepressants and antipsychotics. Calmidazolium chloride decreased CaM-stimulated AC1 activity moderately by about 30%. In contrast, CaM-stimulated EF activity was abrogated by calmidazolium chloride and additionally decreased by chlorpromazine, felodipine, penfluridol and trifluoperazine by about 20–40%. The activity of both ACs was decreased by calmidazolium chloride in the presence and absence of CaM. Thus, CaM-stimulated AC1 activity is more insensitive to inhibition by small molecules than CaM-stimulated EF activity. Inhibition of AC1 and EF by calmidazolium chloride is largely mediated via a CaM-independent allosteric mechanism. PMID:25946093

  12. Activation of the Ano1 (TMEM16A) chloride channel by calcium is not mediated by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuai; Zhu, Jinqiu; Qu, Zhiqiang; Cui, Yuan-Yuan; Hartzell, H Criss

    2014-02-01

    The Ca(2+)-activated Cl channel anoctamin-1 (Ano1; Tmem16A) plays a variety of physiological roles, including epithelial fluid secretion. Ano1 is activated by increases in intracellular Ca(2+), but there is uncertainty whether Ca(2+) binds directly to Ano1 or whether phosphorylation or additional Ca(2+)-binding subunits like calmodulin (CaM) are required. Here we show that CaM is not necessary for activation of Ano1 by Ca(2+) for the following reasons. (a) Exogenous CaM has no effect on Ano1 currents in inside-out excised patches. (b) Overexpression of Ca(2+)-insensitive mutants of CaM have no effect on Ano1 currents, whereas they eliminate the current mediated by the small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK2) channel. (c) Ano1 does not coimmunoprecipitate with CaM, whereas SK2 does. Furthermore, Ano1 binds very weakly to CaM in pull-down assays. (d) Ano1 is activated in excised patches by low concentrations of Ba(2+), which does not activate CaM. In addition, we conclude that reversible phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is not required for current activation by Ca(2+) because the current can be repeatedly activated in excised patches in the absence of ATP or other high-energy compounds. Although Ano1 is blocked by the CaM inhibitor trifluoperazine (TFP), we propose that TFP inhibits the channel in a CaM-independent manner because TFP does not inhibit Ano1 when applied to the cytoplasmic side of excised patches. These experiments lead us to conclude that CaM is not required for activation of Ano1 by Ca(2+). Although CaM is not required for channel opening by Ca(2+), work of other investigators suggests that CaM may have effects in modulating the biophysical properties of the channel.

  13. Involvement of calmodulin in regulation of primary root elongation by N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Chao; Jia, Zhenhua; Huang, Yali; Li, Haili; Song, Shuishan

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria use signal molecules of low molecular weight to monitor their local population density and to coordinate their collective behavior in a process called “quorum sensing” (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the primary QS signals among Gram-negative bacteria. AHL-mediated QS plays an essential role in diverse bacterial physiological processes. Recent evidence shows that plants are able to sense bacterial AHLs and respond to them appropriately. However, little is known about the mechanism by which plants perceive and transduce the bacterial AHLs within cells. In this study, we found that the stimulatory effect of N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC6-HSL) on primary root elongation of Arabidopsis was abolished by the calmodulin (CaM) antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) and trifluoperazine (TFP). Western-blot and ELISA analysis revealed that the concentration of CaM protein in Arabidopsis roots increased after treatment with 1 μM 3OC6-HSL. Results from quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that the transcription of all nine CaM genes in Arabidopsis genome was up-regulated in the plants treated with 3OC6-HSL. The loss-of-function mutants of each AtCaM gene (AtCaM1-9) were insensitive to 3OC6-HSL-stimulation of primary root elongation. On the other hand, the genetic evidence showed that CaM may not participates the inhibition of primary root length caused by application of long-chained AHLs such as C10-HSL and C12-HSL. Nevertheless, our results suggest that CaM is involved in the bacterial 3OC6-HSL signaling in plant cells. These data offer new insight into the mechanism of plant response to bacterial QS signals. PMID:25628641

  14. Overexpression of Antimicrobial, Anticancer, and Transmembrane Peptides in Escherichia coli through a Calmodulin-Peptide Fusion System.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Nguyen, Leonard T; Gopal, Ramamourthy; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has become a serious health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the innate immune system of most organisms. A better understanding of their structures and mechanisms of action would lead to the design of more potent and safer AMPs as alternatives for current antibiotics. For detailed investigations, effective recombinant production which allows the facile modification of the amino acid sequence, the introduction of unnatural amino acids, and labeling with stable isotopes for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies is desired. Several expression strategies have been introduced in previous reports; however, their effectiveness has been limited to a select few AMPs. Here, we have studied calmodulin (CaM) as a more universal carrier protein to express many types of AMPs in E. coli. We have discovered that the unique architecture of CaM, consisting of two independent target binding domains with malleable methionine-rich interaction surfaces, can accommodate numerous amino acid sequences containing basic and hydrophobic residues. This effectively masks the toxic antimicrobial activities of many amphipathic AMPs and protects them from degradation during expression and purification. Here, we demonstrate the expression of various AMPs using a CaM-fusion expression system, including melittin, fowlicidin-1, tritrpticin, indolicidin, puroindoline A peptide, magainin II F5W, lactoferrampin B, MIP3α51-70, and human β-defensin 3 (HBD-3), the latter requiring three disulfide bonds for proper folding. In addition, our approach was extended to the transmembrane domain of the cell adhesion protein l-selectin. We propose the use of the CaM-fusion system as a universal approach to express many cationic amphipathic peptides that are normally toxic and would kill the bacterial host cells. PMID:27502305

  15. Calcium binding decreases the stokes radius of calmodulin and mutants R74A, R90A, and R90G.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, B R; Shea, M A

    1996-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an intracellular cooperative calcium-binding protein essential for activating many diverse target proteins. Biophysical studies of the calcium-induced conformational changes of CaM disagree on the structure of the linker between domains and possible orientations of the domains. Molecular dynamics studies have predicted that Ca4(2+)CaM is in equilibrium between an extended and compact conformation and that Arg74 and Arg90 are critical to the compaction process. In this study gel permeation chromatography was used to resolve calcium-induced changes in the hydrated shape of CaM at pH 7.4 and 5.6. Results showed that mutation of Arg 74 to Ala increases the R(s) as predicted; however, the average separation of domains in Ca4(2+)-CaM was larger than predicted by molecular dynamics. Mutation of Arg90 to Ala or Gly affected the dimensions of apo-CaM more than those of Ca4(2+)-CaM. Calcium binding to CaM and mutants (R74A-CaM, R90A-CaM, and R90G-CaM) lowered the Stokes radius (R(s)). Differences between R(s) values reported here and Rg values determined by small-angle x-ray scattering studies illustrate the importance of using multiple techniques to explore the solution properties of a flexible protein such as CaM. Images FIGURE 2 SCHEME 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:8968610

  16. Transcription factor Hes1 modulates osteoarthritis development in cooperation with calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Shurei; Hosaka, Yoko; Okada, Keita; Mori, Daisuke; Yano, Fumiko; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Yuki; Mori, Yoshifumi; Okuma, Tomotake; Chang, Song Ho; Kawata, Manabu; Taketomi, Shuji; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Chung, Ung-il; Tanaka, Sakae; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Ohba, Shinsuke; Saito, Taku

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling modulates skeletal formation and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) through induction of catabolic factors. Here we examined roles of Hes1, a transcription factor and important target of Notch signaling, in these processes. SRY-box containing gene 9 (Sox9)-Cre mice were mated with Hes1fl/fl mice to generate tissue-specific deletion of Hes1 from chondroprogenitor cells; this deletion caused no obvious abnormality in the perinatal period. Notably, OA development was suppressed when Hes1 was deleted from articular cartilage after skeletal growth in type II collagen (Col2a1)-CreERT;Hes1fl/fl mice. In cultured chondrocytes, Hes1 induced metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1 motif, 5 (Adamts5) and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (Mmp13), which are catabolic enzymes that break down cartilage matrix. ChIP-seq and luciferase assays identified Hes1-responsive regions in intronic sites of both genes; the region in the ADAMTS5 gene contained a typical consensus sequence for Hes1 binding, whereas that in the MMP13 gene did not. Additionally, microarray analysis, together with the ChIP-seq, revealed novel Hes1 target genes, including Il6 and Il1rl1, coding a receptor for IL-33. We further identified calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2δ (CaMK2δ) as a cofactor of Hes1; CaMK2δ was activated during OA development, formed a protein complex with Hes1, and switched it from a transcriptional repressor to a transcriptional activator to induce cartilage catabolic factors. Therefore, Hes1 cooperated with CaMK2δ to modulate OA pathogenesis through induction of catabolic factors, including Adamts5, Mmp13, Il6, and Il1rl1. Our findings have contributed to further understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of OA, and may provide the basis for development of novel treatments for joint disorders. PMID:25733872

  17. Light-modulated abundance of an mRNA encoding a calmodulin-regulated, chromatin-associated NTPase in pea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, H. L.; Tong, C. G.; Thomas, C.; Roux, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    A CDNA encoding a 47 kDa nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) that is associated with the chromatin of pea nuclei has been cloned and sequenced. The translated sequence of the cDNA includes several domains predicted by known biochemical properties of the enzyme, including five motifs characteristic of the ATP-binding domain of many proteins, several potential casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, a helix-turn-helix region characteristic of DNA-binding proteins, and a potential calmodulin-binding domain. The deduced primary structure also includes an N-terminal sequence that is a predicted signal peptide and an internal sequence that could serve as a bipartite-type nuclear localization signal. Both in situ immunocytochemistry of pea plumules and immunoblots of purified cell fractions indicate that most of the immunodetectable NTPase is within the nucleus, a compartment proteins typically reach through nuclear pores rather than through the endoplasmic reticulum pathway. The translated sequence has some similarity to that of human lamin C, but not high enough to account for the earlier observation that IgG against human lamin C binds to the NTPase in immunoblots. Northern blot analysis shows that the NTPase MRNA is strongly expressed in etiolated plumules, but only poorly or not at all in the leaf and stem tissues of light-grown plants. Accumulation of NTPase mRNA in etiolated seedlings is stimulated by brief treatments with both red and far-red light, as is characteristic of very low-fluence phytochrome responses. Southern blotting with pea genomic DNA indicates the NTPase is likely to be encoded by a single gene.

  18. RyRCa2+ Leak Limits Cardiac Ca2+ Window Current Overcoming the Tonic Effect of Calmodulin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Velasco, María; Neco, Patricia; Mercado-Morales, Martha; Delgado, Carmen; Napolitano, Carlo; Priori, Silvia G.; Richard, Sylvain; María Gómez, Ana; Benitah, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ mediates the functional coupling between L-type Ca2+ channel (LTCC) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR), participating in key pathophysiological processes. This crosstalk manifests as the orthograde Ca2+-induced Ca2+-release (CICR) mechanism triggered by Ca2+ influx, but also as the retrograde Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) of LTCC, which depends on both Ca2+ permeating through the LTCC itself and on SR Ca2+ release through the RyR. This latter effect has been suggested to rely on local rather than global Ca2+ signaling, which might parallel the nanodomain control of CDI carried out through calmodulin (CaM). Analyzing the CICR in catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) mice as a model of RyR-generated Ca2+ leak, we evidence here that increased occurrence of the discrete local SR Ca2+ releases through the RyRs (Ca2+ sparks) causea depolarizing shift in activation and a hyperpolarizing shift inisochronic inactivation of cardiac LTCC current resulting in the reduction of window current. Both increasing fast [Ca2+]i buffer capacity or depleting SR Ca2+ store blunted these changes, which could be reproduced in WT cells by RyRCa2+ leak induced with Ryanodol and CaM inhibition.Our results unveiled a new paradigm for CaM-dependent effect on LTCC gating and further the nanodomain Ca2+ control of LTCC, emphasizing the importance of spatio-temporal relationships between Ca2+ signals and CaM function. PMID:21673970

  19. Opposing Orientations of the Anti-Psychotic Drug Trifluoperazine Selected by Alternate Conformations of M144 in Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Feldkamp, Michael D.; Gakhar, Lokesh; Pandey, Nisha; Shea, Madeline A.

    2015-01-01

    The anti-psychotic drug trifluoperazine (TFP) is an antagonist observed to bind to calcium-saturated calmodulin ((Ca2+)4-CaM) at ratios of 1:1 (1CTR), 2:1 (1A29), and 4:1 (1LIN). Each structure contains one TFP bound in the hydrophobic cleft of the C-domain of CaM. However, the orientation of the trifluoromethyl (CF3) moiety differs among them: it is buried in the C-domain cleft of 1A29 and 1LIN, but protrudes from 1CTR. We report a 2.0 Å resolution crystallographic structure (4RJD) of TFP bound to the (Ca2+)-saturated C-domain of CaM (CaMC). The asymmetric unit contains two molecules of (Ca2+)2-CaMC. Chain backbones were nearly identical, but the orientation of TFP in the cleft of chain A matched 1A29/1LIN, while TFP bound to chain B matched 1CTR. This was accommodated by a flip of the M144 sidechain and small changes in sidechains of M109 and M145. Docking simulations suggested that the rotamer conformation of M144 determined the orientation of TFP within the cleft of (Ca2+)2-CaMC. Chains A and B show that the open cleft of (Ca2+)2-CaMC is promiscuous in accepting TFP in reversed directions under the same crystallization conditions. Observing multiple orientations of an antagonist bound to a single protein highlights the challenge of designing highly specific pharmaceuticals, and may have importance for QSAR of other CF3-containing drugs such as fluoxetine (anti-depressant) or efavirenz (reverse transcriptase inhibitor). This study emphasizes that a single structure of a complex represents an energetically accessible state, but does not necessarily show the full range of energetically equivalent states. PMID:25694384

  20. Phosphorylation of CEACAM1 molecule by calmodulin kinase IID in a three-dimensional model of mammary gland lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tung; Chen, Charng-Jui; Shively, John E

    2014-01-31

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1), a transmembrane protein, expressed on normal breast epithelial cells is down-regulated in breast cancer. Phosphorylation of Thr-457 on the short cytoplasmic domain isoform (CEACAM1-SF) that is predominant in normal epithelial cells is required for lumen formation in a three-dimensional model that involves apoptosis of the central acinar cells. Calmodulin kinase IID (CaMKIID) was selected as a candidate for the kinase required for Thr-457 phosphorylation from a gene chip analysis comparing genes up-regulated in MCF7 cells expressing wild type CEACAM1-SF compared with the T457A-mutated gene (Chen, C. J., Kirshner, J., Sherman, M. A., Hu, W., Nguyen, T., and Shively, J. E. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5749-5760). Up-regulation of CaMKIID during lumen formation was confirmed by analysis of mRNA and protein levels. CaMKIID was able to phosphorylate a synthetic peptide corresponding to the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM1-SF and was covalently bound to biotinylated and T457C-modified peptide in the presence of a kinase trap previously described by Shokat and co-workers (Maly, D. J., Allen, J. A., and Shokat, K. M. (2004) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126, 9160-9161). When cell lysates from wild type-transfected MCF7 cells undergoing lumen formation were incubated with the peptide and kinase trap, a cross-linked band corresponding to CaMKIID was observed. When these cells were treated with an RNAi that inhibits CaMKIID expression, lumen formation was blocked by over 90%. We conclude that CaMKIID specifically phosphorylates Thr-457 on CEACAM1-SF, which in turn regulates the process of lumen formation via apoptosis of the central acinar cells.

  1. Phosphorylation of CEACAM1 Molecule by Calmodulin Kinase IID in a Three-dimensional Model of Mammary Gland Lumen Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tung; Chen, Charng-Jui; Shively, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1), a transmembrane protein, expressed on normal breast epithelial cells is down-regulated in breast cancer. Phosphorylation of Thr-457 on the short cytoplasmic domain isoform (CEACAM1-SF) that is predominant in normal epithelial cells is required for lumen formation in a three-dimensional model that involves apoptosis of the central acinar cells. Calmodulin kinase IID (CaMKIID) was selected as a candidate for the kinase required for Thr-457 phosphorylation from a gene chip analysis comparing genes up-regulated in MCF7 cells expressing wild type CEACAM1-SF compared with the T457A-mutated gene (Chen, C. J., Kirshner, J., Sherman, M. A., Hu, W., Nguyen, T., and Shively, J. E. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5749–5760). Up-regulation of CaMKIID during lumen formation was confirmed by analysis of mRNA and protein levels. CaMKIID was able to phosphorylate a synthetic peptide corresponding to the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM1-SF and was covalently bound to biotinylated and T457C-modified peptide in the presence of a kinase trap previously described by Shokat an