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Sample records for calmodulin

  1. Dityrosine formation in calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Malencik, D.A.; Anderson, S.R.

    1987-02-10

    Ultraviolet (280-nm) irradiation of bovine brain calmodulin results in calcium-dependent changes in its fluorescence emission spectrum. These consist of a decline in the intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence of the protein and the appearance of a new emission maximum at 400 nm. Chromatography of irradiated calmodulin, using Ultrogel AcA 54 and phenyl-agarose columns, yields several distinctive fractions. One of these, representing 2.8% of the total recovered protein and 53% of the total fluorescence emission at 400 nm, was selected for detailed characterization. Analyses performed on acid hydrolysates reveal the presence of dityrosine, a derivative of tyrosine known for its fluorescence near 400 nm, at the level of 0.59-0.89 mol per 16,700 g of protein. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrate two components of apparent molecular weights 14,000 (80%) and 16,000 (20%). Observations on the effects of UV irradiation on the thrombic fragments of calmodulin and on related calcium binding proteins (rabbit skeletal muscle troponin C, bovine cardiac troponin C, and parvalbumin) support the interpretation that dityrosine formation in calmodulin results from the intramolecular cross-linking of Tyr-99 and Tyr-138. The dityrosine-containing photoproduct of calmodulin is unable to stimulate the p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity of calcineurin under standard assay conditions. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase binds the derivative about 280-fold less effectively than it binds native calmodulin. Of several metal ions tested, only Cd/sup 2 +/ approaches Ca/sup 2 +/ in its ability to promote the appearance of the 400-nm emission band during UV irradiation of calmodulin. Mn/sup 2 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ appear to inhibit dityrosine formation.

  2. Functional expression of chicken calmodulin in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Y; Anraku, Y

    1989-01-31

    The coding region of a chicken calmodulin cDNA was fused to a galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter, and an expression system was constructed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of calmodulin was demonstrated by purifying the heterologously expressed protein and analyzing its biochemical properties. When the expression plasmid was introduced into a calmodulin gene (cmd1)-disrupted strain of yeast, the cells grew in galactose medium, showing that chicken calmodulin could complement the lesion of yeast calmodulin functionally. Repression of chicken calmodulin in the (cmd1)-disrupted strain caused cell cycle arrest with a G2/M nucleus, as observed previously with a conditional-lethal mutant of yeast calmodulin. These results suggest that the essential function of calmodulin for cell proliferation is conserved in cells ranging from yeast to vertebrate cells.

  3. Role of Calmodulin in Cell Proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafouleas, J.

    1983-01-01

    Calmodulin levels were found to increase as cells enter plateau. The data suggest that the cells are exiting the cell cycle late in the G sub 1 phase, or that the calmodulin levels in plateau cells are uncoupled to progression into S phase in plateau cells. Upon release, calmodulin levels rapidly decrease. Following this decrease, there is a increase prior to S phase.

  4. Calmodulin regulates KCNQ2 function in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuhong; Zhuang, Fei; Li, Hong; Zheng, Kun; Hong, Ze; Feng, Weijing; Zhou, Wendi; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is linked to mutations in KCNQ channels. KCNQ channels including KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 are enriched in neurons, regulating action potential generation and modulation. Here, we showed that properties of KCNQ2 channel in rat hippocampal cultured neurons are regulated by ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin. We analyzed calmodulin function on the KCNQ2 channel in both HEK293 cells and neurons. We used shRNAs to suppress expression of calmodulin protein. On the other hand, we used cDNA to over-express calmodulin in HEK293 and neuron cells. In wild type and mis-sense mutations of KCNQ2 proteins, calmodulin over-expression enhanced outward K+ current and decreased neuronal activity. Meanwhile, calmodulin knockdown reduced KCNQ2 current and increased neuronal activity, showing that hippocampal neuronal excitability is regulated by expression level of calmodulin protein. Our data suggest that calmodulin performs a major function in regulating KCNQ2 properties via direct binding to KCNQ2 protein, indicating that calmodulin could be a target of as gene therapy in epilepsy. PMID:28078031

  5. Purification and biochemical properties of calmodulin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Y; Uno, I; Ishikawa, T; Anraku, Y

    1987-10-01

    Calmodulin from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified to complete homogeneity by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and HPLC gel filtration. The biochemical properties of the purified protein as calmodulin were examined under various criteria and its similarity and dissimilarity to other calmodulins have been described. Like other calmodulins, yeast calmodulin activated bovine phosphodiesterase and pea NAD kinase in a Ca2+-dependent manner, but its concentration for half-maximal activation was 8-10 times that of bovine calmodulin. The amino acid composition of yeast calmodulin was different from those of calmodulins from other lower eukaryotes in that it contained no tyrosine, but more leucine and had a high ratio of serine to threonine. Yeast calmodulin did not contain tryptophanyl or tyrosyl residues, so its ultraviolet spectrum reflected the absorbance of phenylalanyl residues, and had a molar absorption coefficient at 259 nm of 1900 M-1 cm-1. Ca2+ ions changed the secondary structure of yeast calmodulin, causing a 3% decrease in the alpha-helical content, unlike its effect on other calmodulins. Antibody against yeast calmodulin did not cross-react with bovine calmodulin, and antibody against bovine calmodulin did not cross-react with yeast calmodulin, presumably due to differences in the amino acid sequences of the antigenic sites. It is concluded that the molecular structure of yeast calmodulin differs from those of calmodulins from other sources, but that its Ca2+-dependent regulatory functions are highly conserved and essentially similar to those of calmodulins of higher eukaryotes.

  6. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  7. Developmental differences in posttranslational calmodulin methylation in pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-05-01

    A calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used to analyze the degree of lysine-115 methylation of pea calmodulin. Calmodulin was isolated from segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of {sup 3}H-methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The methylation of these calmodulin samples occurs specifically at lysine 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position were not methylated and competitively inhibited methylation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in NAD kinase activation by methylated and unmethylated calmodulins, raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation could affect calmodulin action.

  8. Regulation of RYR1 activity by Ca(2+) and calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodney, G. G.; Williams, B. Y.; Strasburg, G. M.; Beckingham, K.; Hamilton, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The skeletal muscle calcium release channel (RYR1) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that is regulated by another Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. The functional consequences of calmodulin's interaction with RYR1 are dependent on Ca(2+) concentration. At nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an activator, but at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an inhibitor of RYR1. This raises the question of whether the Ca(2+)-dependent effects of calmodulin on RYR1 function are due to Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin, RYR1, or both. To distinguish the effects of Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin from those of Ca(2+) binding to RYR1, a mutant calmodulin that cannot bind Ca(2+) was used to evaluate the effects of Ca(2+)-free calmodulin on Ca(2+)-bound RYR1. We demonstrate that Ca(2+)-free calmodulin enhances the affinity of RYR1 for Ca(2+) while Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin converts calmodulin from an activator to an inhibitor. Furthermore, Ca(2+) binding to RYR1 enhances its affinity for both Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin.

  9. Calmodulin independence of human duodenal adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J A; Griffin, M; Mireylees, S E; Long, R G

    1991-01-01

    The calmodulin and calcium dependence of human adenylate cyclase from the second part of the duodenum was assessed in washed particulate preparations of biopsy specimens by investigating (a) the concentration dependent effects of free [Ca2+] on enzyme activity, (b) the effects of exogenous calmodulin on enzyme activity in ethylene glycol bis (b-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) washed particulate preparations, and (c) the effects of calmodulin antagonists on enzyme activity. Both basal (IC50 = 193.75 (57.5) nmol/l (mean (SEM)) and NaF stimulated (IC50 = 188.0 (44.0) nmol/l) adenylate cyclase activity was strongly inhibited by free [Ca2+] greater than 90 nmol/l. Free [Ca2+] less than 90 nmol/l had no effect on adenylate cyclase activity. NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by 50% at 2.5 mmol/l EGTA. This inhibition could not be reversed by free Ca2+. The addition of exogenous calmodulin to EGTA (5 mmol/l) washed particulate preparations failed to stimulate adenylate cyclase activity. Trifluoperazine and N-(8-aminohexyl)-5-IODO-1-naphthalene-sulphonamide (IODO 8) did not significantly inhibit basal and NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity when measured at concentrations of up to 100 mumol/l. These results suggest that human duodenal adenylate cyclase activity is calmodulin independent but is affected by changes in free [Ca2+]. PMID:1752461

  10. Structure and dynamics of calmodulin in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Wriggers, W; Mehler, E; Pitici, F; Weinstein, H; Schulten, K

    1998-01-01

    To characterize the dynamic behavior of calmodulin in solution, we have carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Ca2+-loaded structure. The crystal structure of calmodulin was placed in a solvent sphere of radius 44 A, and 6 Cl- and 22 Na+ ions were included to neutralize the system and to model a 150 mM salt concentration. The total number of atoms was 32,867. During the 3-ns simulation, the structure exhibits large conformational changes on the nanosecond time scale. The central alpha-helix, which has been shown to unwind locally upon binding of calmodulin to target proteins, bends and unwinds near residue Arg74. We interpret this result as a preparative step in the more extensive structural transition observed in the "flexible linker" region 74-82 of the central helix upon complex formation. The major structural change is a reorientation of the two Ca2+-binding domains with respect to each other and a rearrangement of alpha-helices in the N-terminus domain that makes the hydrophobic target peptide binding site more accessible. This structural rearrangement brings the domains to a more favorable position for target binding, poised to achieve the orientation observed in the complex of calmodulin with myosin light-chain kinase. Analysis of solvent structure reveals an inhomogeneity in the mobility of water in the vicinity of the protein, which is attributable to the hydrophobic effect exerted by calmodulin's binding sites for target peptides. PMID:9545028

  11. Differential inhibition of calmodulin-sensitive phosphodiesterase and Ca++-adenosine triphosphatase by chlorpromazine-linked calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Prozialeck, W.C.; Wallace, T.L.; Weiss, B.

    1987-10-01

    Upon irradiation with UV light, chlorpromazine binds irreversibly to calmodulin and inactivates it. To determine whether this chlorpromazine-calmodulin (CPZ-CaM) complex can inhibit the actions of native calmodulin, we examined its effects on the activity of calmodulin-sensitive cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase from rat brain and on the Ca++-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) of human erythrocyte membranes. The CPZ-CaM complex was prepared by irradiating purified bovine brain calmodulin in the presence of chlorpromazine and Ca++. The sample was then dialyzed extensively to remove reversibly bound chlorpromazine and then assayed for its ability to activate calmodulin-sensitive phosphodiesterase and Ca++-ATPase, and for its ability to block the stimulatory effects of native calmodulin on these enzymes. The CPZ-CaM complex had no effect on the basal activity of either enzyme; it neither activated nor inhibited the enzymes when assayed in the absence of calmodulin. However, it affected differentially the activation of the two enzymes by native calmodulin. The CPZ-CaM complex totally inhibited calmodulin-stimulated phosphodiesterase but had no effect on the activation of the ATPase by calmodulin. Other studies showed that CPZ-CaM increased the activation constant (Ka) for the interaction of calmodulin with phosphodiesterase but did not affect the maximal activation (Vmax) of the enzyme by calmodulin. Neither calmodulin nor CPZ-CaM altered the Km for the interaction between phosphodiesterase and cyclic AMP. These results suggest that CPZ-CaM inhibits the calmodulin-induced activation of phosphodiesterase by competing with calmodulin for regulatory sites on the enzyme and not by interacting with calmodulin itself or by blocking the interaction of cyclic AMP with the enzyme.

  12. Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

  13. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signal network in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    Various extracellular stimuli elicit specific calcium signatures that can be recognized by different calcium sensors. Calmodulin, the predominant calcium receptor, is one of the best-characterized calcium sensors in eukaryotes. In recent years, completion of the Arabidopsis genome project and advances in functional genomics have helped to identify and characterize numerous calmodulin-binding proteins in plants. There are some similarities in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling in plants and animals. However, plants possess multiple calmodulin genes and many calmodulin target proteins, including unique protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these proteins are likely to act as "hubs" during calcium signal transduction. Hence, a better understanding of the function of these calmodulin target proteins should help in deciphering the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signal network and its role in plant growth, development and response to environmental stimuli.

  14. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  15. Kv7 Channels Can Function without Constitutive Calmodulin Tethering

    PubMed Central

    Alberdi, Araitz; Alaimo, Alessandro; Etxeberría, Ainhoa; Fernández-Orth, Juncal; Zamalloa, Teresa; Roura-Ferrer, Meritxell; Villace, Patricia; Areso, Pilar; Casis, Oscar; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    M-channels are voltage-gated potassium channels composed of Kv7.2-7.5 subunits that serve as important regulators of neuronal excitability. Calmodulin binding is required for Kv7 channel function and mutations in Kv7.2 that disrupt calmodulin binding cause Benign Familial Neonatal Convulsions (BFNC), a dominantly inherited human epilepsy. On the basis that Kv7.2 mutants deficient in calmodulin binding are not functional, calmodulin has been defined as an auxiliary subunit of Kv7 channels. However, we have identified a presumably phosphomimetic mutation S511D that permits calmodulin-independent function. Thus, our data reveal that constitutive tethering of calmodulin is not required for Kv7 channel function. PMID:21980481

  16. Competitive inhibition of TRPV1-calmodulin interaction by vanilloids.

    PubMed

    Hetényi, Anasztázia; Németh, Lukács; Wéber, Edit; Szakonyi, Gerda; Winter, Zoltán; Jósvay, Katalin; Bartus, Éva; Oláh, Zoltán; Martinek, Tamás A

    2016-08-01

    There is enormous interest toward vanilloid agonists of the pain receptor TRPV1 in analgesic therapy, but the mechanisms of their sensory neuron-blocking effects at high or repeated doses are still a matter of debate. Our results have demonstrated that capsaicin and resiniferatoxin form nanomolar complexes with calmodulin, and competitively inhibit TRPV1-calmodulin interaction. These interactions involve the protein recognition interface of calmodulin, which is responsible for all of the cell-regulatory calmodulin-protein interactions. These results draw attention to a previously unknown vanilloid target, which may contribute to the explanation of the paradoxical pain-modulating behavior of these important pharmacons.

  17. Functional conformations of calmodulin: I. Preparation and characterization of a conformational specific anti-bovine calmodulin monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Wolf, T; Fleminger, G; Solomon, B

    1995-01-01

    Calmodulin, similarly to many other Ca(2+)-activated proteins, undergoes considerable conformational changes in the presence of Ca2+ ions. These changes were followed using specific monoclonal antibodies against calmodulin. Since calmodulin is a poor immunogen due to its high phylogenetic conservancy, glutaraldehyde-crosslinked bovine brain extract, which contains a considerable amount of functionally active calmodulin complexed with its target proteins, was used as an antigen. Out of nine anti-calmodulin mAbs isolated, three (namely, CAM1, CAM2 and CAM4) were purified and characterized. MAb CAM1 was identified as an IgG1 while mAbs CAM2 and CAM4 belong to IgM class. Additivity ELISA showed that mAb CAM1 binds to an epitope located remote from the epitopes recognized by the other two mAbs, while mAbs CAM2 and CAM4 recognize close epitopes. MAb CAM1 was found to be especially sensitive to the conformational state of calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+ ions. The interactions of mAbs CAM2 and CAM4 with calmodulin are only slightly affected by Ca2+ removal. In addition mAb CAM1 failed to recognize other calmodulin molecules, such as spinach and various plant recombinant calmodulins, while mAbs CAM1 and CAM4 share common epitopes with the above molecules.

  18. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  19. Decoding of calcium signal through calmodulin: calmodulin-binding proteins in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many abiotic and biotic stimuli such as heat, cold, drought, salt, light, wind, touch, wounding, symbionts and pathogens as well as growth, developmental and hormonal cues can quickly induce cytosolic calcium increases. Calmodulin, the most thoroughly studied calcium sensor, mediates interpretation...

  20. Specific localization of scallop gill epithelial calmodulin in cilia.

    PubMed

    Stommel, E W; Stephens, R E; Masure, H R; Head, J F

    1982-03-01

    Calmodulin has been isolated and characterized from the gill of the bay scallop aequipecten irradians. Quantitative electrophoretic analysis of epithelial cell fractions show most of the calmodulin to be localized in the cilia, specifically in the detergent- solubilized membrane-matrix fraction. Calmodulin represents 2.2 +/- 0.3 percent of the membrane-matrix protein or 0.41 +/- 0.5 percent of the total ciliary protein. Its concentration is at least 10(-4) M if distributed uniformly within the matrix. Extraction in the presence of calcium suggests that the calmodulin is not bound to the axoneme proper. The ciliary protein is identified as a calmodulin on the basis of its calcium- dependent binding to a fluphenazine-sepharose affinity column and its comigration with bovine brain calmodulin on alkaline-urea and SDS polyacrylamide gels in both the presence and absence of calcium. Scallop ciliary calmodulin activates bovine brain phosphodiesterase to the same extent as bovine brain and chicken gizzard calmodulins. Containing trimethyllysine and lacking cysteine and tryptophan, the amino acid composition of gill calmodulin is typical of known calmodulins, except that it is relatively high in serine and low in methionine. Its composition is less acidic than other calmodulins, in agreement with an observed isoelectric point approximately 0.2 units higher than that of bovine brain. Comparative tryptic peptide mapping of scallop gill ciliary and bovine brain calmodulins indicates coincidence of over 75 percent of the major peptides, but at least two major peptides in each show no near-equivalency. Preliminary results using ATP-reactivated gill cell models show no effect of calcium at micromolar levels on ciliary beat or directionality of the lateral cilia, the cilia which constitute the vast majority of those isolated. However, ciliary arrest will occur at calcium levels more than 150 muM. Because calmodulin usually functions in the micromolar range, its role in this system

  1. Use of fluorescently labelled calmodulins as tools to measure subcellular calmodulin activation in living dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Milikan, J M; Bolsover, S R

    2000-01-01

    We have used fluorescently labelled calmodulins to probe the activity of calmodulin in living dorsal root ganglion cells. Calmodulin labelled with the fluorophore 5-([4,6 dichlorotriazin-2yl]amino)-fluorescein (FL-CaM) does not change its fluorescence when it binds calcium, while calmodulin labelled at lysine 75 with 2-chloro-(6-(4-N,N-diethylamino-phenyl)-1,4,5-triazin-4-yl (TA-CaM), an environment-sensitive probe, increases its fluorescence when it binds calcium. We micro-injected FL-CaM or TA-CaM into rat dorsal root ganglion cells and found that both probes localise to the cell nucleus. In contrast, endogenous cellular calmodulin, in dorsal root ganglion cells as in hippocampal neurones, is predominantly cytosolic unless the neurones are depolarised, then it moves to the nucleus. FL-CaM and TA-CaM, introduced into dorsal root ganglion cells via a patch pipette, also immediately move to the nucleus, indicating that the nuclear localisation is a property of the labelled calmodulins. Although the subcellular distribution of FL-CaM and TA-CaM does not necessarily match that of endogenous calmodulin, we show that FL-CaM can be used as a control for TA-CaM when studying calmodulin activation in different cellular compartments.

  2. High-pressure SANS and fluorescence unfolding study of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Gibrat, Gabriel; Hoa, Gaston Hui Bon; Craescu, Constantin T; Assairi, Liliane; Blouquit, Yves; Annighöfer, Burkhard; May, Roland P; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2014-09-01

    Apo-calmodulin, a small soluble mainly α protein, is a calcium-dependent protein activator. Calcium binding affects the calmodulin conformation but also its stability. Calcium free form unfolds between 40 and 80°C, whereas the calcium-saturated form is stable up to temperatures as high as 100°C, forbidding comparison of the thermal unfolding pathways of the two forms. Thus, this paper focuses especially on the conformation of pressure-induced unfolding states of both forms of calmodulin, by combining small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) with biophysical techniques such as tyrosines and ANS fluorescence. In contrast to heat denaturation (Gibrat et al., BBA, 2012), the pressure denaturation of calmodulin is reversible up to pressures of 3000bar (300MPa). A pressure-induced compact intermediate state has been found for the two calmodulin forms, but their unfolding pathways are different. A domain compaction and an increase of the ANS fluorescence of holo form have been evidenced. On the contrary, a domain dilatation and an ANS fluorescence decrease have been found for the apo form. The pressure induced an increase of the interdomain distance for both calmodulin forms, suggesting that the central linker of calmodulin is flexible in solution.

  3. Calcium/Calmodulin-Mediated Gravitropic Response in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a fundamental understanding of how calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is involved in gravity signal transduction in plants. During the period of support, significant progress was made in elucidating the role of calmodulin and its target proteins in gravitropism. This laboratory has made breakthroughs by cloning and characterizing genes that are involved in calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling. Some of these genes show altered expression under hypergravity and simulated microgravity conditions. A major advance was made in our attempts to understand gravity signal transduction by cloning and characterizing a catalase which requires calcium/calmodulin for its activation. Our results suggest that calcium/calmodulin have dual roles in regulating the level of hydrogen peroxide (H202), a signal molecule that plays a major role in gravitropism. It is well established that auxin plays a major role in gravitropism. Our results indicate that there is a 'cross-talk' between calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and auxin-mediated signal transduction. Auxin-regulated SAUR proteins that are involved in gravitropism bind to calmodulin in a calcium-dependent manner. A novel chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase was cloned and characterized and its role in gravity signal transduction was investigated. These studies have provided some answers to the fundamental questions about how signal molecules such as calcium, H202, and hormones such as auxin bring about the ultimate gravitropic response and the integral role of calmodulin in gravity signal transduction. This NASA-funded study has led to some spinoffs that have applications in solving agricultural problems. The Washington State University Research Foundation has obtained several patents related to this work.

  4. Human Calmodulin Methyltransferase: Expression, Activity on Calmodulin, and Hsp90 Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Sophia; Magnani, Roberta; Haziza, Sitvanit; Hershkovitz, Eli; Houtz, Robert; Cambi, Franca; Parvari, Ruti

    2012-01-01

    Deletion of the first exon of calmodulin-lysine N-methyltransferase (CaM KMT, previously C2orf34) has been reported in two multigene deletion syndromes, but additional studies on the gene have not been reported. Here we show that in the cells from 2p21 deletion patients the loss of CaM KMT expression results in accumulation of hypomethylated calmodulin compared to normal controls, suggesting that CaM KMT is essential for calmodulin methylation and there are no compensatory mechanisms for CaM methylation in humans. We have further studied the expression of this gene at the transcript and protein levels. We have identified 2 additional transcripts in cells of the 2p21 deletion syndrome patients that start from alternative exons positioned outside the deletion region. One of them starts in the 2nd known exon, the other in a novel exon. The transcript starting from the novel exon was also identified in a variety of tissues from normal individuals. These new transcripts are not expected to produce proteins. Immunofluorescent localization of tagged CaM KMT in HeLa cells indicates that it is present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells whereas the short isoform is localized to the Golgi apparatus. Using Western blot analysis we show that the CaM KMT protein is broadly expressed in mouse tissues. Finally we demonstrate that the CaM KMT interacts with the middle portion of the Hsp90 molecular chaperon and is probably a client protein since it is degraded upon treatment of cells with the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin. These findings suggest that the CaM KMT is the major, possibly the single, methyltransferase of calmodulin in human cells with a wide tissue distribution and is a novel Hsp90 client protein. Thus our data provides basic information for a gene potentially contributing to the patient phenotype of two contiguous gene deletion syndromes. PMID:23285036

  5. Human calmodulin methyltransferase: expression, activity on calmodulin, and Hsp90 dependence.

    PubMed

    Magen, Sophia; Magnani, Roberta; Haziza, Sitvanit; Hershkovitz, Eli; Houtz, Robert; Cambi, Franca; Parvari, Ruti

    2012-01-01

    Deletion of the first exon of calmodulin-lysine N-methyltransferase (CaM KMT, previously C2orf34) has been reported in two multigene deletion syndromes, but additional studies on the gene have not been reported. Here we show that in the cells from 2p21 deletion patients the loss of CaM KMT expression results in accumulation of hypomethylated calmodulin compared to normal controls, suggesting that CaM KMT is essential for calmodulin methylation and there are no compensatory mechanisms for CaM methylation in humans. We have further studied the expression of this gene at the transcript and protein levels. We have identified 2 additional transcripts in cells of the 2p21 deletion syndrome patients that start from alternative exons positioned outside the deletion region. One of them starts in the 2(nd) known exon, the other in a novel exon. The transcript starting from the novel exon was also identified in a variety of tissues from normal individuals. These new transcripts are not expected to produce proteins. Immunofluorescent localization of tagged CaM KMT in HeLa cells indicates that it is present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells whereas the short isoform is localized to the Golgi apparatus. Using Western blot analysis we show that the CaM KMT protein is broadly expressed in mouse tissues. Finally we demonstrate that the CaM KMT interacts with the middle portion of the Hsp90 molecular chaperon and is probably a client protein since it is degraded upon treatment of cells with the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin. These findings suggest that the CaM KMT is the major, possibly the single, methyltransferase of calmodulin in human cells with a wide tissue distribution and is a novel Hsp90 client protein. Thus our data provides basic information for a gene potentially contributing to the patient phenotype of two contiguous gene deletion syndromes.

  6. Detection of calmodulin-binding proteins using a 32P-labeled GST-calmodulin fusion protein and a novel renaturation protocol.

    PubMed

    Fischer, R; Wei, Y; Berchtold, M

    1996-08-01

    To identify calmodulin-binding proteins in cellular extracts and tissue homogenates and to analyze purified calmodulin target proteins, overlay procedures using 125I-calmodulin or, more recently, nonradioactive biotinylated calmodulin have been widely used. Here we describe a rapid, alternative method for detecting calmodulin-binding proteins with a 32P-labeled calmodulin probe generated as a glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fusion protein. We used a modified pGEX-2TK vector, which contains the flag epitope and the consensus sequence R-R-A-S, that can be phosphorylated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. The fusion protein is easily purified from bacterial bysates by affinity chromatography using glutathione-Sepharose 4B beads. Phosphorylation of GST-calmodulin is performed directly on the beads and, after elution with reduced glutathione, the labeled calmodulin probe can be used for overlay experiments. We also describe a rapid renaturation protocol that enhances the signal for some but not all calmodulin-binding proteins and is used after the proteins have been transferred to nitrocellulose filters. Furthermore, we have compared the specificity and sensitivity of the 32P-labeled GST-calmodulin overlay with those of 125I-calmodulin and biotinylated calmodulin, clearly indicating that our newly developed protocol is a suitable alternative to conventionally used calmodulin overlay procedures.

  7. Dopamine binds calmodulin during autoregulation of dopaminergic D2 receptor signaling through CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex.

    PubMed

    Laoye, B J; Okurumeh, O A; Obagaye, O V; Olagunju, M O; Bankole, O O; Olubiyi, O O; Ogundele, O M

    2016-01-01

    The role of dopaminergic D2 receptor (D2R) autoregulation in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission cannot be overemphasized in cause and progression of disorders associated with complex behaviors. Although previous studies have shown that D2R is structurally and physiologically linked with calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKIIα), however, the role of calmodulin in the CaMKIIα complex in D2R regulation remains elusive. In this study, using structural biology modeling softwares (iGEMDOCK and CueMol), we have shown the interaction between D2R, CaMKIIα, calmodulin, and DA under varying conditions. The outcomes of this study suggest that CaMKIIα causes a change in DA binding affinity to the D2R receptive site while the detached DA binds to calmodulin to stop the activity of D2R in the D2R-dopaminergic D1 receptor (D1R) heteromer. Ultimately, we concluded that D2R autoregulates to stop its heteromeric combination with D1R. D2R interacts with D1R to facilitate calcium movement that activates calmodulin, then CaMKIIα. The CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex changes the affinity of DA-D2R causing DA to break free and bind with calmodulin.

  8. Calmodulin inhibitors from natural sources: an update.

    PubMed

    Mata, Rachel; Figueroa, Mario; González-Andrade, Martín; Rivera-Chávez, José Alberto; Madariaga-Mazón, Abraham; Del Valle, Paulina

    2015-03-27

    Calmodulin (CaM) plays a central role in regulating a myriad of cellular functions in physiological and pathophysiological processes, thus representing an important drug target. In previous reviews, our group has reported relevant information regarding natural anti-CaM compounds up to 2009. Natural sources continue to provide a diverse and unique reservoir of CaM inhibitors for drug and research tool discovery. This review provides an update of natural products with reported CaM inhibitory properties, which includes around 70 natural products and some synthetic analogues, belonging to different structural classes. Most of these natural inhibitors were isolated from fungi and plants and belong to the stilbenoid, polyketide, alkaloid, and peptide structural classes. These products were discovered mainly using a fluorescence-based method on rationally designed biosensors, which are highly specific, low-cost, and selective and have short reaction times. The effect of several antimitotic drugs on Ca(2+)-hCaM is also described.

  9. Role of Calcium and Calmodulin in Plant Cell Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium and calmodulin in plant cell regulation is discussed. Experiments are done to discover the level of calcium in plants and animals. The effect of intracellular calcium on photosynthesis is discussed.

  10. Antibodies to calmodulin during experimental Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infections in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Ruben, L; Patton, C L

    1985-01-01

    Calmodulin is an intracellular Ca2+ receptor protein which regulates a wide variety of enzymatic processes in eukaryotic cells examined in detail. Native calmodulin is not antigenic in rabbits because of its small size, high degree of amino acid sequence conservation and hydrophobicity. African trypanosomes contain a novel calmodulin which is structurally distinct from bovine brain and Tetrahymena calmodulins. In the present study, we examine the antibody response towards these calmodulins during chronic Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infections. Injection of purified trypanosome calmodulin into rabbits stimulates the production of specific IgG antibodies which recognize trypanosome, but not bovine brain or Tetrahymena calmodulins. By contrast, during chronic T. brucei infections in rabbits, antibodies (IgG + IgM + IgA) that recognize trypanosome, Tetrahymena and mammalian calmodulins arise. When only IgG antibodies are evaluated from infection sera, the major response is against mammalian and Tetrahymena calmodulins. Significantly fewer IgG antibodies are measured in the infection sera which recognize trypanosome calmodulin, while the non-specific control protein, chicken ovalbumin, is not recognized. Peak IgG antibody responses against calmodulin occur between Days 30-34 post-infection. Competition assays indicate that Tetrahymena and mammalian calmodulins are recognized at identical epitopes which are distinct from epitopes on trypanosome calmodulin. We conclude that, in the context of chronic T. brucei infections in rabbits, antibodies arise which are able to recognize mammalian host calmodulin. Images Figure 1 PMID:2414212

  11. Expression of a calmodulin methylation mutant affects the growth and development of transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D M; Besl, L; Oh, S H; Masterson, R V; Schell, J; Stacey, G

    1992-01-01

    Transgenic plants were constructed that express two foreign calmodulins (VU-1 and VU-3 calmodulins) derived from a cloned synthetic calmodulin gene. VU-1 calmodulin, similar to endogenous plant calmodulin, possesses a lysine residue at position 115 and undergoes posttranslational methylation. VU-3 calmodulin is a site-directed mutant of VU-1 calmodulin that is identical in sequence except for the substitution of an arginine at position 115 and thus is incapable of methylation. Both calmodulin genes, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, were expressed in transgenic tobacco. Foreign calmodulin protein accumulated in plant tissues to levels equivalent to that of the endogenous calmodulin. All transformed lines of VU-1 plants were indistinguishable from untransformed controls with respect to growth and development. However, all transformed lines of VU-3 plants were characterized by decreased stem internode growth, reduced seed production, and reduced seed and pollen viability. The data suggest that these phenotypes are the result of the expression of the calmodulin mutant rather than the position of transferred DNA insertion or the overall alteration of calmodulin levels. Analyses of the activity of the purified transgenic calmodulins suggest that calmodulin-dependent NAD kinase is among the potential targets that may have altered regulation in VU-3 transgenic plants. Images PMID:1325656

  12. Inorganic lead and calcium interact positively in activation of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Kern, M; Wisniewski, M; Cabell, L; Audesirk, G

    2000-06-01

    Calmodulin is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that mediates many of the intracellular actions of Ca2+ ions. The calcium-binding sites of calmodulin consist of four EF-hand motifs; full activation of calmodulin normally occurs when all four sites are occupied by Ca2+. Inorganic lead (PY2+) has been shown to activate calmodulin at total lead concentrations similar to the concentrations of Ca2+ required for activation (Goldstein and Ar, 1983; Habermann et al., 1983), but the free Pb2+ concentrations required for calmodulin activation have not been determined. In addition, it is possible that activation may occur with different sites occupied by different divalent cations, for example Ca2+ and Pb2+. We investigated the ability of free Pb2+, alone or in combination with Ca2+, to activate calmodulin. In aqueous media, N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) show increased fluorescence when bound to hydrophobic regions of proteins. This increased fluorescence has been used to monitor the conformational change that occurs during calmodulin activation (LaPorte et al., 1980). In the presence of calmodulin, both Ca2+ and Pb2+ stimulated increased fluorescence of NPN and ANS. Threshold and EC50 free metal concentrations were approximately 100 nM and 450-500 nM, respectively, for Ca2+ and 100 pM and 400-550 pM, respectively, for Pb2+. Fluorescence was enhanced by combinations of low concentrations of free Ca2+ and Pb2+; for example, as little as 20 pM free Pb2+ enhanced fluorescence in combination with 200 nM free Ca2+. The activity of the PDE1 isoform of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase is stimulated by Ca2+/calmodulin (Wang et al., 1990). In the presence of calmodulin, we found that Ca2+ and Pb2+ activated calmodulin-stimulated PDE activity, with threshold and EC50 free metal concentrations of approximately 200 nM and 1200 nM, respectively, for Ca2+ and 300 pM and 430 pM, respectively, for Pb2+. PDE activity was stimulated by

  13. A citrate-binding site in calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, T; Eisenstein, M; Muszkat, K A; Fleminger, G

    1998-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a major Ca2+ messenger which, upon Ca2+ activation, binds and activates a number of target enzymes involved in crucial cellular processes. The dependence on Ca2+ ion concentration suggests that CaM activation may be modulated by low-affinity Ca2+ chelators. The effect on CaM structure and function of citrate ion, a Ca2+ chelator commonly found in the cytosol and the mitochondria, was therefore investigated. A series of structural and biochemical methods, including tryptic mapping, immunological recognition by specific monoclonal antibodies, CIDNP-NMR, binding to specific ligands and association with radiolabeled citrate, showed that citrate induces conformational modifications in CaM which affect the shape and activity of the protein. These changes were shown to be associated with the C-terminal lobe of the molecule and involve actual binding of citrate to CaM. Analyzing X-ray structures of several citrate-binding proteins by computerized molecular graphics enabled us to identify a putative citrate-binding site (CBS) on the CaM molecule around residues Arg106-His107. Owing to the tight proximity of this site to the third Ca(2+)-binding loop of CaM, binding of citrate is presumably translated into changes in Ca2+ binding to site III (and indirectly to site IV). These changes apparently affect the structural and biochemical properties of the conformation-sensitive protein.

  14. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention. PMID:27040077

  15. Regulation of brain adenylate cyclase by calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis examined the interaction between the Ca{sup 2+}-binding protein, calmodulin (CaM), and the cAMP synthesizing enzyme, adenylate cyclase. The regulation of guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylate cyclase by CaM was examined in a particulate fraction from bovine striatum. CaM stimulated basal adenylate cyclase activity and enhanced the stimulation of the enzyme by GTP and dopamine (DA). The potentiation of GTP- and DA-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities by CaM was more sensitive to the concentration of CaM than was the stimulation of basal activity. A photoreactive CaM derivative was developed in order to probe the interactions between CaM and the adenylate cyclase components of bovine brain. Iodo-({sup 125}I)-CaM-diazopyruvamide ({sup 125}I-CAM-DAP) behaved like native CaM with respect to Ca{sup 2+}-enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent, concentration-dependent, and CaM-specific manner. Photolysis of {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP and forskolin-agarose purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase produced an adduct with a molecular weight of 140,000.

  16. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention.

  17. Acute inhibition of corticosteroidogenesis by inhibitors of calmodulin action.

    PubMed

    Carsia, R V; Moyle, W R; Wolff, D J; Malamed, S

    1982-11-01

    To identify the possible role of calmodulin in ACTH function, we tested the ability of chlorpromazine (CP) and other calmodulin antagonists to inhibit steroidogenesis of isolated adrenocortical cells of the rat. CP reversibly inhibited maximal ACTH-induced corticosterone (B) production. The presence of the drug did not alter the ED50 of ACTH stimulation (3.2 X 10(3) pg/ml), suggesting that it inhibited ACTH-induced steroidogenesis in a noncompetitive manner. The CP concentration required for half-maximal inhibition was 8.2 microM, a value close to the dissociation constant of the CP-calmodulin complex (5.3 microM). Concentrations greater than 40 microM resulted in complete inhibition. Similar concentrations of CP inhibited ACTH-induced cAMP accumulation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating an effect of the drug on early events in ACTH action. In addition, CP also apparently acted at a site distal to the point of cAMP formation, as shown by the finding that it inhibited cAMP-induced B production. CP inhibition of ACTH-induced B production was independent of the Ca2+ concentration, suggesting that the drug did not compete with Ca2+ directly. Concentrations of CP greater than 20 microM inhibited protein synthesis as measured by leucine incorporation into cellular proteins. Thus, although the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of CP on steroidogenesis might be explained by an effect on protein synthesis, the inhibition seen at 10 microM appeared to be independent of protein synthesis. Other antagonists of calmodulin action inhibited maximal ACTH-induced B production with the following relative potencies: trifluoperazine greater than CP greater than haloperidol greater than chlordiazepoxide. This order is similar to that reported for inhibition of calmodulin-activated phosphodiesterase and for binding to calmodulin. These findings suggest that calmodulin may modulate the effect of ACTH on steroidogenesis at multiple sites.

  18. Suramin and the suramin analogue NF307 discriminate among calmodulin-binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, M; Bofill-Cardona, E; Mayer, B; Nanoff, C; Freissmuth, M; Hohenegger, M

    2001-01-01

    Calmodulin-binding sites on target proteins show considerable variation in primary sequence; hence compounds that block the access of calmodulin to these binding sites may be more selective than compounds that inactivate calmodulin. Suramin and its analogue NF307 inhibit the interaction of calmodulin with the ryanodine receptor. We have investigated whether inhibition of calmodulin binding to target proteins is a general property of these compounds. Suramin inhibited binding of [(125)I]calmodulin to porcine brain membranes and to sarcoplasmic reticulum from skeletal muscle (IC(50)=4.9+/-1.2 microM and 19.9+/-1.8 microM, respectively) and blocked the cross-linking of [(125)I]calmodulin to some, but not all, target proteins in brain membranes by [(125)I]calmodulin. Four calmodulin-binding proteins were purified [ryanodine receptor-1 (RyR1) from rabbit skeletal muscle, neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) from Sf9 cells, G-protein betagamma dimers (Gbetagamma) from porcine brain and a glutathione S-transferase-fusion protein comprising the C-terminal calmodulin-binding domain of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 7A (GST-CmGluR7A) from bacterial lysates]. Three of the proteins employed (Gbetagamma, GST-CmGluR7A and RyR1) display a comparable affinity for calmodulin (in the range of 50-70 nM). Nevertheless, suramin and NF307 only blocked the binding of Gbetagamma and RyR1 to calmodulin-Sepharose. In contrast, the association of GST-CmGluR7A and nNOS was not impaired, whereas excess calmodulin uniformly displaced all proteins from the matrix. Thus suramin and NF307 are prototypes of a new class of calmodulin antagonists that do not interact directly with calmodulin but with calmodulin-recognition sites. In addition, these compounds discriminate among calmodulin-binding motifs. PMID:11311147

  19. Characterization and Functional Analysis of Calmodulin and Calmodulin-Like Genes in Fragaria vesca

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Yue, Dingyi; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang; Feng, Jiayue; Zou, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    Calcium is a universal messenger that is involved in the modulation of diverse developmental and adaptive processes in response to various stimuli. Calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-like (CML) proteins are major calcium sensors in all eukaryotes, and they have been extensively investigated for many years in plants and animals. However, little is known about CaMs and CMLs in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca). In this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the strawberry genome and identified 4 CaM and 36 CML genes. Bioinformatics analyses, including gene structure, phylogenetic tree, synteny and three-dimensional model assessments, revealed the conservation and divergence of FvCaMs and FvCMLs, thus providing insight regarding their functions. In addition, the transcript abundance of four FvCaM genes and the four most related FvCML genes were examined in different tissues and in response to multiple stress and hormone treatments. Moreover, we investigated the subcellular localization of several FvCaMs and FvCMLs, revealing their potential interactions based on the localizations and potential functions. Furthermore, overexpression of five FvCaM and FvCML genes could not induce a hypersensitive response, but four of the five genes could increase resistance to Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. This study provides evidence for the biological roles of FvCaM and CML genes, and the results lay the foundation for future functional studies of these genes. PMID:27990153

  20. Studies on a novel macrophage-specific calmodulin binding glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The murine macrophage-like cell line J774 and peritoneal exudate cells elicited with thioglycollate or starch contain a major calmodulin-binding protein which is absent in trifluoperazine-resistant variants of J774, resident peritoneal macrophages and these elicited with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, proteose peptone or Bacillus Clamette Guerin. Resident murine peritoneal cells maintained in tissue culture for 3 days begin to accumulate this protein as do human peripheral blood monocytes after 7 days of culture. A specific competitive displacement radioimmunoassay was developed using a rabbit antiserum raised to the partially purified calmodulin binding protein and (/sup 125/I) calmodulin covalently crosslinked to the principal calmodulin binding protein in the preparation. The radioimmunoassay confirmed the unique cellular distribution of this protein suggesting that it may be a marker for certain stages of macrophage differentiation. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared and one of these was used to further purify the protein by immunoaffinity chromatography. A protein of molecular weight 50,000 to 60,000 was isolated. It could be selectively adsorbed to wheat germ agglutinin agarose and subsequently eluted with N-acetyl glucosamine. This property plus its sensitivity to endoglycosidase F led to the conclusion that it is a glycoprotein. The cellular distribution, subcellular localization and evidence of glycosylation suggest that this protein may be a macrophage-specific receptor with a high affinity for calcium-calmodulin.

  1. Calcium and Calmodulin Localization in Gravitropically-responding Plant Organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    Antimonate staining procedures were used to detect calcium redistribution changes in corn roots. Results show that an asymmetric redistribution of Ca is induced by a gravitropic stimulus in roots as it is in shoots. Since this response occurs within 10 min, at least 5 min before any visible bending, it could play a role in the regulation of root gravitropism. Two different general approaches were used to localize calmodulin in plant tissue: radioimmunoassay of its content in tissue and in purified subcellular organelles, and immunocytochemical detection of it in roots and coleoptiles. Radioimmunoassay results indicate that calmodulin is present in large quantities in pllant cells and that it is specifically associated with mitochondria, etioplasts and nuclei. An assayed of an extract of soluble wall proteins revealed that over 1% of these proteins was calmodulin. Controls indicate that this calmodulin is not cytoplasmic in origin. A reaction product from anti-calmodulin was found mainly in the root cap cells, moderately in metazylem elements, in some cells in the stele surrounding metaxylem elements and in cortical cells.

  2. Calmodulin-mediated reversible immobilization of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas G; Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Gregory, Kalvin J; Schrift, G; Deo, Sapna

    2007-07-01

    This work demonstrates the use of the protein calmodulin, CaM, as an affinity tag for the reversible immobilization of enzymes on surfaces. Our strategy takes advantage of the of the reversible, calcium-mediated binding of CaM to its ligand phenothiazine and of the ability to produce fusion proteins between CaM and a variety of enzymes to reversibly immobilize enzymes in an oriented fashion to different surfaces. Specifically, we employed two different enzymes, organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and beta-lactamase and two different solid supports, a silica surface and cellulose membrane modified by covalently attaching a phenothiazine ligand, to demonstrate the versatility of our immobilization method. Fusion proteins between CaM-OPH and CaM-beta-lactamase were prepared by using genetic engineering strategies to introduce the calmodulin tail at the N-terminus of each of the two enzymes. In the presence of Ca(2+), CaM adopts a conformation that favors interaction between hydrophobic pockets in CaM and phenothiazine, while in the presence of a Ca(2+)-chelating agent such as EGTA, the interaction between CaM and phenothiazine is disrupted, thus allowing for removal of the CaM-fusion protein from the surface under mild conditions. CaM also acts as a spacer molecule, orienting the enzyme away from the surface and toward the solution, which minimizes enzyme interactions with the immobilization surface. Since the method is based on the highly selective binding of CaM to its phenothiazine ligand, and this is covalently immobilized on the surface, the method does not suffer from ligand leaching nor from interference from other proteins present in the cell extract. An additional advantage lies in that the support can be regenerated by passing through EGTA, and then reused for the immobilization of the same or, if desired, a different enzyme. Using a fusion protein approach for immobilization purposes avoids the use of harsh conditions in the immobilization and/or regeneration

  3. Centrin isoforms in mammals. Relation to calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Felix

    2006-12-01

    In mammals, three calmodulin (CaM) genes code for 100% identical proteins. In these species, four centrin (Cetn) genes have been reported to exist. They are examined in this paper. While the gene for Cetn 1 contains no introns and appears to be derived from Cetn 2 by retroposition, a gene product for Cetn 1 is expressed. Cetn 2, 3, and 4 represent bona fide genes. The major difference between the members of the CaM and the Cetn subfamilies is the presence (usually) in Cetn of an approximately 23 amino acids long (but occasionally much longer) protruding amino acid end. In all members of these two subgroups, four EF hand motifs (in this paper taken as loops containing 12 amino acids) are separated by 24, 25 and 24 amino acids (each a helix-loop-helix) positioned between motifs 1and 2, 2 and 3, and 3 and 4, respectively. This rule applies not only to CaM and Cetn in mammals but also to these two subfamilies in simpler eukaryotes such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Giardia lamblia. The various mRNA products can be identified most readily by their characteristic 3' UTRs. While CaM is an ancient molecule that is expressed in all cells and is ubiquitous within these cells and interacts therein with almost 100 different proteins, many of which display the IQ or related binding motifs, the distribution and function of Cetn (an equally ancient molecule) is restricted mostly to basal bodies (e.g. in rods of the retina), axonemes, flagella, cilia and centrosomes. Are these two subclasses of calcium carriers (each molecule possessing four EF hands which possibly interact with different association constants)-if they are both present within a cell-randomly chosen for their service to the specific proteins with which they interact?

  4. Structural Consequences of Calmodulin EF Hand Mutations.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Michael; Taiakina, Valentina; Dieckmann, Thorsten; Guillemette, J Guy

    2017-02-21

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a cytosolic Ca(2+)-binding protein that serves as a control element for many enzymes. It consists of two globular domains, each containing two EF hand pairs capable of binding Ca(2+), joined by a flexible central linker region. CaM is able to bind and activate its target proteins in the Ca(2+)-replete and Ca(2+)-deplete forms. To study the Ca(2+)-dependent/independent properties of binding and activation of target proteins by CaM, CaM constructs with Ca(2+)-binding disrupting mutations of Asp to Ala at position one of each EF hand have been used. These CaM mutant proteins are deficient in binding Ca(2+) in either the N-lobe EF hands (CaM12), C-lobe EF hands (CaM34), or all four EF hands (CaM1234). To investigate potential structural changes these mutations may cause, we performed detailed NMR studies of CaM12, CaM34, and CaM1234 including determining the solution structure of CaM1234. We then investigated if these CaM mutants affected the interaction of CaM with a target protein known to interact with apoCaM by determining the solution structure of CaM34 bound to the iNOS CaM binding domain peptide. The structures provide direct structural evidence of changes that are present in these Ca(2+)-deficient CaM mutants and show these mutations increase the hydrophobic exposed surface and decrease the electronegative surface potential throughout each lobe of CaM. These Ca(2+)-deficient CaM mutants may not be a true representation of apoCaM and may not allow for native-like interactions of apoCaM with its target proteins.

  5. Intron analyses reveal multiple calmodulin copies in Littorina.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R J; Wilding, C S; Grahame, J

    2005-04-01

    Intron 3 and the flanking exons of the calmodulin gene have been amplified, cloned, and sequenced from 18 members of the gastropod genus Littorina. From the 48 sequences, at least five different gene copies have been identified and their functionality characterized using a strategy based upon the potential protein product predicted from flanking exon data. The functionality analyses suggest that four of the genes code for functional copies of calmodulin. All five copies have been identified across a wide range of littorinid species although not ubiquitously. Using this novel approach based on intron sequences, we have identified an unprecedented number of potential calmodulin copies in Littorina, exceeding that reported for any other invertebrate. This suggests a higher number of, and more ancient, gene duplications than previously detected in a single genus.

  6. Calcium/Calmodulin-Mediated Gravitropic Response in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Plant organs respond to different physical signals such as gravity, light and touch. Gravity gives plants proper orientation, resulting in the proper form that we take for granted; the roots grow down into soil and shoots grow towards the light. Under microgravity conditions, as in space, plant growth patterns lack a clear sense of direction. Calcium and calmodulin (CaM) play an important role in gravity signal transduction. However, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in gravity signal transduction are not clearly understood. The goal of this project was to gain a fundamental understanding of how calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is involved in gravity signal transduction in plants. During the grant period, significant progress was made in elucidating the role of calmodulin and its target proteins in gravitropism.

  7. Effects of opiates on synaptosomal calmodulin and calcium uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Hoss, W.; Formaniak, M.

    1983-02-01

    Acute opiate administration in vivo increases the level of cytoplasmic calmodulin in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. These synaptosomes do not, however, display decreased K/sup +/-stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake in vitro. Opiates affect neither cytoplasmic calmodulin nor Ca uptake after incubation of synaptosomes with the drugs in vitro. In contrast to the interpretation of electrophysiological data, these results suggest that the observed inhibition by opiates of the release of several transmitters may not be mediated by presynaptic opiate receptors that inhibit Ca uptake.

  8. Role of calmodulin in thyroid hormone stimulation in vitro of human erythrocyte Ca2+-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Davis, F B; Davis, P J; Blas, S D

    1983-03-01

    Because human erythrocyte membrane Ca2+-ATPase is a calmodulin-dependent enzyme, and because physiological levels of thyroid hormone stimulate this enzyme system in vitro, we have studied the role of calmodulin in this model of extranuclear thyroid hormone action. Ca2+-ATPase activity in the absence of thyroid hormone ("basal activity") was increased by inclusion in the preassay incubation mixture of purified calmodulin or hypothyroid erythrocyte hemolysate that contained calmodulin (39 micrograms calmodulin/ml packed cells, determined by radioimmunoassay); addition of L-thyroxine or 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (10(-10)M) significantly enhanced (P less than 0.001) enzyme activity in the presence of calmodulin or hemolysate. The stimulatory effects of thyroid hormone, calmodulin, and hemolysate were additive. At 5-10 microM, trifluoperazine, an antagonist of calmodulin, inhibited thyroid hormone stimulation of Ca2+-ATPase activity. Higher concentrations of trifluoperazine (50-100 microM) inhibited basal and hormone-stimulated enzyme activity, with or without added calmodulin. Anti-calmodulin antibody (10-50 micrograms antibody/mg membrane protein) inhibited basal, calmodulin-stimulated and thyroid hormone-stimulated Ca2+-ATPase activity. Membrane preparations were shown by radioimmunoassay to contain residual endogenous calmodulin (0.27 +/- 0.02 micrograms/mg membrane protein). The latter accounts for the effect of trifluoperazine and calmodulin antibody on membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity in the absence of added purified calmodulin. These results support the conclusion that the in vitro action of physiological levels of iodothyronines on human erythrocyte Ca2+-ATPase activity requires the presence of calmodulin.

  9. Mission CaMKIIγ: shuttle calmodulin from membrane to nucleus.

    PubMed

    Malik, Zulfiqar A; Stein, Ivar S; Navedo, Manuel F; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-10-09

    Neuronal plasticity depends on plasma membrane Ca(2+) influx, resulting in activity-dependent gene transcription. Calmodulin (CaM) activated by Ca(2+) initiates the nuclear events, but how CaM makes its way to the nucleus has remained elusive. Ma et al. now show that CaMKIIγ transports CaM from cell surface Ca(2+) channels to the nucleus.

  10. Mutations in Calmodulin Cause Ventricular Tachycardia and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Nyegaard, Mette; Overgaard, Michael T.; Søndergaard, Mads T.; Vranas, Marta; Behr, Elijah R.; Hildebrandt, Lasse L.; Lund, Jacob; Hedley, Paula L.; Camm, A. John; Wettrell, Göran; Fosdal, Inger; Christiansen, Michael; Børglum, Anders D.

    2012-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a devastating inherited disorder characterized by episodic syncope and/or sudden cardiac arrest during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. Although rare, CPVT is suspected to cause a substantial part of sudden cardiac deaths in young individuals. Mutations in RYR2, encoding the cardiac sarcoplasmic calcium channel, have been identified as causative in approximately half of all dominantly inherited CPVT cases. Applying a genome-wide linkage analysis in a large Swedish family with a severe dominantly inherited form of CPVT-like arrhythmias, we mapped the disease locus to chromosome 14q31-32. Sequencing CALM1 encoding calmodulin revealed a heterozygous missense mutation (c.161A>T [p.Asn53Ile]) segregating with the disease. A second, de novo, missense mutation (c.293A>G [p.Asn97Ser]) was subsequently identified in an individual of Iraqi origin; this individual was diagnosed with CPVT from a screening of 61 arrhythmia samples with no identified RYR2 mutations. Both CALM1 substitutions demonstrated compromised calcium binding, and p.Asn97Ser displayed an aberrant interaction with the RYR2 calmodulin-binding-domain peptide at low calcium concentrations. We conclude that calmodulin mutations can cause severe cardiac arrhythmia and that the calmodulin genes are candidates for genetic screening of individual cases and families with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and unexplained sudden cardiac death. PMID:23040497

  11. Targeting of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Colbran, Roger J

    2004-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has diverse roles in virtually all cell types and it is regulated by a plethora of mechanisms. Local changes in Ca2+ concentration drive calmodulin binding and CaMKII activation. Activity is controlled further by autophosphorylation at multiple sites, which can generate an autonomously active form of the kinase (Thr286) or can block Ca2+/calmodulin binding (Thr305/306). The regulated actions of protein phosphatases at these sites also modulate downstream signalling from CaMKII. In addition, CaMKII targeting to specific subcellular microdomains appears to be necessary to account for the known signalling specificity, and targeting is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin and autophosphorylation. The present review focuses on recent studies revealing the diversity of CaMKII interactions with proteins localized to neuronal dendrites. Interactions with various subunits of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) subtype of glutamate receptor have attracted the most attention, but binding of CaMKII to cytoskeletal and several other regulatory proteins has also been reported. Recent reports describing the molecular basis of each interaction and their potential role in the normal regulation of synaptic transmission and in pathological situations are discussed. These studies have revealed fundamental regulatory mechanisms that are probably important for controlling CaMKII functions in many cell types. PMID:14653781

  12. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on calcium pump of ram spermatozoa plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, H; Rubinstein, S

    1988-01-01

    Plasma membranes isolated from ram spermatozoa contain calmodulin, which represents approximately 0.03% of the total sperm calmodulin and 0.025% of the membrane protein. When membranes were isolated in the presence of ethylene glycol (beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), the amount of calmodulin associated with the plasma membranes was reduced by only 20%. The ATP-dependent calcium transport activity of the isolated plasma membranes is not enhanced by adding calmodulin and not inhibited by the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazinc (TFP), compound 48/80, or calmidazolium. In fact, there is an enhancement of calcium uptake by the calmodulin antagonists and this enhancement can be blocked by the Ca2+-channel blocker D-600. It is suggested that the ATP-dependent calcium transport activity in the plasma membrane of ram spermatozoa is not regulated by calmodulin.

  13. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin in rat sertoli cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spruill, W A; Zysk, J R; Tres, L L; Kierszenbaum, A L

    1983-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent protein phosphorylation and the role of calmodulin in this process was investigated in subcellular fractions of primary cultures of rat Sertoli cells. Significant Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in Sertoli cells was restricted to the cytosol fraction. The calmodulin dependence of these effects was confirmed by using the calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine. One of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphoproteins was identified as the intermediate filament protein vimentin, based on the following criteria: (i) migration pattern in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels, (ii) Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of a 58-kilodalton protein present in detergent-insoluble intermediate filament protein extract of Sertoli cells, and (iii) peptide mapping of the phosphoprotein. These data support a role for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in the modulation of Sertoli cell cytoskeletal components. Images PMID:6572367

  14. Cellular distribution of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins in Vicia faba L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, V.; Assmann, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-binding proteins within Vicia faba was investigated. Both CaM and CaM-binding proteins were found to be differentially distributed among organs, tissues, and protoplast types. CaM levels, on a per protein basis, were found to be the highest in leaf epidermis, containing 3-fold higher levels of CaM than in total leaf. Similarly, guard cell and epidermal cell protoplasts were also found to have higher levels of CaM than mesophyll cell protoplasts. 125I-CaM blot overlay assays were performed to qualitatively examine CaM-binding proteins in these protoplast types as well as in whole tissues and organs. CaM-binding proteins with Mr 52,000, 78,000, and 115,000 were common in all metabolically active plant parts. Unique CaM-binding protein bands were detected in guard cell protoplasts (Mr 39,000, 88,000), stems (Mr 45,000, 60,000, 64,000), and roots (Mr 62,000), suggesting the presence of specialized CaM-dependent processes in these cells and organs.

  15. Analysis of the state of posttranslational calmodulin methylation in developing pea plants. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-07-01

    A specific calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used in a radiometric assay to analyze the degree of methylation of lysine-115 in pea (Pisum sativum) plants. Calmodulin was isolated from dissected segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by incubation with the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of ({sup 3}H)methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. By this approach, the presence of unmethylated calmodulins were demonstrated in pea tissues, and the levels of methylation varied depending on the developmental state of the tissue tested. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments of both etiolated and green plants, and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The incorporation of methyl groups into these calmodulin samples appears to be specific for position 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position competitively inhibited methyl group incorporation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in the ability of methylated and unmethylated calmodulins to activate pea NAD kinase raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation of calmodulin could be another mechanism for regulating calmodulin activity.

  16. Calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins in cystic fibrosis and normal human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the possibility that a lesion in a calmodulin (CaM)-dependent regulatory mechanism may be involved in cystic fibrosis (CF). The level of CaM, CaM-binding proteins (CaM-BP) and a CaM-dependent phosphatase (CaM-Ptase) have been compared in cultured fibroblasts from CF patients versus age- and sex-matched control subjects. The CaM concentration, measured by radioimmunoassay, ranged from 0.20 to 0.76 ..mu..g/mg protein (n=8); there was no significant difference in the average CaM concentration from CF patients vs controls. Using Western blotting techniques with /sup 125/I-CaM, they detected at least ten distinct CaM-BPs in fibroblasts with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 37K; the only consistent difference between control and CF cell lines was in a 46.5K CaM-BP, which was depressed in all three CF samples. The 46.5 K CaM-BP was found only in the particulate fraction. A 59K CaM-BP was identified as a CaM-Ptase by its crossreactivity with an antibody against a brain CaM-Ptase. There was no significant difference in CaM-Ptase activity or in the amount of the phosphatase as determined by radioimmunoassay in CF vs. normal samples (n=8). Thus, the level of CaM as well as its various enzymes and proteins do not appear to be altered in CF fibroblasts except for a CaM-BP of 46.5K, the identity of which is currently being investigated.

  17. Calmodulin regulation and identification of calmodulin binding region of type-3 ryanodine receptor calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Xu, Le; Pasek, Daniel A; Evans, Kelly E; Chen, S R Wayne; Meissner, Gerhard

    2005-11-15

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a family of intracellular Ca(2+) channels that are regulated by calmodulin (CaM). At low Ca(2+) concentrations (<1 microM), CaM activates RyR1 and RyR3 and inhibits RyR2. At elevated Ca(2+) concentrations (>1 microM), CaM inhibits all three RyR isoforms. Here we report that the regulation of recombinant RyR3 by CaM is sensitive to redox regulation. RyR3 in the presence of reduced glutathione binds CaM with 10-15-fold higher affinity, at low and high Ca(2+) concentrations, compared to in the presence of oxidized glutathione. However, compared to RyR1 assayed at low Ca(2+) concentrations under both reducing and oxidizing conditions, CaM binds RyR3 with reduced affinity but activates RyR3 to a greater extent. Under reducing conditions, RyR1 and RyR3 activities are inhibited with a similar affinity at [Ca(2+)] > 1 microM. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that RyR3 contains a single conserved CaM binding site. Corresponding amino acid substitutions in the CaM binding site differentially affect CaM binding and CaM regulation of RyR3 and those of the two other isoforms. The results support the suggestion that other isoform dependent regions have a major role in the regulation of RyRs by CaM [Yamaguchi et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 36433-36439].

  18. Effect of Melatonin and Calmodulin in an Idiopathic Scoliosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Zhe; He, Li-Jiang; Ke, Qing-Feng; Huang, Long; Dai, Zhang-Sheng; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background. To explore influence of continuous illumination, luzindole, and Tamoxifen on incidence of scoliosis model of rats. Methods. Thirty-two one-month-old female rats were rendered into bipedal rats. The bipedal rats were divided into 4 groups: group A by intraperitoneal injection of luzindole and continuous illumination; group B by intraperitoneal injection of luzindole only; group C by intraperitoneal injection of luzindole and oral administration of Tamoxifen; and group D by intraperitoneal injection of equivalent saline. Radiographs were taken at 8th week and 16th week, and incidence and the Cobb angles of scoliosis were calculated. At 16th week, all rats were sacrificed. Before the sacrifice, the levels of calmodulin were measured in each group. Results. At 8th week, scoliosis occurred in groups A and B, with an incidence of 75% and 12.5%, respectively, while rats in group C or D had no scoliosis. At 16th week, scoliosis incidences in groups A and B were 57% and 62.5%, respectively. No scoliosis occurred in group C or D. Calmodulin in platelets in group B was significantly different, compared with groups A and D. There was no significant difference in calmodulin in platelets in groups B and C. Conclusion. By intraperitoneal injection of luzindole in bipedal rats, scoliosis rat models could be successfully made. Under light, incidence of scoliosis may be increased at an early period but it is reversible. Tamoxifen can suppress natural process of scoliosis. PMID:28042574

  19. Isolation and characterization of a calmodulin-like protein from Halobacterium salinarium.

    PubMed Central

    Rothärmel, T; Wagner, G

    1995-01-01

    The first evidence for a calmodulin-like protein in an archaeon, Halobacterium salinarium, is reported here. The calmodulin-like protein, with a molecular mass of 24 kDa and an estimated pI of 4.8, stimulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in a calcium-dependent manner. This stimulation could be suppressed by calmodulin inhibitors. The Ca(2+)-binding ability was verified by 45Ca autoradiography. PMID:7836331

  20. A novel role for calmodulin: Ca2+-independent inhibition of type-1 inositol trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Cardy, T J; Taylor, C W

    1998-01-01

    Calmodulin inhibits both inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) binding to, and IP3-evoked Ca2+ release by, cerebellar IP3 receptors [Patel, Morris, Adkins, O'Beirne and Taylor (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S.A. 94, 11627-11632]. In the present study, full-length rat type-1 and -3 IP3 receptors were expressed at high levels in insect Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells and the effects of calmodulin were examined. In the absence of Ca2+, calmodulin caused a concentration-dependent and reversible inhibition of [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 IP3 receptors by decreasing their apparent affinity for IP3. The effect was not reproduced by high concentrations of troponin C, parvalbumin or S-100. Increasing the medium free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]m) inhibited [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 receptors, but the further inhibition caused by a submaximal concentration of calmodulin was similar at each [Ca2+]m. In the absence of Ca2+, 125I-calmodulin bound to a single site on each type-1 receptor subunit and to an additional site in the presence of Ca2+. There was no detectable binding of 125I-calmodulin to type-3 receptors and binding of [3H]IP3 was insensitive to calmodulin at all [Ca2+]m. Both peptide and conventional Ca2+-calmodulin antagonists affected neither [3H]IP3 binding directly nor the inhibitory effect of calmodulin in the absence of Ca2+, but each caused a [Ca2+]m-dependent reversal of the inhibition of [3H]IP3 binding caused by calmodulin. Camstatin, a peptide that binds to calmodulin equally well in the presence or absence of Ca2+, reversed the inhibitory effects of calmodulin on [3H]IP3 binding at all [Ca2+]m. We conclude that calmodulin specifically inhibits [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 IP3 receptors: the first example of a protein regulated by calmodulin in an entirely Ca2+-independent manner. Inhibition of type-1 IP3 receptors by calmodulin may dynamically regulate their sensitivity to IP3 in response to the changes in cytosolic free calmodulin concentration thought to accompany stimulation

  1. Calmodulin-binding proteins are developmentally regulated in gametes and embryos of fucoid algae

    SciTech Connect

    Brawley, S.H.; Roberts, D.M.

    1989-02-01

    Calcium-binding proteins and calmodulin-binding proteins were identified in gametes and zygotes of the marine brown algae Fucus vesiculosus, Fucus distichus, and Pelvetia fastigiata using gel (SDS-PAGE) overlay techniques. A calcium current appears to be important during cell polarization in fucoid zygotes, but there are no biochemical data on calcium-binding proteins in these algae. By using a sensitive 45Ca2+ overlay method designed to detect high-affinity calcium-binding proteins, at least 9-11 polypeptides were detected in extracts of fucoid gametes and zygotes. All samples had calcium-binding proteins with apparent molecular weights of about 17 and 30 kDa. A 17-kDa calcium-binding protein was purified by calcium-dependent hydrophobic chromatography and was identified as calmodulin by immunological and enzyme activator criteria. A 125I-calmodulin overlay assay was used to identify potential targets of calmodulin action. Sperm contained one major calmodulin-binding protein of about 45 kDa. Eggs lacked major calmodulin-binding activity. A 72-kDa calmodulin-binding protein was prominent in zygotes from 1-65 hr postfertilization. Both calmodulin-binding proteins showed calcium-dependent binding activity. Overall, the data suggest that the appearance and distribution of certain calcium-binding and calmodulin-binding proteins are under developmental regulation, and may reflect the different roles of calcium during fertilization and early embryogenesis.

  2. Synthesis and Accumulation of Calmodulin in Suspension Cultures of Carrot (Daucus carota L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Imara Y.; Zielinski, Raymond E.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of calmodulin mRNA and protein were measured during a growth cycle of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells grown in suspension culture. A full-length carrot calmodulin cDNA clone isolated from a λgt10 library was used to measure steady-state calmodulin mRNA levels. During the exponential phase of culture growth when mitotic activity and oxidative respiration rates were maximal, calmodulin mRNA levels were 4- to 5-fold higher than they were during the later stages of culture growth, when respiration rates were lower and growth was primarily by cell expansion. Net calmodulin polypeptide synthesis, as measured by pulse-labeling in vivo with [35S]methionine, paralleled the changes in calmodulin steady-state mRNA level during culture growth. As a consequence, net calmodulin polypeptide synthesis declined 5- to 10-fold during the later stages of culture growth. The qualitative spectrum of polypeptides synthesized and accumulated by the carrot cells during the course of a culture cycle, however, remained largely unchanged. Calmodulin polypeptide levels, in contrast to its net synthesis, remained relatively constant during the exponential phases of the culture growth cycle and increased during the later stages of culture growth. Our data are consistent with increased calmodulin polypeptide turnover associated with periods of rapid cell proliferation and high levels of respiration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:16653062

  3. Calmodulin interacts with Rab3D and modulates osteoclastic bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Sipin; Chim, Shek Man; Cheng, Taksum; Ang, Estabelle; Ng, Benjamin; Lim, Baysie; Chen, Kai; Qiu, Heng; Tickner, Jennifer; Xu, Huazi; Pavlos, Nathan; Xu, Jiake

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin is a highly versatile protein that regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis and is involved in a variety of cellular functions including cardiac excitability, synaptic plasticity and signaling transduction. During osteoclastic bone resorption, calmodulin has been reported to concentrate at the ruffled border membrane of osteoclasts where it is thought to modulate bone resorption activity in response to calcium. Here we report an interaction between calmodulin and Rab3D, a small exocytic GTPase and established regulator osteoclastic bone resorption. Using yeast two-hybrid screening together with a series of protein-protein interaction studies, we show that calmodulin interacts with Rab3D in a calcium dependent manner. Consistently, expression of a calcium insensitive form of calmodulin (i.e. CaM1234) perturbs calmodulin-Rab3D interaction as monitored by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays. In osteoclasts, calmodulin and Rab3D are constitutively co-expressed during RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, co-occupy plasma membrane fractions by differential gradient sedimentation assay and colocalise in the ruffled border as revealed by confocal microscopy. Further, functional blockade of calmodulin-Rab3D interaction by calmidazolium chloride coincides with an attenuation of osteoclastic bone resorption. Our data imply that calmodulin- Rab3D interaction is required for efficient bone resorption by osteoclasts in vitro. PMID:27897225

  4. Energetics of Calmodulin Domain Interactions with the Calmodulin Binding Domain of CaMKII

    PubMed Central

    Evans, T. Idil Apak; Shea, Madeline A.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential eukaryotic calcium receptor that regulates many kinases, including CaMKII. Calcium-depleted CaM does not bind to CaMKII under physiological conditions. However, binding of (Ca2+)4-CaM to a basic amphipathic helix in CaMKII releases auto-inhibition of the kinase. The crystal structure of CaM bound to CaMKIIp, a peptide representing the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of CaMKII, shows an anti-parallel interface: the C-domain of CaM primarily contacts the N-terminal half of the CaMBD. The two domains of calcium-saturated CaM are believed to play distinct roles in releasing auto-inhibition. To investigate the underlying mechanism of activation, calcium-dependent titrations of isolated domains of CaM binding to CaMKIIp were monitored using fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CaMKIIp for the domains of CaM increased upon saturation with calcium, with a 35-fold greater increase observed for the C-domain than the N-domain. Because the interdomain linker of CaM regulates calcium-binding affinity and contribute to conformational change, the role of each CaM domain was explored further by investigating effects of CaMKIIp on site-knockout mutants affecting the calcium-binding sites of a single domain. Investigation of the thermodynamic linkage between saturation of individual calcium-binding sites and CaM-domain binding to CaMKIIp showed that calcium binding to sites III and IV was sufficient to recapitulate the behavior of (Ca2+)4-CaM. The magnitude of favorable interdomain cooperativity varied depending on which of the four calcium-binding sites were mutated, emphasizing differential regulatory roles for the domains of CaM, despite the high degree of homology among the four EF-hands of CaM. PMID:19089983

  5. Tyrosine-specific phosphorylation of calmodulin by the insulin receptor kinase purified from human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, D B; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Y; Gale, R D; McDonald, J M

    1989-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that calmodulin can be phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo by both tyrosine-specific and serine/threonine protein kinase. We demonstrate here that the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase purified from human placenta phosphorylates calmodulin. The highly purified receptors (prepared by insulin-Sepharose chromatography) were 5-10 times more effective in catalysing the phosphorylation of calmodulin than an equal number of partially purified receptors (prepared by wheat-germ agglutinin-Sepharose chromatography). Phosphorylation occurred exclusively on tyrosine residues, up to a maximum of 1 mol [0.90 +/- 0.14 (n = 5)] of phosphate incorporated/mol of calmodulin. Phosphorylation of calmodulin was dependent on the presence of certain basic proteins and divalent cations. Some of these basic proteins, i.e. polylysine, polyarginine, polyornithine, protamine sulphate and histones H1 and H2B, were also able to stimulate the phosphorylation of calmodulin via an insulin-independent activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase. Addition of insulin further increased incorporation of 32P into calmodulin. The magnitude of the effect of insulin was dependent on the concentration and type of basic protein used, ranging from 0.5- to 9.0-fold stimulation. Maximal phosphorylation of calmodulin was obtained at an insulin concentration of 10(-10) M, with half-maximal effect at 10(-11) M. Either Mg2+ or Mn2+ was necessary to obtain phosphorylation, but Mg2+ was far more effective than Mn2+. In contrast, maximal phosphorylation of calmodulin was observed in the absence of Ca2+. Inhibition of phosphorylation was observed as free Ca2+ concentration exceeded 0.1 microM, with almost complete inhibition at 30 microM free Ca2+. The Km for calmodulin was approx. 0.1 microM. To gain further insight into the effects of basic proteins in this system, we examined the binding of calmodulin to the insulin receptor and the polylysine. Calmodulin binds to the insulin

  6. Brush-border calmodulin. A major component of the isolated microvillus core

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Calmodulin is present in brush borders isolated from intestinal epithelial cells and is one of the major components of the microvillar filament bundle. Calmodulin was purified from either demembranated brush borders or microvilli by a simple boiling procedure. The boiled supernate derived from the microvillus cores contained one major polypeptide of 20,000 daltons.The supernate from the brush-border preparation contained the 20,000-dalton subunit and a second protein of 30,000 daltons. The 20,000-dalton subunit has been identified as calmodulin by several criteria: (a) heat resistance, (b) comigration with brain calmodulin on alkaline urea gels and SDS gels, both cases in which the 20,000-dalton protein, like calmodulin, exhibits a shift in electrophoretic mobility in the presence of Ca++, and (c) 4--5-fold activation of 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in the presence but not the absence of Ca++. With a cosedimentation assay it was determined that brush-border calmodulin does not bind directly to actin. In the presence of Ca++ (greater than 5 x 10(-7) M) there was a partial release of calmodulin from the microvillus core, along with a substantial conversion of microvillus actin into a nonpelletable from. The dissociation of calmodulin was reversed by removal of Ca++. If microvillus cores were pretreated with phalloidin, the Ca++-induced solubilization of actin was prevented, but the partial dissociation of calmodulin still occurred. The molar ratio of calmodulin:actin is 1:10 in the demembranated brush border and 1:2-3 in the microvillus core. No calmodulin was detected in the detergent-solubilized brush-border membrane fraction. PMID:6893051

  7. Dual Regulation of a Chimeric Plant Serine/Threonine Kinase by Calcium and Calcium/Calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Ramachandiran, S.; Paranjape, V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene characterized by a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain was recently cloned from plants. The Escherichia coli-expressed CCaMK phosphorylates various protein and peptide substrates in a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent manner. The calmodulin-binding region of CCAMK has similarity to the calmodulin-binding region of the alpha-subunit of multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). CCaMK exhibits basal autophosphorylation at the threonine residue(s) (0.098 mol of P-32/mol) that is stimulated 3.4-fold by Ca(2+) (0.339 mol of P-32/mol), while calmodulin inhibits Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation to the basal level. A deletion mutant lacking the visinin-like domain did not show Ca(2+)-simulated autophosphorylation activity but retained Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity at a reduced level. Ca(2+)-dependent mobility shift assays using E.coli-expressed protein from residues 358-520 revealed that Ca(2+) binds to the visinin-like domain. Studies with site-directed mutants of the visinin-like domain indicated that EF-hands II and III are crucial for Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes in the visinin-like domain. Autophosphorylation of CCaMK increases Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity by about 5-fold, whereas it did not affect its C(2+)-independent activity. This report provides evidence for the existence of a protein kinase in plants that is modulated by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain in CCaMK adds an additional Ca(2+)-sensing mechanism not previously known to exist in the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling cascade in plants.

  8. Correlation between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Kuzmanoff, K. M.; Evans, M. L.; Jarrett, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates a role for calcium and calmodulin in the gravitropic response of primary roots of maize (Zea mays, L.). We examined this possibility by testing the relationship between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in roots of the maize cultivars Merit and B73 x Missouri 17. Roots of the Merit cultivar require light to the gravitropically competent. The gravitropic response of the Missouri cultivar is independent of light. The occurrence of calmodulin in primary roots of these maize cultivars was tested by affinity gel chromatography followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with bovine brain calmodulin as standard. The distribution of calmodulin activity was measured using both the phosphodiesterase and NAD kinase assays for calmodulin. These assays were performed on whole tissue segments, crude extracts, and purified extracts. In light-grown seedlings of the Merit cultivar or in either dark- or light-grown seedlings of the Missouri cultivar, calmodulin activity per millimeter of root tissue was about 4-fold higher in the apical millimeter than in the subtending 3 millimeters. Calmodulin activity was very low in the apical millimeter of roots of dark-grown (gravitropically nonresponsive) seedlings of the Merit cultivar. Upon illumination, the calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter increased to a level comparable to that of light-grown seedlings and the roots became gravitropically competent. The time course of the development of gravitropic sensitivity following illumination paralleled the time course of the increase in calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter of the root. The results are consistent with the suggestion that calmodulin plays an important role in the gravitropic response of roots.

  9. Calmodulin gene expression in response to mechanical wounding and Botrytis cinerea infection in tomato fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding the stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various physiological responses in plants. To determine the functional significance of calmodulin in fl...

  10. Abnormal response to calmodulin in vitro of dystrophic chicken muscle membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Galindo, J; Hudecki, M S; Davis, F B; Davis, P J; Thacore, H R; Pollina, C M; Blas, S D; Schoenl, M

    1988-09-20

    A skeletal muscle membrane fraction enriched in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) contained Ca2+-ATPase activity which was stimulated in vitro in normal chickens (line 412) by 6 nM purified bovine calmodulin (33% increase over control, P less than 0.001). In contrast, striated muscle from chickens (line 413) affected with an inherited form of muscular dystrophy, but otherwise genetically similar to line 412, contained SR-enriched Ca2+-ATPase activity which was resistant to stimulation in vitro by calmodulin. Basal levels of Ca2+-ATPase activity (no added calmodulin) were comparable in muscles of unaffected and affected animals, and the Ca2+ optima of the enzymes in normal and dystrophic muscle were identical. Purified SR vesicles, obtained by calcium phosphate loading and sucrose density gradient centrifugation, showed the same resistance of dystrophic Ca2+-ATPase to exogenous calmodulin as the SR-enriched muscle membrane fraction. Dystrophic muscle had increased Ca2+ content compared to that of normal animals (P less than 0.04) and has been previously shown to contain increased levels of immuno- and bioactive calmodulin and of calmodulin mRNA. The calmodulin resistance of the Ca2+-ATPase in dystrophic muscle reflects a defect in regulation of cell Ca2+ metabolism associated with elevated cellular Ca2+ and calmodulin concentrations.

  11. Influence of neurotropic compounds on the calmodulin- and troponin C-dependent processes

    SciTech Connect

    Baldenkov, G.N.; Men'shikov, M.Yu.; Feoktistov, I.A.; Tkachuk, V.A.

    1986-01-20

    An analysis was made of the effects of neurotropic compounds on the Ca-binding proteins - calmodulin and troponin C. It was shown that most of the neuroleptics of the phenothiazine group interact effectively both with calmodulin and with troponin C and also inhibit the calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase of cyclic nucleotides and calcium-activated actomyosin ATPase. Neuroleptics of the butyrophenone group, as well as imipramine and diphenhydramine, are capable of a low-efficiency interaction only with calmodulin. It was found that one of the phenothiazines - methophenazine, which is an effective inhibitor of calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase - does not affect troponin C and Ca-dependent actomyosin ATPase. As a result of this, methophenazine can serve as a convenient tool for studying processes regulated by these Ca-binding proteins. It was concluded that troponin C possesses Ca-dependent binding sites for drugs structurally similar to those of calmodulin but binding the drugs less effectively and exhibiting selectivity with respect to certain preparations. It was shown that despite the homology of the two Ca-binding proteins, calmodulin and troponin C, a selective action on the processes regulated by them is possible.

  12. Glucose-independent inhibition of yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase by calmodulin antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, I; Maldonado, A M; Eraso, P

    1997-01-01

    Glucose metabolism causes activation of the yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase. The molecular mechanism of this regulation is not known, but it is probably mediated by phosphorylation of the enzyme. The involvement in this process of several kinases has been suggested but their actual role has not been proved. The physiological role of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in glucose-induced activation was investigated by studying the effect of specific calmodulin antagonists on the glucose-induced ATPase kinetic changes in wild-type and two mutant strains affected in the glucose regulation of the enzyme. Preincubation of the cells with calmidazolium or compound 48/80 impeded the increase in ATPase activity by reducing the Vmax of the enzyme without modifying the apparent affinity for ATP in the three strains. In one mutant, pma1-T912A, the putative calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-phosphorylatable Thr-912 was eliminated, and in the other, pma1-P536L, H+-ATPase was constitutively activated, suggesting that the antagonistic effect was not mediated by a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and not related to glucose regulation. This was corroborated when the in vitro effect of the calmodulin antagonists on H+-ATPase activity was tested. Purified plasma membranes from glucose-starved or glucose-fermenting cells from both pma1-P890X, another constitutively activated ATPase mutant, and wild-type strains were preincubated with calmidazolium or melittin. In all cases, ATP hydrolysis was inhibited with an IC50 of approximately 1 microM. This inhibition was reversed by calmodulin. Analysis of the calmodulin-binding protein pattern in the plasma-membrane fraction eliminates ATPase as the calmodulin target protein. We conclude that H+-ATPase inhibition by calmodulin antagonists is mediated by an as yet unidentified calmodulin-dependent membrane protein. PMID:9148755

  13. Fluorescence anisotropy imaging microscopy maps calmodulin binding during cellular contraction and locomotion

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Calmodulin is a calcium transducer that activates key regulatory and structural proteins through calcium-induced binding to the target proteins. A fluorescent analog of calmodulin in conjunction with ratio imaging, relative to a volume indicator, has demonstrated that calmodulin is uniformly distributed in serum-deprived fibroblasts and there is no immediate change in the distribution upon stimulation with complete serum. The same fluorescent analog of calmodulin together with steady state fluorescence anisotropy imaging microscopy has been used to define the temporal and spatial changes in calmodulin binding to cellular targets during stimulation of serum-deprived fibroblasts and in polarized fibroblasts during wound healing. In serum-deprived fibroblasts, which exhibit a low free calcium ion concentration, a majority of the fluorescent analog of calmodulin remained unbound (fraction bound, fB < 10%). However, upon stimulation of the serum- deprived cells with complete serum, calmodulin binding (maximum fB approximately 95%) was directly correlated with the time course of the elevation and decline of the free calcium ion concentration, while the contraction of stress fibers continued for an hour or more. Calmodulin binding was also elevated in the leading lamellae of fibroblasts (maximum FB approximately 50%) during the lamellar contraction phase of wound healing and was spatially correlated with the contraction of transverse fibers containing myosin II. Highly polarized and motile fibroblasts exhibited the highest anisotropy (calmodulin binding) in the retracting tails and in association with contracting transverse fibers in the cortex of the cell. These results suggest that local activation of myosin II-based contractions involves the local binding of calmodulin to target proteins. The results also demonstrate a powerful yet simple mode of light microscopy that will be valuable for mapping molecular binding of suitably labeled macromolecules in living cells

  14. Identification of spectrin as a calmodulin-binding component in the pituitary gonadotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Wooge, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide which stimulates the release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) from the pituitary. Ca{sup 2+} fulfills the requirements of a second messenger for this system. Inhibition of calmodulin will inhibit GnRH stimulated LH release. The aim of the present studies has been to identify the locus of action of calmodulin within the pituitary. By use of an {sup 125}I-calmodulin gel overlayer assay, five major Ca{sup 2+}-dependent {sup 125}I-calmodulin labelled components of subunit M{sub r} > 205,000; 200,000; 135,000; 60,000; and 52,000 have been identified. This labeling was found to be phenothiazine-sensitive. Ca{sup 2+}-independent binding that was observed appears to be due to hydrophobic interactions of calmodulin with acid-soluble proteins, principally histones. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent calmodulin-binding components are localized primarily in the cytosolic fraction. Separation of dispersed anterior pituitary cells through a linear Metrizamide gradient yielded gonadotrope-enriched fractions, which were found to contain all five {sup 125}I-calmodulin binding components corresponding to the major bands in the pituitary homogenate. The calmodulin-binding component levels do not appear to be differentially regulated by steroids. The calmodulin binding component with a M{sub r} > 205,000 has been identified as spectrin. Spectrin-like immunoreactivity and {sup 125}I-calmodulin-binding activity in pituitary tissue homogenates co-migrated in various percentage acrylamide gels with avian erythrocyte spectrin. Spectrin was detected in a gonadotrope-enriched fraction by immunoblotting, and confirmed in gonadotropes by indirect immunofluorescence of cultured pituitary cells in which spectrin- and LH-immunoreactivity co-localized.

  15. Ca2+/calmodulin system: participation on rat sexual hypothalamic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Medina, M; Canchola, E; Vergara-Onofre, M; Rosado, A

    1993-11-01

    Modifications of male rat hypothalamic sexual differentiation after neonatal administration of drugs that participate on the Ca2+/calmodulin system (haloperidol, trifluoperazine, penfluridol, pimozide, and verapamil) were studied. Pups treated 72 h after birth were behaviorally tested on day 120 of extrauterine life. Five tests for homotypical behavior were conducted. Afterwards animals were castrated and tested twice for heterotypical (female) behavior under replacement hormonal therapy. Fifty percent (80% in the case of pimozide) of all treated males showed lordotic behavior compared with none of the controls. Haloperidol (39%, lordosis quotient) and pimozide (40%, lordosis quotient) were more active than the others. Results obtained with verapamil were not statistically different from the controls. Pimozide was the most active agent influencing the appetitive masculine behavior (mount latency, intromission latency, and postejaculatory interval). Verapamil was more efficient than the rest of the drugs on the consummatory behavior (mount latency, intromission frequency, interintromission interval, and ejaculatory latency). Our results support the participation of the Ca2+/calmodulin system in hypothalamic sexual differentiation and in the differential modulation of the masculine and feminine behavioral patterns.

  16. Molecular modeling of calmodulin: a comparison with crystallographic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, J. J.; Rein, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods of side-chain placement on a modeled protein have been examined. Two molecular models of calmodulin were constructed that differ in the treatment of side chains prior to optimization of the molecule. A virtual bond analysis program developed by Purisima and Scheraga was used to determine the backbone conformation based on 2.2 angstroms resolution C alpha coordinates for the molecules. In the first model, side chains were initially constructed in an extended conformation. In the second model, a conformational grid search technique was employed. Calcium ions were treated explicitly during energy optimization using CHARMM. The models are compared to a recently published refined crystal structure of calmodulin. The results indicate that the initial choices for side-chains, but also significant effects on the main-chain conformation and supersecondary structure. The conformational differences are discussed. Analysis of these and other methods makes possible the formulation of a methodology for more appropriate side-chain placement in modeled proteins.

  17. Elucidating the mechanisms of cooperative calcium-calmodulin interactions: a structural systems biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Valeyev, Najl V; Bates, Declan G; Heslop-Harrison, Pat; Postlethwaite, Ian; Kotov, Nikolay V

    2008-01-01

    Background Calmodulin is an important multifunctional molecule that regulates the activities of a large number of proteins in the cell. Calcium binding induces conformational transitions in calmodulin that make it specifically active to particular target proteins. The precise mechanisms underlying calcium binding to calmodulin are still, however, quite poorly understood. Results In this study, we adopt a structural systems biology approach and develop a mathematical model to investigate various types of cooperative calcium-calmodulin interactions. We compare the predictions of our analysis with physiological dose-response curves taken from the literature, in order to provide a quantitative comparison of the effects of different mechanisms of cooperativity on calcium-calmodulin interactions. The results of our analysis reduce the gap between current understanding of intracellular calmodulin function at the structural level and physiological calcium-dependent calmodulin target activation experiments. Conclusion Our model predicts that the specificity and selectivity of CaM target regulation is likely to be due to the following factors: variations in the target-specific Ca2+ dissociation and cooperatively effected dissociation constants, and variations in the number of Ca2+ ions required to bind CaM for target activation. PMID:18518982

  18. Oxidation of calmodulin alters activation and regulation of CaMKII.

    PubMed

    Robison, A J; Winder, Danny G; Colbran, Roger J; Bartlett, Ryan K

    2007-04-27

    Increases in reactive oxygen species and mis-regulation of calcium homeostasis are associated with various physiological conditions and disease states including aging, ischemia, exposure to drugs of abuse, and neurodegenerative diseases. In aged animals, this is accompanied by a reduction in oxidative repair mechanisms resulting in increased methionine oxidation of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin in the brain. Here, we show that oxidation of calmodulin results in an inability to: (1) activate CaMKII; (2) support Thr(286) autophosphorylation of CaMKII; (3) prevent Thr(305/6) autophosphorylation of CaMKII; (4) support binding of CaMKII to the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor; and (5) compete with alpha-actinin for binding to CaMKII. Moreover, oxidized calmodulin does not efficiently bind calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in rat brain lysates or in vitro. These observations contrast from past experiments performed with oxidized calmodulin and the plasma membrane calcium ATPase, where oxidized calmodulin binds to, and partially activates the PMCA. When taken together, these data suggest that oxidative stress may perturb neuronal and cardiac function via a decreased ability of oxidized calmodulin to bind, activate, and regulate the interactions of CaMKII.

  19. Heparin blocks /sup 125/I-calmodulin internalization by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Roden, L.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-03-05

    /sup 125/I-Calmodulin is internalized by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) in a time, temperature and calcium dependent manner. Internalization of /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the osmotically sensitive space of BBV was distinguished from binding of the ligand to the outer BBV surface by examining the interaction of ligand and BBV at different medium osmolarities (300-1100 mosm), uptake was inversely proportional to medium osmolarity. Internalized /sup 125/I-calmodulin was intact and Western blots of solubilized BBV with /sup 125/I-calmodulin demonstrated the presence of several calmodulin-binding proteins of 143, 118, 50, 47.5, 46.5 and 35 kilodaltons which could represent potential intravesicular binding sites for the ligand. Heparin and the related glycosaminoglycan heparin sulfate both showed a dose-dependent inhibition (0.5-50 ..mu..g/ml) of /sup 125/I-calmodulin uptake by BBV, but other sulfated and nonsulfated glycosaminoglycans including chondroitin sulfates, keratan sulfate and hyaluronic acid showed little or no inhibitory effect. Desulfation of heparin virtually abolished the inhibition of uptake while depolymerization reduced it. Heparin did not block the binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to BBV proteins as assessed by Western blotting technique suggesting its effect was on internalization of the ligand rather than on its association with internal membrane proteins.

  20. Insulin phosphorylates calmodulin in preparations of solubilized rat hepatocyte insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, D.B.; McDonald, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    It has previously been shown that insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of calmodulin in adipocyte insulin receptor preparations. Here they demonstrate that insulin also stimulates the phosphorylation of calmodulin in wheat germ lectin-enriched insulin receptor preparations obtained from rat hepatocytes. Standard phosphorylation assays were performed at 30C in the presence of 50mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.5), 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100, 1mM EGTA, 50 M (el-TSP)ATP, 5mM MgCl2, 0.25 M polylysine, 1.2 M calmodulin and various CaS and insulin concentrations. The phosphorylation of calmodulin was determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Phosphorylation of calmodulin had an absolute requirement for insulin receptors, insulin and certain basic proteins. Phosphorylation was maximal above 13 nM insulin and at submicromolar CaS concentrations, whereas supramicromolar CaS concentrations were inhibitory. As was observed in the adipocyte insulin receptor system, calmodulin phosphorylation was dependent upon the presence of co-factors, such as polylysine, histone H/sub f/2b and protamine sulfate. The role played by these co-factors has not yet been established. These data suggest that both CaS and calmodulin participate in post receptor insulin events in hepatocytes.

  1. Plant chimeric Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. Role of the neural visinin-like domain in regulating autophosphorylation and calmodulin affinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Cremo, C. R.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by a serine-threonine kinase domain, an autoinhibitory domain, a calmodulin-binding domain and a neural visinin-like domain with three EF-hands. The neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain at the C-terminal end of the CaM-binding domain makes CCaMK unique among all the known calmodulin-dependent kinases. Biological functions of the plant visinin-like proteins or visinin-like domains in plant proteins are not well known. Using EF-hand deletions in the visinin-like domain, we found that the visinin-like domain regulated Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK. To investigate the effects of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation on the interaction with calmodulin, the equilibrium binding constants of CCaMK were measured by fluorescence emission anisotropy using dansylated calmodulin. Binding was 8-fold tighter after Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. This shift in affinity did not occur in CCaMK deletion mutants lacking Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. A variable calmodulin affinity regulated by Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation mediated through the visinin-like domain is a new regulatory mechanism for CCaMK activation and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Our experiments demonstrate the existence of two functional molecular switches in a protein kinase regulating the kinase activity, namely a visinin-like domain acting as a Ca(2+)-triggered switch and a CaM-binding domain acting as an autophosphorylation-triggered molecular switch.

  2. Hepatocyte insulin receptor is a calmodulin binding protein and is functionally inhibited by calmidazolium

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, T.P.; Pollet, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Insulin-induced autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor and changes in intracellular Ca/sup + +/ have been proposed as possible mediators of insulin action in target tissues. The authors have investigated the association of the 17kD calcium binding protein calmodulin with the insulin receptor solubilized from rat liver plasma membranes. Insulin receptors solubilized in 0.1% Triton X-100 exhibited strong binding to calmodulin-agarose affinity columns in the presence of 100..mu..M calcium and could be eluded with 100..mu..M ethelene glycol-bis (amino ethel ether) Tetra Acetic Acid (EGTA) with an 80% yield in insulin binding activity. In addition, /sup 125/I-Calmodulin was shown to bind to wheat germ agglutinin purified solubilized receptors, was specifically inhibited by EGTA (100 ..mu..M) and/or calmidazolium (10 ..mu..M) and was found to be insulin-dependent (max 10/sup -10/ M insulin). SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis data suggests that /sup 125/I-calmodulin may be associated with the 92 kD beta-subunit of the insulin receptor, consistent with the cytoplasmic domain of this subunit. While they have confirmed previous reports that the addition of calcium and calmodulin to solubilized insulin receptors preparations produces no demonstrable change in receptor phosphorylation, the addition of the calmodulin inhibitor calmidazolium did show more than 50% inhibition of insulin stimulated receptor phosphorylation, suggesting that a domain of the calmodulin molecule may be very tightly associated with the insulin receptor. These results indicate that calmodulin binds tightly and specifically to the insulin receptor of the hepatocyte and is insulin dependent. The findings also suggest that this interaction may be functionally significant in mediating insulin-induced receptor phosphorylation as well as other insulin actions. Thus, calmodulin may play a major role as an intracellular contributor to insulin action.

  3. Calmodulin interacts with angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) and inhibits shedding of its ectodomain.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Daniel W; Clarke, Nicola E; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2008-01-23

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) is a regulatory protein of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and a receptor for the causative agent of severe-acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), the SARS-coronavirus. We have previously shown that ACE2 can be shed from the cell surface in response to phorbol esters by a process involving TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE; ADAM17). In this study, we demonstrate that inhibitors of calmodulin also stimulate shedding of the ACE2 ectodomain, a process at least partially mediated by a metalloproteinase. We also show that calmodulin associates with ACE2 and that this interaction is decreased by calmodulin inhibitors.

  4. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-01-01

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  5. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of the family of voltage-gated CaV1-2 channels comprises a prominent prototype for ion channel regulation, remarkable for its powerful Ca2+ sensing capabilities, deep in elegant mechanistic lessons, and rich in biological and therapeutic implications. This field thereby resides squarely at the epicenter of Ca2+ signaling biology, ion channel biophysics, and therapeutic advance. This review summarizes the historical development of ideas in this field, the scope and richly patterned organization of Ca2+ feedback behaviors encompassed by this system, and the long-standing challenges and recent developments in discerning a molecular basis for calmodulation. We conclude by highlighting the considerable synergy between mechanism, biological insight, and promising therapeutics. PMID:24863929

  6. Possible role of calmodulin in excystation of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Bernal, R M; Tovar, R; Santos, J I; Muñoz, M L

    1998-09-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia initiates infection when trophozoites emerge from a cyst in the hosts by the excystation process. Although this process is crucial to the initiation of infection by G. lamblia, little is known about its regulation. To study the possible involvement of calmodulin (CaM) in excystation we tested the effect of several CaM antagonists (TFP, W-7, and W-5) on this cellular function. Except for W-5 the rest of these compounds inhibited excystation. The protein kinase C inhibitor H-7 had no effect on excystation, suggesting that CaM antagonists acted by selectively inhibiting CaM. Furthermore, CaM was redistributed after the induction of excystation and there was an increase in its fluorescence and activity. These results suggest that a CaM-dependent process is involved in G. lamblia excystation.

  7. Calmodulin and Ca(2+) control of voltage gated Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Yoder, Jesse B; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Amzel, L Mario

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the cytosolic portion of voltage activated sodium channels (CTNav) in complexes with calmodulin and other effectors in the presence and the absence of calcium provide information about the mechanisms by which these effectors regulate channel activity. The most studied of these complexes, those of Nav1.2 and Nav1.5, show details of the conformations and the specific contacts that are involved in channel regulation. Another voltage activated sodium channel, Nav1.4, shows significant calcium dependent inactivation, while its homolog Nav1.5 does not. The available structures shed light on the possible localization of the elements responsible for this effect. Mutations in the genes of these 3 Nav channels are associated with several disease conditions: Nav1.2, neurological conditions; Nav1.4, syndromes involving skeletal muscle; and Nav1.5, cardiac arrhythmias. Many of these disease-specific mutations are located at the interfaces involving CTNav and its effectors.

  8. Physico-chemical pathways in radioprotective action of calmodulin antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1996-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.9 Gy/s. The fluidity of membrane decreased with radiation dose and in the presence of calmodulin antagonists (CA) like chlorpromazine (CPZ), promethazine (PMZ) and trimeprazine (TMZ) it increased. Radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from membranes. This release was inhibited by CA mainly by CPZ and PMZ. Being Ca 2+ dependent, the changes in the activity of acetylcholine estrase (AchE) following irradiation was also studied. Radiation decreased the activity of AchE in dose dependent manner. Presence of CPZ and PMZ diminished the radiation induced inhibition of AchE but not in the presence of TMZ at the lower concentration tested. It is suggested that apart from scavenging of free radicals, CA perhaps exert their euxoic radioprotective effect through Ca 2+ dependent processes.

  9. Novel Calmodulin (CALM2) Mutations Associated with Congenital Arrhythmia Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Naomasa; Yagihara, Nobue; Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Roh, Michelle S.; Shigemizu, Daichi; Lichtner, Peter; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aiba, Takeshi; Homfray, Tessa; Behr, Elijah R.; Klug, Didier; Denjoy, Isabelle; Mastantuono, Elisa; Theisen, Daniel; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Naoto; Kimura, Akinori; Ozaki, Kouichi; Motomura, Hideki; Suda, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Schwartz, Peter J.; Meitinger, Thomas; Kääb, Stefan; Guicheney, Pascale; Shimizu, Wataru; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Chazin, Walter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as in congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) represent treatable causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and children. Recently, mutations in calmodulin (CALM1, CALM2) have been associated with severe forms of LQTS and CPVT, with life-threatening arrhythmias occurring very early in life. Additional mutation-positive cases are needed to discern genotype-phenotype correlations associated with calmodulin mutations. Methods and Results We employed conventional and next-generation sequencing approaches including exome analysis in genotype-negative LQTS probands. We identified five novel de novo missense mutations in CALM2 in three subjects with LQTS (p.N98S, p.N98I, p.D134H) and two subjects with clinical features of both LQTS and CPVT (p.D132E, p.Q136P). Age of onset of major symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest) ranged from 1–9 years. Three of five probands had cardiac arrest and one of these subjects did not survive. Although all probands had LQTS, two subjects also exhibited electrocardiographic features consistent with CPVT. The clinical severity among subjects in this series was generally less than that originally reported for CALM1 and CALM2 associated with recurrent cardiac arrest during infancy. Four of five probands responded to β-blocker therapy whereas one subject with mutation p.Q136P died suddenly during exertion despite this treatment. Mutations affect conserved residues located within calcium binding loops III (p.N98S, p.N98I) or IV (p.D132E, p.D134H, p.Q136P) and caused reduced calcium binding affinity. Conclusions CALM2 mutations can be associated with LQTS and with overlapping features of LQTS and CPVT. PMID:24917665

  10. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  11. A Novel Kinesin-Like Protein with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse developmental processes in plants through the action of calmodulin. A cDNA expression library from developing anthers of tobacco was screened with S-35-labeled calmodulin to isolate cDNAs encoding calmodulin-binding proteins. Among several clones isolated, a kinesin-like gene (TCK1) that encodes a calmodulin-binding kinesin-like protein was obtained. The TCK1 cDNA encodes a protein with 1265 amino acid residues. Its structural features are very similar to those of known kinesin heavy chains and kinesin-like proteins from plants and animals, with one distinct exception. Unlike other known kinesin-like proteins, TCK1 contains a calmodulin-binding domain which distinguishes it from all other known kinesin genes. Escherichia coli-expressed TCK1 binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In addition to the presence of a calmodulin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal, it also has a leucine zipper motif in the stalk region. The amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminal of TCK1 has striking homology with the mechanochemical motor domain of kinesins. The motor domain has ATPase activity that is stimulated by microtubules. Southern blot analysis revealed that TCK1 is coded by a single gene. Expression studies indicated that TCKI is expressed in all of the tissues tested. Its expression is highest in the stigma and anther, especially during the early stages of anther development. Our results suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin may play an important role in the function of this microtubule-associated motor protein and may be involved in the regulation of microtubule-based intracellular transport.

  12. Structure-Based Systematic Isolation of Conditional-Lethal Mutations in the Single Yeast Calmodulin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Y.; Botstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Conditional-lethal mutations of the single calmodulin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been very difficult to isolate by random and systematic methods, despite the fact that deletions cause recessive lethality. We report here the isolation of numerous conditional-lethal mutants that were recovered by systematically altering phenylalanine residues. The phenylalanine residues of calmodulin were implicated in function both by structural studies of calmodulin bound to target peptides and by their extraordinary conservation in evolution. Seven single and 26 multiple Phe -> Ala mutations were constructed. Mutant phenotypes were examined in a haploid cmd1 disrupted strain under three conditions: single copy, low copy, and overexpressed. Whereas all but one of the single mutations caused no obvious phenotype, most of the multiple mutations caused obvious growth phenotypes. Five were lethal, 6 were lethal only in synthetic medium, 13 were temperature-sensitive lethal and 2 had no discernible phenotypic consequences. Overexpression of some of the mutant genes restored the phenotype to nearly wild type. Several temperature-sensitive calmodulin mutations were suppressed by elevated concentration of CaCl(2) in the medium. Mutant calmodulin protein was detected at normal levels in extracts of most of the lethal mutant cells, suggesting that the deleterious phenotypes were due to loss of the calmodulin function and not protein instability. Analysis of diploid strains heterozygous for all combinations of cmd1-ts alleles revealed four intragenic complementation groups. The contributions of individual phe->ala changes to mutant phenotypes support the idea of internal functional redundancy in the symmetrical calmodulin protein molecule. These results suggest that the several phenylalanine residues in calmodulin are required to different extents in different combinations in order to carry out each of the several essential tasks. PMID:7896089

  13. Mechanistic Basis of Calmodulin Mediated Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activation and Antiestrogen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    these types of studies of CaM interactions with binding domains from protein targets have been very successful (6, 7). Thus, this approach will...Because there are nine methionine residues in CaM, most of which interact with the CaM binding domains of target proteins , the effects of oxidation...Prokaryotic Transcription Initiation, July 14-19, Saxton’s River, Vermont. March 27, 2000 “Calmodulin and its Interactions with Calmodulin Binding Proteins

  14. Axonal transport of calmodulin: a physiologic approach to identification of long-term associations between proteins

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Calmodulin is a soluble, heat-stable protein which has been shown to modulate both membrane-bound and soluble enzymes, but relatively little has been known about the in vivo associations of calmodulin. A 17,000- dalton heat-stable protein was found to move in axonal transport in the guinea pig visual system with the proteins of slow component b (SCb; 2 mm/d) along with actin and the bulk of the soluble proteins of the axon. Co-electrophoresis of purified calmodulin and radioactively labeled SCb proteins in two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) demonstrated the identity of the heat-stable SCb protein and calmodulin on the basis of pI, molecular weight, and anomalous migration in the presence of Ca2+-chelating agents. No proteins co-migrating with calmodulin in two-dimensional PAGE could be detected among the proteins of slow component a (SCa; 0.3 mm/d, microtubules and neurofilaments) or fast component (FC; 250 mm/d, membrane-associated proteins). We conclude that calmodulin is transported solely as part of the SCb complex of proteins, the axoplasmic matrix. Calmodulin moves in axonal transport independent of the movements of microtubules (SCa) and membranes (FC), which suggests that the interactions of calmodulin with these structures may represent a transient interaction between groups of proteins moving in axonal transport at different rates. Axonal transport has been shown to be an effective tool for the demonstration of long-term in vivo protein associations. PMID:6166619

  15. In vivo effects of zinc deficiency on calmodulin concentrations in selected rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.S.; McBride, S.A.; Graham, S.; Nelson, N.R.; Slotnick, B.M.; Henkin, R.I.

    1987-12-14

    Two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats, one fed zinc-deficient diet, ad libitum, the other, pair-fed with the same diet, but given supplemental zinc in the drinking water were studied. After ten weeks of diet, rats were exsanguinated and zinc and calmodulin concentration in brain and testes were measured. Mean zinc concentration in testes was significantly decreased in rats fed zinc-deficient diet without supplemental Zn/sup + +/, but mean zinc concentration in brain was not different. Similarly, mean calmodulin concentration in testes was decreased in rats fed zinc-deficient diet without supplemental Zn/sup + +/ whereas mean calmodulin concentration in brain was not different. Distribution studies of zinc and calmodulin showed that both zinc and calmodulin were released more freely into soluble fractions of testes in rats fed zinc-deficient diet without supplemental Zn/sup + +/. These results indicate, for the first time in in vivo studies, that zinc influences the calmodulin content of testes. 26 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  16. Interaction of calmodulin with histones. Alteration of histone dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wolff, D J; Ross, J M; Thompson, P N; Brostrom, M A; Brostrom, C O

    1981-02-25

    The Ca2+-dependent regulator protein (CDR), also frequently termed "calmodulin" was determined to influence the dephosphorylation of mixed calf thymus histones or purified histones 1, 2A, or 2B by a partially purified bovine brain phosphoprotein phosphatase. CDR increase the rate of dephosphorylation of mixed histones more than 20-fold. With increasing concentrations of mixed histones as substrate, a proportionate increase of CDR concentration was required to maintain maximal expression of histone phosphatase activity. Mixed histones suppressed the activation by CDR of a bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity, with activation being restored by increased quantities of CDR. Dephosphorylation of casein and phosphorylase alpha by the phosphatase preparation was not affected by CDR. These observations support the interpretation that the effects of CDR on histone dephosphorylation are substrate-directed. The rates of dephosphorylation of histones 1, 2A, and 2B by the phosphatase were 4- to 12-fold more rapid at low (sub-micromolar) concentrations of free Ca2+ than at high (200 microM) Ca2+ in incubations containing CDR, but they were unaffected by Ca2+ in incubations without CDR. The addition of stoichiometric quantities of calmodulin increased the apparent Km of the phosphatase for the various histones 2- to 6-fold, while maximal velocities were 4- to 12-fold higher at low than at high added Ca2+. The inhibitory effect of Ca2+ on histone dephosphorylation was immediately reversible by chelation of Ca2+ with EDTA. Ca2+-dependent inhibition of histone 1 or 2B phosphatase activities was also produced by rabbit skeletal muscle troponin C, but not by rabbit skeletal muscle parvalbumin, by poly(L-aspartate) or poly(L-glutamate). The phosphorylated fragment from the NH2-terminal region of either H2A (generated by treatment with N-bromosuccinimide) or H2B (generated by treatment with cyanogen bromide) was dephosphorylated by the phosphatase, with the rates of

  17. Impact of methionine oxidation on calmodulin structural dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Megan R.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J.; Olenek, Michael J.; Klein, Jennifer C.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • We measured the distance distribution between two spin labels on calmodulin by DEER. • Two structural states, open and closed, were resolved at both low and high Ca. • Ca shifted the equilibrium toward the open state by a factor of 13. • Methionine oxidation, simulated by glutamine substitution, decreased the Ca effect. • These results have important implications for aging in muscle and other tissues. - Abstract: We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron–electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous X-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM’s structural heterogeneity in solution: in both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ∼4 nm (closed) and another at ∼6 nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each

  18. Uptake and binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the interaction of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) using an experimental protocol which allows us to distinguish between ligand binding to the outside of the vesicles vs. uptake and possible binding to the vesicle interior. By examining the association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with BBV as a function of medium osmolarity (300-1100 mosm) to alter intravesicular space, virtually all ligand interaction with BBV was found to represent uptake of intact /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the intravesicular space. Uptake appeared specific by the following criteria: (1) it was largely calcium dependent (2) it was inhibited in a dose dependent fashion by calmodulin and the homologous protein troponin C, but not by unrelated proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome C, insulin) (3) it was inhibited by known calmodulin antagonists (calmidazolium, mellitin, trifluoperazine). Calmodulin uptake may be followed by binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to intravesicular BBV proteins; calmodulin-binding proteins in BBV with molecular weights of 143K, 118K, 50K, 47.5K, 46.5K and 35K were identified by Western blotting techniques. The specific association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated BBV is of interest in regard to the possible role of this calcium regulatory protein in the protein reabsorptive and ion transport functions of this renal tubular membrane fraction.

  19. Coupling calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and herbivore-induced plant response calmodulin-binding transcription factor AtSR1/CAMTA3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) has long been considered a crucial component in wound signaling pathway. However, no functional significance of Ca2+/CaM-binding proteins has been identified in plant responses to herbivore attack/wounding stress. We have reported earlier that a family of Ca2+/CaM-bindi...

  20. Conserved properties of individual Ca2+-binding sites in calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Halling, D. Brent; Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hall, Amelia W.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca2+-sensing protein that is highly conserved and ubiquitous in eukaryotes. In humans it is a locus of life-threatening cardiomyopathies. The primary function of CaM is to transduce Ca2+ concentration into cellular signals by binding to a wide range of target proteins in a Ca2+-dependent manner. We do not fully understand how CaM performs its role as a high-fidelity signal transducer for more than 300 target proteins, but diversity among its four Ca2+-binding sites, called EF-hands, may contribute to CaM’s functional versatility. We therefore looked at the conservation of CaM sequences over deep evolutionary time, focusing primarily on the four EF-hand motifs. Expanding on previous work, we found that CaM evolves slowly but that its evolutionary rate is substantially faster in fungi. We also found that the four EF-hands have distinguishing biophysical and structural properties that span eukaryotes. These results suggest that all eukaryotes require CaM to decode Ca2+ signals using four specialized EF-hands, each with specific, conserved traits. In addition, we provide an extensive map of sites associated with target proteins and with human disease and correlate these with evolutionary sequence diversity. Our comprehensive evolutionary analysis provides a basis for understanding the sequence space associated with CaM function and should help guide future work on the relationship between structure, function, and disease. PMID:26884197

  1. Calmodulin is a subunit of nitric oxide synthase from macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    A central issue in nitric oxide (NO) research is to understand how NO can act in some settings as a servoregulator and in others as a cytotoxin. To answer this, we have sought a molecular basis for the differential regulation of the two known types of NO synthase (NOS). Constitutive NOS's in endothelium and neurons are activated by agonist- induced elevation of Ca2+ and resultant binding of calmodulin (CaM). In contrast, NOS in macrophages does not require added Ca2+ or CaM, but is regulated instead by transcription. We show here that macrophage NOS contains, as a tightly bound subunit, a molecule with the immunologic reactivity, high performance liquid chromatography retention time, tryptic map, partial amino acid sequence, and exact molecular mass of CaM. In contrast to most CaM-dependent enzymes, macrophage NOS binds CaM tightly without a requirement for elevated Ca2+. This may explain why NOS that is independent of Ca2+ and elevated CaM appears to be activated simply by being synthesized. PMID:1380065

  2. Stimulation of cleavage of membrane proteins by calmodulin inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rodríguez, E; Esparís-Ogando, A; Montero, J C; Yuste, L; Pandiella, A

    2000-01-01

    The ectodomain of several membrane-bound proteins can be shed by proteolytic cleavage. The activity of the proteases involved in shedding is highly regulated by several intracellular second messenger pathways, such as protein kinase C (PKC) and intracellular Ca(2+). Recently, the shedding of the adhesion molecule L-selectin has been shown to be regulated by the interaction of calmodulin (CaM) with the cytosolic tail of L-selectin. Prevention of CaM-L-selectin interaction by CaM inhibitors or mutation of a CaM binding site in L-selectin induced L-selectin ectodomain shedding. Whether this action of CaM inhibitors also affects other membrane-bound proteins is not known. In the present paper we show that CaM inhibitors also stimulate the cleavage of several other transmembrane proteins, such as the membrane-bound growth factor precursors pro-transforming growth factor-alpha and pro-neuregulin-alpha2c, the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkA, and the beta-amyloid precursor protein. Cleavage induced by CaM inhibitors was a rapid event, and resulted from the activation of a mechanism that was independent of PKC or intracellular Ca(2+) increases, but was highly sensitive to hydroxamic acid-based metalloprotease inhibitors. Mutational analysis of the intracellular domain of the TrkA receptor indicated that CaM inhibitors may stimulate membrane-protein ectodomain cleavage by mechanisms independent of CaM-substrate interaction. PMID:10677354

  3. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  4. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  5. PEP-19 modulates calcium binding to calmodulin by electrostatic steering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Putkey, John A.

    2016-01-01

    PEP-19 is a small protein that increases the rates of Ca2+ binding to the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM) by an unknown mechanism. Although an IQ motif promotes binding to CaM, an acidic sequence in PEP-19 is required to modulate Ca2+ binding and to sensitize HeLa cells to ATP-induced Ca2+ release. Here, we report the NMR solution structure of a complex between PEP-19 and the C-domain of apo CaM. The acidic sequence of PEP-19 associates between helices E and F of CaM via hydrophobic interactions. This allows the acidic side chains in PEP-19 to extend toward the solvent and form a negatively charged surface that resembles a catcher's mitt near Ca2+ binding loop III of CaM. The topology and gradients of negative electrostatic surface potential support a mechanism by which PEP-19 increases the rate of Ca2+ binding to the C-domain of CaM by ‘catching' and electrostatically steering Ca2+ to site III. PMID:27876793

  6. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  7. Phosphorylation of rat liver heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2 and C can be modulated by calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Bosser, R; Faura, M; Serratosa, J; Renau-Piqueras, J; Pruschy, M; Bachs, O

    1995-01-01

    It was previously reported that the phosphorylation of three proteins of 36, 40 to 42, and 50 kDa by casein kinase 2 is inhibited by calmodulin in nuclear extracts from rat liver cells (R. Bosser, R. Aligué, D. Guerini, N. Agell, E. Carafoli, and O. Bachs, J. Biol. Chem. 268:15477-15483, 1993). By immunoblotting, peptide mapping, and endogenous phosphorylation experiments, the 36- and 40- to 42-kDa proteins have been identified as the A2 and C proteins, respectively, of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. To better understand the mechanism by which calmodulin inhibits the phosphorylation of these proteins, they were purified by using single-stranded DNA chromatography, and the effect of calmodulin on their phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 was analyzed. Results revealed that whereas calmodulin inhibited the phosphorylation of purified A2 and C proteins in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, it did not affect the casein kinase 2 phosphorylation of a different protein substrate, i.e., beta-casein. These results indicate that the effect of calmodulin was not on casein kinase 2 activity but on specific protein substrates. The finding that the A2 and C proteins can bind to a calmodulin-Sepharose column in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner suggests that this association could prevent the phosphorylation of the proteins by casein kinase 2. Immunoelectron microscopy studies have revealed that such interactions could also occur in vivo, since calmodulin and A2 and C proteins colocalize on the ribonucleoprotein particles in rat liver cell nuclei. PMID:7823935

  8. A role for cysteine 3635 of RYR1 in redox modulation and calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Moore, C.; Zhang, J. Z.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca(2+) release channel (RYR1) increases its activity, produces intersubunit disulfide bonds, and blocks its interaction with calmodulin. Conversely, bound calmodulin protects RYR1 from the effects of oxidants (Zhang, J.-Z., Wu, Y., Williams, B. Y., Rodney, G., Mandel, F., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Am. J. Physiol. 276, Cell Physiol. C46-C53). In addition, calmodulin protects RYR1 from trypsin cleavage at amino acids 3630 and 3637 (Moore, C. P., Rodney, G., Zhang, J.-Z., Santacruz-Toloza, L., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 8532-8537). The sequence between these two tryptic sites is AVVACFR. Alkylation of RYR1 with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) blocks both (35)S-apocalmodulin binding and oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-linking. In the current work, we demonstrate that both cysteines needed for the oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-link are protected from alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide by bound calmodulin. We also show, using N-terminal amino acid sequencing together with analysis of the distribution of [(3)H]NEM labeling with each sequencing cycle, that cysteine 3635 of RYR1 is rapidly labeled by NEM and that this labeling is blocked by bound calmodulin. We propose that cysteine 3635 is located at an intersubunit contact site that is close to or within a calmodulin binding site. These findings suggest that calmodulin and oxidation modulate RYR1 activity by regulating intersubunit interactions in a mutually exclusive manner and that these interactions involve cysteine 3635.

  9. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Danton H.; Huber, Robert J.; Suarez, Andres

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin is present throughout growth and development in Dictyostelium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin localizes within the ECM during development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin inhibits cell proliferation and increases chemotaxis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin exists in eukaryotic microbes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin may be functionally as important as intracellular calmodulin. -- Abstract: The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan.

  10. Fluorescence probe study of Ca2+-dependent interactions of calmodulin with calmodulin-binding peptides of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Grabarek, Zenon; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2004-10-22

    We have used a highly environment-sensitive fluorescent probe 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (badan) to study the interaction between calmodulin (CaM) and a CaM-binding peptide of the ryanodine receptor (CaMBP) and its sub-fragments F1 and F4. Badan was attached to the Thr34Cys mutant of CaM (CaM-badan). Ca(2+) increase in a physiological range of Ca(2+) (0.1-2 microM) produced about 40 times increase in the badan fluorescence. Upon binding to CaMBP, the badan fluorescence of apo-CaM showed a small increase at a slow rate; whereas that of Ca-CaM showed a large decrease at a very fast rate. Upon binding of CaM to the badan-labeled CaMBP, the badan fluorescence showed a small and slow increase at low Ca(2+), and a large and fast increase at high Ca(2+). Thus, the badan probe attached to CaM Cys(34) can be used to monitor conformational changes occurring not only in CaM, but also those in the CaM-CaMBP interface. Based on our results we propose that both the interaction interface and the global conformation of the CaM-CaMBP complex are altered by calcium.

  11. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways: potential mediators of skeletal muscle growth and development.

    PubMed

    Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire E

    2009-11-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age and disuse has a significant impact on the physiological and social well-being of the aged; this is an increasingly important problem as the population becomes skewed towards older age. Exercise has psychological benefits but it also impacts on muscle protein synthesis and degradation, increasing muscle tissue volume in both young and older individuals. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy involves an increase in muscle mass and cross-sectional area and associated increased myofibrillar protein content. Attempts to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie muscle growth, development and maintenance, have focused on characterising the molecular pathways that initiate, maintain and regenerate skeletal muscle. Such understanding may aid in improving targeted interventional therapies for age-related muscle loss and muscle wasting associated with diseases. Two major routes through which skeletal muscle development and growth are regulated are insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways. Many reviews have focused on understanding the signalling pathways of IGF-I and its receptor, which govern skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, alternative molecular signalling pathways such as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways should also be considered as potential mediators of muscle growth. These latter pathways have received relatively little attention and the purpose herein is to highlight the progress being made in the understanding of these pathways and associated molecules: calmodulin, calmodulin kinases (CaMKs), calcineurin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), which are involved in skeletal muscle regulation. We describe: (1) how conformational changes in the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin result in the exposure of binding pockets for the target proteins (CaMKs and calcineurin). (2) How Calmodulin consequently activates either the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases

  12. Computational comparison of a calcium-dependent jellyfish protein (apoaequorin) and calmodulin-cholesterol in short-term memory maintenance.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2017-03-06

    Memory reconsolidation and maintenance depend on calcium channels and on calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases regulating protein turnover in the hippocampus. Ingestion of a jellyfish protein, apoaequorin, reportedly protects and/or improves verbal learning in adults and is currently widely advertised for use by the elderly. Apoaequorin is a member of the EF-hand calcium binding family of proteins that includes calmodulin. Calmodulin-1 (148 residues) differs from Apoaequorin (195 residues) in that it contains four rather than three Ca(2+)-binding sites and three rather than four cholesterol-binding (CRAC, CARC) domains. All three cholesterol-binding CARC domains in calmodulin have a high interaction affinity for cholesterol compared to only two high affinity CARC domains in apoaequorin. Both calmodulin and apoaequorin can form dimers with a potential of eight bound Ca(2+) ions and six high affinity-bound cholesterol molecules in calmodulin with six bound Ca(2+) ions and a mixed population of eight cholesterols bound to both CARC and CRAC domains in apoaqueorin. MEMSAT-SVM analysis indicates that both calmodulin and apoaqueorin have a pore-lining region. The Peptide-Cutter algorithm predicts that calmodulin-1 contains 11 trypsin-specific cleavage sites (compared to 21 in apoaqueorin), four of which are potentially blocked by cholesterol and three are within the Ca-binding domains and/or the pore-lining region. Three are clustered between the third and fourth Ca(2+)-binding sites. Only calmodulin pore-lining regions contain Ca(2+) binding sites and as dimers may insert into the plasma membrane of neural cells and act as Ca(2+) channels. In a dietary supplement, bound cholesterol may protect both apoaequorin and calmodulin from proteolysis in the gut as well as facilitate uptake across the blood-brain barrier. Our results suggest that a physiological calmodulin-cholesterol complex, not cholesterol-free jellyfish protein, may better serve as a dietary supplement to

  13. The effects of weak extremely low frequency magnetic fields on calcium/calmodulin interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Hendee, S P; Faour, F A; Christensen, D A; Patrick, B; Durney, C H; Blumenthal, D K

    1996-01-01

    Mechanisms by which weak electromagnetic fields may affect biological systems are of current interest because of their potential health effects. Lednev has proposed an ion parametric resonance hypothesis (Lednev, 1991, Bioelectromagnetics, 12:71-75), which predicts that when the ac, frequency of a combined dc-ac magnetic field equals the cyclotron frequency of calcium, the affinity of calcium for calcium-binding proteins such as calmodulin will be markedly affected. The present study evaluated Lednev's theory using two independent systems, each sensitive to changes in the affinity of calcium for calmodulin. One of the systems used was the calcium/calmodulin-dependent activation of myosin light chain kinase, a system similar to that previously used by Lednev. The other system monitored optical changes in the binding of a fluorescent peptide to the calcium/calmodulin complex. Each system was exposed to a 20.9 microT static field superimposed on a 20.9 microT sinusoidal field over a narrow frequency range centered at 16 Hz, the cyclotron frequency of the unhydrated calcium ion. In contrast to Lednev's predictions, no significant effect of combined dc-ac magnetic fields on calcium/calmodulin interactions was indicated in either experimental system. PMID:8744329

  14. Calcium ion fluorescence detection using liposomes containing Alexa-labeled calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuvan; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2002-09-01

    This paper describes the preparation and characterization of calcium ion sensitive fluorescent liposomes and their application for the determination of calcium ions in aqueous samples. Calmodulin (CaM), a calcium ion-binding protein labeled with the fluorophore Alexa-488 is embedded in the membrane of unilamellar liposomes. Upon calcium ion binding, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change that exposes its hydrophobic core and affects the fluorescence intensity of the attached fluorophore. Characterization studies of Alexa-CaM-containing liposomes reveal that embedding calmodulin molecules in the bilayer membrane of liposomes extends the lifetime of the calcium ion binding activity of calmodulin by about fourfold compared to the lifetime of its calcium-binding activity in free solution. Moreover, the calcium ion response of Alexa-CaM-containing liposomes is about threefold higher than the calcium ion response of Alexa-CaM in solution. The improvement in the calcium ion detection properties is attributed to the interaction between calmodulin, a membranal protein, and the hydrophobic phospholipids of the liposomes. The analytical properties of the calcium ion sensitive fluorescent liposomes are discussed.

  15. The calmodulin intergenic spacer as molecular target for characterization of Leishmania species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human leishmaniasis is a neglected disease caused by parasites of the genus Leishmania. Clinical aspects of this disease can vary significantly, reflecting the wide range of parasites in the genus Leishmania. Knowing accurately the Leishmania species infecting humans is important for clinical case management and evaluation of epidemiological risk. Calmodulin is an essential gene in trypanosomatids that modulates the calcium metabolism in various cellular activities. Despite its strong conservation in trypanosomatids, it has been recently observed that its untranslated regions (UTR) diverge among species. Methods In this study we analyzed the sequences and the absolute dinucleotide frequency of the intergenic spacer of the calmodulin gene (containing both, 3′ and 5′UTR) in nine reference Leishmania species and ten clinical isolates obtained from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Results We show that the short calmodulin intergenic spacers exhibit features that make them interesting for applications in molecular characterization and phylogenetic studies of Leishmania. Dendrograms based on sequence alignments and on the dinucleotide frequency indicate that this particular region of calmodulin gene might be useful for species typing between the Leishmania and Viannia subgenera. Conclusions Mutations and composition of the calmodulin intergenic spacer from Leishmania species might have taxonomic value as parameters to define if an isolate is identical to a certain species or belongs to one of the two current subgenera. PMID:24438764

  16. Calmodulin is responsible for Ca2+-dependent regulation of TRPA1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Raquibul; Leeson-Payne, Alasdair T. S.; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Zhang, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    TRPA1 is a Ca2+-permeable ion channel involved in many sensory disorders such as pain, itch and neuropathy. Notably, the function of TRPA1 depends on Ca2+, with low Ca2+ potentiating and high Ca2+ inactivating TRPA1. However, it remains unknown how Ca2+ exerts such contrasting effects. Here, we show that Ca2+ regulates TRPA1 through calmodulin, which binds to TRPA1 in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Calmodulin binding enhanced TRPA1 sensitivity and Ca2+-evoked potentiation of TRPA1 at low Ca2+, but inhibited TRPA1 sensitivity and promoted TRPA1 desensitization at high Ca2+. Ca2+-dependent potentiation and inactivation of TRPA1 were selectively prevented by disrupting the interaction of the carboxy-lobe of calmodulin with a calmodulin-binding domain in the C-terminus of TRPA1. Calmodulin is thus a critical Ca2+ sensor enabling TRPA1 to respond to diverse Ca2+ signals distinctly. PMID:28332600

  17. Regulation of microtubule cold stability by calmodulin-dependent and -independent phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Job, D; Rauch, C T; Fischer, E H; Margolis, R L

    1983-07-01

    Cold-labile microtubule protein can be rendered cold-stable by addition of a fraction containing a small number of polypeptides that are derived from cold-stable microtubules. These polypeptides can be obtained from purified cold-stable microtubules by passage through a DEAE-cellulose (DE-52) ion exchange column from which they emerge in the first eluate fraction. The stabilizing activity of these proteins is abolished by phosphorylation catalyzed by two types of protein kinases, one dependent on calmodulin and the other independent of that regulatory protein. The calmodulin-dependent reaction appears to phosphorylate mainly two polypeptides, 56 and 72 kilodaltons; the reaction is blocked by trifluoperazine. The calmodulin-independent reaction appears to phosphorylate different cold-stable microtubule-associated proteins. That reaction is observed only in purified material obtained from vigorously homogenized brain tissue. Gently homogenization yields cold-stable microtubules that are responsive only to the calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. A distinguishing feature of the calmodulin-independent reaction is that it does not occur on polypeptides while they are bound to the microtubules.

  18. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  19. Preparation, characterization and biological properties of biotinylated derivatives of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Polli, J W; Billingsley, M L

    1991-05-01

    Biotinylated derivatives of calmodulin (CaM) were prepared and their biological properties characterized by using enzyme assays, affinity and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. Several N-hydroxysuccinimidobiotin derivatives [sulphosuccinimidobiotin (sulpho-NHS) and sulphosuccinimido-6-(biotinamido)hexanoate (BNHS-LC)] differing in spacer arm length were used to modify CaM. The shorter-spacer-arm CaM derivative (sulpho-CaM) activated CaM-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and CaM-dependent protein kinase II; preincubation with avidin blocked its ability to activate these enzymes. The extended-spacer-arm derivative (BNHS-LC-CaM) activated CaM-dependent enzymes both in the presence and in the absence of avidin, suggesting that the longer spacer arm diminished steric effects from avidin preincubation. Other biotinylated CaM derivatives were prepared with biotinylated tyrosine and/or histidine residues (diazobenzoylbiocytin; DBB-CaM) or nucleophilic sites (photobiotin acetate; photo-CaM). These derivatives activated CaM-dependent enzymes in the presence and in the absence of avidin. Oriented affinity columns were constructed with covalently immobilized avidin complexed to each biotinylated CaM derivative. The chromatographic profiles obtained revealed that each column interacted with a specific subset of CaM-binding proteins. Elution profiles of biotinyl CaM derivatives on phenyl-Sepharose hydrophobic-interaction chromatography suggested that several derivatives displayed diminished binding to the matrix in the presence of Ca2+. Development and characterization of a series of biotinylated CaM molecules can be used to identify domains of CaM that interact with specific CaM-dependent enzymes.

  20. Ligand binding and thermodynamic stability of a multidomain protein, calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Masino, L.; Martin, S. R.; Bayley, P. M.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical and thermal denaturation of calmodulin has been monitored spectroscopically to determine the stability for the intact protein and its two isolated domains as a function of binding of Ca2+ or Mg2+. The reversible urea unfolding of either isolated apo-domain follows a two-state mechanism with relatively low deltaG(o)20 values of approximately 2.7 (N-domain) and approximately 1.9 kcal/mol (C-domain). The apo-C-domain is significantly unfolded at normal temperatures (20-25 degrees C). The greater affinity of the C-domain for Ca2+ causes it to be more stable than the N-domain at [Ca2+] > or = 0.3 mM. By contrast, Mg2+ causes a greater stabilization of the N- rather than the C-domain, consistent with measured Mg2+ affinities. For the intact protein (+/-Ca2+), the bimodal denaturation profiles can be analyzed to give two deltaG(o)20 values, which differ significantly from those of the isolated domains, with one domain being less stable and one domain more stable. The observed stability of the domains is strongly dependent on solution conditions such as ionic strength, as well as specific effects due to metal ion binding. In the intact protein, different folding intermediates are observed, depending on the ionic composition. The results illustrate that a protein of low intrinsic stability is liable to major perturbation of its unfolding properties by environmental conditions and liganding processes and, by extension, mutation. Hence, the observed stability of an isolated domain may differ significantly from the stability of the same structure in a multidomain protein. These results address questions involved in manipulating the stability of a protein or its domains by site directed mutagenesis and protein engineering. PMID:10975573

  1. Calcium fingerprints induced by calmodulin interactors in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Dagher, Rania; Brière, Christian; Fève, Marie; Zeniou, Maria; Pigault, Claire; Mazars, Christian; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Ranjeva, Raoul; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Haiech, Jacques

    2009-06-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is a ubiquitous second messenger which promotes cell responses through transient changes in intracellular concentrations. The prominent role of Ca2+ in cell physiology is mediated by a whole set of proteins constituting a Ca2+-signalling toolkit involved in Ca2+-signal generation, deciphering and arrest. The different Ca2+-signalosomes deliver Ca2+-signals with spatial and temporal dynamics to control the function of specific cell types. Among the intracellular proteins involved in Ca2+-signal deciphering, calmodulin (CaM) plays a pivotal role in controlling Ca2+-homeostasis and downstream Ca2+-based signalling events. Due to its ubiquitous expression in eukaryotic cells and the variety of proteins it interacts with, CaM is central in Ca2+-signalling networks. For these reasons, it is expected that disrupting or modifying CaM interactions with its target proteins will affect Ca2+-homeostasis and cellular responses. The resulting calcium response will vary depending on which interactions between CaM and target proteins are altered by the molecules and on the specific Ca2+-toolkit expressed in a given cell, even in the resting state. In the present paper, the effect of six classical CaM interactors (W5, W7, W12, W13, bifonazole and calmidazolium) was studied on Ca2+-signalling in tumor initiating cells isolated from human glioblastoma (TG1) and tobacco cells (BY-2) using the fluorescent Ca2+-sensitive Indo-1 dye and aequorin, respectively. Various Ca2+-fingerprints were obtained depending both on the CaM interactor used and the cell type investigated. These data demonstrate that interaction between the antagonists and CaM results in a differential inhibition of CaM-dependent proteins involved in Ca2+-signal regulation. In addition, the distinct Ca2+-fingerprints in tobacco and human tumor initiating glioblastoma cells induced by a given CaM interactor highlight the specificity of the Ca2+-signalosome in eukaryotic cells.

  2. Preparation, characterization and biological properties of biotinylated derivatives of calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Polli, J W; Billingsley, M L

    1991-01-01

    Biotinylated derivatives of calmodulin (CaM) were prepared and their biological properties characterized by using enzyme assays, affinity and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. Several N-hydroxysuccinimidobiotin derivatives [sulphosuccinimidobiotin (sulpho-NHS) and sulphosuccinimido-6-(biotinamido)hexanoate (BNHS-LC)] differing in spacer arm length were used to modify CaM. The shorter-spacer-arm CaM derivative (sulpho-CaM) activated CaM-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and CaM-dependent protein kinase II; preincubation with avidin blocked its ability to activate these enzymes. The extended-spacer-arm derivative (BNHS-LC-CaM) activated CaM-dependent enzymes both in the presence and in the absence of avidin, suggesting that the longer spacer arm diminished steric effects from avidin preincubation. Other biotinylated CaM derivatives were prepared with biotinylated tyrosine and/or histidine residues (diazobenzoylbiocytin; DBB-CaM) or nucleophilic sites (photobiotin acetate; photo-CaM). These derivatives activated CaM-dependent enzymes in the presence and in the absence of avidin. Oriented affinity columns were constructed with covalently immobilized avidin complexed to each biotinylated CaM derivative. The chromatographic profiles obtained revealed that each column interacted with a specific subset of CaM-binding proteins. Elution profiles of biotinyl CaM derivatives on phenyl-Sepharose hydrophobic-interaction chromatography suggested that several derivatives displayed diminished binding to the matrix in the presence of Ca2+. Development and characterization of a series of biotinylated CaM molecules can be used to identify domains of CaM that interact with specific CaM-dependent enzymes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1645521

  3. Loss of conformational stability in calmodulin upon methionine oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Yin, D H; Yao, Y; Sun, H; Qin, Z; Schöneich, C; Williams, T D; Squier, T C

    1998-01-01

    We have used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the secondary and tertiary structural consequences that result from oxidative modification of methionine residues in wheat germ calmodulin (CaM), and prevent activation of the plasma membrane Ca-ATPase. Using ESI-MS, we have measured rates of modification and molecular mass distributions of oxidatively modified CaM species (CaMox) resulting from exposure to H2O2. From these rates, we find that oxidative modification of methionine to the corresponding methionine sulfoxide does not predispose CaM to further oxidative modification. These results indicate that methionine oxidation results in no large-scale alterations in the tertiary structure of CaMox, because the rates of oxidative modification of individual methionines are directly related to their solvent exposure. Likewise, CD measurements indicate that methionine oxidation results in little change in the apparent alpha-helical content at 28 degrees C, and only a small (0.3 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1)) decrease in thermal stability, suggesting the disruption of a limited number of specific noncovalent interactions. Fluorescence lifetime, anisotropy, and quenching measurements of N-(1-pyrenyl)-maleimide (PMal) covalently bound to Cys26 indicate local structural changes around PMal in the amino-terminal domain in response to oxidative modification of methionine residues in the carboxyl-terminal domain. Because the opposing globular domains remain spatially distant in both native and oxidatively modified CaM, the oxidative modification of methionines in the carboxyl-terminal domain are suggested to modify the conformation of the amino-terminal domain through alterations in the structural features involving the interdomain central helix. The structural basis for the linkage between oxidative modification and these global conformational changes is discussed in terms of possible alterations in

  4. Regulation of Polycystin-1 Function by Calmodulin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Nicholas; Wang, Yidi; Kipp, Kevin R.; Liu, Guangyi; Benza, Jesse J.; Pletnev, Vladimir; Pavlov, Tengis S.; Staruschenko, Alexander; Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; Takahashi, Maki; Nauli, Surya M.; Weimbs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease that leads to progressive renal cyst growth and loss of renal function, and is caused by mutations in the genes encoding polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), respectively. The PC1/PC2 complex localizes to primary cilia and can act as a flow-dependent calcium channel in addition to numerous other signaling functions. The exact functions of the polycystins, their regulation and the purpose of the PC1/PC2 channel are still poorly understood. PC1 is an integral membrane protein with a large extracytoplasmic N-terminal domain and a short, ~200 amino acid C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Most proteins that interact with PC1 have been found to bind via the cytoplasmic tail. Here we report that the PC1 tail has homology to the regulatory domain of myosin heavy chain including a conserved calmodulin-binding motif. This motif binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Disruption of the CaM-binding motif in PC1 does not affect PC2 binding, cilia targeting, or signaling via heterotrimeric G-proteins or STAT3. However, disruption of CaM binding inhibits the PC1/PC2 calcium channel activity and the flow-dependent calcium response in kidney epithelial cells. Furthermore, expression of CaM-binding mutant PC1 disrupts cellular energy metabolism. These results suggest that critical functions of PC1 are regulated by its ability to sense cytosolic calcium levels via binding to CaM. PMID:27560828

  5. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vaka S; Ali, Gul S; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2002-03-22

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  6. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between −295 to −300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26320171

  7. Calmodulin disrupts the structure of the HIV-1 MA protein†

    PubMed Central

    Chow, John Y. H.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Kwan, Ann H.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill

    2010-01-01

    The MA protein from HIV-1 is a small, multifunctional protein responsible for regulating various stages of the viral replication cycle. To achieve its diverse tasks MA interacts with host cell proteins and it has been reported that one of these is the ubiquitous calcium -sensing calmodulin (CaM) which is up-regulated upon HIV-1 infection. The nature of the CaM-MA interaction has been the subject of structural studies using peptides based on the MA sequence that have led to conflicting conclusions. The results presented here show that CaM binds intact MA with 1:1 stoichiometry in a Ca2+-dependent manner and that the complex adopts a highly extended conformation in solution as revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering. Alterations in tryptophan fluorescence suggest that the two tryptophans at the N-terminus of MA mediate the CaM interaction. Major chemical shift changes occur in the NMR spectrum of MA upon complex formation, while chemical shift changes in the CaM spectrum are quite modest and are assigned to residues within the target-protein binding hydrophobic clefts of CaM. The NMR data indicate that CaM binds MA via its N-and C-terminal lobes and induces a dramatic conformational change involving a significant loss of secondary and tertiary structure within MA. Circular dichroism experiments suggest that MA looses ~20% of its α-helical content upon CaM binding. Thus CaM binding is expected to impact upon the accessibility of interaction sites within MA that are involved in its various functions. PMID:20488189

  8. Cardiac calmodulin kinase: a potential target for drug design.

    PubMed

    Bányász, T; Szentandrássy, N; Tóth, A; Nánási, P P; Magyar, J; Chen-Izu, Y

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic strategy for cardiac arrhythmias has undergone a remarkable change during the last decades. Currently implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy is considered to be the most effective therapeutic method to treat malignant arrhythmias. Some even argue that there is no room for antiarrhythmic drug therapy in the age of implantable cardioverter defibrillators. However, in clinical practice, antiarrhythmic drug therapies are frequently needed, because implantable cardioverter defibrillators are not effective in certain types of arrhythmias (i.e. premature ventricular beats or atrial fibrillation). Furthermore, given the staggering cost of device therapy, it is economically imperative to develop alternative effective treatments. Cardiac ion channels are the target of a number of current treatment strategies, but therapies based on ion channel blockers only resulted in moderate success. Furthermore, these drugs are associated with an increased risk of proarrhythmia, systemic toxicity, and increased defibrillation threshold. In many cases, certain ion channel blockers were found to increase mortality. Other drug classes such as ßblockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists, and statins appear to have proven efficacy for reducing cardiac mortality. These facts forced researchers to shift the focus of their research to molecular targets that act upstream of ion channels. One of these potential targets is calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Several lines of evidence converge to suggest that CaMKII inhibition may provide an effective treatment strategy for heart diseases. (1) Recent studies have elucidated that CaMKII plays a key role in modulating cardiac function and regulating hypertrophy development. (2) CaMKII activity has been found elevated in the failing hearts from human patients and animal models. (3) Inhibition of CaMKII activity has been shown to mitigate hypertrophy, prevent functional remodeling and

  9. Cardiac Calmodulin Kinase: A Potential Target for Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Bányász, T.; Szentandrássy, N.; Tóth, A.; Nánási, P.P.; Magyar, J.; Chen-Izu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic strategy for cardiac arrhythmias has undergone a remarkable change during the last decades. Currently implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy is considered to be the most effective therapeutic method to treat malignant arrhythmias. Some even argue that there is no room for antiarrhythmic drug therapy in the age of implantable cardioverter defibrillators. However, in clinical practice, antiarrhythmic drug therapies are frequently needed, because implantable cardioverter defibrillators are not effective in certain types of arrhythmias (i.e. premature ventricular beats or atrial fibrillation). Furthermore, given the staggering cost of device therapy, it is economically imperative to develop alternative effective treatments. Cardiac ion channels are the target of a number of current treatment strategies, but therapies based on ion channel blockers only resulted in moderate success. Furthermore, these drugs are associated with an increased risk of proarrhythmia, systemic toxicity, and increased defibrillation threshold. In many cases, certain ion channel blockers were found to increase mortality. Other drug classes such as β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists, and statins appear to have proven efficacy for reducing cardiac mortality. These facts forced researchers to shift the focus of their research to molecular targets that act upstream of ion channels. One of these potential targets is calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Several lines of evidence converge to suggest that CaMKII inhibition may provide an effective treatment strategy for heart diseases. (1) Recent studies have elucidated that CaMKII plays a key role in modulating cardiac function and regulating hypertrophy development. (2) CaMKII activity has been found elevated in the failing hearts from human patients and animal models. (3) Inhibition of CaMKII activity has been shown to mitigate hypertrophy, prevent functional remodeling and

  10. Effects of Calcium and Calmodulin on Spore Germination and Appressorium Development in Colletotrichum trifolii

    PubMed Central

    Warwar, V.; Dickman, M. B.

    1996-01-01

    Spore germination and appressorium formation are important steps in the process of fungal development and pathogenesis. These prepenetration events, which begin with spore attachment and culminate with appressorium maturation, a common scheme for many pathogenic fungi, are prerequisites for penetration of host external barriers and subsequent colonization. Conditions for in vitro spore germination and appressorium development in Colletotrichum trifolii are described. In addition, effects of Ca(sup2+) and calmodulin on these processes have been examined. Results indicate that, as for other pathogenic fungi, appressorium development is induced on a hard surface. The data suggest that disturbance of calcium homeostasis, by ethylene-bis(oxy-ethylenenitrolo)tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or calcium channel blockers, impairs appressorium development. Moreover, calmodulin inhibitors affect both germination and differentiation, implying that the Ca(sup2+)/calmodulin signal transduction pathway is important in the early development of C. trifolii on the plant host surface. PMID:16535223

  11. Altered Purkinje cell responses and calmodulin expression in the spontaneously ataxic mouse, Pogo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwan Young; Kim, Jin Seong; Kim, Se Hoon; Park, Hyung Seo; Jeong, Young-Gil; Lee, Nam-Seob; Kim, Dong Kwan

    2011-04-01

    Ataxia is often associated with altered cerebellar motor control, a process in which Purkinje cells (PCs) play a principal role. Pogo mice display severe motor deficits characterized by an ataxic gait accompanying hindlimb hyperextension. Here, using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we show that parallel fiber (PF)-excitatory post-synaptic currents (PF-EPSCs) are reduced, paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) is increased and PF-PC long-term depression (LTD) is impaired in Pogo mice; in contrast, climbing-fiber EPSCs are preserved. In control mice, treatment with the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium (5 μm) impaired PPF and LTD. Notably, cerebellar calmodulin expression was significantly reduced in Pogo mice compared with control mice. Control PCs predominantly exhibited a tonic firing pattern, whereas the firing pattern in Pogo PCs was mainly a complex burst type. These results implicate alterations in PC responses and calmodulin content in the abnormal cerebellar function of Pogo mice.

  12. Interaction with calmodulin is required for the function of Spc110p, an essential component of the yeast spindle pole body.

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, D A; Welch, K A; Stark, M J

    1994-01-01

    NUF1/SPC110, encoding a nuclear filament-related protein which is a component of the yeast spindle pole body (SPB), has been identified in a screen designed to isolate genes encoding targets of yeast calmodulin. Spc110p interacts with calmodulin by two different criteria and the calmodulin interacting region has been localized within the C-terminus of the protein. Point mutations between residues 898 and 917 further define the calmodulin binding site within this region. Mutations in this domain which abolish calmodulin binding in vitro prevent Spc110p function in vivo, demonstrating that calmodulin binding by Spc110p has important functional consequences. In keeping with a role for calmodulin in Spc110p function, we show that calmodulin localizes to the yeast SPB when cells are prepared under appropriate conditions. Non-functional mutant Spc110 proteins which cannot bind calmodulin are present at lowered steady-state levels in the cell; when their level is increased by elevated gene dosage, partial recovery of Spc110p function is seen. Overexpression of calmodulin suppresses the defect(s) associated with the mutant Spc110 proteins, supporting the notion that Spc110p stability is a consequence of its ability to bind calmodulin and pointing to a direct role for calmodulin in Spc110p function. Images PMID:7925277

  13. Altered binding of /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin to a 46. 5-kilodalton protein in skin fibroblasts cultured from patients with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1987-02-01

    The levels of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins have been determined in cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and age- and sex-matched controls. Calmodulin ranged from 0.20 to 0.76 microgram/mg protein; there was no difference between calmodulin concentration in fibroblasts from CF patients and controls. Calmodulin-binding proteins of 230, 212, 204, 164, 139, 70, 59, 46.5, and 41 kD were identified. A protein with a mobility identical to the 59-kD calmodulin-binding protein was labeled by antiserum against calmodulin-dependent phosphatase. Although Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-dependent phosphatase activity was detected, there was no different in activity between control and CF fibroblasts or in the level of phosphatase protein as determined by radioimmunoassay. Lower amounts of /sup 125/I-calmodulin were bound to the 46.5-kD calmodulin-binding protein in CF fibroblasts as compared with controls. The 46.5-kD calmodulin-binding protein may be reduced in CF fibroblasts or its structure may be altered resulting in a reduced binding capacity and/or affinity for calmodulin and perhaps reflecting, either directly or indirectly, the genetic defect responsible for cystic fibrosis.

  14. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca(2+)/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca(2+)/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca(2+) concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca(2+) range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca(2+) signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca(2+) regulation in anoctamin Cl(-) channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types.

  15. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca2+/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca2+/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca2+ concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca2+ range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca2+ signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca2+ regulation in anoctamin Cl− channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types. PMID:24081981

  16. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  17. Ca2+ and Calmodulin Dynamics during Photopolarization in Fucus serratus Zygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Love, J.; Brownlee, C.; Trewavas, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    The role of Ca2+ in zygote polarization in fucoid algae (Fucus, Ascophyllum, and Pelvetia species) zygote polarization is controversial. Using a local source of Fucus serratus, we established that zygotes form a polar axis relative to unilateral light (photopolarization) between 8 and 14 h after fertilization (AF), and become committed to this polarity at approximately 15 to 18 h AF. We investigated the role of Ca2+, calmodulin, and actin during photopolarization by simultaneously exposing F. serratus zygotes to polarizing light and various inhibitors. Neither removal of Ca2+ from the culture medium or high concentrations of EGTA and LaCl3 had any effect on photopolarization. Bepridil, 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino) octyl ester, nifedipine, and verapamil, all of which block intracellular Ca2 release, reduced photopolarization from 75 to 30%. The calmodulin antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-L-naphthalenesulfonamide and trifluoperazine inhibited photopolarization in all zygotes, whereas N-(6-aminohexyl)-L-naphthalenesulfonamide had no effect. Cytochalasin B, cytochalasin D, and latrunculin B, all of which inhibit actin polymerization, had no effect on photopolarization, but arrested polar axis fixation. The role of calmodulin during polarization was investigated further. Calmodulin mRNA from the closely related brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera was cloned and the protein was expressed in bacteria. Photopolarization was enhanced following microinjections of this recombinant calmodulin into developing zygotes. Confocal imaging of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled recombinant calmodulin in photopolarized zygotes showed a homogenous signal distribution at 13 h AF, which localized to the presumptive rhizoid site at 15 h AF. PMID:12223805

  18. Characterization and identification of calmodulin and calmodulin binding proteins in hemocyte of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Sengprasert, Panjana; Amparyup, Piti; Tassanakajorn, Anchalee; Wongpanya, Ratree

    2015-06-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) sensor in all eukaryotic cells, is one of the well-known signaling proteins. Previously, CaM gene has shown a high transcriptional level in hemocyte of the pathogen infected shrimp, suggesting that shrimp CaM does not only regulate Ca(2+) metabolism, but is also involved in immune response cascade. In the present study, the CaM gene of shrimp Penaeus monodon was identified and the recombinant P.monodon CaM (rPmCaM) was produced and biochemically characterized. The identification of CaM-binding proteins was also performed. The PmCaM cDNA consisted of an open reading frame of 447 bp encoding for 149 amino acid residues with a calculated mass of 16,810 Da and an isoelectric point of 4.09. Tissue distribution showed that the PmCaM transcript was expressed in all examined tissues. The results of gel mobility shift assay, circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy all confirmed that the conformational changes of the rPmCaM were observed after the calcium binding. According to the gene silencing of PmCaM transcript levels, the shrimp's susceptibility to pathogenic Vibrio harveyi infection increased in comparison with that of the control groups. Protein pull-down assay and LC-MS/MS analysis were performed to identify rPmCaM-binding proteins involved in shrimp immune responses and transglutaminase, elongation factor 1-alpha, elongation factor 2 and actin were found. However, by computational analysis, only the first three proteins contained CaM-binding domain. These findings suggested that PmCaM may play an important role in regulation of shrimp immune system.

  19. Ca2+/Calmodulin and Apo-Calmodulin Both Bind to and Enhance the Tyrosine Kinase Activity of c-Src

    PubMed Central

    Anguita, Estefanía; Benaim, Gustavo; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Src family non-receptor tyrosine kinases play a prominent role in multiple cellular processes, including: cell proliferation, differentiation, cell survival, stress response, and cell adhesion and migration, among others. And when deregulated by mutations, overexpression, and/or the arrival of faulty incoming signals, its hyperactivity contributes to the development of hematological and solid tumors. c-Src is a prototypical member of this family of kinases, which is highly regulated by a set of phosphorylation events. Other factor contributing to the regulation of Src activity appears to be mediated by the Ca2+ signal generated in cells by different effectors, where the Ca2+-receptor protein calmodulin (CaM) plays a key role. In this report we demonstrate that CaM directly interacts with Src in both Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent manners in vitro and in living cells, and that the CaM antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) inhibits the activation of this kinase induced by the upstream activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), in human carcinoma epidermoide A431 cells, and by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, in both A431 cells and human breast adenocarcinoma SK-BR-3 cells. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+/CaM complex strongly activates the auto-phosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity of c-Src toward exogenous substrates, but most relevantly and for the first time, we demonstrate that Ca2+-free CaM (apo-CaM) exerts a far higher activatory action on Src auto-phosphorylation and kinase activity toward exogenous substrates than the one exerted by the Ca2+/CaM complex. This suggests that a transient increase in the cytosolic concentration of free Ca2+ is not an absolute requirement for CaM-mediated activation of Src in living cells, and that a direct regulation of Src by apo-CaM could be inferred. PMID:26058065

  20. Immuno-detection of aluminium and aluminium induced conformational changes in calmodulin--implications in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Levi, R; Wolf, T; Fleminger, G; Solomon, B

    1998-12-01

    Binding of calcium to calmodulin (CAM) induces specific structural rearrangements in the whole protein molecule. Ca2+ organizes and stabilizes the four-domains structure of calmodulin in a helical, active conformation that can bind to its target proteins; the central helix remaining flexible is an essential condition for their bio-recognition. The conformation of calmodulin, and its efficacy to interact with target proteins, is profoundly altered when bound to metal ions other than calcium. As recently reported, the local structural changes of CaM, which occur upon aluminium binding, lead to the impairment of protein flexibility and to the loss of its ability to interact with several other proteins, which may decrease or inhibit the regulatory character of calmodulin. In this study we followed conformational changes occurring in the calmodulin molecule after aluminium binding using highly specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) able to differentiate between the conformational states of calmodulin, as well as mAbs which recognize aluminium free or bound to proteins. Under the same experimental conditions, mAb CAM-1, a Ca2+ conformation sensitive antibody raised against calmodulin, fails to recognize the calmodulin-aluminium complex, despite the presence of Ca2+, while the anti-Al antibodies show a maximal binding pattern towards their antigen. These data suggest that Al3+ ions bind to calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+ ions, leading to an inactive, reversible conformation, instead of its physiological active form. Alteration of the conformation of calmodulin imposed by Al binding may have possible implications in the neurotoxicity mechanism related to Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone signalling downstream of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Melamed, P; Savulescu, D; Lim, S; Wijeweera, A; Luo, Z; Luo, M; Pnueli, L

    2012-12-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) regulates reproduction via binding a G-protein coupled receptor on the surface of the gonadotroph, through which it transmits signals, mostly via the mitogen-activated protein (MAPK) cascade, to increase synthesis of the gonadotrophin hormones: luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Activation of the MAPK cascade requires an elevation in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, which is a result of both calcium influx and mobilisation from intracellular stores. However, Ca(2+) also transmits signals via an MAPK-independent pathway, through binding calmodulin (CaM), which is then able to bind a number of proteins to impart diverse downstream effects. Although the ability of GnRH to activate CaM was recognised over 20 years ago, only recently have some of the downstream effects been elucidated. GnRH was shown to activate the CaM-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, which targets gonadotrophin gene expression both directly and indirectly via transcription factors such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells and Nur77, the Transducer of Regulated CREB (TORC) co-activators and also the prolyl isomerase, Pin1. Gonadotrophin gene expression is also regulated by GnRH-induced CaM-dependent kinases (CaMKs); CaMKI is able to derepress the histone deacetylase-inhibition of β-subunit gene expression, whereas CaMKII appears to be essential for the GnRH-activation of all three subunit genes. Asides from activating gonadotrophin gene expression, GnRH also exerts additional effects on gonadotroph function, some of which clearly occur via CaM, including the proliferation of immature gonadotrophs, which is dependent on calcineurin. In this review, we summarise these pathways, and discuss the additional functions that have been proposed for CaM with respect to modifying GnRH-induced signalling pathways via the regulation of the small GTP-binding protein, Gem, and/or the regulator of G-protein signalling protein 2.

  2. Impact of Methionine Oxidation on Calmodulin Structural Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Megan R.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J.; Olenek, Michael J.; Klein, Jennifer C.; Thomas, David D.

    2014-01-01

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous x-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM’s structural heterogeneity in solution: In both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ~4 nm (closed) and another at ~6 nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each population ranging from 1.5 to 3 nm. Both mutations (M109Q and M124Q) decrease the effect of Ca on the structure of CaM, primarily by decreasing the closed-to-open equilibrium constant in the presence of Ca. We propose that Met oxidation alters CaM’s functional interaction with its target proteins by perturbing this Ca-dependent structural shift. PMID:25478640

  3. Temperature dependent conformation studies of Calmodulin Protein using Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneja, Sahil; Bhartiya, Vivek Kumar; Negi, Sunita

    2016-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) protein plays a very crucial role in the calcium signaling inside the eukaryotic cell structure [1, 2]. It can also bind to other proteins/targets and facilitate various activities inside the cell [3, 4]. Temperature dependent conformation changes in the CaM protein are studied with extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The quantitative comparison of simulation data with various forms of experimental results probing different aspects of the folding process can facilitate robust assessment of the accuracy of the calculations. It can also provide a detailed structural interpretation for the experimental observations as well as physical interpretation for theory behind different aspects of the experiment. Earlier these kinds of studies have been performed experimentally using fluorescence measurements as in [5]. The calcium bound form of CaM is observed to undergo a reversible conformation change in the range 295-301 K at calcium ion concentration 150 mM. The transition temperature was observed to depend on the calcium ion concentration of the protein. Leap-dynamics approach was used earlier to study the temperature dependent conformation change of CaM [6]. At 290 K, both the N- and C-lobes were stable, at 325 K, the C-lobe unfolds whereas at 360 both the lobes unfold [6]. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of 100 ns each for the temperatures 325 K and 375 K on the apo form of CaM, 3CLN and 1CFD. A remarkable dependence of the temperature is observed on the overall dynamics of both the forms of the protein as reported in our earlier study [7, 8]. 1CFD shows a much flexible linker as compared to 3CLN whereas the overall dynamics of the lobes mainly N-lobe is observed to be more in later case. Salt bridge formation between the residues 2 (ASP) and 148 (LYS) leads to a more compact form of 1CFD at 325 K. The unfolding of the protein is observed to increase with the increase in the temperature similar to the earlier reported

  4. Direct detection of calmodulin tuning by ryanodine receptor channel targets using a Ca2+-sensitive acrylodan-labeled calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Fruen, Bradley R; Balog, Edward M; Schafer, Janet; Nitu, Florentin R; Thomas, David D; Cornea, Razvan L

    2005-01-11

    Calmodulin (CaM) activates the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) at nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations but inhibits it at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, indicating that binding of Ca(2+) to CaM may provide a molecular switch for modulating RyR1 channel activity. To directly examine the Ca(2+) sensitivity of RyR1-complexed CaM, we used an environment-sensitive acrylodan adduct of CaM. The resulting (ACR)CaM probe displayed high-affinity binding to, and Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of, RyR1 similar to that of unlabeled wild-type (WT) CaM. Upon addition of Ca(2+), (ACR)CaM exhibited a substantial (>50%) decrease in fluorescence (K(Ca) = 2.7 +/- 0.8 microM). A peptide derived from the RyR1 CaM binding domain (RyR1(3614)(-)(43)) caused an even more pronounced Ca(2+)-dependent fluorescence decrease, and a >or=10-fold leftward shift in its K(Ca) (0.2 +/- 0.1 microM). In the presence of intact RyR1 channels in SR vesicles, (ACR)CaM fluorescence spectra were distinct from those in the presence of RyR1(3614)(-)(43), although a Ca(2+)-dependent decrease in fluorescence was still observed. The K(Ca) for (ACR)CaM fluorescence in the presence of SR (0.8 +/- 0.4 microM) was greater than in the presence of RyR1(3614)(-)(43) but was consistent with functional determinations showing the conversion of (ACR)CaM from channel activator (apoCaM) to inhibitor (Ca(2+)CaM) at Ca(2+) concentrations between 0.3 and 1 microM. These results indicate that binding to RyR1 targets evokes significant changes in the CaM structure and Ca(2+) sensitivity (i.e., CaM tuning). However, changes resulting from binding of CaM to the full-length, tetrameric channels are clearly distinct from changes caused by the RyR1-derived peptide. We suggest that the Ca(2+) sensitivity of CaM when in complex with full-length channels may be tuned to respond to physiologically relevant changes in Ca(2+).

  5. Regulated Expression of a Calmodulin Isoform Alters Growth and Development in Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Takezawa, D.; An, G.; Han, T.-J.

    1996-01-01

    A transgene approach was taken to study the consequences of altered expression of a calmodutin iso-form on plant growth and development. Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM 1 to 8) have been isolated and characterized. Among the potato calmodulin isoforms studied, PCM 1 differs from the other isoforms because of its unique amino acid substitutions. Transgenic potato plants were produced carrying sense construct of PCM 1 fused to the CAMV 35S promoter. Transgenic plants showing a moderate increase in PCM 1 MRNA exhibited strong apical dominance, produced elongated tubers, and were taller than the controls. Interestingly, the plants expressing the highest level of PCM 1 MRNA did not form underground tubers. Instead, these transgenic plants produced aerial tubers when allowed to grow for longer periods. The expression of different calmodulin isoforms (PCM 1, 5, 6, and 8) was studied in transgenic plants. Among the four potato calmodulin isoforms, only the expression of PCM 1 MRNA was altered in transgenic plants, while the expression of other isoforms was not significantly altered. Western analysis revealed increased PCM 1 protein in transgenic plants, indicating that the expression of both MRNA and protein are altered in transgenic plants. These results suggest that increasing the expression of PCM 1 alters growth and development in potato plants.

  6. Transient dissociation of polyribosomes and concurrent recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts in gravistimulated maize pulvini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilmann, I.; Shin, J.; Huang, J.; Perera, I. Y.; Davies, E.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of polyribosome abundance were studied in gravistimulated maize (Zea mays) stem pulvini. During the initial 15 min of gravistimulation, the amount of large polyribosomes transiently decreased. The transient decrease in polyribosome levels was accompanied by a transient decrease in polyribosome-associated mRNA. After 30 min of gravistimulation, the levels of polyribosomes and the amount of polyribosome-associated mRNA gradually increased over 24 h up to 3- to 4-fold of the initial value. Within 15 min of gravistimulation, total levels of transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were elevated 5-fold in maize pulvinus total RNA. Transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were recruited into polyribosomes within 15 min of gravistimulation. Over 4 h of gravistimulation, a gradual increase in the association of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts with polyribosomes was seen predominantly in the lower one-half of the maize pulvinus; the association of transcripts for vacuolar invertase with polyribosomes did not change over this period. Our results suggest that within 15 min of gravistimulation, the translation of the majority of transcripts associated with polyribosomes decreased, resembling a general stress response. Recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts into polyribosomes occurred predominantly in the lower pulvinus one-half during the first 4 h when the presentation time for gravistimulation in the maize pulvinus is not yet complete.

  7. Microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis for the discovery and characterisation of calmodulin binding partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herling, Therese; Linse, Sara; Knowles, Tuomas

    2015-03-01

    Non-covalent and transient protein-ligand interactions are integral to cellular function and malfunction. Key steps in signalling and regulatory pathways rely on reversible non-covalent protein-protein binding or ion chelation. Here we present a microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis method for detecting and characterising protein-ligand interactions in solution. We apply this method to probe the binding equilibria of calmodulin, a central protein to calcium signalling pathways. In this study we characterise the specific binding of calmodulin to phosphorylase kinase, a known target, and creatine kinase, which we identify as a putative binding partner through a protein array screen and surface plasmon resonance experiments. We verify the interaction between calmodulin and creatine kinase in solution using free-flow electrophoresis and investigate the effect of calcium and sodium chloride on the calmodulin-ligand binding affinity in free solution without the presence of a potentially interfering surface. Our results demonstrate the general applicability of quantitative microfluidic electrophoresis to characterise binding equilibria between biomolecules in solution.

  8. Absolute configuration of acremoxanthone C, a potent calmodulin inhibitor from Purpureocillium lilacinum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of an extract prepared from the culture medium and mycelium of Purpureocillium lilacinum allowed the isolation of two calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors, namely, acremoxanthone C (1) and acremonidin A (2). The absolute configuration of 1 was established as 2R, 3R, 1'S, 11'S, ...

  9. Structural plasticity of calmodulin on the surface of CaF2 nanoparticles preserves its biological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astegno, Alessandra; Maresi, Elena; Marino, Valerio; Dominici, Paola; Pedroni, Marco; Piccinelli, Fabio; Dell'Orco, Daniele

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly used in biomedical applications and are especially attractive as biocompatible and biodegradable protein delivery systems. Herein, the interaction between biocompatible 25 nm CaF2 nanoparticles and the ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin has been investigated in order to assess the potential of these particles to serve as suitable surface protein carriers. Calmodulin is a multifunctional messenger protein that activates a wide variety of signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells by changing its conformation in a calcium-dependent manner. Isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism studies have shown that the interaction between calmodulin and CaF2 nanoparticles occurs with physiologically relevant affinity and that the binding process is fully reversible, occurring without significant alterations in protein secondary and tertiary structures. Experiments performed with a mutant form of calmodulin having an impaired Ca2+-binding ability in the C-terminal lobe suggest that the EF-hand Ca2+-binding motifs are directly involved in the binding of calmodulin to the CaF2 matrix. The residual capability of nanoparticle-bound calmodulin to function as a calcium sensor protein, binding to and altering the activity of a target protein, was successfully probed by biochemical assays. Even if efficiently carried by CaF2 nanoparticles, calmodulin may dissociate, thus retaining the ability to bind the peptide encompassing the putative C-terminal calmodulin-binding domain of glutamate decarboxylase and activate the enzyme. We conclude that the high flexibility and structural plasticity of calmodulin are responsible for the preservation of its function when bound in high amounts to a nanoparticle surface.Nanoparticles are increasingly used in biomedical applications and are especially attractive as biocompatible and biodegradable protein delivery systems. Herein, the interaction between biocompatible 25 nm CaF2 nanoparticles and the ubiquitous

  10. Nonconserved Ca2+/Calmodulin Binding Sites in Munc13s Differentially Control Synaptic Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lipstein, Noa; Schaks, Sabine; Dimova, Kalina; Kalkhof, Stefan; Ihling, Christian; Kölbel, Knut; Ashery, Uri; Rhee, JeongSeop; Brose, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Munc13s are presynaptic proteins that mediate synaptic vesicle priming and thereby control the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles. During high synaptic activity, Munc13-1 and its closely related homolog, ubMunc13-2, bind Ca2+/calmodulin, resulting in enhanced priming activity and in changes of short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. Here, we studied whether bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, two remote isoforms of Munc13-1 with a neuronal subtype-specific expression pattern, mediate synaptic vesicle priming and regulate short-term synaptic plasticity in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. We identified a single functional Ca2+/calmodulin binding site in these isoforms and provide structural evidence that all Munc13s employ a common mode of interaction with calmodulin despite the lack of sequence homology between their Ca2+/calmodulin binding sites. Electrophysiological analysis showed that, during high-frequency activity, Ca2+/calmodulin binding positively regulates the priming activity of bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, resulting in an increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles and subsequently in strong short-term synaptic enhancement of neurotransmission. We conclude that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent regulation of priming activity is structurally and functionally conserved in all Munc13 proteins, and that the composition of Munc13 isoforms in a neuron differentially controls its short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. PMID:22966208

  11. Apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin bind to the same region on the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C. P.; Rodney, G.; Zhang, J. Z.; Santacruz-Toloza, L.; Strasburg, G.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    The skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (RYR1) is regulated by calmodulin in both its Ca2+-free (apocalmodulin) and Ca2+-bound (Ca2+ calmodulin) states. Apocalmodulin is an activator of the channel, and Ca2+ calmodulin is an inhibitor of the channel. Both apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin binding sites on RYR1 are destroyed by a mild tryptic digestion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes, but calmodulin (either form), bound to RYR1 prior to tryptic digestion, protects both the apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin sites from tryptic destruction. The protected sites are after arginines 3630 and 3637 on RYR1. These studies suggest that both Ca2+ calmodulin and apocalmodulin bind to the same or overlapping regions on RYR1 and block access of trypsin to sites at amino acids 3630 and 3637. This sequence is part of a predicted Ca2+ CaM binding site of amino acids 3614-3642 [Takeshima, H., et al. (1989) Nature 339, 439-445].

  12. The essential mitotic target of calmodulin is the 110-kilodalton component of the spindle pole body in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, J R; Sundberg, H A; Chang, B H; Muller, E G; Davis, T N

    1993-01-01

    Two independent methods identified the spindle pole body component Nuf1p/Spc110p as the essential mitotic target of calmodulin. Extragenic suppressors of cmd1-1 were isolated and found to define three loci, XCM1, XCM2, and XCM3 (extragenic suppressor of cmd1-1). The gene encoding a dominant suppressor allele of XCM1 was cloned. On the basis of DNA sequence analysis, genetic cosegregation, and mutational analysis, XCM1 was identified as NUF1/SPC110. Independently, a C-terminal portion of Nuf1p/Spc110p, amino acid residues 828 to 944, was isolated as a calmodulin-binding protein by the two-hybrid system. As assayed by the two-hybrid system, Nuf1p/Spc110p interacts with wild-type calmodulin and triple-mutant calmodulins defective in binding Ca2+ but not with two mutant calmodulins that confer a temperature-sensitive phenotype. Deletion analysis by the two-hybrid system mapped the calmodulin-binding site of Nuf1p/Spc110p to amino acid residues 900 to 927. Direct binding between calmodulin and Nuf1p/Spc110p was demonstrated by a modified gel overlay assay. Furthermore, indirect immunofluorescence with fixation procedures known to aid visualization of spindle pole body components localized calmodulin to the spindle pole body. Sequence analysis of five suppressor alleles of NUF1/SPC110 indicated that suppression of cmd1-1 occurs by C-terminal truncation of Nuf1p/Spc110p at amino acid residues 856, 863, or 881, thereby removing the calmodulin-binding site. Images PMID:8247006

  13. Ca2+-dependent inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Haga, K; Tsuga, H; Haga, T

    1997-02-11

    Agonist- or light-dependent phosphorylation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) or rhodopsin by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) was found to be inhibited by calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The phosphorylation was fully inhibited in the absence of G protein betagamma subunits and partially inhibited in the presence of betagamma subunits. The dose-response curve for stimulation by betagamma subunits of the m2 and rhodopsin phosphorylation was shifted to the higher concentration of betagamma subunits by addition of Ca2+-calmodulin. The phosphorylation by GRK2 of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing a peptide corresponding to the central part of the third intracellular loop of m2 receptors (I3-GST) was not affected by Ca2+-calmodulin in the presence or absence of betagamma subunits, but the agonist-dependent stimulation of I3-GST phosphorylation by an I3-deleted m2 receptor mutant in the presence of betagamma subunits was suppressed by Ca2+-calmodulin. These results indicate that Ca2+-calmodulin does not directly interact with the catalytic site of GRK2 but inhibits the kinase activity of GRK2 by interfering with the activation of GRK2 by agonist-bound m2 receptors and G protein betagamma subunits. In agreement with the assumption that GRK2 activity is suppressed by the increase in intracellular Ca2+, the sequestration of m2 receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was found to be attenuated by the treatment with a Ca2+ ionophore, A23187.

  14. Inhibitory effects of calmodulin antagonists on urinary enzyme excretion in rats after nephrotoxic doses of mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S.D. Jr.; Cox, J.L.; Giles, R.C. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    Prochlorperazine, a phenothiazine antiemetic, has been reported to protect rats against mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/)-induced nephrotoxicity. Mercuric ion and 12 other divalent metal ions of toxicologic importance inhibit the activity of calmodulin, a ubiquitous intracellular calcium receptor and regulatory protein, at physiologically relevant concentrations. Phenothiazines, including prochlorperazine, are reversible calmodulin antagonists, and as such they interact with divalent calcium at the level of calmodulin. It was of interest therefore to evaluate the comparative effects of several phenothiazines on HgCl/sub 2/-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

  15. Role of Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants. Progress report, FY91

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-12-31

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  16. Direct interaction between the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine brain with /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin and /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Minocherhomjee, A.M.; Selfe, S.; Flowers, N.J.; Storm, D.R.

    1987-07-14

    A calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase has been purified to apparent homogeneity from bovine cerebral cortex using calmodulin-Sepharose followed by forskolin-Sepharose and wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose. The final product appeared as one major polypeptide of approximately 135,000 daltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. This polypeptide was a major component of the protein purified through calmodulin-Sepharose. The catalytic subunit was stimulated 3-4-fold by calmodulin (CaM) with a turnover number greater than 1000 min/sup -1/ and was directly inhibited by adenosine. The catalytic subunit of the enzyme interacted directly with /sup 125/I-CaM on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay system, and this interaction was Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration dependent. In addition, the catalytic subunit was shown to directly bind /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin using a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay technique, and N-acetylglucosamine inhibited binding of the lectin to the catalytic subunit. Calmodulin did not inhibit binding of wheat germ agglutinin to the catalytic subunit, and the binding of calmodulin was unaffected by wheat germ agglutinin. These data illustrate that the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase is a glycoprotein which interacts directly with calmodulin and that adenosine can inhibit the enzyme without intervening receptors or G coupling proteins. It is concluded that the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase is a transmembrane protein with a domain accessible from the outer surface of the cell.

  17. Behavior of a fluorescent analogue of calmodulin in living 3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have prepared and partially characterized a lissamine-rhodamine B fluorescent analogue of calmodulin, LRB-CM. The analogue had a dye/protein ratio of approximately 1.0 and contained no free dye or contaminating labeled proteins. LRB-CM was indistinguishable from native calmodulin upon SDS PAGE and in assays of phosphodiesterase and myosin light chain kinase. The emission spectrum of LRB-CM was insensitive to changes in pH, ionic strength, and temperature over the physiological range, but the apparent quantum yield was influenced somewhat by divalent cation concentration. LRB-CM injected into living Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts became associated with nitrobenzoxadiazole- phallacidin staining stress fibers in some interphase cells. LRB-CM and acetamidofluorescein-labeled actin co-injected into the same cell both became associated with fibers in some cells, but in most cases association of the two analogues with fibers was mutually exclusive. This suggests that calmodulin may differ from actin in the timing of incorporation into stress fibers or that we have distinguished distinct populations of stress fibers. We were able to detect no direct interaction of LRB-CM with actin by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FRAP) of aqueous solutions. Interaction of LRB-CM with myosin light chain kinase also was not detected by FRAP. This suggests that the mean lifetime of the calmodulin-myosin light chain kinase complex is too short to affect the diffusion coefficient of calmodulin. We examined various fluorescent derivatives of proteins and dextrans as suitable control molecules for quantitative fluorescent analogue cytochemistry in living cells. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans were found to be preferable to all the proteins tested, since their mobilities in cytoplasm were inversely dependent on molecular size and there was no evidence of binding to intracellular components. In contrast, FRAP of LRB-CM in the cytoplasm of living 3T3 cells suggested that the analogue

  18. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress disrupts calcium binding on calmodulin: More evidence for oxidative stress in vitiligo

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, K.U. . E-mail: k.schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, N.C.J.; Zothner, C.; Abou Elloof, M.M.; Wood, J.M.

    2007-08-17

    Patients with acute vitiligo have low epidermal catalase expression/activities and accumulate 10{sup -3} M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. One consequence of this severe oxidative stress is an altered calcium homeostasis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Here, we show decreased epidermal calmodulin expression in acute vitiligo. Since 10{sup -3}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidises methionine and tryptophan residues in proteins, we examined calcium binding to calmodulin in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} utilising {sup 45}calcium. The results showed that all four calcium atoms exchanged per molecule of calmodulin. Since oxidised calmodulin looses its ability to activate calcium ATPase, enzyme activities were followed in full skin biopsies from lesional skin of patients with acute vitiligo (n = 6) and healthy controls (n = 6). The results yielded a 4-fold decrease of ATPase activities in the patients. Computer simulation of native and oxidised calmodulin confirmed the loss of all four calcium ions from their specific EF-hand domains. Taken together H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation affects calcium binding in calmodulin leading to perturbed calcium homeostasis and perturbed L-phenylalanine-uptake in the epidermis of acute vitiligo.

  20. Calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Li, L; Yang, P; Ma, Z

    2017-02-01

    The migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) shows aggregative traits in nymph marching bands and swarm formations through mutual olfactory attraction of conspecifics. However, olfactory preference in different nymph stages in gregarious locusts is not sufficiently explored. In this study, we found that the nymph olfactory preference for gregarious volatiles exhibited obvious variations at different developmental stages. The gregarious locusts show attractive response to conspecific volatiles from the third stadium. Transcriptome comparison between third- and fourth-stadium nymphs showed that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) pathways are significantly enriched. Amongst the genes present in GPCR pathways, the expression level of calmodulin in locust brains significantly increased from the third- to the fourth-stadium nymphs. Amongst the four octopamine receptors (OARs) belonging to the GPCR family, only OAR α1 showed similar expression patterns to those of calmodulin, and knockdown of OAR α1 reduced the expression level of calmodulin. RNA interference of calmodulin decreased locomotion and induced the loss of olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Moreover, the activation of OAR α1 in calmodulin-knockdown locusts did not induce olfactory attraction of the nymphs to gregarious volatiles. Thus, calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 (OA-OAR α1) signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Overall, this study provides novel insights into the mechanism of OA-OAR α1 signalling involved in olfactory attraction of gregarious locusts.

  1. Distribution of calmodulin in corn seedlings - Immunocytochemical localization in coleoptiles and root apices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Immunofluorescence techniques have been used to study the distribution of calmodulin in several tissues in etiolated corn (Zea mays, var. Bear Hybrid) seedlings. Uniform staining was seen in the background cytoplasm of most cell types. Cell walls and vacuoles were not stained. In coleoptile mesophyll cells the nucleoplasm of most nuclei was stained as was the stroma of most amyloplasts. The lumen border of mature tracheary elements in coleoptiles also stained. In the rootcap the most intensely stained regions were the cytoplasms of columella cells and of the outermost cells enmeshed in the layer of secreted slime. Nuclei in the rootcap cells did not stain distinctly, but those in all cell types of the root meristem did. Also in the root meristem, the cytoplasm of metaxylem elements stained brightly. These results are compared and contrasted with previous data on the localization of calmodulin in pea root apices and epicotyls and discussed in relation to current hypotheses on mechanisms of gravitropism.

  2. Towards a unified theory of calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+ channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca2+ and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms. PMID:25966688

  3. Towards a Unified Theory of Calmodulin Regulation (Calmodulation) of Voltage-Gated Calcium and Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Dick, Ivy E; Sang, Lingjie; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Kang, Po Wei; Niu, Jacqueline; Banerjee, Rahul; Yang, Wanjun; Babich, Jennifer S; Issa, John B; Lee, Shin Rong; Namkung, Ho; Li, Jiangyu; Zhang, Manning; Yang, Philemon S; Bazzazi, Hojjat; Adams, Paul J; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, Daniel N; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca(2+) channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca(2+) and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms.

  4. Synthesis and decay of calmodulin-ubiquitin conjugates in cell-free extracts of various rabbit tissues.

    PubMed

    Laub, M; Jennissen, H P

    1997-06-27

    Calmodulin is the natural substrate for ubiquitin-ligation by the enzyme ubiquitin-calmodulin ligase (uCaM-synthetase; EC 6.3.2.21). The activity of this ligase is regulated by the binding of the second messenger Ca2+ to the substrate calmodulin, which increases the activity ca. 10-fold. Up till now, two components of the ligase could be identified: uCaM Syn-F1 and uCaM Syn-F2, the first of which binds to ubiquitin and the second which binds to calmodulin. Since the physiological role of this enzyme is still unclear, this study was designed to examine whether the activity of uCaM-Synthetase in 40,000 x g tissue supernatants correlates with the calmodulin content in the various tissues. In reticulocytes, spleen, erythrocytes, testis and brain, which are rich in uCaM synthetase, the tissue contents calculated on the basis of activity measurements were between 4-80-fold higher than in red and white skeletal muscle. These activities did not correlate with the respective calmodulin contents of the tissues indicating that other factors were determining these enzyme levels. A second aim was to gain information on the role of the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway in those tissues displaying uCaM synthetase activity. In the reticulocyte system which contains the classical ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway as measured with 125I-BSA, no ubiquitin-dependent degradation of calmodulin could be detected. We therefore examined the other tissues of the rabbit with the substrate 125I-BSA and succeeded in finding a ubiquitin-independent ATP-dependent proteolytic activity in every case but no ubiquitin-dependent activity. The ubiquitin-independent activity was highest in smooth muscle and red skeletal muscle being ca. 3-4-fold higher than in lung and testis. In 50% of the tissue crude extracts the time curve of calmodulin ubiquitylation progressed through a maximum indicating a dynamic steady state based on conjugate synthesis and decay. If a ubiquitylation pulse

  5. Mechanistic Basis of Calmodulin Mediated Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activation and Antiestrogen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    cancers . Calmodulin (CaM) is an obligatory ERa activator. Moreover, antiestrogens (tamoxifen) bind tightly to CaM, and some therapeutic benefits of...antiestrogens for breast cancers are hypothesized to derive from this interaction. The purpose and scope of the research is to define the structural...antiestrogens, including the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent for estrogen-dependent breast cancers , tamoxifen (TAM). The therapeutic effects of

  6. Endogenous Polysialic Acid Based Micelles for Calmodulin Antagonist Delivery against Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Gao, Yin-Ping; Lu, Nan-Nan; Li, Wei-Shuo; Xu, Ji-Fang; Ying, Xiao-Ying; Wu, Gang; Liao, Mei-Hua; Tan, Chao; Shao, Ling-Xiao; Lu, Ying-Mei; Zhang, Chen; Fukunaga, Kohji; Han, Feng; Du, Yong-Zhong

    2016-12-28

    Clinical treatment for vascular dementia still remains a challenge mainly due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, a micelle based on polysialic acid (PSA), which is a hydrophilic and endogenous carbohydrate polymer, was designed to deliver calmodulin antagonist for therapy of vascular dementia. PSA was first chemically conjugated with octadecylamine (ODA), and the obtained PSA-ODA copolymer could self-assemble into micelle in aqueous solution with a 120.0 μg/mL critical micelle concentration. The calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle, featuring sustained drug release behavior over a period of 72 h with a 3.6% (w/w) drug content and a 107.0 ± 4.0 nm size was then fabricated. The PSA-ODA micelle could cross the BBB mainly via active endocytosis by brain endothelial cells followed by transcytosis. In a water maze test for spatial learning, calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle significantly reduced the escape latencies of right unilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (rUCCAO) mice with dosage significantly reduced versus free drug. The decrease of hippocampal phospho-CaMKII (Thr286/287) and phospho-synapsin I (Ser603) was partially restored in rUCCAO mice following calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle treatment. Consistent with the restored CaMKII phosphorylation, the elevation of BrdU/NeuN double-positive cells in the same context was also observed. Overall, the PSA-ODA micelle developed from the endogenous material might promote the development of therapeutic approaches for improving the efficacy of brain-targeted drug delivery and have great potential for vascular dementia treatment.

  7. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize.

    PubMed

    Stinemetz, C L; Hasenstein, K H; Young, L M; Evans, M L

    1992-11-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  8. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  9. Calcium transport in vesicles from carrot cells: Stimulation by calmodulin and phosphatidylserine. [Daucus carota cv. Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Wenling Hsieh; Sze, Heven )

    1991-05-01

    The transport properties of Ca-pumping ATPases from carrot (Daucus carota cv. Danvers) tissue culture cells were studied. ATP dependent Ca transport in vesicles that comigrated with an ER marker, was stimulated 3-4 fold by calmodulin. Cyclopiazonic acid (a specific inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase) partially inhibited oxalate-stimulated Ca transport activity; however, it had little or not effect on calmodulin-stimulated Ca uptake. The results suggested the presence of two types of Ca ATPases, and ER- and a plasma membrane-type. Incubation of membranes with (gamma{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the formation of a single acyl ({sup 32}P) phosphoprotein of 120 kDa. Formation of this phosphoprotein was dependent on Ca, and enhanced by La {sup 3+}, characteristic of the plasma membrane CaATPase. Acidic phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, stimulated Ca transport, similar to their effect on the erythrocyte plasma membrane CaATPase. These results would indicate that the calmodulin-stimulated Ca transport originated in large part from a plasma membrane-type Ca pump of 120 kDa.

  10. Structural and Functional Consequences of Connexin 36 (Cx36) Interaction with Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Ryan C. F.; Smirnova, Ekaterina; Brown, Cherie A.; Zoidl, Christiane; Spray, David C.; Donaldson, Logan W.; Zoidl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Functional plasticity of neuronal gap junctions involves the interaction of the neuronal connexin36 with calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). The important relationship between Cx36 and CaMKII must also be considered in the context of another protein partner, Ca2+ loaded calmodulin, binding an overlapping site in the carboxy-terminus of Cx36. We demonstrate that CaM and CaMKII binding to Cx36 is calcium-dependent, with Cx36 able to engage with CaM outside of the gap junction plaque. Furthermore, Ca2+ loaded calmodulin activates Cx36 channels, which is different to other connexins. The NMR solution structure demonstrates that CaM binds Cx36 in its characteristic compact state with major hydrophobic contributions arising from W277 at anchor position 1 and V284 at position 8 of Cx36. Our results establish Cx36 as a hub binding Ca2+ loaded CaM and they identify this interaction as a critical step with implications for functions preceding the initiation of CaMKII mediated plasticity at electrical synapses. PMID:27917108

  11. Functional consequences of single amino acid substitutions in calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, P; Munier, H; Gilles, A M; Krin, E; Porumb, T; Bârzu, O; Sarfati, R; Pellecuer, C; Danchin, A

    1991-01-01

    Calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis and Bacillus anthracis are two cognate bacterial toxins. Three short regions of 13-24 amino acid residues in these proteins exhibit between 66 and 80% identity. Site-directed mutagenesis of four residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase situated in the second (Asp188, Asp190) and third (His298, Glu301) segments of identity were accompanied by important decrease, or total loss, of enzyme activity. The calmodulin-binding properties of mutated proteins showed no important differences when compared to the wild-type enzyme. Apart from the loss of enzymatic activity, the most important change accompanying replacement of Asp188 by other amino acids was a dramatic decrease in binding of 3'-anthraniloyl-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, a fluorescent analogue of ATP. From these results we concluded that the two neighbouring aspartic acid residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase, conserved in many other ATP-utilizing enzymes, are essential for binding the Mg(2+)-nucleotide complex, and for subsequent catalysis. Replacement of His298 and Glu301 by other amino acid residues affected the nucleotide-binding properties of adenylate cyclase to a lesser degree suggesting that they might be important in the mechanism of enzyme activation by calmodulin, rather than being involved directly in catalysis. PMID:2050107

  12. Identification of a calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase in the endoplasmic reticulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, B.; Ichida, A.; Wang, Y.; Gens, J. S.; Pickard, B. G.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    A unique subfamily of calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-ATPases was recently identified in plants. In contrast to the most closely related pumps in animals, plasma membrane-type Ca2+-ATPases, members of this new subfamily are distinguished by a calmodulin-regulated autoinhibitor located at the N-terminal instead of a C-terminal end. In addition, at least some isoforms appear to reside in non-plasma membrane locations. To begin delineating their functions, we investigated the subcellular localization of isoform ACA2p (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2 protein) in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ACA2p resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In buoyant density sucrose gradients performed with and without Mg2+, ACA2p cofractionated with an ER membrane marker and a typical "ER-type" Ca2+-ATPase, ACA3p/ECA1p. To visualize its subcellular localization, ACA2p was tagged with a green fluorescence protein at its C terminus (ACA2-GFPp) and expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. We collected fluorescence images from live root cells using confocal and computational optical-sectioning microscopy. ACA2-GFPp appeared as a fluorescent reticulum, consistent with an ER location. In addition, we observed strong fluorescence around the nuclei of mature epidermal cells, which is consistent with the hypothesis that ACA2p may also function in the nuclear envelope. An ER location makes ACA2p distinct from all other calmodulin-regulated pumps identified in plants or animals.

  13. Modulation of radiation induced lipid peroxidation by phospholipase A 2 and calmodulin antagonists: Relevance to detoxification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1995-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with 0.9 Gy s -1. Lipid peroxidation initiated by ionizing radiation was enhanced by phospholipase A 2, and required both phospholipase A 2 and GSH-peroxidase for consecutive action to convert fatty acid peroxides into corresponding alcohols. The ability of phospholipase A 2 to enhance lipid peroxidation was increased in presence of Ca 2+. However, in combination, phospholipase A 2 and GSH-peroxidase were effective in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. These findings show that free fatty acid peroxides considerably increase the peroxidation. Calmodulin antagonists inhibit lipid peroxidation and decrease the radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from the membranes. Our results suggest the importance of Ca 2+ dependent phospholipase A 2 in detoxification of fatty acid peroxides in the membranes. It is quite possible that scavenging of free radicals by calmodulin antagonists lower the formation of hydroperoxides, resulting in the decrease in activity of phospholipase A 2. Alternatively, decrease in Ca 2+ release due to the calmodulin antagonists might have affected the activity of phospholipase A 2. Our observations might be of considerable significance in the understanding of post irradiation effect on biological membranes.

  14. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  15. Kinetic analysis of the calmodulin-binding region of the plasma membrane calcium pump isoform 4b.

    PubMed

    Penheiter, Alan R; Filoteo, Adelaida G; Penniston, John T; Caride, Ariel J

    2005-02-15

    The sequence L(1086)RRGQILWFRGLNRIQTQIKVVKAFHSS(1113) (peptide C28) is responsible for calmodulin binding to PMCA4b. In this work, peptides following the above sequence were progressively shortened either at the N-terminus (C28NDelta3, C28NDelta5, or C28NDelta6) or at the C-terminus (C20, C22, C23, and C25). Competitive inhibition of PMCA activity was used to measure apparent dissociation constants of the complexes between calmodulin and C28 or progressively shortened peptides. Additionally, equilibrium titrations were used to measure the apparent dissociation constants of the various peptides with TA-calmodulin by changes in TA-calmodulin fluorescence and Trp fluorescence of the peptides. At the N-terminus, deletion of five residues did not change calmodulin affinity, but deletion of six residues resulted in a 5-fold decrease in affinity. There were no major differences in the time course of TA-CaM binding, but C28NDelta6 exhibited a different time course of Trp fluorescence change. At the C-terminus, deletion of five residues (C23) or more resulted in a net increase in fluorescence of TA-CaM upon binding, while longer peptides (C25 and C28) produced both a transient increase and a net decrease in the fluorescence of TA-CaM. Global regression analysis revealed that binding of TA-CaM to the C23 peptide could be fit by a two-step model, while longer peptides required three-step models for adequate fitting. TA-calmodulin dissociated rapidly from C23, C22, and C20, resulting in a marked increase in apparent K(d). Thus, the sequence I(1091)LWFRGLNRIQTQIKVVKAF(1110) (C25NDelta5) is required to reproduce the calmodulin-binding properties of C28. When F(1110) was replaced by A, the TA-calmodulin association and dissociation kinetics resembled C23 kinetics, but changing V(1107) to A produced a smaller effect, suggesting that F(1110), rather than V(1107), is the main anchor for the N-terminal lobe of calmodulin in PMCA4b.

  16. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  17. Catalase activity is modulated by calcium and calmodulin in detached mature leaves of sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Afiyanti, Mufidah; Chen, Hsien-Jung

    2014-01-15

    Catalase (CAT) functions as one of the key enzymes in the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and affects the H2O2 homeostasis in plants. In sweet potato, a major catalase isoform was detected, and total catalase activity showed the highest level in mature leaves (L3) compared to immature (L1) and completely yellow, senescent leaves (L5). The major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity were strongly suppressed by ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). This inhibition could be specifically and significantly mitigated in mature L3 leaves by exogenous CaCl2, but not MgCl2 or CoCl2. EGTA also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Furthermore, chlorpromazine (CPZ), a calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor, drastically suppressed the major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity, and this suppression was alleviated by exogenous sweet potato calmodulin (SPCAM) fusion protein in L3 leaves. CPZ also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Protein blot hybridization showed that both anti-catalase SPCAT1 and anti-calmodulin SPCAM antibodies detect a band at the same position, which corresponds to the activity of the major catalase isoform from unboiled, but not boiled crude protein extract of L3 leaves. An inverse correlation between the major catalase isoform/total enzymatic activity and the H2O2 level was also observed. These data suggest that sweet potato CAT activity is modulated by CaCl2 and SPCAM, and plays an important role in H2O2 homeostasis in mature leaves. Association of SPCAM with the major CAT isoform is required and regulates the in-gel CAT activity band.

  18. Autophosphorylation-dependent inactivation of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by the presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain unlike other known calmodulin- dependent kinases. Ca(2+)-Binding to the visinin-like domain leads to autophosphorylation and changes in the affinity for calmodulin [Sathyanarayanan P.V., Cremo C.R. & Poovaiah B.W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422]. Here, we report that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK results in time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. This time-dependent loss of activity or self-inactivation due to autophosphorylation is also dependent on reaction pH and ATP concentration. Inactivation of the enzyme resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme due to self-association. Specifically, autophosphorylation in the presence of 200 microm ATP at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme with a 33% loss in enzyme activity. Under similar conditions at pH 6.5, the enzyme lost 67% of its activity and at pH 8.5, 84% enzyme activity was lost. Furthermore, autophosphorylation at either acidic or alkaline reaction pH lead to the formation of a sedimentable enzyme. Transmission electron microscopic studies on autophosphorylated kinase revealed particles that clustered into branched complexes. The autophosphorylation of wild-type kinase in the presence of AMP-PNP (an unhydrolyzable ATP analog) or the autophosphorylation-site mutant, T267A, did not show formation of branched complexes under the electron microscope. Autophosphorylation- dependent self-inactivation may be a mechanism of modulating the signal transduction pathway mediated by CCaMK.

  19. Increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by morphine-sensitization in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Mehdi; Farahmandfar, Maryam; Ranjbar, Faezeh Esmaeli; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-07-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse, such as morphine, elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect long-lasting changes in some of the important molecules involved in memory processing such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In the present study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression of α and β isoforms and activity of CaMKII in the hippocampus of male rats. Animals were treated for 3 days with saline or morphine (20mg/kg) and following a washout period of 5 days, a challenge dose of morphine (5mg/kg) were administered. The results indicate that morphine administration in pre-treated animals produces behavioral sensitization, as determined by significant increase in locomotion and oral stereotypy behavior. In addition, repeated morphine treatment increased mRNA expression of both α and β isoforms of CaMKII in the hippocampus. The present study also showed that induction of morphine sensitization significantly increased both Ca2+/calmodulin-independent and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent activities of CaMK II in the rat hippocampus. However, acute administration of morphine (5mg/kg) did not alter either α and β CaMKII mRNA expression or CaMKII activity in the hippocampus. The stimulation effects of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression and activity of CaMKII were completely abolished by administration of naloxone, 30min prior to s.c. injections of morphine (20mg/kg/day×3 days). Our data demonstrated that induction of morphine sensitization could effectively modulate the activity and the mRNA expression of CaMKII in the hippocampus and this effect of morphine was exerted by the activation of opioid receptors.

  20. Identification and characterization of CKLiK, a novel granulocyte Ca(++)/calmodulin-dependent kinase.

    PubMed

    Verploegen, S; Lammers, J W; Koenderman, L; Coffer, P J

    2000-11-01

    Human granulocytes are characterized by a variety of specific effector functions involved in host defense. Several widely expressed protein kinases have been implicated in the regulation of these effector functions. A polymerase chain reaction-based strategy was used to identify novel granulocyte-specific kinases. A novel protein kinase complementary DNA with an open reading frame of 357 amino acids was identified with homology to calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase I (CaMKI). This has been termed CaMKI-like kinase (CKLiK). Analysis of CKLiK messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in hematopoietic cells demonstrated an almost exclusive expression in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). Up-regulation of CKLiK mRNA occurs during neutrophilic differentiation of CD34(+) stem cells. CKLiK kinase activity was dependent on Ca(++) and calmodulin as analyzed by in vitro phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator (CREM). Furthermore, CKLiK- transfected cells treated with ionomycin demonstrated an induction of CRE- binding protein (CREB) transcriptional activity compared to control cells. Additionally, CaMK-kinasealpha enhanced CKLiK activity. In vivo activation of CKLiK was shown by addition of interleukin (IL)-8 to a myeloid cell line stably expressing CKLiK. Furthermore inducible activation of CKLiK was sufficient to induce extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. These data identify a novel Ca(++)/calmodulin-dependent PMN- specific kinase that may play a role in Ca(++)-mediated regulation of human granulocyte functions.

  1. Purification and sequencing of radish seed calmodulin antagonists phosphorylated by calcium-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Polya, G M; Chandra, S; Condron, R

    1993-01-01

    A family of radish (Raphanus sativus) calmodulin antagonists (RCAs) was purified from seeds by extraction, centrifugation, batch-wise elution from carboxymethyl-cellulose, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on an SP5PW cation-exchange column. This RCA fraction was further resolved into three calmodulin antagonist polypeptides (RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3) by denaturation in the presence of guanidinium HCl and mercaptoethanol and subsequent reverse-phase HPLC on a C8 column eluted with an acetonitrile gradient in the presence of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and other radish seed proteins are phosphorylated by wheat embryo Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). The RCA preparation contains other CDPK substrates in addition to RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 inhibit chicken gizzard calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase assayed with a myosin-light chain-based synthetic peptide substrate (fifty percent inhibitory concentrations of RCA2 and RCA3 are about 7 and 2 microM, respectively). N-terminal sequencing by sequential Edman degradation of RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 revealed sequences having a high homology with the small subunit of the storage protein napin from Brassica napus and with related proteins. The deduced amino acid sequences of RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and RCA3' (a subform of RCA3) have agreement with average molecular masses from electrospray mass spectrometry of 4537, 4543, 4532, and 4560 kD, respectively. The only sites for serine phosphorylation are near or at the C termini and hence adjacent to the sites of proteolytic precursor cleavage. PMID:8278508

  2. MIPS: a calmodulin-binding protein of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Huiyue; Zang, Xiaonan; Gong, Le; Sun, Hengyi; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2014-08-01

    To study the Ca(2+)/Calmodulin (CaM) signal transduction pathway of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat stress, myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS), a calmodulin-binding protein, was isolated using the yeast two-hybrid system. cDNA and DNA sequences of mips were cloned from G. lemaneiformis by using 5'RACE and genome walking procedures. The MIPS DNA sequence was 2,067 nucleotides long, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,623 nucleotides with no intron. The mips ORF was predicted to encode 540 amino acids, which included the conserved MIPS domain and was 61-67 % similar to that of other species. After analyzing the amino acid sequence of MIPS, the CaM-Binding Domain (CaMBD) was inferred to be at a site spanning from amino acid 212 to amino acid 236. The yeast two-hybrid results proved that MIPS can interact with CaM and that MIPS is a type of calmodulin-binding protein. Next, the expression of CaM and MIPS in wild-type G. lemaneiformis and a heat-tolerant G. lemaneiformis cultivar, "981," were analyzed using real-time PCR under a heat shock of 32 °C. The expression level displayed a cyclical upward trend. Compared with wild type, the CaM expression levels of cultivar 981 were higher, which might directly relate to its resistance to high temperatures. This paper indicates that MIPS and CaM may play important roles in the high-temperature resistance of G. lemaneiformis.

  3. Activation of ERK1/2 and TNF-α production are regulated by calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway during Penicillium marneffei infection within human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renqiong; Ji, Guangquan; Wang, Ling; Ren, Hong; Xi, Liyan

    2016-04-01

    Previous study have shown that Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei)-induced TNF-α production via an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism is an important host defence mechanism against P. marneffei in human macrophages. Therefore, we explore signaling pathway that regulates TNF-α secretion and activation of ERK1/2 by intracellular signaling mechanisms during P. marneffei infection. We found that ERK1/2 activation was dependent on the calcium/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ pathway in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages. In contrast, P. marneffei-induced p38 MAPK activation was negatively regulated by calcium/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ signaling pathway. Furthermore, TNF-α production in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages was also dependent on Ca(2+)/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ pathway. These data suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ pathway plays vital regulatory roles in macrophage activation and subsequent cytokine production during P. marneffei infection.

  4. [Study of the calmodulin-dependent regulation of calcium adenosine triphosphatase of erythrocyte membranes in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Malaia, L T; Petruniaka, V V; Rudyk, Iu S

    1991-01-01

    The inhibitor calmodulin (R 24571) was examined for effects on the activity of red blood cell Ca-ATPases in patients with coronary heart disease during the treatment with nitrates, beta-blockers and calcium antagonists. The maximum activity of Ca-ATPase was measured in the erythrocytes perforated with saponine in the presence of endogenous regulators at a concentration of Ca2+ of 3-5 microM. Patients with high and low Ca-ATPase activity were identified. In the control group R24571 failed to affect Ca-ATPase activity. In patients, the calmodulin inhibitor caused both Ca-ATPase activation and inhibition. The effects of R 24571 correlated with the severity of the patients' condition. In effective therapy, the action of the calmodulin inhibitor became lower on Ca-ATPase activity. It was concluded that there was Ca-ATPase regulation imbalance in patients with coronary heart diseases.

  5. [Calmodulin can induce and control damping oscillations in the plasma membrane Ca2+ -ATPase activity: a kinetic model].

    PubMed

    Gol'dshtein, B N; Aksirov, A M; Zakrzhevskaia, D T

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase is the calcium pump that extrudes calcium ions from cells using ATP hydrolisis for the maintenance of low Ca2+ concentrations in the cell. Calmodulin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase by binding to the autoinhibitory enzyme domain, which allows the access of cytoplasmic ATP and Ca2+ to the active and transport cites. Our kinetic model predicts damped oscillations in the enzyme activity and interprets the known nonmonotonous kinetic behavior of the enzyme in the presence of calmodulin. For the parameters close to the experimental ones, the kinetic model explains the changes in frequency and damping factor of the oscillatory enzyme activity, as dependent on calmodulin concentration. The calculated pre-steady-state curves fit well the known experimental data. The kinetic analysis allows us to assign Ca2+-ATPase to the hysteretic enzymes exhibiting activity oscillations in open systems.

  6. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  7. Dependence upon conditions of the properties of specifically located fluorescent probes on wheat germ calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Robert F.; Waldron, Richard; Juminaga, D.

    1992-04-01

    The single tyrosine, Tyr-139, of wheat germ calmodulin provides an intrinsic fluorescent probe to monitor Ca2+-binding domain 4, while the single cysteine, Cys-27, provides a site for the attachment of an extrinsic fluorescent label to monitor the N-terminal lobe. This has resulted in a means of comparing the response of the N- and C- terminal regions to pH, ionic strength, and Ca2+ level. Ca2+ ligation decreases the mobility sensed by Tyr-139 at neutral pH, while a shift in pH to 5.2 results in a further decrease.

  8. Comparison of the crystal and solution structures of calmodulin and troponin C

    SciTech Connect

    Heidorn, D.B.; Trewhella, J.

    1988-02-09

    X-ray solution scattering data from skeletal muscle troponin C and from calmodulin have been measured. Modeling studies based on the crystal structure coordinates for these proteins show discrepancies between the solution data and the crystal structure that indicate that if the size and shape of the globular domains are the same in solution as in the crystal, the distances between them must be smaller by several angstroms. Bringing the globular domains closer together requires structural changes in the interconnecting helix that joins them.

  9. Does a calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-regulated Mg2+-dependent ATPase contribute to hepatic microsomal calcium uptake?

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, S; Söling, H D

    1987-01-01

    Solubilization of microsomal proteins followed by calmodulin affinity chromatography resulted in the separation of two distinct Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPases (Ca2+-regulated Mg2+-dependent ATPases), one being insensitive to calmodulin (ATPase-1), the other being stimulated about 5-fold by calmodulin (ATPase-2). ATPase-2 accounts for only 8% of total microsomal Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase-activity. ATPase-1 and -2 can also be distinguished by different pH optima, different sensitivity towards inhibition by vanadate and LaCl3, and different apparent Mr values of the phosphoenzyme intermediates (115,000 and 150,000 for ATPase-1 and ATPase-2 respectively). ATPase-1 from liver co-migrated with Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase from rat skeletal-muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum, whereas ATPase-2 from liver co-migrated with calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase derived from rat skeletal-muscle sarcolemma. After separation of parenchymal and nonparenchymal liver cells, a calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase of Mr 150,000 was found only in the non-parenchymal cells. The kinetic parameters of ATPase-2 and the similarity of the apparent Mr of its phosphoenzyme intermediate to that of skeletal-muscle sarcolemma Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase makes it likely that the calmodulin-sensitive Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase found in rat liver microsomal fractions reflects a contamination with plasma membranes (possibly from non-parenchymal cells) rather than a true location in the endoplasmic reticulum of parenchymal liver cells. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2959269

  10. A calcium/calmodulin-regulated member of the receptor-like kinase family confers cold tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianbao; Chaudhuri, Shubho; Yang, Lihua; Du, Liqun; Poovaiah, B W

    2010-03-05

    Cold is a limiting environmental factor that adversely affects plant growth and productivity. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is believed to play a pivotal role in plant response to cold stress, but its exact role is not clearly understood. Here, we report that CRLK1, a novel calcium/calmodulin-regulated receptor-like kinase, is crucial for cold tolerance in plants. CRLK1 has two calmodulin-binding sites with different affinities as follows: one located at residues 369-390 with a K(d) of 25 nm, and the other located at residues 28-112 with a K(d) of 160 nm. Calcium/calmodulin stimulated the kinase activity, but the addition of chlorpromazine, a calmodulin antagonist, blocked its stimulation. CRLK1 is mainly localized in the plasma membrane, and its expression is stimulated by cold and hydrogen peroxide treatments. Under normal growth conditions, there is no noticeable phenotypic difference between wild-type and crlk1 knock-out mutant plants. However, as compared with wild-type plants, the crlk1 knock-out mutants exhibited an increased sensitivity to chilling and freezing temperatures. Northern analysis showed that the induction of cold-responsive genes, including CBF1, RD29A, COR15a, and KIN1 in crlk1 mutants, is delayed as compared with wild-type plants. These results indicate that CRLK1 is a positive regulator of cold tolerance in plants. Furthermore, our results suggest that CRLK1 plays a role in bridging calcium/calmodulin signaling and cold signaling.

  11. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  12. Molecular Insights into the Mechanism of Calmodulin Inhibition of the EAG1 Potassium Channel.

    PubMed

    Marques-Carvalho, Maria João; Oppermann, Johannes; Muñoz, Eva; Fernandes, Andreia S; Gabant, Guillaume; Cadene, Martine; Heinemann, Stefan H; Schönherr, Roland; Morais-Cabral, João Henrique

    2016-10-04

    The human EAG1 potassium channel belongs to the superfamily of KCNH voltage-gated potassium channels that have roles in cardiac repolarization and neuronal excitability. EAG1 is strongly inhibited by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) through a mechanism that is not understood. We determined the binding properties of CaM with each one of three previously identified binding sites (BDN, BDC1, and BDC2), analyzed binding to protein stretches that include more than one site, and determined the effect of neighboring globular domains on the binding properties. The determination of the crystal structure of CaM bound to BDC2 shows the channel fragment interacting with only the C lobe of calmodulin and adopting an unusual bent conformation. Based on this structure and on a functional and biochemical analysis of mutants, we propose a model for the mechanism of inhibition whereby the local conformational change induced by CaM binding at BDC2 lies at the basis of channel modulation.

  13. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the interaction of melatonin with calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Adrián G.; Estrin, Darío A.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.; McCormick, John E.; Martin, Stephen R.; Pastore, Annalisa; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R.; Martorana, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Pineal hormone melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is thought to modulate the calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway either by changing intracellular Ca2+ concentration via activation of its G-protein–coupled membrane receptors, or through a direct interaction with calmodulin (CaM). The present work studies the direct interaction of melatonin with intact calcium-saturated CaM both experimentally, by fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and theoretically, by molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the interaction is calcium-dependent. The affinity, as obtained from monitoring 15N and 1H chemical shift changes for a melatonin titration, is weak (in the millimolar range) and comparable for the N- and C-terminal domains. Partial replacement of diamagnetic Ca2+ by paramagnetic Tb3+ allowed the measurement of interdomain NMR pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings, indicating that each domain movement in the complex is not correlated with the other one. Molecular dynamics simulations allow us to follow the dynamics of melatonin in the binding pocket of CaM. Overall, this study provides an example of how a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches can shed light on a weakly interacting system of biological and pharmacological significance. PMID:15498938

  14. The Effect of Macromolecular Crowding, Ionic Strength and Calcium Binding on Calmodulin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Liang, Kao-Chen; Czader, Arkadiusz; Waxham, M. Neal; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2011-01-01

    The flexibility in the structure of calmodulin (CaM) allows its binding to over 300 target proteins in the cell. To investigate the structure-function relationship of CaM, we combined methods of computer simulation and experiments based on circular dichroism (CD) to investigate the structural characteristics of CaM that influence its target recognition in crowded cell-like conditions. We developed a unique multiscale solution of charges computed from quantum chemistry, together with protein reconstruction, coarse-grained molecular simulations, and statistical physics, to represent the charge distribution in the transition from apoCaM to holoCaM upon calcium binding. Computationally, we found that increased levels of macromolecular crowding, in addition to calcium binding and ionic strength typical of that found inside cells, can impact the conformation, helicity and the EF hand orientation of CaM. Because EF hand orientation impacts the affinity of calcium binding and the specificity of CaM's target selection, our results may provide unique insight into understanding the promiscuous behavior of calmodulin in target selection inside cells. PMID:21829336

  15. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-01-01

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca[sup ++] as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca[sup ++]/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  16. Isolation of Hybridomas for Golgi-associated Proteins and a Plant Calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmanoff, K. M.; Ray, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    The demonstration of a role for calcium in the mechanism of the gravitropic response indicates a role for calmodulin. Localization studies indicate that plant cell walls have a high content of calmodulin which suggests a regulatory role for CaM in both gravitropic curvature and auxin-induced growth. Auxin regulation of cell wall loosening and elongation is the basis for most models of this phenomenon. Auxin treatment of pea stem tissue rapidly increases the ctivity of Golgi-localized B-1,4-glucan synthase (GS), an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of wall xyloglucan which apparently constitutes the substrate for the wall loosening process. In order to determine whether auxin stimulates GS activity either by modulation of existing enzyme or induces de novo formation of Golgi glucan synthase, a study was undertaken to isolate and quantitate glucan synthase. This enzyme appears to be an integral protein of the Golgi membrane and has resisted isolation with retention of activity. The production of monoclonal antibody for glucan synthase was undertaken due to the inability to isolate GS by standard detergent/liposome techniques.

  17. Autolytic activation of calpain 3 proteinase is facilitated by calmodulin protein.

    PubMed

    Ermolova, Natalia; Kramerova, Irina; Spencer, Melissa J

    2015-01-09

    Calpains are broadly distributed, calcium-dependent enzymes that induce limited proteolysis in a wide range of substrates. Mutations in the gene encoding the muscle-specific family member calpain 3 (CAPN3) underlie limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A. We have shown previously that CAPN3 knockout muscles exhibit attenuated calcium release, reduced calmodulin kinase (CaMKII) signaling, and impaired muscle adaptation to exercise. However, neither the precise role of CAPN3 in these processes nor the mechanisms of CAPN3 activation in vivo have been fully elucidated. In this study, we identify calmodulin (CaM), a known transducer of the calcium signal, as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 autolytic activity. CaM was shown to bind CAPN3 at two sites located in the C2L domain. Biochemical studies using muscle extracts from transgenic mice overexpressing CAPN3 or its inactive mutant revealed that CaM binding enhanced CAPN3 autolytic activation. Furthermore, CaM facilitated CAPN3-mediated cleavage of its in vivo substrate titin in tissue extracts. Therefore, these studies reveal a novel interaction between CAPN3 and CaM and identify CaM as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 activity.

  18. Autolytic Activation of Calpain 3 Proteinase Is Facilitated by Calmodulin Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Ermolova, Natalia; Kramerova, Irina; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Calpains are broadly distributed, calcium-dependent enzymes that induce limited proteolysis in a wide range of substrates. Mutations in the gene encoding the muscle-specific family member calpain 3 (CAPN3) underlie limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A. We have shown previously that CAPN3 knockout muscles exhibit attenuated calcium release, reduced calmodulin kinase (CaMKII) signaling, and impaired muscle adaptation to exercise. However, neither the precise role of CAPN3 in these processes nor the mechanisms of CAPN3 activation in vivo have been fully elucidated. In this study, we identify calmodulin (CaM), a known transducer of the calcium signal, as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 autolytic activity. CaM was shown to bind CAPN3 at two sites located in the C2L domain. Biochemical studies using muscle extracts from transgenic mice overexpressing CAPN3 or its inactive mutant revealed that CaM binding enhanced CAPN3 autolytic activation. Furthermore, CaM facilitated CAPN3-mediated cleavage of its in vivo substrate titin in tissue extracts. Therefore, these studies reveal a novel interaction between CAPN3 and CaM and identify CaM as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 activity. PMID:25389288

  19. Down-regulation of a calmodulin-related gene during transformation of human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yaswen, P.; Smoll, A.; Stampfer, M.R. ); Peehl, D.M. ); Trask, D.K.; Sager, R. )

    1990-10-01

    A human cDNA library obtained from cultured normal mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) was searched by subtractive hybridization for genes whose decrease in expression might be relevant to epithelial transformation. One clone identified by this procedure corresponded to a 1.4 kilobase mRNA, designated NB-1, whose expression was decreased >50-fold in HMECs tumorigenically transformed in vitro after exposure to benzo({alpha})pyrene and Kirsten sarcoma virus. Sequence analysis of NB-1 cDNA revealed an open reading frame with a high degree of homology to calmodulin. NB-1 expression could be demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction amplification in normal breast, prostate, cervix, and epidermal tissues. The presence of NB-1 transcripts was variable in primary breast carcinoma tissues and undetectable in tumor-derived cell lines of breast, prostate, or other origins. NB-1 mRNA expression could be down-regulated in cultured HMECs by exposure to reconstituted extracellular matrix material, while exposure to transforming growth factor type {beta} increased its relative abundance. The protein encoded by NB-1 may have Ca{sup 2{sup plus}} binding properties and perform functions similar to those of authentic calmodulin. Its possible roles in differentiation and/or suppression of tumorigenicity in epithelial tissues remain to be examined.

  20. Role of Calmodulin-Calmodulin Kinase II, cAMP/Protein Kinase A and ERK 1/2 on Aeromonas hydrophila-Induced Apoptosis of Head Kidney Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Chaitali; Khatri, Preeti; Raman, Rajagopal; Bhatia, Himanshi; Datta, Malabika; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2014-01-01

    The role of calcium (Ca2+) and its dependent protease calpain in Aeromonas hydrophila-induced head kidney macrophage (HKM) apoptosis has been reported. Here, we report the pro-apoptotic involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin kinase II gamma (CaMKIIg) in the process. We observed significant increase in CaM levels in A. hydrophila-infected HKM and the inhibitory role of BAPTA/AM, EGTA, nifedipine and verapamil suggested CaM elevation to be Ca2+-dependent. Our studies with CaM-specific siRNA and the CaM inhibitor calmidazolium chloride demonstrated CaM to be pro-apoptotic that initiated the downstream expression of CaMKIIg. Using the CaMKIIg-targeted siRNA, specific inhibitor KN-93 and its inactive structural analogue KN-92 we report CaM-CaMKIIg signalling to be critical for apoptosis of A. hydrophila-infected HKM. Inhibitor studies further suggested the role of calpain-2 in CaMKIIg expression. CaMK Kinase (CaMKK), the other CaM dependent kinase exhibited no role in A. hydrophila-induced HKM apoptosis. We report increased production of intracellular cAMP in infected HKM and our results with KN-93 or KN-92 implicate the role of CaMKIIg in cAMP production. Using siRNA to PKACA, the catalytic subunit of PKA, anti-PKACA antibody and H-89, the specific inhibitor for PKA we prove the pro-apoptotic involvement of cAMP/PKA pathway in the pathogenicity of A. hydrophila. Our inhibitor studies coupled with siRNA approach further implicated the role of cAMP/PKA in activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK 1/2). We conclude that the alteration in intracellular Ca2+ levels initiated by A. hydrophila activates CaM and calpain-2; both pathways converge on CaMKIIg which in turn induces cAMP/PKA mediated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation leading to caspase-3 mediated apoptosis of infected HKM. PMID:24763432

  1. Crystal Structure of Calmodulin Binding Domain of Orai1 in Complex with Ca2+•Calmodulin Displays a Unique Binding Mode*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanshun; Zheng, Xunhai; Mueller, Geoffrey A.; Sobhany, Mack; DeRose, Eugene F.; Zhang, Yingpei; London, Robert E.; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    Orai1 is a plasma membrane protein that in its tetrameric form is responsible for calcium influx from the extracellular environment into the cytosol in response to interaction with the Ca2+-depletion sensor STIM1. This is followed by a fast Ca2+·calmodulin (CaM)-dependent inhibition, resulting from CaM binding to an Orai1 region called the calmodulin binding domain (CMBD). The interaction between Orai1 and CaM at the atomic level remains unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a CaM·Orai1-CMBD complex showing one CMBD bound to the C-terminal lobe of CaM, differing from other CaM-target protein complexes, in which both N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM (CaM-N and CaM-C) are involved in target binding. Orai1-CMBD binds CaM-C mainly through hydrophobic interactions, primarily involving residue Trp76 of Orai1-CMBD, which interacts with the hydrophobic pocket of CaM-C. However, NMR data, isothermal titration calorimetry data, and pulldown assays indicated that CaM-N and CaM-C both can bind Orai1-CMBD, with CaM-N having ∼4 times weaker affinity than CaM-C. Pulldown assays of a Orai1-CMBD(W76E) mutant, gel filtration chromatography data, and NOE signals indicated that CaM-N and CaM-C can each bind one Orai1-CMBD. Thus our studies support an unusual, extended 1:2 binding mode of CaM to Orai1-CMBDs, and quantify the affinity of Orai1 for CaM. We propose a two-step mechanism for CaM-dependent Orai1 inactivation initiated by binding of the C-lobe of CaM to the CMBD of one Orai1 followed by the binding of the N-lobe of CaM to the CMBD of a neighboring Orai1. PMID:23109337

  2. Calmodulin binding proteins of the cholinergic electromotor synapse: synaptosomes, synaptic vesicles, receptor-enriched membranes, and cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Walker, J H; Stadler, H; Witzemann, V

    1984-02-01

    Calmodulin binding proteins (CBPs) have been identified using a gel overlay technique for fractions isolated from Torpedo electromotor nerve endings. Different fractions possessed characteristic patterns of CBPs. Synaptosomes showed five major CBPs--Mr 220,000, 160,000, 125,000, 55,000, and 51,000. Polypeptides of Mr 55,000 and 51,000 were found in the cytoplasm and the others are membrane-associated. The Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeleton of synaptosomes was isolated in the presence or absence of calcium. The major CBPs had Mr of 19,000, 18,000, and 16,000. In the presence of calcium, no other CBPs were seen. In the absence of calcium, an Mr 160,000 polypeptide was present in the Triton cytoskeleton. Synaptic vesicles showed CBPs of Mr 160,000, 25,000, and 20,000. Membrane fragments enriched in acetylcholine receptors contained two major CBPs, Mr 160,000 and 125,000, together with a less prominent protein at Mr 26,000. A protein of Mr similar to that of fodrin was present in synaptosomes and acetylcholine receptor membrane fragments, but only in small amounts relative to the other polypeptides observed. The heavy and light chains of clathrin-coated vesicles from pig brain did not bind calmodulin, although strong labelling of an Mr 47,000 polypeptide was found. Results showed that calelectrin does not bind calmodulin. The possible identity of the calmodulin binding proteins is discussed.

  3. SPLICE VARIANT SPECIFIC UPREGULATIONOF CA+2/CALMODULIN DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE 1G BY PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides induce neurotoxicity in mammals by interfering with ion channel function in excitable neuronal membranes. Previous work demonstrated dose-dependent increases in expression of Ca+2/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (Camk1g) mRNA following acute deltameth...

  4. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA gene family during tomato fruit development and ripening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well established that calcium treatment delays fruit ripening and senescence. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have shown that calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA genes are important for modulation of disease resistance, cold sensitivity and wound...

  5. Identification of kinesin-C, a calmodulin-binding carboxy-terminal kinesin in animal (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G C; Hart, C L; Wedaman, K P; Scholey, J M

    1999-11-19

    Several novel members of the kinesin superfamily, until now identified only in plants, are unique in their ability to bind calmodulin in the presence of Ca(2+). Here, we identify the first such kinesin in an animal system. Sequence analysis of this new motor, called kinesin-C, predicts that it is a large carboxy-terminal kinesin, 1624 amino acid residues in length, with a predicted molecular mass of 181 kDa. Kinesin-C is predicted to contain a kinesin motor domain at its carboxy terminus, linked to a segment of alpha-helical coiled-coil 950 amino acid residues long, ending with an amino-terminal proline-rich tail domain. A putative calmodulin-binding domain resides at the extreme carboxy terminus of the motor polypeptide, and recombinant kinesin-C binds to a calmodulin-affinity column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion. The presence of this novel calmodulin-binding motor in sea urchin embryos suggests that it plays a critical role in Ca(2+)-dependent events during early sea urchin development.

  6. Sequential assignment of 1H, 15N, 13C resonances and secondary structure of human calmodulin-like protein determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, H.; Rogers, M. S.; Schleucher, J.; Edlund, U.; Strehler, E. E.; Sethson, I.

    1998-01-01

    Human calmodulin-like protein (CLP) is closely related to vertebrate calmodulin, yet its unique cell specific expression pattern, overlapping but divergent biochemical properties, and specific target proteins suggest that it is not an isoform of calmodulin. To gain insight into the structural differences that may underlie the difference target specificities and biochemical properties of CLP when compared to calmodulin, we determined the sequential backbone assignment and associated secondary structure of 144 out of the 148 residues of Ca2+-CLP by using multinuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Despite a very high overall degree of structural similarity between CLP and calmodulin, a number of significant differences were found mainly in the length of alpha-helices and in the central nonhelical flexible region. Interestingly, the regions of greatest primary sequence divergence between CLP and calmodulin in helices III and VIII displayed only minor secondary structure differences. The data suggest that the distinct differences in target specificity and biochemical properties of CLP and calmodulin result from the sum of several minor structural and side-chain changes spread over multiple domains in these proteins. PMID:9828009

  7. Channel-anchored Protein Kinase CK2 and Protein Phosphatase 1 Reciprocally Regulate KCNQ2-containing M-channels via Phosphorylation of Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seungwoo; Xu, Mingxuan; Cooper, Edward C.; Hoshi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    M-type potassium channels, encoded by the KCNQ family genes (KCNQ2–5), require calmodulin as an essential co-factor. Calmodulin bound to the KCNQ2 subunit regulates channel trafficking and stabilizes channel activity. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of calmodulin by protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) rapidly and reversibly modulated KCNQ2 current. CK2-mediated phosphorylation of calmodulin strengthened its binding to KCNQ2 channel, caused resistance to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate depletion, and increased KCNQ2 current amplitude. Accordingly, application of CK2-selective inhibitors suppressed KCNQ2 current. This suppression was prevented by co-expression of CK2 phosphomimetic calmodulin mutants or pretreatment with a protein phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin A. We also demonstrated that functional CK2 and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) were selectively tethered to the KCNQ2 subunit. We identified a functional KVXF consensus site for PP1 binding in the N-terminal tail of KCNQ2 subunit: mutation of this site augmented current density. CK2 inhibitor treatment suppressed M-current in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons, an effect negated by overexpression of phosphomimetic calmodulin or pretreatment with calyculin A Furthermore, CK2 inhibition diminished the medium after hyperpolarization by suppressing the M-current. These findings suggest that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of calmodulin regulates the M-current, which is tonically regulated by CK2 and PP1 anchored to the KCNQ2 channel complex. PMID:24627475

  8. Controlled Proteolysis Activates the Plasma Membrane Ca2+ Pump of Higher Plants (A Comparison with the Effect of Calmodulin in Plasma Membrane from Radish Seedlings).

    PubMed Central

    Rasi-Caldogno, F.; Carnelli, A.; De Michelis, M. I.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of calmodulin and of controlled trypsin treatments on the activity of the Ca2+ pump were investigated in plasma membrane purified from radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings. Treatment of the plasma membrane with ethylenediaminetetra-acetate (EDTA), which removed about two-thirds of the plasma membrane-associated calmodulin, markedly increased the stimulation of the Ca2+ pump by calmodulin. In EDTA-treated plasma membrane, stimulation by calmodulin of the Ca2+ pump activity was maximal at low free Ca2+ (2-5 [mu]M) and decreased with the increase of free Ca2+ concentration. The Ca2+ pump activity was stimulated also by a controlled treatment of the plasma membrane with trypsin: the effect of trypsin treatment depended on the concentration of both trypsin and plasma membrane proteins and on the duration of incubation. Stimulation of the Ca2+ pump activity by trypsin treatment of the plasma membrane was similar to that induced by calmodulin both in extent and in dependence on the free Ca2+ concentration in the assay medium. Moreover, the Ca2+ pump of trypsin-treated plasma membrane was insensitive to further stimulation by calmodulin, suggesting that limited proteolysis preferentially cleaves a regulatory domain of the enzyme that is involved in its activation by calmodulin. PMID:12231945

  9. Activation of the Edema Factor of Bacillus anthracis by Calmodulin: Evidence of an Interplay between the EF-Calmodulin Interaction and Calcium Binding

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Elodie; Martínez, Leandro; Blondel, Arnaud; Malliavin, Thérèse E.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a remarkably flexible protein which can bind multiple targets in response to changes in intracellular calcium concentration. It contains four calcium-binding sites, arranged in two globular domains. The calcium affinity of CaM N-terminal domain (N-CaM) is dramatically reduced when the complex with the edema factor (EF) of Bacillus anthracis is formed. Here, an atomic explanation for this reduced affinity is proposed through molecular dynamics simulations and free energy perturbation calculations of the EF-CaM complex starting from different crystallographic models. The simulations show that electrostatic interactions between CaM and EF disfavor the opening of N-CaM domains usually induced by calcium binding. Relative calcium affinities of the N-CaM binding sites are probed by free energy perturbation, and dissociation probabilities are evaluated with locally enhanced sampling simulations. We show that EF impairs calcium binding on N-CaM through a direct conformational restraint on Site 1, by an indirect destabilization of Site 2, and by reducing the cooperativity between the two sites. PMID:20923661

  10. Increased intracellular calcium activates serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) through a calmodulin-calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase pathway in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Seiji; Okayama, Naotsuka; Shimizu, Manabu; Itoh, Makoto

    2003-04-04

    SGK1 is one of the protein-serine/threonine kinases that is activated by insulin in a PI3K-dependent manner. Although SGK1 mediates a variety of biological activities, the mechanisms regulating its activity remain unclear. In this study, we examined the potential roles of calcium signaling in the activation of SGK1. Treatment of CHO-IR cells with a cell-permeable calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM, abolished the insulin-induced activation of SGK1. Increasing intracellular calcium concentration by treating cells with thapsigargin or ionomycin induced a 6-8 fold increase in SGK1 activation. This was not affected by a PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin, but was completely inhibited by the calmodulin inhibitors, W 7 and W 5. Co-transfection of CHO cells with FLAG-SGK1 and CaMKK revealed the direct association of CaMKK with SGK1. These results suggest a calcium-triggered signaling cascade in which an increase in intracellular calcium concentration directly stimulates SGK1 through CaMKK.

  11. A general strategy to characterize calmodulin-calcium complexes involved in CaM-target recognition: DAPK and EGFR calmodulin binding domains interact with different calmodulin-calcium complexes.

    PubMed

    Dagher, Rania; Peng, Shan; Gioria, Sophie; Fève, Marie; Zeniou, Maria; Zimmermann, Michael; Pigault, Claire; Haiech, Jacques; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2011-05-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca(2+) sensor regulating many biochemical processes in eukaryotic cells. Its interaction with a great variety of different target proteins has led to the fundamental question of its mechanism of action. CaM exhibits four "EF hand" type Ca(2+) binding sites. One way to explain CaM functioning is to consider that the protein interacts differently with its target proteins depending on the number of Ca(2+) ions bound to it. To test this hypothesis, the binding properties of three entities known to interact with CaM (a fluorescent probe and two peptide analogs to the CaM binding sites of death associated protein kinase (DAPK) and of EGFR) were investigated using a quantitative approach based on fluorescence polarization (FP). Probe and peptide interactions with CaM were studied using a titration matrix in which both CaM and calcium concentrations were varied. Experiments were performed with SynCaM, a hybrid CaM able to activate CaM dependent enzymes from mammalian and plant cells. Results show that the interaction between CaM and its targets is regulated by the number of calcium ions bound to the protein, namely one for the DAPK peptide, two for the probe and four for the EGFR peptide. The approach used provides a new tool to elaborate a typology of CaM-targets, based on their recognition by the various CaM-Ca(n) (n=0-4) complexes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium.

  12. GsCBRLK, a calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase, is a positive regulator of plant tolerance to salt and ABA stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Ji, Wei; Zhu, Yanming; Gao, Peng; Li, Yong; Cai, Hua; Bai, Xi; Guo, Dianjing

    2010-05-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases play vital roles in protein phosphorylation in eukaryotes, yet little is known about the phosphorylation process of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and its role in stress signal transduction in plants. A novel plant-specific calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase (GsCBRLK) has been isolated from Glycine soja. A subcellular localization study using GFP fusion protein indicated that GsCBRLK is localized in the plasma membrane. Binding assays demonstrated that calmodulin binds to GsCBRLK with an affinity of 25.9 nM in a calcium-dependent manner and the binding motif lies between amino acids 147 to169 within subdomain II of the kinase domain. GsCBRLK undergoes autophosphorylation and Myelin Basis Protein phosphorylation in the presence of calcium. It was also found that calcium/calmodulin positively regulates GsCBRLK kinase activity through direct interaction between the calmodulin-binding domain and calmodulin. So, it is likely that GsCBRLK responds to an environmental stimulus in two ways: by increasing the protein expression level and by regulating its kinase activity through the calcium/calmodulin complex. Furthermore, cold, salinity, drought, and ABA stress induce GsCBRLK gene transcripts. Over-expression of GsCBRLK in transgenic Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced plant tolerance to high salinity and ABA and increased the expression pattern of a number of stress gene markers in response to ABA and high salt. These results identify GsCBRLK as a molecular link between the stress- and ABA-induced calcium/calmodulin signal and gene expression in plant cells.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Calcium- and Phosphorylation-dependentCalmodulin Complexes in Mammalian Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Wang, Daojing

    2006-05-26

    Protein conformational changes due to cofactor binding (e.g. metal ions, heme) and/or posttranslational modifications (e.g. phosphorylation) modulate dynamic protein complexes. Calmodulin (CaM) plays an essential role in regulating calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) signaling and homeostasis. No systematic approach on the identification of phosphorylation-dependent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM binding proteins has been published. Herein, we report a proteome-wide study of phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins from mammalian cells. This method, termed 'Dynamic Phosphoprotein Complex Trapping', 'DPPC Trapping' for short, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays. The basic strategy is to drastically shift the equilibrium towards endogenous phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr at the global scale by inhibiting corresponding phosphatases in vivo. The phosphorylation-dependent calmodulin-binding proteins are then trapped in vitro in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. Finally, the isolated calmodulin-binding proteins are separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by LC/MS/MS. In parallel, the phosphorylation-dependent binding is visualized by silver staining and/or Western blotting. Using this method, we selectively identified over 120 CaM-associated proteins including many previously uncharacterized. We verified ubiquitin-protein ligase EDD1, inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (IP{sub 3}R1), and ATP-dependent RNA helicase DEAD box protein 3 (DDX3), as phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins. To demonstrate the utilities of our method in understanding biological pathways, we showed that pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 in vivo by staurosporine-sensitive kinase(s), but not by PKA/PKG/PKC, significantly reduced the affinity of its Ca{sup 2+}-dependent CaM binding. However, pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 did not substantially affect its Ca{sup 2+}-independent CaM binding. We further showed that phosphatase PP1, but not PP2A or PP2B, plays a critical role in

  14. Interaction of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase with a homolog of eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    A chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was previously cloned and characterized in this laboratory. To investigate the biological functions of CCaMK, the yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with CCaMK. One of the cDNA clones obtained from the screening (LlEF-1alpha1) has high similarity with the eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha). CCaMK phosphorylated LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The phosphorylation site for CCaMK (Thr-257) was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, Thr-257 is located in the putative tRNA-binding region of LlEF-1alpha1. An isoform of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) phosphorylated multiple sites of LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-dependent but calmodulin-independent manner. Unlike CDPK, CCaMK phosphorylated only one site, and this site is different from CDPK phosphorylation sites. This suggests that the phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by these two kinases may have different functional significance. Although the phosphorylation of LlEF-1alpha1 by CCaMK is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, in vitro binding assays revealed that CCaMK binds to LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-independent manner. This was further substantiated by coimmunoprecipitation of CCaMK and EF-1alpha using the protein extract from lily anthers. Dissociation of CCaMK from EF-1alpha by Ca2+ and phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by CCaMK in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner suggests that these interactions may play a role in regulating the biological functions of EF-1alpha.

  15. Hydrophobic Peptides Affect Binding of Calmodulin and Ca2+ as Explored by H/D Amide Exchange and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sperry, Justin B.; Huang, Richard Y-C.; Zhu, Mei M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous intracellular sensor protein, binds Ca2+ and interacts with various targets as part of signal transduction. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/DX) and a high resolution PLIMSTEX (Protein-Ligand Interactions by Mass Spectrometry, Titration, and H/D Exchange) protocol, we examined five different states of calmodulin: calcium-free, calcium-loaded, and three states of calcium-loaded in the presence of either melittin, mastoparan, or skeletal myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK). When CaM binds Ca2+, the extent of HDX decreased, consistent with the protein becoming stabilized upon binding. Furthermore, Ca2+-saturated calmodulin exhibits increased protection when bound to the peptides, forming high affinity complexes. The protocol reveals significant changes in EF hands 1, 3, and 4 with saturating levels of Ca2+. Titration of the protein using PLIMSTEX provides the binding affinity of Ca2+ to calmodulin within previously reported values. The affinities of calmodulin to Ca2+ increase by factors of 300 and 1000 in the presence of melittin and mastoparan, respectively. A modified PLIMSTEX protocol whereby the protein is digested to component peptides gives a region-specific titration. The titration data taken in this way show a decrease in the root mean square fit of the residuals, indicating a better fit of the data. The global H/D exchange results and those obtained in a region-specific way provide new insight into the Ca2+-binding properties of this well-studied protein. PMID:21765646

  16. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  17. Quantitation of chlorpromazine-bound calmodulin during chlorpromazine inhibition of gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.; Biro, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM), controls the activity of a plasma membrane localized ATPase in plants which serves to pump calcium out of cells. Recent data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of this pump is one of the early steps necessary for gravitropism. Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a CaM antagonist, reversibly inhibits gravitropism in oat coleoptiles at concentrations which permit normal growth rates. C-14-labeled CPZ was used to photo-affinity label endogenous CaM in vivo to learn whether the drug is actually binding to some portion of endogenous CaM when it inhibits gravitropism. Under conditions in which CPZ inhibits gravitropism for over an hour, at least 11% of the CaM in gravitropically stimulated coleoptiles is bound to CPZ. In a given CPZ experiment the degree of inhibition of gravitropism correlates well with the amount of CaM bound to CPZ.

  18. The Ca(2+)/Calmodulin/CaMKK2 Axis: Nature's Metabolic CaMshaft.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, Kathrina L; Means, Anthony R; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an essential ligand that binds its primary intracellular receptor calmodulin (CaM) to trigger a variety of downstream processes and pathways. Central to the actions of Ca(2+)/CaM is the activation of a highly conserved Ca(2+)/CaM kinase (CaMK) cascade that amplifies Ca(2+) signals through a series of subsequent phosphorylation events. Proper regulation of Ca(2+) flux is necessary for whole-body metabolism and disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis has been linked to various metabolic diseases. Here we provide a synthesis of recent advances that highlight the roles of the Ca(2+)/CaMK axis in key metabolic tissues. An appreciation of this information is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent signaling contributes to metabolic homeostasis and disease.

  19. Calmodulin-binding protein CBP60g functions as a negative regulator in Arabidopsis anthocyanin accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Bo; Wan, Dongli; Li, Ruili; Han, Xiaomin; Li, Guojing; Wang, Ruigang

    2017-01-01

    Anthocyanins, a kind of flavonoid, normally accumulate in the flowers and fruits and make them colorful. Anthocyanin accumulation is regulated via the different temporal and spatial expression of anthocyanin regulatory and biosynthetic genes. CBP60g, a calmodulin binding protein, has previously been shown to have a role in pathogen resistance, drought tolerance and ABA sensitivity. In this study, we found that CBP60g repressed anthocyanin accumulation induced by drought, sucrose and kinetin. The expression pattern of CBP60g was in accordance with the anthocyanin accumulation tissues. Real-time qPCR analysis revealed that the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes CHS, CHI and DFR, as well as two members of MBW complex, PAP1, a MYB transcription factor, and TT8, a bHLH transcription factor, were down regulated by CBP60g. PMID:28253311

  20. Isolation of calcium-binding proteins on selective adsorbents. Application to purification of bovine calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G S; Ersson, B; Porath, J O

    1996-05-03

    We report the fractionation of calcium-binding proteins using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) with hard metal ions. Various hard metal ions (Mn2+, La3+, Nd3+, Eu(3 were immobilized on cross-linked agarose substituted with Tris(carboxymethyl)ethylenediamine (TED) and used as an adsorbent. After systematic studies, europium was selected for further work on the fractionation of calcium-binding proteins. It was found that the presence of Ca2+ in the sample and the solvent strongly promoted the adsorption and selectivity. Selective elution was accomplished in stepwise mode by the addition of calcium chelators such as malonate, citrate and phosphate. Calmodulin of high purity was isolated from a crude extract. Similar behavior of other calcium-binding proteins indicates that the reported chromatographic procedure can be generally applied to such proteins.

  1. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Debanne, Dominique; Alcaraz, Gisele

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  2. Parvulin 17-catalyzed Tubulin Polymerization Is Regulated by Calmodulin in a Calcium-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Schmidt, Andreas; Manns, Annika; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Jahreis, Günther; Lin, Yi-Jan; Schulze, Bianca; Masch, Antonia; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recently we have shown that the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase parvulin 17 (Par17) interacts with tubulin in a GTP-dependent manner, thereby promoting the formation of microtubules. Microtubule assembly is regulated by Ca2+-loaded calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) both in the intact cell and under in vitro conditions via direct interaction with microtubule-associated proteins. Here we provide the first evidence that Ca2+/CaM interacts also with Par17 in a physiologically relevant way, thus preventing Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. In contrast, parvulin 14 (Par14), which lacks only the first 25 N-terminal residues of the Par17 sequence, does not interact with Ca2+/CaM, indicating that this interaction is exclusive for Par17. Pulldown experiments and chemical shift perturbation analysis with 15N-labeled Par17 furthermore confirmed that calmodulin (CaM) interacts in a Ca2+-dependent manner with the Par17 N terminus. The reverse experiment with 15N-labeled Ca2+/CaM demonstrated that the N-terminal Par17 segment binds to both CaM lobes simultaneously, indicating that Ca2+/CaM undergoes a conformational change to form a binding channel between its two lobes, apparently similar to the structure of the CaM-smMLCK796–815 complex. In vitro tubulin polymerization assays furthermore showed that Ca2+/CaM completely suppresses Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. The results imply that Ca2+/CaM binding to the N-terminal segment of Par17 causes steric hindrance of the Par17 active site, thus interfering with the Par17/tubulin interaction. This Ca2+/CaM-mediated control of Par17-assisted microtubule assembly may provide a mechanism that couples Ca2+ signaling with microtubule function. PMID:25940090

  3. Energy transfer as a probe of protein dynamics in the proteins transferrin and calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, P B; Gorski, K M; Rosen, M A

    1988-01-01

    We have initiated an investigation into the usefulness of fluorescence energy transfer in probing protein dynamics. Our analysis involves measuring the energy transfer efficiency while perturbing the protein conformational equilibrium with heat. As the temperature increases, the amplitudes of vibrations increase, and fluorescence energy transfer should also increase if the donor and acceptor are in a flexible region of the protein. A theoretical analysis developed by Somogyi and co-workers for the temperature dependence of dipole-dipole energy transfer (Somogyi, B., J. Matko, S. Papp, J. Hevessey, G. R. Welch, and S. Damjanovich. 1984. Biochemistry. 23:3403-3411) was tested by the authors in one protein system. Energy transfer from tryptophan to a pyridoxamine derivatized side group in RNase increased 40% over 25 degrees C. Here we report further testing of this model in two additional protein systems: calmodulin, a calcium activated regulatory protein, and transferrin, a blood serum iron shuttle. Our studies show a slight differential sensitivity of the transfer efficiency to heat for the two systems. Normalized energy transfer over 6.5 A in calmodulin from a tyrosine donor to a Tb(III) acceptor increases 40% from 295 to 320 K. Normalized energy transfer over 42 A in transferrin from a Tb(III) donor to an Fe(III) acceptor increases 35% over the same temperature range. Whereas these results demonstrate that thermally induced fluctuations do increase energy transfer as predicted by Somogyi, they also appear rather insensitive to the nature of the protein host environment. In contrast to the Förster processes examined above, energy transfer over very short distances has shown an anomalously high temperature dependence. PMID:3395656

  4. Interaction of a plant pseudo-response regulator with a calmodulin-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Perochon, Alexandre; Dieterle, Stefan; Pouzet, Cecile; Aldon, Didier; Galaud, Jean-Philippe

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} The pseudo-response regulator PRR2 specifically binds CML9, a calmodulin-like protein {yields} The interaction is confirmed in plant cell nuclei {yields} The interaction requires an intact PRR2 protein. -- Abstract: Calmodulin (CaM) plays a crucial role in the regulation of diverse cellular processes by modulating the activities of numerous target proteins. Plants possess an extended CaM family including numerous CaM-like proteins (CMLs), most of which appear to be unique to plants. We previously demonstrated a role for CML9 in abiotic stress tolerance and seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. We report here the isolation of PRR2, a pseudo-response regulator as a CML9 interacting protein by screening an expression library prepared from Arabidopsis seedlings with CML9 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid system. PRR2 is similar to the response regulators of the two-component system, but lacks the invariant residue required for phosphorylation by which response regulators switch their output response, suggesting the existence of alternative regulatory mechanisms. PRR2 was found to bind CML9 and closely related CMLs but not a canonical CaM. Mapping analyses indicate that an almost complete form of PRR2 is required for interaction with CML9, suggesting a recognition mode different from the classical CaM-target peptide complex. PRR2 contains several features that are typical of transcription factors, including a GARP DNA recognition domain, a Pro-rich region and a Golden C-terminal box. PRR2 and CML9 as fusion proteins with fluorescent tags co-localized in the nucleus of plant cells, and their interaction in the nuclear compartment was validated in planta by using a fluorophore-tagged protein interaction assay. These findings suggest that binding of PRR2 to CML9 may be an important mechanism to modulate the physiological role of this transcription factor in plants.

  5. 2,5-hexanedione (HD) treatment alters calmodulin, Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and protein kinase C in rats' nerve tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qingshan Hou Liyan; Zhang Cuili; Zhao Xiulan; Yu Sufang; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-10-01

    Calcium-dependent mechanisms, particularly those mediated by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), have been implicated in neurotoxicant-induced neuropathy. However, it is unknown whether similar mechanisms exist in 2,5-hexanedione (HD)-induced neuropathy. For that, we investigated the changes of CaM, CaMKII, protein kinase C (PKC) and polymerization ratios (PRs) of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H in cerebral cortex (CC, including total cortex and some gray), spinal cord (SC) and sciatic nerve (SN) of rats treated with HD at a dosage of 1.75 or 3.50 mmol/kg for 8 weeks (five times per week). The results showed that CaM contents in CC, SC and SN were significantly increased, which indicated elevation of Ca{sup 2+} concentrations in nerve tissues. CaMKII contents and activities were also increased in CC and were positively correlated with gait abnormality, but it could not be found in SC and SN. The increases of PKC contents and activities were also observed in SN and were positively correlated with gait abnormality. Except for that of NF-M in CC, the PRs of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H were also elevated in nerve tissues, which was consistent with the activation of protein kinases. The results suggested that CaMKII might be partly (in CC but not in SC and SN) involved in HD-induced neuropathy. CaMKII and PKC might mediate the HD neurotoxicity by altering the NF phosphorylation status and PRs.

  6. Analysis of a soluble calmodulin binding protein from fava bean roots: identification of glutamate decarboxylase as a calmodulin-activated enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ling, V; Snedden, W A; Shelp, B J; Assmann, S M

    1994-08-01

    The identity of a soluble 62-kD Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding protein (CaM-BP) from fava bean seedlings was determined. Using 125I-CaM overlay assays, a class of soluble CaM-BPs was detected in extracts of tissues comprising the axis of 1.5-week-old seedlings, excluding the root tip and emergent leaves. The size of these CaM-BPs was not uniform within all parts of the plant; the apparent molecular masses were 62 kD in roots, 60 kD in stems, and 64 kD in nodules. The root 62-kD CaM-BP was purified, and internal microsequence analysis was performed on the protein. A tryptic peptide derived from the CaM-BP consisted of a 13-residue sequence corresponding to a highly conserved region of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the alpha-decarboxylation of glutamate to form the stress-related metabolite gamma-aminobutyrate. Activity assays of partially purified, desalted, root GAD revealed a 50% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+, a 100% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+ plus 100 nM CaM, and no appreciable stimulation by CaM in the absence of added Ca2+. The demonstration that plant GAD is a Ca(2+)-CaM-stimulated enzyme provides a model in which stress-linked metabolism is modulated by a Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathway.

  7. Calmodulin and calcium interplay in the modulation of TRPC5 channel activity. Identification of a novel C-terminal domain for calcium/calmodulin-mediated facilitation.

    PubMed

    Ordaz, Benito; Tang, Jisen; Xiao, Rui; Salgado, Alfonso; Sampieri, Alicia; Zhu, Michael X; Vaca, Luis

    2005-09-02

    TRPC5 forms Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channels important for neurite outgrowth and growth cone morphology of hippocampal neurons. Here we studied the activation of mouse TRPC5 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary and human embryonic kidney 293 cells by agonist stimulation of several receptors that couple to the phosphoinositide signaling cascade and the role of calmodulin (CaM) on the activation. We showed that exogenous application of 10 microM CaM through patch pipette accelerated the agonist-induced channel activation by 2.8-fold, with the time constant for half-activation reduced from 4.25 +/- 0.4 to 1.56 +/- 0.85 min. We identified a novel CaM-binding site located at the C terminus of TRPC5, 95 amino acids downstream from the previously determined common CaM/IP3R-binding (CIRB) domain for all TRPC proteins. Deletion of the novel CaM-binding site attenuated the acceleration in channel activation induced by CaM. However, disruption of the CIRB domain from TRPC5 rendered the channel irresponsive to agonist stimulation without affecting the cell surface expression of the channel protein. Furthermore, we showed that high (>5 microM) intracellular free Ca2+ inhibited the current density without affecting the time course of TRPC5 activation by receptor agonists. These results demonstrated that intracellular Ca2+ has dual and opposite effects on the activation of TRPC5. The novel CaM-binding site is important for the Ca2+/CaM-mediated facilitation, whereas the CIRB domain is critical for the overall response of receptor-induced TRPC5 channel activation.

  8. Analysis of a soluble calmodulin binding protein from fava bean roots: identification of glutamate decarboxylase as a calmodulin-activated enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, V; Snedden, W A; Shelp, B J; Assmann, S M

    1994-01-01

    The identity of a soluble 62-kD Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding protein (CaM-BP) from fava bean seedlings was determined. Using 125I-CaM overlay assays, a class of soluble CaM-BPs was detected in extracts of tissues comprising the axis of 1.5-week-old seedlings, excluding the root tip and emergent leaves. The size of these CaM-BPs was not uniform within all parts of the plant; the apparent molecular masses were 62 kD in roots, 60 kD in stems, and 64 kD in nodules. The root 62-kD CaM-BP was purified, and internal microsequence analysis was performed on the protein. A tryptic peptide derived from the CaM-BP consisted of a 13-residue sequence corresponding to a highly conserved region of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the alpha-decarboxylation of glutamate to form the stress-related metabolite gamma-aminobutyrate. Activity assays of partially purified, desalted, root GAD revealed a 50% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+, a 100% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+ plus 100 nM CaM, and no appreciable stimulation by CaM in the absence of added Ca2+. The demonstration that plant GAD is a Ca(2+)-CaM-stimulated enzyme provides a model in which stress-linked metabolism is modulated by a Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathway. PMID:7919983

  9. A new and potent calmodulin antagonist, HF-2035, which inhibits vascular relaxation induced by nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Win, N H; Ishikawa, T; Saito, N; Kato, M; Yokokura, H; Watanabe, Y; Iida, Y; Hidaka, H

    1996-03-28

    HF-2035, 2-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2,4,5-trichlorobenzenesulfonyl)] amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine, was synthesized and its effects on calmodulin-dependent enzymes were investigated. HF-2035 inhibited calmodulin kinase I, calmodulin kinase II and myosin light-chain kinase with IC50 values of 1.3 microM, 1.6 microM and 68 microM, respectively. HF-2035 also inhibited the activity of recombinant rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase, one of the calmodulin-dependent enzymes, with a Ki of 0.78 microM. Partially purified nitric oxide synthase of rat brain was also inhibited by HF-2035 with an IC50 of 3.2 microM. Kinetic analysis indicated that this inhibitory effect of HF-2035 was competitive with respect to calmodulin. We examined the effects of HF-2035 on constitutive nitric oxide synthase in a bioassay using vascular strips of rabbit carotid artery with and without endothelium. HF-2035 inhibited acetylcholine- and calcium ionophore, A23187 (6S-[6 alpha (2S*,3S*),8 beta (R*),9 beta, 11 alpha]-5- (methylamino)-2-[[3,9,11-trimethyl-8-[1-methyl-2-oxo-2-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)- ethyl]-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undec-2-yl]methyl]-4-benzoxazol ecarboxylic acid)-induced relaxation of endothelium-intact strips with an ED50 of 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 2.8 +/- 1 microM, respectively. This compound, however, did not inhibit N-nitroso-N-morpholinoaminoacetonitrile (SIN-1A), an exogenous nitric oxide donor, -induced relaxation of endothelium-denuded strips. W-7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1- naphthalenesulfonamide) inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation with an ED50 of 46 +/- 7 microM, which was 30-fold less potent than HF-2035. HF-2035 was unable to inhibit the activity of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase in isolated thoracic aorta of rat treated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. These findings suggest that HF-2035 is a new and potent calmodulin antagonist, and may be used as a mother compound to develop more selective inhibitors of constitutive nitric oxide

  10. Neutron and x-ray scattering studies of the interactions between Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins and their regulatory targets: Comparisons of troponin C and calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Olah, G.A.

    1993-11-01

    The regulatory proteins calmodulin and troponin C share a strikingly unusual overall structure. Their crystal structures show each protein consists of two structurally homologous globular domains connected by an extended, solvent exposed alpha-helix of = 8 turns. Calmodulin regulates a variety of enzymes that show remarkable functional and structural diversity. This diversity extends to the amino acid sequences of the calmodulin-binding domains in the target enzymes. In contrast with calodulin, troponin C appears to have a single very specialized function. It is an integral part of the troponin complex, and Ca{sup 2+} binding to troponin c results in the release of the inhibitory function of troponin I, which eventually leads to actin-binding to myosin and the triggering of muscle contraction. Small-angle scattering has been particularly useful for studying the dumbbell shaped proteins because the technique is very sensitive to changes in the relative dispositions of the two globular domains. Small-angle scattering, using x-rays or neutrons, gives information on the overall shapes of proteins in solution. Small-angle scattering studies of calmodulin and its complexes with calmodulin-binding domains from various target enzymes have played an important role in helping us understand the functional role of its unusual solvent exposed helix. Likewise, small-angle scattering has been used to study troponin C with various peptides, to shed light on the similarities and differences between calmodulin and troponin C.

  11. Molecular and biochemical characterization of dNOS: a Drosophila Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Regulski, M; Tully, T

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger involved with various aspects of mammalian physiology ranging from vasodilation and macrophage cytotoxicity to neuronal transmission. NO is synthesized from L-arginine by NO synthase (NOS). Here, we report the cloning of a Drosophila NOS gene, dNOS, located at cytological position 32B. The dNOS cDNA encodes a protein of 152 kDa, with 43% amino acid sequence identity to rat neuronal NOS. Like mammalian NOSs, DNOS protein contains putative binding sites for calmodulin, FMN, FAD, and NADPH. DNOS activity is Ca2+/calmodulin dependent when expressed in cell culture. An alternative RNA splicing pattern also exists for dNOS, which is identical to that for vertebrate neuronal NOS. These structural and functional observations demonstrate remarkable conservation of NOS between vertebrates and invertebrates. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7568075

  12. Isolation of NPY-25 (neuropeptide Y[12-36]), a potent inhibitor of calmodulin, from porcine brain.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, K; Kangawa, K; Tanaka, K; Matsuo, H

    1990-06-29

    In the present purification of low molecular weight fractions (Mr: 2000-4000) containing basic peptides, twenty nmol of novel calmodulin binding peptide, possessing a potent affinity for calmodulin, was isolated from 18 kg of porcine brain. By analysis with gas phase sequencer, the sequence was determined to be APAEDLARYYSALRHYINLITRQRY. Carboxy terminus of the peptide was determined to be Tyr-NH2. The peptide was a carboxy terminal pentacosanepeptide of neuropeptide Y and was termed NPY-25. NPY-25 competitively inhibited the activation of cAMP-phosphodiesterase through CaM binding in a Ca++ dependent fashion, but did not inhibit the basal activity of cAMP phosphodiesterase. NPY-25 elicited a more potent activity than did neuropeptide Y. IC50 values of NPY-25 and Neuropeptide Y were 0.06 microM and 0.54 microM respectively.

  13. Effect of inhibitors of auxin transport and of calmodulin on a gravisensing-dependent current in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Some characteristics of the gravity sensing mechanism in maize root caps were investigated using a bioelectric current as an indicator of gravity sensing. This technique involves the measurement of a change in the current density which arises at the columella region coincidently with the presentation time. Two inhibitors of auxin transport, triiodobenzoic acid and naphthylphthalamic acid, blocked gravitropic curvature but not the change in current density. Two inhibitors of calmodulin activity, compound 48/80 and calmidazolium, blocked both curvature and gravity-induced current. The results suggest that auxin transport is not a component of gravity sensing in the root cap. By contrast, the results suggest that calmodulin plays an intrinsic role in gravity sensing.

  14. Reconstitution and Characterization of a Calmodulin-Stimulated Ca2+-Pumping ATPase Purified from Brassica oleracea L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Askerlund, Per; Evans, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Purification and functional reconstitution of a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+-ATPase from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) is described. Activity was purified about 120-fold from a microsomal fraction using calmodulin-affinity chromatography. The purified fraction showed a polypeptide at 115 kD, which formed a phosphorylated intermediate in the presence of Ca2+, together with a few polypeptides with lower molecular masses that were not phosphorylated. The ATPase was reconstituted into liposomes by 3-([cholamidopropyl]-dimethylammonio-)1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) dialysis. The proteoliposomes showed ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake and ATPase activity, both of which were stimulated about 4-fold by calmodulin. Specific ATPase activity was about 5 μmol min−1 (mg protein)−1, and the Ca2+/ATP ratio was 0.1 to 0.5 when the ATPase was reconstituted with entrapped oxalate. The purified, reconstituted Ca2+-ATPase was inhibited by vanadate and erythrosin B, but not by cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin. Activity was supported by ATP (100%) and GTP (50%) and had a pH optimum of about 7.0. The effect of monovalent and divalent cations (including Ca2+) on activity is described. Assay of membranes purified by two-phase partitioning indicated that approximately 95% of the activity was associated with intracellular membranes, but only about 5% with plasma membranes. Sucrose gradient centrifugation suggests that the endoplasmic reticulum is the major cellular location of calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+-pumping ATPase in Brassica oleracea inflorescences. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16653183

  15. The Plasma Membrane Ca(2+) ATPase: Purification by Calmodulin Affinity Chromatography, and Reconstitution of the Purified Protein.

    PubMed

    Niggli, Verena; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases (PMCA pumps) are key regulators of cytosolic Ca(2+) in eukaryotes. They extrude Ca(2+) from the cytosol, using the energy of ATP hydrolysis and operate as Ca(2+)-H(+) exchangers. They are activated by the Ca(2+)-binding protein calmodulin, by acidic phospholipids and by other mechanisms, among them kinase-mediated phosphorylation. Isolation of the PMCA in pure and active form is essential for the analysis of its structure and function. In this chapter, the purification of the pump, as first achieved from erythrocyte plasma membranes by calmodulin-affinity chromatography, is described in detail. The reversible, high-affinity, Ca(2+)-dependent interaction of the pump with calmodulin is the basis of the procedure. Either phospholipids or glycerol have to be present in the isolation buffers to keep the pump active during the isolation procedure. After the isolation of the PMCA pump from human erythrocytes the pump was purified from other cell types, e.g., heart sarcolemma, plant microsomal fractions, and cells that express it ectopically. The reconstitution of the purified pump into phospholipid vesicles using the cholate dialysis method will also be described. It allows studies of transport mechanism and of regulation of pump activity. The purified pump can be stored in the reconstituted form for several days at 4 °C with little loss of activity, but it rapidly loses activity when stored in the detergent-solubilized form.

  16. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13405.001 PMID:26949248

  17. Ca(2+)-dependent phosphorylation of the tail domain of myosin-V, a calmodulin-binding myosin in vertebrate brain.

    PubMed

    Coelho, M V; Larson, R E

    1993-05-01

    1. Myosin-V from vertebrate brain is a novel molecular motor with a myosin-like head domain, a calmodulin-binding neck region and a unique tail domain of unknown function. Previous studies showed brain myosin-V to be a phosphoprotein substrate for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase associated with actomyosin. In the present study we describe the preparation of a specific actin-cytoskeletal fraction which is enriched in brain myosin-V. 2. We show that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity is also associated with this preparation and phosphorylates brain myosin-V. 3. Calpain, a Ca(2+)-dependent protease, generates a M(r) 80,000 fragment from the COOH terminal region of brain myosin-V containing most or all of the phosphorylation sites. 4. These results suggest that the unique tail domain of this novel myosin is subject to Ca2+ control via phosphorylation by kinase activity associated with the actin cytoskeleton.

  18. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2010-05-28

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca{sup 2+} leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes (Hamada et al., 2009 ). The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca{sup 2+} spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca{sup 2+} events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional

  19. Innate immunity signaling: cytosolic Ca2+ elevation is linked to downstream nitric oxide generation through the action of calmodulin or a calmodulin-like protein.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Smigel, Andries; Tsai, Yu-Chang; Braam, Janet; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2008-10-01

    Ca(2+) rise and nitric oxide (NO) generation are essential early steps in plant innate immunity and initiate the hypersensitive response (HR) to avirulent pathogens. Previous work from this laboratory has demonstrated that a loss-of-function mutation of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable inwardly conducting ion channel impairs HR and that this phenotype could be rescued by the application of a NO donor. At present, the mechanism linking cytosolic Ca(2+) rise to NO generation during pathogen response signaling in plants is still unclear. Animal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation is Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) dependent. Here, we present biochemical and genetic evidence consistent with a similar regulatory mechanism in plants: a pathogen-induced Ca(2+) signal leads to CaM and/or a CaM-like protein (CML) activation of NOS. In wild-type Arabidopsis plants, the use of a CaM antagonist prevents NO generation and the HR. Application of a CaM antagonist does not prevent pathogen-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation, excluding the possibility of CaM acting upstream from Ca(2+). The CaM antagonist and Ca(2+) chelation abolish NO generation in wild-type Arabidopsis leaf protein extracts as well, suggesting that plant NOS activity is Ca(2+)/CaM dependent in vitro. The CaM-like protein CML24 has been previously associated with NO-related phenotypes in Arabidopsis. Here, we find that innate immune response phenotypes (HR and [avirulent] pathogen-induced NO elevation in leaves) are inhibited in loss-of-function cml24-4 mutant plants. Pathogen-associated molecular pattern-mediated NO generation in cells of cml24-4 mutants is impaired as well. Our work suggests that the initial pathogen recognition signal of Ca(2+) influx into the cytosol activates CaM and/or a CML, which then acts to induce downstream NO synthesis as intermediary steps in a pathogen perception signaling cascade, leading to innate immune responses, including the HR.

  20. The Arrhythmogenic Calmodulin p.Phe142Leu Mutation Impairs C-domain Ca2+ Binding but Not Calmodulin-dependent Inhibition of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingjie; Larsen, Kamilla Taunsig; Nani, Alma; Tian, Xixi; Holt, Christian; Wang, Ruiwu; Fill, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A number of point mutations in the intracellular Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) are arrhythmogenic, yet their underlying mechanisms are not clear. These mutations generally decrease Ca2+ binding to CaM and impair inhibition of CaM-regulated Ca2+ channels like the cardiac Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR2), and it appears that attenuated CaM Ca2+ binding correlates with impaired CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Here, we investigated the RyR2 inhibitory action of the CaM p.Phe142Leu mutation (F142L; numbered including the start-Met), which markedly reduces CaM Ca2+ binding. Surprisingly, CaM-F142L had little to no aberrant effect on RyR2-mediated store overload-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells compared with CaM-WT. Furthermore, CaM-F142L enhanced CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition at the single channel level compared with CaM-WT. This is in stark contrast to the actions of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations N54I, D96V, N98S, and D130G, which all diminish CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Thermodynamic analysis showed that apoCaM-F142L converts an endothermal interaction between CaM and the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of RyR2 into an exothermal one. Moreover, NMR spectra revealed that the CaM-F142L-CaMBD interaction is structurally different from that of CaM-WT at low Ca2+. These data indicate a distinct interaction between CaM-F142L and the RyR2 CaMBD, which may explain the stronger CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition by CaM-F142L, despite its reduced Ca2+ binding. Collectively, these results add to our understanding of CaM-dependent regulation of RyR2 as well as the mechanistic effects of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations. The unique properties of the CaM-F142L mutation may provide novel clues on how to suppress excessive RyR2 Ca2+ release by manipulating the CaM-RyR2 interaction. PMID:27927985

  1. Loss of the Calmodulin-Dependent Inhibition of RyR1 Calcium Release Channel Upon Oxidation of Methionines in Calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Boschek, Curt B.; Jones, Terry E.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2008-01-08

    The oxidation of methionines in calmodulin (CaM) can affect the activity of calcium pumps and channels to modulate the amplitude and duration of calcium signals. We have therefore investigated the possible oxidation of CaM in skeletal muscle and its affect on the CaM-dependent regulation of the RyR1 calcium release channel. Taking advantage of characteristic reductions in electrophoretic mobility by SDS-PAGE, we find that approximately two methionines are oxidized in CaM from skeletal muscle. The functional effect of CaM oxidation on the open probability of the RyR1 calcium release channel was assessed through measurements of 3[H]-ryanodine binding using a heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation enriched in RyR1. There is a biphasic regulation of RyR1 by unoxidized CaM, where calcium-activated CaM acts to enhance the calcium-sensitivity of channel closure, while apo-CaM functions to enhance channel activity at resting calcium levels. We find that physiological levels of CaM oxidation preferentially diminish the CaM-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel observed at activating micromolar levels of calcium. In contrast, the oxidation of CaM resulted in a minimal functional changes in the CaM-dependent activation of RyR1 at resting nanomolar calcium levels. Oxidation does not affect the high-affinity binding of calcium-activated CaM to the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1; rather, methionine oxidation disrupts interdomain interactions between the opposing domains of CaM in complex with the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1 that normally function as a conformational switch associated with RyR1 inhibition. These results suggest that the oxidation of CaM can contribute to observed elevations in intracellular calcium levels in response to conditions of oxidative stress. We suggest that the sensitivity of RyR1 channel activity to CaM oxidation may function as part of an adaptive cellular response to enhance the duration of calcium transients to promote enhanced

  2. Loss of the calmodulin-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel upon oxidation of methionines in calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Smallwood, Heather S; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2008-01-08

    The oxidation of methionines in calmodulin (CaM) can affect the activity of calcium pumps and channels to modulate the amplitude and duration of calcium signals. We have therefore investigated the possible oxidation of CaM in skeletal muscle and its effect on the CaM-dependent regulation of the RyR1 calcium release channel. Taking advantage of characteristic reductions in electrophoretic mobility determined by SDS-PAGE, we find that approximately two methionines are oxidized in CaM from skeletal muscle. The functional effect of CaM oxidation on the open probability of the RyR1 calcium release channel was assessed through measurements of [3H]ryanodine binding using a heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation enriched in RyR1. There is a biphasic regulation of RyR1 by unoxidized CaM, in which calcium-activated CaM acts to enhance the calcium sensitivity of channel closure, while apo-CaM functions to enhance channel activity at resting calcium levels. We find that physiological levels of CaM oxidation preferentially weaken the CaM-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel observed at activating micromolar levels of calcium. In contrast, the oxidation of CaM resulted in minimal functional changes in the CaM-dependent activation of RyR1 at resting nanomolar calcium levels. Oxidation does not significantly affect the high-affinity binding of calcium-activated CaM to the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1; rather, methionine oxidation disrupts interdomain interactions between the opposing domains of CaM in complex with the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1 that normally function as part of a conformational switch associated with RyR1 inhibition. These results suggest that the oxidation of CaM can contribute to observed elevations in intracellular calcium levels in response to conditions of oxidative stress observed during biological aging. We suggest that the sensitivity of RyR1 channel activity to CaM oxidation may function as part of an adaptive cellular response

  3. Modulating Uranium Binding Affinity in Engineered Calmodulin EF-Hand Peptides: Effect of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T9TKE12 sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from Kd = 25±6 nM to Kd = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (Kd = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the νas(P-O) and νs(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in νas(UO2)2+ vibration (from 923 cm−1 to 908 cm−1) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  4. Isolation and characterization of a novel calmodulin-binding protein from potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Anireddy S N.; Day, Irene S.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Safadi, Farida; Reddy, Vaka S.; Golovkin, Maxim; Harnly, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    Tuberization in potato is controlled by hormonal and environmental signals. Ca(2+), an important intracellular messenger, and calmodulin (CaM), one of the primary Ca(2+) sensors, have been implicated in controlling diverse cellular processes in plants including tuberization. The regulation of cellular processes by CaM involves its interaction with other proteins. To understand the role of Ca(2+)/CaM in tuberization, we have screened an expression library prepared from developing tubers with biotinylated CaM. This screening resulted in isolation of a cDNA encoding a novel CaM-binding protein (potato calmodulin-binding protein (PCBP)). Ca(2+)-dependent binding of the cDNA-encoded protein to CaM is confirmed by (35)S-labeled CaM. The full-length cDNA is 5 kb long and encodes a protein of 1309 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed significant similarity with a hypothetical protein from another plant, Arabidopsis. However, no homologs of PCBP are found in nonplant systems, suggesting that it is likely to be specific to plants. Using truncated versions of the protein and a synthetic peptide in CaM binding assays we mapped the CaM-binding region to a 20-amino acid stretch (residues 1216-1237). The bacterially expressed protein containing the CaM-binding domain interacted with three CaM isoforms (CaM2, CaM4, and CaM6). PCBP is encoded by a single gene and is expressed differentially in the tissues tested. The expression of CaM, PCBP, and another CaM-binding protein is similar in different tissues and organs. The predicted protein contained seven putative nuclear localization signals and several strong PEST motifs. Fusion of the N-terminal region of the protein containing six of the seven nuclear localization signals to the reporter gene beta-glucuronidase targeted the reporter gene to the nucleus, suggesting a nuclear role for PCBP.

  5. A pollen-specific novel calmodulin-binding protein with tetratricopeptide repeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safadi, F.; Reddy, V. S.; Reddy, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium is essential for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. A large body of information has established a link between elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) at the pollen tube tip and its growth. Since the action of Ca(2+) is primarily mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM), identification of CaM-binding proteins in pollen should provide insights into the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, a CaM-binding protein from maize pollen (maize pollen calmodulin-binding protein, MPCBP) was isolated in a protein-protein interaction-based screening using (35)S-labeled CaM as a probe. MPCBP has a molecular mass of about 72 kDa and contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) suggesting that it is a member of the TPR family of proteins. MPCBP protein shares a high sequence identity with two hypothetical TPR-containing proteins from Arabidopsis. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-Sepharose binding, we show that the bacterially expressed MPCBP binds to bovine CaM and three CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To map the CaM-binding domain several truncated versions of the MPCBP were expressed in bacteria and tested for their ability to bind CaM. Based on these studies, the CaM-binding domain was mapped to an 18-amino acid stretch between the first and second TPR regions. Gel and fluorescence shift assays performed with CaM and a CaM-binding synthetic peptide further confirmed MPCBP binding to CaM. Western, Northern, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis have shown that MPCBP expression is specific to pollen. MPCBP was detected in both soluble and microsomal proteins. Immunoblots showed the presence of MPCBP in mature and germinating pollen. Pollen-specific expression of MPCBP, its CaM-binding properties, and the presence of TPR motifs suggest a role for this protein in Ca(2+)-regulated events during pollen germination and growth.

  6. Calmodulin and S100A1 protein interact with N terminus of TRPM3 channel.

    PubMed

    Holakovska, Blanka; Grycova, Lenka; Jirku, Michaela; Sulc, Miroslav; Bumba, Ladislav; Teisinger, Jan

    2012-05-11

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 ion channel (TRPM3) belongs to the TRP family of cation-permeable ion channels involved in many important biological functions such as pain transduction, thermosensation, and mechanoregulation. The channel was reported to play an important role in Ca(2+) homeostasis, but its gating mechanisms, functions, and regulation are still under research. Utilizing biophysical and biochemical methods, we characterized two independent domains, Ala-35-Lys-124 and His-291-Gly-382, on the TRPM3 N terminus, responsible for interactions with the Ca(2+)-binding proteins calmodulin (CaM) and S100A1. We identified several positively charged residues within these domains as having a crucial impact on CaM/S100A1 binding. The data also suggest that the interaction is calcium-dependent. We also performed competition assays, which suggested that CaM and S100A1 are able to compete for the same binding sites within the TRPM3 N terminus. This is the first time that such an interaction has been shown for TRP family members.

  7. Responses of plant calmodulin to endocytosis induced by rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Cheng, Mengzhu; Chu, Yunxia; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, David D Y; Huang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Qing

    2016-07-01

    The wide application of rare earth elements (REEs) have led to their diffusion and accumulation in the environment. The activation of endocytosis is the primary response of plant cells to REEs. Calmodulin (CaM), as an important substance in calcium (Ca) signaling systems, regulating almost all of the physiological activities in plants, such as cellular metabolism, cell growth and division. However, the response of CaM to endocytosis activated by REEs remains unknown. By using immunofluorescence labeling and a confocal laser scanning microscope, we found that trivalent lanthanum [La(III)], an REE ion, affected the expression of CaM in endocytosis. Using circular dichroism, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and computer simulations, we demonstrated that a low concentration of La(III) could interact with extracellular CaM by electrostatic attraction and was then bound to two Ca-binding sites of CaM, making the molecular structure more compact and orderly, whereas a high concentration of La(III) could be coordinated with cytoplasmic CaM or bound to other Ca-binding sites, making the molecular structure more loose and disorderly. Our results provide a reference for revealing the action mechanisms of REEs in plant cells.

  8. Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel alters calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J. Z.; Wu, Y.; Williams, B. Y.; Rodney, G.; Mandel, F.; Strasburg, G. M.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    This study presents evidence for a close relationship between the oxidation state of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (RyR1) and its ability to bind calmodulin (CaM). CaM enhances the activity of RyR1 in low Ca2+ and inhibits its activity in high Ca2+. Oxidation, which activates the channel, blocks the binding of 125I-labeled CaM at both micromolar and nanomolar Ca2+ concentrations. Conversely, bound CaM slows oxidation-induced cross-linking between subunits of the RyR1 tetramer. Alkylation of hyperreactive sulfhydryls (<3% of the total sulfhydryls) on RyR1 with N-ethylmaleimide completely blocks oxidant-induced intersubunit cross-linking and inhibits Ca2+-free 125I-CaM but not Ca2+/125I-CaM binding. These studies suggest that 1) the sites on RyR1 for binding apocalmodulin have features distinct from those of the Ca2+/CaM site, 2) oxidation may alter the activity of RyR1 in part by altering its interaction with CaM, and 3) CaM may protect RyR1 from oxidative modifications during periods of oxidative stress.

  9. Calmodulin-dependent kinase II regulates osteoblast differentiation through regulation of Osterix.

    PubMed

    Choi, You Hee; Choi, Jun-Ha; Oh, Jae-Wook; Lee, Kwang-Youl

    2013-03-08

    Osterix (Osx), a zinc-finger transcription factor, is required for osteoblast differentiation and new bone formation during embryonic development. Calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) acts as a key regulator of osteoblast differentiation. However, the precise molecular signaling mechanisms between Osterix and CaMKII are not known. In this study, we focused on the relationship between Osterix and CaMKII during osteoblast differentiation. We examined the role of the CaMKII pathway in the regulation of protein levels and its transcriptional activity on Osterix. We showed that CaMKII interacts with Osterix by increasing the protein levels and enhancing the transcriptional activity of Osterix. Conversely, CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 decreases the protein levels and increases the stability of Osterix. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKII decreased the protein levels and transcriptional activity of Osterix. These results suggest that Osterix is a novel target of CaMKII and the activity of Osterix can be modulated by a novel mechanism involving CaMKII during osteoblast differentiation.

  10. Calmodulin-like protein from M. tuberculosis H37Rv is required during infection

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Meeta J.; Rajagopalan, Malini; Reddy, P. Hemalatha

    2014-01-01

    M. tuberculosis constitutes very sophisticated signaling systems that convert the environment signals into appropriate cellular response and helps the bacilli to overcome the onslaught of host defence mechanisms. Although mycobacterial two-component systems and STPKs have gained lot of attention as virulence factors, mycobacterial calcium signaling has not been very well studied. Calcium signaling has been the primary mechanism in eukaryotes for regulation of kinases, however in prokaryotes auto-phosphorylation of number of kinases has been reported. We have previously reported a small calmodulin-like-protein (CAMLP) from M. tuberculosis regulating enzymes of heterogeneous origin. To understand its role in both viability and virulence, we have assessed the effect of reduced expression of CAMLP coding gene Rv1211 on M. tb growth in vitro and ex vivo. Further, we have also studied the expression profile of Rv1211 in various conditions simulating host microenvironments. Our results highlight the possible role of CAMLP in growth and survival of M. tb during infection. PMID:25359006

  11. Calmodulin binding proteins provide domains of local Ca2+ signaling in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J; Bers, Donald M

    2012-02-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) acts as a common Ca(2+) sensor for many signaling pathways, transducing local Ca(2+) signals into specific cellular outcomes. Many of CaM's signaling functions can be explained by its unique biochemical properties, including high and low affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites with slow and fast kinetics, respectively. CaM is expected to have a limited spatial range of action, emphasizing its role in local Ca(2+) signaling. Interactions with target proteins further fine-tune CaM signal transduction. Here, we focus on only three specific cellular targets for CaM signaling in cardiac myocytes: the L-type Ca(2+) channel, the ryanodine receptor, and the IP(3) receptor. We elaborate a working hypothesis that each channel is regulated by two distinct functional populations of CaM: dedicated CaM and promiscuous CaM. Dedicated CaM is typically tethered to each channel and directly regulates channel activity. In addition, a local pool of promiscuous CaM appears poised to sense local Ca(2+) signals and trigger downstream pathways such as Ca(2+)/CaM dependent-protein kinase II and calcineurin. Understanding how promiscuous CaM coordinates multiple distinct signaling pathways remains a challenge, but is aided by the use of mathematical modeling and a new generation of fluorescent biosensors. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes."

  12. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  13. Physiological calcium concentrations regulate calmodulin binding and catalysis of adenylyl cyclase exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuequan; Lee, Young-Sam; Soelaiman, Sandriyana; Bergson, Pamela; Lu, Dan; Chen, Alice; Beckingham, Kathy; Grabarek, Zenon; Mrksich, Milan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2002-12-16

    Edema factor (EF) and CyaA are calmodulin (CaM)-activated adenylyl cyclase exotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of anthrax and whooping cough, respectively. Using spectroscopic, enzyme kinetic and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy analyses, we show that low Ca(2+) concentrations increase the affinity of CaM for EF and CyaA causing their activation, but higher Ca(2+) concentrations directly inhibit catalysis. Both events occur in a physiologically relevant range of Ca(2+) concentrations. Despite the similarity in Ca(2+) sensitivity, EF and CyaA have substantial differences in CaM binding and activation. CyaA has 100-fold higher affinity for CaM than EF. CaM has N- and C-terminal globular domains, each binding two Ca(2+) ions. CyaA can be fully activated by CaM mutants with one defective C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding site or by either terminal domain of CaM while EF cannot. EF consists of a catalytic core and a helical domain, and both are required for CaM activation of EF. Mutations that decrease the interaction of the helical domain with the catalytic core create an enzyme with higher sensitivity to Ca(2+)-CaM activation. However, CyaA is fully activated by CaM without the domain corresponding to the helical domain of EF.

  14. Structural analysis of calmodulin binding by nNOS inhibitory amphibian peptides.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Antonio N; Bowie, John H; Pukala, Tara L

    2015-01-20

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous protein in nature and plays a regulatory role in numerous biological processes, including the upregulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in vivo. Several peptides that prevent NO production by interacting with CaM have been isolated in the cutaneous secretions of Australian amphibians, and are thought to serve as a defense mechanism against predators. In this work, we probe the mechanism by which three of these peptides, namely, caerin 1.8, dahlein 5.6, and a synthetic modification of citropin 1.1, interact with CaM to inhibit NO signaling. Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to determine thermodynamic parameters of the binding interactions and revealed that all the peptides bind to CaM in a similar fashion, with the peptide encapsulated between the two lobes of CaM. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry was used to investigate the changes in collision cross section that occur as a result of complexation, providing additional evidence for this binding mode. Finally, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to track chemical shift changes upon binding. The results obtained confirm that these complexes adopt canonical collapsed structures and demonstrate the strength of the interaction between the peptides and CaM. An understanding of these molecular recognition events provides insights into the underlying mechanism of the amphibian host-defense system.

  15. Calcium-modulated conformational affinity chromatography. Application to the purification of calmodulin and S100 proteins.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, G; Neufeld, T; Star-Weinstock, M; Litvak, M; Solomon, B

    1992-04-24

    The purification of proteins by affinity chromatography is based on their highly specific interaction with an immobilized ligand followed by elution under conditions where their affinity towards the ligand is markedly reduced. Thus, a high-degree purification by a single chromatographic step is achieved. However, when several proteins in the crude mixture share affinity to a common immobilized ligand, they may not be resolved by affinity chromatography and subsequent "real" chromatographic purification steps may be required. It is shown that by using properly selected gradient elution conditions, the affinities of the various proteins towards the immobilized ligand may be gradually modulated and their separation may be achieved. This is exemplified by the isolation and separation of a group of Ca(2+)-activated proteins, Calmodulin, S100a and S100b, from bovine brain extract, using a melittin-Eupergit C affinity column which is developed with Ca(2+)-chelator gradients. As expected, separation of the three proteins into individual peaks, eluted in order of increasing affinity to the matrix, was obtained. Sigmoid selectivity curves calculated from the elution volumes under different elution conditions for each of the proteins were obtained, illustrating the chromatographic behaviour of the gradient affinity separation system.

  16. Conservation of Ca2+/Calmodulin Regulation across Na and Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Yang, Philemon S.; Niu, Jacqueline; Yang, Wanjun; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, David T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+channels comprise distinct ion-channel superfamilies, yet the carboxy tails of these channels exhibit high homology hinting at a long-shared and purposeful module. For different Ca2+ channels, carboxyl-tail inter actions with calmodulin do elaborate robust and similar forms of Ca2+ regulation. However, Na channels have only shown subtler Ca2+modulation that differs among reports, challenging attempts at unified understanding. Here, by rapid Ca2+photoreleaseon to Na channels, we reset this view of Na channel regulation. For cardiac muscle channels (NaV1.5), reported effects from which most mechanistic proposals derive, we observe no Ca2+modulation. Conversely, for skeletal-muscle channels (NaV1.4), we uncover fast Ca2+ regulation eerily similar to that of Ca2+ channels. Channel opathic myotonia mutations halve NaV1.4 Ca2+ regulation, and transplanting the NaV1.4 carboxy tail onto Ca2+ channels recapitulates Ca2+ regulation. Thus we argue for the persistence and physiological relevance of an ancient Ca2+ regulatory module across Na and Ca2+ channels. PMID:24949975

  17. Distribution of calmodulin in pea seedlings: immunocytochemical localization in plumules and root apices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.; Hardison, L.

    1986-01-01

    Immunofluorescence techniques have been used to study the distribution of calmodulin in several tissues in young etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings. A fairly uniform staining was seen in the nucleoplasm and background cytoplasm of most cell types. Cell walls and nucleoli were not stained. In addition, patterned staining reactions were seen in many cells. In cells of the plumule, punctate staining of the cytoplasm was common, and in part this stain appeared to be associated with the plastids. A very distinctive staining of amyloplasts was seen in the columella of the root cap. Staining associated with cytoskeletal elements could be shown in division stages. By metaphase, staining of the spindle region was quite evident. In epidermal cells of the stem and along the underside of the leaf there was an intense staining of the vacuolar contents. Guard cells lacked this vacuolar stain. Vacuolar staining was sometimes seen in cells of the stele, but the most distinctive pattern in the stele was associated with young conducting cells of the xylem. These staining patterns are consistent with the idea that the interactions of plastids and the cytoskeletal may be one of the Ca(2+)-mediated steps in the response of plants to environmental stimuli. Nuclear functions may also be controlled, at least in part, by Ca2+.

  18. Calmodulin-mediated suppression of 2-ketoisovalerate reductase in Beauveria bassiana beauvericin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Yoon, Deok-Hyo; Oh, Junsang; Hyun, Min-Woo; Han, Jae-Gu; Sung, Gi-Ho

    2016-11-01

    Ketoisovalerate reductase (KIVR, E.C. 1.2.7.7) mediates the specific reduction of 2-ketoisovalerate (2-Kiv) to d-hydroxyisovalerate (d-Hiv), a precursor for beauvericin biosynthesis. Beauvericin, a famous mycotoxin produced by many fungi, is a cyclooligomer depsipeptide, which has insecticidal, antimicrobial, antiviral, and cytotoxic activities. In this report, we demonstrated that Beauveria bassiana 2-ketoisovalerate reductase (BbKIVR) acts as a typical KIVR enzyme in the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana. In addition, we found that BbKIVR interacts with calmodulin (CaM) in vitro and in vivo. The functional role of CaM-binding to BbKIVR was to negatively regulate the BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress suppressed BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Interestingly, this negative effect of BbKIVR activity by light and salt stress was recovered by CaM inhibitors, suggesting that the inhibitory mechanism is mediated through stimulation of CaM activity. Therefore, this work suggests that BbKIVR plays an important role in the beauvericin biosynthetic pathway mediated by environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress via the CaM signaling pathway.

  19. Divergent Soybean Calmodulins Respond Similarly to Calcium Transients: Insight into Differential Target Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Shane D.; Chakravarthy, Harshini; Shettigar, Vikram; O’Neil, Andrew J.; Siddiqui, Jalal K.; Jones, Benjamin R.; Tikunova, Svetlana B.; Davis, Jonathan P.

    2017-01-01

    Plants commonly respond to stressors by modulating the expression of a large family of calcium binding proteins including isoforms of the ubiquitous signaling protein calmodulin (CaM). The various plant CaM isoforms are thought to differentially regulate the activity of specific target proteins to modulate cellular stress responses. The mechanism(s) behind differential target activation by the plant CaMs is unknown. In this study, we used steady-state and stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the strategy by which two soybean CaMs (sCaM1 and sCaM4) have evolved to differentially regulate NAD kinase (NADK), which is activated by sCaM1 but inhibited by sCaM4. Although the isolated proteins have different cation binding properties, in the presence of Mg2+ and the CaM binding domains from proteins that are differentially regulated, the two plant CaMs respond nearly identically to rapid and slow Ca2+ transients. Our data suggest that the plant CaMs have evolved to bind certain targets with comparable affinities, respond similarly to a particular Ca2+ signature, but achieve different structural states, only one of which can activate the enzyme. Understanding the basis for differential enzyme regulation by the plant CaMs is the first step to engineering a vertebrate CaM that will selectively alter the CaM signaling network. PMID:28261258

  20. Hunting increases phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II in adult barn owls.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is "off" in adults.

  1. Defective calmodulin-dependent rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish sensory hair cell mutants.

    PubMed

    Seiler, C; Nicolson, T

    1999-11-15

    Vertebrate mechanosensory hair cells contain a narrow "pericuticular" zone which is densely populated with small vesicles between the cuticular plate and cellular junctions near the apical surface. The presence of many cytoplasmic vesicles suggests that the apical surface of hair cells has a high turnover rate. The significance of intense membrane trafficking at the apical surface is not known. Using a marker of endocytosis, the styryl dye FM1-43, this report shows that rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells is calcium and calmodulin dependent and is partially blocked by the presence of amiloride and dihydrostreptomycin, known inhibitors of mechanotransduction channels. As seen in lateral line hair cells, sensory hair cells within the larval otic capsule also exhibit rapid apical endocytosis. Defects in internalization of the dye in both lateral line and inner ear hair cells were found in five zebrafish auditory/vestibular mutants: sputnik, mariner, orbiter, mercury, and skylab. In addition, lateral line hair cells in these mutants were not sensitive to prolonged exposure to streptomycin, which is toxic to hair cells. The presence of endocytic defects in the majority of zebrafish mechanosensory mutants points to a important role of apical endocytosis in hair cell function.

  2. The Cotton Kinesin-Like Calmodulin-Binding Protein Associates with Cortical Microtubles in Cotton Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Preuss, Mary L.; Delmar, Deborah P.; Liu, Bo

    2003-05-01

    Microtubules in interphase plant cells form a cortical array, which is critical for plant cell morphogenesis. Genetic studies imply that the minus end-directed microtubule motor kinesin-like calmodulin-binding protein (KCBP) plays a role in trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis. However, it was not clear whether this motor interacted with interphase microtubules. In cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers, cortical microtubules undergo dramatic reorganization during fiber development. In this study, cDNA clones of the cotton KCBP homolog GhKCBP were isolated from a cotton fiber-specific cDNA library. During cotton fiber development from 10 to 21 DPA, the GhKCBP protein level gradually decreases. By immunofluorescence, GhKCBP was detected as puncta along cortical microtubules in fiber cells of different developmental stages. Thus the results provide evidence that GhKCBP plays a role in interphase cell growth likely by interacting with cortical microtubules. In contrast to fibers, in dividing cells of cotton, GhKCBP localized to the nucleus, the microtubule preprophase band, mitotic spindle, and the phragmoplast. Therefore KCBP likely exerts multiple roles in cell division and cell growth in flowering plants.

  3. Regulation of gastrointestinal motility by Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Perrino, Brian A

    2011-06-15

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility ultimately depends upon the contractile activity of the smooth muscle cells of the tunica muscularis. Integrated functioning of multiple tissues and cell types, including enteric neurons and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) is necessary to generate coordinated patterns of motor activity that control the movement of material through the digestive tract. The neurogenic mechanisms that govern GI motility patterns are superimposed upon intrinsic myogenic mechanisms regulating smooth muscle cell excitability. Several mechanisms regulate smooth muscle cell responses to neurogenic inputs, including the multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII). CaMKII can be activated by Ca(2+) transients from both extracellular and intracellular sources. Prolonging the activities of Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels in the plasma membrane of GI smooth muscle cells is an important regulatory mechanism carried out by CaMKII. Phospholamban (PLN) phosphorylation by CaMKII activates the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), increasing both the rate of Ca(2+) clearance from the myoplasm and the frequency of localized Ca(2+) release events from intracellular stores. Overall, CaMKII appears to moderate GI smooth muscle cell excitability. Finally, transcription factor activities may be facilitated by the neutralization of HDAC4 by CaMKII phosphorylation, which may contribute to the phenotypic plasticity of GI smooth muscle cells.

  4. Calmodulin regulation of TMEM16A and 16B Ca2+-activated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tingting; Colecraft, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+-activated chloride channels encoded by TMEM16A and 16B are important for regulating epithelial mucus secretion, cardiac and neuronal excitability, smooth muscle contraction, olfactory transduction, and cell proliferation. Whether and how the ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor calmodulin (CaM) regulates the activity of TMEM16A and 16B channels has been controversial and the subject of an ongoing debate. Recently, using a bioengineering approach termed ChIMP (Channel Inactivation induced by Membrane-tethering of an associated Protein) we argued that Ca2+-free CaM (apoCaM) is pre-associated with functioning TMEM16A and 16B channel complexes in live cells. Further, the pre-associated apoCaM mediates Ca2+-dependent sensitization of activation (CDSA) and Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) of some TMEM16A splice variants. In this review, we discuss these findings in the context of previous and recent results relating to Ca2+-dependent regulation of TMEM16A/16B channels and the putative role of CaM. We further discuss potential future directions for these nascent ideas on apoCaM regulation of TMEM16A/16B channels, noting that such future efforts will benefit greatly from the pioneering work of Dr. David T. Yue and colleagues on CaM regulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. PMID:26083059

  5. A loss-of-function mutation in Calmodulin2 gene affects pollen germination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Landoni, Michela; De Francesco, Alessandra; Galbiati, Massimo; Tonelli, Chiara

    2010-10-01

    Calmodulin (CAM) is an ubiquitous calcium binding protein whose function is to translate the signals, perceived as calcium concentration variations, into the appropriate cellular responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are 4 CAM isoforms which are highly similar, encoded by 7 genes, and one possible explanation proposed for the evolutionary conservation of the CAM gene family is that the different genes have acquired different functions so that they play possibly overlapping but non-identical roles. Here we report the characterization of the Arabidopsis mutant cam2-2, identified among the lines of the gene-trapping collection EXOTIC because of a distorted segregation of kanamycin resistance. Phenotypic analysis showed that in normal growth conditions cam2-2 plants were indistinguishable from the wild type while genetic analysis showed a reduced transmission of the cam2-2 allele through the male gametophyte and in vitro pollen germination revealed a reduced level of germination in comparison with the wild type. These results provide genetic evidence of the involvement of a CAM gene in pollen germination and support the theory of functional diversification of the CAM gene family.

  6. Capping of the N-terminus of PSD-95 by calmodulin triggers its postsynaptic release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Matt, Lucas; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Malik, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Park, Deborah K; Renieri, Alessandra; Ames, James B; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-06-17

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is a central element of the postsynaptic architecture of glutamatergic synapses. PSD-95 mediates postsynaptic localization of AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors and plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. PSD-95 is released from postsynaptic membranes in response to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA receptors. Here, we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) binds at the N-terminus of PSD-95. Our NMR structure reveals that both lobes of CaM collapse onto a helical structure of PSD-95 formed at its N-terminus (residues 1-16). This N-terminal capping of PSD-95 by CaM blocks palmitoylation of C3 and C5, which is required for postsynaptic PSD-95 targeting and the binding of CDKL5, a kinase important for synapse stability. CaM forms extensive hydrophobic contacts with Y12 of PSD-95. The PSD-95 mutant Y12E strongly impairs binding to CaM and Ca(2+)-induced release of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane in dendritic spines. Our data indicate that CaM binding to PSD-95 serves to block palmitoylation of PSD-95, which in turn promotes Ca(2+)-induced dissociation of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane.

  7. Distinguishing Unfolding and Functional Conformational Transitions of Calmodulin Using Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Squier, Thomas C.; Spiro, Thomas

    2014-06-14

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous moderator protein for calcium signaling in all eukaryotic cells. This small calcium-binding protein exhibits a broad range of structural transitions, including domain opening and folding-unfolding, that allow it to recognize a wide variety of binding partners in vivo. While the static structures of CaM associated with its various binding activities are fairly well known, it has been challenging to examine the dynamics of transition between these structures in real-time, due to a lack of suitable spectroscopic probes of CaM structure. In this paper, we examine the potential of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy for clarifying the nature of structural transitions in CaM. We find that the UVRR spectral change (with 229 nm excitation) due to thermal unfolding of CaM is qualitatively different from that associated with opening of the C-terminal domain in response to Ca2+ binding. This spectral difference is entirely due to differences in teritary contacts at the inter-domain tyrosine residue Tyr138, toward which other spectroscopic methods are not sensitive. We conclude that UVRR is ideally suited to identifying the different types of structural transitions in CaM and other proteins with conformation-sensitive tyrosine residues, opening a path to time-resolved studies of CaM dynamics using Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Bcl10 is phosphorylated on Ser138 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Xavier, Ramnik

    2007-03-01

    Ordered assembly of scaffold proteins Carma1-Bcl10-Malt1 determines NF-kappaB activation following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. Carma1-Bcl10 interaction and the signaling pathway are controlled by Carma1 phosphorylation, which are induced by PKCtheta and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In addition to Carma1 phosphorylation, previous studies have demonstrated that Bcl10 is phosphorylated in the C-terminal Ser/Thr rich region following TCR engagement. However the kinases that phosphorylate Bcl10 are incompletely understood. Here we show that CaMKII phosphorylates Bcl10 on Ser138. Furthermore, a CaMKII inhibitor, KN93, and CaMKII siRNA substantially reduce Bcl10 phosphorylation induced by phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin. S138A mutation prolongs Bcl10-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting that Bcl10 phosphorylation is involved in attenuation of NF-kappaB activation. These findings suggest that CaMKII modulates NF-kappaB activation via phosphorylating Bcl10 as well as Carma1.

  9. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Love, Nick R; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-02-03

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD(+) kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms.

  10. Role of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinases in skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Chin, Eva R

    2005-08-01

    In skeletal muscle, the increase in intracellular Ca(2+) resulting from motor activation plays a key role in both contractile activity-dependent and fiber type-specific gene expression. These motor activation-dependent signals are linked to the amplitude and duration of the Ca(2+) transients that are decoded downstream by Ca(2+)-dependent transcriptional pathways. Evidence is mounting that the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKs) such as CaMKII play an important role in regulating oxidative enzyme expression, mitochondrial biogenesis, and expression of fiber type-specific myofibrillar proteins. CaMKIV has been shown to promote mitochondrial biogenesis and a mild fast-to-slow fiber type transition but has recently been shown to not be required for activity-dependent changes in muscle phenotype. CaMKII is known to decode frequency-dependent information and is activated during hypertrophic growth and endurance adaptations and also is upregulated during muscle atrophy. CaMKII has also been shown to remain active in a Ca(2+)-independent manner after acute and prolonged exercise, and, therefore, is implicated as a mechanism for muscle memory. This mechanism can sense altered functional demands and trigger activation of an adaptational response that is dose dependently related to the activation level. This class of enzymes may therefore be the ideal decoders of information encoded by the intensity, frequency, and duty cycle of muscle activation and thus translate level of muscle activation into phenotypic adaptations through regulation of important muscle genes.

  11. Calcium/calmodulin kinase II activity of hippocampus in kainate-induced epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M. C.; Ban, S. S.; Woo, Y. J.; Kim, S. U.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) activity related to long-standing neuronal injury of the hippocampus in kainate (KA)-induced experimental temporal lobe epilepsy. Epileptic seizure was induced by injection of KA (1 microg/microL) dissolved in phosphate buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4) into the left amygdala. Clinical seizures, histopathologic changes and CaMKII activity of the hippocampus were evaluated. Characteristic early limbic and late seizures were developed. Hippocampal CaMKII activity increased significantly 4 and 8 weeks after intra-amygdaloid injection of KA, when late seizures developed. The histopathologic changes of the hippocampus included swelling of neuronal cytoplasm with nuclear pyknosis and loss of neurons in CA3 during this period. The increased activity of CaMKII may correlate with appearance of distant damage in the hippocampus. The above results indicate that intra-amygdaloid injection of KA produces excitatory signals for ipsilateral CA3 neurons in the hippocampus and that subsequently increased levels of CaMKII in postsynaptic neurons induce neuronal injury via phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate type glutamate receptor. PMID:11641537

  12. Selective Nitration of Tyr(99) in Calmodulin as a Marker of Cellular Conditions of Oxidative Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S. ); Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Bartlett, Ryan K.; Urbauer, Ramona J.; Williams, Todd D.; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Squier, Thomas C. )

    2003-01-01

    We examined the possible role of methionines as oxidant scavengers that prevent the peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosines within calmodulin (CaM). We used mass spectrometry to investigate the reactivity of peroxynitrite with CaM at physiological pH. The possible role of methionines in scavenging peroxynitrite(ONOO-)was assessed in wild-type CaM and following substitution of all nine methionines in CaM with leucines. We find that peroxynitrite selectively nitrates Tyr-99 at physiological pH resulting in the formation of between 0.05 and 0.25 mol of nitrotyrosine/mol of CaM when the added molar ratio of peroxynitrite per CaM was varied between 2.5 and 15. In wild-type CaM there is a corresponding oxidation of between 0.8 and 2.8 mol of methionine to form methionine sulfoxide. However, following site-directed substitution of all nine methionines in wild-type CaM with leucines, the extent of nitration by peroxynitrite was unchanged. These results indicate that Tyr-99 is readily nitrated by perioxynitrite and that methionine side chains do not function as an antioxidant in scavenging perioxynitrite. Thus, separate reactive species are involved in the oxidation of

  13. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  14. Secreted calmodulin-like skin protein ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaaki; Tajima, Hirohisa; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2014-06-18

    Humanin, a short bioactive peptide, inhibits cell death in a variety of cell-based death models through Humanin receptors in vitro. In vivo, Humanin ameliorates both muscarinic receptor antagonist-induced memory impairment in normal mice and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-relevant mouse models including aged transgenic mice expressing a familial AD-linked gene. Recently, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP) has been shown to be secreted from skin tissues, contain a region minimally similar to the core region of Humanin, and inhibit AD-related neuronal death through the heterotrimeric Humanin receptor on the cell surface in vitro. As CLSP is much more potent than Humanin and efficiently transported through blood circulation across the blood-brain barrier to the central nervous system, CLSP is considered as a physiological agonist that binds to the heterotrimeric Humanin receptor and triggers the Humanin-induced signals in central nervous system. However, it remains unknown whether CLSP ameliorates memory impairment in mouse dementia models as Humanin does. In this study, we show that recombinant CLSP, administered intracerebroventricularly or intraperitoneally, ameliorates scopolamine-induced dementia in mice.

  15. Structural Environment and Stability of the Complexes Formed Between Calmodulin and Actinyl Ions.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, Florian; Safi, Samir; Jeanson, Aurélie; Martinez-Baez, Ernesto; Roques, Jérôme; Berthomieu, Catherine; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Simoni, Éric

    2016-03-21

    Because of their presence in the nuclear fuel cycle, neptunium and uranium are two actinides of main interest in case of internal contamination. Complexation of U(VI) and Np(V) by the target protein calmodulin (CaM(WT)) was therefore studied herein. Both actinides have two axial oxygen atoms, which, charge aside, makes them very similar structurally wise. This work combines spectroscopy and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Structural characterization was performed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the L(III)-edge for each studied actinide. Models for the binding site of the protein were developed and then refined by using DFT to fit the obtained experimental EXAFS data. The effect of hydrolysis was also considered for both actinides (the uranyl experiment was performed at pH 3 and 6, while the neptunyl experiment was conducted at pH 7 and 9). The effect of the pH variation was apparent on the coordination sphere of the uranyl complexes, while the neptunyl complex characteristics remained stable under both studied conditions. The DFT calculations showed that at near physiological pH the complex formed by CaM(WT) with the neptunium ion is more stable than the one formed with uranyl.

  16. Quantum Chemical Studies on Stability and Chemical Activities in Calcium Ion Bound Calmodulin Loops.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Samapan; Ghosh, Mahua; De Raychaudhury, Molly; Chakrabarti, J

    2015-11-19

    Quantum chemical (QC) calculations for macromolecules require truncation of the molecule, highlighting the portion of interest due to heavy computation cost. As a result, an estimation of the effects of truncation is important to interpret the energy spectrum of such calculations. We perform density functional theory based QC calculations on calcium ion bound EF-hand loops of Calmodulin isolated from the crystal structure in an implicit solvent. We find that the terminal contributions of neutral capping are negligible across the entire ground-state energy spectrum. The coordination energy range and the nature of hybridization of the coordination state molecular orbitals remain qualitatively similar across these loops. While the HOMO and LUMO of loops in the N-terminal domain are dominated by the acidic aspartates, and the polar/hydrophobic residues, respectively, these levels of the C-terminal domain loops show strong localized electron density on the phenyl rings of the tyrosines. The Fukui index calculation identifies the hydroxyl oxygen in the phenyl ring of Y99 as a potent nucleophile. Our analysis indicates a general way of interpreting the electronic energy spectra to understand stability and functions of large biomolecules where the truncation of the molecule and, hence, the terminal capping effects are inevitable.

  17. Intracerebroventricular administration of morphine confers remote cardioprotection--role of opioid receptors and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Irwin, Michael G; Lu, Yao; Mei, Bin; Zuo, You-Mei; Chen, Zhi-Wu; Wong, Tak-Ming

    2011-04-10

    The current study aimed to delineate the mechanism of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine (RMPC) against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intracerebroventricular morphine injection before myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Ischemia-reperfusion injury was achieved by 30min of left coronary artery occlusion followed by 120min of reperfusion. The effects of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine preconditioning were also determined upon selective blockade of the δ, κ or μ-opioid receptors, or calmodulin (CaM). The infarct size, as a percentage of the area at risk, was determined by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium staining. Remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine reduced infarct size in the ischemic/reperfused myocardium, and the effect was abolished by the selective blockade of any one of the three δ, κ and μ opioid receptors or CaM. Furthermore, remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine increased the expression of CaM in the hippocampus and the plasma level of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The results of the present study provide evidence that the cardioprotection of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine involves not only all three types of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, but also CaM, which releases CGRP, one of the mediators of remote preconditioning.

  18. Regulation of mTORC1 by lysosomal calcium and calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruo-Jing; Xu, Jing; Fu, Chenglai; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Yujun George; Jia, Hao; Liu, Jun O

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of lysosomal calcium release due to lysosomal lipid accumulation has been shown to inhibit mTORC1 signaling. However, the mechanism by which lysosomal calcium regulates mTORC1 has remained undefined. Herein we report that proper lysosomal calcium release through the calcium channel TRPML1 is required for mTORC1 activation. TRPML1 depletion inhibits mTORC1 activity, while overexpression or pharmacologic activation of TRPML1 has the opposite effect. Lysosomal calcium activates mTORC1 by inducing association of calmodulin (CaM) with mTOR. Blocking the interaction between mTOR and CaM by antagonists of CaM significantly inhibits mTORC1 activity. Moreover, CaM is capable of stimulating the kinase activity of mTORC1 in a calcium-dependent manner in vitro. These results reveal that mTOR is a new type of CaM-dependent kinase, and TRPML1, lysosomal calcium and CaM play essential regulatory roles in the mTORC1 signaling pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19360.001 PMID:27787197

  19. Molecular characterization of a calmodulin involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Daiker, Viktor; Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2010-04-01

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis shows a negative gravitactic behavior. This is based on physiological mechanisms which in the past have been indirectly assessed. Meanwhile, it was possible to isolate genes involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis. The DNA sequences of five calmodulins were found in Euglena, one of which was only known in its protein structure (CaM.1); the other four are new. The biosynthesis of the corresponding proteins of CaM.1-CaM.5 was inhibited by means of RNA interference to determine their involvement in the gravitactic signal transduction chain. RNAi of CaM.1 inhibits free swimming of the cells and pronounced cell-form aberrations. The division of cells was also hampered. After recovery from RNAi the cell showed precise negative gravitaxis again. Blockage of CaM.3 to CaM. 5 did not impair gravitaxis. In contrast, the blockage of CaM.2 has only a transient and not pronounced influence on motility and cell form, but leads to a total loss of gravitactic orientation for more than 30 days. This indicates that CaM.2 is an element in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in E. gracilis. The results are discussed with regard to the current working model of gravitaxis in E. gracilis.

  20. Structural and thermodynamic studies of the tobacco calmodulin-like rgs-CaM protein.

    PubMed

    Makiyama, Rodrigo K; Fernandes, Carlos A H; Dreyer, Thiago R; Moda, Bruno S; Matioli, Fabio F; Fontes, Marcos R M; Maia, Ivan G

    2016-11-01

    The tobacco calmodulin-like protein rgs-CaM is involved in host defense against virus and is reported to possess an associated RNA silencing suppressor activity. Rgs-CaM is also believed to act as an antiviral factor by interacting and targeting viral silencing suppressors for autophagic degradation. Despite these functional data, calcium interplay in the modulation of rgs-CaM is still poorly understood. Here we show that rgs-CaM displays a prevalent alpha-helical conformation and possesses three functional Ca(2+)-binding sites. Using computational modeling and molecular dynamics simulation, we demonstrate that Ca(2+) binding to rgs-CaM triggers expansion of its tertiary structure with reorientation of alpha-helices within the EF-hands. This conformational change leads to the exposure of a large negatively charged region that may be implicated in the electrostatic interactions between rgs-CaM and viral suppressors. Moreover, the kd values obtained for Ca(2+) binding to the three functional sites are not within the affinity range of a typical Ca(2+) sensor.

  1. Cloning and analysis of calmodulin gene from Porphyra yezoensis Ueda (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengqiang; Mao, Yunxiang; Zhuang, Yunyun; Kong, Fanna; Sui, Zhenghong

    2009-09-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of signal transduction and anti-desiccation mechanisms of Porphyra yezoensis, cDNA and its genomic sequence of Calmodulin gene (CaM) was cloned by the technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the analysis of P. yezoensis ESTs from dbEST database. The result shows that the full-length cDNA of CaM consists of 603 bps including an ORF encoding for 151 amino acids and a terminate codon UGA, while the length of genomic sequence is 1231 bps including 2 exons and 1 intron. The average GC content of the coding region is 58.77%, while the GC content of the third position of this gene is as high as 82.23%. Four Ca2+ binding sites (EF-hand) are found in this gene. The predicted molecular mass of the deduced peptide is 16688.72 Da and the pI is 4.222. By aligning with known CaM genes, the similarity of CaM gene sequence with homologous genes in Chlamydomonas incerta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is 72.7% and 72.2% respectively, and the similarity of the deduced amino acid sequence of CaM gene with homologous genes in C. incerta and C. reinhardtii are both 71.5%. This is the first report on CaM from a species of Rhodophyta.

  2. Glucocorticoid interactions with ethanol effects on synaptic plasma membranes: influence on [125I]calmodulin binding.

    PubMed

    Sze, P Y

    1996-02-01

    Ca(++)-dependent binding of calmodulin (CaM) to brain synaptic plasma membranes is known to be inhibited by ethanol and stimulated by glucocorticoids. These opposite neurochemical actions between ethanol and the steroids in vitro are consistent with glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol-induced sedation reported to occur in vivo. The present study was undertaken to characterize the interactions of corticosterone with ethanol effects on [125I]CaM binding in synaptic plasma membranes. From the shift of concentration-response curves when corticosterone and ethanol were present in combination, the interaction between steroid stimulation and ethanol inhibition occurred in an additive relationship over the range of their effective concentrations. From Scatchard analyses, ethanol-induced decrease in membrane affinity for [125I]CaM was antagonized by steroid-induced increase in the membrane affinity, indicating that the convergent event in their interaction was the alteration of membrane affinity for CaM. Glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol inhibition of [125I]CaM binding exhibited a high degree of steroid specificity; steroids with glucocorticoid activity including cortisol, dexamethasone and triamcinolone were effective, whereas gonadal steroids and excitatory neuroactive steroid metabolites were ineffective. The demonstration that glucocorticoids antagonized the inhibition of CaM binding by ethanol provides support for the hypothesis that these steroids are among the endogenous factors that modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol.

  3. Calmodulin Binds a Highly Extended HIV-1 MA Protein That Refolds Upon Its Release

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, James E.; Chow, John Y.H.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Kwan, Ann H.; Duff, Anthony P.; Hamilton, William A.; Trewhella, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) expression is upregulated upon HIV-1 infection and interacts with proteins involved in viral processing, including the multifunctional HIV-1 MA protein. We present here the results of studies utilizing small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation that, when considered in the light of earlier fluorescence and NMR data, show CaM binds MA in an extended open-clamp conformation via interactions with two tryptophans that are widely spaced in sequence and space. The interaction requires a disruption of the MA tertiary fold such that MA becomes highly extended in a long snakelike conformation. The CaM-MA interface is extensive, covering ∼70% of the length of the MA such that regions known to be important in MA interactions with critical binding partners would be impacted. The CaM conformation is semiextended and as such is distinct from the classical CaM-collapse about short α-helical targets. NMR data show that upon dissociation of the CaM-MA complex, either by the removal of Ca2+ or increasing ionic strength, MA reforms its native tertiary contacts. Thus, we observe a high level of structural plasticity in MA that may facilitate regulation of its activities via intracellular Ca2+-signaling during viral processing. PMID:22947870

  4. Regulation of the NaV1.5 cytoplasmic domain by calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabelli, Sandra B.; Boto, Agedi; Kuhns, Victoria Halperin; Bianchet, Mario A.; Farinelli, Federica; Aripirala, Srinivas; Yoder, Jesse; Jakoncic, Jean; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2014-11-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) underlie the rapid upstroke of action potentials in excitable tissues. Binding of channel-interactive proteins is essential for controlling fast and long-term inactivation. In the structure of the complex of the carboxy-terminal portion of Nav1.5 (CTNav1.5) with calmodulin (CaM)-Mg2+ reported here, both CaM lobes interact with the CTNav1.5. On the basis of the differences between this structure and that of an inactivated complex, we propose that the structure reported here represents a non-inactivated state of the CTNav, that is, the state that is poised for activation. Electrophysiological characterization of mutants further supports the importance of the interactions identified in the structure. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that CaM binds to CTNav1.5 with high affinity. The results of this study provide unique insights into the physiological activation and the pathophysiology of Nav channels.

  5. Regulation of the NaV1.5 cytoplasmic domain by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Boto, Agedi; Kuhns, Victoria Halperin; Bianchet, Mario A; Farinelli, Federica; Aripirala, Srinivas; Yoder, Jesse; Jakoncic, Jean; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Amzel, L Mario

    2014-11-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) underlie the rapid upstroke of action potentials in excitable tissues. Binding of channel-interactive proteins is essential for controlling fast and long-term inactivation. In the structure of the complex of the carboxy-terminal portion of Na(v)1.5 (CTNa(v)1.5) with calmodulin (CaM)-Mg(2+) reported here, both CaM lobes interact with the CTNa(v)1.5. On the basis of the differences between this structure and that of an inactivated complex, we propose that the structure reported here represents a non-inactivated state of the CTNa(v), that is, the state that is poised for activation. Electrophysiological characterization of mutants further supports the importance of the interactions identified in the structure. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that CaM binds to CTNa(v)1.5 with high affinity. The results of this study provide unique insights into the physiological activation and the pathophysiology of Na(v) channels.

  6. Calcium-dependent interaction of calmodulin with human 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes.

    PubMed

    Behnen, Petra; Davis, Elizabeth; Delaney, Erin; Frohm, Birgitta; Bauer, Mikael; Cedervall, Tommy; O'Connell, David; Åkerfeldt, Karin S; Linse, Sara

    2012-08-28

    Ribosomes are the protein factories of every living cell. The process of protein translation is highly complex and tightly regulated by a large number of diverse RNAs and proteins. Earlier studies indicate that Ca(2+) plays a role in protein translation. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous Ca(2+)-binding protein, regulates a large number of proteins participating in many signaling pathways. Several 40S and 60S ribosomal proteins have been identified to interact with CaM, and here, we report that CaM binds with high affinity to 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. No binding is observed in buffer with 6 mM Mg(2+) and 1 mM EGTA that chelates Ca(2+), suggesting high specificity of the CaM-ribosome interaction dependent on the Ca(2+) induced conformational change of CaM. The interactions between CaM and ribosomes are inhibited by synthetic peptides comprising putative CaM-binding sites in ribosomal proteins S2 and L14. Using a cell-free in vitro translation system, we further found that these synthetic peptides are potent inhibitors of protein synthesis. Our results identify an involvement of CaM in the translational activity of ribosomes.

  7. Calmodulin physically interacts with the erythropoietin receptor and enhances Jak2-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Masahide; Iiyama, Mitsuko; Miura, Osamu . E-mail: miura.hema@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-09-23

    Stimulation of the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) induces a transient increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} level as well as activation of the Jak2 tyrosine kinase to stimulate various downstream signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that the universal Ca{sup 2+} receptor calmodulin (CaM) binds EpoR in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner in vitro. Binding studies using various EpoR mutants in hematopoietic cells showed that CaM binds the membrane-proximal 65-amino-acid cytoplasmic region (amino acids 258-312) of EpoR that is critical for activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling. Structurally unrelated CaM antagonists, W-13 and CMZ, inhibited activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling pathways, whereas W-12, a W-13 analog, did not show any significant inhibitory effect. Moreover, overexpression of CaM augmented Epo-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the EpoR. W-13, but not W-12, also inhibited Epo-induced proliferation and survival. Together, these results indicate that CaM binds to the membrane-proximal EpoR cytoplasmic region and plays an essential role in activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling.

  8. Calmodulin inhibition contributes to sensitize TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mi-kyung; Min, Yong Ki; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2009-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially triggers apoptosis in tumor cells versus normal cells. However, TRAIL alone is not effective in treating TRAIL-resistant tumors. We evaluated the effect of 180 enzyme inhibitors on TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells, and found fluphenazine-N-2-chloroethane (a calmodulin (CaM) antagonist) sensitized TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, in the presence of TRAIL, it increased caspase-8 binding to the Fas-associated death domain (FADD), but decreased binding of FADD-like interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme inhibitory proteins (FLIPs). Additionally, its combination with TRAIL inhibited Akt phosphorylation. These results were consistently observed in cells treated with CaM siRNA. We suggested the blockade of CaM could sensitize lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in at least 2 ways: (i) it can activate death-inducing signaling complex mediated apoptosis by inhibiting TRAIL-induced binding of FLIP and TRAIL-enhanced binding of caspase-8 to FADD; (ii) it can inhibit Akt phosphorylation, consequently leading to decreased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules such as FLIP and members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family. This study suggests the combination of CaM antagonists with TRAIL may have the therapeutic potential to overcome the resistance of lung cancers to apoptosis.

  9. Genome-wide identification and analyses of the rice calmodulin and related potential calcium sensor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boonburapong, Bongkoj; Buaboocha, Teerapong

    2007-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli evoke rapid and transient increases in [Ca2+]cyt in plant cells which are transmitted by protein sensors that contain EF-hand motifs. Here, a group of Oryza sativa L. genes encoding calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-like (CML) proteins that do not possess functional domains other than the Ca2+-binding EF-hand motifs was analyzed. Results By functional analyses and BLAST searches of the TIGR rice database, a maximum number of 243 proteins that possibly have EF-hand motifs were identified in the rice genome. Using a neighbor-joining tree based on amino acid sequence similarity, five loci were defined as Cam genes and thirty two additional CML genes were identified. Extensive analyses of the gene structures, the chromosome locations, the EF-hand motif organization, expression characteristics including analysis by RT-PCR and a comparative analysis of Cam and CML genes in rice and Arabidopsis are presented. Conclusion Although many proteins have unknown functions, the complexity of this gene family indicates the importance of Ca2+-signals in regulating cellular responses to stimuli and this family of proteins likely plays a critical role as their transducers. PMID:17263873

  10. Kinetic studies show that Ca2+ and Tb3+ have different binding preferences toward the four Ca2+-binding sites of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L; Leavis, P C; Gergely, J

    1984-12-18

    The stepwise addition of Tb3+ to calmodulin yields a large tyrosine-sensitized Tb3+ luminescence enhancement as the third and fourth ions bind to the protein [Wang, C.-L. A., Aquaron, R. R., Leavis, P. C., & Gergely, J. (1982) Eur. J. Biochem. 124, 7-12]. Since the only tyrosine residues in calmodulin are located within binding sites III and IV, these results suggest that Tb3+ binds first to sites I and II. Recent NMR studies have provided evidence that Ca2+, on the other hand, binds preferentially to sites III and IV. Kinetic studies using a stopped-flow apparatus also show that the preferential binding of Ca2+ and lanthanide ions is different. Upon rapid mixing of 2Ca-calmodulin with two Tb3+ ions, there was a small and rapid tyrosine fluorescence change, but no Tb3+ luminescence was observed, indicating that Tb3+ binds to sites I and II but not sites III and IV. When two Tb3+ ions are mixed with 2Dy-calmodulin, Tb3+ luminescence rises rapidly as Tb3+ binds to the empty sites III and IV, followed by a more gradual decrease (k = 0.4 s-1 as the ions redistribute themselves over the four sites. These results indicate that (i) both Tb3+ and Dy3+ prefer binding to sites I and II of calmodulin and (ii) the binding of Tb3+ to calmodulin is not impeded by the presence of two Ca2+ ions initially bound to the protein. Thus, the Ca2+ and lanthanide ions must exhibit opposite preferences for the four sites of calmodulin: sites III and IV are the high-affinity sites for Ca2+, whereas Tb3+ and Dy3+ prefer sites I and II.

  11. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  12. Calmodulin and CaMKII modulate ENaC activity by regulating the association of MARCKS and the cytoskeleton with the apical membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hui-Fang; Liu, Bing-Chen; Yu, Ling; Aldrugh, Summer; Montgomery, Darrice S.; Ma, He-Ping; Eaton, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) regulates epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) open probability. In turn, myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) protein or MARCKS-like protein 1 (MLP-1) at the plasma membrane regulates the delivery of PIP2 to ENaC. MARCKS and MLP-1 are regulated by changes in cytosolic calcium; increasing calcium promotes dissociation of MARCKS from the membrane, but the calcium-regulatory mechanisms are unclear. However, it is known that increased intracellular calcium can activate calmodulin and we show that inhibition of calmodulin with calmidazolium increases ENaC activity presumably by regulating MARCKS and MLP-1. Activated calmodulin can regulate MARCKS and MLP-1 in two ways. Calmodulin can bind to the effector domain of MARCKS or MLP-1, inactivating both proteins by causing their dissociation from the membrane. Mutations in MARCKS that prevent calmodulin association prevent dissociation of MARCKS from the membrane. Calmodulin also activates CaM kinase II (CaMKII). An inhibitor of CaMKII (KN93) increases ENaC activity, MARCKS association with ENaC, and promotes MARCKS movement to a membrane fraction. CaMKII phosphorylates filamin. Filamin is an essential component of the cytoskeleton and promotes association of ENaC, MARCKS, and MLP-1. Disruption of the cytoskeleton with cytochalasin E reduces ENaC activity. CaMKII phosphorylation of filamin disrupts the cytoskeleton and the association of MARCKS, MLP-1, and ENaC, thereby reducing ENaC open probability. Taken together, these findings suggest calmodulin and CaMKII modulate ENaC activity by destabilizing the association between the actin cytoskeleton, ENaC, and MARCKS, or MLP-1 at the apical membrane. PMID:26136560

  13. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of tyrosine environment and ligand binding of plant calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Gautam; Thompson, Faith; Puett, David

    1990-05-01

    Recent studies in our laboratories have focused on using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence of calmodulin (CaM) and tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence of CaM-bound peptdies as intrinsic probes of structure and interactions of this Ca2+ regulatory protein. Plant CaM contains a single Tyr (Tyr.-l38) and vertebrate CaM contains two (Tyr-99 and Tyr-.l38). Neither protein contains Trp. The fluorescence properties of Tyr-138 of wheat-germ CaM is sensitive to conformational changes induced by perturbations such as Ca2+ ligation or depletion, and pH changes. Effects of these perturbations on quantum yield, lifetime and dynamic quenching of Tyr-l38 fluorescence are reported. We have also studied binding of amphiphilic peptides to wheat-germ CaM. A comparison of wheat CaM induced changes in the fluorescence properties of a single Trp of these peptides with those induced by bovine testes CaM indicate general similarities of the peptide binding surfaces of plant and mammalian CaMs. Frequency domain measurements of decay of intensity and anisotropy have suggested some orientational freedom and local motion of the Trp residue of CaM-bound peptide, independent of the overall protein motion, even when the Trp is expected to be buried in the doubly apolar protein-peptide interface. Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous calcium binding protein which is believed to regulate several different enzymes in diverse cells (Klee et al., 1982). Much of the structural work to date has been carried out on mammalian CaM. However, CaM has also been isolated from plant and invertebrate sources, and a high degree of sequence homology with vertebrate CaM has been found. The amino acid sequence of wheat germ CaM shows eleven substitutions, two insertions and one deletion compared with the 148.-residue bovine brain CaM (Toda et al., 1985). Specific differences with mammalian CaM at two sites make plant CaM attractive for fluorescence spectroscopic studies. These are: (1) The presence of a single tyrosine residue (Tyr

  14. Calmodulin Activation Limits the Rate of KCNQ2 K+ Channel Exit from the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Alaimo, Alessandro; Gómez-Posada, Juan Camilo; Aivar, Paloma; Etxeberría, Ainhoa; Rodriguez-Alfaro, Jose Angel; Areso, Pilar; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    The potential regulation of protein trafficking by calmodulin (CaM) is a novel concept that remains to be substantiated. We proposed that KCNQ2 K+ channel trafficking is regulated by CaM binding to the C-terminal A and B helices. Here we show that the L339R mutation in helix A, which is linked to human benign neonatal convulsions, perturbs CaM binding to KCNQ2 channels and prevents their correct trafficking to the plasma membrane. We used glutathione S-transferase fused to helices A and B to examine the impact of this and other mutations in helix A (I340A, I340E, A343D, and R353G) on the interaction with CaM. The process appears to require at least two steps; the first involves the transient association of CaM with KCNQ2, and in the second, the complex adopts an “active” conformation that is more stable and is that which confers the capacity to exit the endoplasmic reticulum. Significantly, the mutations that we have analyzed mainly affect the stability of the active configuration of the complex, whereas Ca2+ alone appears to affect the initial binding step. The spectrum of responses from this collection of mutants revealed a strong correlation between adopting the active conformation and channel trafficking in mammalian cells. These data are entirely consistent with the concept that CaM bound to KCNQ2 acts as a Ca2+ sensor, conferring Ca2+ dependence to the trafficking of the channel to the plasma membrane and fully explaining the requirement of CaM binding for KCNQ2 function. PMID:19494108

  15. A new calmodulin-binding motif for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase regulation.

    PubMed

    Franco-Echevarría, Elsa; Baños-Sanz, Jose I; Monterroso, Begoña; Round, Adam; Sanz-Aparicio, Julia; González, Beatriz

    2014-11-01

    IP3-3K [Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase] is a key enzyme that catalyses the synthesis of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4, using Ins(1,4,5)P3 and ATP as substrates. Both inositides, substrate and product, present crucial roles in the cell. Ins(1,4,5)P3 is a key point in Ca2+ metabolism that promotes Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and together with Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 regulates Ca2+ homoeostasis. In addition, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 is involved in immune cell development. It has been proved that Ca2+/CaM (calmodulin) regulates the activity of IP3-3K, via direct interaction between both enzymes. Although we have extensive structural knowledge of the kinase domains of the three IP3-3K isoforms, no structural information is available about the interaction between IP3-3K and Ca2+/CaM. In the present paper we describe the crystal structure of the complex between human Ca2+/CaM and the CaM-binding region of human IP3-3K isoform A (residues 158-183) and propose a model for a complex including the kinase domain. The structure obtained allowed us to identify all of the key residues involved in the interaction, which have been evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis, pull-down and fluorescence anisotropy experiments. The results allowed the identification of a new CaM-binding motif, expanding our knowledge about how CaM interacts with its partners.

  16. Calmodulin kinase II is required for fight or flight sinoatrial node physiology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Chen, Biyi; Koval, Olha M; Singh, Madhu V; Guan, Xiaoqun; Hund, Thomas J; Kutschke, William; Sarma, Satyam; Grumbach, Isabella M; Wehrens, Xander H T; Mohler, Peter J; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2009-04-07

    The best understood "fight or flight" mechanism for increasing heart rate (HR) involves activation of a cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel (HCN4) by beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) agonist stimulation. HCN4 conducts an inward "pacemaker" current (I(f)) that increases the sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cell membrane diastolic depolarization rate (DDR), leading to faster SAN action potential generation. Surprisingly, HCN4 knockout mice were recently shown to retain physiological HR increases with isoproterenol (ISO), suggesting that other I(f)-independent pathways are critical to SAN fight or flight responses. The multifunctional Ca(2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a downstream signal in the betaAR pathway that activates Ca(2+) homeostatic proteins in ventricular myocardium. Mice with genetic, myocardial and SAN cell CaMKII inhibition have significantly slower HRs than controls during stress, leading us to hypothesize that CaMKII actions on SAN Ca(2+) homeostasis are critical for betaAR agonist responses in SAN. Here we show that CaMKII mediates ISO HR increases by targeting SAN cell Ca(2+) homeostasis. CaMKII inhibition prevents ISO effects on SAN Ca(2+) uptake and release from intracellular sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores that are necessary for increasing DDR. CaMKII inhibition has no effect on the ISO response in SAN cells when SR Ca(2+) release is disabled and CaMKII inhibition is only effective at slowing HRs during betaAR stimulation. These studies show the tightly coupled, but previously unanticipated, relationship of CaMKII to the betaAR pathway in fight or flight physiology and establish CaMKII as a critical signaling molecule for physiological HR responses to catecholamines.

  17. Identification and Inhibitory Properties of a Novel Ca2+/Calmodulin Antagonist†

    PubMed Central

    Colomer, Josep; Schmitt, Allison A.; Toone, Eric J.; Means, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a high-throughput yeast-based assay to screen for chemical inhibitors of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase pathways. After screening two small libraries we identified the novel antagonist 125-C9, a substituted ethyleneamine. In vitro kinase assays confirmed that 125-C9 inhibited several CaMKs competitively with Ca2+/CaM. This suggested that 125-C9 acted as an antagonist for Ca2+/CaM rather than for CaMKs. We confirmed this hypothesis by showing that 125-C9 binds directly to Ca2+/CaM using isothermal titration calorimetry. We further characterized 125-C9 binding to Ca2+/CaM and compared its properties with those of two well-studied CaM antagonists: trifluoperazine (TFP) and W-13. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that 125-C9 binding to CaM is absolutely Ca2+-dependent, likely occurs with a stoichiometry of five 125-C9 molecules to one CaM molecule, and involves an exchange of two protons at pH 7.0. Binding of 125-C9 is driven overall by entropy and appears to be competitive with TFP and W-13, which is consistent with occupation of similar binding sites. To test the effects of 125-C9 in living cells, we evaluated mitogen-stimulated re-entry of quiescent cells into proliferation and found similar – although slightly better – levels of inhibition by 125-C9 than TFP and W-13. Our results not only define a novel Ca2+/CaM inhibitor but reveal that chemically unique CaM antagonists can bind CaM by distinct mechanisms but similarly inhibit cellular actions of CaM. PMID:20392081

  18. Intra- and Interdomain Effects Due to Mutation of Calcium-binding Sites in Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liang-Wen; Kleerekoper, Quinn K.; Wang, Xu; Putkey, John A.

    2010-01-01

    The IQ-motif protein PEP-19, binds to the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM) with significantly different kon and koff rates in the presence and absence of Ca2+, which could play a role in defining the levels of free CaM during Ca2+ transients. The initial goal of the current study was to determine whether Ca2+ binding to sites III or IV in the C-domain of CaM was responsible for affecting the kinetics of binding PEP-19. EF-hand Ca2+-binding sites were selectively inactivated by the common strategy of changing Asp to Ala at the X-coordination position. Although Ca2+ binding to both sites III and IV appeared necessary for native-like interactions with PEP-19, the data also indicated that the mutations caused undesirable structural alterations as evidenced by significant changes in amide chemical shifts for apoCaM. Mutations in the C-domain also affected chemical shifts in the unmodified N-domain, and altered the Ca2+ binding properties of the N-domain. Conversion of Asp93 to Ala caused the greatest structural perturbations, possibly due to the loss of stabilizing hydrogen bonds between the side chain of Asp93 and backbone amides in apo loop III. Thus, although these mutations inhibit binding of Ca2+, the mutated CaM may not be able to support potentially important native-like activity of the apoprotein. This should be taken into account when designing CaM mutants for expression in cell culture. PMID:20048169

  19. Effects of EGTA and antioxidants on the interaction of phenothiazine free radicals with calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Prozialeck, W.C.

    1986-03-05

    Upon irradiation with UV light or treatment with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), phenothiazines generate free radicals that bind irreversibly to calmodulin (CaM). The purpose of the present studies was to examine the effects of the Ca/sup 2 +/-chelator EGTA and various antioxidants on the binding of these phenothiazine radicals to CaM. Solutions containing 2 ..mu..M CaM, 10 ..mu..M /sup 3/H-chlorpromazine, 10 ..mu..M CaCl/sub 2/, and either EGTA or the antioxidants (2mM), were irradiated with UV light or treated with HRP-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Samples were dialyzed to remove free chlorpromazine and counted for radioactivity. The antioxidants (ascorbic acid, dithiothreitol and glutathione) inhibited the HRP-induced irreversible binding by 95-100% but had little effect on the UV-induced binding. EGTA inhibited the HRP-induced binding by 100% but reduced the UV-induced binding by only 70%. The inhibition of the UV-induced binding by EGTA could be prevented by incubating the samples in the presence of excess Ca/sup 2 +/. By contrast, Ca/sup 2 +/ did not prevent the inhibition of the HRP-induced binding by EGTA. These findings indicate that EGTA and antioxidants inhibit the HRP-induced irreversible binding of chlorpromazine to CaM by interacting with the chlorpromazine free radical and not by modifying CaM or chelating Ca/sup 2 +/. The fact that the UV-induced binding is resistant to inhibition by the antioxidants suggests that chlorpromazine binds to the Ca/sup 2 +/-CaM complex before photoactivation causes the formation of the free radical.

  20. Cardiac calcium signalling pathologies associated with defective calmodulin regulation of type 2 ryanodine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Arnáiz-Cot, Juan José; Damon, Brooke James; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Cleemann, Lars; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Meissner, Gerhard; Morad, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a homotetramer of 560 kDa polypeptides regulated by calmodulin (CaM), which decreases its open probability at diastolic and systolic Ca2+ concentrations. Point mutations in the CaM-binding domain of RyR2 (W3587A/L3591D/F3603A, RyR2ADA) in mice result in severe cardiac hypertrophy, poor left ventricle contraction and death by postnatal day 16, suggesting that CaM inhibition of RyR2 is required for normal cardiac function. Here, we report on Ca2+ signalling properties of enzymatically isolated, Fluo-4 dialysed whole cell clamped cardiac myocytes from 10–15-day-old wild-type (WT) and homozygous Ryr2ADA/ADA mice. Spontaneously occurring Ca2+ spark frequency, measured at −80 mV, was 14-fold lower in mutant compared to WT myocytes. ICa, though significantly smaller in mutant myocytes, triggered Ca2+ transients that were of comparable size to those of WT myocytes, but with slower activation and decay kinetics. Caffeine-triggered Ca2+ transients were about three times larger in mutant myocytes, generating three- to four-fold bigger Na+-Ca2+ exchanger NCX currents (INCX). Mutant myocytes often exhibited Ca2+ transients of variable size and duration that were accompanied by similarly alternating and slowly activating INCX. The data suggest that RyR2ADA mutation produces significant reduction in ICa density and ICa-triggered Ca2+ release gain, longer but infrequently occurring Ca2+ sparks, larger sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ loads, and spontaneous Ca2+ releases accompanied by activation of large and potentially arrhythmogenic inward INCX. PMID:23836685

  1. Asymmetric calmodulin distribution in the hypothalamus: role of sexual differentiation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Medina, Marco A; Reyes, Alejandro; Chavarría, María Eugenia; Vergara-Onofre, Marcela; Canchola, Enrique; Rosado, Adolfo

    2002-05-01

    The Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) system plays important roles both in hypothalamic sexual differentiation and in the progesterone-induced facilitation of lordosis behavior in the adult rat. We recently showed sex-dependent differences in rat hypothalamic CaM levels, both in newborn and in adult animals. Here, we evaluated the presence of left-right hypothalamic asymmetries in CaM concentration in male and female rats, as well as the changes induced on these parameters by neonatal (1 h after birth) subcutaneous administration of tamoxifen (200 microg/rat) or testosterone (30 microg/rat). CaM was measured by RIA in each half of the hypothalamus (at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h and at 90 days after birth) in both control and treated animals. In untreated young rats (2-24 h after birth), CaM concentration was significantly higher in the right half of the hypothalamus of males, whereas in females, it was higher in the hypothalamic left half. Treatment of females with testosterone or tamoxifen to males, consistently reversed these results. In the hypothalamus of treated animals, we found higher CaM levels in the left half of males, as well as in the right half of females. In control adult females, CaM concentration was also higher in the left half of the hypothalamus, as it was in the right half of adult males. However, this asymmetry was lost after neonatal hormone manipulation. These results reinforce the role of CaM in the development of sex-related hypothalamic functions.

  2. Reduced Arrhythmia Inducibility with Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Inhibition in Heart Failure Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hoeker, Gregory S.; Hanafy, Mohamed A.; Oster, Robert A.; Bers, Donald M.; Pogwizd, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is activated in heart failure (HF) and can contribute to arrhythmias induced by β-adrenergic receptor-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak. Objective To evaluate the effect of CaMKII inhibition on ventricular tachycardia (VT) induction in conscious HF and naïve rabbits. Methods and Results Nonischemic HF was induced by aortic insufficiency and constriction. Electrocardiograms were recorded in rabbits pretreated with vehicle (saline) or the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (300 μg/kg); VT was induced by infusion of increasing doses of norepinephrine (NE, 1.56-25 μg/kg/min) in naïve (n = 8) and HF (n = 7) rabbits. With saline, median VT dose threshold in HF was 6.25 versus 12.5 μg/kg/min NE in naïve rabbits (p = 0.06). Pretreatment with KN-93 significantly increased VT threshold in HF and naïve rabbits (median = 25 μg/kg/min, p < 0.05 versus saline for both groups). Mean cycle length of VT initiation was shorter in HF (221 ± 20 ms) than naïve (296 ± 23 ms, p < 0.05) rabbits with saline; this difference was not significant after treatment with KN-93. Conclusions KN-93 significantly reduced arrhythmia inducibility and slowed initiation of VT, suggesting that CaMKII inhibition may have antiarrhythmic effects in the failing human heart. PMID:26650851

  3. Ca+2/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Mediates Glucose Toxicity-Induced Cardiomyocyte Contractile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong-Huai; Guo, Haitao; Kandadi, Machender R.; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    (1) Hyperglycemia leads to cytotoxicity in the heart. Although several theories are postulated for glucose toxicity-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction, the precise mechanism still remains unclear. (2) This study was designed to evaluate the impact of elevated extracellular Ca2+ on glucose toxicity-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca2+ anomalies as well as the mechanism(s) involved with a focus on Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase. Isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes were maintained in normal (NG, 5.5 mM) or high glucose (HG, 25.5 mM) media for 6-12 hours. Contractile indices were measured including peak shortening (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (±dL/dt), time-to-PS (TPS), and time-to-90% relengthening (TR90). (3) Cardiomyocytes maintained with HG displayed abnormal mechanical function including reduced PS, ±dL/dt, and prolonged TPS, TR90 and intracellular Ca2+ clearance. Expression of intracellular Ca2+ regulatory proteins including SERCA2a, phospholamban and Na+-Ca2+ exchanger were unaffected whereas SERCA activity was inhibited by HG. Interestingly, the HG-induced mechanical anomalies were abolished by elevated extracellular Ca2+ (from 1.0 to 2.7 mM). Interestingly, the high extracellular Ca2+-induced beneficial effect against HG was abolished by the CaM kinase inhibitor KN93. (4) These data suggest that elevated extracellular Ca2+ protects against glucose toxicity-induced cardiomyocyte contractile defects through a mechanism associated with CaM kinase. PMID:22745633

  4. Calmodulin is a stress and immune response gene in Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Jia, Zirui; Li, Xuejing; Geng, Xuyun; Sun, Jinsheng

    2014-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a multifunctional calcium sensor protein that participates in various cellular processes under normal, stress and pathological conditions. In crabs, however, the involvement of CaM in response to environmental stress and immune challenges has not been revealed yet. In the present study, a CaM cDNA (EsCaM) was identified from Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis and its mRNA expression patterns in response to ambient (salinity and pH) stress and immune challenges was examined. EsCaM encodes a 149-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 16.8 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.09. In unstimulated healthy E. sinensis, EsCaM mRNA transcript was detected in all tested tissues with predominant expression in hepatopancreas and the lowest expression in haemocytes. Ambient salinity (15‰ and 30‰ salinities) and pH (pH 6 and 8.5) stress significantly altered EsCaM mRNA expression in gill, hepatopancreas, haemocytes, intestine and muscle in Chinese mitten crab. In addition, EsCaM gene expression was significantly and rapidly induced as early as 2 h after LPS and Poly(I:C) immune stimulations in haemocytes in vitro. Furthermore, EsCaM expression was significantly up-regulated in E. sinensis haemocytes, gill, hepatopancreas, intestine and muscle in response to Edwardsiella tarda and Vibrio anguillarum challenges. Collectively, our findings suggest that EsCaM is an important stress and immune response gene in Chinese mitten crab.

  5. Calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase from Neurospora crassa. Molecular cloning and expression of recombinant catalytic subunit.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, S; Tamura, J; Giri, P R; Polli, J W; Kincaid, R L

    1991-09-25

    A cDNA for the catalytic subunit of a calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein phosphatase was cloned from Neurospora crassa. The open reading frame of 1557 base pairs encoded a protein of Mr approximately 59,580 and was followed by a 3'-untranslated region of 363 base pairs including the poly(A) tail. Based on primer extension analysis, the mRNA transcript in vivo was 2403 base pairs. Expression of this CaM-protein phosphatase mRNA was developmentally regulated, being highest during early mycelial growth; production of the corresponding protein followed mRNA with a time lag of 8-12 h. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA revealed three small introns, the positions of which coincided with those in the mouse gene, indicating evolutionary conservation of these structures. The deduced sequence showed approximately 75% identity with the mammalian homologue, calcineurin, in aligned regions. A region of 40 amino acids preceding the CaM-binding domain was essentially unchanged, suggesting conservation of a crucial interaction site. Three small segments in the carboxyl half of the protein were unrelated to the mammalian gene and may constitute "variable regions" that confer substrate specificity to the enzyme. An active recombinant catalytic subunit was expressed in bacteria and purified by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. This preparation was stimulated 2- 3-fold by CaM and showed a p-nitrophenol phosphatase activity equal to that of the bovine brain holoenzyme, although its dephosphorylation of phosphoprotein substrates was markedly different. These findings demonstrate that the catalytic subunit of this phosphatase can exhibit high activity in the absence of its intrinsic Ca(2+)-binding subunit.

  6. Structural Insights into the M-Channel Proximal C-Terminus/Calmodulin Complex.

    PubMed

    Strulovich, Roi; Tobelaim, William Sam; Attali, Bernard; Hirsch, Joel A

    2016-09-27

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) channel family, comprising voltage-gated potassium channels, plays major roles in fine-tuning cellular excitability by reducing firing frequency and controlling repolarization. Kv7 channels have a unique intracellular C-terminal (CT) domain bound constitutively by calmodulin (CaM). This domain plays key functions in channel tetramerization, trafficking, and gating. CaM binds to the proximal CT, comprising helices A and B. Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 are expressed in neural tissues. Together, they form the heterotetrameric M channel. We characterized Kv7.2, Kv7.3, and chimeric Kv7.3 helix A-Kv7.2 helix B (Q3A-Q2B) proximal CT/CaM complexes by solution methods at various Ca(2+)concentrations and determined them all to have a 1:1 stoichiometry. We then determined the crystal structure of the Q3A-Q2B/CaM complex at high Ca(2+) concentration to 2.0 Å resolution. CaM hugs the antiparallel coiled coil of helices A and B, braced together by an additional helix. The structure displays a hybrid apo-Ca(2+) CaM conformation even though four Ca(2+) ions are bound. Our results pinpoint unique interactions enabling the possible intersubunit pairing of Kv7.3 helix A and Kv7.2 helix B while underlining the potential importance of Kv7.3 helix A's role in stabilizing channel oligomerization. Also, the structure can be used to rationalize various channelopathic mutants. Functional testing of the chimeric channel found it to have a voltage-dependence similar to the M channel, thereby demonstrating helix A's importance in imparting gating properties.

  7. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin signaling in cercosporin toxin biosynthesis by Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2003-02-01

    Cercosporin is a non-host-selective, perylenequinone toxin produced by many phytopathogenic Cercospora species. The involvement of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) signaling in cercosporin biosynthesis was investigated by using pharmacological inhibitors. The results suggest that maintaining endogenous Ca(2+) homeostasis is required for cercosporin biosynthesis in Cercospora nicotianae. The addition of excess Ca(2+) to the medium slightly increased fungal growth but resulted in a reduction in cercosporin production. The addition of Ca(2+) chelators [EGTA and 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] also reduced cercosporin production. Ca(2+) channel blockers exhibited a strong inhibition of cercosporin production only at higher concentrations (>2 mM). Cercosporin production was reduced greatly by Ca(2+) ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin) and internal Ca(2+) blocker [3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino)octyl ester]. Phospholipase C inhibitors (lithium, U73122, and neomycin) led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of cercosporin biosynthesis. Furthermore, the addition of CaM inhibitors (compound 48/80, trifluoperazine, W-7, and chlorpromazine) also markedly reduced cercosporin production. In contrast to W-7, W-5, with less specificity for CaM, led to only minor inhibition of cercosporin production. The inhibitory effects of Ca(2+)/CaM inhibitors were partially or completely reversed by the addition of external Ca(2+). As assessed with Fluo-3/AM (a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator), the Ca(2+) content in the cytoplasm decreased significantly when fungal cultures were grown in a medium containing Ca(2+)/CaM antagonists, confirming the specificity of those Ca(2+)/CaM antagonists in C. nicotianae. Taken together, the results suggest that Ca(2+)/CaM signal transduction may play a pivotal role in cercosporin biosynthesis in C. nicotianae.

  8. Calmodulin increases transmitter release by mobilizing quanta at the frog motor nerve terminal.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, Eugen; Miyamoto, Michael D; Dun, Nae J

    2002-11-01

    The role of calmodulin (CaM) in transmitter release was investigated using liposomes to deliver CaM and monoclonal antibodies against CaM (antiCaM) directly into the frog motor nerve terminal. Miniature endplate potentials (MEPPs) were recorded in a high K+ solution, and effects on transmitter release were monitored using estimates of the quantal release parameters m (number of quanta released), n (number of functional transmitter release sites), p (mean probability of release), and var(s) p (spatial variance in p). Administration of CaM, but not heat-inactivated CaM, encapsulated in liposomes (1000 units ml(-1)) produced an increase in m (25%) that was due to an increase in n. MEPP amplitude was not altered by CaM. Administration of antiCaM, but not heat-inactivated antiCaM, in liposomes (50 microl ml(-1)) produced a progressive decrease in m (40%) that was associated with decreases in n and p. MEPP amplitude was decreased (15%) after a 25 min lag time, suggesting a separation in time between the decreases in quantal release and quantal size. Bath application of the membrane-permeable CaM antagonist W7 (28 microM) produced a gradual decrease in m (25%) that was associated with a decrease in n. W7 also produced a decrease in MEPP amplitude that paralleled the decrease in m. The decreases in MEPP size and m produced by W7 were both reversed by addition of CaM. Our results suggest that CaM increases transmitter release by mobilizing synaptic vesicles at the frog motor nerve terminal.

  9. Let-7a Is an Antihypertrophic Regulator in the Heart via Targeting Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Sun, Fei; Luo, Shenjian; Zhao, Wei; Yang, Ti; Zhang, Guiye; Gao, Ming; Lu, Renzhong; Shu, You; Mu, Wei; Zhuang, Yanan; Ding, Fengzhi; Xu, Chaoqian; Lu, Yanjie

    2017-01-01

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been emerged as important regulator in a multiple of cardiovascular disease, including arrhythmia, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether miRNA let-7a has antihypertrophic effects in angiotensin II (AngII)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) were exposed to AngII for 36 h as a cellular model of hypertrophy; subcutaneous injection of AngII for 2 weeks was used to establish a mouse model of cardiac hypertrophy in vivo study. Cell surface area (CSA) was measured by immunofluorescence cytochemistry; expression of hypertrophy-related genes ANP, BNP, β-MHC was detected by Real-time PCR; luciferase activity assay was performed to confirm the miRNA's binding site in the calmodulin (CaM) gene; CaM protein was detected by Western blot; the hypertrophy parameters were measured by echocardiographic assessment. Results: The expression of let-7a was decreased in AngII-induced cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of let-7a attenuated AngII-induced increase of cell surface area and repressed the increased mRNA levels of ANP, BNP and β-MHC. Dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that let-7a could bind to the 3'UTR of CaM 1 gene. Let-7a downregulated the expression of CaM protein. In vivo, let-7a produced inhibitory effects on cardiac hypertrophy, including the downregulation of cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in mouse heart, the reduction of IVSD and LVPWD, the suppression of hypertrophy marker genes ANP, BNP, β-MHC mRNA level, and the downregulation of CaM protein level. Conclusions: let-7a possesses a prominent anti-hypertrophic property by targeting CaM genes. The findings provide new insight into molecular mechanism of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:28123343

  10. Effects of Ureaplasma diversum on bovine oviductal explants: quantitative measurement using a calmodulin assay.

    PubMed Central

    Smits, B; Rosendal, S; Ruhnke, H L; Plante, C; O'Brien, P J; Miller, R B

    1994-01-01

    Calmodulin (CAM) acts as an intracellular regulator of calcium, an important mediator of many cell processes. We used the CAM assay and electron microscopy to investigate the effects of Ureaplasma diversum on bovine oviductal explants obtained aseptically from slaughtered cows. A stock suspension of U. diversum (treated specimens) and sterile broth (controls) was added to replicates of cultured explants and incubated at 38 degrees C in an atmosphere of 5.5% CO2 for 48 hours. Explants were examined for ciliary activity, extracellular CAM loss, and for histological and ultrastructural changes. Explants and their culture media were examined for changes in CAM concentration. All experiments were replicated three times. In addition, U. diversum, medium and broth were assayed for CAM content. The concentrations of CAM in explants and media changed significantly (p < 0.05) in samples which were inoculated with U. diversum when compared to controls. The controls and infected specimens did not differ histologically or ultrastructurally, but U. diversum was seen to be closely associated with infected explant tissue. In view of this close affinity it is assumed the loss of CAM from the oviductal cells was causally related, but this was not proven. The failure to show cell membrane injury on light and electron microscopic examination was probably related to the short duration of the experiment and may only point out the sensitivity of the CAM assay in detecting early cell membrane injury. Compromise in characteristics of the medium to support both, the viability of oviductal cells and U. diversum limited the experimental time to 48 hours.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:8004536

  11. Structural and biophysical characterization of the interactions between the death domain of Fas receptor and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Timothy F; Samal, Alexandra B; Bedwell, Gregory J; Chen, Yabing; Saad, Jamil S

    2013-07-26

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by cell surface death receptors such as Fas. Engagement of Fas by Fas ligand triggers a conformational change that allows Fas to interact with adaptor protein Fas-associated death domain (FADD) via the death domain, which recruits downstream signaling proteins to form the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM) is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells, suggesting a novel role of CaM in Fas-mediated signaling. CaM antagonists induce apoptosis through a Fas-related mechanism in cholangiocarcinoma and other cancer cell lines possibly by inhibiting Fas-CaM interactions. The structural determinants of Fas-CaM interaction and the underlying molecular mechanisms of inhibition, however, are unknown. Here we employed NMR and biophysical techniques to elucidate these mechanisms. Our data show that CaM binds to the death domain of Fas (FasDD) with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of ~2 μM and 2:1 CaM:FasDD stoichiometry. The interactions between FasDD and CaM are endothermic and entropically driven, suggesting that hydrophobic contacts are critical for binding. We also show that both the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM are important for binding. NMR and surface plasmon resonance data show that three CaM antagonists (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide, tamoxifen, and trifluoperazine) greatly inhibit Fas-CaM interactions by blocking the Fas-binding site on CaM. Our findings provide the first structural evidence for Fas-CaM interactions and mechanism of inhibition and provide new insight into the molecular basis for a novel role of CaM in regulating Fas-mediated apoptosis.

  12. Abiotic stress responses in plants: roles of calmodulin-regulated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Virdi, Amardeep S.; Singh, Supreet; Singh, Prabhjeet

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular changes in calcium ions (Ca2+) in response to different biotic and abiotic stimuli are detected by various sensor proteins in the plant cell. Calmodulin (CaM) is one of the most extensively studied Ca2+-sensing proteins and has been shown to be involved in transduction of Ca2+ signals. After interacting with Ca2+, CaM undergoes conformational change and influences the activities of a diverse range of CaM-binding proteins. A number of CaM-binding proteins have also been implicated in stress responses in plants, highlighting the central role played by CaM in adaptation to adverse environmental conditions. Stress adaptation in plants is a highly complex and multigenic response. Identification and characterization of CaM-modulated proteins in relation to different abiotic stresses could, therefore, prove to be essential for a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Various studies have revealed involvement of CaM in regulation of metal ions uptake, generation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of transcription factors such as CAMTA3, GTL1, and WRKY39. Activities of several kinases and phosphatases have also been shown to be modulated by CaM, thus providing further versatility to stress-associated signal transduction pathways. The results obtained from contemporary studies are consistent with the proposed role of CaM as an integrator of different stress signaling pathways, which allows plants to maintain homeostasis between different cellular processes. In this review, we have attempted to present the current state of understanding of the role of CaM in modulating different stress-regulated proteins and its implications in augmenting abiotic stress tolerance in plants. PMID:26528296

  13. Impaired calcium calmodulin kinase signaling and muscle adaptation response in the absence of calpain 3.

    PubMed

    Kramerova, I; Kudryashova, E; Ermolova, N; Saenz, A; Jaka, O; López de Munain, A; Spencer, M J

    2012-07-15

    Mutations in the non-lysosomal, cysteine protease calpain 3 (CAPN3) result in the disease limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A). CAPN3 is localized to several subcellular compartments, including triads, where it plays a structural, rather than a proteolytic, role. In the absence of CAPN3, several triad components are reduced, including the major Ca(2+) release channel, ryanodine receptor (RyR). Furthermore, Ca(2+) release upon excitation is impaired in the absence of CAPN3. In the present study, we show that Ca-calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling is compromised in CAPN3 knockout (C3KO) mice. The CaMK pathway has been previously implicated in promoting the slow skeletal muscle phenotype. As expected, the decrease in CaMKII signaling that was observed in the absence of CAPN3 is associated with a reduction in the slow versus fast muscle fiber phenotype. We show that muscles of WT mice subjected to exercise training activate the CaMKII signaling pathway and increase expression of the slow form of myosin; however, muscles of C3KO mice do not exhibit these adaptive changes to exercise. These data strongly suggest that skeletal muscle's adaptive response to functional demand is compromised in the absence of CAPN3. In agreement with our mouse studies, RyR levels were also decreased in biopsies from LGMD2A patients. Moreover, we observed a preferential pathological involvement of slow fibers in LGMD2A biopsies. Thus, impaired CaMKII signaling and, as a result, a weakened muscle adaptation response identify a novel mechanism that may underlie LGMD2A and suggest a pharmacological target that should be explored for therapy.

  14. Structural Studies of a Complex Between Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Calmodulin at Physiological Calcium Concentration.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Michael; Dieckmann, Thorsten; Guillemette, Joseph Guy

    2016-10-04

    The small acidic protein Calmodulin (CaM) serves as a Ca(2+) sensor and control element for many enzymes including nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes that play major roles in key physiological and pathological processes. CaM binding causes a conformational change in NOS to allow for the electron transfer between the reductase and oxygenase domains through a process that is thought to be highly dynamic. In this report, NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the solution structure of the endothelial NOS (eNOS) peptide in complex with CaM at the lowest Ca(2+) concentration (225 nM) required for CaM to bind to eNOS and corresponds to a physiological elevated Ca2+ level found in mammalian cells. Under these conditions, the CaM-eNOS complex has a Ca(2+)-replete C-terminal lobe bound the eNOS peptide and a Ca(2+) free N-terminal lobe loosely associated to the eNOS peptide. With increasing Ca(2+) concentration, the binding of Ca(2+) by the N-lobe of CaM results in a stronger interaction with the C-terminal region of the eNOS peptide and increased α-helical structure of the peptide that may be part of the mechanism resulting in electron transfer from the FMN to the heme in the oxygenase domain of the enzyme. SPR studies performed under the same conditions show Ca(2+) concentration dependent binding kinetics were consistent with the NMR structural results. This investigation shows that structural studies performed under more physiological relevant conditions provide information on subtle changes in structure that may not be apparent when experiments are performed in excess Ca(2+) concentrations.

  15. Autonomous CaMKII requires further stimulation by Ca2+/calmodulin for enhancing synaptic strength.

    PubMed

    Barcomb, Kelsey; Buard, Isabelle; Coultrap, Steven J; Kulbe, Jacqueline R; O'Leary, Heather; Benke, Timothy A; Bayer, K Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    A hallmark feature of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is generation of autonomous (Ca(2+)-independent) activity by T286 autophosphorylation. Biochemical studies have shown that "autonomous" CaMKII is ∼5-fold further stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM, but demonstration of a physiological function for such regulation within cells has remained elusive. In this study, CaMKII-induced enhancement of synaptic strength in rat hippocampal neurons required both autonomous activity and further stimulation. Synaptic strength was decreased by CaMKIIα knockdown and rescued by reexpression, but not by mutants impaired for autonomy (T286A) or binding to NMDA-type glutamate receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B; formerly NR2B; I205K). Full rescue was seen with constitutively autonomous mutants (T286D), but only if they could be further stimulated (additional T305/306A mutation), and not with two other mutations that additionally impair Ca(2+)/CaM binding. Compared to rescue with wild-type CaMKII, the CaM-binding-impaired mutants even had reduced synaptic strength. One of these mutants (T305/306D) mimicked an inhibitory autophosphorylation of CaMKII, whereas the other one (Δstim) abolished CaM binding without introducing charged residues. Inhibitory T305/306 autophosphorylation also reduced GluN2B binding, but this effect was independent of reduced Ca(2+)/CaM binding and was not mimicked by T305/306D mutation. Thus, even autonomous CaMKII activity must be further stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM for enhancement of synaptic strength.

  16. Cardiac myosin light chain is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent and -independent kinase activities

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Pravin; Knapp, Stefan; Barton, Hannah; Sweeney, H. Lee; Kamm, Kristine E.; Stull, James T.

    2016-01-01

    The well-known, muscle-specific smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) (smMLCK) and skeletal muscle MLCK (skMLCK) are dedicated protein kinases regulated by an autoregulatory segment C terminus of the catalytic core that blocks myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) binding and phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM). Although it is known that a more recently discovered cardiac MLCK (cMLCK) is necessary for normal RLC phosphorylation in vivo and physiological cardiac performance, information on cMLCK biochemical properties are limited. We find that a fourth uncharacterized MLCK, MLCK4, is also expressed in cardiac muscle with high catalytic domain sequence similarity with other MLCKs but lacking an autoinhibitory segment. Its crystal structure shows the catalytic domain in its active conformation with a short C-terminal “pseudoregulatory helix” that cannot inhibit catalysis as a result of missing linker regions. MLCK4 has only Ca2+/CaM-independent activity with comparable Vmax and Km values for different RLCs. In contrast, the Vmax value of cMLCK is orders of magnitude lower than those of the other three MLCK family members, whereas its Km (RLC and ATP) and KCaM values are similar. In contrast to smMLCK and skMLCK, which lack activity in the absence of Ca2+/CaM, cMLCK has constitutive activity that is stimulated by Ca2+/CaM. Potential contributions of autoregulatory segment to cMLCK activity were analyzed with chimeras of skMLCK and cMLCK. The constitutive, low activity of cMLCK appears to be intrinsic to its catalytic core structure rather than an autoinhibitory segment. Thus, RLC phosphorylation in cardiac muscle may be regulated by two different protein kinases with distinct biochemical regulatory properties. PMID:27325775

  17. Expression of Calmodulin and Myosin Light Chain Kinase during Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhang-Fan; Wang, Hao; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus ( = Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM), encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite. PMID:22348072

  18. Calmodulin enhances ribbon replenishment and shapes filtering of synaptic transmission by cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, Matthew J; Parmelee, Caitlyn M; Chen, Minghui; Cork, Karlene M; Curto, Carina; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2014-11-01

    At the first synapse in the vertebrate visual pathway, light-evoked changes in photoreceptor membrane potential alter the rate of glutamate release onto second-order retinal neurons. This process depends on the synaptic ribbon, a specialized structure found at various sensory synapses, to provide a supply of primed vesicles for release. Calcium (Ca(2+)) accelerates the replenishment of vesicles at cone ribbon synapses, but the mechanisms underlying this acceleration and its functional implications for vision are unknown. We studied vesicle replenishment using paired whole-cell recordings of cones and postsynaptic neurons in tiger salamander retinas and found that it involves two kinetic mechanisms, the faster of which was diminished by calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors. We developed an analytical model that can be applied to both conventional and ribbon synapses and showed that vesicle resupply is limited by a simple time constant, τ = 1/(Dρδs), where D is the vesicle diffusion coefficient, δ is the vesicle diameter, ρ is the vesicle density, and s is the probability of vesicle attachment. The combination of electrophysiological measurements, modeling, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of single synaptic vesicles suggested that CaM speeds replenishment by enhancing vesicle attachment to the ribbon. Using electroretinogram and whole-cell recordings of light responses, we found that enhanced replenishment improves the ability of cone synapses to signal darkness after brief flashes of light and enhances the amplitude of responses to higher-frequency stimuli. By accelerating the resupply of vesicles to the ribbon, CaM extends the temporal range of synaptic transmission, allowing cones to transmit higher-frequency visual information to downstream neurons. Thus, the ability of the visual system to encode time-varying stimuli is shaped by the dynamics of vesicle replenishment at photoreceptor synaptic ribbons.

  19. Functional Regulation of the SLC26-Family Protein Prestin by Calcium/Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Jacob Pearson; Homma, Kazuaki; Duan, Chongwen; Zheng, Jing; Cheatham, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    The solute carrier gene family 26 (SLC26) encodes membrane proteins with diverse physiological roles but with the common feature of halide involvement. Here, we present bioinformatic and biochemical evidence that SLC26 proteins have intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) in their C-terminal domains and that these regions contain calmodulin (CaM) binding sites. The veracity of these predictions and the functional consequences of CaM binding were examined in prestin, SLC26A5, as a model for the SLC26 family and as one of the most investigated and best understood members. We found that CaM binds directly to the IDR in the C-terminal domain of prestin in a calcium-obligate manner. Using both isolated murine outer hair cells (OHCs) and a heterologous expression system, we also found that this calcium-obligate CaM binding shifts the operating point of the protein to more hyperpolarized potentials with consequent alteration of the function of the prestin. Because calcium is the main intracellular second messenger used by the efferent medial olivocochlear (MOC) pathway of the auditory system and CaM is abundant in OHCs, the CaM–prestin interaction may be involved in the MOC-mediated modulation of cochlear amplification. However, this regulatory mechanism is not likely to be restricted to cochlear OHCs, in light of both clear bioinformatic evidence and the fact that calcium and CaM are ubiquitous intracellular second messengers used by virtually all cell types. Hence, the calcium/CaM-dependent regulatory mechanism described herein is likely applicable to most, if not all, SLC26 paralogs. PMID:24453323

  20. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression in motor neurons: effect of axotomy.

    PubMed

    Lund, L M; McQuarrie, I G

    1997-11-20

    Although Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent (CaM) protein kinase II isoforms are present in the nervous system in high amounts, many aspects of in vivo expression, localization, and function remain unexplored. During development, CaM kinase IIalpha and IIbeta are differentially expressed. Here, we examined CaM kinase II isoforms in Sprague-Dawley rat sciatic motor neurons before and after axotomy. We cut the L4-5 spinal nerves unilaterally and exposed the proximal nerve stumps to a fluoroprobe, to retrogradely label the neurons of origin. Anti-CaM kinase IIbeta antibody showed immunoreactivity in motor neurons, which decreased to low levels by 4 days after axotomy. We found a similar response by in situ hybridization with riboprobes. The decrease in expression of mRNA and protein was confined to fluorescent motor neurons. For CaM kinase IIalpha, in situ hybridization showed that the mRNA was in sciatic motor neurons, with a density unaffected by axotomy. However, these neurons were also enlarged, suggesting an up-regulation of expression. Northern blots confirmed an mRNA increase. We were unable to find CaM kinase IIalpha immunoreactivity before or after axotomy in sciatic motor neuron cell bodies, suggesting that CaM kinase IIalpha is in the axons or dendrites, or otherwise unavailable to the antibody. Using rats with crush lesions, we radiolabeled axonal proteins being synthesized in the cell body and used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Western blots to identify CaM kinase IIalpha as a component of slow axonal transport. This differential regulation and expression of kinase isoforms suggests separate and unique intracellular roles. Because we find CaM kinase IIbeta down-regulates during axonal regrowth, its role in these neurons may be related to synaptic transmission. CaM kinase IIalpha appears to support axonal regrowth.

  1. A receptor-like kinase from Arabidopsis thaliana is a calmodulin-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Charpenteau, Martine; Jaworski, Krzysztof; Ramirez, Bertha C; Tretyn, Andrzej; Ranjeva, Raoul; Ranty, Benoît

    2004-01-01

    Screening a cDNA expression library with a radiolabelled calmodulin (CaM) probe led to the isolation of AtCaMRLK, a receptor-like kinase (RLK) of Arabidopsis thaliana. AtCaMRLK polypeptide sequence shows a modular organization consisting of the four distinctive domains characteristic of receptor kinases: an amino terminal signal sequence, a domain containing seven leucine-rich repeats, a single putative membrane-spanning segment and a protein kinase domain. Using truncated versions of the protein and a synthetic peptide, we demonstrated that a region of 23 amino acids, located near the kinase domain of AtCaMRLK, binds CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Real-time binding experiments showed that AtCaMRLK interacted in vitro with AtCaM1, a canonical CaM, but not with AtCaM8, a divergent isoform of the Ca2+ sensor. The bacterially expressed kinase domain of the protein was able to autophosphorylate and to phosphorylate the myelin basic protein, using Mn2+ preferentially to Mg2+ as an ion activator. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved lysine residue (Lys423) to alanine, in the kinase subdomain II, resulted in a complete loss of kinase activity. CaM had no influence on the autophosphorylation activity of AtCaMRLK. AtCaMRLK was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of A. thaliana, except in leaves. Disruption in the AtCaMRLK coding sequence by insertion of a DsG transposable element in an Arabidopsis mutant did not generate a discernible phenotype. The CaM-binding motif of AtCaMRLK was found to be conserved in several other members of the plant RLK family, suggesting a role for Ca2+/CaM in the regulation of RLK-mediated pathways. PMID:14720124

  2. Engineering of a novel Ca{sup 2+}-regulated kinesin molecular motor using a calmodulin dimer linker

    SciTech Connect

    Shishido, Hideki; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Engineered kinesin-M13 and calmodulin involving single cysteine were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaM mutant was cross-linked to dimer by bifunctional thiol reactive reagent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinesin-M13 was dimerized via CaM dimer in the presence of calcium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Function of the engineered kinesin was regulated by a Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin dimer linker. -- Abstract: The kinesin-microtubule system holds great promise as a molecular shuttle device within biochips. However, one current barrier is that such shuttles do not have 'on-off' control of their movement. Here we report the development of a novel molecular motor powered by an accelerator and brake system, using a kinesin monomer and a calmodulin (CaM) dimer. The kinesin monomer, K355, was fused with a CaM target peptide (M13 peptide) at the C-terminal part of the neck region (K355-M13). We also prepared CaM dimers using CaM mutants (Q3C), (R86C), or (A147C) and crosslinkers that react with cysteine residues. Following induction of K355-M13 dimerization with CaM dimers, we measured K355-M13 motility and found that it can be reversibly regulated in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. We also found that velocities of K355-M13 varied depending on the type and crosslink position of the CaM dimer used; crosslink length also had a moderate effect on motility. These results suggest Ca{sup 2+}-dependent dimerization of K355-M13 could be used as a novel molecular shuttle, equipped with an accelerator and brake system, for biochip applications.

  3. Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins (FPOP) for Comparing Structures of Protein/Ligand Complexes: The Calmodulin-peptide Model System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Gau, Brian C.; Jones, Lisa M.; Vidavsky, Ilan; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins (FPOP) is a mass-spectrometry-based protein footprinting method that modifies proteins on the microsecond time scale. Highly reactive •OH, produced by laser photolysis of hydrogen peroxide, oxidatively modifies the side chains of approximately one half the common amino acids on this time scale. Owing to the short labeling exposure, only solvent-accessible residues are sampled. Quantification of the modification extent for the apo and holo states of a protein-ligand complex should provide structurally sensitive information at the amino-acid level to compare the structures of unknown protein complexes with known ones. We report here the use of FPOP to monitor the structural changes of calmodulin in its established binding to M13 of the skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase. We use the outcome to establish the unknown structures resulting from binding with melittin and mastoparan. The structural comparison follows from a comprehensive examination of the extent of FPOP modifications as measured by proteolysis and LC-MS/MS for each protein-ligand equilibrium. The results not only show that the three calmodulin-peptide complexes have similar structures but also reveal those regions of the protein that became more or less solvent-accessible upon binding. This approach has the potential for relatively high throughput, information-dense characterization of a series of protein-ligand complexes in biochemistry and drug discovery when the structure of one reference complex is known, as is the case for calmodulin and M13 of the skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase, and the structures of related complexes are not,. PMID:21142124

  4. Activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase involves intramolecular binding of a calmodulin-like regulatory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. F.; Teyton, L.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are regulated by a C-terminal calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD). The CaM-LD is connected to the kinase by a short junction sequence which contains a pseudosubstrate autoinhibitor. To understand how the CaM-LD regulates a CDPK, a recombinant CDPK (isoform CPK-1 from Arabidopsis, accession no. L14771) was made as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We show here that a truncated CDPK lacking a CaM-LD (e.g. mutant delta NC-26H) can be activated by exogenous calmodulin or an isolated CaM-LD (Kact approximately 2 microM). We propose that Ca2+ activation of a CDPK normally occurs through intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to the junction. When the junction and CaM-LD are made as two separate polypeptides, the CaM-LD can bind the junction in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion with a dissociation constant (KD) of 6 x 10(-6) M, as determined by kinetic binding analyses. When the junction and CaM-LD are tethered in a single polypeptide (e.g. in protein JC-1), their ability to engage in bimolecular binding is suppressed (e.g. the tethered CaM-LD cannot bind a separate junction). A mutation which disrupts the putative CaM-LD binding sequence (e.g. substitution LRV-1444 to DLPG) appears to block intramolecular binding, as indicated by the restored ability of a tethered CaM-LD to engage in bimolecular binding. This mutation, in the context of a full-length enzyme (mutant KJM46H), appears to block Ca2+ activation. Thus, a disruption of intramolecular binding correlates with a disruption of the Ca2+ activation mechanism. CDPKs provide the first example of a member of the calmodulin superfamily where a target binding sequence is located within the same polypeptide.

  5. A calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump in plasma-membrane vesicles from Trypanosoma brucei; selective inhibition by pentamidine.

    PubMed Central

    Benaim, G; Lopez-Estraño, C; Docampo, R; Moreno, S N

    1993-01-01

    Despite previous reports [McLaughlin (1985) Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 15, 189-201; Ghosh, Ray, Sarkar and Bhaduri (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 11345-11351; Mazumder, Mukherjee, Ghosh, Ray and Bhaduri (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 18440-18446] that the plasma membrane of different trypanosomatids only contains Ca(2+)-ATPase that does not show any demonstrable dependence on Mg2+, a high-affinity (Ca(2+)-Mg2+)-ATPase was demonstrated in the plasma membrane of Trypanosoma brucei. The enzyme became saturated with micromolar amounts of Ca2+, reaching a Vmax. of 3.45 +/- 0.66 nmol of ATP/min per mg of protein. The Km,app. for Ca2+ was 0.52 +/- 0.03 microM. This was decreased to 0.23 +/- 0.05 microM, and the Vmax. was increased to 6.36 +/- 0.22 nmol of ATP/min per mg of protein (about 85%), when calmodulin was present. T. brucei plasma-membrane vesicles accumulated Ca2+ on addition of ATP only when Mg2+ was present, and released it to addition of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. In addition, this Ca2+ transport was stimulated by calmodulin. Addition of NaCl to Ca(2+)-loaded T. brucei plasma-membrane vesicles did not result in Ca2+ release, thus suggesting the absence of a Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in these parasites. Therefore the (Ca(2+)-Mg2+)-ATPase would be the only mechanism so far described that is responsible for the long-term fine tuning of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of these parasites. The trypanocidal drug pentamidine inhibited the T. brucei plasma-membrane (Ca(2+)-Mg2+)-ATPase and Ca2+ transport at concentrations that had no effect on the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of human or pig erythrocytes. In this latter case, pentamidine behaved as a weak calmodulin antagonist, since it inhibited the stimulation of the erythrocyte Ca(2+)-ATPase by calmodulin. PMID:8280074

  6. Calcium modulates calmodulin/α-actinin 1 interaction with and agonist-dependent internalization of the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Piirainen, Henni; Taura, Jaume; Kursula, Petri; Ciruela, Francisco; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2017-04-01

    Adenosine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that sense extracellular adenosine to transmit intracellular signals. One of the four adenosine receptor subtypes, the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), has an exceptionally long intracellular C terminus (A2AR-ct) that mediates interactions with a large array of proteins, including calmodulin and α-actinin. Here, we aimed to ascertain the α-actinin 1/calmodulin interplay whilst binding to A2AR and the role of Ca(2+) in this process. First, we studied the A2AR-α-actinin 1 interaction by means of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance, using purified recombinant proteins. α-Actinin 1 binds the A2AR-ct through its distal calmodulin-like domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner with a dissociation constant of 5-12μM, thus showing an ~100 times lower affinity compared to the A2AR-calmodulin/Ca(2+) complex. Importantly, calmodulin displaced α-actinin 1 from the A2AR-ct in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, disrupting the A2AR-α-actinin 1 complex. Finally, we assessed the impact of Ca(2+) on A2AR internalization in living cells, a function operated by the A2AR-α-actinin 1 complex. Interestingly, while Ca(2+) influx did not affect constitutive A2AR endocytosis, it abolished agonist-dependent internalization. In addition, we demonstrated that the A2AR/α-actinin interaction plays a pivotal role in receptor internalization and function. Overall, our results suggest that the interplay of A2AR with calmodulin and α-actinin 1 is fine-tuned by Ca(2+), a fact that might power agonist-mediated receptor internalization and function.

  7. Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, calmodulin, adenylyl cyclase, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II are required for late, but not early, long-term memory formation in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-04-16

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee Apis mellifera, olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM) are formed upon multiple-trial conditioning: an early phase (e-LTM) which depends on translation from already available mRNA, and a late phase (l-LTM) which requires de novo transcription and translation. Here we combined olfactory PER conditioning and neuropharmacological inhibition and studied the involvement of the NO-cGMP pathway, and of specific molecules, such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNG), calmodulin (CaM), adenylyl cyclase (AC), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), in the formation of olfactory LTM in bees. We show that in addition to NO-cGMP and cAMP-PKA, CNG channels, CaM, AC, and CaMKII also participate in the formation of a l-LTM (72-h post-conditioning) that is specific for the learned odor. Importantly, the same molecules are dispensable for olfactory learning and for the formation of both MTM (in the minute and hour range) and e-LTM (24-h post-conditioning), thus suggesting that the signaling pathways leading to l-LTM or e-LTM involve different molecular actors.

  8. IP3 receptor binds to and sensitizes TRPV4 channel to osmotic stimuli via a calmodulin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Elias, Anna; Lorenzo, Ivan M; Vicente, Rubén; Valverde, Miguel A

    2008-11-14

    Activation of the non-selective cation channel TRPV4 by mechanical and osmotic stimuli requires the involvement of phospholipase A2 and the subsequent production of the arachidonic acid metabolites, epoxieicosatrienoic acids (EET). Previous studies have shown that inositol trisphosphate (IP3) sensitizes TRPV4 to mechanical, osmotic, and direct EET stimulation. We now search for the IP3 receptor-binding site on TRPV4 and its relevance to IP3-mediated sensitization. Three putative sites involved in protein-protein interactions were evaluated: a proline-rich domain (PRD), a calmodulin (CaM)-binding site, and the last four amino acids (DAPL) that show a PDZ-binding motif-like. TRPV4-DeltaCaM-(Delta812-831) channels preserved activation by hypotonicity, 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and EET but lost their physical interaction with IP3 receptor 3 and IP3-mediated sensitization. Deletion of a PDZ-binding motif-like (TRPV4-DeltaDAPL) did not affect channel activity or IP3-mediated sensitization, whereas TRPV4-DeltaPRD-(Delta132-144) resulted in loss of channel function despite correct trafficking. We conclude that IP3-mediated sensitization requires IP3 receptor binding to a TRPV4 C-terminal domain that overlaps with a previously described calmodulin-binding site.

  9. Inactivation of Smad-Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling by Ca2+-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Wicks, Stephen J.; Lui, Stephen; Abdel-Wahab, Nadia; Mason, Roger M.; Chantry, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family transduce signals through Smad proteins. Smad signaling can be regulated by the Ras/Erk/mitogen-activated protein pathway in response to receptor tyrosine kinase activation and the gamma interferon pathway and also by the functional interaction of Smad2 with Ca2+-calmodulin. Here we report that Smad–TGF-β-dependent transcriptional responses are prevented by expression of a constitutively activated Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Cam kinase II). Smad2 is a target substrate for Cam kinase II in vitro at serine-110, -240, and -260. Cam kinase II induces in vivo phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad4 and, to a lesser extent, Smad3. A phosphopeptide antiserum raised against Smad2 phosphoserine-240 reacted with Smad2 in vivo when coexpressed with Cam kinase II and by activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor, HER2 (c-erbB2), and the TGF-β receptor. Furthermore, Cam kinase II blocked nuclear accumulation of a Smad2 and induced Smad2-Smad4 hetero-oligomerization independently of TGF-β receptor activation, while preventing TGF-β-dependent Smad2-Smad3 interactions. These findings provide a novel cross-talk mechanism by which Ca2+-dependent kinases activated downstream of multiple growth factor receptors antagonize cell responses to TGF-β. PMID:11027280

  10. In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in Avena sativa L. coleoptiles: effects of Ca2+, calmodulin antagonists, and auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veluthambi, K.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylations in oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile segments were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In vitro phosphorylation of several polypeptides was distinctly promoted at 1 to 15 micromolar free Ca2+ concentrations. Ca2(+)-stimulated phosphorylation was markedly reduced by trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, and naphthalene sulfonamide (W7). Two polypeptides were phosphorylated both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, but the patterns of phosphorylation of several other polypeptides were different under the two conditions indicating that the in vivo phosphorylation pattern of proteins is not truly reflected by in vitro phosphorylation studies. Trifluoperazine, W7, or ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + calcium ionophore A23187 treatments resulted in reduced levels of in vivo protein phosphorylation of both control and auxin-treated coleoptile segments. Analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis following in vivo phosphorylation revealed auxin-dependent changes of certain polypeptides. A general inhibition of phosphorylation by calmodulin antagonists suggested that both control and auxin-treated coleoptiles exhibited Ca2+, and calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in vivo.

  11. Role of Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants. Progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-12-31

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca{sup ++} as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca{sup ++}/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  12. Structure of Calmodulin Bound to a Calcineurin Peptide: A New Way of Making an Old Binding Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Ye,Q.; Li, X.; Wong, A.; Wei, Q.; Jia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Calcineurin is a calmodulin-binding protein in brain and the only serine/threonine protein phosphatase under the control of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin (CaM), which plays a critical role in coupling Ca{sup 2+} signals to cellular responses. CaM up-regulates the phosphatase activity of calcineurin by binding to the CaM-binding domain (CBD) of calcineurin subunit A. Here, we report crystal structural studies of CaM bound to a CBD peptide. The chimeric protein containing CaM and the CBD peptide forms an intimate homodimer, in which CaM displays a native-like extended conformation and the CBD peptide shows -helical structure. Unexpectedly, the N-terminal lobe from one CaM and the C-terminal lobe from the second molecule form a combined binding site to trap the peptide. Thus, the dimer provides two binding sites, each of which is reminiscent of the fully collapsed conformation of CaM commonly observed in complex with, for example, the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) peptide. The interaction between the peptide and CaM is highly specific and similar to MLCK.

  13. Structural insights into Ca2+-calmodulin regulation of Plectin 1a-integrin β4 interaction in hemidesmosomes.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Geun; Kostan, Julius; Drepper, Friedel; Knapp, Bettina; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Konarev, Petr V; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Wiche, Gerhard; Gregor, Martin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Warscheid, Bettina; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2015-03-03

    The mechanical stability of epithelial cells, which protect organisms from harmful external factors, is maintained by hemidesmosomes via the interaction between plectin 1a (P1a) and integrin α6β4. Binding of calcium-calmodulin (Ca(2+)-CaM) to P1a together with phosphorylation of integrin β4 disrupts this complex, resulting in disassembly of hemidesmosomes. We present structures of the P1a actin binding domain either in complex with the N-ter lobe of Ca(2+)-CaM or with the first pair of integrin β4 fibronectin domains. Ca(2+)-CaM binds to the N-ter isoform-specific tail of P1a in a unique manner, via its N-ter lobe in an extended conformation. Structural, cell biology, and biochemical studies suggest the following model: binding of Ca(2+)-CaM to an intrinsically disordered N-ter segment of plectin converts it to an α helix, which repositions calmodulin to displace integrin β4 by steric repulsion. This model could serve as a blueprint for studies aimed at understanding how Ca(2+)-CaM or EF-hand motifs regulate F-actin-based cytoskeleton.

  14. Deletion of the calmodulin-binding domain of Grb7 impairs cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and migration

    SciTech Connect

    García-Palmero, Irene; Villalobo, Antonio

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein. •Deleting the CaM-binding site impairs cell attachment and migration. •CaM antagonists inhibit Grb7-mediated cell migration. •We conclude that CaM controls Grb7-mediated cell migration. -- Abstract: The adaptor Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein that participates in signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and the control of angiogenesis, and plays a significant role in tumor growth, its metastatic spread and tumor-associated neo-vasculature formation. In this report we show that deletion of the CaM-binding site of Grb7, located in the proximal region of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, impairs cell migration, cell attachment to the extracellular matrix, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton occurring during this process. Moreover, we show that the cell-permeable CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) and N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-13) both retard the migration of cells expressing wild type Grb7, but not the migration of cells expressing the mutant protein lacking the CaM-binding site (Grb7Δ), underscoring the proactive role of CaM binding to Grb7 during this process.

  15. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV mediates acute nicotine-induced antinociception in acute thermal pain tests.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Damaj, Mohamad I

    2013-12-01

    Calcium-activated second messengers such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II have been implicated in drug-induced antinociception. The less abundant calcium-activated second messenger, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), mediates emotional responses to pain and tolerance to morphine analgesia but its role in nicotine-mediated antinociception is currently unknown. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of CaMKIV in the acute effects of nicotine, primarily acute nicotine-induced antinociception. CaMKIV knockout (-/-), heterozygote (+/-), and wild-type (+/+) mice were injected with various doses of nicotine and evaluated in a battery of tests, including the tail-flick and hot-plate tests for antinociception, body temperature, and locomotor activity. Our results show a genotype-dependent reduction in tail-flick and hot-plate latency in CaMKIV (+/-) and (-/-) mice after acute nicotine treatment, whereas no difference was observed between genotypes in the body temperature and locomotor activity assessments. The results of this study support a role for CaMKIV in acute nicotine-induced spinal and supraspinal pain mechanisms, and further implicate involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms in drug-induced antinociception.

  16. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  17. Calmodulin Methyltransferase Is Required for Growth, Muscle Strength, Somatosensory Development and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Haziza, Sitvanit; Magnani, Roberta; Lan, Dima; Keinan, Omer; Saada, Ann; Hershkovitz, Eli; Yanay, Nurit; Cohen, Yoram; Nevo, Yoram; Houtz, Robert L.; Sheffield, Val C.; Golan, Hava; Parvari, Ruti

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin lysine methyl transferase (CaM KMT) is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved from plants to vertebrates. CaM is frequently trimethylated at Lys-115, however, the role of CaM methylation in vertebrates has not been studied. CaM KMT was found to be homozygously deleted in the 2P21 deletion syndrome that includes 4 genes. These patients present with cystinuria, severe intellectual disabilities, hypotonia, mitochondrial disease and facial dysmorphism. Two siblings with deletion of three of the genes included in the 2P21 deletion syndrome presented with cystinuria, hypotonia, a mild/moderate mental retardation and a respiratory chain complex IV deficiency. To be able to attribute the functional significance of the methylation of CaM in the mouse and the contribution of CaM KMT to the clinical presentation of the 2p21deletion patients, we produced a mouse model lacking only CaM KMT with deletion borders as in the human 2p21deletion syndrome. No compensatory activity for CaM methylation was found. Impairment of complexes I and IV, and less significantly III, of the mitochondrial respiratory chain was more pronounced in the brain than in muscle. CaM KMT is essential for normal body growth and somatosensory development, as well as for the proper functioning of the adult mouse brain. Developmental delay was demonstrated for somatosensory function and for complex behavior, which involved both basal motor function and motivation. The mutant mice also had deficits in motor learning, complex coordination and learning of aversive stimuli. The mouse model contributes to the evaluation of the role of methylated CaM. CaM methylation appears to have a role in growth, muscle strength, somatosensory development and brain function. The current study has clinical implications for human patients. Patients presenting slow growth and muscle weakness that could result from a mitochondrial impairment and mental retardation should be considered for sequence analysis of the Ca

  18. Characterization of Calmodulin-Free Murine Inducible Nitric-Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Latika; Panda, Koustubh

    2015-01-01

    Nitric-Oxide Synthase (NOS), that produces the biological signal molecule Nitric-Oxide (NO), exists in three different isoforms called, neuronal (nNOS), endothelial (eNOS) and inducible (iNOS). All NOS isoforms require post-translational interaction with the calcium-binding protein, calmodulin (CaM) for manifesting their catalytic activity. However, CaM has been suggested to control the translational assembly of the enzyme as well, particularly in helping its inducible isoform, iNOS assume a stable, heme-replete, dimeric and active form. Expression of recombinant murine iNOS in E.coli in the absence of CaM has been previously shown to give extremely poor yield of the enzyme which was claimed to be absolutely heme-free, devoid of flavins, completely monomeric and catalytically inactive when compared to the heme-replete, active, dimeric iNOS, generated through co-expression with CaM. In contrast, we found that although iNOS expressed without CaM does produce significantly low amounts of the CaM-free enzyme, the iNOS thus produced, is not completely devoid of heme and is neither entirely monomeric nor absolutely bereft of catalytic activity as reported before. In fact, iNOS synthesized in the absence of CaM undergoes compromised heme incorporation resulting in extremely poor dimerization and activity compared to its counterpart co-expressed with CaM. Moreover, such CaM-free iNOS has similar flavin content and reductase activity as iNOS co-expressed with CaM, suggesting that CaM may not be as much required for the functional assembly of the iNOS reductase domain as its oxygenase domain. LC-MS/MS-based peptide mapping of the CaM-free iNOS confirmed that it had the same full-length sequence as the CaM-replete iNOS. Isothermal calorimetric measurements also revealed high affinity for CaM binding in the CaM-free iNOS and thus the possible presence of a CaM-binding domain. Thus CaM is essential but not indispensible for the assembly of iNOS and such CaM-free iNOS may help

  19. Calmodulin Methyltransferase Is Required for Growth, Muscle Strength, Somatosensory Development and Brain Function.

    PubMed

    Haziza, Sitvanit; Magnani, Roberta; Lan, Dima; Keinan, Omer; Saada, Ann; Hershkovitz, Eli; Yanay, Nurit; Cohen, Yoram; Nevo, Yoram; Houtz, Robert L; Sheffield, Val C; Golan, Hava; Parvari, Ruti

    2015-08-01

    Calmodulin lysine methyl transferase (CaM KMT) is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved from plants to vertebrates. CaM is frequently trimethylated at Lys-115, however, the role of CaM methylation in vertebrates has not been studied. CaM KMT was found to be homozygously deleted in the 2P21 deletion syndrome that includes 4 genes. These patients present with cystinuria, severe intellectual disabilities, hypotonia, mitochondrial disease and facial dysmorphism. Two siblings with deletion of three of the genes included in the 2P21 deletion syndrome presented with cystinuria, hypotonia, a mild/moderate mental retardation and a respiratory chain complex IV deficiency. To be able to attribute the functional significance of the methylation of CaM in the mouse and the contribution of CaM KMT to the clinical presentation of the 2p21deletion patients, we produced a mouse model lacking only CaM KMT with deletion borders as in the human 2p21deletion syndrome. No compensatory activity for CaM methylation was found. Impairment of complexes I and IV, and less significantly III, of the mitochondrial respiratory chain was more pronounced in the brain than in muscle. CaM KMT is essential for normal body growth and somatosensory development, as well as for the proper functioning of the adult mouse brain. Developmental delay was demonstrated for somatosensory function and for complex behavior, which involved both basal motor function and motivation. The mutant mice also had deficits in motor learning, complex coordination and learning of aversive stimuli. The mouse model contributes to the evaluation of the role of methylated CaM. CaM methylation appears to have a role in growth, muscle strength, somatosensory development and brain function. The current study has clinical implications for human patients. Patients presenting slow growth and muscle weakness that could result from a mitochondrial impairment and mental retardation should be considered for sequence analysis of the Ca

  20. Calcium binding to calmodulin mutants monitored by domain-specific intrinsic phenylalanine and tyrosine fluorescence.

    PubMed

    VanScyoc, Wendy S; Sorensen, Brenda R; Rusinova, Elena; Laws, William R; Ross, J B Alexander; Shea, Madeline A

    2002-11-01

    Cooperative calcium binding to the two homologous domains of calmodulin (CaM) induces conformational changes that regulate its association with and activation of numerous cellular target proteins. Calcium binding to the pair of high-affinity sites (III and IV in the C-domain) can be monitored by observing calcium-dependent changes in intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence intensity (lambda(ex)/lambda(em) of 277/320 nm). However, calcium binding to the low-affinity sites (I and II in the N-domain) is more difficult to measure with optical spectroscopy because that domain of CaM does not contain tryptophan or tyrosine. We recently demonstrated that calcium-dependent changes in intrinsic phenylalanine fluorescence (lambda(ex)/lambda(em) of 250/280 nm) of an N-domain fragment of CaM reflect occupancy of sites I and II (VanScyoc, W. S., and M. A. Shea, 2001, Protein Sci. 10:1758-1768). Using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods, we now show that these excitation and emission wavelength pairs for phenylalanine and tyrosine fluorescence can be used to monitor equilibrium calcium titrations of the individual domains in full-length CaM. Calcium-dependent changes in phenylalanine fluorescence specifically indicate ion occupancy of sites I and II in the N-domain because phenylalanine residues in the C-domain are nonemissive. Tyrosine emission from the C-domain does not interfere with phenylalanine fluorescence signals from the N-domain. This is the first demonstration that intrinsic fluorescence may be used to monitor calcium binding to each domain of CaM. In this way, we also evaluated how mutations of two residues (Arg74 and Arg90) located between sites II and III can alter the calcium-binding properties of each of the domains. The mutation R74A caused an increase in the calcium affinity of sites I and II in the N-domain. The mutation R90A caused an increase in calcium affinity of sites III and IV in the C-domain whereas R90G caused an increase in calcium affinity

  1. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Changsoo; Choi, Eunmi; Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shin, Dong Chun; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Joung, Boyoung

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague–Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0 ± 14.0 to 142.1 ± 18.4 ms (p = 0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/ml for 30 min, n = 5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p = 0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5 mmol/L, n = 3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/ml for 20 min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5 mmol/L, n = 5), nifedipine (10 μmol/L, n = 5), and active Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1 μmol/L, n = 5), but not by thapsigargin (200 nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10 μmol/L, n = 5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1 μmol/L, n = 5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5 μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► The ambient PM consistently prolonged repolarization. ► The ambient PM induced triggered activity and ventricular arrhythmia. ► These effects were prevented by antioxidants, I{sub CaL} blockade and CaMKII blockade. ► The ambient PM can induce

  2. Molecular determinants for cardiovascular TRPC6 channel regulation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Juan; Geshi, Naomi; Takahashi, Shinichi; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Ichikawa, Jun; Hu, Yaopeng; Mori, Yasuo; Ito, Yushi; Inoue, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated regulation of the mouse transient receptor potential channel TRPC6 was explored by chimera, deletion and site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Induction of currents (ICCh) in TRPC6-expressing HEK293 cells by a muscarinic agonist carbachol (CCh; 100 μm) was strongly attenuated by a CaMKII-specific peptide, autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide (AIP; 10 μm). TRPC6/C7 chimera experiments showed that the TRPC6 C-terminal sequence is indispensable for ICCh to be sensitive to AIP-induced CaMKII inhibition. Further, deletion of a distal region (Gln855–Glu877) of the C-terminal CaM/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor binding domain (CIRB) of TRPC6 was sufficient to abolish ICCh. Systematic alanine scanning for potential CaMKII phosphorylation sites revealed that Thr487 was solely responsible for the activation of the TRPC6 channel by receptor stimulation. The abrogating effect of the alanine mutation of Thr487 (T487A) was reproduced with other non-polar amino acids, namely glutamine or asparagine, while being partially rescued by phosphomimetic mutations with glutamate or aspartate. The cellular expression and distribution of TRPC6 channels did not significantly change with these mutations. Electrophysiological and immunocytochemical data with the Myc-tagged TRPC6 channel indicated that Thr487 is most likely located at the intracellular side of the cell membrane. Overexpression of T487A caused significant reduction of endogenous TRPC6-like current induced by Arg8-vasopressin in A7r5 aortic myocytes. Based on these results, we propose that the optimal spatial arrangement of a C-terminal domain (presumably the distal CIRB region) around a single CaMKII phosphorylation site Thr487 may be essential for CaMKII-mediated regulation of TRPC6 channels. This mechanism may be of physiological significance in a native environment such as in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID

  3. Driving Calmodulin Protein towards Conformational Shift by Changing Ionization States of Select Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, Sunita; Rana Atilgan, Ali; Atilgan, Canan

    2012-12-01

    Proteins are complex systems made up of many conformational sub-states which are mainly determined by the folded structure. External factors such as solvent type, temperature, pH and ionic strength play a very important role in the conformations sampled by proteins. Here we study the conformational multiplicity of calmodulin (CaM) which is a protein that plays an important role in calcium signaling pathways in the eukaryotic cells. CaM can bind to a variety of other proteins or small organic compounds, and mediates different physiological processes by activating various enzymes. Binding of calcium ions and proteins or small organic molecules to CaM induces large conformational changes that are distinct to each interacting partner. In particular, we discuss the effect of pH variation on the conformations of CaM. By using the pKa values of the charged residues as a basis to assign protonation states, the conformational changes induced in CaM by reducing the pH are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Our current view suggests that at high pH, barrier crossing to the compact form is prevented by repulsive electrostatic interactions between the two lobes. At reduced pH, not only is barrier crossing facilitated by protonation of residues, but also conformations which are on average more compact are attained. The latter are in accordance with the fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiment results of other workers. The key events leading to the conformational change from the open to the compact conformation are (i) formation of a salt bridge between the N-lobe and the linker, stabilizing their relative motions, (ii) bending of the C-lobe towards the N-lobe, leading to a lowering of the interaction energy between the two-lobes, (iii) formation of a hydrophobic patch between the two lobes, further stabilizing the bent conformation by reducing the entropic cost of the compact form, (iv) sharing of a Ca+2 ion between the two lobes.

  4. Molecular and biochemical evidence for the involvement of calcium/calmodulin in auxin action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    The use of (35)S-labeled calmodulin (CaM) to screen a corn root cDNA expression library has led to the isolation of a CaM-binding protein, encoded by a cDNA with sequence similarity to small auxin up RNAs (SAURs), a class of early auxin-responsive genes. The cDNA designated as ZmSAUR1 (Zea mays SAURs) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified by CaM affinity chromatography. The CaM binding assay revealed that the recombinant protein binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion analysis revealed that the CaM binding site was located at the NH(2)-terminal domain. A synthetic peptide of amino acids 20-45, corresponding to the potential CaM binding region, was used for calcium-dependent mobility shift assays. The synthetic peptide formed a stable complex with CaM only in the presence of calcium. The CaM affinity assay indicated that ZmSAUR1 binds to CaM with high affinity (K(d) approximately 15 nM) in a calcium-dependent manner. Comparison of the NH(2)-terminal portions of all of the characterized SAURs revealed that they all contain a stretch of the basic alpha-amphiphilic helix similar to the CaM binding region of ZmSAUR1. CaM binds to the two synthetic peptides from the NH(2)-terminal regions of Arabidopsis SAUR-AC1 and soybean 10A5, suggesting that this is a general phenomenon for all SAURs. Northern analysis was carried out using the total RNA isolated from auxin-treated corn coleoptile segments. ZmSAUR1 gene expression began within 10 min, increased rapidly between 10 and 60 min, and peaked around 60 min after 10 microM alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid treatment. These results indicate that ZmSAUR1 is an early auxin-responsive gene. The CaM antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride inhibited the auxin-induced cell elongation but not the auxin-induced expression of ZmSAUR1. This suggests that calcium/CaM do not regulate ZmSAUR1 at the transcriptional level. CaM binding to ZmSAUR1 in a calcium

  5. Genome-wide identification and functional analyses of calmodulin genes in Solanaceous species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calmodulin (CaM) is a major calcium sensor in all eukaryotes. It binds calcium and modulates the activity of a wide range of downstream proteins in response to calcium signals. However, little is known about the CaM gene family in Solanaceous species, including the economically important species, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and the gene silencing model plant, Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, the potential function of CaM in plant disease resistance remains largely unclear. Results We performed genome-wide identification of CaM gene families in Solanaceous species. Employing bioinformatics approaches, multiple full-length CaM genes were identified from tomato, N. benthamiana and potato (S. tuberosum) genomes, with tomato having 6 CaM genes, N. benthamiana having 7 CaM genes, and potato having 4 CaM genes. Sequence comparison analyses showed that three tomato genes, SlCaM3/4/5, two potato genes StCaM2/3, and two sets of N. benthamiana genes, NbCaM1/2/3/4 and NbCaM5/6, encode identical CaM proteins, yet the genes contain different intron/exon organization and are located on different chromosomes. Further sequence comparisons and gene structural and phylogenetic analyses reveal that Solanaceous species gained a new group of CaM genes during evolution. These new CaM genes are unusual in that they contain three introns in contrast to only a single intron typical of known CaM genes in plants. The tomato CaM (SlCaM) genes were found to be expressed in all organs. Prediction of cis-acting elements in 5' upstream sequences and expression analyses demonstrated that SlCaM genes have potential to be highly responsive to a variety of biotic and abiotic stimuli. Additionally, silencing of SlCaM2 and SlCaM6 altered expression of a set of signaling and defense-related genes and resulted in significantly lower resistance to Tobacco rattle virus and the oomycete pathogen, Pythium aphanidermatum. Conclusions The CaM gene families in the Solanaceous species tomato, N

  6. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  7. Molecular characterization of a calmodulin gene, VcCaM1, that is differentially expressed under aluminum stress in highbush blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calmodulin (CaM), a small acidic protein, is one of the best characterized Ca2+ sensors in eukaryotes. This Ca2+-regulated protein plays a critical role in decoding and transducing environmental stress signals by activating specific targets. Many environmental stresses elicit changes in intracellu...

  8. Purification and partial characterization of a novel calcium-binding protein from Bacillus cereus T spores and inhibition of germination by calmodulin antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding protein has been purified from the dormant spores of Bacillus cereus T. B. cereus T spores were extensively washed, broken, and heated at 90{degree}C for 2 min. Using calcium-dependent hydrophobic interaction chromatography plus DEAE-cellulose and hydroxylapatite columns, a single protein was obtained which possessed calcium-binding capacity and some characteristics of calmodulin. This heat-stable protein was retained by hydrophobic matrices or a calmodulin antagonist in a calcium-dependent manner. The crude spore extract displaced bovine brain calmodulin from its antibody in a radioimmunoassay and the immunoreactive specific activity of the partially purified fraction which eluted from phenyl-Sepharose was ca. 200-fold greater than the crude spore extract. Purity of this protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyarcylamide gel electrophoresis and reversed-phase HPLC. Calcium-binding ability was verified with a competitive calcium binding assay using Chelex-100 resin and {sup 45}Ca autoradiography. SDS-PAGE and amino acid composition indicated the molecular weight of the protein was 24-kDa. The effects of two calmodulin antagonists, trifluoperazine (TFP) and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) on L-alanine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus T spores were examined by measuring commitment to germination, loss of heat resistance, release of calcium, decrease in optical density at 660 nm and phase-contrast microscopy.

  9. Calmodulin-binding proteins in bryophytes: identification of abscisic acid-, cold-, and osmotic stress-induced genes encoding novel membrane-bound transporter-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Daisuke; Minami, Anzu

    2004-04-30

    Plant responses to environmental stresses are mediated in part by signaling processes involving cytosolic Ca2+ and a Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. Screening with radiolabeled calmodulin of a cDNA library of the moss Physcomitrella patens resulted in identification of genes encoding novel membrane transporter-like proteins, MCamb1 and MCamb2. These proteins each had a central hydrophobic domain with two putative membrane spans and N- and C-terminal hydrophilic domains, and showed sequence similarity to mammalian inward rectifier potassium channels. Calmodulin binds to MCamb1 and MCamb2 via interaction with basic amphiphilic amino acids in the C-terminal domain. Levels of MCamb1 and MCamb2 transcripts increased dramatically following treatment with low temperature, hyperosmotic solutes, and the stress hormone abscisic acid, all of which were previously shown to increase cellular tolerance to freezing stress. These results suggest that calmodulin participates in cellular signaling events leading to enhancement of stress resistance through regulation of novel transporter-like proteins.

  10. Calmodulin activation of an endoplasmic reticulum-located calcium pump involves an interaction with the N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Harper, J. F.; Liang, F.; Sze, H.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how calmodulin regulates a unique subfamily of Ca(2+) pumps found in plants, we examined the kinetic properties of isoform ACA2 identified in Arabidopsis. A recombinant ACA2 was expressed in a yeast K616 mutant deficient in two endogenous Ca(2+) pumps. Orthovanadate-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) transport into vesicles isolated from transformants demonstrated that ACA2 is a Ca(2+) pump. Ca(2+) pumping by the full-length protein (ACA2-1) was 4- to 10-fold lower than that of the N-terminal truncated ACA2-2 (Delta2-80), indicating that the N-terminal domain normally acts to inhibit the pump. An inhibitory sequence (IC(50) = 4 microM) was localized to a region within valine-20 to leucine-44, because a peptide corresponding to this sequence lowered the V(max) and increased the K(m) for Ca(2+) of the constitutively active ACA2-2 to values comparable to the full-length pump. The peptide also blocked the activity (IC(50) = 7 microM) of a Ca(2+) pump (AtECA1) belonging to a second family of Ca(2+) pumps. This inhibitory sequence appears to overlap with a calmodulin-binding site in ACA2, previously mapped between aspartate-19 and arginine-36 (J.F. Harper, B. Hong, I. Hwang, H.Q. Guo, R. Stoddard, J.F. Huang, M.G. Palmgren, H. Sze inverted question mark1998 J Biol Chem 273: 1099-1106). These results support a model in which the pump is kept "unactivated" by an intramolecular interaction between an autoinhibitory sequence located between residues 20 and 44 and a site in the Ca(2+) pump core that is highly conserved between different Ca(2+) pump families. Results further support a model in which activation occurs as a result of Ca(2+)-induced binding of calmodulin to a site overlapping or immediately adjacent to the autoinhibitory sequence.

  11. A Top-Down LC-FTICR MS-Based Strategy for Characterizing Oxidized Calmodulin in Activated Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lourette, Natacha M.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Wu, Si; Robinson, Errol W.; Squier, Thomas C.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2010-06-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based approach for monitoring time dependent changes in the degree of nitration and oxidation of intact calmodulin (CaM) has been used to resolve approximately 500 CaM oxiforms. Tentative identifications of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) such as oxidation or nitration have been assigned by combining tryptic peptide information (generated from bottom-up analyses) with online collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) at the intact protein level. The reduction in abundance and diversity of oxidatively modified CaM (i.e. nitrated tyrosines and oxidized methionines) induced by macrophage activation has been explored and semi-quantified for different oxidation degrees of CaM (i.e. no oxidation, moderate and high oxidation). This work demonstrates the power of top-down approach to identify hundreds of combinations of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) for single protein target such as CaM.

  12. Differential AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Recognition Mechanism of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) is a known activating kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In vitro, CaMKKβ phosphorylates Thr(172) in the AMPKα subunit more efficiently than CaMKKα, with a lower Km (∼2 μm) for AMPK, whereas the CaMKIα phosphorylation efficiencies by both CaMKKs are indistinguishable. Here we found that subdomain VIII of CaMKK is involved in the discrimination of AMPK as a native substrate by measuring the activities of various CaMKKα/CaMKKβ chimera mutants. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that Leu(358) in CaMKKβ/Ile(322) in CaMKKα confer, at least in part, a distinct recognition of AMPK but not of CaMKIα.

  13. CML9, a multifunctional Arabidopsis thaliana calmodulin-like protein involved in stress responses and plant growth?

    PubMed Central

    Leba, Louis-Jérôme; Perochon, Alexandre; Cheval, Cécilia; Ranty, Benoit; Galaud, Jean-Philippe; Aldon, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Plants have evolved complex signaling networks to respond to their fluctuating environment and adapt their growth and development. Calcium-dependent signaling pathways play key role in the onset of these adaptive responses. In plant cells, the intracellular calcium transients are triggered by numerous stimuli and it is supposed that the large repertory of calcium sensors present in higher plants could contribute to integrate these signals in physiological responses. Here, we present data on CML9, a calmodulin-like protein that appears to be involved in plant responses to both biotic and abiotic stress. Using a reverse genetic approach based on gain and loss of function mutants, we present here data indicating that this CML might also be involved in root growth control in response to the flagellin, a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) also involved in plant immunity. PMID:22899061

  14. Activation of calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), the central regulator of plant root endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sylvia; Parniske, Martin

    2012-08-01

    The key molecular event during the development of arbuscular mycorrhiza and the root nodule symbiosis is the activation of calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK). Its regulation is complex and involves positive as well as negative regulation facilitated by autophosphorylation of two conserved sites. Deregulated versions of CCaMK are sufficient for mediating both organogenesis and infection processes. Epistasis tests demonstrated that a main function of signaling components upstream of calcium spiking is the activation of CCaMK. Despite CCaMK being a central signaling hub, specificity for both symbioses exists, resulting in differential transcriptional gene expression patterns. While the specificity upstream of CCaMK can be conceptualized by the specific perception of rhizobial and fungal lipo-chitooligosaccharides via cognate LysM receptors, the mechanisms conferring transcriptional specificity downstream of CCaMK are likely conferred by a variety of transcriptional regulators, mediating symbiosis appropriate gene regulation.

  15. Discovery of a small molecule that inhibits the interaction of anthrax edema factor with its cellular activator, calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sam; Bergson, Pamela; He, Wei Song; Mrksich, Milan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2004-08-01

    The catalytic efficiency of adenylyl cyclase activity of edema factor (EF) from Bacillus anthracis is enhanced by approximately 1000-fold upon its binding to mammalian protein calmodulin (CaM). A tandem cell-based and protein binding-based screen of a 10,000 member library identified a molecule that inhibits the EF-CaM interaction and therefore the adenylyl cyclase activity. A combination of fluorescence spectroscopy and photolabeling studies showed that the molecule targets the CaM binding region of EF. A series of related compounds were synthesized and evaluated to identify one compound, 4-[4-(4-nitrophenyl)-thiazolylamino]-benzenesulfonamide, that maintained activity against EF but showed minimal toxicity to two cultured cell lines. This compound represents an important reagent to study the role of EF in anthrax pathology and may represent a drug lead against anthrax infection.

  16. Functional identification of the promoter for the gene encoding the alpha subunit of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, N J; Massé, T; Suzuki, T; Chen, J; Alam, D; Kelly, P T

    1995-01-01

    To examine the expression of the alpha subunit of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, various 5' flanking genomic sequences were inserted into a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter plasmid and CAT enzyme activities were analyzed in transfected NB2a neuroblastoma cells and mRNA transcription was analyzed by nuclease protection assays. A core promoter was identified which contained an essential TATA element located 162 nt 5' to the transcription start site. Sequences 3' to the transcription start site, as well as 5' to the TATA element, increased levels of CAT activity in transfected cells. The alpha-subunit gene promoter displayed higher CAT activities, relative to a simian virus 40 promoter, in transfected neuronal cell lines than in nonneuronal cell lines. Results also suggested that sequence surrounding the natural alpha-gene transcription initiation site may be important for targeting transcription initiation 162 nt downstream of its TATA element. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7878035

  17. Transcription factor Sp1 is necessary for basal calmodulin gene transcription and for its selective stimulation by insulin.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S S; Palazzolo, M R; Takahashi, T; Raghow, R

    1997-11-01

    Insulin positively regulates transcription of rat calmodulin (CaM) I gene and activates the low Km cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE). To elucidate the mechanism of transcriptional regulation, rat hepatoma (H-411E) cells were transfected with DNA constructs containing the putative CaM promoters coupled to a luciferase reporter and challenged with insulin. Activation of the full length 1835 bp rat CaM I promoter containing all three Sp1 sites or truncated promoters with combinations of one to three of the Sp1 sites was studied in Sp1 deficient Drosophilia SL2 cells and in SL2 cells co-transfected with an Sp1 expression vector and re-challenged with insulin. Our results demonstrate that Sp1 is obligatory for basal activation of the CaM promoter. The maximal insulin stimulation of CaM promoter is elicited only if it contains at least two Sp1 sites.

  18. Cross-talk between calcium-calmodulin and nitric oxide in abscisic acid signaling in leaves of maize plants.

    PubMed

    Sang, Jianrong; Zhang, Aying; Lin, Fan; Tan, Mingpu; Jiang, Mingyi

    2008-05-01

    Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, the signaling pathways between hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), calcium (Ca(2+))-calmodulin (CaM), and nitric oxide (NO) in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defense were investigated in leaves of maize (Zea mays L.) plants. Treatments with ABA, H(2)O(2), and CaCl(2) induced increases in the generation of NO in maize mesophyll cells and the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the cytosolic and microsomal fractions of maize leaves. However, such increases were blocked by the pretreatments with Ca(2+) inhibitors and CaM antagonists. Meanwhile, pretreatments with two NOS inhibitors also suppressed the Ca(2+)-induced increase in the production of NO. On the other hand, treatments with ABA and the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) also led to increases in the concentration of cytosolic Ca(2+) in protoplasts of mesophyll cells and in the expression of calmodulin 1 (CaM1) gene and the contents of CaM in leaves of maize plants, and the increases induced by ABA were reduced by the pretreatments with a NO scavenger and a NOS inhibitor. Moreover, SNP-induced increases in the expression of the antioxidant genes superoxide dismutase 4 (SOD4), cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (cAPX), and glutathione reductase 1 (GR1) and the activities of the chloroplastic and cytosolic antioxidant enzymes were arrested by the pretreatments with Ca(2+) inhibitors and CaM antagonists. Our results suggest that Ca(2+)-CaM functions both upstream and downstream of NO production, which is mainly from NOS, in ABA- and H(2)O(2)-induced antioxidant defense in leaves of maize plants.

  19. Hypotonic shock modulates Na(+) current via a Cl(-) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependent mechanism in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dagenais, André; Tessier, Marie-Claude; Tatur, Sabina; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Berthiaume, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial cells are involved in Na(+) absorption via the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), an important process for maintaining an appropriate volume of liquid lining the respiratory epithelium and for lung oedema clearance. Here, we investigated how a 20% hypotonic shock modulates the ionic current in these cells. Polarized alveolar epithelial cells isolated from rat lungs were cultured on permeant filters and their electrophysiological properties recorded. A 20% bilateral hypotonic shock induced an immediate, but transient 52% rise in total transepithelial current and a 67% increase in the amiloride-sensitive current mediated by ENaC. Amiloride pre-treatment decreased the current rise after hypotonic shock, showing that ENaC current is involved in this response. Since Cl(-) transport is modulated by hypotonic shock, its contribution to the basal and hypotonic-induced transepithelial current was also assessed. Apical NPPB, a broad Cl(-) channel inhibitor and basolateral DIOA a potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC) inhibitor reduced the total and ENaC currents, showing that transcellular Cl(-) transport plays a major role in that process. During hypotonic shock, a basolateral Cl(-) influx, partly inhibited by NPPB is essential for the hypotonic-induced current rise. Hypotonic shock promoted apical ATP secretion and increased intracellular Ca(2+). While apyrase, an ATP scavenger, did not inhibit the hypotonic shock current response, W7 a calmodulin antagonist completely prevented the hypotonic current rise. These results indicate that a basolateral Cl(-) influx as well as Ca(2+)/calmodulin, but not ATP, are involved in the acute transepithelial current rise elicited by hypotonic shock.

  20. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca2+-CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca2+-dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. PMID:28115582

  1. Nanomolar concentrations of inorganic lead increase Ca2+ efflux and decrease intracellular free Ca2+ ion concentrations in cultured rat hippocampal neurons by a calmodulin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2000-06-01

    Inorganic lead (Pb2+) activates calmodulin, which in turn may stimulate many other cellular processes. The plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase is a calmodulin-stimulated enzyme that plays the major role in regulating the "resting" intracellular free Ca2+ ion concentration, [Ca2+]i. We hypothesized that exposing neurons to low levels of Pb2+ would cause Pb2+ to enter the cytoplasm, and that intracellular Pb2+, by activating calmodulin, would stimulate plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase activity, thereby increasing Ca2+ extrusion and reducing [Ca2+]i. We used the ratiometric Ca2+ indicator fura-2 to estimate changes in [Ca2+]i. In vitro calibrations of fura-2 with solutions of defined free Ca2+ and free Pb2+ concentrations showed that, at free Ca2+ concentrations from 10 nM to 1000 nM, adding Pb2+ caused either no significant change in the F340/F380 ratio (free Pb2+ concentrations from 100 fM to 1 pM) or increased the F340/F380 ratio (free Pb2+ concentrations from 5 to 50 pM). Therefore, fura-2 should be suitable for estimating Pb2+-induced decreases in [Ca2+]i, but not increases in [Ca2+]i. We exposed cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons to 100 nM Pb2+ for periods from 1 hour to 2 days and measured the F340/F380 ratio; the ratio decreased significantly by 9 to 16% at all time points, indicating that Pb2+ exposure decreased [Ca2+]i. In neurons loaded with 45Ca, Pb2+ exposure increased Ca2+ efflux for at least two hours; by 24 hours, Ca2+ efflux returned to control levels. Influx of 45Ca was not altered by Pb2+ exposure. Low concentrations (250 nM) of the calmodulin inhibitor calmidazolium had no effect on either 45Ca efflux or on the F340/F380 ratio in fura-loaded control neurons, but completely eliminated the increase in 45Ca efflux and decrease in F340/F380 ratio in Pb2+-exposed neurons. Zaldoride, another calmodulin inhibitor, also eliminated the decrease in F340/F380 ratio in Pb2+-exposed neurons. We conclude that Pb2+ exposure decreases [Ca2+]i and increases Ca2+ efflux

  2. A brain-specific Ca sup 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase-Gr) is regulated by autophosphorylation. Relevance to neuronal Ca sup 2+ signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Frangakis, M.V.; Ohmstede, C.A.; Sahyoun, N. )

    1991-06-15

    A neuronal Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase-Gr) undergoes autophosphorylation on a serine residue(s) in response to Ca2+ and calmodulin. Phosphate incorporation leads to the formation of a Ca(2+)-independent (autonomous) activity state, as well as potentiation of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent response. The autonomous enzyme activity of the phosphorylated enzyme {approximately} equals the Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated activity of the unphosphorylated enzyme, but displays diminished affinity toward ATP and the synthetic substrate, syntide-2. The Km(app) for ATP and syntide-2 increased 4.3- and 1.7-fold, respectively. Further activation of the autonomous enzyme by Ca2+/calmodulin yields a marked increase in the affinity for ATP and peptide substrate such that the Km(app) for ATP and syntide-2 decreased by 14- and 8-fold, respectively. Both autophosphorylation and the addition of Ca2+/calmodulin are required to produce the maximum level of enzyme activation and to increase substrate affinity. Unlike Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II that is dephosphorylated by the Mg(2+)-independent phosphoprotein phosphatases 1 and 2A, CaM kinase-Gr is dephosphorylated by a Mg(2+)-dependent phosphoprotein phosphatase that may be related to the type 2C enzyme. Dephosphorylation of CaM kinase-Gr reverses the effects of autophosphorylation on enzyme activity. A comparison between the autophosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions of CaM kinase-Gr and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II provides useful insights into the operation of Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switches.

  3. Vitellogenesis in the Fruit Fly, Drosophila melanogaster: Antagonists Demonstrate that the PLC, IP3/DAG, PK-C Pathway is Triggered by Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker-Purkey, Bethany J.; Woodruff, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster M. (Diptera: Drosophilidae), a phospholipase-C to proteininase-C signal cascade leads to the endocytic uptake of yolk precursor molecules. The data suggest that D. melanogaster has a phospholipase-C/proteinkinase-C signaling pathway similar to that previously shown to be required for vitellogenesis in the milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus Dallas (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae). Calmodulin, derived from epithelial cells and transported to the oocytes via gap junctions, may trigger this pathway. To investigate this, a series of known antagonists to various elements of the pathway were used. W-7 (which prevents calmodulin binding to phospholipase-C), U-73122 (which prevents activation of phospholipase-C), verapamil (which blocks Ca2+ release by IP3), HAG (which blocks diacylglycerol), and staurosporine (which inactivates proteinkinase-C) were each shown to inhibit endocytosis, thereby blocking formation of nascent yolk spheres. PMID:24228869

  4. Phosphorylation and activation of nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI)

    SciTech Connect

    Onouchi, Takashi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Kameshita, Isamu

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaMKP-N/PPM1E underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proteolysis was effectively inhibited by the proteasome inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ser-480 of zebrafish CaMKP-N was phosphorylated by cytosolic CaMKI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation-mimic mutants of CaMKP-N showed enhanced activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results suggest that CaMKP-N is regulated by CaMKI. -- Abstract: Nuclear Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N/PPM1E) is an enzyme that dephosphorylates and downregulates multifunctional Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) as well as AMP-dependent protein kinase. In our previous study, we found that zebrafish CaMKP-N (zCaMKP-N) underwent proteolytic processing and translocated to cytosol in a proteasome inhibitor-sensitive manner. In the present study, we found that zCaMKP-N is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser-480. When zCaMKP-N was incubated with the activated CaMKI, time-dependent phosphorylation of the enzyme was observed. This phosphorylation was significantly reduced when Ser-480 was replaced by Ala, suggesting that CaMKI phosphorylates Ser-480 of zCaMKP-N. Phosphorylation-mimic mutants, S480D and S480E, showed higher phosphatase activities than those of wild type and S480A mutant in solution-based phosphatase assay using various substrates. Furthermore, autophosphorylation of CaMKII after ionomycin treatment was more severely attenuated in Neuro2a cells when CaMKII was cotransfected with the phosphorylation-mimic mutant of zCaMKP-N than with the wild-type or non-phosphorylatable zCaMKP-N. These results strongly suggest that phosphorylation of zCaMKP-N at Ser-480 by CaMKI activates CaMKP-N catalytic activity and thereby downregulates multifunctional CaMKs in the cytosol.

  5. The alterations of Ca2+/calmodulin/CaMKII/CaV1.2 signaling in experimental models of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Min, Dongyu; Guo, Feng; Zhu, Shu; Xu, Xiaoxue; Mao, Xiaoyuan; Cao, Yonggang; Lv, Xintong; Gao, Qinghua; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Hao, Liying; Cai, Jiqun

    2013-03-22

    The two critical forms of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD). The alterations of Ca(2+)/calmodulin/CaMKII/CaV1.2 signaling in AD and VD have not been well elucidated. Here we have demonstrated changes in the levels of CaV1.2, calmodulin, p-CaMKII, p-CREB and BDNF proteins by Western blot analysis and the co-localization of p-CaMKII/CaV1.2 by double-labeling immunofluorescence in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice and VD gerbils. Additionally, expression of these proteins and intracellular calcium levels were examined in cultured neurons treated with Aβ1-42. The expression of CaV1.2 protein was increased in VD gerbils and in cultured neurons but decreased in APP/PS1 mice; the expression of calmodulin protein was increased in APP/PS1 mice and VD gerbils; levels of p-CaMKII, p-CREB and BDNF proteins were decreased in AD and VD models. The number of neurons in which p-CaMKII and CaV1.2 were co-localized, was decreased in the CA1 and CA3 regions in two models. Intracellular calcium was increased in the cultured neurons treated with Aβ1-42. Collectively, our results suggest that the alterations in CaV1.2, calmodulin, p-CaMKII, p-CREB and BDNF can be reflective of an involvement in the impairment in memory and cognition in AD and VD models.

  6. Dopaminergic denervation switches dopamine D3 receptor signaling and disrupts its Ca(2+) dependent modulation by CaMKII and calmodulin in striatonigral projections of the rat.

    PubMed

    Avalos-Fuentes, Arturo; Albarrán-Bravo, Sacnité; Loya-Lopéz, Santiago; Cortés, Hernán; Recillas-Morales, Sergio; Magaña, Jonathan J; Paz-Bermúdez, Francisco; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Aceves, Jorge; Erlij, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-02-01

    In striatonigral projections activation of dopamine D3 receptors (D3Rs) potentiates the stimulation of GABA release and cAMP production caused by activation of dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs). Cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)] in the terminals controls this response by modulating CaMKII, an enzyme that depresses D3R action. To examine the effects of dopamine deprivation on D3R signaling we investigated their function in striatonigral terminals of hemiparkinsonian rats. Denervation switched the signaling cascade initiated by D3R activation. In the non-lesioned side activation of D3R potentiated the stimulatory effects of D1R activation on cAMP production and K(+)-depolarization induced [(3)H] GABA release. In contrast, in the denervated side the stimulatory effects of both D1R activation and forskolin administration were blocked by D3R activation. In non-lesioned slices, D3R responses were inhibited by the activation of CaMKII produced by K(+)-depolarization (via increased Ca(2+) entry). The CaMKII-induced inhibition was blocked by the selective inhibitor KN-62. In denervated tissues the response to D3R stimulation was not modified either by K(+) depolarization or by blocking CaMKII with KN-62. Immunoblotting studies showed that depolarization-induced CaMKII binding to the D3 receptor and CaMKII phosphorylation were suppressed in denervated tissues. We also determined calmodulin expression with PCR and immunoblot techniques. Both techniques showed that calmodulin expression was depressed in the lesioned side. In sum, our studies show that dopaminergic denervation switches the D3R signaling cascade and depresses CaMKII signaling through a process that appears to involve reduced calmodulin levels. Since calmodulin is a major cytoplasmic Ca(2+) buffer our findings suggest that abnormal Ca(2+) buffering may be an important component of the abnormalities observed during dopaminergic denervation.

  7. The Arabidopsis calmodulin-like proteins AtCML30 and AtCML3 are targeted to mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively.

    PubMed

    Chigri, Fatima; Flosdorff, Sandra; Pilz, Sahra; Kölle, Eva; Dolze, Esther; Gietl, Christine; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2012-02-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous sensor/transducer of calcium signals in eukaryotic organisms. While CaM mediated calcium regulation of cytosolic processes is well established, there is growing evidence for the inclusion of organelles such as chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes into the calcium/calmodulin regulation network. A number of CaM-binding proteins have been identified in these organelles and processes such as protein import into chloroplasts and mitochondria have been shown to be governed by CaM regulation. What have been missing to date are the mediators of this regulation since no CaM or calmodulin-like protein (CML) has been identified in any of these organelles. Here we show that two Arabidopsis CMLs, AtCML3 and AtCML30, are localized in peroxisomes and mitochondria, respectively. AtCML3 is targeted via an unusual C-terminal PTS1-like tripeptide while AtCML30 utilizes an N-terminal, non-cleavable transit peptide. Both proteins possess the typical structure of CaMs, with two pairs of EF-hand motifs separated by a short linker domain. They furthermore display common characteristics, such as calcium-dependent alteration of gel mobility and calcium-dependent exposure of a hydrophobic surface. This indicates that they can function in a similar manner as canonical CaMs. The presence of close homologues to AtCML3 and AtCML30 in other plants further indicates that organellar targeting of these CMLs is not a specific feature of Arabidopsis. The identification of peroxisomal and mitochondrial CMLs is an important step in the understanding how these organelles are integrated into the cellular calcium/calmodulin signaling pathways.

  8. Intramolecular activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase is disrupted by insertions in the tether that connects the calmodulin-like domain to the kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitart, V.; Christodoulou, J.; Huang, J. F.; Chazin, W. J.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) have a calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD) tethered to the C-terminal end of the kinase. Activation is proposed to involve intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to a junction sequence that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase domain. Consistent with this model, a truncated CDPK (DeltaNC) in which the CaM-LD has been deleted can be activated in a bimolecular interaction with an isolated CaM-LD or calmodulin, similar to the activation of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) by calmodulin. Here we provide genetic evidence that this bimolecular activation requires a nine-residue binding segment from F436 to I444 (numbers correspond to CPK-1 accession number L14771). Two mutations at either end of this core segment (F436/A and VI444/AA) severely disrupted bimolecular activation, whereas flanking mutations had only minor effects. Intramolecular activation of a full-length kinase was also disrupted by a VI444/AA mutation, but surprisingly not by a F436/A mutation (at the N-terminal end of the binding site). Interestingly, intramolecular but not bimolecular activation was disrupted by insertion mutations placed immediately downstream of I444. To show that mutant enzymes were not misfolded, latent kinase activity was stimulated through binding of an antijunction antibody. Results here support a model of intramolecular activation in which the tether (A445 to G455) that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase provides an important structural constraint and is not just a simple flexible connection.

  9. Structural characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a genetically engineered high-affinity calmodulin-binding peptide derived from Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munier, H; Bouhss, A; Gilles, A M; Palibroda, N; Bârzu, O; Mispelter, J; Craescu, C T

    1995-07-10

    This paper reports the solution conformation of a peptide (P196-267) derived from the calmodulin-binding domain of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase. P196-267 corresponding to the protein fragment situated between amino acid residues 196-267 was overproduced by a recombinant Escherichia coli strain. Its affinity for calmodulin is only one order of magnitude lower (Kd = 2.4 nM) than that of the whole bacterial enzyme (Kd = 0.2 nM). The proton resonances of the NMR spectra of P196-267 were assigned using homonuclear two-dimensional techniques (double-quantum-filtered J-correlated spectroscopy, total correlation spectroscopy, and nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy) and a standard assignment procedure. Analysis of the nuclear Overhauser effect connectivities and the secondary shift distribution of C alpha protons along the sequence allowed us to identify the elements of regular secondary structure. The peptide is flexible in solution, being in equilibrium between random coil and helical structures. Two segments of 11 amino acids (situated between V215 and A225) and 15 amino acids (situated between L233 and A247) populate in a significant proportion the helix conformational state. The two helices can be considerably stabilized in a mixed solvent, trifluoroethanol/water (30/70), suggesting that the corresponding fragment in the intact protein assumes a similar secondary conformation. No elements of tertiary structure organization were detected by the present experiments. The conformational properties of the isolated calmodulin target fragment are discussed in relation with the available NMR and X-ray data on various peptides complexed to calmodulin.

  10. Partial deduced sequence of the 110-kD-calmodulin complex of the avian intestinal microvillus shows that this mechanoenzyme is a member of the myosin I family

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The actin bundle within each microvillus of the intestinal brush border is laterally tethered to the membrane by bridges composed of the protein complex, 110-kD-calmodulin. Previous studies have shown that avian 110-kD-calmodulin shares many properties with myosins including mechanochemical activity. In the present study, a cDNA molecule encoding 1,000 amino acids of the 110-kD protein has been sequenced, providing direct evidence that this protein is a vertebrate homologue of the tail-less, single-headed myosin I first described in amoeboid cells. The primary structure of the 110-kD protein (or brush border myosin I heavy chain) consists of two domains, an amino-terminal "head" domain and a 35-kD carboxy-terminal "tail" domain. The head domain is homologous to the S1 domain of other known myosins, with highest homology observed between that of Acanthamoeba myosin IB and the S1 domain of the protein encoded by bovine myosin I heavy chain gene (MIHC; Hoshimaru, M., and S. Nakanishi. 1987. J. Biol. Chem. 262:14625- 14632). The carboxy-terminal domain shows no significant homology with any other known myosins except that of the bovine MIHC. This demonstrates that the bovine MIHC gene most probably encodes the heavy chain of bovine brush border myosin I (BBMI). A bacterially expressed fusion protein encoded by the brush border 110-kD cDNA binds calmodulin. Proteolytic removal of the carboxy-terminal domain of the fusion protein results in loss of calmodulin binding activity, a result consistent with previous studies on the domain structure of the 110-kD protein. No hydrophobic sequence is present in the molecule indicating that chicken BBMI heavy chain is probably not an integral membrane protein. Northern blot analysis of various chicken tissue indicates that BBMI heavy chain is preferentially expressed in the intestine. PMID:2687288

  11. Proteolytic footprinting titrations for estimating ligand-binding constants and detecting pathways of conformational switching of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Shea, M A; Sorensen, B R; Pedigo, S; Verhoeven, A S

    2000-01-01

    To dissect the chemical basis for interactions controlling regulatory properties of macromolecular assemblies, it is essential to explore experimentally the linkage between ligand binding, conformational change, and subunit assembly. There are many advantages to using techniques that will probe the occupancy of individual binding sites or monitor conformational responses of individual residues, as described here. Proteolytic footprinting titrations may be used to infer binding free energies for ligands interacting with multiple sites or domains and to detect otherwise unrecognized "silent" interdomain interactions. Microgram quantities of pure protein are required, which is low relative to the hundreds of milligrams needed for comparable discontinuous equilibirum titrations monitored by NMR. By running comparative studies with several proteases, it is easy to determine whether resulting titration curves are consistent, independent of the protease used and therefore representative of the structural response of the protein to ligand binding or other differences in solution conditions (pH, salt, temperature). The results from multiple techniques (e.g., NMR, fluorescence, and footprinting) applied to aliquots from the same discontinuous titration may be compared easily to test for consistency. Classic methods for determining thermodynamic and kinetic properties of calcium binding to calmodulin include filter binding and equilibrium or flow dialysis (employing the isotope 45Ca), spectroscopic studies of stopped-flow fluorescence, calorimetry, and direct ion titrations. A cautionary note is that many different sets of microscopic data would be consistent with a single set of macroscopic constants determined by classic methods. This was well illustrated in Fig. 9. Thus, while it is important to compare results with those obtained by classic binding methods, they are, by definition, incapable of resolving the microscopic constants of interest. Thus, there is only one

  12. Effects of ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid, A23187 and calmodulin, calcium activated neutral proteinase antagonists on melatonin secretion in perifused chick pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Agapito, M T; Pablos, M; Reiter, R J; Recio, J M; Gutierrez-Baraja, R

    1998-04-10

    We have recently described, using perifused pineal glands, that calcium influx participates in the activation of chick pineal gland. This study shows that the loss of perifused chick pineal gland activity is a complex process which seems to involve the release of calcium from intracellular stores, calmodulin and calcium-activated neutral protease (CANP). Pineal glands were perifused with Krebs medium (controls) or with Krebs medium plus the drugs ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA; calcium chelator), A23187 (calcium ionophore), EGTA plus A23187 (extra-intra cellular calcium chelation), trifluoperazine and CGS9343B (calmodulin inhibitors), and E-64 (CANP inhibitor) at the time of the natural peak of melatonin release. When EGTA or A23187 were added to the perifusion medium, no effects were observed. On the other hand, when the calcium chelator EGTA plus A23187 (free extra and intracellular calcium levels were dramatically decreased), trifluoperazine, CGS 9343B or E-64 were added to the perifusion medium melatonin synthesis increased significantly and was sustained for 8 h. We propose a prominent role for calcium output from intracellular stores in regulating melatonin production primarily by acting on Ca-calmodulin and calcium-activated neutral protease.

  13. A calmodulin-like protein suppresses RNA silencing and promotes geminivirus infection by degrading SGS3 via the autophagy pathway in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fangfang; Zhao, Nan; Xu, Xiongbiao; Wang, Yaqin; Yang, Xiuling; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Aiming; Zhou, Xueping

    2017-01-01

    A recently characterized calmodulin-like protein is an endogenous RNA silencing suppressor that suppresses sense-RNA induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (S-PTGS) and enhances virus infection, but the mechanism underlying calmodulin-like protein-mediated S-PTGS suppression is obscure. Here, we show that a calmodulin-like protein from Nicotiana benthamiana (NbCaM) interacts with Suppressor of Gene Silencing 3 (NbSGS3). Deletion analyses showed that domains essential for the interaction between NbSGS3 and NbCaM are also required for the subcellular localization of NbSGS3 and NbCaM suppressor activity. Overexpression of NbCaM reduced the number of NbSGS3-associated granules by degrading NbSGS3 protein accumulation in the cytoplasm. This NbCaM-mediated NbSGS3 degradation was sensitive to the autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and E64d, and was compromised when key autophagy genes of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) complex were knocked down. Meanwhile, silencing of key autophagy genes within the PI3K complex inhibited geminivirus infection. Taken together these data suggest that NbCaM acts as a suppressor of RNA silencing by degrading NbSGS3 through the autophagy pathway. PMID:28212430

  14. Structural Insights into the Calcium-Mediated Allosteric Transition in the C-Terminal Domain of Calmodulin from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kukic, Predrag; Lundström, Patrik; Camilloni, Carlo; Evenäs, Johan; Akke, Mikael; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-12

    Calmodulin is a two-domain signaling protein that becomes activated upon binding cooperatively two pairs of calcium ions, leading to large-scale conformational changes that expose its binding site. Despite significant advances in understanding the structural biology of calmodulin functions, the mechanistic details of the conformational transition between closed and open states have remained unclear. To investigate this transition, we used a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on the Ca(2+)-saturated E140Q C-terminal domain variant. Using chemical shift restraints in replica-averaged metadynamics simulations, we obtained a high-resolution structural ensemble consisting of two conformational states and validated such an ensemble against three independent experimental data sets, namely, interproton nuclear Overhauser enhancements, (15)N order parameters, and chemical shift differences between the exchanging states. Through a detailed analysis of this structural ensemble and of the corresponding statistical weights, we characterized a calcium-mediated conformational transition whereby the coordination of Ca(2+) by just one oxygen of the bidentate ligand E140 triggers a concerted movement of the two EF-hands that exposes the target binding site. This analysis provides atomistic insights into a possible Ca(2+)-mediated activation mechanism of calmodulin that cannot be achieved from static structures alone or from ensemble NMR measurements of the transition between conformations.

  15. Dynamic control of synaptic vesicle replenishment and short-term plasticity by Ca(2+)-calmodulin-Munc13-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lipstein, Noa; Sakaba, Takeshi; Cooper, Benjamin H; Lin, Kun-Han; Strenzke, Nicola; Ashery, Uri; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Taschenberger, Holger; Neher, Erwin; Brose, Nils

    2013-07-10

    Short-term synaptic plasticity, the dynamic alteration of synaptic strength during high-frequency activity, is a fundamental characteristic of all synapses. At the calyx of Held, repetitive activity eventually results in short-term synaptic depression, which is in part due to the gradual exhaustion of releasable synaptic vesicles. This is counterbalanced by Ca(2+)-dependent vesicle replenishment, but the molecular mechanisms of this replenishment are largely unknown. We studied calyces of Held in knockin mice that express a Ca(2+)-Calmodulin insensitive Munc13-1(W464R) variant of the synaptic vesicle priming protein Munc13-1. Calyces of these mice exhibit a slower rate of synaptic vesicle replenishment, aberrant short-term depression and reduced recovery from synaptic depression after high-frequency stimulation. Our data establish Munc13-1 as a major presynaptic target of Ca(2+)-Calmodulin signaling and show that the Ca(2+)-Calmodulin-Munc13-1 complex is a pivotal component of the molecular machinery that determines short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics.

  16. Activation of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Stimulates Cardiac ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channels via a ROS/Calmodulin/CaMKII Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yongping; Zhang, Dai-Min; Lin, Yu-Fung

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is recognized as an important signaling component in diverse cell types. PKG may influence the function of cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, an ion channel critical for stress adaptation in the heart; however, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The present study was designed to address this issue. Methods and Findings Single-channel recordings of cardiac KATP channels were performed in both cell-attached and inside-out patch configurations using transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells and rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes. We found that Kir6.2/SUR2A (the cardiac-type KATP) channels were activated by cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-attached patches obtained from HEK293 cells, an effect mimicked by the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP whereas abolished by selective PKG inhibitors. Intriguingly, direct application of PKG moderately reduced rather than augmented Kir6.2/SUR2A single-channel currents in excised, inside-out patches. Moreover, PKG stimulation of Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells was abrogated by ROS/H2O2 scavenging, antagonism of calmodulin, and blockade of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), respectively. Exogenous H2O2 also concentration-dependently stimulated Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells, and its effect was prevented by inhibition of calmodulin or CaMKII. PKG stimulation of KATP channels was confirmed in intact ventricular cardiomyocytes, which was ROS- and CaMKII-dependent. Kinetically, PKG appeared to stimulate these channels by destabilizing the longest closed state while stabilizing the long open state and facilitating opening transitions. Conclusion The present study provides novel evidence that PKG exerts dual regulation of cardiac KATP channels, including marked stimulation resulting from intracellular signaling mediated by ROS (H2O2 in

  17. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization. PMID:27703977

  18. Limbic epilepsy in transgenic mice carrying a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II alpha-subunit mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, L S; Silva, A J; Abeliovich, A; Watanabe, Y; Tonegawa, S; McNamara, J O

    1995-01-01

    Multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK) phosphorylates proteins pivotally involved in diverse neuronal processes and thereby coordinates cellular responses to external stimuli that regulate intracellular Ca2+ [Hanson, P. I. & Schulman, H. (1992) Annu. Rev. Biochem. 61, 559-664]. Despite extensive study, the impact of this enzyme on control of the excitability of neuron populations in the mammalian nervous system in situ is unknown. To address this question, we studied transgenic mice carrying a null mutation (-/-) for the alpha subunit of CaMK. In contrast to wild-type littermates, null mutants exhibit profound hyperexcitability, evident in epileptic seizures involving limbic structures including the hippocampus. No evidence of increased excitability was detected in mice carrying null mutations of the gamma isoform of protein kinase C, underscoring the specificity of the effect of CaMK. CaMK plays a powerful and previously underappreciated role in control of neuronal excitability in the mammalian nervous system. These insights have important implications for analyses of mechanisms of epilepsy and, perhaps, learning and memory. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7624331

  19. Inhibition of SRY-calmodulin complex formation induces ectopic expression of ovarian cell markers in developing XY gonads.

    PubMed

    Sim, Helena; Argentaro, Anthony; Czech, Daniel P; Bagheri-Fam, Stefan; Sinclair, Andrew H; Koopman, Peter; Boizet-Bonhoure, Brigitte; Poulat, Francis; Harley, Vincent R

    2011-07-01

    The transcription factor sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY) plays a key role in human sex determination, because mutations in SRY cause disorders of sex development in XY individuals. During gonadal development, Sry in pre-Sertoli cells activates Sox9 gene transcription, committing the fate of the bipotential gonad to become a testis rather than an ovary. The high-mobility group domain of human SRY contains two independent nuclear localization signals, one bound by calmodulin (CaM) and the other by importin-β. Although XY females carry SRY mutations in these nuclear localization signals that affect SRY nuclear import in transfected cells, it is not known whether these transport mechanisms are essential for gonadal development and sex determination. Here, we show that mouse Sry protein binds CaM and that a CaM antagonist reduces CaM binding, nuclear accumulation, and transcriptional activity of Sry in transfected cells. CaM antagonist treatment of cultured, sexually indifferent XY mouse fetal gonads led to reduced expression of the Sry target gene Sox9, defects in testicular cord formation, and ectopic expression of the ovarian markers Rspondin1 and forkhead box L2. These results indicate the importance of CaM for SRY nuclear import, transcriptional activity, testis differentiation, and sex determination.

  20. Intracellular Ca2+ and Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Mediate Acute Potentiation of Neurotransmitter Release by Neurotrophin-3

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang-ping; Yang, Feng; Xie, Zuo-ping; Lu, Bai

    2000-01-01

    Neurotrophins have been shown to acutely modulate synaptic transmission in a variety of systems, but the underlying signaling mechanisms remain unclear. Here we provide evidence for an unusual mechanism that mediates synaptic potentiation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) induced by neurotrophin-3 (NT3), using Xenopus nerve–muscle co-culture. Unlike brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which requires Ca2+ influx for its acute effect, NT3 rapidly enhances spontaneous transmitter release at the developing NMJ even when Ca2+ influx is completely blocked, suggesting that the NT3 effect is independent of extracellular Ca2+. Depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, or blockade of inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate (IP3) or ryanodine receptors, prevents the NT3-induced synaptic potentiation. Blockade of IP3 receptors can not prevent BDNF-induced potentiation, suggesting that BDNF and NT3 use different mechanisms to potentiate transmitter release. Inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) completely blocks the acute effect of NT3. Furthermore, the NT3-induced potentiation requires a continuous activation of CaMKII, because application of the CaMKII inhibitor KN62 reverses the previously established NT3 effect. Thus, NT3 potentiates neurotransmitter secretion by stimulating Ca2+ release from intracellular stores through IP3 and/or ryanodine receptors, leading to an activation of CaMKII. PMID:10811820

  1. Development of a new Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin antagonist and its anti-proliferative activity against colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Joong Sup; Lee, Jiyong; Kim, Kyung Noo; Kwon, Ho Jeong . E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr

    2007-08-03

    We previously identified a cellular target of a cell cycle inhibitor HBC as Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin (Ca{sup 2+}/CaM) through chemical genetics approach. Using the mechanism-based drug design, we developed a new Ca{sup 2+}/CaM antagonists based on the structure of HBC. The compound, (4-{l_brace}3,5-bis-[2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-vinyl]-4,5-dihydro-pyrazol-1-yl {r_brace}-phenyl)-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-yl)-methanone (referred as HBCP), binds to Ca{sup 2+}/CaM in vitro and inhibits the proliferation of HCT15 colon cancer cells. HBCP induced sustained phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and subsequently activated p21{sup WAF1} expression in HCT15 cells. Moreover, HBCP reversibly induced the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest in the cells. These data demonstrate that HBCP is a new potent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM antagonist and can be applied for CaM related therapeutic uses.

  2. Identification of peptides in wheat germ hydrolysate that demonstrate calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Kumrungsee, Thanutchaporn; Akiyama, Sayaka; Guo, Jian; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-12-15

    Hydrolysis of wheat germ by proteases resulted in bioactive peptides that demonstrated an inhibitory effect against the vasoconstrictive Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). The hydrolysate by thermolysin (1.0wt%, 5h) showed a particularly potent CaMK II inhibition. As a result of mixed mode high-performance liquid chromatography of thermolysin hydrolysate with pH elution gradient ranging between 4.8 and 8.9, the fraction eluted at pH 8.9 was the most potent CaMK II inhibitor. From this fraction, Trp-Val and Trp-Ile were identified as CaMK II inhibitors. In Sprague-Dawley rats, an enhanced aortic CaMK II activity by 1μM phenylephrine was significantly (p<0.05) suppressed by 15-min incubation with 300μM Trp-Val or Trp-Ile. On the basis of Ca(2+)-chelating fluorescence and CaMK II activity assays, it was concluded that Trp-Val and Trp-Ile competed with Ca(2+)-CaM complex to bind to CaMK II with Ki values of 5.4 and 3.6μM, respectively.

  3. Different Roles of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Domains in Calmodulin for Activation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lübker, Carolin; Dove, Stefan; Tang, Wei-Jen; Urbauer, Ramona J. Bieber; Moskovitz, Jackob; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Seifert, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis adenylyl cyclase toxin edema factor (EF) is one component of the anthrax toxin and is essential for establishing anthrax disease. EF activation by the eukaryotic Ca2+-sensor calmodulin (CaM) leads to massive cAMP production resulting in edema. cAMP also inhibits the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase, thus reducing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) used for host defense in activated neutrophils and thereby facilitating bacterial growth. Methionine (Met) residues in CaM, important for interactions between CaM and its binding partners, can be oxidized by ROS. We investigated the impact of site-specific oxidation of Met in CaM on EF activation using thirteen CaM-mutants (CaM-mut) with Met to leucine (Leu) substitutions. EF activation shows high resistance to oxidative modifications in CaM. An intact structure in the C-terminal region of oxidized CaM is sufficient for major EF activation despite altered secondary structure in the N-terminal region associated with Met oxidation. The secondary structures of CaM-mut were determined and described in previous studies from our group. Thus, excess cAMP production and the associated impairment of host defence may be afforded even under oxidative conditions in activated neutrophils. PMID:26184312

  4. Inhibition of apoplastic calmodulin impairs calcium homeostasis and cell wall modeling during Cedrus deodara pollen tube growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Lv, Xueqin; Li, Hong; Zhang, Min; Wang, Hong; Jin, Biao; Chen, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is one of the most well-studied Ca(2+) transducers in eukaryotic cells. It is known to regulate the activity of numerous proteins with diverse cellular functions; however, the functions of apoplastic CaM in plant cells are still poorly understood. By combining pharmacological analysis and microscopic techniques, we investigated the involvement of apoplastic CaM in pollen tube growth of Cedrus deodara (Roxb.) Loud. It was found that the tip-focused calcium gradient was rapidly disturbed as one of the early events after application of pharmacological agents, while the cytoplasmic organization was not significantly affected. The deposition and distribution of acidic pectins and esterified pectins were also dramatically changed, further perturbing the normal modeling of the cell wall. Several protein candidates from different functional categories may be involved in the responses to inhibition of apoplastic CaM. These results revealed that apoplastic CaM functions to maintain the tip-focused calcium gradient and to modulate the distribution/transformation of pectins during pollen tube growth.

  5. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV is a target gene of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Arrázola, Macarena S; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Colombres, Marcela; Toledo, Enrique M; Cruzat, Fernando; Pavez, Leonardo; Assar, Rodrigo; Aravena, Andrés; González, Mauricio; Montecino, Martín; Maass, Alejandro; Martínez, Servet; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2009-12-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) plays a key role in the regulation of calcium-dependent gene expression. The expression of CaMKIV and the activation of CREB regulated genes are involved in memory and neuronal survival. We report here that: (a) a bioinformatic analysis of 15,476 promoters of the human genome predicted several Wnt target genes, being CaMKIV a very interesting candidate; (b) CaMKIV promoter contains TCF/LEF transcription motifs similar to those present in Wnt target genes; (c) biochemical studies indicate that lithium and the canonical ligand Wnt-3a induce CaMKIV mRNA and protein expression levels in rat hippocampal neurons as well as CaMKIV promoter activity; (d) treatment of hippocampal neurons with Wnt-3a increases the binding of beta-catenin to the CaMKIV promoter: (e) In vivo activation of the Wnt signaling improve spatial memory impairment and restores the expression of CaMKIV in a mice double transgenic model for Alzheimer's disease which shows decreased levels of the kinase. We conclude that CaMKIV is regulated by the Wnt signaling pathway and that its expression could play a role in the neuroprotective function of the Wnt signaling against the Alzheimer's amyloid peptide.

  6. Structure of human Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 regulatory region in complex with calmodulin and Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Köster, Stefan; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Yildiz, Özkan

    2011-11-25

    The ubiquitous mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 has critical functions in regulating intracellular pH, salt concentration, and cellular volume. The regulatory C-terminal domain of NHE1 is linked to the ion-translocating N-terminal membrane domain and acts as a scaffold for signaling complexes. A major interaction partner is calmodulin (CaM), which binds to two neighboring regions of NHE1 in a strongly Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Upon CaM binding, NHE1 is activated by a shift in sensitivity toward alkaline intracellular pH. Here we report the 2.23 Å crystal structure of the NHE1 CaM binding region (NHE1(CaMBR)) in complex with CaM and Ca(2+). The C- and N-lobes of CaM bind the first and second helix of NHE1(CaMBR), respectively. Both the NHE1 helices and the Ca(2+)-bound CaM are elongated, as confirmed by small angle x-ray scattering analysis. Our x-ray structure sheds new light on the molecular mechanisms of the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of NHE1 and enables us to propose a model of how Ca(2+) regulates NHE1 activity.

  7. Structural Properties of Human CaMKII Ca2+ /Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II using X-ray Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumeng Melody; McSpadden, Ethan; Kuriyan, John; Department of Molecular; Cell Biology; Department of Chemistry Team

    To this day, human memory storage remains a mystery as we can at most describe the process vaguely on a cellular level. Switch-like properties of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II make it a leading candidate in understanding the molecular basis of human memory. The protein crystal was placed in the beam of a synchrotron source and the x-ray crystallography data was collected as reflections on a diffraction pattern that undergo Fourier transform to obtain the electron density. We observed two drastic differences from our solved structure at 2.75Å to a similar construct of the mouse CaMKII association domain. Firstly, our structure is a 6-fold symmetric dodecamer, whereas the previously published construct was a 7-fold symmetric tetradecamer. This suggests the association domain of human CaMKII is a dynamic structure that is triggered subunit exchange process. Secondly, in our structure the N-terminal tag is docked as an additional beta-strand on an uncapped beta-sheet present in each association domain protomer. This is concrete evidence of the involvement of the polypeptide docking site in the molecular mechanism underlining subunit exchange. In the future, we would like to selectively inhibit the exchange process while not disrupting the other functionalities of CaMKII.

  8. Interactions of calmodulin with metal ions and with its target proteins revealed by conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, T; Solomon, B; Ivnitski, D; Rishpon, J; Fleminger, G

    1998-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against bovine calmodulin (CaM), CAM1 and CAM4, enable one to monitor conformational changes that occur in the molecule. The interaction of CAM1 with CaM depends on the Ca2+ occupancy of its Ca(2+)-binding sites. CAM4, in contrast, interacts with CaM in a Ca(2+)-independent manner, interacting with both holoCaM and EGTA-treated CaM to a similar extent. Their interaction with various CaMs, CaM tryptic fragments and chemically modified CaM, as well as molecular graphics, led to identification of the CAM1 and CAM4 epitopes on the C- and N-terminal lobes of CAM respectively. The two mAbs were used as macromolecular probes to detect conformational changes occurring in the CaM molecule upon binding of metal ions and target proteins and peptides. MAb CAM1 successfully detected changes associated with Al3+ binding even in the presence of Ca2+, indicating that Al3+ and Ca2+ ions may bind to the protein simultaneously, leading to a new conformation of the molecule. MAbs CAM1 and CAM4 were used to follow the interactions of CaM with its target peptides and proteins. Complexes with melittin, mastoparan, calcineurin and phosphodiesterase showed different immunological properties on an immuno-enzyme electrode, indicating unique structural properties for each complex.

  9. Ocular dominance plasticity is stably maintained in the absence of alpha calcium calmodulin kinase II (alphaCaMKII) autophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Taha, Sharif A; Stryker, Michael P

    2005-11-08

    The molecule alpha calcium calmodulin kinase II (alphaCaMKII) is known to play a fundamental role in the induction of many forms of synaptic plasticity. A major theory of alphaCaMKII function proposes that autophosphorylation of the molecule mediates not only the induction but also the maintenance of synaptic plasticity. To test this hypothesis, we assessed ocular dominance plasticity in genetically engineered mice that carry a mutation preventing autophosphorylation of alphaCaMKII. These mutant mice are deficient in plasticity after monocular deprivation, but a sufficiently long period of monocular deprivation will induce ocular dominance plasticity. After induction of ocular dominance plasticity, the stability of the induced changes was assayed after binocular deprivation. Plasticity in homozygous mutant animals was as stable as that measured in WT littermates; also, response characteristics did not differ between the two groups. Our results suggest that alphaCaMKII autophosphorylation is required for the induction of ocular dominance plasticity but is not needed for its stable maintenance thereafter.

  10. Activated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIgamma is a critical regulator of myeloid leukemia cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Si, Jutong; Collins, Steven J

    2008-05-15

    Ca(2+) signaling is an important component of signal transduction pathways regulating B and T lymphocyte proliferation, but the functional role of Ca(2+) signaling in regulating myeloid leukemia cell proliferation has been largely unexplored. We observe that the activated (autophosphorylated) Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIgamma (CaMKIIgamma) is invariably present in myeloid leukemia cell lines as well as in the majority of primary acute myelogenous leukemia patient samples. In contrast, myeloid leukemia cells induced to terminally differentiate or undergo growth arrest display a marked reduction in this CaMKIIgamma autophosphorylation. In cells harboring the bcr-abl oncogene, the activation (autophosphorylation) of CaMKIIgamma is regulated by this oncogene. Moreover, inhibition of CaMKIIgamma activity with pharmacologic agents, dominant-negative constructs, or short hairpin RNAs inhibits the proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells, and this is associated with the inactivation/down-regulation of multiple critical signal transduction networks involving the mitogen-activated protein kinase, Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3beta)/beta-catenin pathways. In myeloid leukemia cells, CaMKIIgamma directly phosphorylates Stat3 and enhances its transcriptional activity. Thus, CaMKIIgamma is a critical regulator of multiple signaling networks regulating the proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells. Inhibiting CaMKIIgamma may represent a novel approach in the targeted therapy of myeloid leukemia.

  11. A temperature-responsive gene in sorghum encodes a glycine-rich protein that interacts with calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Supreet; Virdi, Amardeep Singh; Jaswal, Rajdeep; Chawla, Mrinalini; Kapoor, Sanjay; Mohapatra, Samar B; Manoj, Narayanan; Pareek, Ashwani; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Prabhjeet

    2017-03-18

    Imposition of different biotic and abiotic stress conditions results in an increase in intracellular levels of Ca(2+) which is sensed by various sensor proteins. Calmodulin (CaM) is one of the best studied transducers of Ca(2+) signals. CaM undergoes conformational changes upon binding to Ca(2+) and interacts with different types of proteins, thereby, regulating their activities. The present study reports the cloning and characterization of a sorghum cDNA encoding a protein (SbGRBP) that shows homology to glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins. The expression of SbGRBP in the sorghum seedlings is modulated by heat stress. The SbGRBP protein is localized in the nucleus as well as in cytosol, and shows interaction with CaM that requires the presence of Ca(2+). SbGRBP depicts binding to single and also double stranded DNA. Fluorescence spectroscopic analyses suggest that interaction of SbGRBP with nucleic acids may be modulated after binding with CaM. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide evidence for interaction of a stress regulated glycine-rich RNA-binding protein with CaM.

  12. Structure and calcium-binding studies of calmodulin-like domain of human non-muscle α-actinin-1

    PubMed Central

    Drmota Prebil, Sara; Slapšak, Urška; Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Puž, Vid; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Anrather, Dorothea; Hartl, Markus; Backman, Lars; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The activity of several cytosolic proteins critically depends on the concentration of calcium ions. One important intracellular calcium-sensing protein is α-actinin-1, the major actin crosslinking protein in focal adhesions and stress fibers. The actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 has been proposed to be negatively regulated by calcium, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, we determined the first high-resolution NMR structure of its functional calmodulin-like domain (CaMD) in calcium-bound and calcium-free form. These structures reveal that in the absence of calcium, CaMD displays a conformationally flexible ensemble that undergoes a structural change upon calcium binding, leading to limited rotation of the N- and C-terminal lobes around the connecting linker and consequent stabilization of the calcium-loaded structure. Mutagenesis experiments, coupled with mass-spectrometry and isothermal calorimetry data designed to validate the calcium binding stoichiometry and binding site, showed that human non-muscle α-actinin-1 binds a single calcium ion within the N-terminal lobe. Finally, based on our structural data and analogy with other α-actinins, we provide a structural model of regulation of the actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 where calcium induced structural stabilisation causes fastening of the juxtaposed actin binding domain, leading to impaired capacity to crosslink actin. PMID:27272015

  13. Mechanistic aspects of the low-molecular-weight phosphatase activity of the calmodulin-activated phosphatase, calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Martin, B L; Graves, D J

    1986-11-05

    Product and substrate analogs have been employed as inhibitors of the low-molecular-weight phosphatase activity of calcineurin, a calmodulin-activated protein phosphatase. Product inhibition kinetics demonstrate that both products, para-nitrophenol and inorganic phosphate, inhibit para-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis in a competitive manner. Inorganic phosphate is a linear competitive inhibitor, whereas the inhibition by para-nitrophenol is more complex. An analog of para-nitrophenol, pentafluorophenol, was found to be a linear competitive inhibitor. These patterns indicate a rapid equilibrium random kinetic mechanism for calcineurin. This mechanism suggests that calcineurin does not generate a phosphoryl enzyme during its catalytic reaction. Application of sulfate analogs indicates that binding of substrate occurs via the phosphoryl moiety. It is suggested that binding is a function of the affinity of ligand for the metal ion involved in calcineurin action. The dependence of the kinetic parameters of calcineurin upon pH was examined to provide information concerning the role of protonation in the activity and specificity of calcineurin. Log (VM) versus pH data for two low-molecular-weight substrates, para-nitrophenyl phosphate and tyrosine-O-phosphate, reveal a pKa value for the enzyme-substrate complex. Analysis of log (VM/KM) data yields a pKa value for the free enzyme of 8.0. Protonation of the phenolic leaving group during hydrolysis is not the rate-limiting step in calcineurin catalysis.

  14. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase Kinase α Is Expressed by Monocytic Cells and Regulates the Activation Profile

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Christopher B.; Deszo, Eric L.; Hartman, Matthew E.; York, Jason M.; Kelley, Keith W.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are capable of assuming numerous phenotypes in order to adapt to endogenous and exogenous challenges but many of the factors that regulate this process are still unknown. We report that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase α (CaMKKα) is expressed in human monocytic cells and demonstrate that its inhibition blocks type-II monocytic cell activation and promotes classical activation. Affinity chromatography with paramagnetic beads isolated an approximately 50 kDa protein from nuclear lysates of U937 human monocytic cells activated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). This protein was identified as CaMKKα by mass spectrometry and Western analysis. The function of CaMKKα in monocyte activation was examined using the CaMKKα inhibitors (STO-609 and forskolin) and siRNA knockdown. Inhibition of CaMKKα, enhanced PMA-dependent CD86 expression and reduced CD11b expression. In addition, inhibition was associated with decreased translocation of CaMKKα to the nucleus. Finally, to further examine monocyte activation profiles, TNFα and IL-10 secretion were studied. CaMKKα inhibition attenuated PMA-dependent IL-10 production and enhanced TNFα production indicating a shift from type-II to classical monocyte activation. Taken together, these findings indicate an important new role for CaMKKα in the differentiation of monocytic cells. PMID:18270593

  15. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Full-Length cDNA of Calmodulin Gene from Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Xia; Yu, Wen-Chao; Cai, Zhong-Qiang; He, Cheng; Wei, Na; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Yue, Xi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The shell of the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) mainly comprises aragonite whereas that of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is mainly calcite, thereby suggesting the different mechanisms of shell formation between above two mollusks. Calmodulin (CaM) is an important gene for regulating the uptake, transport, and secretion of calcium during the process of shell formation in pearl oyster. It is interesting to characterize the CaM in oysters, which could facilitate the understanding of the different shell formation mechanisms among mollusks. We cloned the full-length cDNA of Pacific oyster CaM (cgCaM) and found that the cgCaM ORF encoded a peptide of 113 amino acids containing three EF-hand calcium-binding domains, its expression level was highest in the mantle, hinting that the cgCaM gene is probably involved in shell formation of Pacific oyster, and the common ancestor of Gastropoda and Bivalvia may possess at least three CaM genes. We also found that the numbers of some EF hand family members in highly calcified species were higher than those in lowly calcified species and the numbers of these motifs in oyster genome were the highest among the mollusk species with whole genome sequence, further hinting the correlation between CaM and biomineralization.

  16. Calcium-calmodulin does not alter the anion permeability of the mouse TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yawei; Kuan, Ai-Seon

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TMEM16A forms a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel that is permeable to many anions, including SCN−, I−, Br−, Cl−, and HCO3−, and has been implicated in various physiological functions. Indeed, controlling anion permeation through the TMEM16A channel pore may be critical in regulating the pH of exocrine fluids such as the pancreatic juice. The anion permeability of the TMEM16A channel pore has recently been reported to be modulated by Ca2+-calmodulin (CaCaM), such that the pore of the CaCaM-bound channel shows a reduced ability to discriminate between anions as measured by a shift of the reversal potential under bi-ionic conditions. Here, using a mouse TMEM16A clone that contains the two previously identified putative CaM-binding motifs, we were unable to demonstrate such CaCaM-dependent changes in the bi-ionic potential. We confirmed the activity of CaCaM used in our study by showing CaCaM modulation of the olfactory cyclic nucleotide–gated channel. We suspect that the different bi-ionic potentials that were obtained previously from whole-cell recordings in low and high intracellular [Ca2+] may result from different degrees of bi-ionic potential shift secondary to a series resistance problem, an ion accumulation effect, or both. PMID:24981232

  17. Purification method for recombinant proteins based on a fusion between the target protein and the C-terminus of calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Deo, Sapna K.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) was used as an affinity tail to facilitate the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a model target protein. The protein GFP was fused to the C-terminus of CaM, and a factor Xa cleavage site was introduced between the two proteins. A CaM-GFP fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and purified on a phenothiazine-derivatized silica column. CaM binds to the phenothiazine on the column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion and it was, therefore, used as an affinity tail for the purification of GFP. The fusion protein bound to the affinity column was then subjected to a proteolytic digestion with factor Xa. Pure GFP was eluted with a Ca(2+)-containing buffer, while CaM was eluted later with a buffer containing the Ca(2+)-chelating agent EGTA. The purity of the isolated GFP was verified by SDS-PAGE, and the fluorescence properties of the purified GFP were characterized.

  18. Graded Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent coupling of voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Rose E; Moreno, Claudia M; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Navedo, Manuel F; Santana, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    In the heart, reliable activation of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the plateau of the ventricular action potential requires synchronous opening of multiple CaV1.2 channels. Yet the mechanisms that coordinate this simultaneous opening during every heartbeat are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CaV1.2 channels form clusters that undergo dynamic, reciprocal, allosteric interactions. This ‘functional coupling’ facilitates Ca2+ influx by increasing activation of adjoined channels and occurs through C-terminal-to-C-terminal interactions. These interactions are initiated by binding of incoming Ca2+ to calmodulin (CaM) and proceed through Ca2+/CaM binding to the CaV1.2 pre-IQ domain. Coupling fades as [Ca2+]i decreases, but persists longer than the current that evoked it, providing evidence for ‘molecular memory’. Our findings suggest a model for CaV1.2 channel gating and Ca2+-influx amplification that unifies diverse observations about Ca2+ signaling in the heart, and challenges the long-held view that voltage-gated channels open and close independently. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05608.001 PMID:25714924

  19. Calmodulin Gene Family in Potato: Developmental and Touch-Induced Expression of the mRNA Encoding a Novel Isoform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Liu, Z. H.; An, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM1 to 8) were isolated and characterized. Sequence comparisons of different genes revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence of PCM1 had several unique substitutions, especially in the fourth Ca(2+)-binding area. The expression patterns of different genes were studied by northern analysis using the 3'-untranslated regions as probes. The expression of PCM1, 5, and 8 was highest in the stolon tip and it decreased during tuber development. The expression of PCM6 did not vary much in the tissues tested, except in the leaves, where the expression was lower; whereas, the expression of PCM4 was very low in all the tissues. The expression of PCM2 and PCM3 was not detected in any of the tissues tested. Among these genes, only PCM1 showed increased expression following touch stimulation. To study the regulation of PCM1, transgenic potato plants carrying the PCM1 promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were produced. GUS expression was found to be developmentally regulated and touch-responsive, indicating a positive correlation between the expression of PCM1 and GUS mRNAs. These results suggest that the 5'-flanking region of PCM1 controls developmental and touch-induced expression. X-Gluc staining patterns revealed that GUS localization is high in meristematic tissues such as the stem apex, stolon tip, and vascular regions.

  20. Development of a novel photoreactive calmodulin derivative: Cross-linking of purified adenylate cyclase from bovine brain

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.; Lawton, R.G.; Gnegy, M.E. )

    1989-07-11

    A novel photoreactive calmodulin (CaM) derivative was developed and used to label the purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex. {sup 125}I-CaM was conjugated with the heterobifunctional cross-linking agent p-nitrophenyl 3-diazopyruvate (DAPpNP). Spectral data indicated that diazopyruvoyl (DAP) groups were incorporated into the CaM molecule. Iodo-CaM-DAPs behaved like native CaM with respect to (1) Ca{sup 2+}-dependent enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and (2) Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP photochemically cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a manner that was both Ca{sup 2+} dependent and CaM specific. Photolysis of forskolin-agarose-purified adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex with {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP produced a single cross-linked product which migrates on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 140,000.

  1. Involvement of calcium and calmodulin in oxidative and temperature stress of Amaranthus lividus L. during early germination.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Soumen

    2009-07-01

    Both heat and chilling caused reduction in membrane protein thiol level and increased accumulation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in 72 hr old germinating tissues (indicators of oxidative stress) and reduced germination and early growth performances. Calcium chelator EGTA [Ethylene glycol-bis (2-aminoethylether)-N, N,N',N, tetra acetic acid] calcium channel blocker LaCI3 (Lanthanum chloride) and calmodulin inhibitor TFP (trifluroperazine) aggravated these effects of heat and chilling and added calcium reversed them. Imposition of heat and chilling stress during early germination also causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) like 02(-) and H2O2. Calcium treatment significantly reduced the accumulation of both the toxic ROS, while EGTA, LaCl3 and TFP treatment enhanced the accumulation. Activities of antioxidative enzymes catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APOX) and glutathione reductase (GR) and total thiol content decreased significantly under both heat and chilling stress in germinating Amaranthus seedlings. Seedlings raised with Ca2+ treatment under heat and chilling stress exhibit higher activities of CAT7 GR and APOX and total thiol level than the untreated plants. EGTA, LaCl3 and TFP treatment, on the other hand significantly reduce the activities of all anti-oxidative enzymes and total thiol level. The work clearly supports the view that Ca2+-signalling pathway plays significant role in limiting heat and chilling induced oxidative stress by upregulating antioxidative defense during recovery phase of post-germination event in Amaranthus lividus.

  2. Urea-induced denaturation of human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: a combined spectroscopic and MD simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Haque, Md Anzarul; Bisetty, Krishna; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2017-02-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) is a multifunctional enzyme which belongs to the Ser/Thr kinase family. CaMKIV plays important role in varieties of biological processes such as gene expression regulation, memory consolidation, bone growth, T-cell maturation, sperm motility, regulation of microtubule dynamics, cell-cycle progression, and apoptosis. To measure stability parameters, urea-induced denaturation of CaMKIV was carried out at pH 7.4 and 25°C, using three different probes, namely far-UV CD, near-UV absorption, and tryptophan fluorescence. A coincidence of normalized denaturation curves of these optical properties suggests that urea-induced denaturation is a two-state process. Analysis of these denaturation curves gave values of 4.20 ± 0.12 kcal mol(-1), 2.95 ± 0.15 M, and 1.42 ± 0.06 kcal mol(-1) M(-1) for [Formula: see text] (Gibbs free energy change (ΔGD) in the absence of urea), Cm (molar urea concentration ([urea]) at the midpoint of the denaturation curve), and m (=∂ΔGD/∂[urea]), respectively. All these experimental observations have been fully supported by 30 ns molecular dynamics simulation studies.

  3. Nephrocystin-5, a ciliary IQ domain protein, is mutated in Senior-Loken syndrome and interacts with RPGR and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Otto, Edgar A; Loeys, Bart; Khanna, Hemant; Hellemans, Jan; Sudbrak, Ralf; Fan, Shuling; Muerb, Ulla; O'Toole, John F; Helou, Juliana; Attanasio, Massimo; Utsch, Boris; Sayer, John A; Lillo, Concepcion; Jimeno, David; Coucke, Paul; De Paepe, Anne; Reinhardt, Richard; Klages, Sven; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Kawakami, Isao; Kusakabe, Takehiro; Omran, Heymut; Imm, Anita; Tippens, Melissa; Raymond, Pamela A; Hill, Jo; Beales, Phil; He, Shirley; Kispert, Andreas; Margolis, Benjamin; Williams, David S; Swaroop, Anand; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2005-03-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is the most frequent genetic cause of chronic renal failure in children. Identification of four genes mutated in NPHP subtypes 1-4 (refs. 4-9) has linked the pathogenesis of NPHP to ciliary functions. Ten percent of affected individuals have retinitis pigmentosa, constituting the renal-retinal Senior-Loken syndrome (SLSN). Here we identify, by positional cloning, mutations in an evolutionarily conserved gene, IQCB1 (also called NPHP5), as the most frequent cause of SLSN. IQCB1 encodes an IQ-domain protein, nephrocystin-5. All individuals with IQCB1 mutations have retinitis pigmentosa. Hence, we examined the interaction of nephrocystin-5 with RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator), which is expressed in photoreceptor cilia and associated with 10-20% of retinitis pigmentosa. We show that nephrocystin-5, RPGR and calmodulin can be coimmunoprecipitated from retinal extracts, and that these proteins localize to connecting cilia of photoreceptors and to primary cilia of renal epithelial cells. Our studies emphasize the central role of ciliary dysfunction in the pathogenesis of SLSN.

  4. Purification of the Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase from Radish Seedlings by Calmodulin-Agarose Affinity Chromatography1

    PubMed Central

    Bonza, Cristina; Carnelli, Antonella; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Rasi-Caldogno, Franca

    1998-01-01

    The Ca2+-ATPase of the plasma membrane (PM) of germinating radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seeds was purified by calmodulin (CaM)-affinity chromatography using a batch procedure. PM purified by aqueous two-phase partitioning was solubilized with n-dodecyl β-d-maltoside and applied to a CaM-agarose matrix. After various washings with decreasing Ca2+ concentrations, the Ca2+-ATPase was eluted with 5 mm ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA). The EDTA-eluted fraction contained about 25% of the loaded Ca2+-ATPase activity, with a specific activity 70-fold higher than that of the starting PM fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction was highly enriched in a 133-kD polypeptide, which was identified as the PM Ca2+-ATPase by 125I-CaM overlay and fluorescein-isothiocyanate labeling. The PM Ca2+-ATPase cross-reacted with an antiserum against a putative Ca2+-ATPase of the Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast envelope. PMID:9490776

  5. Engineering of a novel Ca²⁺-regulated kinesin molecular motor using a calmodulin dimer linker.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Hideki; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2012-06-29

    The kinesin-microtubule system holds great promise as a molecular shuttle device within biochips. However, one current barrier is that such shuttles do not have "on-off" control of their movement. Here we report the development of a novel molecular motor powered by an accelerator and brake system, using a kinesin monomer and a calmodulin (CaM) dimer. The kinesin monomer, K355, was fused with a CaM target peptide (M13 peptide) at the C-terminal part of the neck region (K355-M13). We also prepared CaM dimers using CaM mutants (Q3C), (R86C), or (A147C) and crosslinkers that react with cysteine residues. Following induction of K355-M13 dimerization with CaM dimers, we measured K355-M13 motility and found that it can be reversibly regulated in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. We also found that velocities of K355-M13 varied depending on the type and crosslink position of the CaM dimer used; crosslink length also had a moderate effect on motility. These results suggest Ca(2+)-dependent dimerization of K355-M13 could be used as a novel molecular shuttle, equipped with an accelerator and brake system, for biochip applications.

  6. Deletion of the calmodulin-binding domain of Grb7 impairs cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and migration.

    PubMed

    García-Palmero, Irene; Villalobo, Antonio

    2013-06-28

    The adaptor Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein that participates in signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and the control of angiogenesis, and plays a significant role in tumor growth, its metastatic spread and tumor-associated neo-vasculature formation. In this report we show that deletion of the CaM-binding site of Grb7, located in the proximal region of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, impairs cell migration, cell attachment to the extracellular matrix, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton occurring during this process. Moreover, we show that the cell-permeable CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) and N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-13) both retard the migration of cells expressing wild type Grb7, but not the migration of cells expressing the mutant protein lacking the CaM-binding site (Grb7Δ), underscoring the proactive role of CaM binding to Grb7 during this process.

  7. Neuronal calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II mediates nicotine reward in the conditioned place preference test in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Muldoon, Pretal P; Walters, Carrie; Damaj, Mohamad Imad

    2016-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated the involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms, in particular the abundant calcium-activated kinase, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), in behaviors associated with nicotine dependence in mice. Behavioral and biochemical studies have shown that CaMKII is involved in acute and chronic nicotine behaviors and nicotine withdrawal; however, evidence of a role for CaMKII in nicotine reward is lacking. Thus, the goal of the current study was to examine the role of CaMKII in nicotine reward. Using pharmacological and genetic tools, we tested nicotine conditioned place preference (CPP) in C57Bl/6 mice after administration of CaMKII antagonists and in α-CaMKII wild-type (+/+) and heterozygote (±) mice. CaMKII antagonists blocked expression of nicotine CPP, and the preference score was significantly reduced in α-CaMKII ± mice compared with their +/+ counterparts. Further, we assessed CaMKII activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus after nicotine CPP and found significant increases in CaMKII activity in the mouse VTA and NAc that were blocked by CaMKII antagonists. The findings from this study show that CaMKII mediates nicotine reward and suggest that increases in CaMKII activity in the VTA and NAc are relevant to nicotine reward behaviors.

  8. Structural analysis of the complex between calmodulin and full-length myelin basic protein, an intrinsically disordered molecule.

    PubMed

    Majava, Viivi; Wang, Chaozhan; Myllykoski, Matti; Kangas, Salla M; Kang, Sung Ung; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Baumgärtel, Peter; Heape, Anthony M; Lubec, Gert; Kursula, Petri

    2010-06-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is present between the cytoplasmic leaflets of the compact myelin membrane in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, and characterized to be intrinsically disordered in solution. One of the best-characterized protein ligands for MBP is calmodulin (CaM), a highly acidic calcium sensor. We pulled down MBP from human brain white matter as the major calcium-dependent CaM-binding protein. We then used full-length brain MBP, and a peptide from rodent MBP, to structurally characterize the MBP-CaM complex in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering, NMR spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy, and size exclusion chromatography. We determined 3D structures for the full-length protein-protein complex at different stoichiometries and detect ligand-induced folding of MBP. We also obtained thermodynamic data for the two CaM-binding sites of MBP, indicating that CaM does not collapse upon binding to MBP, and show that CaM and MBP colocalize in myelin sheaths. In addition, we analyzed the post-translational modifications of rat brain MBP, identifying a novel MBP modification, glucosylation. Our results provide a detailed picture of the MBP-CaM interaction, including a 3D model of the complex between full-length proteins.

  9. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha in optic axons moves with slow axonal transport and undergoes posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Lund, L M; McQuarrie, I G

    2001-12-21

    In neurons, the mRNA for calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CKIIalpha) is known to be targeted to dendrites-where the enzyme is synthesized and supports postsynaptic functions. We are interested in knowing how neuronal proteins enter axons from the nerve cell body, and the mechanism for protein transport to terminals. Because CKIIalpha immunofluorescence can be demonstrated in over 80% of retinal ganglion cells, we asked whether this regulatory protein is being transported into optic axons. Using Sprague-Dawley rats, [(35)S] methionine was injected into the vitreous humor of the eye. Four days later, the optic nerves, tracts, lateral geniculate ganglia, and superior colliculi were removed and processed for 2D-PAGE and Western blotting. Radiolabeled CKIIalpha appears to move with slow component b (SCb) of axonal transport, as is the case in rodent sciatic motor neurons. In addition, the radiolabeled CKIIalpha isoform that enters the optic nerve is found to be 4 kDa heavier (in SDS-PAGE molecular mass) than the isoform in the optic tract, superior colliculus, and lateral geniculate nucleus. This reduction is likely the result of dephosphorylation, which is a mechanism used to regulate the enzyme's activity.

  10. Structure and calcium-binding studies of calmodulin-like domain of human non-muscle α-actinin-1.

    PubMed

    Drmota Prebil, Sara; Slapšak, Urška; Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Puž, Vid; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Anrather, Dorothea; Hartl, Markus; Backman, Lars; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2016-06-07

    The activity of several cytosolic proteins critically depends on the concentration of calcium ions. One important intracellular calcium-sensing protein is α-actinin-1, the major actin crosslinking protein in focal adhesions and stress fibers. The actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 has been proposed to be negatively regulated by calcium, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, we determined the first high-resolution NMR structure of its functional calmodulin-like domain (CaMD) in calcium-bound and calcium-free form. These structures reveal that in the absence of calcium, CaMD displays a conformationally flexible ensemble that undergoes a structural change upon calcium binding, leading to limited rotation of the N- and C-terminal lobes around the connecting linker and consequent stabilization of the calcium-loaded structure. Mutagenesis experiments, coupled with mass-spectrometry and isothermal calorimetry data designed to validate the calcium binding stoichiometry and binding site, showed that human non-muscle α-actinin-1 binds a single calcium ion within the N-terminal lobe. Finally, based on our structural data and analogy with other α-actinins, we provide a structural model of regulation of the actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 where calcium induced structural stabilisation causes fastening of the juxtaposed actin binding domain, leading to impaired capacity to crosslink actin.

  11. Fimbrin is a homologue of the cytoplasmic phosphoprotein plastin and has domains homologous with calmodulin and actin gelation proteins.

    PubMed

    de Arruda, M V; Watson, S; Lin, C S; Leavitt, J; Matsudaira, P

    1990-09-01

    Fimbrin is an actin-bundling protein found in intestinal microvilli, hair cell stereocilia, and fibroblast filopodia. The complete protein sequence (630 residues) of chicken intestine fimbrin has been determined from two full-length cDNA clones. The sequence encodes a small amino-terminal domain (115 residues) that is homologous with two calcium-binding sites of calmodulin and a large carboxy-terminal domain (500 residues) consisting of a fourfold-repeated 125-residue sequence. This repeat is homologous with the actin-binding domain of alpha-actinin and the amino-terminal domains of dystrophin, actin-gelation protein, and beta-spectrin. The presence of this duplicated domain in fimbrin links actin bundling proteins and gelation proteins into a common family of actin cross-linking proteins. Fimbrin is also homologous in sequence with human L-plastin and T-plastin. L-plastin is found in only normal or transformed leukocytes where it becomes phosphorylated in response to IL 1 or phorbol myristate acetate. T-plastin is found in cells of solid tissues where it does not become phosphorylated. Neoplastic cells derived from solid tissues express both isoforms. The differences in expression, sequence, and phosphorylation suggest possible functional differences between fimbrin isoforms.

  12. Mutation of the Arabidopsis calmodulin-like protein CML37 deregulates the jasmonate pathway and enhances susceptibility to herbivory.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Sandra S; Vadassery, Jyothilakshmi; Heyer, Monika; Reichelt, Michael; Bender, Kyle W; Snedden, Wayne A; Boland, Wilhelm; Mithöfer, Axel

    2014-12-01

    Throughout their life, plants are challenged by various abiotic and biotic stress factors. Among those are attacks from herbivorous insects. The molecular mechanisms underlying the detection of herbivores and the subsequent signal transduction are not well understood. As a second messenger, fluxes in intracellular Ca(2+) levels play a key role in mediating stress response pathways. Ca(2+) signals are decoded by Ca(2+) sensor proteins such as calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs). Here, we demonstrate that recombinant CML37 behaves like a Ca(2+) sensor in vitro and, in Arabidopsis, AtCML37 is induced by mechanical wounding as well as by infestation with larvae of the generalist lepidopteran herbivore Spodoptera littoralis. Loss of function of CML37 led to a better feeding performance of larvae suggesting that CML37 is a positive defense regulator. No herbivory-induced changes in secondary metabolites such as glucosinolates or flavonoids were detected in cml37 plants, although a significant reduction in the accumulation of jasmonates was observed, due to reduced expression of JAR1 mRNA and cellular enzyme activity. Consequently, the expression of jasmonate-responsive genes was reduced as well. Summarizing, our results suggest that the Ca(2+) sensor protein, CML37, functions as a positive regulator in Ca(2+) signaling during herbivory, connecting Ca(2+) and jasmonate signaling.

  13. Backbone dynamics of a symmetric calmodulin dimer in complex with the calmodulin-binding domain of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor SEF2-1/E2-2: a highly dynamic complex.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Göran; Schleucher, Jürgen; Onions, Jacqueline; Hermann, Stefan; Grundström, Thomas; Wijmenga, Sybren S

    2005-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) interacts specifically as a dimer with some dimeric basic-Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors via a novel high affinity binding mode. Here we report a study of the backbone dynamics by (15)N-spin relaxation on the CaM dimer in complex with a dimeric peptide that mimics the CaM binding region of the bHLH transcription factor SEF2-1. The relaxation data were measured at multiple magnetic fields, and analyzed in a model-free manner using in-house written software designed to detect nanosecond internal motion. Besides picosecond motions, all residues also experience internal motion with an effective correlation time of approximately 2.5 ns with squared order parameter (S(2)) of approximately 0.75. Hydrodynamic calculations suggest that this can be attributed to motions of the N- and C-terminal domains of the CaM dimer in the complex. Moreover, residues with significant exchange broadening are found. They are clustered in the CaM:SEF2-1mp binding interface, the CaM:CaM dimer interface, and in the flexible helix connecting the CaM N- and C-terminal domains, and have similar exchange times (approximately 50 micros), suggesting a cooperative mechanism probably caused by protein:protein interactions. The dynamic features presented here support the conclusion that the conformationally heterogeneous bHLH mimicking peptide trapped inside the CaM dimer exchanges between different binding sites on both nanosecond and microsecond timescales. Nature has thus found a way to specifically recognize a relatively ill-fitting target. This novel mode of target-specific binding, which neither belongs to lock-and-key nor induced-fit binding, is characterized by dimerization and continuous exchange between multiple flexible binding alternatives.

  14. Primary structure and cellular localization of chicken brain myosin-V (p190), an unconventional myosin with calmodulin light chains

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Recent biochemical studies of p190, a calmodulin (CM)-binding protein purified from vertebrate brain, have demonstrated that this protein, purified as a complex with bound CM, shares a number of properties with myosins (Espindola, F. S., E. M. Espreafico, M. V. Coelho, A. R. Martins, F. R. C. Costa, M. S. Mooseker, and R. E. Larson. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 118:359-368). To determine whether or not p190 was a member of the myosin family of proteins, a set of overlapping cDNAs encoding the full-length protein sequence of chicken brain p190 was isolated and sequenced. Verification that the deduced primary structure was that of p190 was demonstrated through microsequence analysis of a cyanogen bromide peptide generated from chick brain p190. The deduced primary structure of chicken brain p190 revealed that this 1,830-amino acid (aa) 212,509-D) protein is a member of a novel structural class of unconventional myosins that includes the gene products encoded by the dilute locus of mouse and the MYO2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have named the p190-CM complex "myosin-V" based on the results of a detailed sequence comparison of the head domains of 29 myosin heavy chains (hc), which has revealed that this myosin, based on head structure, is the fifth of six distinct structural classes of myosin to be described thus far. Like the presumed products of the mouse dilute and yeast MYO2 genes, the head domain of chicken myosin-V hc (aa 1-764) is linked to a "neck" domain (aa 765-909) consisting of six tandem repeats of an approximately 23-aa "IQ-motif." All known myosins contain at least one such motif at their head-tail junctions; these IQ-motifs may function as calmodulin or light chain binding sites. The tail domain of chicken myosin-V consists of an initial 511 aa predicted to form several segments of coiled-coil alpha helix followed by a terminal 410-aa globular domain (aa, 1,421-1,830). Interestingly, a portion of the tail domain (aa, 1,094-1,830) shares 58% amino acid

  15. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  16. Mycorrhizal-induced calmodulin mediated changes in antioxidant enzymes and growth response of drought-stressed trifoliate orange

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong-Ming; Srivastava, A. K.; Zou, Ying-Ning; Ni, Qiu-Dan; Han, Yu; Wu, Qiang-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Trifoliate orange [Poncirus trifoliata (L) Raf.] is considered highly arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) dependent for growth responses through a series of signal transductions in form of various physiological responses. The proposed study was carried out to evaluate the effect of an AM fungus (Funneliformis mosseae) on growth, antioxidant enzyme (catalase, CAT; superoxide dismutase, SOD) activities, leaf relative water content (RWC), calmodulin (CaM), superoxide anion (O2•−), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations in leaves of the plants exposed to both well-watered (WW) and drought stress (DS) conditions. A 58-day of DS significantly decreased mycorrhizal colonization by 60% than WW. Compared to non-AM seedlings, AM seedlings displayed significantly higher shoot morphological properties (plant height, stem diameter, and leaf number), biomass production (shoot and root fresh weight) and leaf RWC, regardless of soil water status. AM inoculation significantly increased CaM and soluble protein concentrations and CAT activity, whereas significantly decreased O2•− and H2O2 concentration under both WW and DS conditions. The AM seedlings also exhibited significantly higher Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD activities than the non-AM seedlings under DS but not under WW, which are triggered by higher CaM levels in AM plants on the basis of correlation studies. Further, the negative correlation of Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD activities with O2•− and H2O2 concentration showed the DS-induced ROS scavenging ability of CaM mediated SODs under mycorrhization. Our results demonstrated that AM-inoculation elevated the synthesis of CaM in leaves and up-regulated activities of the antioxidant enzymes, thereby, repairing the possible oxidative damage to plants by lowering the ROS accumulation under DS condition. PMID:25538696

  17. Impact of Genetic Variation on Human CaMKK2 Regulation by Ca2+-Calmodulin and Multisite Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Matthew T.; Oakhill, Jonathan S.; Ling, Naomi X. Y.; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Hoque, Ashfaqul; Dite, Toby A.; Means, Anthony R.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Scott, John W.

    2017-01-01

    The Ca2+-calmodulin dependent protein kinase kinase-2 (CaMKK2) is a key regulator of neuronal function and whole-body energy metabolism. Elevated CaMKK2 activity is strongly associated with prostate and hepatic cancers, whereas reduced CaMKK2 activity has been linked to schizophrenia and bipolar disease in humans. Here we report the functional effects of nine rare-variant point mutations that were detected in large-scale human genetic studies and cancer tissues, all of which occur close to two regulatory phosphorylation sites and the catalytic site on human CaMKK2. Four mutations (G87R, R139W, R142W and E268K) cause a marked decrease in Ca2+-independent autonomous activity, however S137L and P138S mutants displayed increased autonomous and Ca2+-CaM stimulated activities. Furthermore, the G87R mutant is defective in Thr85-autophosphorylation dependent autonomous activity, whereas the A329T mutation rendered CaMKK2 virtually insensitive to Ca2+-CaM stimulation. The G87R and R139W mutants behave as dominant-negative inhibitors of CaMKK2 signaling in cells as they block phosphorylation of the downstream substrate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in response to ionomycin. Our study provides insight into functionally disruptive, rare-variant mutations in human CaMKK2, which have the potential to influence risk and burden of disease associated with aberrant CaMKK2 activity in human populations carrying these variants. PMID:28230171

  18. Crystal Structure of the Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase in Complex with the Inhibitor STO-609*

    PubMed Central

    Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Yoshikawa, Seiko; Takagi, Tetsuo; Ohsawa, Noboru; Tomabechi, Yuri; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Suzuki, Atsushi; Lee, Suni; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Iwabu, Masato; Kadowaki, Takashi; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) kinase (CaMKK) is a member of the CaMK cascade that mediates the response to intracellular Ca2+ elevation. CaMKK phosphorylates and activates CaMKI and CaMKIV, which directly activate transcription factors. In this study, we determined the 2.4 Å crystal structure of the catalytic kinase domain of the human CaMKKβ isoform complexed with its selective inhibitor, STO-609. The structure revealed that CaMKKβ lacks the αD helix and that the equivalent region displays a hydrophobic molecular surface, which may reflect its unique substrate recognition and autoinhibition. Although CaMKKβ lacks the activation loop phosphorylation site, the activation loop is folded in an active-state conformation, which is stabilized by a number of interactions between amino acid residues conserved among the CaMKK isoforms. An in vitro analysis of the kinase activity confirmed the intrinsic activity of the CaMKKβ kinase domain. Structure and sequence analyses of the STO-609-binding site revealed amino acid replacements that may affect the inhibitor binding. Indeed, mutagenesis demonstrated that the CaMKKβ residue Pro274, which replaces the conserved acidic residue of other protein kinases, is an important determinant for the selective inhibition by STO-609. Therefore, the present structure provides a molecular basis for clarifying the known biochemical properties of CaMKKβ and for designing novel inhibitors targeting CaMKKβ and the related protein kinases. PMID:21504895

  19. Light-modulated abundance of an mRNA encoding a calmodulin-regulated, chromatin-associated NTPase in pea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, H. L.; Tong, C. G.; Thomas, C.; Roux, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    A CDNA encoding a 47 kDa nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) that is associated with the chromatin of pea nuclei has been cloned and sequenced. The translated sequence of the cDNA includes several domains predicted by known biochemical properties of the enzyme, including five motifs characteristic of the ATP-binding domain of many proteins, several potential casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, a helix-turn-helix region characteristic of DNA-binding proteins, and a potential calmodulin-binding domain. The deduced primary structure also includes an N-terminal sequence that is a predicted signal peptide and an internal sequence that could serve as a bipartite-type nuclear localization signal. Both in situ immunocytochemistry of pea plumules and immunoblots of purified cell fractions indicate that most of the immunodetectable NTPase is within the nucleus, a compartment proteins typically reach through nuclear pores rather than through the endoplasmic reticulum pathway. The translated sequence has some similarity to that of human lamin C, but not high enough to account for the earlier observation that IgG against human lamin C binds to the NTPase in immunoblots. Northern blot analysis shows that the NTPase MRNA is strongly expressed in etiolated plumules, but only poorly or not at all in the leaf and stem tissues of light-grown plants. Accumulation of NTPase mRNA in etiolated seedlings is stimulated by brief treatments with both red and far-red light, as is characteristic of very low-fluence phytochrome responses. Southern blotting with pea genomic DNA indicates the NTPase is likely to be encoded by a single gene.

  20. RyRCa2+ Leak Limits Cardiac Ca2+ Window Current Overcoming the Tonic Effect of Calmodulin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Velasco, María; Neco, Patricia; Mercado-Morales, Martha; Delgado, Carmen; Napolitano, Carlo; Priori, Silvia G.; Richard, Sylvain; María Gómez, Ana; Benitah, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ mediates the functional coupling between L-type Ca2+ channel (LTCC) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR), participating in key pathophysiological processes. This crosstalk manifests as the orthograde Ca2+-induced Ca2+-release (CICR) mechanism triggered by Ca2+ influx, but also as the retrograde Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) of LTCC, which depends on both Ca2+ permeating through the LTCC itself and on SR Ca2+ release through the RyR. This latter effect has been suggested to rely on local rather than global Ca2+ signaling, which might parallel the nanodomain control of CDI carried out through calmodulin (CaM). Analyzing the CICR in catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) mice as a model of RyR-generated Ca2+ leak, we evidence here that increased occurrence of the discrete local SR Ca2+ releases through the RyRs (Ca2+ sparks) causea depolarizing shift in activation and a hyperpolarizing shift inisochronic inactivation of cardiac LTCC current resulting in the reduction of window current. Both increasing fast [Ca2+]i buffer capacity or depleting SR Ca2+ store blunted these changes, which could be reproduced in WT cells by RyRCa2+ leak induced with Ryanodol and CaM inhibition.Our results unveiled a new paradigm for CaM-dependent effect on LTCC gating and further the nanodomain Ca2+ control of LTCC, emphasizing the importance of spatio-temporal relationships between Ca2+ signals and CaM function. PMID:21673970

  1. Oxidatively modified calmodulin binds to the plasma membrane Ca-ATPase in a nonproductive and conformationally disordered complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Yao, Y; Squier, T C

    2001-01-01

    Oxidation of either Met(145) or Met(146) in wheat germ calmodulin (CaM) to methionine sulfoxide prevents the CaM-dependent activation of the plasma membrane (PM) Ca-ATPase (D. Yin, K. Kuczera, and T. C. Squier, 2000, Chem. Res. Toxicol. 13:103-110). To investigate the structural basis for the inhibition of the PM-Ca-ATPase by oxidized CaM (CaM(ox)), we have used circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy to resolve conformational differences within the complex between CaM and the PM-Ca-ATPase. The similar excited-state lifetime and solvent accessibility of the fluorophore N-1-pyrenyl-maleimide covalently bound to Cys(26) in unoxidized CaM and CaM(ox) indicates that the globular domains within CaM(ox) assume a native-like structure following association with the PM-Ca-ATPase. However, in comparison with oxidized CaM there are increases in the 1) molar ellipticity in the CD spectrum and 2) conformational heterogeneity between the opposing globular domains for CaM(ox) bound to the CaM-binding sequence of the PM-Ca-ATPase. Furthermore, CaM(ox) binds to the PM-Ca-ATPase with high affinity at a distinct, but overlapping, site to that normally occupied by unoxidized CaM. These results suggest that alterations in binding interactions between CaM(ox) and the PM-Ca-ATPase block important structural transitions within the CaM-binding sequence of the PM-Ca-ATPase that are normally associated with enzyme activation. PMID:11259292

  2. Increases in Calmodulin Abundance and Stabilization of Activated iNOS Mediate Bacterial Killing in RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-08-01

    The rapid activation of macrophages in response to bacterial antigens is central to the innate immune system that permits the recognition and killing of pathogens to limit infection. To understand regulatory mechanisms underlying macrophage activation, we have investigated changes in the abundance of calmodulin (CaM) and iNOS in response to the bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using RAW 264.7 macrophages. Critical to these measurements was the ability to differentiate free iNOS from the CaM-bound (active) form of iNOS associated with nitric oxide generation. We observe a rapid two-fold increase in CaM abundance during the first 30 minutes that is blocked by inhibition of NF?B nuclear translocation or protein synthesis. A similar two-fold increase in the abundance of the complex between CaM and iNOS is observed with the same time dependence. In contrast, there are no detectable increases in the CaM-free (i.e., inactive) form of iNOS within the first hour; it remains at a very low abundance during the initial phase of macrophage activation. Increasing cellular CaM levels in stably transfected cells results in a corresponding increase in the abundance of the CaM/iNOS complex that promotes effective bacterial killing following challenge by Salmonella typhimurium. Thus, LPS-dependent increases in CaM abundance function in the stabilization and activation of iNOS on the rapid time-scale associated with macrophage activation and bacterial killing. These results explain how CaM and iNOS coordinately function to form a stable complex that is part of a rapid host-response that functions within the first 30 minutes following bacterial infection to up-regulate the innate immune system involving macrophage activation.

  3. The octopamine receptor OAMB mediates ovulation via Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the Drosophila oviduct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  4. Calmodulin in complex with the first IQ motif of myosin-5a functions as an intact calcium sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Mei; Zhang, Ning; Zheng, Sanduo; Zhang, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Hai-Man; Lu, Zekuan; Su, Qian Peter; Sun, Yujie; Li, Xiang-dong

    2016-01-01

    The motor function of vertebrate myosin-5a is inhibited by its tail in a Ca2+-dependent manner. We previously demonstrated that the calmodulin (CaM) bound to the first isoleucine-glutamine (IQ) motif (IQ1) of myosin-5a is responsible for the Ca2+-dependent regulation of myosin-5a. We have solved the crystal structure of a truncated myosin-5a containing the motor domain and IQ1 (MD-IQ1) complexed with Ca2+-bound CaM (Ca2+-CaM) at 2.5-Å resolution. Compared with the structure of the MD-IQ1 complexed with essential light chain (an equivalent of apo-CaM), MD-IQ1/Ca2+-CaM displays large conformational differences in IQ1/CaM and little difference in the motor domain. In the MD-IQ1/Ca2+-CaM structure, the N-lobe and the C-lobe of Ca2+-CaM adopt an open conformation and grip the C-terminal and the N-terminal portions of the IQ1, respectively. Remarkably, the interlobe linker of CaM in IQ1/Ca2+-CaM is in a position opposite that in IQ1/apo-CaM, suggesting that CaM flip-flops relative to the IQ1 during the Ca2+ transition. We demonstrated that CaM continuously associates with the IQ1 during the Ca2+ transition and that the binding of CaM to IQ1 increases Ca2+ affinity and substantially changes the kinetics of the Ca2+ transition, suggesting that the IQ1/CaM complex functions as an intact Ca2+ sensor responding to distinct calcium signals. PMID:27647889

  5. Calmodulin is essential for cardiac IKS channel gating and assembly: impaired function in long-QT mutations.

    PubMed

    Shamgar, Liora; Ma, Lijuan; Schmitt, Nicole; Haitin, Yoni; Peretz, Asher; Wiener, Reuven; Hirsch, Joel; Pongs, Olaf; Attali, Bernard

    2006-04-28

    The slow IKS K+ channel plays a major role in repolarizing the cardiac action potential and consists of the assembly of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes produce the long-QT syndrome, a life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia. Here, we show that long-QT mutations located in the KCNQ1 C terminus impair calmodulin (CaM) binding, which affects both channel gating and assembly. The mutations produce a voltage-dependent macroscopic inactivation and dramatically alter channel assembly. KCNE1 forms a ternary complex with wild-type KCNQ1 and Ca(2+)-CaM that prevents inactivation, facilitates channel assembly, and mediates a Ca(2+)-sensitive increase of IKS-current, with a considerable Ca(2+)-dependent left-shift of the voltage-dependence of activation. Coexpression of KCNQ1 or IKS channels with a Ca(2+)-insensitive CaM mutant markedly suppresses the currents and produces a right shift in the voltage-dependence of channel activation. KCNE1 association to KCNQ1 long-QT mutants significantly improves mutant channel expression and prevents macroscopic inactivation. However, the marked right shift in channel activation and the subsequent decrease in current amplitude cannot restore normal levels of IKS channel activity. Our data indicate that in healthy individuals, CaM binding to KCNQ1 is essential for correct channel folding and assembly and for conferring Ca(2+)-sensitive IKS-current stimulation, which increases the cardiac repolarization reserve and hence prevents the risk of ventricular arrhythmias.

  6. Competition of calcified calmodulin N lobe and PIP2 to an LQT mutation site in Kv7.1 channel.

    PubMed

    Tobelaim, William Sam; Dvir, Meidan; Lebel, Guy; Cui, Meng; Buki, Tal; Peretz, Asher; Marom, Milit; Haitin, Yoni; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Hirsch, Joel Alan; Attali, Bernard

    2017-01-31

    Voltage-gated potassium 7.1 (Kv7.1) channel and KCNE1 protein coassembly forms the slow potassium current IKS that repolarizes the cardiac action potential. The physiological importance of the IKS channel is underscored by the existence of mutations in human Kv7.1 and KCNE1 genes, which cause cardiac arrhythmias, such as the long-QT syndrome (LQT) and atrial fibrillation. The proximal Kv7.1 C terminus (CT) binds calmodulin (CaM) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), but the role of CaM in channel function is still unclear, and its possible interaction with PIP2 is unknown. Our recent crystallographic study showed that CaM embraces helices A and B with the apo C lobe and calcified N lobe, respectively. Here, we reveal the competition of PIP2 and the calcified CaM N lobe to a previously unidentified site in Kv7.1 helix B, also known to harbor an LQT mutation. Protein pulldown, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and patch-clamp recordings indicate that residues K526 and K527 in Kv7.1 helix B form a critical site where CaM competes with PIP2 to stabilize the channel open state. Data indicate that both PIP2 and Ca(2+)-CaM perform the same function on IKS channel gating by producing a left shift in the voltage dependence of activation. The LQT mutant K526E revealed a severely impaired channel function with a right shift in the voltage dependence of activation, a reduced current density, and insensitivity to gating modulation by Ca(2+)-CaM. The results suggest that, after receptor-mediated PIP2 depletion and increased cytosolic Ca(2+), calcified CaM N lobe interacts with helix B in place of PIP2 to limit excessive IKS current inhibition.

  7. Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase mediates Hypergravity-Induced Changes in F-Actin Expression by Endothelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Felisha D.; Melhado, Caroline; Bosah, Francis; Harris-Hooker, Sandra A.; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A number of basic cellular functions, e.g., electrolyte concentration cell growth rate, glucose utilization, bone formation, response to growth stimulation and exocytosis are modified by microgravity or during spaceflight. Studies with intact animal during spaceflights have found lipid accumulations within the lumen of the vasculature and degeneration of the vascular wall. Capillary alterations with extensive endothelial invaginations were also seen. Hemodynamic studies have shown that there is a redistribution of blood from the lower extremities to the upper part of the body; this will alter vascular permeability, resulting in leakage into surrounding tissues. These studies indicate that changes in gravity will affect a number of physiological systems, including the vasculature. However, few studies have addressed the effect of microgravity on vascular cell function and metabolism. A major problem with ground based studies is that achieving a true microgravity hand, environment for prolonged period is not possible. On the other increasing gravity (i.e., hypergravity) is easily achieved. Several researchers have shown that hypergravity will increase the proliferation of several different cell limes (e.g., chick embryo fibroblasts) while decreasing cell motility and slowing liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy. These studies suggest that hypergravity will alter the behavior of most cells. Several investigators have shown that hypergravity affects the expression of the early response genes (c-fos and c-myc) and the activation of several protein kinases (PK's) in cells (10,11). In this study we investigated whether hypergravity alters the expression of f-actin by aortic endothelial cells, and the possible role of protein kinases (calmodulin(II)-dependent and PKA) as mediators of these effects.

  8. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    SciTech Connect

    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells.

  9. Gene Expression Profile of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IIα in Rat's Hippocampus during Morphine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Amiri, Shahin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) which is highly expressed in the hippocampus is known to play a pivotal role in reward-related memories and morphine dependence. Methods In the present study, repeated morphine injections once daily for 7 days was done to induce morphine tolerance in male Wistar rats, after which gene expression profile of α-isoform of CaMKII (CaMKIIα) in the hippocampus was evaluated upon discontinuation of morphine injection over 21 days of morphine withdrawal. Control groups received saline for 7 consecutive days. For gene expression study, rats’ brains were removed and the hippocampus was dissected in separate groups on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 since discontinuation of of morphine injection. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was used to evaluate the gene expression profile. Results Tolerance to morphine was verified by a significant decrease in morphine analgesia in a hotplate test on day 8 (one day after the final repeated morphine injections). Results showed that gene expression of CaMKIIα at mRNA level on day 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 of morphine withdrawal was significantly altered as compared to the saline control group. Post hoc Tukey's test revealed a significantly enhanced CaMKIIα gene expression on day 14. Discussion It can be concluded that CaMKIIα gene expression during repeated injections of morphine is increased and this increase continues up to 14 days of withdrawal then settles at a new set point. Therefore, the strong morphine reward-related memory in morphine abstinent animals may, at least partly be attributed to, the up-regulation of CaMKIIα in the hippocampus over 14 days of morphine withdrawal. PMID:25337341

  10. Activation of the Ano1 (TMEM16A) chloride channel by calcium is not mediated by calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinqiu; Qu, Zhiqiang; Cui, Yuan-Yuan; Hartzell, H. Criss

    2014-01-01

    The Ca2+-activated Cl channel anoctamin-1 (Ano1; Tmem16A) plays a variety of physiological roles, including epithelial fluid secretion. Ano1 is activated by increases in intracellular Ca2+, but there is uncertainty whether Ca2+ binds directly to Ano1 or whether phosphorylation or additional Ca2+-binding subunits like calmodulin (CaM) are required. Here we show that CaM is not necessary for activation of Ano1 by Ca2+ for the following reasons. (a) Exogenous CaM has no effect on Ano1 currents in inside-out excised patches. (b) Overexpression of Ca2+-insensitive mutants of CaM have no effect on Ano1 currents, whereas they eliminate the current mediated by the small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK2) channel. (c) Ano1 does not coimmunoprecipitate with CaM, whereas SK2 does. Furthermore, Ano1 binds very weakly to CaM in pull-down assays. (d) Ano1 is activated in excised patches by low concentrations of Ba2+, which does not activate CaM. In addition, we conclude that reversible phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is not required for current activation by Ca2+ because the current can be repeatedly activated in excised patches in the absence of ATP or other high-energy compounds. Although Ano1 is blocked by the CaM inhibitor trifluoperazine (TFP), we propose that TFP inhibits the channel in a CaM-independent manner because TFP does not inhibit Ano1 when applied to the cytoplasmic side of excised patches. These experiments lead us to conclude that CaM is not required for activation of Ano1 by Ca2+. Although CaM is not required for channel opening by Ca2+, work of other investigators suggests that CaM may have effects in modulating the biophysical properties of the channel. PMID:24420770

  11. Phosphorylation of CEACAM1 Molecule by Calmodulin Kinase IID in a Three-dimensional Model of Mammary Gland Lumen Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tung; Chen, Charng-Jui; Shively, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1), a transmembrane protein, expressed on normal breast epithelial cells is down-regulated in breast cancer. Phosphorylation of Thr-457 on the short cytoplasmic domain isoform (CEACAM1-SF) that is predominant in normal epithelial cells is required for lumen formation in a three-dimensional model that involves apoptosis of the central acinar cells. Calmodulin kinase IID (CaMKIID) was selected as a candidate for the kinase required for Thr-457 phosphorylation from a gene chip analysis comparing genes up-regulated in MCF7 cells expressing wild type CEACAM1-SF compared with the T457A-mutated gene (Chen, C. J., Kirshner, J., Sherman, M. A., Hu, W., Nguyen, T., and Shively, J. E. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5749–5760). Up-regulation of CaMKIID during lumen formation was confirmed by analysis of mRNA and protein levels. CaMKIID was able to phosphorylate a synthetic peptide corresponding to the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM1-SF and was covalently bound to biotinylated and T457C-modified peptide in the presence of a kinase trap previously described by Shokat and co-workers (Maly, D. J., Allen, J. A., and Shokat, K. M. (2004) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126, 9160–9161). When cell lysates from wild type-transfected MCF7 cells undergoing lumen formation were incubated with the peptide and kinase trap, a cross-linked band corresponding to CaMKIID was observed. When these cells were treated with an RNAi that inhibits CaMKIID expression, lumen formation was blocked by over 90%. We conclude that CaMKIID specifically phosphorylates Thr-457 on CEACAM1-SF, which in turn regulates the process of lumen formation via apoptosis of the central acinar cells. PMID:24302721

  12. Involvement of calmodulin in regulation of primary root elongation by N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Chao; Jia, Zhenhua; Huang, Yali; Li, Haili; Song, Shuishan

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria use signal molecules of low molecular weight to monitor their local population density and to coordinate their collective behavior in a process called “quorum sensing” (QS). N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are the primary QS signals among Gram-negative bacteria. AHL-mediated QS plays an essential role in diverse bacterial physiological processes. Recent evidence shows that plants are able to sense bacterial AHLs and respond to them appropriately. However, little is known about the mechanism by which plants perceive and transduce the bacterial AHLs within cells. In this study, we found that the stimulatory effect of N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC6-HSL) on primary root elongation of Arabidopsis was abolished by the calmodulin (CaM) antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) and trifluoperazine (TFP). Western-blot and ELISA analysis revealed that the concentration of CaM protein in Arabidopsis roots increased after treatment with 1 μM 3OC6-HSL. Results from quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that the transcription of all nine CaM genes in Arabidopsis genome was up-regulated in the plants treated with 3OC6-HSL. The loss-of-function mutants of each AtCaM gene (AtCaM1-9) were insensitive to 3OC6-HSL-stimulation of primary root elongation. On the other hand, the genetic evidence showed that CaM may not participates the inhibition of primary root length caused by application of long-chained AHLs such as C10-HSL and C12-HSL. Nevertheless, our results suggest that CaM is involved in the bacterial 3OC6-HSL signaling in plant cells. These data offer new insight into the mechanism of plant response to bacterial QS signals. PMID:25628641

  13. Evidence of the presence of a calmodulin-sensitive plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase in Trypanosoma equiperdum.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gordones, María Carolina; Ramírez-Iglesias, José Rubén; Cervino, Vincenza; Uzcanga, Graciela L; Benaim, Gustavo; Mendoza, Marta

    2017-02-14

    Trypanosoma equiperdum belongs to the subgenus Trypanozoon, which has a significant socio-economic impact by limiting animal protein productivity worldwide. Proteins involved in the intracellular Ca(2+) regulation are prospective chemotherapeutic targets since several drugs used in experimental treatment against trypanosomatids exert their action through the disruption of the parasite intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Therefore, the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) is considered as a potential drug target. This is the first study revealing the presence of a PMCA in T. equiperdum (TePMCA) showing that it is calmodulin (CaM) sensitive, revealed by ATPase activity, western-blot analysis and immuno-absorption assays. The cloning sequence for TePMCA encodes a 1080 amino acid protein which contains domains conserved in all PMCAs so far studied. Molecular modeling predicted that the protein has 10 transmembrane and three cytoplasmic loops which include the ATP-binding site, the phosphorylation domain and Ca(2+) translocation site. Like all PMCAs reported in other trypanosomatids, TePMCA lacks a classic CaM binding domain. Nevertheless, this enzyme presents in the C-terminal tail a region of 28 amino acids (TeC28), which most likely adopts a helical conformation within a 1-18 CaM binding motif. Molecular docking between Trypanosoma cruzi CaM (TcCaM) and TeC28 shows a significant similarity with the CaM-C28PMCA4b reference structure (2kne). TcCaM-TeC28 shows an anti-parallel interaction, the peptide wrapped by CaM and the anchor buried in the hydrophobic pocket, structural characteristic described for similar complexes. Our results allows to conclude that T. equiperdum possess a CaM-sensitive PMCA, which presents a non-canonical CaM binding domain that host a 1-18 motif.

  14. Nicotine reward and affective nicotine withdrawal signs are attenuated in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Sanjakdar, Sarah S; Chen, Xiangning; Damaj, M Imad

    2012-01-01

    The influx of Ca(2+) through calcium-permeable nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) leads to activation of various downstream processes that may be relevant to nicotine-mediated behaviors. The calcium activated protein, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) phosphorylates the downstream transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), which mediates nicotine responses; however the role of CaMKIV in nicotine dependence is unknown. Given the proposed role of CaMKIV in CREB activation, we hypothesized that CaMKIV might be a crucial molecular component in the development of nicotine dependence. Using male CaMKIV genetically modified mice, we found that nicotine reward is attenuated in CaMKIV knockout (-/-) mice, but cocaine reward is enhanced in these mice. CaMKIV protein levels were also increased in the nucleus accumbens of C57Bl/6 mice after nicotine reward. In a nicotine withdrawal assessment, anxiety-related behavior, but not somatic signs or the hyperalgesia response are attenuated in CaMKIV -/- mice. To complement our animal studies, we also conducted a human genetic association analysis and found that variants in the CaMKIV gene are associated with a protective effect against nicotine dependence. Taken together, our results support an important role for CaMKIV in nicotine reward, and suggest that CaMKIV has opposing roles in nicotine and cocaine reward. Further, CaMKIV mediates affective, but not physical nicotine withdrawal signs, and has a protective effect against nicotine dependence in human genetic association studies. These findings further indicate the importance of calcium-dependent mechanisms in mediating behaviors associated with drugs of abuse.

  15. Differential expression of genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in response to bacterial pathogens and inducers of defense responses.

    PubMed

    Ali, Gul Shad; Reddy, Vaka S; Lindgren, Peter B; Jakobek, Judy L; Reddy, A S N

    2003-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) plays an important role in sensing and transducing changes in cellular Ca2+ concentration in response to several biotic and abiotic stresses. Although CaM is implicated in plant-pathogen interactions, its molecular targets and their role in defense signaling pathway(s) are poorly understood. To elucidate the signaling pathways that link CaM to defense responses, we screened a cDNA library constructed from bean leaves undergoing a hypersensitive response (HR) with radiolabeled CaM isoforms. A total of 26 putative CBPs were identified. Sequencing of the cDNAs revealed that they represent 8 different genes. They are homologues of previously identified CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) in other systems. However, some CBPs are novel members of known CBP families. The proteins encoded by these clones bound CaM in a Ca2+-dependent manner. To determine if these CBPs are involved in plant defense responses, we analyzed their expression in bean leaves inoculated with compatible, incompatible and nonpathogenic bacterial strains. Expression of three CBPs including an isoform of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (PvCNGC-A) and two hypothetical proteins (PvCBP60-C and PvCBP60-D) was induced whereas the expression of two other isoforms of CNGCs (PvCNGC-B and PvCNGC-C) was repressed in response to incompatible pathogens. The expression of the rest, a small auxin up RNA (PvSAUR1) and two hypothetical proteins (PvCBP60-A and PvCBP60-B), was not changed. The expression of most of the pathogen-regulated genes was also affected by salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, hydrogen peroxide and a fungal elicitor, which are known to induce defense responses. Our results strongly suggest that at least five bean CBPs are involved in plant defense responses.

  16. The role of calcium and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases in skeletal muscle plasticity and mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Eva R

    2004-05-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) plays an important role in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling and also in excitation-transcription coupling. Activity-dependent alterations in muscle gene expression as a result of increased load (i.e. resistance or endurance training) or decreased activity (i.e. immobilization or injury) are tightly linked to the level of muscle excitation. Differential expression of genes in slow- and fast-twitch fibres is also dependent on fibre activation. Both these biological phenomena are, therefore, tightly linked to the amplitude and duration of the Ca(2+) transient, a signal decoded downstream by Ca(2+)-dependent transcriptional pathways. Evidence is mounting that the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cells pathway and the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMK) II and IV play important roles in regulating oxidative enzyme expression, mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of fibre-type specific myofibrillar proteins. CaMKII is known to decode frequency-dependent information and is activated during hypertrophic growth and endurance adaptations. Thus, it was hypothesized that CaMKII, and possibly CaMKIV, are down regulated during muscle atrophy and levels of expression of CaMKII alpha, -II beta, -II gamma and -IV were assessed in skeletal muscles from young, aged and denervated rats. The results indicate that CaMKII gamma, but not CaMKIIalpha or -beta, is up regulated in aged and denervated soleus muscle and that CaMKIV is absent in skeletal but not cardiac muscle. Whether CaMKII gamma up-regulation is part of the pathology of wasting or a result of some adaptational response to atrophy is not known. Future studies will be important in determining whether insights from the adaptational response of muscle to increased loads will provide pharmacological approaches for increasing muscle strength or endurance to counter muscle wasting.

  17. The Octopamine Receptor OAMB Mediates Ovulation via Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in the Drosophila Oviduct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  18. Abscisic acid activates a Ca2+-calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase involved in antioxidant defense in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shucheng

    2010-09-01

    The role of a calcium-dependent and calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated protein kinase in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defense was determined in leaves of maize (Zea mays). In-gel kinase assays showed that treatments with ABA or H(2)O(2) induced the activation of a 49-kDa protein kinase and a 52-kDa protein kinase significantly. Furthermore, we showed that the 52-kDa protein kinase has the characteristics of CaM-stimulating activity and is sensitive to calcium-CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) inhibitor KN-93 or CaM antagonist W-7. Treatments with ABA or H(2)O(2) not only induced the activation of the 52-kDa protein kinase, but also enhanced the total activities of the antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and superoxide dismutase. Such enhancements were blocked by pretreatment with a CaMK inhibitor and a reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor or scavenger. Pretreatment with the CaMK inhibitor also substantially arrested the ABA-induced H(2)O(2) production. Kinase activity enhancements induced by ABA were attenuated by pretreatment with an ROS inhibitor or scavenger. These results suggest that the 52-kDa CaMK is involved in ABA-induced antioxidant defense and that cross-talk between CaMK and H(2)O(2) plays a pivotal role in ABA signaling. We infer that CaMK acts both upstream and downstream of H(2)O(2), but mainly acts between ABA and H(2)O(2) in ABA-induced antioxidant-defensive signaling.

  19. An early ethylene up-regulated gene encoding a calmodulin-binding protein involved in plant senescence and death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    35S-Labeled calmodulin (CaM) was used to screen a tobacco anther cDNA library. A positive clone (NtER1) with high homology to an early ethylene-up-regulated gene (ER66) in tomato, and an Arabidopsis homolog was isolated and characterized. Based on the helical wheel projection, a 25-mer peptide corresponding to the predicted CaM-binding region of NtER1 (amino acids 796-820) was synthesized. The gel-mobility shift assay showed that the peptide formed a stable complex with CaM only in the presence of Ca(2+). CaM binds to NtER1 with high affinity (K(d) approximately 12 nm) in a calcium-dependent manner. Tobacco flowers at different stages of development were treated with ethylene or with 1-methylcyclopropene for 2 h before treating with ethylene. Northern analysis showed that the NtER1 was rapidly induced after 15 min of exposure to ethylene. However, the 2-h 1-methylcyclopropene treatment totally blocked NtER1 expression in flowers at all stages of development, suggesting that NtER1 is an early ethylene-up-regulated gene. The senescing leaves and petals had significantly increased NtER1 induction as compared with young leaves and petals, implying that NtER1 is developmentally regulated and acts as a trigger for senescence and death. This is the first documented evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated signaling in ethylene action.

  20. Pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of Domain Docking in Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase: The Calmodulin and Output State Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The binding of calmodulin (CaM) to neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) enables formation of the output state of nNOS for nitric oxide production. Essential to NOS function is the geometry and dynamics of CaM docking to the NOS oxygenase domain, but little is known about these details. In the present work, the domain docking in a CaM-bound oxygenase/FMN (oxyFMN) construct of nNOS was investigated using the relaxation-induced dipolar modulation enhancement (RIDME) technique, which is a pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance technique sensitive to the magnetic dipole interaction between the electron spins. A cysteine was introduced at position 110 of CaM, after which a nitroxide spin label was attached at the position. The RIDME study of the magnetic dipole interaction between the spin label and the ferric heme centers in the oxygenase domain of nNOS revealed that, with increasing [Ca2+], the concentration of nNOS·CaM complexes increases and reaches a maximum at [Ca2+]/[CaM] ≥ 4. The RIDME kinetics of CaM-bound nNOS represented monotonous decays without well-defined oscillations. The analysis of these kinetics based on the structural models for the open and docked states has shown that only about 15 ± 3% of the CaM-bound nNOS is in the docked state at any given time, while the remaining 85 ± 3% of the protein is in the open conformations characterized by a wide distribution of distances between the bound CaM and the oxygenase domain. The results of this investigation are consistent with a model that the Ca2+–CaM interaction causes CaM docking with the oxygenase domain. The low population of the docked state indicates that the CaM-controlled docking between the FMN and heme domains is highly dynamic. PMID:25046446

  1. Calmodulin in complex with the first IQ motif of myosin-5a functions as an intact calcium sensor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mei; Zhang, Ning; Zheng, Sanduo; Zhang, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Hai-Man; Lu, Zekuan; Su, Qian Peter; Sun, Yujie; Ye, Keqiong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-10-04

    The motor function of vertebrate myosin-5a is inhibited by its tail in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. We previously demonstrated that the calmodulin (CaM) bound to the first isoleucine-glutamine (IQ) motif (IQ1) of myosin-5a is responsible for the Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of myosin-5a. We have solved the crystal structure of a truncated myosin-5a containing the motor domain and IQ1 (MD-IQ1) complexed with Ca(2+)-bound CaM (Ca(2+)-CaM) at 2.5-Å resolution. Compared with the structure of the MD-IQ1 complexed with essential light chain (an equivalent of apo-CaM), MD-IQ1/Ca(2+)-CaM displays large conformational differences in IQ1/CaM and little difference in the motor domain. In the MD-IQ1/Ca(2+)-CaM structure, the N-lobe and the C-lobe of Ca(2+)-CaM adopt an open conformation and grip the C-terminal and the N-terminal portions of the IQ1, respectively. Remarkably, the interlobe linker of CaM in IQ1/Ca(2+)-CaM is in a position opposite that in IQ1/apo-CaM, suggesting that CaM flip-flops relative to the IQ1 during the Ca(2+) transition. We demonstrated that CaM continuously associates with the IQ1 during the Ca(2+) transition and that the binding of CaM to IQ1 increases Ca(2+) affinity and substantially changes the kinetics of the Ca(2+) transition, suggesting that the IQ1/CaM complex functions as an intact Ca(2+) sensor responding to distinct calcium signals.

  2. Resveratrol Inhibits Neuronal Apoptosis and Elevated Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Activity in Diabetic Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hee; Kim, Yoon-Sook; Kang, Sang-Soo; Cho, Gyeong-Jae; Choi, Wan-Sung

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigated the effects of resveratrol, a natural polyphenol with neuroprotective properties, on retinal neuronal cell death mediated by diabetes-induced activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Diabetes was induced in C57BL/6 mice by five consecutive intraperitoneal injections of 55 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ). Control mice received buffer. All mice were killed 2 months after the injections, and the extent of neuronal cell death, CaMKII, and phospho-CaMKII protein expression levels and CaMKII kinase activity were examined in the retinas. To assess the role of CaMKII in the death of retinal neurons, a small-interfering RNA (siRNA) or specific inhibitor of CaMKII was injected into the right vitreous humor, and vehicle only was injected into the left vitreous humor, 2 days before death. Resveratrol (20 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage daily for 4 weeks, beginning 1 month after the fifth injection of either STZ or buffer. RESULTS The death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), CaMKII, phospho-CaMKII protein levels, and CaMKII activity were all greatly increased in the retinas of diabetic mice compared with controls, 2 months after induction of diabetes. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive signals co-localized with CaMKII- and phospho-CaMKII immunoreactive RGCs. However, in addition to CaMKII knockdown and inhibition by siRNA or a specific inhibitor, respectively, resveratrol provided complete protection from diabetes-induced retinal cell death. CONCLUSIONS In the present study, resveratrol prevented diabetes-induced RGC death via CaMKII downregulation, implying that resveratrol may have potential therapeutic applications for prevention of diabetes-induced visual dysfunction. PMID:20424226

  3. Calmodulin activation of the Ca2+ pump revealed by fluorescent chelator dyes in human red blood cell ghosts

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Ca2+ transport in red blood cell ghosts was monitored with fura2 or quin2 incorporated as the free acid during resealing. This is the first report of active transport monitored by the fluorescent intensity of the chelator dyes fura2 (5-50 microM) or quin2 (250 microM) in hemoglobin-depleted ghosts. Since there are no intracellular compartments in ghosts and the intracellular concentrations of all assay chelator substances including calmodulin (CaM), the dyes, and ATP could be set, the intracellular concentrations of free and total Ca [( Cafree]i and [Catotal]i) could be calculated during the transport. Ghosts prepared with or without CaM rapidly extruded Ca2+ to a steady- state concentration of 60-100 nM. A 10(4)-fold gradient for Ca2+ was routinely produced in medium containing 1 mM Ca2+. During active Ca2+ extrusion, d[Cafree]i/dt was a second order function of [Cafree]i and was independent of the dye concentration, whereas d[Catotal]i/dt increased as a first order function of both the [Cafree]i and the concentration of the Ca:dye complex. CaM (5 microM) increased d[Catotal]i/dt by 400% at 1 microM [Cafree]i, while d[Cafree]i/dt increased by only 25%. From a series of experiments we conclude that chelated forms of Ca2+ serve as substrates for the pump under permissive control of the [Cafree]i, and this dual effect may explain cooperativity. Free Ca2+ is extruded, and probably also Ca2+ bound to CaM or other chelators, while CaM and the chelators are retained in the cell. PMID:1371307

  4. Calcium binding decreases the stokes radius of calmodulin and mutants R74A, R90A, and R90G.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, B R; Shea, M A

    1996-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an intracellular cooperative calcium-binding protein essential for activating many diverse target proteins. Biophysical studies of the calcium-induced conformational changes of CaM disagree on the structure of the linker between domains and possible orientations of the domains. Molecular dynamics studies have predicted that Ca4(2+)CaM is in equilibrium between an extended and compact conformation and that Arg74 and Arg90 are critical to the compaction process. In this study gel permeation chromatography was used to resolve calcium-induced changes in the hydrated shape of CaM at pH 7.4 and 5.6. Results showed that mutation of Arg 74 to Ala increases the R(s) as predicted; however, the average separation of domains in Ca4(2+)-CaM was larger than predicted by molecular dynamics. Mutation of Arg90 to Ala or Gly affected the dimensions of apo-CaM more than those of Ca4(2+)-CaM. Calcium binding to CaM and mutants (R74A-CaM, R90A-CaM, and R90G-CaM) lowered the Stokes radius (R(s)). Differences between R(s) values reported here and Rg values determined by small-angle x-ray scattering studies illustrate the importance of using multiple techniques to explore the solution properties of a flexible protein such as CaM. Images FIGURE 2 SCHEME 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:8968610

  5. Developmental changes in calcium/calmodulin-dependent inactivation of calcium currents at the rat calyx of Held

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takeshi; Yamashita, Takayuki; Saitoh, Naoto; Takahashi, Tomoyuki

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+-binding to calmodulin (CaM) causes facilitation and/or inactivation of recombinant Ca2+ channels. At the rat calyx of Held, before hearing onset, presynaptic Ca2+ currents (IpCa) undergo Ca2+/CaM-dependent inactivation during repetitive activation at around 1 Hz, implying that this may be a major cause of short-term synaptic depression. However, it remains open whether the Ca2+/CaM-dependent inactivation of IpCa persists in more mature animals. To address this question, we tested the effect of CaM inhibitors on the activity-dependent modulation of IpCa in calyces, before (postnatal day (P) 7–9) and after (P13–15) hearing onset. Our results indicate that the CaM-dependent IpCa inactivation during low-frequency stimulation, and the ensuing synaptic depression, occur only at calyces in the prehearing period. However, CaM immunoreactivity in P8 and P14 calyces was equally strong. Even at P13–15, high frequency stimulation (200–500 Hz) could induce IpCa inactivation, which was attenuated by EGTA (10 mm) or a CaM inhibitor peptide loaded into the terminal. Furthermore, the CaM inhibitor peptide attenuated a transient facilitation of IpCa preceding inactivation observed at 500 Hz stimulation, whereas it had no effect on sustained IpCa facilitations during trains of 50–200 Hz stimulation. These results suggest that the Ca2+/CaM-dependent IpCa modulation requires a high intraterminal Ca2+ concentration, which can be attained at immature calyces during low frequency stimulation, but only during unusually high frequency stimulation at calyceal terminals in the posthearing period. PMID:18238813

  6. The calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B inhibits voltage-dependent K{sup +} channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongliang; Hong, Da Hye; Kim, Han Sol; Kim, Hye Won; Jung, Won-Kyo; Na, Sung Hun; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Won Sun

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the effects of the calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B on voltage-dependent K{sup +} (Kv) channels using whole-cell patch clamp technique in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells. CGS 9343B inhibited Kv currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) value of 0.81 μM. The decay rate of Kv channel inactivation was accelerated by CGS 9343B. The rate constants of association and dissociation for CGS 9343B were 2.77 ± 0.04 μM{sup −1} s{sup −1} and 2.55 ± 1.50 s{sup −1}, respectively. CGS 9343B did not affect the steady-state activation curve, but shifted the inactivation curve toward to a more negative potential. Train pulses (1 or 2 Hz) application progressively increased the CGS 9343B-induced Kv channel inhibition. In addition, the inactivation recovery time constant was increased in the presence of CGS 9343B, suggesting that CGS 9343B-induced inhibition of Kv channel was use-dependent. Another calmodulin inhibitor, W-13, did not affect Kv currents, and did not change the inhibitory effect of CGS 9343B on Kv current. Our results demonstrated that CGS 9343B inhibited Kv currents in a state-, time-, and use-dependent manner, independent of calmodulin inhibition. - Highlights: • We investigated the effects of CGS 9394B on Kv channels. • CGS 9394B inhibited Kv current in a state-, time-, and use-dependent manner. • Caution is required when using CGS 9394B in vascular function studies.

  7. Molecular characterisation of a calmodulin gene, VcCaM1, that is differentially expressed under aluminium stress in highbush blueberry.

    PubMed

    Inostroza-Blancheteau, C; Aquea, F; Loyola, R; Slovin, J; Josway, S; Rengel, Z; Reyes-Díaz, M; Alberdi, M; Arce-Johnson, P

    2013-11-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a small acidic protein, is one of the best characterised Ca(2+) sensors in eukaryotes. This Ca(2+) -regulated protein plays a critical role in decoding and transducing environmental stress signals by activating specific targets. Many environmental stresses elicit changes in intracellular Ca(2+) activity that could initiate adaptive responses under adverse conditions. We report the first molecular cloning and characterisation of a calmodulin gene, VcCaM1 (Vaccinium corymbosum Calmodulin 1), in the woody shrub, highbush blueberry. VcCaM1 was first identified as VCAL19, a gene induced by aluminium stress in V. corymbosum L. A full-length cDNA of VcCaM1 containing a 766-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 149 amino acids was cloned from root RNA. The sequence encodes four Ca(2+) -binding motifs (EF-hands) and shows high similarity (99%) with the isoform CaM 201 of Daucus carota. Expression analyses showed that following Al treatment, VcCaM1 message level decreased in roots of Brigitta, an Al-resistant cultivar, and after 48 h, was lower than in Bluegold, an Al-sensitive cultivar. VcCAM1 message also decreased in leaves of both cultivars within 2 h of treatment. Message levels in leaves then increased by 24 h to control levels in Brigitta, but not in Bluegold, but then decreased again by 48 h. In conclusion, VcCaM1 does not appear to be directly involved in Al resistance, but may be involved in improved plant performance under Al toxicity conditions through regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis and antioxidant systems in leaves.

  8. Toxicity of heavy metals: 1. Correlation of metal toxicity with in vitro calmodulin inhibition. 2. Interactions of inorganic mercury with red blood cells: Control vs. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, J.L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The toxic effects of metals are examined in two separate in vitro systems. In the first system, the correlation between published mouse LD{sub 50} values and experimentally derived values for calmodulin inhibition was determined. Calmodulin activity was defined as stimulated phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. The basal PDE activity was determined with each cation and was unaffected by any of the concentrations utilized. The IC{sub 50} was determined from a plot of the log of the cation concentration vs. stimulated PDE activity for each cation. A very strong correlation was obtained when the IC{sub 50} vs. mouse LD{sub 50} curve was examined (p < 0.001). Calmodulin regulates many enzyme systems and processes that affect or are affected by calcium. This study was examined in light of the possible role of calcium in cell damage and death. In the second study, the interactions of erythrocytes (RBCs) and inorganic mercury (Hg) were examined. A broad range of Hg concentrations were utilized to explore the nature of the interactions. Two different mechanisms of RBC Hg accumulation and retention were evident. At lower Hg concentrations (0.001-0.1 {mu}M), the RBC accumulation/retention of Hg was constant (52% of available Hg), reversible, and temperature sensitive. At higher concentrations (1-100 {mu}M), the accumulation increased with Hg concentration, was not reversible, and was not temperature sensitive. A relationship between Hg and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is suggested by several reports in the literature. The accumulation/ retention of Hg by RBCs from control and ALS patients were compared. The RBCs from ALS patients released far more Hg during a two hr incubation 37C at 10 and 100 {mu}M Hg compared to controls.

  9. Involvement of calcium and calmodulin in the regulation of ovarian steroidogenesis in Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus) and modulation by Aroclor 1254.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Abby D; Thomas, Peter

    2005-12-01

    The involvement of calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways in the regulation of ovarian steroidogenesis was investigated in Atlantic croaker. Treatment with the calcium ionophores A23187 and ionomycin caused a 2- to 5-fold increase in basal steroid accumulation by croaker ovarian tissue in vitro. A23187 potentiated human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced testosterone (T) accumulation, whereas it inhibited accumulation of estradiol-17beta (E(2)) and the conversion of T to E(2), suggesting that intracellular calcium modulates aromatase enzyme activity. Gonadotropin stimulation of ovarian steroidogenesis was decreased in the presence of EGTA and inhibitors of voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate-receptors (IP(3)Rs), indicating that releases of calcium from both intracellular and extracellular stores are components of the signal transduction pathways initiated by gonadotropin. Calmodulin is also involved in the regulation of ovarian steroidogenesis in croaker, since the calmodulin inhibitors W-7 and trifluoperazine (TFP) attenuated hCG-stimulated T and E(2) accumulation. These results are broadly similar to those reported previously in goldfish and suggest that the major calcium-dependent signaling pathways involved in gonadotropin stimulation of ovarian steroidogenesis in tetrapods are also present in teleosts. In addition, the involvement of calcium in the regulation of aromatase activity was demonstrated for the first time in a vertebrate ovary. Finally, acute exposure to 0.001-1 ppm Aroclor 1254 induced up to a 5-fold increase in hCG-stimulated E(2) accumulation, and this effect was attenuated by co-treatment with inhibitors of VSCCs and calmodulin, suggesting the existence of a novel mechanism of endocrine disruption by an environmental contaminant involving alteration of calcium-dependent signaling pathways regulating steroidogenesis.

  10. Calmodulin 2 Mutation N98S Is Associated with Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Infants Due to Low Clinical Penetrance Electrical Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Jáimez, Juan; Palomino Doza, Julián; Ortega, Ángeles; Macías-Ruiz, Rosa; Perin, Francesca; Rodríguez-Vázquez del Rey, M. Mar; Ortiz-Genga, Martín; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Barriales-Villa, Roberto; Blanca, Enrique; Álvarez, Miguel; Tercedor, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Calmodulin 1, 2 and 3 (CALM) mutations have been found to cause cardiac arrest in children at a very early age. The underlying