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Sample records for calmodulin

  1. Dityrosine formation in calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Malencik, D.A.; Anderson, S.R.

    1987-02-10

    Ultraviolet (280-nm) irradiation of bovine brain calmodulin results in calcium-dependent changes in its fluorescence emission spectrum. These consist of a decline in the intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence of the protein and the appearance of a new emission maximum at 400 nm. Chromatography of irradiated calmodulin, using Ultrogel AcA 54 and phenyl-agarose columns, yields several distinctive fractions. One of these, representing 2.8% of the total recovered protein and 53% of the total fluorescence emission at 400 nm, was selected for detailed characterization. Analyses performed on acid hydrolysates reveal the presence of dityrosine, a derivative of tyrosine known for its fluorescence near 400 nm, at the level of 0.59-0.89 mol per 16,700 g of protein. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrate two components of apparent molecular weights 14,000 (80%) and 16,000 (20%). Observations on the effects of UV irradiation on the thrombic fragments of calmodulin and on related calcium binding proteins (rabbit skeletal muscle troponin C, bovine cardiac troponin C, and parvalbumin) support the interpretation that dityrosine formation in calmodulin results from the intramolecular cross-linking of Tyr-99 and Tyr-138. The dityrosine-containing photoproduct of calmodulin is unable to stimulate the p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity of calcineurin under standard assay conditions. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase binds the derivative about 280-fold less effectively than it binds native calmodulin. Of several metal ions tested, only Cd/sup 2 +/ approaches Ca/sup 2 +/ in its ability to promote the appearance of the 400-nm emission band during UV irradiation of calmodulin. Mn/sup 2 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ appear to inhibit dityrosine formation.

  2. Functional expression of chicken calmodulin in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Y; Anraku, Y

    1989-01-31

    The coding region of a chicken calmodulin cDNA was fused to a galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter, and an expression system was constructed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of calmodulin was demonstrated by purifying the heterologously expressed protein and analyzing its biochemical properties. When the expression plasmid was introduced into a calmodulin gene (cmd1)-disrupted strain of yeast, the cells grew in galactose medium, showing that chicken calmodulin could complement the lesion of yeast calmodulin functionally. Repression of chicken calmodulin in the (cmd1)-disrupted strain caused cell cycle arrest with a G2/M nucleus, as observed previously with a conditional-lethal mutant of yeast calmodulin. These results suggest that the essential function of calmodulin for cell proliferation is conserved in cells ranging from yeast to vertebrate cells.

  3. Role of Calmodulin in Cell Proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafouleas, J.

    1983-01-01

    Calmodulin levels were found to increase as cells enter plateau. The data suggest that the cells are exiting the cell cycle late in the G sub 1 phase, or that the calmodulin levels in plateau cells are uncoupled to progression into S phase in plateau cells. Upon release, calmodulin levels rapidly decrease. Following this decrease, there is a increase prior to S phase.

  4. Calmodulin regulates KCNQ2 function in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuhong; Zhuang, Fei; Li, Hong; Zheng, Kun; Hong, Ze; Feng, Weijing; Zhou, Wendi; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is linked to mutations in KCNQ channels. KCNQ channels including KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 are enriched in neurons, regulating action potential generation and modulation. Here, we showed that properties of KCNQ2 channel in rat hippocampal cultured neurons are regulated by ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin. We analyzed calmodulin function on the KCNQ2 channel in both HEK293 cells and neurons. We used shRNAs to suppress expression of calmodulin protein. On the other hand, we used cDNA to over-express calmodulin in HEK293 and neuron cells. In wild type and mis-sense mutations of KCNQ2 proteins, calmodulin over-expression enhanced outward K+ current and decreased neuronal activity. Meanwhile, calmodulin knockdown reduced KCNQ2 current and increased neuronal activity, showing that hippocampal neuronal excitability is regulated by expression level of calmodulin protein. Our data suggest that calmodulin performs a major function in regulating KCNQ2 properties via direct binding to KCNQ2 protein, indicating that calmodulin could be a target of as gene therapy in epilepsy. PMID:28078031

  5. Purification and biochemical properties of calmodulin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Y; Uno, I; Ishikawa, T; Anraku, Y

    1987-10-01

    Calmodulin from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified to complete homogeneity by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and HPLC gel filtration. The biochemical properties of the purified protein as calmodulin were examined under various criteria and its similarity and dissimilarity to other calmodulins have been described. Like other calmodulins, yeast calmodulin activated bovine phosphodiesterase and pea NAD kinase in a Ca2+-dependent manner, but its concentration for half-maximal activation was 8-10 times that of bovine calmodulin. The amino acid composition of yeast calmodulin was different from those of calmodulins from other lower eukaryotes in that it contained no tyrosine, but more leucine and had a high ratio of serine to threonine. Yeast calmodulin did not contain tryptophanyl or tyrosyl residues, so its ultraviolet spectrum reflected the absorbance of phenylalanyl residues, and had a molar absorption coefficient at 259 nm of 1900 M-1 cm-1. Ca2+ ions changed the secondary structure of yeast calmodulin, causing a 3% decrease in the alpha-helical content, unlike its effect on other calmodulins. Antibody against yeast calmodulin did not cross-react with bovine calmodulin, and antibody against bovine calmodulin did not cross-react with yeast calmodulin, presumably due to differences in the amino acid sequences of the antigenic sites. It is concluded that the molecular structure of yeast calmodulin differs from those of calmodulins from other sources, but that its Ca2+-dependent regulatory functions are highly conserved and essentially similar to those of calmodulins of higher eukaryotes.

  6. Differential recognition of calmodulin-enzyme complexes by a conformation-specific anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R.S.; Beavo, J.A.

    1986-11-05

    An anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody having an absolute requirement for Ca/sup 2 +/ has been produced from mice immunized with a mixture of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins. Radioimmune assays were developed for the determination of its specificity. The epitope for this antibody resides on the COOH-terminal half of the mammalian protein. Plant calmodulin or toponin C had little reactivity. The apparent affinity of the antibody for calmodulin was increased approximately 60-fold in the presence of heart calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase. The presence of heart phosphodiesterase in the radioimmune assay greatly enhanced the sensitivity for calmodulin. The intrinsic calmodulin subunit of phosphorylase kinase and calmodulin which was bound to brain phosphodiesterases was also recognized with high affinity by the antibody. In direct binding experiments, most of the calmodulin-binding proteins studied were unreactive with the antibody. This selectivity allowed purification of heart and two brain calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isozymes on immobilized antibody affinity columns. The data suggest that the binding of ligands to Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin induce conformation changes in calmodulin which alter reactivity with the anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody. The differential antibody reactivity toward calmodulin-enzyme complexes indicates that target proteins either induce very different conformations in calmodulin and/or interact with different geometries relative to the antibody binding site. The anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody should be useful for the purification of other calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterases as well as isozymes of phosphorylase kinase.

  7. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  8. Developmental differences in posttranslational calmodulin methylation in pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-05-01

    A calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used to analyze the degree of lysine-115 methylation of pea calmodulin. Calmodulin was isolated from segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of {sup 3}H-methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The methylation of these calmodulin samples occurs specifically at lysine 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position were not methylated and competitively inhibited methylation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in NAD kinase activation by methylated and unmethylated calmodulins, raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation could affect calmodulin action.

  9. Regulation of RYR1 activity by Ca(2+) and calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodney, G. G.; Williams, B. Y.; Strasburg, G. M.; Beckingham, K.; Hamilton, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The skeletal muscle calcium release channel (RYR1) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that is regulated by another Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. The functional consequences of calmodulin's interaction with RYR1 are dependent on Ca(2+) concentration. At nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an activator, but at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an inhibitor of RYR1. This raises the question of whether the Ca(2+)-dependent effects of calmodulin on RYR1 function are due to Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin, RYR1, or both. To distinguish the effects of Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin from those of Ca(2+) binding to RYR1, a mutant calmodulin that cannot bind Ca(2+) was used to evaluate the effects of Ca(2+)-free calmodulin on Ca(2+)-bound RYR1. We demonstrate that Ca(2+)-free calmodulin enhances the affinity of RYR1 for Ca(2+) while Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin converts calmodulin from an activator to an inhibitor. Furthermore, Ca(2+) binding to RYR1 enhances its affinity for both Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin.

  10. Regulation of RYR1 activity by Ca(2+) and calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodney, G. G.; Williams, B. Y.; Strasburg, G. M.; Beckingham, K.; Hamilton, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The skeletal muscle calcium release channel (RYR1) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that is regulated by another Ca(2+)-binding protein, calmodulin. The functional consequences of calmodulin's interaction with RYR1 are dependent on Ca(2+) concentration. At nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an activator, but at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, calmodulin is an inhibitor of RYR1. This raises the question of whether the Ca(2+)-dependent effects of calmodulin on RYR1 function are due to Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin, RYR1, or both. To distinguish the effects of Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin from those of Ca(2+) binding to RYR1, a mutant calmodulin that cannot bind Ca(2+) was used to evaluate the effects of Ca(2+)-free calmodulin on Ca(2+)-bound RYR1. We demonstrate that Ca(2+)-free calmodulin enhances the affinity of RYR1 for Ca(2+) while Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin converts calmodulin from an activator to an inhibitor. Furthermore, Ca(2+) binding to RYR1 enhances its affinity for both Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound calmodulin.

  11. Calmodulin independence of human duodenal adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J A; Griffin, M; Mireylees, S E; Long, R G

    1991-01-01

    The calmodulin and calcium dependence of human adenylate cyclase from the second part of the duodenum was assessed in washed particulate preparations of biopsy specimens by investigating (a) the concentration dependent effects of free [Ca2+] on enzyme activity, (b) the effects of exogenous calmodulin on enzyme activity in ethylene glycol bis (b-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) washed particulate preparations, and (c) the effects of calmodulin antagonists on enzyme activity. Both basal (IC50 = 193.75 (57.5) nmol/l (mean (SEM)) and NaF stimulated (IC50 = 188.0 (44.0) nmol/l) adenylate cyclase activity was strongly inhibited by free [Ca2+] greater than 90 nmol/l. Free [Ca2+] less than 90 nmol/l had no effect on adenylate cyclase activity. NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by 50% at 2.5 mmol/l EGTA. This inhibition could not be reversed by free Ca2+. The addition of exogenous calmodulin to EGTA (5 mmol/l) washed particulate preparations failed to stimulate adenylate cyclase activity. Trifluoperazine and N-(8-aminohexyl)-5-IODO-1-naphthalene-sulphonamide (IODO 8) did not significantly inhibit basal and NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity when measured at concentrations of up to 100 mumol/l. These results suggest that human duodenal adenylate cyclase activity is calmodulin independent but is affected by changes in free [Ca2+]. PMID:1752461

  12. Structure and dynamics of calmodulin in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Wriggers, W; Mehler, E; Pitici, F; Weinstein, H; Schulten, K

    1998-01-01

    To characterize the dynamic behavior of calmodulin in solution, we have carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Ca2+-loaded structure. The crystal structure of calmodulin was placed in a solvent sphere of radius 44 A, and 6 Cl- and 22 Na+ ions were included to neutralize the system and to model a 150 mM salt concentration. The total number of atoms was 32,867. During the 3-ns simulation, the structure exhibits large conformational changes on the nanosecond time scale. The central alpha-helix, which has been shown to unwind locally upon binding of calmodulin to target proteins, bends and unwinds near residue Arg74. We interpret this result as a preparative step in the more extensive structural transition observed in the "flexible linker" region 74-82 of the central helix upon complex formation. The major structural change is a reorientation of the two Ca2+-binding domains with respect to each other and a rearrangement of alpha-helices in the N-terminus domain that makes the hydrophobic target peptide binding site more accessible. This structural rearrangement brings the domains to a more favorable position for target binding, poised to achieve the orientation observed in the complex of calmodulin with myosin light-chain kinase. Analysis of solvent structure reveals an inhomogeneity in the mobility of water in the vicinity of the protein, which is attributable to the hydrophobic effect exerted by calmodulin's binding sites for target peptides. PMID:9545028

  13. Differential inhibition of calmodulin-sensitive phosphodiesterase and Ca++-adenosine triphosphatase by chlorpromazine-linked calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Prozialeck, W.C.; Wallace, T.L.; Weiss, B.

    1987-10-01

    Upon irradiation with UV light, chlorpromazine binds irreversibly to calmodulin and inactivates it. To determine whether this chlorpromazine-calmodulin (CPZ-CaM) complex can inhibit the actions of native calmodulin, we examined its effects on the activity of calmodulin-sensitive cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase from rat brain and on the Ca++-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) of human erythrocyte membranes. The CPZ-CaM complex was prepared by irradiating purified bovine brain calmodulin in the presence of chlorpromazine and Ca++. The sample was then dialyzed extensively to remove reversibly bound chlorpromazine and then assayed for its ability to activate calmodulin-sensitive phosphodiesterase and Ca++-ATPase, and for its ability to block the stimulatory effects of native calmodulin on these enzymes. The CPZ-CaM complex had no effect on the basal activity of either enzyme; it neither activated nor inhibited the enzymes when assayed in the absence of calmodulin. However, it affected differentially the activation of the two enzymes by native calmodulin. The CPZ-CaM complex totally inhibited calmodulin-stimulated phosphodiesterase but had no effect on the activation of the ATPase by calmodulin. Other studies showed that CPZ-CaM increased the activation constant (Ka) for the interaction of calmodulin with phosphodiesterase but did not affect the maximal activation (Vmax) of the enzyme by calmodulin. Neither calmodulin nor CPZ-CaM altered the Km for the interaction between phosphodiesterase and cyclic AMP. These results suggest that CPZ-CaM inhibits the calmodulin-induced activation of phosphodiesterase by competing with calmodulin for regulatory sites on the enzyme and not by interacting with calmodulin itself or by blocking the interaction of cyclic AMP with the enzyme.

  14. Characterization of the secondary structure of calmodulin in complex with a calmodulin-binding domain peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, S.M.; Schneider, D.M.; Strobel, L.A.; Wand, A.J. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana ); Van Berkum, M.F.A.; Means, A.R. )

    1992-02-11

    The interaction between calcium-saturated chicken calmodulin and a peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding domain of the chicken smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase has been studied by multinuclear and multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance methods. Extensive {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonance assignments of calmodulin in the complex have been obtained from the analysis of two- and three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The assignment of calmodulin in the complex was facilitated by the use of selective labeling of the protein with {alpha}-{sup 15}N-labeled valine, alanine, lysine, leucine, and glycine. These provided reference points during the main-chain-directed analysis of three-dimensional spectra of complexes prepared with uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled calmodulin. The pattern of nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) seen among main-chain amide NH, C{sub {alpha}}H, and C{sub {beta}}H hydrogens indicates that the secondary structure of the globular domains of calmodulin in the complex closely corresponds to that observed in the calcium-saturated state of the protein in the absence of bound peptide. However, the backbone conformation of residues 76-84 adopts an extended chain conformation upon binding of the peptide in contrast to its helical conformation in the absence of peptide. A sufficient number of NOEs between the globular domains of calmodulin and the bound peptide have been found to indicate that the N- and C-terminal regions of the peptide interact with the C- and N-terminal domains of calmodulin, respectively. The significance of these results are discussed in terms of recently proposed models for the structure of calmodulin-peptide complexes.

  15. Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

  16. Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

  17. Carboxylmethylation of calmodulin in cultured pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P.L.; Siegel, F.L.

    1986-05-01

    It has previously been shown that calmodulin (CaM) is a substrate for protein carboxyl methyltransferase (PCM) and that carboxylmethylation of calmodulin reduces it biological activity. Carboxylmethylation has been postulated to underwrite the repair of isomerized protein and the modulation of neurotransmitter release. The repair hypothesis indicates that proteins become substrates for carboxylmethylation only following deamidation caused by heat or exposure to basic conditions. The carboxyl-methylation of calmodulin had not been previously demonstrated to take place in situ - they have shown that in rat pituitary GH/sub 3/ cells calmodulin is carboxylmethylated by endogenous PCM. Cells were incubated with (methyl-/sup 3/)H L-methionine, rapidly frozen, lysed and fractionated by sequential chromatography on Mono-Q (FPLC) Superose (FPLC) and C3 reverse-phase HPLC. Two major and five minor carboxylmethylated proteins were identified; CaM showed the second highest incorporation of carboxylmethyl groups. The identity of CaM was confirmed by co-elution with authentic CaM and by a characteristic EGTA shift on RP-HPLC. The methods developed for demonstration of carboxylmethylation in this system will be useful to approach the study of the biological significance of this reaction.

  18. Aquaporin 6 binds calmodulin in a calcium-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Rabaud, Nicole E; Song, Linhua; Wang, Yiding; Agre, Peter; Yasui, Masato; Carbrey, Jennifer M

    2009-05-22

    Aquaporin 6 (AQP6) is an anion channel that is expressed primarily in acid secreting alpha-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct. In addition, AQP6 anion channel permeability is gated by low pH. Inspection of the N-terminus of AQP6 revealed a putative calmodulin binding site. AQP6-expressing CHO-K1 cell lysates were mixed with calmodulin beads and AQP6 was pulled down in the presence of calcium. Mutagenesis of the N-terminal calmodulin binding site in full length mouse AQP6 resulted in a loss of calmodulin binding activity. Mouse and human AQP6 calmodulin binding site peptides bound dansyl-calmodulin with a dissociation constant of approximately 1microM. The binding of AQP6 to calmodulin may be an important key to determining the physiological role of AQP6 in the kidney.

  19. Aquaporin 6 binds calmodulin in a calcium dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Rabaud, Nicole E.; Song, Linhua; Wang, Yiding; Agre, Peter; Yasui, Masato; Carbrey, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporin 6 (AQP6) is an anion channel that is expressed primarily in acid secreting α-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct. In addition, AQP6 anion channel permeability is gated by low pH. Inspection of the N-terminus of AQP6 revealed a putative calmodulin binding site. AQP6-expressing CHO-K1 cell lysates were mixed with calmodulin beads and AQP6 was pulled down in the presence of calcium. Mutagenesis of the N-terminal calmodulin binding site in full length mouse AQP6 resulted in a loss of calmodulin binding activity. Mouse and human AQP6 calmodulin binding site peptides bound dansyl-calmodulin with a dissociation constant of approximately 1 μM. The binding of AQP6 to calmodulin may be an important key to determining the physiological role of AQP6 in the kidney. PMID:19336226

  20. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signal network in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    Various extracellular stimuli elicit specific calcium signatures that can be recognized by different calcium sensors. Calmodulin, the predominant calcium receptor, is one of the best-characterized calcium sensors in eukaryotes. In recent years, completion of the Arabidopsis genome project and advances in functional genomics have helped to identify and characterize numerous calmodulin-binding proteins in plants. There are some similarities in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling in plants and animals. However, plants possess multiple calmodulin genes and many calmodulin target proteins, including unique protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these proteins are likely to act as "hubs" during calcium signal transduction. Hence, a better understanding of the function of these calmodulin target proteins should help in deciphering the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signal network and its role in plant growth, development and response to environmental stimuli.

  1. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signal network in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    Various extracellular stimuli elicit specific calcium signatures that can be recognized by different calcium sensors. Calmodulin, the predominant calcium receptor, is one of the best-characterized calcium sensors in eukaryotes. In recent years, completion of the Arabidopsis genome project and advances in functional genomics have helped to identify and characterize numerous calmodulin-binding proteins in plants. There are some similarities in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling in plants and animals. However, plants possess multiple calmodulin genes and many calmodulin target proteins, including unique protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these proteins are likely to act as "hubs" during calcium signal transduction. Hence, a better understanding of the function of these calmodulin target proteins should help in deciphering the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signal network and its role in plant growth, development and response to environmental stimuli.

  2. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  3. Structural basis for activation of calcineurin by calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Rumi-Masante, Julie; Rusinga, Farai I.; Lester, Terrence E.; Dunlap, Tori B.; Williams, Todd D.; Dunker, A. Keith; Weis, David D.; Creamer, Trevor P.

    2011-01-01

    The highly conserved phosphatase calcineurin plays vital roles in numerous processes including T-cell activation, development and function of the central nervous system, and cardiac growth. It is activated by the calcium sensor calmodulin. Calmodulin binds to a regulatory domain within calcineurin, causing a conformational change that displaces an autoinhibitory domain from the active site, resulting in activation of the phosphatase. This is the same general mechanism by which calmodulin activates calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Previously published data has hinted that the regulatory domain of calcineurin is intrinsically disordered. In this work we demonstrate that the regulatory domain is unstructured and that it folds upon binding calmodulin, ousting the autoinhibitory domain from the catalytic site. The regulatory domain is 95 residues long, with the autoinhibitory domain attached to its C-terminal end and the 24 residue calmodulin binding region towards the N-terminal end. This is unlike the calmodulin-dependent protein kinases which have calmodulin binding sites and autoinhibitory domains immediately adjacent in sequence. Our data demonstrate that not only does the calmodulin binding region fold, but that an ~25-30 residue region between it and the autoinhibitory domain also folds, resulting in over half of the regulatory domain adopting α-helical structure. This appears to be the first observation of calmodulin inducing folding of this scale outside of its binding site on a target protein. PMID:22100452

  4. Asymmetry of calmodulin revealed by peptide binding.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, E; Leclerc, L; Marden, M C

    1993-03-01

    The binding of amphiphilic peptides to calmodulin has been studied using fluorescence energy transfer techniques. Calmodulin has no tryptophan residues but possesses two tyrosines (at positions 99 and 138) in the C-terminal half of the protein. The peptides have a single tryptophan which serves as energy acceptor for the protein tyrosine fluorescence. For the binding of mastoparan or peptide Baa17, with a tryptophan at position 3, the observed quenching of the tyrosine fluorescence of over a factor of 2 corresponds to an average tyrosine-trytophan distance of less than 14 Å. These results indicate that the peptides binds preferentially with the tryptophan in the C-terminal half of the protein.

  5. The Year in Basic Science: calmodulin kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Means, Anthony R

    2008-12-01

    This article highlights studies published during the past year that represent significant scientific achievements in the world of calmodulin kinase cascades. Calmodulin is the primary receptor for calcium present in all cells. The binding of its calcium ligand results in a conformational change in calmodulin, which allows the calcium-calmodulin complex to interact with many different targets. In the studies to be summarized in this review, the particular calmodulin cascade involved is shown to be the pathway responsible for important biological responses, including long-term memory formation, dendritic cell survival, hypercapnia, neuronal migration, synapse formation, autophagy, fatty acid oxidation, and energy balance. In some cases, the pathway was previously unknown, and the identification of the calmodulin cascade represents the definition of roles. In other cases, manipulating the cascade has suggested therapeutic approaches to certain diseases, most significantly, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  6. Competitive inhibition of TRPV1-calmodulin interaction by vanilloids.

    PubMed

    Hetényi, Anasztázia; Németh, Lukács; Wéber, Edit; Szakonyi, Gerda; Winter, Zoltán; Jósvay, Katalin; Bartus, Éva; Oláh, Zoltán; Martinek, Tamás A

    2016-08-01

    There is enormous interest toward vanilloid agonists of the pain receptor TRPV1 in analgesic therapy, but the mechanisms of their sensory neuron-blocking effects at high or repeated doses are still a matter of debate. Our results have demonstrated that capsaicin and resiniferatoxin form nanomolar complexes with calmodulin, and competitively inhibit TRPV1-calmodulin interaction. These interactions involve the protein recognition interface of calmodulin, which is responsible for all of the cell-regulatory calmodulin-protein interactions. These results draw attention to a previously unknown vanilloid target, which may contribute to the explanation of the paradoxical pain-modulating behavior of these important pharmacons.

  7. Functional conformations of calmodulin: I. Preparation and characterization of a conformational specific anti-bovine calmodulin monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Wolf, T; Fleminger, G; Solomon, B

    1995-01-01

    Calmodulin, similarly to many other Ca(2+)-activated proteins, undergoes considerable conformational changes in the presence of Ca2+ ions. These changes were followed using specific monoclonal antibodies against calmodulin. Since calmodulin is a poor immunogen due to its high phylogenetic conservancy, glutaraldehyde-crosslinked bovine brain extract, which contains a considerable amount of functionally active calmodulin complexed with its target proteins, was used as an antigen. Out of nine anti-calmodulin mAbs isolated, three (namely, CAM1, CAM2 and CAM4) were purified and characterized. MAb CAM1 was identified as an IgG1 while mAbs CAM2 and CAM4 belong to IgM class. Additivity ELISA showed that mAb CAM1 binds to an epitope located remote from the epitopes recognized by the other two mAbs, while mAbs CAM2 and CAM4 recognize close epitopes. MAb CAM1 was found to be especially sensitive to the conformational state of calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+ ions. The interactions of mAbs CAM2 and CAM4 with calmodulin are only slightly affected by Ca2+ removal. In addition mAb CAM1 failed to recognize other calmodulin molecules, such as spinach and various plant recombinant calmodulins, while mAbs CAM1 and CAM4 share common epitopes with the above molecules.

  8. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  9. Decoding of calcium signal through calmodulin: calmodulin-binding proteins in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many abiotic and biotic stimuli such as heat, cold, drought, salt, light, wind, touch, wounding, symbionts and pathogens as well as growth, developmental and hormonal cues can quickly induce cytosolic calcium increases. Calmodulin, the most thoroughly studied calcium sensor, mediates interpretation...

  10. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  11. Specific localization of scallop gill epithelial calmodulin in cilia.

    PubMed

    Stommel, E W; Stephens, R E; Masure, H R; Head, J F

    1982-03-01

    Calmodulin has been isolated and characterized from the gill of the bay scallop aequipecten irradians. Quantitative electrophoretic analysis of epithelial cell fractions show most of the calmodulin to be localized in the cilia, specifically in the detergent- solubilized membrane-matrix fraction. Calmodulin represents 2.2 +/- 0.3 percent of the membrane-matrix protein or 0.41 +/- 0.5 percent of the total ciliary protein. Its concentration is at least 10(-4) M if distributed uniformly within the matrix. Extraction in the presence of calcium suggests that the calmodulin is not bound to the axoneme proper. The ciliary protein is identified as a calmodulin on the basis of its calcium- dependent binding to a fluphenazine-sepharose affinity column and its comigration with bovine brain calmodulin on alkaline-urea and SDS polyacrylamide gels in both the presence and absence of calcium. Scallop ciliary calmodulin activates bovine brain phosphodiesterase to the same extent as bovine brain and chicken gizzard calmodulins. Containing trimethyllysine and lacking cysteine and tryptophan, the amino acid composition of gill calmodulin is typical of known calmodulins, except that it is relatively high in serine and low in methionine. Its composition is less acidic than other calmodulins, in agreement with an observed isoelectric point approximately 0.2 units higher than that of bovine brain. Comparative tryptic peptide mapping of scallop gill ciliary and bovine brain calmodulins indicates coincidence of over 75 percent of the major peptides, but at least two major peptides in each show no near-equivalency. Preliminary results using ATP-reactivated gill cell models show no effect of calcium at micromolar levels on ciliary beat or directionality of the lateral cilia, the cilia which constitute the vast majority of those isolated. However, ciliary arrest will occur at calcium levels more than 150 muM. Because calmodulin usually functions in the micromolar range, its role in this system

  12. Fas Binding to Calmodulin Regulates Apoptosis in Osteoclasts*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaojun; Ahn, Eun-Young; McKenna, Margaret A.; Yeo, Hyeonju; McDonald, Jay M.

    2005-01-01

    Promotion of osteoclast apoptosis is one therapeutic approach to osteoporosis. Calmodulin, the major intracellular Ca2+ receptor, modulates both osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. The calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine, rescues bone loss in ovariectomized mice (Zhang, L., Feng, X., and McDonald, J. M. (2003) Endocrinology 144, 4536–4543). We show here that a 3-h treatment of mouse osteoclasts with either of the calmodulin antagonists, tamoxifen or trifluoperazine, induces osteoclast apoptosis dose-dependently. Tamoxifen, 10 μm, and trifluoperazine, 10 μm, induce 7.3 ± 1.8-fold and 5.3 ± 0.9-fold increases in osteoclast apoptosis, respectively. In Jurkat cells, calmodulin binds to Fas, the death receptor, and this binding is regulated during Fas-mediated apoptosis (Ahn, E. Y., Lim, S. T., Cook, W. J., and McDonald, J. M. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 5661–5666). In osteoclasts, calmodulin also binds Fas. When osteoclasts are treated with 10 μm trifluoperazine, the binding between Fas and calmodulin is dramatically decreased at 15 min and gradually recovers by 60 min. A point mutation of the Fas death domain in the Lpr−cg mouse renders Fas inactive. Using glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins, the human Fas cytoplasmic domain is shown to bind calmodulin, whereas a point mutation (V254N) comparable with the Lpr−cg mutation in mice has markedly reduced calmodulin binding. Osteoclasts derived from Lpr−cg mice have diminished calmodulin/Fas binding and are more sensitive to calmodulin antagonist-induced apoptosis than those from wild-type mice. Both tamoxifen- and trifluoperazine-induced apoptosis are increased 1.6 ± 0.2-fold in Lpr−cg-derived osteoclasts compared with osteoclasts derived from wild-type mice. In summary, calmodulin antagonists induce apoptosis in osteoclasts by a mechanism involving interference with calmodulin binding to Fas. The effects of calmodulin/Fas binding on calmodulin antagonist-induced apoptosis may open a new

  13. Use of fluorescently labelled calmodulins as tools to measure subcellular calmodulin activation in living dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Milikan, J M; Bolsover, S R

    2000-01-01

    We have used fluorescently labelled calmodulins to probe the activity of calmodulin in living dorsal root ganglion cells. Calmodulin labelled with the fluorophore 5-([4,6 dichlorotriazin-2yl]amino)-fluorescein (FL-CaM) does not change its fluorescence when it binds calcium, while calmodulin labelled at lysine 75 with 2-chloro-(6-(4-N,N-diethylamino-phenyl)-1,4,5-triazin-4-yl (TA-CaM), an environment-sensitive probe, increases its fluorescence when it binds calcium. We micro-injected FL-CaM or TA-CaM into rat dorsal root ganglion cells and found that both probes localise to the cell nucleus. In contrast, endogenous cellular calmodulin, in dorsal root ganglion cells as in hippocampal neurones, is predominantly cytosolic unless the neurones are depolarised, then it moves to the nucleus. FL-CaM and TA-CaM, introduced into dorsal root ganglion cells via a patch pipette, also immediately move to the nucleus, indicating that the nuclear localisation is a property of the labelled calmodulins. Although the subcellular distribution of FL-CaM and TA-CaM does not necessarily match that of endogenous calmodulin, we show that FL-CaM can be used as a control for TA-CaM when studying calmodulin activation in different cellular compartments.

  14. High-pressure SANS and fluorescence unfolding study of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Gibrat, Gabriel; Hoa, Gaston Hui Bon; Craescu, Constantin T; Assairi, Liliane; Blouquit, Yves; Annighöfer, Burkhard; May, Roland P; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2014-09-01

    Apo-calmodulin, a small soluble mainly α protein, is a calcium-dependent protein activator. Calcium binding affects the calmodulin conformation but also its stability. Calcium free form unfolds between 40 and 80°C, whereas the calcium-saturated form is stable up to temperatures as high as 100°C, forbidding comparison of the thermal unfolding pathways of the two forms. Thus, this paper focuses especially on the conformation of pressure-induced unfolding states of both forms of calmodulin, by combining small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) with biophysical techniques such as tyrosines and ANS fluorescence. In contrast to heat denaturation (Gibrat et al., BBA, 2012), the pressure denaturation of calmodulin is reversible up to pressures of 3000bar (300MPa). A pressure-induced compact intermediate state has been found for the two calmodulin forms, but their unfolding pathways are different. A domain compaction and an increase of the ANS fluorescence of holo form have been evidenced. On the contrary, a domain dilatation and an ANS fluorescence decrease have been found for the apo form. The pressure induced an increase of the interdomain distance for both calmodulin forms, suggesting that the central linker of calmodulin is flexible in solution.

  15. Structural basis for calmodulin as a dynamic calcium sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Abrams, Cameron; Wang, Liping; Gizzi, Anthony; He, Liping; Lin, Ruihe; Chen, Yuan; Loll, Patrick J.; Pascal, John M.; Zhang, Ji-fang

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin is a prototypical and versatile Ca2+ sensor with EF-hands as its high-affinity Ca2+ binding domains. Calmodulin is present in all eukaryotic cells, mediating Ca2+-dependent signaling. Upon binding Ca2+, calmodulin changes its conformation to form complexes with a diverse array of target proteins. Despite a wealth of knowledge on calmodulin, little is known on how target proteins regulate calmodulin’s ability to bind Ca2+. Here, we take advantage of two splice variants of SK2 channels, which are activated by Ca2+-bound calmodulin, but show different sensitivity to Ca2+ for their activation. Protein crystal structures and other experiments show that depending on which SK2 splice variant it binds to calmodulin adopts drastically different conformations with different affinities for Ca2+ at its C-lobe. Such target protein induced conformational changes make calmodulin a dynamic Ca2+ sensor, capable of responding to different Ca2+ concentrations in cellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:22579256

  16. Calcium/Calmodulin-Mediated Gravitropic Response in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a fundamental understanding of how calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is involved in gravity signal transduction in plants. During the period of support, significant progress was made in elucidating the role of calmodulin and its target proteins in gravitropism. This laboratory has made breakthroughs by cloning and characterizing genes that are involved in calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling. Some of these genes show altered expression under hypergravity and simulated microgravity conditions. A major advance was made in our attempts to understand gravity signal transduction by cloning and characterizing a catalase which requires calcium/calmodulin for its activation. Our results suggest that calcium/calmodulin have dual roles in regulating the level of hydrogen peroxide (H202), a signal molecule that plays a major role in gravitropism. It is well established that auxin plays a major role in gravitropism. Our results indicate that there is a 'cross-talk' between calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and auxin-mediated signal transduction. Auxin-regulated SAUR proteins that are involved in gravitropism bind to calmodulin in a calcium-dependent manner. A novel chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase was cloned and characterized and its role in gravity signal transduction was investigated. These studies have provided some answers to the fundamental questions about how signal molecules such as calcium, H202, and hormones such as auxin bring about the ultimate gravitropic response and the integral role of calmodulin in gravity signal transduction. This NASA-funded study has led to some spinoffs that have applications in solving agricultural problems. The Washington State University Research Foundation has obtained several patents related to this work.

  17. Human Calmodulin Methyltransferase: Expression, Activity on Calmodulin, and Hsp90 Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Sophia; Magnani, Roberta; Haziza, Sitvanit; Hershkovitz, Eli; Houtz, Robert; Cambi, Franca; Parvari, Ruti

    2012-01-01

    Deletion of the first exon of calmodulin-lysine N-methyltransferase (CaM KMT, previously C2orf34) has been reported in two multigene deletion syndromes, but additional studies on the gene have not been reported. Here we show that in the cells from 2p21 deletion patients the loss of CaM KMT expression results in accumulation of hypomethylated calmodulin compared to normal controls, suggesting that CaM KMT is essential for calmodulin methylation and there are no compensatory mechanisms for CaM methylation in humans. We have further studied the expression of this gene at the transcript and protein levels. We have identified 2 additional transcripts in cells of the 2p21 deletion syndrome patients that start from alternative exons positioned outside the deletion region. One of them starts in the 2nd known exon, the other in a novel exon. The transcript starting from the novel exon was also identified in a variety of tissues from normal individuals. These new transcripts are not expected to produce proteins. Immunofluorescent localization of tagged CaM KMT in HeLa cells indicates that it is present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells whereas the short isoform is localized to the Golgi apparatus. Using Western blot analysis we show that the CaM KMT protein is broadly expressed in mouse tissues. Finally we demonstrate that the CaM KMT interacts with the middle portion of the Hsp90 molecular chaperon and is probably a client protein since it is degraded upon treatment of cells with the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin. These findings suggest that the CaM KMT is the major, possibly the single, methyltransferase of calmodulin in human cells with a wide tissue distribution and is a novel Hsp90 client protein. Thus our data provides basic information for a gene potentially contributing to the patient phenotype of two contiguous gene deletion syndromes. PMID:23285036

  18. Human calmodulin methyltransferase: expression, activity on calmodulin, and Hsp90 dependence.

    PubMed

    Magen, Sophia; Magnani, Roberta; Haziza, Sitvanit; Hershkovitz, Eli; Houtz, Robert; Cambi, Franca; Parvari, Ruti

    2012-01-01

    Deletion of the first exon of calmodulin-lysine N-methyltransferase (CaM KMT, previously C2orf34) has been reported in two multigene deletion syndromes, but additional studies on the gene have not been reported. Here we show that in the cells from 2p21 deletion patients the loss of CaM KMT expression results in accumulation of hypomethylated calmodulin compared to normal controls, suggesting that CaM KMT is essential for calmodulin methylation and there are no compensatory mechanisms for CaM methylation in humans. We have further studied the expression of this gene at the transcript and protein levels. We have identified 2 additional transcripts in cells of the 2p21 deletion syndrome patients that start from alternative exons positioned outside the deletion region. One of them starts in the 2(nd) known exon, the other in a novel exon. The transcript starting from the novel exon was also identified in a variety of tissues from normal individuals. These new transcripts are not expected to produce proteins. Immunofluorescent localization of tagged CaM KMT in HeLa cells indicates that it is present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells whereas the short isoform is localized to the Golgi apparatus. Using Western blot analysis we show that the CaM KMT protein is broadly expressed in mouse tissues. Finally we demonstrate that the CaM KMT interacts with the middle portion of the Hsp90 molecular chaperon and is probably a client protein since it is degraded upon treatment of cells with the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin. These findings suggest that the CaM KMT is the major, possibly the single, methyltransferase of calmodulin in human cells with a wide tissue distribution and is a novel Hsp90 client protein. Thus our data provides basic information for a gene potentially contributing to the patient phenotype of two contiguous gene deletion syndromes.

  19. Detection of calmodulin-binding proteins using a 32P-labeled GST-calmodulin fusion protein and a novel renaturation protocol.

    PubMed

    Fischer, R; Wei, Y; Berchtold, M

    1996-08-01

    To identify calmodulin-binding proteins in cellular extracts and tissue homogenates and to analyze purified calmodulin target proteins, overlay procedures using 125I-calmodulin or, more recently, nonradioactive biotinylated calmodulin have been widely used. Here we describe a rapid, alternative method for detecting calmodulin-binding proteins with a 32P-labeled calmodulin probe generated as a glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fusion protein. We used a modified pGEX-2TK vector, which contains the flag epitope and the consensus sequence R-R-A-S, that can be phosphorylated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. The fusion protein is easily purified from bacterial bysates by affinity chromatography using glutathione-Sepharose 4B beads. Phosphorylation of GST-calmodulin is performed directly on the beads and, after elution with reduced glutathione, the labeled calmodulin probe can be used for overlay experiments. We also describe a rapid renaturation protocol that enhances the signal for some but not all calmodulin-binding proteins and is used after the proteins have been transferred to nitrocellulose filters. Furthermore, we have compared the specificity and sensitivity of the 32P-labeled GST-calmodulin overlay with those of 125I-calmodulin and biotinylated calmodulin, clearly indicating that our newly developed protocol is a suitable alternative to conventionally used calmodulin overlay procedures.

  20. Dopamine binds calmodulin during autoregulation of dopaminergic D2 receptor signaling through CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex.

    PubMed

    Laoye, B J; Okurumeh, O A; Obagaye, O V; Olagunju, M O; Bankole, O O; Olubiyi, O O; Ogundele, O M

    2016-01-01

    The role of dopaminergic D2 receptor (D2R) autoregulation in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission cannot be overemphasized in cause and progression of disorders associated with complex behaviors. Although previous studies have shown that D2R is structurally and physiologically linked with calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKIIα), however, the role of calmodulin in the CaMKIIα complex in D2R regulation remains elusive. In this study, using structural biology modeling softwares (iGEMDOCK and CueMol), we have shown the interaction between D2R, CaMKIIα, calmodulin, and DA under varying conditions. The outcomes of this study suggest that CaMKIIα causes a change in DA binding affinity to the D2R receptive site while the detached DA binds to calmodulin to stop the activity of D2R in the D2R-dopaminergic D1 receptor (D1R) heteromer. Ultimately, we concluded that D2R autoregulates to stop its heteromeric combination with D1R. D2R interacts with D1R to facilitate calcium movement that activates calmodulin, then CaMKIIα. The CaMKIIα-calmodulin complex changes the affinity of DA-D2R causing DA to break free and bind with calmodulin.

  1. Calmodulin inhibitors from natural sources: an update.

    PubMed

    Mata, Rachel; Figueroa, Mario; González-Andrade, Martín; Rivera-Chávez, José Alberto; Madariaga-Mazón, Abraham; Del Valle, Paulina

    2015-03-27

    Calmodulin (CaM) plays a central role in regulating a myriad of cellular functions in physiological and pathophysiological processes, thus representing an important drug target. In previous reviews, our group has reported relevant information regarding natural anti-CaM compounds up to 2009. Natural sources continue to provide a diverse and unique reservoir of CaM inhibitors for drug and research tool discovery. This review provides an update of natural products with reported CaM inhibitory properties, which includes around 70 natural products and some synthetic analogues, belonging to different structural classes. Most of these natural inhibitors were isolated from fungi and plants and belong to the stilbenoid, polyketide, alkaloid, and peptide structural classes. These products were discovered mainly using a fluorescence-based method on rationally designed biosensors, which are highly specific, low-cost, and selective and have short reaction times. The effect of several antimitotic drugs on Ca(2+)-hCaM is also described.

  2. Role of Calcium and Calmodulin in Plant Cell Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium and calmodulin in plant cell regulation is discussed. Experiments are done to discover the level of calcium in plants and animals. The effect of intracellular calcium on photosynthesis is discussed.

  3. Role of Calcium and Calmodulin in Plant Cell Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium and calmodulin in plant cell regulation is discussed. Experiments are done to discover the level of calcium in plants and animals. The effect of intracellular calcium on photosynthesis is discussed.

  4. Expression of a calmodulin methylation mutant affects the growth and development of transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D M; Besl, L; Oh, S H; Masterson, R V; Schell, J; Stacey, G

    1992-01-01

    Transgenic plants were constructed that express two foreign calmodulins (VU-1 and VU-3 calmodulins) derived from a cloned synthetic calmodulin gene. VU-1 calmodulin, similar to endogenous plant calmodulin, possesses a lysine residue at position 115 and undergoes posttranslational methylation. VU-3 calmodulin is a site-directed mutant of VU-1 calmodulin that is identical in sequence except for the substitution of an arginine at position 115 and thus is incapable of methylation. Both calmodulin genes, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, were expressed in transgenic tobacco. Foreign calmodulin protein accumulated in plant tissues to levels equivalent to that of the endogenous calmodulin. All transformed lines of VU-1 plants were indistinguishable from untransformed controls with respect to growth and development. However, all transformed lines of VU-3 plants were characterized by decreased stem internode growth, reduced seed production, and reduced seed and pollen viability. The data suggest that these phenotypes are the result of the expression of the calmodulin mutant rather than the position of transferred DNA insertion or the overall alteration of calmodulin levels. Analyses of the activity of the purified transgenic calmodulins suggest that calmodulin-dependent NAD kinase is among the potential targets that may have altered regulation in VU-3 transgenic plants. Images PMID:1325656

  5. Antibodies to calmodulin during experimental Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infections in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Ruben, L; Patton, C L

    1985-01-01

    Calmodulin is an intracellular Ca2+ receptor protein which regulates a wide variety of enzymatic processes in eukaryotic cells examined in detail. Native calmodulin is not antigenic in rabbits because of its small size, high degree of amino acid sequence conservation and hydrophobicity. African trypanosomes contain a novel calmodulin which is structurally distinct from bovine brain and Tetrahymena calmodulins. In the present study, we examine the antibody response towards these calmodulins during chronic Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infections. Injection of purified trypanosome calmodulin into rabbits stimulates the production of specific IgG antibodies which recognize trypanosome, but not bovine brain or Tetrahymena calmodulins. By contrast, during chronic T. brucei infections in rabbits, antibodies (IgG + IgM + IgA) that recognize trypanosome, Tetrahymena and mammalian calmodulins arise. When only IgG antibodies are evaluated from infection sera, the major response is against mammalian and Tetrahymena calmodulins. Significantly fewer IgG antibodies are measured in the infection sera which recognize trypanosome calmodulin, while the non-specific control protein, chicken ovalbumin, is not recognized. Peak IgG antibody responses against calmodulin occur between Days 30-34 post-infection. Competition assays indicate that Tetrahymena and mammalian calmodulins are recognized at identical epitopes which are distinct from epitopes on trypanosome calmodulin. We conclude that, in the context of chronic T. brucei infections in rabbits, antibodies arise which are able to recognize mammalian host calmodulin. Images Figure 1 PMID:2414212

  6. Purification of calmodulin from rice bran and activation of glutamate decarboxylase by Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Min; Lv, Ying Guo; Zhang, Hui

    2010-03-15

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive regulator, and its biosynthesis is primarily through the alpha-decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In plants, it was verified that the production of GABA is regulated, in part, via Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). Our preliminary studies showed that rice bran GAD is probably also a Ca(2+)/CaM dependent enzyme; hence, in the current investigation, we purified calmodulin from rice bran, and studied the effect of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin complex on the activity of rice bran GAD in vitro. CaM was purified to homogeneity from the rice bran by a combined protocol involving TCA precipitation, heat treatment, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, with the purification fold and recovery of 851.7 and 55.6%, respectively. This protein had similar amino acid composition as the CaMs from other higher plants. The rice bran GAD was found to be quite sensitive to the Ca(2+)/CaM complex at pH 7.0, and addition of exogenous EGTA or TFP efficiently inhibited the stimulatory effect of Ca(2+)/CaM complex. At a separate concentration of Ca(2+) and CaM of 200 micromol L(-1) and 150 nmol L(-1), the rice bran GAD was significantly enhanced 3-fold. Moreover, upon binding Ca(2+), CaM underwent a conformational change that facilitated a more obvious emergency of phenylalanine and tyrosine residues. This investigation provided preliminary information for the development of a GABA-based, cost-effective rice bran GAD-related functional food.

  7. Inorganic lead and calcium interact positively in activation of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Kern, M; Wisniewski, M; Cabell, L; Audesirk, G

    2000-06-01

    Calmodulin is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that mediates many of the intracellular actions of Ca2+ ions. The calcium-binding sites of calmodulin consist of four EF-hand motifs; full activation of calmodulin normally occurs when all four sites are occupied by Ca2+. Inorganic lead (PY2+) has been shown to activate calmodulin at total lead concentrations similar to the concentrations of Ca2+ required for activation (Goldstein and Ar, 1983; Habermann et al., 1983), but the free Pb2+ concentrations required for calmodulin activation have not been determined. In addition, it is possible that activation may occur with different sites occupied by different divalent cations, for example Ca2+ and Pb2+. We investigated the ability of free Pb2+, alone or in combination with Ca2+, to activate calmodulin. In aqueous media, N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) show increased fluorescence when bound to hydrophobic regions of proteins. This increased fluorescence has been used to monitor the conformational change that occurs during calmodulin activation (LaPorte et al., 1980). In the presence of calmodulin, both Ca2+ and Pb2+ stimulated increased fluorescence of NPN and ANS. Threshold and EC50 free metal concentrations were approximately 100 nM and 450-500 nM, respectively, for Ca2+ and 100 pM and 400-550 pM, respectively, for Pb2+. Fluorescence was enhanced by combinations of low concentrations of free Ca2+ and Pb2+; for example, as little as 20 pM free Pb2+ enhanced fluorescence in combination with 200 nM free Ca2+. The activity of the PDE1 isoform of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase is stimulated by Ca2+/calmodulin (Wang et al., 1990). In the presence of calmodulin, we found that Ca2+ and Pb2+ activated calmodulin-stimulated PDE activity, with threshold and EC50 free metal concentrations of approximately 200 nM and 1200 nM, respectively, for Ca2+ and 300 pM and 430 pM, respectively, for Pb2+. PDE activity was stimulated by

  8. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention.

  9. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention. PMID:27040077

  10. A citrate-binding site in calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, T; Eisenstein, M; Muszkat, K A; Fleminger, G

    1998-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a major Ca2+ messenger which, upon Ca2+ activation, binds and activates a number of target enzymes involved in crucial cellular processes. The dependence on Ca2+ ion concentration suggests that CaM activation may be modulated by low-affinity Ca2+ chelators. The effect on CaM structure and function of citrate ion, a Ca2+ chelator commonly found in the cytosol and the mitochondria, was therefore investigated. A series of structural and biochemical methods, including tryptic mapping, immunological recognition by specific monoclonal antibodies, CIDNP-NMR, binding to specific ligands and association with radiolabeled citrate, showed that citrate induces conformational modifications in CaM which affect the shape and activity of the protein. These changes were shown to be associated with the C-terminal lobe of the molecule and involve actual binding of citrate to CaM. Analyzing X-ray structures of several citrate-binding proteins by computerized molecular graphics enabled us to identify a putative citrate-binding site (CBS) on the CaM molecule around residues Arg106-His107. Owing to the tight proximity of this site to the third Ca(2+)-binding loop of CaM, binding of citrate is presumably translated into changes in Ca2+ binding to site III (and indirectly to site IV). These changes apparently affect the structural and biochemical properties of the conformation-sensitive protein.

  11. Kinetics of calmodulin binding to calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Andrea R; Wang, Dan; Forbes, Joanna E; Waxham, M Neal

    2005-08-26

    Calcineurin (CaN) binds Ca(2+)-saturated calmodulin (CaM) with relatively high affinity; however, an accurate steady-state K(d) value has not been determined. In this report, we describe, using steady-state and stopped-flow fluorescence techniques, the rates of association and dissociation of Ca(2+)-saturated CaM from CaN heterodimer (CaNA/CaNB) and CaNA only. The rate of Ca(2+)/CaM association was determined to be 4.6 x 10(7) M(-1)s(-1). The rate of Ca(2+)/CaM dissociation from CaN was slower than previously reported and was approximately 0.0012 s(-1). In preparations of CaNA alone (no regulatory CaNB subunit), the dissociation rate was slowed further to 0.00026 s(-1). From these data we calculate a K(d) for binding of Ca(2+)-saturated CaM to CaN of 28 pM. This K(d) is significantly lower than previously reported estimates of approximately 1 nM and indicates that CaN is one of the highest affinity CaM-binding proteins identified to date.

  12. Regulation of brain adenylate cyclase by calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis examined the interaction between the Ca{sup 2+}-binding protein, calmodulin (CaM), and the cAMP synthesizing enzyme, adenylate cyclase. The regulation of guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylate cyclase by CaM was examined in a particulate fraction from bovine striatum. CaM stimulated basal adenylate cyclase activity and enhanced the stimulation of the enzyme by GTP and dopamine (DA). The potentiation of GTP- and DA-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities by CaM was more sensitive to the concentration of CaM than was the stimulation of basal activity. A photoreactive CaM derivative was developed in order to probe the interactions between CaM and the adenylate cyclase components of bovine brain. Iodo-({sup 125}I)-CaM-diazopyruvamide ({sup 125}I-CAM-DAP) behaved like native CaM with respect to Ca{sup 2+}-enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent, concentration-dependent, and CaM-specific manner. Photolysis of {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP and forskolin-agarose purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase produced an adduct with a molecular weight of 140,000.

  13. Conformational Frustration in Calmodulin-Target Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Pengzhi; Hoffman, Laurel; Waxham, M. Neal; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a primary calcium (Ca2+) signaling protein that specifically recognizes and activates highly diverse target proteins. We explored the molecular basis of target recognition of CaM with peptides representing the CaM-binding domains from two Ca2+-CaM dependent kinases, CaMKI and CaMKII, by employing experimentally-constrained molecular simulations. Detailed binding route analysis revealed that the two CaM target peptides, although similar in length and net charge, follow distinct routes that lead to a higher binding frustration in the CaM-CaMKII complex than the CaM-CaMKI complex. We discovered that the molecular origin of the binding frustration is caused by intermolecular contacts formed with the C-domain of CaM that need to be broken before the formation of intermolecular contacts with the N-domain of CaM. We argue that the binding frustration is important for determining the kinetics of the recognition process of proteins involving large structural fluctuations. PMID:25622562

  14. Calmodulin limits pathogenic Na+ channel persistent current

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Haidun; Wang, Chaojian; Marx, Steven O.

    2017-01-01

    Increased “persistent” current, caused by delayed inactivation, through voltage-gated Na+ (NaV) channels leads to cardiac arrhythmias or epilepsy. The underlying molecular contributors to these inactivation defects are poorly understood. Here, we show that calmodulin (CaM) binding to multiple sites within NaV channel intracellular C-terminal domains (CTDs) limits persistent Na+ current and accelerates inactivation across the NaV family. Arrhythmia or epilepsy mutations located in NaV1.5 or NaV1.2 channel CTDs, respectively, reduce CaM binding either directly or by interfering with CTD–CTD interchannel interactions. Boosting the availability of CaM, thus shifting its binding equilibrium, restores wild-type (WT)–like inactivation in mutant NaV1.5 and NaV1.2 channels and likewise diminishes the comparatively large persistent Na+ current through WT NaV1.6, whose CTD displays relatively low CaM affinity. In cerebellar Purkinje neurons, in which NaV1.6 promotes a large physiological persistent Na+ current, increased CaM diminishes the persistent Na+ current, suggesting that the endogenous, comparatively weak affinity of NaV1.6 for apoCaM is important for physiological persistent current. PMID:28087622

  15. Acute inhibition of corticosteroidogenesis by inhibitors of calmodulin action.

    PubMed

    Carsia, R V; Moyle, W R; Wolff, D J; Malamed, S

    1982-11-01

    To identify the possible role of calmodulin in ACTH function, we tested the ability of chlorpromazine (CP) and other calmodulin antagonists to inhibit steroidogenesis of isolated adrenocortical cells of the rat. CP reversibly inhibited maximal ACTH-induced corticosterone (B) production. The presence of the drug did not alter the ED50 of ACTH stimulation (3.2 X 10(3) pg/ml), suggesting that it inhibited ACTH-induced steroidogenesis in a noncompetitive manner. The CP concentration required for half-maximal inhibition was 8.2 microM, a value close to the dissociation constant of the CP-calmodulin complex (5.3 microM). Concentrations greater than 40 microM resulted in complete inhibition. Similar concentrations of CP inhibited ACTH-induced cAMP accumulation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating an effect of the drug on early events in ACTH action. In addition, CP also apparently acted at a site distal to the point of cAMP formation, as shown by the finding that it inhibited cAMP-induced B production. CP inhibition of ACTH-induced B production was independent of the Ca2+ concentration, suggesting that the drug did not compete with Ca2+ directly. Concentrations of CP greater than 20 microM inhibited protein synthesis as measured by leucine incorporation into cellular proteins. Thus, although the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of CP on steroidogenesis might be explained by an effect on protein synthesis, the inhibition seen at 10 microM appeared to be independent of protein synthesis. Other antagonists of calmodulin action inhibited maximal ACTH-induced B production with the following relative potencies: trifluoperazine greater than CP greater than haloperidol greater than chlordiazepoxide. This order is similar to that reported for inhibition of calmodulin-activated phosphodiesterase and for binding to calmodulin. These findings suggest that calmodulin may modulate the effect of ACTH on steroidogenesis at multiple sites.

  16. Suramin and the suramin analogue NF307 discriminate among calmodulin-binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, M; Bofill-Cardona, E; Mayer, B; Nanoff, C; Freissmuth, M; Hohenegger, M

    2001-01-01

    Calmodulin-binding sites on target proteins show considerable variation in primary sequence; hence compounds that block the access of calmodulin to these binding sites may be more selective than compounds that inactivate calmodulin. Suramin and its analogue NF307 inhibit the interaction of calmodulin with the ryanodine receptor. We have investigated whether inhibition of calmodulin binding to target proteins is a general property of these compounds. Suramin inhibited binding of [(125)I]calmodulin to porcine brain membranes and to sarcoplasmic reticulum from skeletal muscle (IC(50)=4.9+/-1.2 microM and 19.9+/-1.8 microM, respectively) and blocked the cross-linking of [(125)I]calmodulin to some, but not all, target proteins in brain membranes by [(125)I]calmodulin. Four calmodulin-binding proteins were purified [ryanodine receptor-1 (RyR1) from rabbit skeletal muscle, neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) from Sf9 cells, G-protein betagamma dimers (Gbetagamma) from porcine brain and a glutathione S-transferase-fusion protein comprising the C-terminal calmodulin-binding domain of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 7A (GST-CmGluR7A) from bacterial lysates]. Three of the proteins employed (Gbetagamma, GST-CmGluR7A and RyR1) display a comparable affinity for calmodulin (in the range of 50-70 nM). Nevertheless, suramin and NF307 only blocked the binding of Gbetagamma and RyR1 to calmodulin-Sepharose. In contrast, the association of GST-CmGluR7A and nNOS was not impaired, whereas excess calmodulin uniformly displaced all proteins from the matrix. Thus suramin and NF307 are prototypes of a new class of calmodulin antagonists that do not interact directly with calmodulin but with calmodulin-recognition sites. In addition, these compounds discriminate among calmodulin-binding motifs. PMID:11311147

  17. Characterization and Functional Analysis of Calmodulin and Calmodulin-Like Genes in Fragaria vesca

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Yue, Dingyi; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang; Feng, Jiayue; Zou, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    Calcium is a universal messenger that is involved in the modulation of diverse developmental and adaptive processes in response to various stimuli. Calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-like (CML) proteins are major calcium sensors in all eukaryotes, and they have been extensively investigated for many years in plants and animals. However, little is known about CaMs and CMLs in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca). In this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the strawberry genome and identified 4 CaM and 36 CML genes. Bioinformatics analyses, including gene structure, phylogenetic tree, synteny and three-dimensional model assessments, revealed the conservation and divergence of FvCaMs and FvCMLs, thus providing insight regarding their functions. In addition, the transcript abundance of four FvCaM genes and the four most related FvCML genes were examined in different tissues and in response to multiple stress and hormone treatments. Moreover, we investigated the subcellular localization of several FvCaMs and FvCMLs, revealing their potential interactions based on the localizations and potential functions. Furthermore, overexpression of five FvCaM and FvCML genes could not induce a hypersensitive response, but four of the five genes could increase resistance to Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. This study provides evidence for the biological roles of FvCaM and CML genes, and the results lay the foundation for future functional studies of these genes. PMID:27990153

  18. Studies on a novel macrophage-specific calmodulin binding glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The murine macrophage-like cell line J774 and peritoneal exudate cells elicited with thioglycollate or starch contain a major calmodulin-binding protein which is absent in trifluoperazine-resistant variants of J774, resident peritoneal macrophages and these elicited with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, proteose peptone or Bacillus Clamette Guerin. Resident murine peritoneal cells maintained in tissue culture for 3 days begin to accumulate this protein as do human peripheral blood monocytes after 7 days of culture. A specific competitive displacement radioimmunoassay was developed using a rabbit antiserum raised to the partially purified calmodulin binding protein and (/sup 125/I) calmodulin covalently crosslinked to the principal calmodulin binding protein in the preparation. The radioimmunoassay confirmed the unique cellular distribution of this protein suggesting that it may be a marker for certain stages of macrophage differentiation. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared and one of these was used to further purify the protein by immunoaffinity chromatography. A protein of molecular weight 50,000 to 60,000 was isolated. It could be selectively adsorbed to wheat germ agglutinin agarose and subsequently eluted with N-acetyl glucosamine. This property plus its sensitivity to endoglycosidase F led to the conclusion that it is a glycoprotein. The cellular distribution, subcellular localization and evidence of glycosylation suggest that this protein may be a macrophage-specific receptor with a high affinity for calcium-calmodulin.

  19. Calcium and Calmodulin Localization in Gravitropically-responding Plant Organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    Antimonate staining procedures were used to detect calcium redistribution changes in corn roots. Results show that an asymmetric redistribution of Ca is induced by a gravitropic stimulus in roots as it is in shoots. Since this response occurs within 10 min, at least 5 min before any visible bending, it could play a role in the regulation of root gravitropism. Two different general approaches were used to localize calmodulin in plant tissue: radioimmunoassay of its content in tissue and in purified subcellular organelles, and immunocytochemical detection of it in roots and coleoptiles. Radioimmunoassay results indicate that calmodulin is present in large quantities in pllant cells and that it is specifically associated with mitochondria, etioplasts and nuclei. An assayed of an extract of soluble wall proteins revealed that over 1% of these proteins was calmodulin. Controls indicate that this calmodulin is not cytoplasmic in origin. A reaction product from anti-calmodulin was found mainly in the root cap cells, moderately in metazylem elements, in some cells in the stele surrounding metaxylem elements and in cortical cells.

  20. Calcium and Calmodulin Localization in Gravitropically-responding Plant Organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    Antimonate staining procedures were used to detect calcium redistribution changes in corn roots. Results show that an asymmetric redistribution of Ca is induced by a gravitropic stimulus in roots as it is in shoots. Since this response occurs within 10 min, at least 5 min before any visible bending, it could play a role in the regulation of root gravitropism. Two different general approaches were used to localize calmodulin in plant tissue: radioimmunoassay of its content in tissue and in purified subcellular organelles, and immunocytochemical detection of it in roots and coleoptiles. Radioimmunoassay results indicate that calmodulin is present in large quantities in pllant cells and that it is specifically associated with mitochondria, etioplasts and nuclei. An assayed of an extract of soluble wall proteins revealed that over 1% of these proteins was calmodulin. Controls indicate that this calmodulin is not cytoplasmic in origin. A reaction product from anti-calmodulin was found mainly in the root cap cells, moderately in metazylem elements, in some cells in the stele surrounding metaxylem elements and in cortical cells.

  1. Calmodulin-mediated reversible immobilization of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas G; Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Gregory, Kalvin J; Schrift, G; Deo, Sapna

    2007-07-01

    This work demonstrates the use of the protein calmodulin, CaM, as an affinity tag for the reversible immobilization of enzymes on surfaces. Our strategy takes advantage of the of the reversible, calcium-mediated binding of CaM to its ligand phenothiazine and of the ability to produce fusion proteins between CaM and a variety of enzymes to reversibly immobilize enzymes in an oriented fashion to different surfaces. Specifically, we employed two different enzymes, organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and beta-lactamase and two different solid supports, a silica surface and cellulose membrane modified by covalently attaching a phenothiazine ligand, to demonstrate the versatility of our immobilization method. Fusion proteins between CaM-OPH and CaM-beta-lactamase were prepared by using genetic engineering strategies to introduce the calmodulin tail at the N-terminus of each of the two enzymes. In the presence of Ca(2+), CaM adopts a conformation that favors interaction between hydrophobic pockets in CaM and phenothiazine, while in the presence of a Ca(2+)-chelating agent such as EGTA, the interaction between CaM and phenothiazine is disrupted, thus allowing for removal of the CaM-fusion protein from the surface under mild conditions. CaM also acts as a spacer molecule, orienting the enzyme away from the surface and toward the solution, which minimizes enzyme interactions with the immobilization surface. Since the method is based on the highly selective binding of CaM to its phenothiazine ligand, and this is covalently immobilized on the surface, the method does not suffer from ligand leaching nor from interference from other proteins present in the cell extract. An additional advantage lies in that the support can be regenerated by passing through EGTA, and then reused for the immobilization of the same or, if desired, a different enzyme. Using a fusion protein approach for immobilization purposes avoids the use of harsh conditions in the immobilization and/or regeneration

  2. Centrin isoforms in mammals. Relation to calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Felix

    2006-12-01

    In mammals, three calmodulin (CaM) genes code for 100% identical proteins. In these species, four centrin (Cetn) genes have been reported to exist. They are examined in this paper. While the gene for Cetn 1 contains no introns and appears to be derived from Cetn 2 by retroposition, a gene product for Cetn 1 is expressed. Cetn 2, 3, and 4 represent bona fide genes. The major difference between the members of the CaM and the Cetn subfamilies is the presence (usually) in Cetn of an approximately 23 amino acids long (but occasionally much longer) protruding amino acid end. In all members of these two subgroups, four EF hand motifs (in this paper taken as loops containing 12 amino acids) are separated by 24, 25 and 24 amino acids (each a helix-loop-helix) positioned between motifs 1and 2, 2 and 3, and 3 and 4, respectively. This rule applies not only to CaM and Cetn in mammals but also to these two subfamilies in simpler eukaryotes such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Giardia lamblia. The various mRNA products can be identified most readily by their characteristic 3' UTRs. While CaM is an ancient molecule that is expressed in all cells and is ubiquitous within these cells and interacts therein with almost 100 different proteins, many of which display the IQ or related binding motifs, the distribution and function of Cetn (an equally ancient molecule) is restricted mostly to basal bodies (e.g. in rods of the retina), axonemes, flagella, cilia and centrosomes. Are these two subclasses of calcium carriers (each molecule possessing four EF hands which possibly interact with different association constants)-if they are both present within a cell-randomly chosen for their service to the specific proteins with which they interact?

  3. Calmodulin antagonists inhibit secretion in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Secretion in Paramecium is Ca2+-dependent and involves exocytic release of the content of the secretory organelle, known as the trichocyst. The content, called the trichocyst matrix, undergoes a Ca2+-induced reordering of its paracrystalline structure during release, and we have defined three stages in this expansion process. The stage I, or fully condensed trichocyst, is the 4 microns-long membrane-bounded form existing prior to stimulation. Stage II, the partially expanded trichocyst, we define as an intermediate stage in the transition, preceding stage III, the fully expanded extruded form which is a 20-40 microns-long needlelike structure. These stages have been used to assay the effects of trifluoperazine (TFP) and W-7, calmodulin (CaM) antagonists, on trichocyst matrix expansion in vivo. TFP and W-7 are shown to reversibly block matrix release induced by picric acid. Ultra- structural examination reveals that one effect of this inhibition is reflected in the organelles themselves, which are prevented from undergoing the stage I-stage II transition by preincubation in 14 microM TFP or 35 microM W-7 before fixation. This inhibition of expansion by TFP can be moderated but not abolished by high extracellular Ca2+ (5 mM). The moderation by high Ca2+ can be eliminated by raising TFP concentration to 20 microM. A possible explanation for the ability to titrate the inhibition in this manner is that TFP is acting to block expansion by binding to the Ca2+-CaM complex. Brief exposure of cells to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 and 5 mM Ca2+ following TFP treatment promotes matrix expansion, although in 14 microM TFP a residual level of inhibition remains. These results suggest that, following stimulation, CaM regulates secretion in Paramecium, possibly by controlling the Ca2+-dependent matrix expansion which accompanies exocytosis in these cells. PMID:6403556

  4. Calcium/Calmodulin-Mediated Gravitropic Response in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Plant organs respond to different physical signals such as gravity, light and touch. Gravity gives plants proper orientation, resulting in the proper form that we take for granted; the roots grow down into soil and shoots grow towards the light. Under microgravity conditions, as in space, plant growth patterns lack a clear sense of direction. Calcium and calmodulin (CaM) play an important role in gravity signal transduction. However, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in gravity signal transduction are not clearly understood. The goal of this project was to gain a fundamental understanding of how calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is involved in gravity signal transduction in plants. During the grant period, significant progress was made in elucidating the role of calmodulin and its target proteins in gravitropism.

  5. Intron analyses reveal multiple calmodulin copies in Littorina.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R J; Wilding, C S; Grahame, J

    2005-04-01

    Intron 3 and the flanking exons of the calmodulin gene have been amplified, cloned, and sequenced from 18 members of the gastropod genus Littorina. From the 48 sequences, at least five different gene copies have been identified and their functionality characterized using a strategy based upon the potential protein product predicted from flanking exon data. The functionality analyses suggest that four of the genes code for functional copies of calmodulin. All five copies have been identified across a wide range of littorinid species although not ubiquitously. Using this novel approach based on intron sequences, we have identified an unprecedented number of potential calmodulin copies in Littorina, exceeding that reported for any other invertebrate. This suggests a higher number of, and more ancient, gene duplications than previously detected in a single genus.

  6. Calcium/Calmodulin-Mediated Gravitropic Response in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Plant organs respond to different physical signals such as gravity, light and touch. Gravity gives plants proper orientation, resulting in the proper form that we take for granted; the roots grow down into soil and shoots grow towards the light. Under microgravity conditions, as in space, plant growth patterns lack a clear sense of direction. Calcium and calmodulin (CaM) play an important role in gravity signal transduction. However, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in gravity signal transduction are not clearly understood. The goal of this project was to gain a fundamental understanding of how calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is involved in gravity signal transduction in plants. During the grant period, significant progress was made in elucidating the role of calmodulin and its target proteins in gravitropism.

  7. Amino Acid Sequence of a Novel Calmodulin from the Unicellular Alga Chlamydomonas1

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Thomas J.; Wiggins, Michael E.; Watterson, D. Martin

    1985-01-01

    An amino acid sequence for a Chlamydomonas calmodulin has been elucidated with emphasis on the characterization of differences that are unique to Chlamydomonas and Dictyostelium calmodulin. While the concentration of calmodulin required for half-maximal activation of plant NAD kinase varies among vertebrate, higher plant, algal, and slime mold calmodulins, only calmodulins from the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas and the slime mold Dictyostelium show increased maximal activation of NAD kinase (Roberts, Burgess, Watterson 1984 Plant Physiol 75: 796-798; Marshak, Clarke, Roberts, Watterson 1984 Biochemistry 23: 2891-2899). The same preparations of calmodulin do not show major differences in phosphodiesterase or myosin light chain kinase activator activity. We report here that a Chlamydomonas calmodulin has four primary structural features similar to Dictyostelium that are not found in other calmodulins characterized to date: an altered carboxy terminus including a novel 11-residue extension for Chlamydomonas calmodulin, unique residues at positions 81 and 118, and an unmethylated lysine at position 115. The only amino acid sequence identity unique to Chlamydomonas and Dictyostelium calmodulin is the presence of a lysine at position 115 instead of a trimethyllysine. These studies indicate that the methylation state of lysine 115 may be important in the maximal NAD kinase activator activity of calmodulin and support the concept that calmodulin has multiple functional domains in addition to multiple structural domains. PMID:16664269

  8. Effects of opiates on synaptosomal calmodulin and calcium uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Hoss, W.; Formaniak, M.

    1983-02-01

    Acute opiate administration in vivo increases the level of cytoplasmic calmodulin in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. These synaptosomes do not, however, display decreased K/sup +/-stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake in vitro. Opiates affect neither cytoplasmic calmodulin nor Ca uptake after incubation of synaptosomes with the drugs in vitro. In contrast to the interpretation of electrophysiological data, these results suggest that the observed inhibition by opiates of the release of several transmitters may not be mediated by presynaptic opiate receptors that inhibit Ca uptake.

  9. Role of calmodulin in thyroid hormone stimulation in vitro of human erythrocyte Ca2+-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Davis, F B; Davis, P J; Blas, S D

    1983-03-01

    Because human erythrocyte membrane Ca2+-ATPase is a calmodulin-dependent enzyme, and because physiological levels of thyroid hormone stimulate this enzyme system in vitro, we have studied the role of calmodulin in this model of extranuclear thyroid hormone action. Ca2+-ATPase activity in the absence of thyroid hormone ("basal activity") was increased by inclusion in the preassay incubation mixture of purified calmodulin or hypothyroid erythrocyte hemolysate that contained calmodulin (39 micrograms calmodulin/ml packed cells, determined by radioimmunoassay); addition of L-thyroxine or 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (10(-10)M) significantly enhanced (P less than 0.001) enzyme activity in the presence of calmodulin or hemolysate. The stimulatory effects of thyroid hormone, calmodulin, and hemolysate were additive. At 5-10 microM, trifluoperazine, an antagonist of calmodulin, inhibited thyroid hormone stimulation of Ca2+-ATPase activity. Higher concentrations of trifluoperazine (50-100 microM) inhibited basal and hormone-stimulated enzyme activity, with or without added calmodulin. Anti-calmodulin antibody (10-50 micrograms antibody/mg membrane protein) inhibited basal, calmodulin-stimulated and thyroid hormone-stimulated Ca2+-ATPase activity. Membrane preparations were shown by radioimmunoassay to contain residual endogenous calmodulin (0.27 +/- 0.02 micrograms/mg membrane protein). The latter accounts for the effect of trifluoperazine and calmodulin antibody on membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity in the absence of added purified calmodulin. These results support the conclusion that the in vitro action of physiological levels of iodothyronines on human erythrocyte Ca2+-ATPase activity requires the presence of calmodulin.

  10. Target molecules of calmodulin on microtubules of Tetrahymena cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano-Ohnishi, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshio )

    1988-09-01

    In the course of an attempt to isolate the calmodulin-binding proteins (CaMBPs) from cilia of Tetrahymena, it was found that some CaMBPs tend to interact with axonemal microtubules. The present study demonstrates this interaction by cosedimentation experiments using in vitro polymerized Tetrahymena axonemal microtubules and Tetrahymena CaMBPs purified from axonemes by calmodulin affinity column chromatography. Analysis by the ({sup 125}I)calmodulin overlay method showed that at least three CaMBPs (M{sub r} 69, 45, and 37 kDa) cosediment with microtubules. Furthermore, without any addition of exogenous CaMBPs, microtubules purified after three cycles of temperature-dependent polymerization and depolymerization included the above CaMBPs and additional CaMBPs which could not cosediment with microtubules. From the results, the authors have classified these microtubule-associated CaMBPs into two groups: (i) CaMBPs which interact with microtubules only during polymerization, and (ii) CaMBPs which interact not only with microtubules during polymerization, but also with polymerized microtubules. These results suggest that the microtubule-associated CaMBPs, especially those of the latter group, are located on the surface of ciliary microtubules, and may become the target molecules of calmodulin at Ca{sup 2+}-triggered ciliary reversal.

  11. Mutations in Calmodulin Cause Ventricular Tachycardia and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Nyegaard, Mette; Overgaard, Michael T.; Søndergaard, Mads T.; Vranas, Marta; Behr, Elijah R.; Hildebrandt, Lasse L.; Lund, Jacob; Hedley, Paula L.; Camm, A. John; Wettrell, Göran; Fosdal, Inger; Christiansen, Michael; Børglum, Anders D.

    2012-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a devastating inherited disorder characterized by episodic syncope and/or sudden cardiac arrest during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. Although rare, CPVT is suspected to cause a substantial part of sudden cardiac deaths in young individuals. Mutations in RYR2, encoding the cardiac sarcoplasmic calcium channel, have been identified as causative in approximately half of all dominantly inherited CPVT cases. Applying a genome-wide linkage analysis in a large Swedish family with a severe dominantly inherited form of CPVT-like arrhythmias, we mapped the disease locus to chromosome 14q31-32. Sequencing CALM1 encoding calmodulin revealed a heterozygous missense mutation (c.161A>T [p.Asn53Ile]) segregating with the disease. A second, de novo, missense mutation (c.293A>G [p.Asn97Ser]) was subsequently identified in an individual of Iraqi origin; this individual was diagnosed with CPVT from a screening of 61 arrhythmia samples with no identified RYR2 mutations. Both CALM1 substitutions demonstrated compromised calcium binding, and p.Asn97Ser displayed an aberrant interaction with the RYR2 calmodulin-binding-domain peptide at low calcium concentrations. We conclude that calmodulin mutations can cause severe cardiac arrhythmia and that the calmodulin genes are candidates for genetic screening of individual cases and families with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and unexplained sudden cardiac death. PMID:23040497

  12. Targeting of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Colbran, Roger J

    2004-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has diverse roles in virtually all cell types and it is regulated by a plethora of mechanisms. Local changes in Ca2+ concentration drive calmodulin binding and CaMKII activation. Activity is controlled further by autophosphorylation at multiple sites, which can generate an autonomously active form of the kinase (Thr286) or can block Ca2+/calmodulin binding (Thr305/306). The regulated actions of protein phosphatases at these sites also modulate downstream signalling from CaMKII. In addition, CaMKII targeting to specific subcellular microdomains appears to be necessary to account for the known signalling specificity, and targeting is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin and autophosphorylation. The present review focuses on recent studies revealing the diversity of CaMKII interactions with proteins localized to neuronal dendrites. Interactions with various subunits of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) subtype of glutamate receptor have attracted the most attention, but binding of CaMKII to cytoskeletal and several other regulatory proteins has also been reported. Recent reports describing the molecular basis of each interaction and their potential role in the normal regulation of synaptic transmission and in pathological situations are discussed. These studies have revealed fundamental regulatory mechanisms that are probably important for controlling CaMKII functions in many cell types. PMID:14653781

  13. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on calcium pump of ram spermatozoa plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, H; Rubinstein, S

    1988-01-01

    Plasma membranes isolated from ram spermatozoa contain calmodulin, which represents approximately 0.03% of the total sperm calmodulin and 0.025% of the membrane protein. When membranes were isolated in the presence of ethylene glycol (beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), the amount of calmodulin associated with the plasma membranes was reduced by only 20%. The ATP-dependent calcium transport activity of the isolated plasma membranes is not enhanced by adding calmodulin and not inhibited by the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazinc (TFP), compound 48/80, or calmidazolium. In fact, there is an enhancement of calcium uptake by the calmodulin antagonists and this enhancement can be blocked by the Ca2+-channel blocker D-600. It is suggested that the ATP-dependent calcium transport activity in the plasma membrane of ram spermatozoa is not regulated by calmodulin.

  14. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin in rat sertoli cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spruill, W A; Zysk, J R; Tres, L L; Kierszenbaum, A L

    1983-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent protein phosphorylation and the role of calmodulin in this process was investigated in subcellular fractions of primary cultures of rat Sertoli cells. Significant Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in Sertoli cells was restricted to the cytosol fraction. The calmodulin dependence of these effects was confirmed by using the calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine. One of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphoproteins was identified as the intermediate filament protein vimentin, based on the following criteria: (i) migration pattern in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels, (ii) Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of a 58-kilodalton protein present in detergent-insoluble intermediate filament protein extract of Sertoli cells, and (iii) peptide mapping of the phosphoprotein. These data support a role for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in the modulation of Sertoli cell cytoskeletal components. Images PMID:6572367

  15. Structure of the smooth muscle myosin light-chain kinase calmodulin-binding domain peptide bound to calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, S.M.; Schneider, D.M.; Wand, A.J. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana ); Strobel, L.A. ); VanBerkum, M.F.A.; Means, A.R. )

    1991-10-22

    The interaction between the peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding domain of smooth muscle myosin light-chain kinase and (Ca{sup 2+}){sub 4}-calmodulin has been studied by multinuclear and multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The study was facilitated by the use of {sup 15}N-labeled peptide in conjunction with {sup 15}N-edited and {sup 15}N-correlated {sup 1}H spectroscopy. The peptide forms a 1:1 complex with calcium-saturated calmodulin which is in slow exchange with free peptide. The {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances of the bound have been assigned. An extensive set of structural constraints for the bound peptide has been assembled from the analysis of nuclear Overhauser effects and three-bond coupling constants. The backbone conformation of the bound peptide has been determined using these constraints by use of distance geometry and related computational methods. The backbone conformation of the peptide has been determined to high precision and is generally indicative of helical secondary structure. Nonhelical backbone conformations are seen in the middle and at the C-terminal end of the bound peptide. These studies provide the first direct confirmation of the amphiphilic helix model for the structure of peptides bound to calcium-saturated calmodulin.

  16. Involvement of calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins in plant responses to abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Houqing; Xu, Luqin; Singh, Amarjeet; Wang, Huizhong; Du, Liqun; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2015-01-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration have been well recognized to act as cell signals coupling various environmental stimuli to appropriate physiological responses with accuracy and specificity in plants. Calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) are major Ca2+ sensors, playing critical roles in interpreting encrypted Ca2+ signals. Ca2+-loaded CaM/CMLs interact and regulate a broad spectrum of target proteins such as channels/pumps/antiporters for various ions, transcription factors, protein kinases, protein phosphatases, metabolic enzymes, and proteins with unknown biochemical functions. Many of the target proteins of CaM/CMLs directly or indirectly regulate plant responses to environmental stresses. Basic information about stimulus-induced Ca2+ signal and overview of Ca2+ signal perception and transduction are briefly discussed in the beginning of this review. How CaM/CMLs are involved in regulating plant responses to abiotic stresses are emphasized in this review. Exciting progress has been made in the past several years, such as the elucidation of Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of AtSR1/CAMTA3 and plant responses to chilling and freezing stresses, Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of CAT3, MAPK8 and MKP1 in homeostasis control of reactive oxygen species signals, discovery of CaM7 as a DNA-binding transcription factor regulating plant response to light signals. However, many key questions in Ca2+/CaM-mediated signaling warrant further investigation. Ca2+/CaM-mediated regulation of most of the known target proteins is presumed based on their interaction. The downstream targets of CMLs are mostly unknown, and how specificity of Ca2+ signaling could be realized through the actions of CaM/CMLs and their target proteins is largely unknown. Future breakthroughs in Ca2+/CaM-mediated signaling will not only improve our understanding of how plants respond to environmental stresses, but also provide the knowledge base to improve stress-tolerance of

  17. Cellular distribution of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins in Vicia faba L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, V.; Assmann, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-binding proteins within Vicia faba was investigated. Both CaM and CaM-binding proteins were found to be differentially distributed among organs, tissues, and protoplast types. CaM levels, on a per protein basis, were found to be the highest in leaf epidermis, containing 3-fold higher levels of CaM than in total leaf. Similarly, guard cell and epidermal cell protoplasts were also found to have higher levels of CaM than mesophyll cell protoplasts. 125I-CaM blot overlay assays were performed to qualitatively examine CaM-binding proteins in these protoplast types as well as in whole tissues and organs. CaM-binding proteins with Mr 52,000, 78,000, and 115,000 were common in all metabolically active plant parts. Unique CaM-binding protein bands were detected in guard cell protoplasts (Mr 39,000, 88,000), stems (Mr 45,000, 60,000, 64,000), and roots (Mr 62,000), suggesting the presence of specialized CaM-dependent processes in these cells and organs.

  18. Cellular distribution of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins in Vicia faba L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, V.; Assmann, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-binding proteins within Vicia faba was investigated. Both CaM and CaM-binding proteins were found to be differentially distributed among organs, tissues, and protoplast types. CaM levels, on a per protein basis, were found to be the highest in leaf epidermis, containing 3-fold higher levels of CaM than in total leaf. Similarly, guard cell and epidermal cell protoplasts were also found to have higher levels of CaM than mesophyll cell protoplasts. 125I-CaM blot overlay assays were performed to qualitatively examine CaM-binding proteins in these protoplast types as well as in whole tissues and organs. CaM-binding proteins with Mr 52,000, 78,000, and 115,000 were common in all metabolically active plant parts. Unique CaM-binding protein bands were detected in guard cell protoplasts (Mr 39,000, 88,000), stems (Mr 45,000, 60,000, 64,000), and roots (Mr 62,000), suggesting the presence of specialized CaM-dependent processes in these cells and organs.

  19. Analysis of the state of posttranslational calmodulin methylation in developing pea plants. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-07-01

    A specific calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used in a radiometric assay to analyze the degree of methylation of lysine-115 in pea (Pisum sativum) plants. Calmodulin was isolated from dissected segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by incubation with the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of ({sup 3}H)methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. By this approach, the presence of unmethylated calmodulins were demonstrated in pea tissues, and the levels of methylation varied depending on the developmental state of the tissue tested. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments of both etiolated and green plants, and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The incorporation of methyl groups into these calmodulin samples appears to be specific for position 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position competitively inhibited methyl group incorporation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in the ability of methylated and unmethylated calmodulins to activate pea NAD kinase raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation of calmodulin could be another mechanism for regulating calmodulin activity.

  20. Mission CaMKIIγ: shuttle calmodulin from membrane to nucleus.

    PubMed

    Malik, Zulfiqar A; Stein, Ivar S; Navedo, Manuel F; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-10-09

    Neuronal plasticity depends on plasma membrane Ca(2+) influx, resulting in activity-dependent gene transcription. Calmodulin (CaM) activated by Ca(2+) initiates the nuclear events, but how CaM makes its way to the nucleus has remained elusive. Ma et al. now show that CaMKIIγ transports CaM from cell surface Ca(2+) channels to the nucleus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Expression analysis of calmodulin and calmodulin-like genes from rice, Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In plants, a large family of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-like (CML) proteins transduce the increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations by binding to and altering the activities of target proteins, and thereby affecting the physiological responses to a vast array of stimuli. Here, transcript expression analysis of Cam and CML gene family members in rice (Oryza sativa L.) was extensively examined. Results Cam and CML genes in rice exhibited differential expression patterns in tissues/organs. Under osmotic stress and salt stress, expression of OsCam1-1, OsCML4, 5, 8, and 11 was induced with different kinetics and magnitude. OsCML4 and 8 mRNA levels significantly increased by 3 h after treatment and remained elevated for at least 24 h while expression of OsCam1-1, OsCML5 and 11 was up-regulated as early as 1–3 h before rapidly returning to normal levels. Several cis-acting elements in response to abiotic stresses, including DREs (important promoter elements responsive to drought, high salt, and cold stress), were detected in the 5′ upstream regions of these genes. The observed induction of the GUS activity of transgenic rice plants via the OsCam1-1 promoter appeared to be biphasic and dependent on the severity of salt stress. Conclusions Large OsCam and OsCML gene family members likely play differential roles as signal transducers in regulating various developmental processes and represent important nodes in the signal transduction and transcriptional regulation networks in abiotic stresss responses mediated by the complex Ca2+ signals in plants, which are rich in both spatial and temporal information. PMID:23134977

  2. Calmodulin priming: Nuclear translocation of a calmodulin complex and the memory of prior neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Mermelstein, Paul G.; Deisseroth, Karl; Dasgupta, Neela; Isaksen, Ann L.; Tsien, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    The neuronal nucleus plays a vital role in information processing, but whether it supports computational functions such as paired-pulse facilitation, comparable to synapses, is unclear. Ca2+-dependent movement of calmodulin (CaM) to the nucleus is highly responsive to Ca2+ entry through L-type channels and promotes activation of the transcription factor CREB (cAMP-responsive element binding protein) through phosphorylation by CaM-sensitive kinases. We characterized key features of this CaM translocation and its possible role in facilitation of nuclear signaling. Nuclear CaM was elevated within 15 s of stimulus onset, preceding the first signs of CREB phosphorylation in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Depolarization-induced elevation of nuclear CaM also was observed in cerebellar granule cells, neocortical neurons, and dentate gyrus granule cells. Nuclear translocation of CaM was not blocked by disruption of actin filaments or microtubules, or by emptying endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin. Translocation of fluorescently tagged CaM was prevented by fusing it with the Ca2+/CaM binding peptide M13, suggesting that nuclear CaM accumulation depends on association with endogenous Ca2+/CaM binding proteins. To determine whether increased nuclear [CaM] might influence subsequent nuclear signal processing, we compared responses to two consecutive depolarizing stimuli. After a weak “priming” stimulus that caused CaM translocation, CREB phosphorylation caused by a subsequent stimulus was significantly faster, more sensitive to Ca2+ elevation, and less specifically dependent on Ca2+ influx through L-type channels. CaM translocation not only supports rapid signaling to the nucleus, but also could provide a “memory” for facilitatory effects of repeated neural activity, seen in altered phosphorylated CREB dynamics and Ca2+ channel dependence. PMID:11742070

  3. Calmodulin regulation and identification of calmodulin binding region of type-3 ryanodine receptor calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Xu, Le; Pasek, Daniel A; Evans, Kelly E; Chen, S R Wayne; Meissner, Gerhard

    2005-11-15

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a family of intracellular Ca(2+) channels that are regulated by calmodulin (CaM). At low Ca(2+) concentrations (<1 microM), CaM activates RyR1 and RyR3 and inhibits RyR2. At elevated Ca(2+) concentrations (>1 microM), CaM inhibits all three RyR isoforms. Here we report that the regulation of recombinant RyR3 by CaM is sensitive to redox regulation. RyR3 in the presence of reduced glutathione binds CaM with 10-15-fold higher affinity, at low and high Ca(2+) concentrations, compared to in the presence of oxidized glutathione. However, compared to RyR1 assayed at low Ca(2+) concentrations under both reducing and oxidizing conditions, CaM binds RyR3 with reduced affinity but activates RyR3 to a greater extent. Under reducing conditions, RyR1 and RyR3 activities are inhibited with a similar affinity at [Ca(2+)] > 1 microM. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that RyR3 contains a single conserved CaM binding site. Corresponding amino acid substitutions in the CaM binding site differentially affect CaM binding and CaM regulation of RyR3 and those of the two other isoforms. The results support the suggestion that other isoform dependent regions have a major role in the regulation of RyRs by CaM [Yamaguchi et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 36433-36439].

  4. Calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins in cystic fibrosis and normal human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the possibility that a lesion in a calmodulin (CaM)-dependent regulatory mechanism may be involved in cystic fibrosis (CF). The level of CaM, CaM-binding proteins (CaM-BP) and a CaM-dependent phosphatase (CaM-Ptase) have been compared in cultured fibroblasts from CF patients versus age- and sex-matched control subjects. The CaM concentration, measured by radioimmunoassay, ranged from 0.20 to 0.76 ..mu..g/mg protein (n=8); there was no significant difference in the average CaM concentration from CF patients vs controls. Using Western blotting techniques with /sup 125/I-CaM, they detected at least ten distinct CaM-BPs in fibroblasts with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 37K; the only consistent difference between control and CF cell lines was in a 46.5K CaM-BP, which was depressed in all three CF samples. The 46.5 K CaM-BP was found only in the particulate fraction. A 59K CaM-BP was identified as a CaM-Ptase by its crossreactivity with an antibody against a brain CaM-Ptase. There was no significant difference in CaM-Ptase activity or in the amount of the phosphatase as determined by radioimmunoassay in CF vs. normal samples (n=8). Thus, the level of CaM as well as its various enzymes and proteins do not appear to be altered in CF fibroblasts except for a CaM-BP of 46.5K, the identity of which is currently being investigated.

  5. Effect of Melatonin and Calmodulin in an Idiopathic Scoliosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Zhe; He, Li-Jiang; Ke, Qing-Feng; Huang, Long; Dai, Zhang-Sheng; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background. To explore influence of continuous illumination, luzindole, and Tamoxifen on incidence of scoliosis model of rats. Methods. Thirty-two one-month-old female rats were rendered into bipedal rats. The bipedal rats were divided into 4 groups: group A by intraperitoneal injection of luzindole and continuous illumination; group B by intraperitoneal injection of luzindole only; group C by intraperitoneal injection of luzindole and oral administration of Tamoxifen; and group D by intraperitoneal injection of equivalent saline. Radiographs were taken at 8th week and 16th week, and incidence and the Cobb angles of scoliosis were calculated. At 16th week, all rats were sacrificed. Before the sacrifice, the levels of calmodulin were measured in each group. Results. At 8th week, scoliosis occurred in groups A and B, with an incidence of 75% and 12.5%, respectively, while rats in group C or D had no scoliosis. At 16th week, scoliosis incidences in groups A and B were 57% and 62.5%, respectively. No scoliosis occurred in group C or D. Calmodulin in platelets in group B was significantly different, compared with groups A and D. There was no significant difference in calmodulin in platelets in groups B and C. Conclusion. By intraperitoneal injection of luzindole in bipedal rats, scoliosis rat models could be successfully made. Under light, incidence of scoliosis may be increased at an early period but it is reversible. Tamoxifen can suppress natural process of scoliosis. PMID:28042574

  6. Isolation and characterization of a calmodulin-like protein from Halobacterium salinarium.

    PubMed Central

    Rothärmel, T; Wagner, G

    1995-01-01

    The first evidence for a calmodulin-like protein in an archaeon, Halobacterium salinarium, is reported here. The calmodulin-like protein, with a molecular mass of 24 kDa and an estimated pI of 4.8, stimulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in a calcium-dependent manner. This stimulation could be suppressed by calmodulin inhibitors. The Ca(2+)-binding ability was verified by 45Ca autoradiography. PMID:7836331

  7. Synthesis and Accumulation of Calmodulin in Suspension Cultures of Carrot (Daucus carota L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Imara Y.; Zielinski, Raymond E.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of calmodulin mRNA and protein were measured during a growth cycle of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells grown in suspension culture. A full-length carrot calmodulin cDNA clone isolated from a λgt10 library was used to measure steady-state calmodulin mRNA levels. During the exponential phase of culture growth when mitotic activity and oxidative respiration rates were maximal, calmodulin mRNA levels were 4- to 5-fold higher than they were during the later stages of culture growth, when respiration rates were lower and growth was primarily by cell expansion. Net calmodulin polypeptide synthesis, as measured by pulse-labeling in vivo with [35S]methionine, paralleled the changes in calmodulin steady-state mRNA level during culture growth. As a consequence, net calmodulin polypeptide synthesis declined 5- to 10-fold during the later stages of culture growth. The qualitative spectrum of polypeptides synthesized and accumulated by the carrot cells during the course of a culture cycle, however, remained largely unchanged. Calmodulin polypeptide levels, in contrast to its net synthesis, remained relatively constant during the exponential phases of the culture growth cycle and increased during the later stages of culture growth. Our data are consistent with increased calmodulin polypeptide turnover associated with periods of rapid cell proliferation and high levels of respiration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:16653062

  8. Calmodulin-binding proteins are developmentally regulated in gametes and embryos of fucoid algae

    SciTech Connect

    Brawley, S.H.; Roberts, D.M.

    1989-02-01

    Calcium-binding proteins and calmodulin-binding proteins were identified in gametes and zygotes of the marine brown algae Fucus vesiculosus, Fucus distichus, and Pelvetia fastigiata using gel (SDS-PAGE) overlay techniques. A calcium current appears to be important during cell polarization in fucoid zygotes, but there are no biochemical data on calcium-binding proteins in these algae. By using a sensitive 45Ca2+ overlay method designed to detect high-affinity calcium-binding proteins, at least 9-11 polypeptides were detected in extracts of fucoid gametes and zygotes. All samples had calcium-binding proteins with apparent molecular weights of about 17 and 30 kDa. A 17-kDa calcium-binding protein was purified by calcium-dependent hydrophobic chromatography and was identified as calmodulin by immunological and enzyme activator criteria. A 125I-calmodulin overlay assay was used to identify potential targets of calmodulin action. Sperm contained one major calmodulin-binding protein of about 45 kDa. Eggs lacked major calmodulin-binding activity. A 72-kDa calmodulin-binding protein was prominent in zygotes from 1-65 hr postfertilization. Both calmodulin-binding proteins showed calcium-dependent binding activity. Overall, the data suggest that the appearance and distribution of certain calcium-binding and calmodulin-binding proteins are under developmental regulation, and may reflect the different roles of calcium during fertilization and early embryogenesis.

  9. A novel role for calmodulin: Ca2+-independent inhibition of type-1 inositol trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Cardy, T J; Taylor, C W

    1998-01-01

    Calmodulin inhibits both inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) binding to, and IP3-evoked Ca2+ release by, cerebellar IP3 receptors [Patel, Morris, Adkins, O'Beirne and Taylor (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S.A. 94, 11627-11632]. In the present study, full-length rat type-1 and -3 IP3 receptors were expressed at high levels in insect Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells and the effects of calmodulin were examined. In the absence of Ca2+, calmodulin caused a concentration-dependent and reversible inhibition of [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 IP3 receptors by decreasing their apparent affinity for IP3. The effect was not reproduced by high concentrations of troponin C, parvalbumin or S-100. Increasing the medium free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]m) inhibited [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 receptors, but the further inhibition caused by a submaximal concentration of calmodulin was similar at each [Ca2+]m. In the absence of Ca2+, 125I-calmodulin bound to a single site on each type-1 receptor subunit and to an additional site in the presence of Ca2+. There was no detectable binding of 125I-calmodulin to type-3 receptors and binding of [3H]IP3 was insensitive to calmodulin at all [Ca2+]m. Both peptide and conventional Ca2+-calmodulin antagonists affected neither [3H]IP3 binding directly nor the inhibitory effect of calmodulin in the absence of Ca2+, but each caused a [Ca2+]m-dependent reversal of the inhibition of [3H]IP3 binding caused by calmodulin. Camstatin, a peptide that binds to calmodulin equally well in the presence or absence of Ca2+, reversed the inhibitory effects of calmodulin on [3H]IP3 binding at all [Ca2+]m. We conclude that calmodulin specifically inhibits [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 IP3 receptors: the first example of a protein regulated by calmodulin in an entirely Ca2+-independent manner. Inhibition of type-1 IP3 receptors by calmodulin may dynamically regulate their sensitivity to IP3 in response to the changes in cytosolic free calmodulin concentration thought to accompany stimulation

  10. Characterization and immunocytochemical distribution of calmodulin in higher plant endosperm cells: localization in the mitotic apparatus

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    In this study we have examined the immunocytochemical distribution of calmodulin during mitosis of higher plant endosperm cells. Spindle development in these cells occurs without centrioles. Instead, asterlike microtubule converging centers appear to be involved in establishing spindle polarity. By indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold staining methods with anti-calmodulin antibodies, we found endosperm calmodulin to be associated with the mitotic apparatus, particularly with asterlike and/or polar microtubule converging centers and kinetochore microtubules, in an immunocytochemical pattern distinct from that of tubulin. In addition, endosperm calmodulin and calcium showed analogous distribution profiles during mitosis. Previous reports have demonstrated that calmodulin is associated with the mitotic apparatus in animal cells. The present observation that calmodulin is also associated with the mitotic apparatus in acentriolar, higher plant endosperm cells suggests that some of the regulatory mechanisms involved in spindle formation, microtubule disassembly, and chromosome movement in plant cells may be similar to those in animal cells. However, unlike animal cell calmodulin, endosperm calmodulin appears to associate with kinetochore microtubules throughout mitosis, which suggests a specialized role for higher plant calmodulin in the regulation of kinetochore microtubule dynamics. PMID:2410433

  11. Calmodulin interacts with Rab3D and modulates osteoclastic bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Sipin; Chim, Shek Man; Cheng, Taksum; Ang, Estabelle; Ng, Benjamin; Lim, Baysie; Chen, Kai; Qiu, Heng; Tickner, Jennifer; Xu, Huazi; Pavlos, Nathan; Xu, Jiake

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin is a highly versatile protein that regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis and is involved in a variety of cellular functions including cardiac excitability, synaptic plasticity and signaling transduction. During osteoclastic bone resorption, calmodulin has been reported to concentrate at the ruffled border membrane of osteoclasts where it is thought to modulate bone resorption activity in response to calcium. Here we report an interaction between calmodulin and Rab3D, a small exocytic GTPase and established regulator osteoclastic bone resorption. Using yeast two-hybrid screening together with a series of protein-protein interaction studies, we show that calmodulin interacts with Rab3D in a calcium dependent manner. Consistently, expression of a calcium insensitive form of calmodulin (i.e. CaM1234) perturbs calmodulin-Rab3D interaction as monitored by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays. In osteoclasts, calmodulin and Rab3D are constitutively co-expressed during RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, co-occupy plasma membrane fractions by differential gradient sedimentation assay and colocalise in the ruffled border as revealed by confocal microscopy. Further, functional blockade of calmodulin-Rab3D interaction by calmidazolium chloride coincides with an attenuation of osteoclastic bone resorption. Our data imply that calmodulin- Rab3D interaction is required for efficient bone resorption by osteoclasts in vitro. PMID:27897225

  12. Energetics of Calmodulin Domain Interactions with the Calmodulin Binding Domain of CaMKII

    PubMed Central

    Evans, T. Idil Apak; Shea, Madeline A.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential eukaryotic calcium receptor that regulates many kinases, including CaMKII. Calcium-depleted CaM does not bind to CaMKII under physiological conditions. However, binding of (Ca2+)4-CaM to a basic amphipathic helix in CaMKII releases auto-inhibition of the kinase. The crystal structure of CaM bound to CaMKIIp, a peptide representing the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of CaMKII, shows an anti-parallel interface: the C-domain of CaM primarily contacts the N-terminal half of the CaMBD. The two domains of calcium-saturated CaM are believed to play distinct roles in releasing auto-inhibition. To investigate the underlying mechanism of activation, calcium-dependent titrations of isolated domains of CaM binding to CaMKIIp were monitored using fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CaMKIIp for the domains of CaM increased upon saturation with calcium, with a 35-fold greater increase observed for the C-domain than the N-domain. Because the interdomain linker of CaM regulates calcium-binding affinity and contribute to conformational change, the role of each CaM domain was explored further by investigating effects of CaMKIIp on site-knockout mutants affecting the calcium-binding sites of a single domain. Investigation of the thermodynamic linkage between saturation of individual calcium-binding sites and CaM-domain binding to CaMKIIp showed that calcium binding to sites III and IV was sufficient to recapitulate the behavior of (Ca2+)4-CaM. The magnitude of favorable interdomain cooperativity varied depending on which of the four calcium-binding sites were mutated, emphasizing differential regulatory roles for the domains of CaM, despite the high degree of homology among the four EF-hands of CaM. PMID:19089983

  13. Tyrosine-specific phosphorylation of calmodulin by the insulin receptor kinase purified from human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, D B; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Y; Gale, R D; McDonald, J M

    1989-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that calmodulin can be phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo by both tyrosine-specific and serine/threonine protein kinase. We demonstrate here that the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase purified from human placenta phosphorylates calmodulin. The highly purified receptors (prepared by insulin-Sepharose chromatography) were 5-10 times more effective in catalysing the phosphorylation of calmodulin than an equal number of partially purified receptors (prepared by wheat-germ agglutinin-Sepharose chromatography). Phosphorylation occurred exclusively on tyrosine residues, up to a maximum of 1 mol [0.90 +/- 0.14 (n = 5)] of phosphate incorporated/mol of calmodulin. Phosphorylation of calmodulin was dependent on the presence of certain basic proteins and divalent cations. Some of these basic proteins, i.e. polylysine, polyarginine, polyornithine, protamine sulphate and histones H1 and H2B, were also able to stimulate the phosphorylation of calmodulin via an insulin-independent activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase. Addition of insulin further increased incorporation of 32P into calmodulin. The magnitude of the effect of insulin was dependent on the concentration and type of basic protein used, ranging from 0.5- to 9.0-fold stimulation. Maximal phosphorylation of calmodulin was obtained at an insulin concentration of 10(-10) M, with half-maximal effect at 10(-11) M. Either Mg2+ or Mn2+ was necessary to obtain phosphorylation, but Mg2+ was far more effective than Mn2+. In contrast, maximal phosphorylation of calmodulin was observed in the absence of Ca2+. Inhibition of phosphorylation was observed as free Ca2+ concentration exceeded 0.1 microM, with almost complete inhibition at 30 microM free Ca2+. The Km for calmodulin was approx. 0.1 microM. To gain further insight into the effects of basic proteins in this system, we examined the binding of calmodulin to the insulin receptor and the polylysine. Calmodulin binds to the insulin

  14. Dual Regulation of a Chimeric Plant Serine/Threonine Kinase by Calcium and Calcium/Calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Ramachandiran, S.; Paranjape, V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene characterized by a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain was recently cloned from plants. The Escherichia coli-expressed CCaMK phosphorylates various protein and peptide substrates in a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent manner. The calmodulin-binding region of CCAMK has similarity to the calmodulin-binding region of the alpha-subunit of multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). CCaMK exhibits basal autophosphorylation at the threonine residue(s) (0.098 mol of P-32/mol) that is stimulated 3.4-fold by Ca(2+) (0.339 mol of P-32/mol), while calmodulin inhibits Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation to the basal level. A deletion mutant lacking the visinin-like domain did not show Ca(2+)-simulated autophosphorylation activity but retained Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity at a reduced level. Ca(2+)-dependent mobility shift assays using E.coli-expressed protein from residues 358-520 revealed that Ca(2+) binds to the visinin-like domain. Studies with site-directed mutants of the visinin-like domain indicated that EF-hands II and III are crucial for Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes in the visinin-like domain. Autophosphorylation of CCaMK increases Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity by about 5-fold, whereas it did not affect its C(2+)-independent activity. This report provides evidence for the existence of a protein kinase in plants that is modulated by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain in CCaMK adds an additional Ca(2+)-sensing mechanism not previously known to exist in the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling cascade in plants.

  15. Brush-border calmodulin. A major component of the isolated microvillus core

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Calmodulin is present in brush borders isolated from intestinal epithelial cells and is one of the major components of the microvillar filament bundle. Calmodulin was purified from either demembranated brush borders or microvilli by a simple boiling procedure. The boiled supernate derived from the microvillus cores contained one major polypeptide of 20,000 daltons.The supernate from the brush-border preparation contained the 20,000-dalton subunit and a second protein of 30,000 daltons. The 20,000-dalton subunit has been identified as calmodulin by several criteria: (a) heat resistance, (b) comigration with brain calmodulin on alkaline urea gels and SDS gels, both cases in which the 20,000-dalton protein, like calmodulin, exhibits a shift in electrophoretic mobility in the presence of Ca++, and (c) 4--5-fold activation of 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in the presence but not the absence of Ca++. With a cosedimentation assay it was determined that brush-border calmodulin does not bind directly to actin. In the presence of Ca++ (greater than 5 x 10(-7) M) there was a partial release of calmodulin from the microvillus core, along with a substantial conversion of microvillus actin into a nonpelletable from. The dissociation of calmodulin was reversed by removal of Ca++. If microvillus cores were pretreated with phalloidin, the Ca++-induced solubilization of actin was prevented, but the partial dissociation of calmodulin still occurred. The molar ratio of calmodulin:actin is 1:10 in the demembranated brush border and 1:2-3 in the microvillus core. No calmodulin was detected in the detergent-solubilized brush-border membrane fraction. PMID:6893051

  16. Correlation between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Kuzmanoff, K. M.; Evans, M. L.; Jarrett, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates a role for calcium and calmodulin in the gravitropic response of primary roots of maize (Zea mays, L.). We examined this possibility by testing the relationship between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in roots of the maize cultivars Merit and B73 x Missouri 17. Roots of the Merit cultivar require light to the gravitropically competent. The gravitropic response of the Missouri cultivar is independent of light. The occurrence of calmodulin in primary roots of these maize cultivars was tested by affinity gel chromatography followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with bovine brain calmodulin as standard. The distribution of calmodulin activity was measured using both the phosphodiesterase and NAD kinase assays for calmodulin. These assays were performed on whole tissue segments, crude extracts, and purified extracts. In light-grown seedlings of the Merit cultivar or in either dark- or light-grown seedlings of the Missouri cultivar, calmodulin activity per millimeter of root tissue was about 4-fold higher in the apical millimeter than in the subtending 3 millimeters. Calmodulin activity was very low in the apical millimeter of roots of dark-grown (gravitropically nonresponsive) seedlings of the Merit cultivar. Upon illumination, the calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter increased to a level comparable to that of light-grown seedlings and the roots became gravitropically competent. The time course of the development of gravitropic sensitivity following illumination paralleled the time course of the increase in calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter of the root. The results are consistent with the suggestion that calmodulin plays an important role in the gravitropic response of roots.

  17. Calmodulin gene expression in response to mechanical wounding and Botrytis cinerea infection in tomato fruit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding the stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various physiological responses in plants. To determine the functional significance of calmodulin in fl...

  18. Abnormal response to calmodulin in vitro of dystrophic chicken muscle membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Galindo, J; Hudecki, M S; Davis, F B; Davis, P J; Thacore, H R; Pollina, C M; Blas, S D; Schoenl, M

    1988-09-20

    A skeletal muscle membrane fraction enriched in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) contained Ca2+-ATPase activity which was stimulated in vitro in normal chickens (line 412) by 6 nM purified bovine calmodulin (33% increase over control, P less than 0.001). In contrast, striated muscle from chickens (line 413) affected with an inherited form of muscular dystrophy, but otherwise genetically similar to line 412, contained SR-enriched Ca2+-ATPase activity which was resistant to stimulation in vitro by calmodulin. Basal levels of Ca2+-ATPase activity (no added calmodulin) were comparable in muscles of unaffected and affected animals, and the Ca2+ optima of the enzymes in normal and dystrophic muscle were identical. Purified SR vesicles, obtained by calcium phosphate loading and sucrose density gradient centrifugation, showed the same resistance of dystrophic Ca2+-ATPase to exogenous calmodulin as the SR-enriched muscle membrane fraction. Dystrophic muscle had increased Ca2+ content compared to that of normal animals (P less than 0.04) and has been previously shown to contain increased levels of immuno- and bioactive calmodulin and of calmodulin mRNA. The calmodulin resistance of the Ca2+-ATPase in dystrophic muscle reflects a defect in regulation of cell Ca2+ metabolism associated with elevated cellular Ca2+ and calmodulin concentrations.

  19. Functional analysis of calmodulin genes family during tomato fruit development and ripening

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calmodulin as a ubiquitous calcium sensor can recognize the different developmental and/or stimulus-triggered calcium changes and modulate the functions of its target proteins involved in plant growth and development. However, it remains elusive for the functions of calmodulin for fleshy fruit devel...

  20. Calmodulin immunoelectron microscopy: redistribution during ram spermatogenesis and epididymal maturation. II.

    PubMed

    Weinman, S; Ores-Carton, C; Escaig, F; Feinberg, J; Puszkin, S

    1986-09-01

    Affinity-purified monospecific antibodies and indirect immunogold and immunoferritin labeling on ultra-thin sections of low-temperature Lowicryl K4M-embedded samples were used to study the redistribution of calmodulin in ram spermatids and epididymal spermatozoa at the electron microscopic level. Calmodulin appeared as an integral component of well-defined structures or organelles of these cells. In young spermatids, calmodulin was localized in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and developing acrosome. During spermatogenesis and epididymal maturation, calmodulin left the acrosome to reach the perinuclear substance and finally became concentrated in the post-acrosomal area of the head, although some calmodulin remained associated with the tip of the acrosome. Such a redistribution is consistent with the preferential location of Ca2+ in the post-acrosomal cytoplasm of ejaculated spermatozoa. Calmodulin was also observed in the flagellum associated with the plasma membrane and with the motility apparatus, between coarse fibers and axonemal microtubules. These changes in calmodulin distribution may account for the Ca2+-dependent regulation of spermatogenesis and sperm maturation. Calmodulin therefore appears to be a pleiotropic regulator of male gamete development and functions.

  1. Influence of neurotropic compounds on the calmodulin- and troponin C-dependent processes

    SciTech Connect

    Baldenkov, G.N.; Men'shikov, M.Yu.; Feoktistov, I.A.; Tkachuk, V.A.

    1986-01-20

    An analysis was made of the effects of neurotropic compounds on the Ca-binding proteins - calmodulin and troponin C. It was shown that most of the neuroleptics of the phenothiazine group interact effectively both with calmodulin and with troponin C and also inhibit the calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase of cyclic nucleotides and calcium-activated actomyosin ATPase. Neuroleptics of the butyrophenone group, as well as imipramine and diphenhydramine, are capable of a low-efficiency interaction only with calmodulin. It was found that one of the phenothiazines - methophenazine, which is an effective inhibitor of calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase - does not affect troponin C and Ca-dependent actomyosin ATPase. As a result of this, methophenazine can serve as a convenient tool for studying processes regulated by these Ca-binding proteins. It was concluded that troponin C possesses Ca-dependent binding sites for drugs structurally similar to those of calmodulin but binding the drugs less effectively and exhibiting selectivity with respect to certain preparations. It was shown that despite the homology of the two Ca-binding proteins, calmodulin and troponin C, a selective action on the processes regulated by them is possible.

  2. How calmodulin binding transcription activators (CAMTAs) mediate auxin responses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is an adaptive feature of all organisms, which, in land plants, entails changes in orientation of growth (tropism), patterns of development, organ architecture, timing of developmental processes and resource allocation. However, little is known about the molecular components that integrate exogenous environmental cues with internal hormonal signaling pathways. This addendum describes a role for calcium-regulated calmodulin-binding transcription 1 (CAMTA1) in auxin signaling and stress responses. We discuss possible mechanisms that may underlie this role of CAMTA1, and speculate on the more general roles of CAMTAs in auxin responses and phenotypic plasticity. PMID:20930517

  3. Calmodulin is responsible for Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of TRPA1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Raquibul; Leeson-Payne, Alasdair T S; Jaggar, Jonathan H; Zhang, Xuming

    2017-03-23

    TRPA1 is a Ca(2+)-permeable ion channel involved in many sensory disorders such as pain, itch and neuropathy. Notably, the function of TRPA1 depends on Ca(2+), with low Ca(2+) potentiating and high Ca(2+) inactivating TRPA1. However, it remains unknown how Ca(2+) exerts such contrasting effects. Here, we show that Ca(2+) regulates TRPA1 through calmodulin, which binds to TRPA1 in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Calmodulin binding enhanced TRPA1 sensitivity and Ca(2+)-evoked potentiation of TRPA1 at low Ca(2+), but inhibited TRPA1 sensitivity and promoted TRPA1 desensitization at high Ca(2+). Ca(2+)-dependent potentiation and inactivation of TRPA1 were selectively prevented by disrupting the interaction of the carboxy-lobe of calmodulin with a calmodulin-binding domain in the C-terminus of TRPA1. Calmodulin is thus a critical Ca(2+) sensor enabling TRPA1 to respond to diverse Ca(2+) signals distinctly.

  4. Fluorescence anisotropy imaging microscopy maps calmodulin binding during cellular contraction and locomotion

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Calmodulin is a calcium transducer that activates key regulatory and structural proteins through calcium-induced binding to the target proteins. A fluorescent analog of calmodulin in conjunction with ratio imaging, relative to a volume indicator, has demonstrated that calmodulin is uniformly distributed in serum-deprived fibroblasts and there is no immediate change in the distribution upon stimulation with complete serum. The same fluorescent analog of calmodulin together with steady state fluorescence anisotropy imaging microscopy has been used to define the temporal and spatial changes in calmodulin binding to cellular targets during stimulation of serum-deprived fibroblasts and in polarized fibroblasts during wound healing. In serum-deprived fibroblasts, which exhibit a low free calcium ion concentration, a majority of the fluorescent analog of calmodulin remained unbound (fraction bound, fB < 10%). However, upon stimulation of the serum- deprived cells with complete serum, calmodulin binding (maximum fB approximately 95%) was directly correlated with the time course of the elevation and decline of the free calcium ion concentration, while the contraction of stress fibers continued for an hour or more. Calmodulin binding was also elevated in the leading lamellae of fibroblasts (maximum FB approximately 50%) during the lamellar contraction phase of wound healing and was spatially correlated with the contraction of transverse fibers containing myosin II. Highly polarized and motile fibroblasts exhibited the highest anisotropy (calmodulin binding) in the retracting tails and in association with contracting transverse fibers in the cortex of the cell. These results suggest that local activation of myosin II-based contractions involves the local binding of calmodulin to target proteins. The results also demonstrate a powerful yet simple mode of light microscopy that will be valuable for mapping molecular binding of suitably labeled macromolecules in living cells

  5. Glucose-independent inhibition of yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase by calmodulin antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, I; Maldonado, A M; Eraso, P

    1997-01-01

    Glucose metabolism causes activation of the yeast plasma-membrane H+-ATPase. The molecular mechanism of this regulation is not known, but it is probably mediated by phosphorylation of the enzyme. The involvement in this process of several kinases has been suggested but their actual role has not been proved. The physiological role of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in glucose-induced activation was investigated by studying the effect of specific calmodulin antagonists on the glucose-induced ATPase kinetic changes in wild-type and two mutant strains affected in the glucose regulation of the enzyme. Preincubation of the cells with calmidazolium or compound 48/80 impeded the increase in ATPase activity by reducing the Vmax of the enzyme without modifying the apparent affinity for ATP in the three strains. In one mutant, pma1-T912A, the putative calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-phosphorylatable Thr-912 was eliminated, and in the other, pma1-P536L, H+-ATPase was constitutively activated, suggesting that the antagonistic effect was not mediated by a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and not related to glucose regulation. This was corroborated when the in vitro effect of the calmodulin antagonists on H+-ATPase activity was tested. Purified plasma membranes from glucose-starved or glucose-fermenting cells from both pma1-P890X, another constitutively activated ATPase mutant, and wild-type strains were preincubated with calmidazolium or melittin. In all cases, ATP hydrolysis was inhibited with an IC50 of approximately 1 microM. This inhibition was reversed by calmodulin. Analysis of the calmodulin-binding protein pattern in the plasma-membrane fraction eliminates ATPase as the calmodulin target protein. We conclude that H+-ATPase inhibition by calmodulin antagonists is mediated by an as yet unidentified calmodulin-dependent membrane protein. PMID:9148755

  6. Identification of spectrin as a calmodulin-binding component in the pituitary gonadotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Wooge, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide which stimulates the release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) from the pituitary. Ca{sup 2+} fulfills the requirements of a second messenger for this system. Inhibition of calmodulin will inhibit GnRH stimulated LH release. The aim of the present studies has been to identify the locus of action of calmodulin within the pituitary. By use of an {sup 125}I-calmodulin gel overlayer assay, five major Ca{sup 2+}-dependent {sup 125}I-calmodulin labelled components of subunit M{sub r} > 205,000; 200,000; 135,000; 60,000; and 52,000 have been identified. This labeling was found to be phenothiazine-sensitive. Ca{sup 2+}-independent binding that was observed appears to be due to hydrophobic interactions of calmodulin with acid-soluble proteins, principally histones. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent calmodulin-binding components are localized primarily in the cytosolic fraction. Separation of dispersed anterior pituitary cells through a linear Metrizamide gradient yielded gonadotrope-enriched fractions, which were found to contain all five {sup 125}I-calmodulin binding components corresponding to the major bands in the pituitary homogenate. The calmodulin-binding component levels do not appear to be differentially regulated by steroids. The calmodulin binding component with a M{sub r} > 205,000 has been identified as spectrin. Spectrin-like immunoreactivity and {sup 125}I-calmodulin-binding activity in pituitary tissue homogenates co-migrated in various percentage acrylamide gels with avian erythrocyte spectrin. Spectrin was detected in a gonadotrope-enriched fraction by immunoblotting, and confirmed in gonadotropes by indirect immunofluorescence of cultured pituitary cells in which spectrin- and LH-immunoreactivity co-localized.

  7. Purification and characterization of calmodulin (lysine 115) N-methyltransferase from Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Pech, L L; Nelson, D L

    1994-03-02

    Calmodulin (lysine 115) N-methyltransferase was purified from the cytosolic fraction of Paramecium tetraurelia by sequential dialysis, cellulose phosphate chromatography, Reactive Red 120 agarose chromatography, and calmodulin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The enzyme was purified 6800-fold with a 15% yield. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified enzyme invariably revealed a major protein of 37 kDa that was reproducibly obtained and minor proteins of 35 and 28 kDa that were sometimes obtained in variable yields. The enzyme formed a mixture of mono-, di-, and trimethyllysine residues at lysine 115 of calmodulin in vitro, had a Km for the methyl donor, S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet), of about 1 microM and a pH optimum of about 7.5. The purified enzyme had an absolute requirement for the reductant DTT for activity, whereas the enzyme in crude fractions did not. The enzyme is a monomer with an estimated molecular mass of 33 kDa. Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, and Ni2+ stimulated calmodulin N-methyltransferase activity but Zn2+ did not. Calmodulin N-methyltransferase was inhibited by its reaction product S-adenosyl homocysteine (SAH), but not by sinefungin and tubercidin. The calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium and mellitin were inhibitory but W7 was not. The enzyme was not stimulated by Triton X-100 nor by NaCl. Only calmodulins with an unmethylated lysine at residue 115, including cam2 calmodulin, were substrates. Histones and calcium-binding proteins from Paramecium other than calmodulin did not act as substrates for the purified calmodulin N-methyltransferase and no other substrates in the cytosolic fraction were observed.

  8. Molecular modeling of calmodulin: a comparison with crystallographic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, J. J.; Rein, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods of side-chain placement on a modeled protein have been examined. Two molecular models of calmodulin were constructed that differ in the treatment of side chains prior to optimization of the molecule. A virtual bond analysis program developed by Purisima and Scheraga was used to determine the backbone conformation based on 2.2 angstroms resolution C alpha coordinates for the molecules. In the first model, side chains were initially constructed in an extended conformation. In the second model, a conformational grid search technique was employed. Calcium ions were treated explicitly during energy optimization using CHARMM. The models are compared to a recently published refined crystal structure of calmodulin. The results indicate that the initial choices for side-chains, but also significant effects on the main-chain conformation and supersecondary structure. The conformational differences are discussed. Analysis of these and other methods makes possible the formulation of a methodology for more appropriate side-chain placement in modeled proteins.

  9. Ca2+/calmodulin system: participation on rat sexual hypothalamic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Medina, M; Canchola, E; Vergara-Onofre, M; Rosado, A

    1993-11-01

    Modifications of male rat hypothalamic sexual differentiation after neonatal administration of drugs that participate on the Ca2+/calmodulin system (haloperidol, trifluoperazine, penfluridol, pimozide, and verapamil) were studied. Pups treated 72 h after birth were behaviorally tested on day 120 of extrauterine life. Five tests for homotypical behavior were conducted. Afterwards animals were castrated and tested twice for heterotypical (female) behavior under replacement hormonal therapy. Fifty percent (80% in the case of pimozide) of all treated males showed lordotic behavior compared with none of the controls. Haloperidol (39%, lordosis quotient) and pimozide (40%, lordosis quotient) were more active than the others. Results obtained with verapamil were not statistically different from the controls. Pimozide was the most active agent influencing the appetitive masculine behavior (mount latency, intromission latency, and postejaculatory interval). Verapamil was more efficient than the rest of the drugs on the consummatory behavior (mount latency, intromission frequency, interintromission interval, and ejaculatory latency). Our results support the participation of the Ca2+/calmodulin system in hypothalamic sexual differentiation and in the differential modulation of the masculine and feminine behavioral patterns.

  10. Heparin blocks /sup 125/I-calmodulin internalization by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Roden, L.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-03-05

    /sup 125/I-Calmodulin is internalized by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) in a time, temperature and calcium dependent manner. Internalization of /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the osmotically sensitive space of BBV was distinguished from binding of the ligand to the outer BBV surface by examining the interaction of ligand and BBV at different medium osmolarities (300-1100 mosm), uptake was inversely proportional to medium osmolarity. Internalized /sup 125/I-calmodulin was intact and Western blots of solubilized BBV with /sup 125/I-calmodulin demonstrated the presence of several calmodulin-binding proteins of 143, 118, 50, 47.5, 46.5 and 35 kilodaltons which could represent potential intravesicular binding sites for the ligand. Heparin and the related glycosaminoglycan heparin sulfate both showed a dose-dependent inhibition (0.5-50 ..mu..g/ml) of /sup 125/I-calmodulin uptake by BBV, but other sulfated and nonsulfated glycosaminoglycans including chondroitin sulfates, keratan sulfate and hyaluronic acid showed little or no inhibitory effect. Desulfation of heparin virtually abolished the inhibition of uptake while depolymerization reduced it. Heparin did not block the binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to BBV proteins as assessed by Western blotting technique suggesting its effect was on internalization of the ligand rather than on its association with internal membrane proteins.

  11. Insulin phosphorylates calmodulin in preparations of solubilized rat hepatocyte insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, D.B.; McDonald, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    It has previously been shown that insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of calmodulin in adipocyte insulin receptor preparations. Here they demonstrate that insulin also stimulates the phosphorylation of calmodulin in wheat germ lectin-enriched insulin receptor preparations obtained from rat hepatocytes. Standard phosphorylation assays were performed at 30C in the presence of 50mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.5), 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100, 1mM EGTA, 50 M (el-TSP)ATP, 5mM MgCl2, 0.25 M polylysine, 1.2 M calmodulin and various CaS and insulin concentrations. The phosphorylation of calmodulin was determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Phosphorylation of calmodulin had an absolute requirement for insulin receptors, insulin and certain basic proteins. Phosphorylation was maximal above 13 nM insulin and at submicromolar CaS concentrations, whereas supramicromolar CaS concentrations were inhibitory. As was observed in the adipocyte insulin receptor system, calmodulin phosphorylation was dependent upon the presence of co-factors, such as polylysine, histone H/sub f/2b and protamine sulfate. The role played by these co-factors has not yet been established. These data suggest that both CaS and calmodulin participate in post receptor insulin events in hepatocytes.

  12. Elucidating the mechanisms of cooperative calcium-calmodulin interactions: a structural systems biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Valeyev, Najl V; Bates, Declan G; Heslop-Harrison, Pat; Postlethwaite, Ian; Kotov, Nikolay V

    2008-01-01

    Background Calmodulin is an important multifunctional molecule that regulates the activities of a large number of proteins in the cell. Calcium binding induces conformational transitions in calmodulin that make it specifically active to particular target proteins. The precise mechanisms underlying calcium binding to calmodulin are still, however, quite poorly understood. Results In this study, we adopt a structural systems biology approach and develop a mathematical model to investigate various types of cooperative calcium-calmodulin interactions. We compare the predictions of our analysis with physiological dose-response curves taken from the literature, in order to provide a quantitative comparison of the effects of different mechanisms of cooperativity on calcium-calmodulin interactions. The results of our analysis reduce the gap between current understanding of intracellular calmodulin function at the structural level and physiological calcium-dependent calmodulin target activation experiments. Conclusion Our model predicts that the specificity and selectivity of CaM target regulation is likely to be due to the following factors: variations in the target-specific Ca2+ dissociation and cooperatively effected dissociation constants, and variations in the number of Ca2+ ions required to bind CaM for target activation. PMID:18518982

  13. Oxidation of calmodulin alters activation and regulation of CaMKII.

    PubMed

    Robison, A J; Winder, Danny G; Colbran, Roger J; Bartlett, Ryan K

    2007-04-27

    Increases in reactive oxygen species and mis-regulation of calcium homeostasis are associated with various physiological conditions and disease states including aging, ischemia, exposure to drugs of abuse, and neurodegenerative diseases. In aged animals, this is accompanied by a reduction in oxidative repair mechanisms resulting in increased methionine oxidation of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin in the brain. Here, we show that oxidation of calmodulin results in an inability to: (1) activate CaMKII; (2) support Thr(286) autophosphorylation of CaMKII; (3) prevent Thr(305/6) autophosphorylation of CaMKII; (4) support binding of CaMKII to the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor; and (5) compete with alpha-actinin for binding to CaMKII. Moreover, oxidized calmodulin does not efficiently bind calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in rat brain lysates or in vitro. These observations contrast from past experiments performed with oxidized calmodulin and the plasma membrane calcium ATPase, where oxidized calmodulin binds to, and partially activates the PMCA. When taken together, these data suggest that oxidative stress may perturb neuronal and cardiac function via a decreased ability of oxidized calmodulin to bind, activate, and regulate the interactions of CaMKII.

  14. Plant chimeric Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. Role of the neural visinin-like domain in regulating autophosphorylation and calmodulin affinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Cremo, C. R.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by a serine-threonine kinase domain, an autoinhibitory domain, a calmodulin-binding domain and a neural visinin-like domain with three EF-hands. The neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain at the C-terminal end of the CaM-binding domain makes CCaMK unique among all the known calmodulin-dependent kinases. Biological functions of the plant visinin-like proteins or visinin-like domains in plant proteins are not well known. Using EF-hand deletions in the visinin-like domain, we found that the visinin-like domain regulated Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK. To investigate the effects of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation on the interaction with calmodulin, the equilibrium binding constants of CCaMK were measured by fluorescence emission anisotropy using dansylated calmodulin. Binding was 8-fold tighter after Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. This shift in affinity did not occur in CCaMK deletion mutants lacking Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. A variable calmodulin affinity regulated by Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation mediated through the visinin-like domain is a new regulatory mechanism for CCaMK activation and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Our experiments demonstrate the existence of two functional molecular switches in a protein kinase regulating the kinase activity, namely a visinin-like domain acting as a Ca(2+)-triggered switch and a CaM-binding domain acting as an autophosphorylation-triggered molecular switch.

  15. Hepatocyte insulin receptor is a calmodulin binding protein and is functionally inhibited by calmidazolium

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, T.P.; Pollet, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Insulin-induced autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor and changes in intracellular Ca/sup + +/ have been proposed as possible mediators of insulin action in target tissues. The authors have investigated the association of the 17kD calcium binding protein calmodulin with the insulin receptor solubilized from rat liver plasma membranes. Insulin receptors solubilized in 0.1% Triton X-100 exhibited strong binding to calmodulin-agarose affinity columns in the presence of 100..mu..M calcium and could be eluded with 100..mu..M ethelene glycol-bis (amino ethel ether) Tetra Acetic Acid (EGTA) with an 80% yield in insulin binding activity. In addition, /sup 125/I-Calmodulin was shown to bind to wheat germ agglutinin purified solubilized receptors, was specifically inhibited by EGTA (100 ..mu..M) and/or calmidazolium (10 ..mu..M) and was found to be insulin-dependent (max 10/sup -10/ M insulin). SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis data suggests that /sup 125/I-calmodulin may be associated with the 92 kD beta-subunit of the insulin receptor, consistent with the cytoplasmic domain of this subunit. While they have confirmed previous reports that the addition of calcium and calmodulin to solubilized insulin receptors preparations produces no demonstrable change in receptor phosphorylation, the addition of the calmodulin inhibitor calmidazolium did show more than 50% inhibition of insulin stimulated receptor phosphorylation, suggesting that a domain of the calmodulin molecule may be very tightly associated with the insulin receptor. These results indicate that calmodulin binds tightly and specifically to the insulin receptor of the hepatocyte and is insulin dependent. The findings also suggest that this interaction may be functionally significant in mediating insulin-induced receptor phosphorylation as well as other insulin actions. Thus, calmodulin may play a major role as an intracellular contributor to insulin action.

  16. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-01-01

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  17. Calmodulin interacts with angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) and inhibits shedding of its ectodomain.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Daniel W; Clarke, Nicola E; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2008-01-23

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) is a regulatory protein of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and a receptor for the causative agent of severe-acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), the SARS-coronavirus. We have previously shown that ACE2 can be shed from the cell surface in response to phorbol esters by a process involving TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE; ADAM17). In this study, we demonstrate that inhibitors of calmodulin also stimulate shedding of the ACE2 ectodomain, a process at least partially mediated by a metalloproteinase. We also show that calmodulin associates with ACE2 and that this interaction is decreased by calmodulin inhibitors.

  18. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of the family of voltage-gated CaV1-2 channels comprises a prominent prototype for ion channel regulation, remarkable for its powerful Ca2+ sensing capabilities, deep in elegant mechanistic lessons, and rich in biological and therapeutic implications. This field thereby resides squarely at the epicenter of Ca2+ signaling biology, ion channel biophysics, and therapeutic advance. This review summarizes the historical development of ideas in this field, the scope and richly patterned organization of Ca2+ feedback behaviors encompassed by this system, and the long-standing challenges and recent developments in discerning a molecular basis for calmodulation. We conclude by highlighting the considerable synergy between mechanism, biological insight, and promising therapeutics. PMID:24863929

  19. Physico-chemical pathways in radioprotective action of calmodulin antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1996-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.9 Gy/s. The fluidity of membrane decreased with radiation dose and in the presence of calmodulin antagonists (CA) like chlorpromazine (CPZ), promethazine (PMZ) and trimeprazine (TMZ) it increased. Radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from membranes. This release was inhibited by CA mainly by CPZ and PMZ. Being Ca 2+ dependent, the changes in the activity of acetylcholine estrase (AchE) following irradiation was also studied. Radiation decreased the activity of AchE in dose dependent manner. Presence of CPZ and PMZ diminished the radiation induced inhibition of AchE but not in the presence of TMZ at the lower concentration tested. It is suggested that apart from scavenging of free radicals, CA perhaps exert their euxoic radioprotective effect through Ca 2+ dependent processes.

  20. Possible role of calmodulin in excystation of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Bernal, R M; Tovar, R; Santos, J I; Muñoz, M L

    1998-09-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia initiates infection when trophozoites emerge from a cyst in the hosts by the excystation process. Although this process is crucial to the initiation of infection by G. lamblia, little is known about its regulation. To study the possible involvement of calmodulin (CaM) in excystation we tested the effect of several CaM antagonists (TFP, W-7, and W-5) on this cellular function. Except for W-5 the rest of these compounds inhibited excystation. The protein kinase C inhibitor H-7 had no effect on excystation, suggesting that CaM antagonists acted by selectively inhibiting CaM. Furthermore, CaM was redistributed after the induction of excystation and there was an increase in its fluorescence and activity. These results suggest that a CaM-dependent process is involved in G. lamblia excystation.

  1. Calmodulin and Ca(2+) control of voltage gated Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Yoder, Jesse B; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Amzel, L Mario

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the cytosolic portion of voltage activated sodium channels (CTNav) in complexes with calmodulin and other effectors in the presence and the absence of calcium provide information about the mechanisms by which these effectors regulate channel activity. The most studied of these complexes, those of Nav1.2 and Nav1.5, show details of the conformations and the specific contacts that are involved in channel regulation. Another voltage activated sodium channel, Nav1.4, shows significant calcium dependent inactivation, while its homolog Nav1.5 does not. The available structures shed light on the possible localization of the elements responsible for this effect. Mutations in the genes of these 3 Nav channels are associated with several disease conditions: Nav1.2, neurological conditions; Nav1.4, syndromes involving skeletal muscle; and Nav1.5, cardiac arrhythmias. Many of these disease-specific mutations are located at the interfaces involving CTNav and its effectors.

  2. Calmodulin Affects Sensitization of Drosophila melanogaster Odorant Receptors.

    PubMed

    Mukunda, Latha; Miazzi, Fabio; Sargsyan, Vardanush; Hansson, Bill S; Wicher, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Flying insects have developed a remarkably sensitive olfactory system to detect faint and turbulent odor traces. This ability is linked to the olfactory receptors class of odorant receptors (ORs), occurring exclusively in winged insects. ORs form heteromeric complexes of an odorant specific receptor protein (OrX) and a highly conserved co-receptor protein (Orco). The ORs form ligand gated ion channels that are tuned by intracellular signaling systems. Repetitive subthreshold odor stimulation of olfactory sensory neurons sensitizes insect ORs. This OR sensitization process requires Orco activity. In the present study we first asked whether OR sensitization can be monitored with heterologously expressed OR proteins. Using electrophysiological and calcium imaging methods we demonstrate that D. melanogaster OR proteins expressed in CHO cells show sensitization upon repeated weak stimulation. This was found for OR channels formed by Orco as well as by Or22a or Or56a and Orco. Moreover, we show that inhibition of calmodulin (CaM) action on OR proteins, expressed in CHO cells, abolishes any sensitization. Finally, we investigated the sensitization phenomenon using an ex vivo preparation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) expressing Or22a inside the fly's antenna. Using calcium imaging, we observed sensitization in the dendrites as well as in the soma. Inhibition of calmodulin with W7 disrupted the sensitization within the outer dendritic shaft, whereas the sensitization remained in the other OSN compartments. Taken together, our results suggest that CaM action is involved in sensitizing the OR complex and that this mechanisms accounts for the sensitization in the outer dendrites, whereas further mechanisms contribute to the sensitization observed in the other OSN compartments. The use of heterologously expressed OR proteins appears to be suitable for further investigations on the mechanistic basis of OR sensitization, while investigations on native neurons are required

  3. Novel Calmodulin (CALM2) Mutations Associated with Congenital Arrhythmia Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Naomasa; Yagihara, Nobue; Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Roh, Michelle S.; Shigemizu, Daichi; Lichtner, Peter; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aiba, Takeshi; Homfray, Tessa; Behr, Elijah R.; Klug, Didier; Denjoy, Isabelle; Mastantuono, Elisa; Theisen, Daniel; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Naoto; Kimura, Akinori; Ozaki, Kouichi; Motomura, Hideki; Suda, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Schwartz, Peter J.; Meitinger, Thomas; Kääb, Stefan; Guicheney, Pascale; Shimizu, Wataru; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Chazin, Walter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as in congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) represent treatable causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and children. Recently, mutations in calmodulin (CALM1, CALM2) have been associated with severe forms of LQTS and CPVT, with life-threatening arrhythmias occurring very early in life. Additional mutation-positive cases are needed to discern genotype-phenotype correlations associated with calmodulin mutations. Methods and Results We employed conventional and next-generation sequencing approaches including exome analysis in genotype-negative LQTS probands. We identified five novel de novo missense mutations in CALM2 in three subjects with LQTS (p.N98S, p.N98I, p.D134H) and two subjects with clinical features of both LQTS and CPVT (p.D132E, p.Q136P). Age of onset of major symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest) ranged from 1–9 years. Three of five probands had cardiac arrest and one of these subjects did not survive. Although all probands had LQTS, two subjects also exhibited electrocardiographic features consistent with CPVT. The clinical severity among subjects in this series was generally less than that originally reported for CALM1 and CALM2 associated with recurrent cardiac arrest during infancy. Four of five probands responded to β-blocker therapy whereas one subject with mutation p.Q136P died suddenly during exertion despite this treatment. Mutations affect conserved residues located within calcium binding loops III (p.N98S, p.N98I) or IV (p.D132E, p.D134H, p.Q136P) and caused reduced calcium binding affinity. Conclusions CALM2 mutations can be associated with LQTS and with overlapping features of LQTS and CPVT. PMID:24917665

  4. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  5. Role of calmodulin and calcineurin in regulating flagellar motility and wave polarity in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Aakash Gautam; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2017-09-07

    We have previously reported the involvement of cyclic AMP in regulating flagellar waveforms in Leishmania. Here, we investigated the roles of calcium, calmodulin, and calcineurin in flagellar motility regulation in L. donovani. Using high-speed videomicroscopy, we show that calcium-independent calmodulin and calcineurin activity is necessary for motility in Leishmania. Inhibition of calmodulin and calcineurin induced ciliary beats interrupting flagellar beating in both live (in vivo) and ATP-reactivated (in vitro) parasites. Our results indicate that signaling mediated by calmodulin and calcineurin operates antagonistically to cAMP signaling in regulating the waveforms of Leishmania flagellum. These two pathways are possibly involved in maintaining the balance between the two waveforms, essential for responding to environmental cues, survival, and infectivity.

  6. Expression of different calmodulin genes in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): role of nod factor on calmodulin gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Camas, Alberto; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen; Lara, Miguel

    2002-05-01

    Three calmodulin (PvCaM-1, PvCaM-2, and PvCaM-3) clones were isolated from a Phaseolus vulgaris nodule cDNA library. All clones contain the complete coding region and are 62 to 74% homologous within this region. Compared to plant CaM consensus sequences, PvCaM-2 has a novel tyrosine118 residue, representing a putative phosphorylation site. Southern analysis suggested that calmodulin is encoded by a gene family. These three CaM clones are expressed mainly in young tissues and meristems. The expression pattern of PvCaM-2 and PvCaM-3 is almost identical but different from that of PvCaM-1, suggesting that PvCaM-1 is a well-defined CaM gene, whereas PvCaM-2 and PvCaM-3 could be alleles. PvCaM clones are expressed early in nodules, and transcript levels increase from nodule primordia to nodule-like structures induced by the Nod factor. Conversely, in roots, Nod factor lowers mRNA levels of all three PvCaM clones, but especially of PvCaM-1. Inhibition of PvCaM-1 expression also is observed when 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid is added and is prevented when roots are treated with indole-3-acetic acid, suggesting that PvCaM-1 regulation is related to the Nod factor inhibition of polar auxin transport. These results could suggest that CaM clones do not participate in the early signaling generated by the Nod factor but do participate in early events of nodule formation.

  7. A Novel Kinesin-Like Protein with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse developmental processes in plants through the action of calmodulin. A cDNA expression library from developing anthers of tobacco was screened with S-35-labeled calmodulin to isolate cDNAs encoding calmodulin-binding proteins. Among several clones isolated, a kinesin-like gene (TCK1) that encodes a calmodulin-binding kinesin-like protein was obtained. The TCK1 cDNA encodes a protein with 1265 amino acid residues. Its structural features are very similar to those of known kinesin heavy chains and kinesin-like proteins from plants and animals, with one distinct exception. Unlike other known kinesin-like proteins, TCK1 contains a calmodulin-binding domain which distinguishes it from all other known kinesin genes. Escherichia coli-expressed TCK1 binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In addition to the presence of a calmodulin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal, it also has a leucine zipper motif in the stalk region. The amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminal of TCK1 has striking homology with the mechanochemical motor domain of kinesins. The motor domain has ATPase activity that is stimulated by microtubules. Southern blot analysis revealed that TCK1 is coded by a single gene. Expression studies indicated that TCKI is expressed in all of the tissues tested. Its expression is highest in the stigma and anther, especially during the early stages of anther development. Our results suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin may play an important role in the function of this microtubule-associated motor protein and may be involved in the regulation of microtubule-based intracellular transport.

  8. Structure-Based Systematic Isolation of Conditional-Lethal Mutations in the Single Yeast Calmodulin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Y.; Botstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Conditional-lethal mutations of the single calmodulin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been very difficult to isolate by random and systematic methods, despite the fact that deletions cause recessive lethality. We report here the isolation of numerous conditional-lethal mutants that were recovered by systematically altering phenylalanine residues. The phenylalanine residues of calmodulin were implicated in function both by structural studies of calmodulin bound to target peptides and by their extraordinary conservation in evolution. Seven single and 26 multiple Phe -> Ala mutations were constructed. Mutant phenotypes were examined in a haploid cmd1 disrupted strain under three conditions: single copy, low copy, and overexpressed. Whereas all but one of the single mutations caused no obvious phenotype, most of the multiple mutations caused obvious growth phenotypes. Five were lethal, 6 were lethal only in synthetic medium, 13 were temperature-sensitive lethal and 2 had no discernible phenotypic consequences. Overexpression of some of the mutant genes restored the phenotype to nearly wild type. Several temperature-sensitive calmodulin mutations were suppressed by elevated concentration of CaCl(2) in the medium. Mutant calmodulin protein was detected at normal levels in extracts of most of the lethal mutant cells, suggesting that the deleterious phenotypes were due to loss of the calmodulin function and not protein instability. Analysis of diploid strains heterozygous for all combinations of cmd1-ts alleles revealed four intragenic complementation groups. The contributions of individual phe->ala changes to mutant phenotypes support the idea of internal functional redundancy in the symmetrical calmodulin protein molecule. These results suggest that the several phenylalanine residues in calmodulin are required to different extents in different combinations in order to carry out each of the several essential tasks. PMID:7896089

  9. Axonal transport of calmodulin: a physiologic approach to identification of long-term associations between proteins

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Calmodulin is a soluble, heat-stable protein which has been shown to modulate both membrane-bound and soluble enzymes, but relatively little has been known about the in vivo associations of calmodulin. A 17,000- dalton heat-stable protein was found to move in axonal transport in the guinea pig visual system with the proteins of slow component b (SCb; 2 mm/d) along with actin and the bulk of the soluble proteins of the axon. Co-electrophoresis of purified calmodulin and radioactively labeled SCb proteins in two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) demonstrated the identity of the heat-stable SCb protein and calmodulin on the basis of pI, molecular weight, and anomalous migration in the presence of Ca2+-chelating agents. No proteins co-migrating with calmodulin in two-dimensional PAGE could be detected among the proteins of slow component a (SCa; 0.3 mm/d, microtubules and neurofilaments) or fast component (FC; 250 mm/d, membrane-associated proteins). We conclude that calmodulin is transported solely as part of the SCb complex of proteins, the axoplasmic matrix. Calmodulin moves in axonal transport independent of the movements of microtubules (SCa) and membranes (FC), which suggests that the interactions of calmodulin with these structures may represent a transient interaction between groups of proteins moving in axonal transport at different rates. Axonal transport has been shown to be an effective tool for the demonstration of long-term in vivo protein associations. PMID:6166619

  10. [Ca2+ (calmodulin)-dependent phosphorylation of plasma membranes of pig myometrium].

    PubMed

    Prishchepa, L A; Kondratiuk, T P; Kurskiĭ, M D

    1989-01-01

    The high-purified vesicles of pig myometrium sarcolemma closed, mainly, so that the cytoplasmatic side is outside possess the Ca2+ (calmodulin)-dependent protein kinase activity. The initial rate of the endogenic phosphorylation without exogenic calmodulin is 6.3 and with its presence--10.7 pmol of 32Pi 1 min per 1 mg of protein. Km for ATP is equal to 164 microM, and Vmax--0.27 nmol of 32Pi 1 min per 1 mg of protein. Exogenic calmodulin increases the affinity to ATP (50 microM), Vmax being unchanged. Under optimal concentrations of calmodulin (10(-7)-10(-6) M) and 10(-4) M Ca2+ the protein kinase activity is 0.132 nmol of 32Pi min per 1 mg of protein. Electrophoresis in DS-PAAG has shown that membrane proteins with molecular weight of 105, 58, 25, 12 and 2 kDa are basic substrates of Ca2+ (calmodulin)-dependent phosphorylation. Trifluoperazine++ in the concentration of 40 microM inhibits phosphorylation of all five proteins. Ca2+ (calmodulin)-dependent phosphorylation is supposed to be a regulator of Ca2+-transport processes of sarcolemma.

  11. Identification of functional connections between calmodulin and the yeast actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya-Kawasaki, M; Botstein, D; Ohya, Y

    1998-01-01

    One of four intragenic complementing groups of temperature-sensitive yeast calmodulin mutations, cmd1A, results in a characteristic functional defect in actin organization. We report here that among the complementing mutations, a representative cmd1A mutation (cmd1-226: F92A) is synthetically lethal with a mutation in MYO2 that encodes a class V unconventional myosin with calmodulin-binding domains. Gel overlay assay shows that a mutant calmodulin with the F92A alteration has severely reduced binding affinity to a GST-Myo2p fusion protein. Random replacement and site-directed mutagenesis at position 92 of calmodulin indicate that hydrophobic and aromatic residues are allowed at this position, suggesting an importance of hydrophobic interaction between calmodulin and Myo2p. To analyze other components involved in actin organization through calmodulin, we isolated and characterized mutations that show synthetic lethal interaction with cmd1-226; these "cax" mutants fell into five complementation groups. Interestingly, all the mutations themselves affect actin organization. Unlike cax2, cax3, cax4, and cax5 mutations, cax1 shows allele-specific synthetic lethality with the cmd1A allele. CAX1 is identical to ANP1/GEM3/MCD2, which is involved in protein glycosylation. CAX4 is identical to the ORF YGR036c, and CAX5 is identical to MNN10/SLC2/BED1. We discuss possible roles for Cax proteins in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:9725829

  12. Calmodulin affinity chromatography yields a functional purified erythrocyte (Ca+ + Mg2+)-dependent adenosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Gietzen, K; Tejcka, M; Wolf, H U

    1980-01-01

    The (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-dependent ATPase of human erythrocyte membranes was solubilized with deoxycholate and purified by calmodulin affinity chromatography to yield a functional enzyme. The method gave an enzyme purified 207-fold as compared with that of the erythrocyte membranes. The molecular weight of the ATPase was in the range 135 000-150 000, as revealed by a single major band after electrophoresis on dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gels. The isolated enzyme was highly sensitive to calmodulin, since the activity was increased about 9-fold. At 37 degrees C and in the presence of calmodulin the purified ATPase had a specific activity of 10.1 mumol/min per mg of protein. Triton X-100 or deoxycholate stimulated the calmodulin-deficient enzyme in a concentration-dependent fashion whereby the calmodulin-sensitivity was lost. The purification method is suitable for studying the lipid-sensitivity of the ATPase, since the lipids can easily be exchanged without a significant loss of activity. A purification procedure described by Niggli, Penniston & Carafoli [(1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 9955-9958] resulted in an enzyme that indeed was pure but was lacking a predominant feature, namely the modulation by calmodulin. Images Fig. 3. PMID:6450590

  13. In vivo effects of zinc deficiency on calmodulin concentrations in selected rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.S.; McBride, S.A.; Graham, S.; Nelson, N.R.; Slotnick, B.M.; Henkin, R.I.

    1987-12-14

    Two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats, one fed zinc-deficient diet, ad libitum, the other, pair-fed with the same diet, but given supplemental zinc in the drinking water were studied. After ten weeks of diet, rats were exsanguinated and zinc and calmodulin concentration in brain and testes were measured. Mean zinc concentration in testes was significantly decreased in rats fed zinc-deficient diet without supplemental Zn/sup + +/, but mean zinc concentration in brain was not different. Similarly, mean calmodulin concentration in testes was decreased in rats fed zinc-deficient diet without supplemental Zn/sup + +/ whereas mean calmodulin concentration in brain was not different. Distribution studies of zinc and calmodulin showed that both zinc and calmodulin were released more freely into soluble fractions of testes in rats fed zinc-deficient diet without supplemental Zn/sup + +/. These results indicate, for the first time in in vivo studies, that zinc influences the calmodulin content of testes. 26 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  14. CALMODULIN ANTAGONISTS EFFECT ON Ca2+ LEVEL IN THE MITOCHONDRIA AND CYTOPLASM OF MYOMETRIUM CELLS.

    PubMed

    Shlykov, S G; Babich, L G; Yevtushenko, M E; Karakhim, S O; Kosterin, S O

    2015-01-01

    It is known that Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of this cation exchange in mitochondria is carried out with participation of calmodulin. We had shown in a previous work using two experimental models: isolated mitochondria and intact myometrium cells, that calmodulin antagonists reduce the level of mitochondrial membrane polarization. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of calmodulin antagonists on the level of ionized Ca in mitochondria and cytoplasm of uterine smooth muscle cells using spectrofluorometry and confocal microscopy. It was shown that myometrium mitochondria, in the presence of ATP and MgCl2 in the incubation medium, accumulate Ca ions in the matrix. Incubation of mitochondria in the presence of CCCP inhibited cation accumulation, but did not cease it. Calmodulin antagonist such as trifluoperazine (100 μm) considerably increased the level of ionized Ca in the mitochondrial matrix. Preliminary incubation of mitochondria with 100 μM Ca2+, before adding trifluoperazine to the incubation medium, partly prevented influence of the latter on the cation level in the matrix. Incubation of myometrium cells (primary culture) with another calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium (10 μM was accompanied by depolarization of mitochondrial membrane and an increase in the concentration of ionized Ca in cytoplasm. Thus, using two models, namely, isolated mitochondria and intact myometrium cells, it has been shown that calmodulin antagonists cause depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and an increase of the ionized Ca concentration in both the mitochondrial matrix and the cell cytoplasm.

  15. Activation of the SK potassium channel-calmodulin complex by nanomolar concentrations of terbium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiyan; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels sense intracellular Ca2+ concentrations via the associated Ca2+-binding protein calmodulin. Structural and functional studies have revealed essential properties of the interaction between calmodulin and SK channels. However, it is not fully understood how the binding of Ca2+ to calmodulin leads to channel opening. Drawing on previous biochemical studies of free calmodulin using lanthanide ions as Ca2+ substitutes, we have used the lanthanide ion, Tb3+, as an alternative ligand to study the activation properties of SK channels. We found that SK channels can be fully activated by nanomolar concentrations of Tb3+, indicating an apparent affinity >100-fold higher than Ca2+. Competition experiments show that Tb3+ binds to the same sites as Ca2+ to activate the channels. Additionally, SK channels activated by Tb3+ demonstrate a remarkably slow deactivation process. Comparison of our results with previous biochemical studies suggests that in the intact SK channel complex, the N-lobe of calmodulin provides ligand-binding sites for channel gating, and that its ligand-binding properties are comparable to those of the N-lobe in isolated calmodulin. PMID:19144926

  16. Calmodulin and the contractile vacuole complex in mitotic cells of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Q; Liu, T; Clarke, M

    1993-04-01

    In amoebae of the eukaryotic microorganism Dictyostelium discoideum, calmodulin is greatly enriched on membranes of the contractile vacuole complex, an osmoregulatory organelle. Antibodies specific for Dictyostelium calmodulin were used in the present study to immunolocalize the contractile vacuole complex in relation to the Golgi complex (detected with wheat germ agglutinin) and the microtubule organizing center (MTOC, detected with anti-tubulin antibodies). Cells were examined throughout the cell cycle. Double-staining experiments indicated that the contractile vacuole complex extended to the MTOC in interphase cells, usually, but not always, overlapping the Golgi complex. In metaphase and anaphase cells, the Golgi staining became diffuse, suggesting dispersal of Golgi membranes. In the same mitotic cells, anti-calmodulin antibodies labeled numerous small cortical vacuoles, indicating that the contractile vacuole complex had also become dispersed. When living mitotic cells were examined, the small cortical vacuoles were seen to be active, implying that all parts of the Dictyostelium contractile vacuole complex possess the ability to accumulate fluid and fuse with the plasma membrane. In contrast to observations reported for other types of cells, anti-calmodulin antibodies did not label the mitotic spindle in Dictyostelium. Despite this difference in localization, it is possible that vacuole-associated calmodulin in Dictyostelium cells and spindle-associated calmodulin in larger eukaryotic cells might perform a similar function, namely, regulating calcium levels.

  17. Calmodulin disruption impacts growth and motility in juvenile liver fluke.

    PubMed

    McCammick, Erin M; McVeigh, Paul; McCusker, Paul; Timson, David J; Morphew, Russell M; Brophy, Peter M; Marks, Nikki J; Mousley, Angela; Maule, Aaron G

    2016-01-27

    Deficiencies in effective flukicide options and growing issues with drug resistance make current strategies for liver fluke control unsustainable, thereby promoting the need to identify and validate new control targets in Fasciola spp. parasites. Calmodulins (CaMs) are small calcium-sensing proteins with ubiquitous expression in all eukaryotic organisms and generally use fluctuations in intracellular calcium levels to modulate cell signalling events. CaMs are essential for fundamental processes including the phosphorylation of protein kinases, gene transcription, calcium transport and smooth muscle contraction. In the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni, calmodulins have been implicated in egg hatching, miracidial transformation and larval development. Previously, CaMs have been identified amongst liver fluke excretory-secretory products and three CaM-like proteins have been characterised biochemically from adult Fasciola hepatica, although their functions remain unknown. In this study, we set out to investigate the biological function and control target potential of F. hepatica CaMs (FhCaMs) using RNAi methodology alongside novel in vitro bioassays. Our results reveal that: (i) FhCaMs are widely expressed in parenchymal cells throughout the forebody region of juvenile fluke; (ii) significant transcriptional knockdown of FhCaM1-3 was inducible by exposure to either long (~200 nt) double stranded (ds) RNAs or 27 nt short interfering (si) RNAs, although siRNAs were less effective than long dsRNAs; (iii) transient long dsRNA exposure-induced RNA interference (RNAi) of FhCaMs triggered transcript knockdown that persisted for ≥ 21 days, and led to detectable suppression of FhCaM proteins; (iv) FhCaM RNAi significantly reduced the growth of juvenile flukes maintained in vitro; (v) FhCaM RNAi juveniles also displayed hyperactivity encompassing significantly increased migration; (vi) both the reduced growth and increased motility phenotypes were recapitulated in juvenile

  18. Impact of methionine oxidation on calmodulin structural dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Megan R.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J.; Olenek, Michael J.; Klein, Jennifer C.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • We measured the distance distribution between two spin labels on calmodulin by DEER. • Two structural states, open and closed, were resolved at both low and high Ca. • Ca shifted the equilibrium toward the open state by a factor of 13. • Methionine oxidation, simulated by glutamine substitution, decreased the Ca effect. • These results have important implications for aging in muscle and other tissues. - Abstract: We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron–electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous X-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM’s structural heterogeneity in solution: in both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ∼4 nm (closed) and another at ∼6 nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each

  19. Interaction of calmodulin with histones. Alteration of histone dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wolff, D J; Ross, J M; Thompson, P N; Brostrom, M A; Brostrom, C O

    1981-02-25

    The Ca2+-dependent regulator protein (CDR), also frequently termed "calmodulin" was determined to influence the dephosphorylation of mixed calf thymus histones or purified histones 1, 2A, or 2B by a partially purified bovine brain phosphoprotein phosphatase. CDR increase the rate of dephosphorylation of mixed histones more than 20-fold. With increasing concentrations of mixed histones as substrate, a proportionate increase of CDR concentration was required to maintain maximal expression of histone phosphatase activity. Mixed histones suppressed the activation by CDR of a bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity, with activation being restored by increased quantities of CDR. Dephosphorylation of casein and phosphorylase alpha by the phosphatase preparation was not affected by CDR. These observations support the interpretation that the effects of CDR on histone dephosphorylation are substrate-directed. The rates of dephosphorylation of histones 1, 2A, and 2B by the phosphatase were 4- to 12-fold more rapid at low (sub-micromolar) concentrations of free Ca2+ than at high (200 microM) Ca2+ in incubations containing CDR, but they were unaffected by Ca2+ in incubations without CDR. The addition of stoichiometric quantities of calmodulin increased the apparent Km of the phosphatase for the various histones 2- to 6-fold, while maximal velocities were 4- to 12-fold higher at low than at high added Ca2+. The inhibitory effect of Ca2+ on histone dephosphorylation was immediately reversible by chelation of Ca2+ with EDTA. Ca2+-dependent inhibition of histone 1 or 2B phosphatase activities was also produced by rabbit skeletal muscle troponin C, but not by rabbit skeletal muscle parvalbumin, by poly(L-aspartate) or poly(L-glutamate). The phosphorylated fragment from the NH2-terminal region of either H2A (generated by treatment with N-bromosuccinimide) or H2B (generated by treatment with cyanogen bromide) was dephosphorylated by the phosphatase, with the rates of

  20. Calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE1).

    PubMed

    Kakkar, R; Raju, R V; Sharma, R K

    1999-07-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE1) is one of the key enzymes involved in the complex interactions between the cyclic nucleotide and Ca2+ second messenger systems. Currently, three genes encode PDE1, and alternate splicing of these genes gives rise to functionally different isozymes which exhibit distinct catalytic and regulatory properties. Some isozymes have similar kinetic and immunological properties but are differentially regulated by Ca2+ and calmodulin. These isozymes also differ in their mechanism of regulation by phosphorylation. Analysis of various regulatory reactions involving Ca2+ and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has revealed the importance of the time dependence of these reactions during cell activation; however, no measurement is available for the time of occurrence of specific regulatory reactions. cAMP-signalling systems provide a pivotal centre for achieving crosstalk regulation by various signalling pathways. It has been proposed that polypeptide sequences enriched in proline (P), glutamate (E), serine (S) and threonine (T), known as PEST motifs, serve as putative intramolecular signals for rapid proteolytic degradation by calpains. Calpains are Ca(2+)-dependent cysteine proteases that regulate various enzymes, transcription factors and structural proteins through limited proteolysis. Isozyme PDE1A2 has a PEST motif and acts as a substrate for m-calpain. In this paper, we have described PDE1A2 regulation by calpains and its physiological implications. cAMP is an important component of the signal transduction pathway and plays an integral role in various physiological processes such as gene transcription, various neuronal functions, cardiac muscle contraction, vascular relaxation, cell proliferation and a host of other functions. It is important to identify the cellular processes where PDE isoform(s) and cAMP response are altered. This will lead to better understanding of the pathology of disease states

  1. Uptake and binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin by isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, E.; Elgavish, A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the interaction of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) using an experimental protocol which allows us to distinguish between ligand binding to the outside of the vesicles vs. uptake and possible binding to the vesicle interior. By examining the association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with BBV as a function of medium osmolarity (300-1100 mosm) to alter intravesicular space, virtually all ligand interaction with BBV was found to represent uptake of intact /sup 125/I-calmodulin into the intravesicular space. Uptake appeared specific by the following criteria: (1) it was largely calcium dependent (2) it was inhibited in a dose dependent fashion by calmodulin and the homologous protein troponin C, but not by unrelated proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome C, insulin) (3) it was inhibited by known calmodulin antagonists (calmidazolium, mellitin, trifluoperazine). Calmodulin uptake may be followed by binding of /sup 125/I-calmodulin to intravesicular BBV proteins; calmodulin-binding proteins in BBV with molecular weights of 143K, 118K, 50K, 47.5K, 46.5K and 35K were identified by Western blotting techniques. The specific association of /sup 125/I-calmodulin with isolated BBV is of interest in regard to the possible role of this calcium regulatory protein in the protein reabsorptive and ion transport functions of this renal tubular membrane fraction.

  2. Coupling calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling and herbivore-induced plant response calmodulin-binding transcription factor AtSR1/CAMTA3

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calcium/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) has long been considered a crucial component in wound signaling pathway. However, no functional significance of Ca2+/CaM-binding proteins has been identified in plant responses to herbivore attack/wounding stress. We have reported earlier that a family of Ca2+/CaM-bindi...

  3. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  4. Photocontrol of calmodulin interaction with target peptides using azobenzene derivative.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Hideki; Yamada, Masafumi D; Kondo, Kazunori; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2009-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a physiologically important Ca(2+)-binding protein, participates in numerous cellular regulatory processes. It is dumbbell shaped and contains two globular domains connected by a short alpha-helix. Each of the globular domains has two Ca(2+)-binding sites, the EF hands. CaM undergoes a conformational change upon binding to Ca(2+), which enables it to bind to specific proteins for specific responses. Here, we successfully photocontrolled CaM binding to its target peptide using the photochromic compound N-(4-phenylazophenyl) maleimide (PAM), which reversibly undergoes cis-trans isomerization upon ultraviolet (UV) and visible (VIS) light irradiation. In order to specifically incorporate PAM, CaM mutants having reactive cysteine residues in the functional region were prepared; PAM was stoichiometrically incorporated into the cysteine residues in these mutants. Further, we prepared the target peptide, M13, fused with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to monitor the CaM-M13 peptide interaction. The binding of the PAM-CaM mutants, N60C, D64C and M124C, to M13-YFP was reversibly photocontrolled upon UV-VIS light irradiation at appropriate Ca(2+) concentrations.

  5. Conserved properties of individual Ca2+-binding sites in calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Halling, D. Brent; Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hall, Amelia W.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca2+-sensing protein that is highly conserved and ubiquitous in eukaryotes. In humans it is a locus of life-threatening cardiomyopathies. The primary function of CaM is to transduce Ca2+ concentration into cellular signals by binding to a wide range of target proteins in a Ca2+-dependent manner. We do not fully understand how CaM performs its role as a high-fidelity signal transducer for more than 300 target proteins, but diversity among its four Ca2+-binding sites, called EF-hands, may contribute to CaM’s functional versatility. We therefore looked at the conservation of CaM sequences over deep evolutionary time, focusing primarily on the four EF-hand motifs. Expanding on previous work, we found that CaM evolves slowly but that its evolutionary rate is substantially faster in fungi. We also found that the four EF-hands have distinguishing biophysical and structural properties that span eukaryotes. These results suggest that all eukaryotes require CaM to decode Ca2+ signals using four specialized EF-hands, each with specific, conserved traits. In addition, we provide an extensive map of sites associated with target proteins and with human disease and correlate these with evolutionary sequence diversity. Our comprehensive evolutionary analysis provides a basis for understanding the sequence space associated with CaM function and should help guide future work on the relationship between structure, function, and disease. PMID:26884197

  6. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  7. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  8. Calmodulin Binds HER2 and Modulates HER2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    White, Colin D.; Li, Zhigang; Sacks, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, has defined roles in neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. Overexpression of HER2 is an adverse prognostic factor in several human neoplasms and, particularly in breast cancer, correlates strongly with a decrease in overall patient survival. HER2 stimulates breast tumorigenesis by forming protein-protein interactions with a diverse array of intracellular signaling molecules, and evidence suggests that manipulation of these associations holds therapeutic potential. To modulate specific HER2 interactions, the region(s) of HER2 to which each target binds must be accurately identified. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitously expressed Ca2+ binding protein, interacts with multiple intracellular substrates. Interestingly, CaM binds the juxtamembrane region of the epidermal growth factor receptor, a HER2 homolog. Here, we show that CaM interacts, in a Ca2+-regulated manner, with two distinct sites on the N-terminal portion of the HER2 intracellular domain. Deletion of residues 676–689 and 714–732 from HER2 prevented CaM-HER2 binding. Inhibition of CaM function or deletion of the CaM binding sites from HER2 significantly decreased both HER2 phosphorylation and HER2-stimulated cell growth. Collectively, these data suggest that inhibition of CaM-HER2 interaction may represent a rational therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with breast cancer. PMID:21185879

  9. Overexpression of calmodulin in pancreatic beta cells induces diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, Yukio; Niki, Ichiro; Kosugi, Tomoki; Maruyama, Shoichi; Yoshida, Futoshi; Takeda, Motohiro; Tagawa, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Yukiko; Kimura, Toshihide; Kato, Noritoshi; Yamamoto, Jyunichiro; Sato, Waichi; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Matsuo, Seiichi

    2008-09-01

    Recently, endothelial dysfunction induced by an uncoupling of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nitric oxide has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Investigating the pathogenesis of DN has been limited, however, because of the lack of animal models that mimic the human disease. In this report, pancreatic beta cell-specific calmodulin-overexpressing transgenic (CaMTg) mice, a potential new model of DN, are characterized with particular emphasis on VEGF and related molecules. CaMTg mice developed hyperglycemia at 3 wk and persistent proteinuria by 3 mo. Morphometric analysis showed considerable increases in the glomerular and mesangial areas with deposition of type IV collagen. Moreover, the pathologic hallmarks of human DN (mesangiolysis, Kimmelstiel-Wilson-like nodular lesions, exudative lesions, and hyalinosis of afferent and efferent arteries with neovascularization) were observed. In addition, increased VEGF expression was associated with an increased number of peritubular capillaries. Expression of endothelial nitric oxidase synthase was reduced and that of VEGF was markedly elevated in CaMTg mice kidney compared with nontransgenic mice. No differences in VEGF receptor-1 or VEGF receptor-2 expression were observed between CaMTg mice and nontransgenic kidneys. In summary, CaMTg mice develop most of the distinguishing lesions of human DN, and the elevated VEGF expression in the setting of diminished endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression may lead to endothelial proliferation and dysfunction. This model may prove useful in the study of the pathogenesis and treatment of DN.

  10. Calmodulin is a subunit of nitric oxide synthase from macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    A central issue in nitric oxide (NO) research is to understand how NO can act in some settings as a servoregulator and in others as a cytotoxin. To answer this, we have sought a molecular basis for the differential regulation of the two known types of NO synthase (NOS). Constitutive NOS's in endothelium and neurons are activated by agonist- induced elevation of Ca2+ and resultant binding of calmodulin (CaM). In contrast, NOS in macrophages does not require added Ca2+ or CaM, but is regulated instead by transcription. We show here that macrophage NOS contains, as a tightly bound subunit, a molecule with the immunologic reactivity, high performance liquid chromatography retention time, tryptic map, partial amino acid sequence, and exact molecular mass of CaM. In contrast to most CaM-dependent enzymes, macrophage NOS binds CaM tightly without a requirement for elevated Ca2+. This may explain why NOS that is independent of Ca2+ and elevated CaM appears to be activated simply by being synthesized. PMID:1380065

  11. Stimulation of cleavage of membrane proteins by calmodulin inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rodríguez, E; Esparís-Ogando, A; Montero, J C; Yuste, L; Pandiella, A

    2000-01-01

    The ectodomain of several membrane-bound proteins can be shed by proteolytic cleavage. The activity of the proteases involved in shedding is highly regulated by several intracellular second messenger pathways, such as protein kinase C (PKC) and intracellular Ca(2+). Recently, the shedding of the adhesion molecule L-selectin has been shown to be regulated by the interaction of calmodulin (CaM) with the cytosolic tail of L-selectin. Prevention of CaM-L-selectin interaction by CaM inhibitors or mutation of a CaM binding site in L-selectin induced L-selectin ectodomain shedding. Whether this action of CaM inhibitors also affects other membrane-bound proteins is not known. In the present paper we show that CaM inhibitors also stimulate the cleavage of several other transmembrane proteins, such as the membrane-bound growth factor precursors pro-transforming growth factor-alpha and pro-neuregulin-alpha2c, the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkA, and the beta-amyloid precursor protein. Cleavage induced by CaM inhibitors was a rapid event, and resulted from the activation of a mechanism that was independent of PKC or intracellular Ca(2+) increases, but was highly sensitive to hydroxamic acid-based metalloprotease inhibitors. Mutational analysis of the intracellular domain of the TrkA receptor indicated that CaM inhibitors may stimulate membrane-protein ectodomain cleavage by mechanisms independent of CaM-substrate interaction. PMID:10677354

  12. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  13. PEP-19 modulates calcium binding to calmodulin by electrostatic steering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Putkey, John A.

    2016-01-01

    PEP-19 is a small protein that increases the rates of Ca2+ binding to the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM) by an unknown mechanism. Although an IQ motif promotes binding to CaM, an acidic sequence in PEP-19 is required to modulate Ca2+ binding and to sensitize HeLa cells to ATP-induced Ca2+ release. Here, we report the NMR solution structure of a complex between PEP-19 and the C-domain of apo CaM. The acidic sequence of PEP-19 associates between helices E and F of CaM via hydrophobic interactions. This allows the acidic side chains in PEP-19 to extend toward the solvent and form a negatively charged surface that resembles a catcher's mitt near Ca2+ binding loop III of CaM. The topology and gradients of negative electrostatic surface potential support a mechanism by which PEP-19 increases the rate of Ca2+ binding to the C-domain of CaM by ‘catching' and electrostatically steering Ca2+ to site III. PMID:27876793

  14. A role for cysteine 3635 of RYR1 in redox modulation and calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Moore, C.; Zhang, J. Z.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca(2+) release channel (RYR1) increases its activity, produces intersubunit disulfide bonds, and blocks its interaction with calmodulin. Conversely, bound calmodulin protects RYR1 from the effects of oxidants (Zhang, J.-Z., Wu, Y., Williams, B. Y., Rodney, G., Mandel, F., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Am. J. Physiol. 276, Cell Physiol. C46-C53). In addition, calmodulin protects RYR1 from trypsin cleavage at amino acids 3630 and 3637 (Moore, C. P., Rodney, G., Zhang, J.-Z., Santacruz-Toloza, L., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 8532-8537). The sequence between these two tryptic sites is AVVACFR. Alkylation of RYR1 with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) blocks both (35)S-apocalmodulin binding and oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-linking. In the current work, we demonstrate that both cysteines needed for the oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-link are protected from alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide by bound calmodulin. We also show, using N-terminal amino acid sequencing together with analysis of the distribution of [(3)H]NEM labeling with each sequencing cycle, that cysteine 3635 of RYR1 is rapidly labeled by NEM and that this labeling is blocked by bound calmodulin. We propose that cysteine 3635 is located at an intersubunit contact site that is close to or within a calmodulin binding site. These findings suggest that calmodulin and oxidation modulate RYR1 activity by regulating intersubunit interactions in a mutually exclusive manner and that these interactions involve cysteine 3635.

  15. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Danton H.; Huber, Robert J.; Suarez, Andres

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin is present throughout growth and development in Dictyostelium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin localizes within the ECM during development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin inhibits cell proliferation and increases chemotaxis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin exists in eukaryotic microbes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin may be functionally as important as intracellular calmodulin. -- Abstract: The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan.

  16. Phosphorylation of rat liver heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2 and C can be modulated by calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Bosser, R; Faura, M; Serratosa, J; Renau-Piqueras, J; Pruschy, M; Bachs, O

    1995-01-01

    It was previously reported that the phosphorylation of three proteins of 36, 40 to 42, and 50 kDa by casein kinase 2 is inhibited by calmodulin in nuclear extracts from rat liver cells (R. Bosser, R. Aligué, D. Guerini, N. Agell, E. Carafoli, and O. Bachs, J. Biol. Chem. 268:15477-15483, 1993). By immunoblotting, peptide mapping, and endogenous phosphorylation experiments, the 36- and 40- to 42-kDa proteins have been identified as the A2 and C proteins, respectively, of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. To better understand the mechanism by which calmodulin inhibits the phosphorylation of these proteins, they were purified by using single-stranded DNA chromatography, and the effect of calmodulin on their phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 was analyzed. Results revealed that whereas calmodulin inhibited the phosphorylation of purified A2 and C proteins in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, it did not affect the casein kinase 2 phosphorylation of a different protein substrate, i.e., beta-casein. These results indicate that the effect of calmodulin was not on casein kinase 2 activity but on specific protein substrates. The finding that the A2 and C proteins can bind to a calmodulin-Sepharose column in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner suggests that this association could prevent the phosphorylation of the proteins by casein kinase 2. Immunoelectron microscopy studies have revealed that such interactions could also occur in vivo, since calmodulin and A2 and C proteins colocalize on the ribonucleoprotein particles in rat liver cell nuclei. PMID:7823935

  17. Calcium-dependent but calmodulin-independent protein kinase from soybean. [Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, A.C.; Putnam-Evans, C.; Cormier, M.J.

    1987-04-01

    A calcium-dependent protein kinase activity from suspension-cultured soybean cells (Glycine max L. Wayne) was shown to be dependent on calcium but not calmodulin. The concentrations of free calcium required for half-maximal histone H1 phosphorylation and autophosphorylation were similar (greater than or equal to 2 micromolar). The protein kinase activity was stimulated 100-fold by greater than or equal to 10 micromolar-free calcium. When exogenous soybean or bovine brain calmodulin was added in high concentration (1 micromolar) to the purified kinase, calcium-dependent and -independent activities were weakly stimulated (less than or equal to 2-fold). Bovine serum albumin had a similar effect on both activities. The kinase was separated from a small amount of contaminating calmodulin by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After renaturation the protein kinase autophosphorylated and phosphorylated histone H1 in a calcium-dependent manner. Following electroblotting onto nitrocellulose, the kinase bound /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in the presence of KCl and MgCl/sub 2/, which indicated that the kinase itself is a high-affinity calcium-binding protein. Also, the mobility of one of two kinase bands in SDS gels was dependent on the presence of calcium. Autophosphorylation of the calmodulin-free kinase was inhibited by the calmodulin-binding compound N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7), showing that the inhibition of activity by W-7 is independent of calmodulin. These results show that soybean calcium-dependent protein kinase represents a new class of protein kinase which requires calcium but not calmodulin for activity.

  18. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of Ca2+ and calmodulin on phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins was studied. Secretory granules were incubated in a phosphorylation reaction mixture containing (32P)ATP and test reagents. The 32P-labeled proteins were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 32P content was visualized by autoradiography, and the relative intensities of specific bands were quantitated. When the reaction mixture contained EGTA and no added Ca2+, 32P was incorporated into two proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 13,000. When 10(-4) M Ca2+ was added without EGTA, two additional proteins (58,000 and 48,000 Mr) were phosphorylated, and the 13,000-Mr protein was absent. The addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin markedly enhanced the phosphorylation of the 58,000- and 48,000-Mr proteins and resulted in the phosphorylation of a major protein whose molecular weight (64,000 Mr) is identical to that of one of the calmodulin binding proteins located on the granule surface. Calmodulin had no effect on phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+ but was effective in the presence of calcium between 10 nM and 50 microM. Trifluoperazine and calmidazolium, calmodulin antagonists, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the calmodulin effect. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, a phorbol ester that activates protein kinase C, produced no increase in phosphorylation, and 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, had no effect. These results indicate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and endogenous substrates are present in islet secretory granules.

  19. Fluorescence probe study of Ca2+-dependent interactions of calmodulin with calmodulin-binding peptides of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Grabarek, Zenon; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2004-10-22

    We have used a highly environment-sensitive fluorescent probe 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (badan) to study the interaction between calmodulin (CaM) and a CaM-binding peptide of the ryanodine receptor (CaMBP) and its sub-fragments F1 and F4. Badan was attached to the Thr34Cys mutant of CaM (CaM-badan). Ca(2+) increase in a physiological range of Ca(2+) (0.1-2 microM) produced about 40 times increase in the badan fluorescence. Upon binding to CaMBP, the badan fluorescence of apo-CaM showed a small increase at a slow rate; whereas that of Ca-CaM showed a large decrease at a very fast rate. Upon binding of CaM to the badan-labeled CaMBP, the badan fluorescence showed a small and slow increase at low Ca(2+), and a large and fast increase at high Ca(2+). Thus, the badan probe attached to CaM Cys(34) can be used to monitor conformational changes occurring not only in CaM, but also those in the CaM-CaMBP interface. Based on our results we propose that both the interaction interface and the global conformation of the CaM-CaMBP complex are altered by calcium.

  20. Purification and characterization of bovine lung calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in free and calmodulin-bound forms

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Wang, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    A rabbit lung Ca/sup 2 +/-stimulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) prepared by successive chromatography in the presence of EGTA on DEAE-cellulose and G-200 Sephadex columns still responded to Ca/sup 2 +/ and contained calmodulin (CaM) suggesting that the enzyme exists as a stable CaM-PDE complex. A similar enzyme was demonstrated to exist in bovine lung extract. A monoclonal antibody Cl previously shown to react with the 60 kDa subunit of bovine brain PDE isozymes cross-reacted with the lung enzyme. Purification of the lung enzyme by Cl antibody immunoaffinity chromatography rendered the enzyme dependent of exogenously added CaM for Ca/sup 2 +/ stimulation. The enzyme was further purified by CaM affinity chromatography to near homogeneity. The purified enzyme could be reconstituted into PDE-CaM complex upon incubation with CaM in the presence of either Ca/sup 2 +/ or EGTA. When reconstitution was carried out in the presence of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/, followed by isolation of the protein complex, no /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ was found to be associated with the complex. CaM antagonists: trifluoroperazine, compound 48/80 and calcineurin at concentrations abolishing CaM-stimulation of bovine brain PDE had little effect on the bovine lung PDE-CaM complex.

  1. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways: potential mediators of skeletal muscle growth and development.

    PubMed

    Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire E

    2009-11-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age and disuse has a significant impact on the physiological and social well-being of the aged; this is an increasingly important problem as the population becomes skewed towards older age. Exercise has psychological benefits but it also impacts on muscle protein synthesis and degradation, increasing muscle tissue volume in both young and older individuals. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy involves an increase in muscle mass and cross-sectional area and associated increased myofibrillar protein content. Attempts to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie muscle growth, development and maintenance, have focused on characterising the molecular pathways that initiate, maintain and regenerate skeletal muscle. Such understanding may aid in improving targeted interventional therapies for age-related muscle loss and muscle wasting associated with diseases. Two major routes through which skeletal muscle development and growth are regulated are insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways. Many reviews have focused on understanding the signalling pathways of IGF-I and its receptor, which govern skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, alternative molecular signalling pathways such as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways should also be considered as potential mediators of muscle growth. These latter pathways have received relatively little attention and the purpose herein is to highlight the progress being made in the understanding of these pathways and associated molecules: calmodulin, calmodulin kinases (CaMKs), calcineurin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), which are involved in skeletal muscle regulation. We describe: (1) how conformational changes in the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin result in the exposure of binding pockets for the target proteins (CaMKs and calcineurin). (2) How Calmodulin consequently activates either the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases

  2. Human platelet calmodulin-binding proteins: identification and Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteolysis upon platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.W.; Tallant, E.A.; McManus, M.C.

    1987-05-19

    Calmodulin-binding proteins have been identified in human platelets by using Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-calmodulin. Ten distinct proteins of 245, 225, 175, 150, 90, 82 (2), 60, and 41 (2) kilodaltons (kDa) bound /sup 125/I-calmodulin in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner; the binding was blocked by ethylene glycol bis(..beta..-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), trifluoperazine, and nonradiolabeled calmodulin. Proteins of 225 and 90 kDa were labeled by antisera against myosin light chain kinase; 60- and 82-kDa proteins were labeled by antisera against the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase and caldesmon, respectively. The remaining calmodulin-binding proteins have not been identified. Calmodulin-binding proteins were degraded upon addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ to a platelet homogenate; the degradation could be blocked by either EGTA, leupeptin, or N-ethylmaleimide which suggests that the degradation was due to a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent protease. Activation of intact platelets by thrombin, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, and collagen under conditions which promote platelet aggregation also resulted in limited proteolysis of calmodulin-binding proteins including those labeled with antisera against myosin light chain kinase and the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase. Activation by the Ca/sup 2 +/ ionophores A23187 and ionomycin also promoted degradation of the calmodulin-binding proteins in the presence of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. The data indicate that limited proteolysis of Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes also occurs in the intact platelet and suggest that the proteolysis is triggered by an influx of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ associated with platelet aggregation.

  3. Computational comparison of a calcium-dependent jellyfish protein (apoaequorin) and calmodulin-cholesterol in short-term memory maintenance.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2017-03-06

    Memory reconsolidation and maintenance depend on calcium channels and on calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases regulating protein turnover in the hippocampus. Ingestion of a jellyfish protein, apoaequorin, reportedly protects and/or improves verbal learning in adults and is currently widely advertised for use by the elderly. Apoaequorin is a member of the EF-hand calcium binding family of proteins that includes calmodulin. Calmodulin-1 (148 residues) differs from Apoaequorin (195 residues) in that it contains four rather than three Ca(2+)-binding sites and three rather than four cholesterol-binding (CRAC, CARC) domains. All three cholesterol-binding CARC domains in calmodulin have a high interaction affinity for cholesterol compared to only two high affinity CARC domains in apoaequorin. Both calmodulin and apoaequorin can form dimers with a potential of eight bound Ca(2+) ions and six high affinity-bound cholesterol molecules in calmodulin with six bound Ca(2+) ions and a mixed population of eight cholesterols bound to both CARC and CRAC domains in apoaqueorin. MEMSAT-SVM analysis indicates that both calmodulin and apoaqueorin have a pore-lining region. The Peptide-Cutter algorithm predicts that calmodulin-1 contains 11 trypsin-specific cleavage sites (compared to 21 in apoaqueorin), four of which are potentially blocked by cholesterol and three are within the Ca-binding domains and/or the pore-lining region. Three are clustered between the third and fourth Ca(2+)-binding sites. Only calmodulin pore-lining regions contain Ca(2+) binding sites and as dimers may insert into the plasma membrane of neural cells and act as Ca(2+) channels. In a dietary supplement, bound cholesterol may protect both apoaequorin and calmodulin from proteolysis in the gut as well as facilitate uptake across the blood-brain barrier. Our results suggest that a physiological calmodulin-cholesterol complex, not cholesterol-free jellyfish protein, may better serve as a dietary supplement to

  4. The calmodulin intergenic spacer as molecular target for characterization of Leishmania species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human leishmaniasis is a neglected disease caused by parasites of the genus Leishmania. Clinical aspects of this disease can vary significantly, reflecting the wide range of parasites in the genus Leishmania. Knowing accurately the Leishmania species infecting humans is important for clinical case management and evaluation of epidemiological risk. Calmodulin is an essential gene in trypanosomatids that modulates the calcium metabolism in various cellular activities. Despite its strong conservation in trypanosomatids, it has been recently observed that its untranslated regions (UTR) diverge among species. Methods In this study we analyzed the sequences and the absolute dinucleotide frequency of the intergenic spacer of the calmodulin gene (containing both, 3′ and 5′UTR) in nine reference Leishmania species and ten clinical isolates obtained from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Results We show that the short calmodulin intergenic spacers exhibit features that make them interesting for applications in molecular characterization and phylogenetic studies of Leishmania. Dendrograms based on sequence alignments and on the dinucleotide frequency indicate that this particular region of calmodulin gene might be useful for species typing between the Leishmania and Viannia subgenera. Conclusions Mutations and composition of the calmodulin intergenic spacer from Leishmania species might have taxonomic value as parameters to define if an isolate is identical to a certain species or belongs to one of the two current subgenera. PMID:24438764

  5. Calmodulin regulates dimerization, motility, and lipid binding of Leishmania myosin XXI

    PubMed Central

    Batters, Christopher; Ellrich, Heike; Helbig, Constanze; Woodall, Katy Anna; Hundschell, Christian; Brack, Dario; Veigel, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Myosin XXI is the only myosin expressed in Leishmania parasites. Although it is assumed that it performs a variety of motile functions, the motor’s oligomerization states, cargo-binding, and motility are unknown. Here we show that binding of a single calmodulin causes the motor to adopt a monomeric state and to move actin filaments. In the absence of calmodulin, nonmotile dimers that cross-linked actin filaments were formed. Unexpectedly, structural analysis revealed that the dimerization domains include the calmodulin-binding neck region, essential for the generation of force and movement in myosins. Furthermore, monomeric myosin XXI bound to mixed liposomes, whereas the dimers did not. Lipid-binding sections overlapped with the dimerization domains, but also included a phox-homology domain in the converter region. We propose a mechanism of myosin regulation where dimerization, motility, and lipid binding are regulated by calmodulin. Although myosin-XXI dimers might act as nonmotile actin cross-linkers, the calmodulin-binding monomers might transport lipid cargo in the parasite. PMID:24379364

  6. Calmodulin is responsible for Ca2+-dependent regulation of TRPA1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Raquibul; Leeson-Payne, Alasdair T. S.; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Zhang, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    TRPA1 is a Ca2+-permeable ion channel involved in many sensory disorders such as pain, itch and neuropathy. Notably, the function of TRPA1 depends on Ca2+, with low Ca2+ potentiating and high Ca2+ inactivating TRPA1. However, it remains unknown how Ca2+ exerts such contrasting effects. Here, we show that Ca2+ regulates TRPA1 through calmodulin, which binds to TRPA1 in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Calmodulin binding enhanced TRPA1 sensitivity and Ca2+-evoked potentiation of TRPA1 at low Ca2+, but inhibited TRPA1 sensitivity and promoted TRPA1 desensitization at high Ca2+. Ca2+-dependent potentiation and inactivation of TRPA1 were selectively prevented by disrupting the interaction of the carboxy-lobe of calmodulin with a calmodulin-binding domain in the C-terminus of TRPA1. Calmodulin is thus a critical Ca2+ sensor enabling TRPA1 to respond to diverse Ca2+ signals distinctly. PMID:28332600

  7. Calcium ion fluorescence detection using liposomes containing Alexa-labeled calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuvan; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2002-09-01

    This paper describes the preparation and characterization of calcium ion sensitive fluorescent liposomes and their application for the determination of calcium ions in aqueous samples. Calmodulin (CaM), a calcium ion-binding protein labeled with the fluorophore Alexa-488 is embedded in the membrane of unilamellar liposomes. Upon calcium ion binding, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change that exposes its hydrophobic core and affects the fluorescence intensity of the attached fluorophore. Characterization studies of Alexa-CaM-containing liposomes reveal that embedding calmodulin molecules in the bilayer membrane of liposomes extends the lifetime of the calcium ion binding activity of calmodulin by about fourfold compared to the lifetime of its calcium-binding activity in free solution. Moreover, the calcium ion response of Alexa-CaM-containing liposomes is about threefold higher than the calcium ion response of Alexa-CaM in solution. The improvement in the calcium ion detection properties is attributed to the interaction between calmodulin, a membranal protein, and the hydrophobic phospholipids of the liposomes. The analytical properties of the calcium ion sensitive fluorescent liposomes are discussed.

  8. The effects of weak extremely low frequency magnetic fields on calcium/calmodulin interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Hendee, S P; Faour, F A; Christensen, D A; Patrick, B; Durney, C H; Blumenthal, D K

    1996-01-01

    Mechanisms by which weak electromagnetic fields may affect biological systems are of current interest because of their potential health effects. Lednev has proposed an ion parametric resonance hypothesis (Lednev, 1991, Bioelectromagnetics, 12:71-75), which predicts that when the ac, frequency of a combined dc-ac magnetic field equals the cyclotron frequency of calcium, the affinity of calcium for calcium-binding proteins such as calmodulin will be markedly affected. The present study evaluated Lednev's theory using two independent systems, each sensitive to changes in the affinity of calcium for calmodulin. One of the systems used was the calcium/calmodulin-dependent activation of myosin light chain kinase, a system similar to that previously used by Lednev. The other system monitored optical changes in the binding of a fluorescent peptide to the calcium/calmodulin complex. Each system was exposed to a 20.9 microT static field superimposed on a 20.9 microT sinusoidal field over a narrow frequency range centered at 16 Hz, the cyclotron frequency of the unhydrated calcium ion. In contrast to Lednev's predictions, no significant effect of combined dc-ac magnetic fields on calcium/calmodulin interactions was indicated in either experimental system. PMID:8744329

  9. Regulation of microtubule cold stability by calmodulin-dependent and -independent phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Job, D; Rauch, C T; Fischer, E H; Margolis, R L

    1983-07-01

    Cold-labile microtubule protein can be rendered cold-stable by addition of a fraction containing a small number of polypeptides that are derived from cold-stable microtubules. These polypeptides can be obtained from purified cold-stable microtubules by passage through a DEAE-cellulose (DE-52) ion exchange column from which they emerge in the first eluate fraction. The stabilizing activity of these proteins is abolished by phosphorylation catalyzed by two types of protein kinases, one dependent on calmodulin and the other independent of that regulatory protein. The calmodulin-dependent reaction appears to phosphorylate mainly two polypeptides, 56 and 72 kilodaltons; the reaction is blocked by trifluoperazine. The calmodulin-independent reaction appears to phosphorylate different cold-stable microtubule-associated proteins. That reaction is observed only in purified material obtained from vigorously homogenized brain tissue. Gently homogenization yields cold-stable microtubules that are responsive only to the calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. A distinguishing feature of the calmodulin-independent reaction is that it does not occur on polypeptides while they are bound to the microtubules.

  10. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  11. Cardiac calmodulin kinase: a potential target for drug design.

    PubMed

    Bányász, T; Szentandrássy, N; Tóth, A; Nánási, P P; Magyar, J; Chen-Izu, Y

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic strategy for cardiac arrhythmias has undergone a remarkable change during the last decades. Currently implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy is considered to be the most effective therapeutic method to treat malignant arrhythmias. Some even argue that there is no room for antiarrhythmic drug therapy in the age of implantable cardioverter defibrillators. However, in clinical practice, antiarrhythmic drug therapies are frequently needed, because implantable cardioverter defibrillators are not effective in certain types of arrhythmias (i.e. premature ventricular beats or atrial fibrillation). Furthermore, given the staggering cost of device therapy, it is economically imperative to develop alternative effective treatments. Cardiac ion channels are the target of a number of current treatment strategies, but therapies based on ion channel blockers only resulted in moderate success. Furthermore, these drugs are associated with an increased risk of proarrhythmia, systemic toxicity, and increased defibrillation threshold. In many cases, certain ion channel blockers were found to increase mortality. Other drug classes such as ßblockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists, and statins appear to have proven efficacy for reducing cardiac mortality. These facts forced researchers to shift the focus of their research to molecular targets that act upstream of ion channels. One of these potential targets is calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Several lines of evidence converge to suggest that CaMKII inhibition may provide an effective treatment strategy for heart diseases. (1) Recent studies have elucidated that CaMKII plays a key role in modulating cardiac function and regulating hypertrophy development. (2) CaMKII activity has been found elevated in the failing hearts from human patients and animal models. (3) Inhibition of CaMKII activity has been shown to mitigate hypertrophy, prevent functional remodeling and

  12. Cardiac Calmodulin Kinase: A Potential Target for Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Bányász, T.; Szentandrássy, N.; Tóth, A.; Nánási, P.P.; Magyar, J.; Chen-Izu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic strategy for cardiac arrhythmias has undergone a remarkable change during the last decades. Currently implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy is considered to be the most effective therapeutic method to treat malignant arrhythmias. Some even argue that there is no room for antiarrhythmic drug therapy in the age of implantable cardioverter defibrillators. However, in clinical practice, antiarrhythmic drug therapies are frequently needed, because implantable cardioverter defibrillators are not effective in certain types of arrhythmias (i.e. premature ventricular beats or atrial fibrillation). Furthermore, given the staggering cost of device therapy, it is economically imperative to develop alternative effective treatments. Cardiac ion channels are the target of a number of current treatment strategies, but therapies based on ion channel blockers only resulted in moderate success. Furthermore, these drugs are associated with an increased risk of proarrhythmia, systemic toxicity, and increased defibrillation threshold. In many cases, certain ion channel blockers were found to increase mortality. Other drug classes such as β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, aldosterone antagonists, and statins appear to have proven efficacy for reducing cardiac mortality. These facts forced researchers to shift the focus of their research to molecular targets that act upstream of ion channels. One of these potential targets is calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Several lines of evidence converge to suggest that CaMKII inhibition may provide an effective treatment strategy for heart diseases. (1) Recent studies have elucidated that CaMKII plays a key role in modulating cardiac function and regulating hypertrophy development. (2) CaMKII activity has been found elevated in the failing hearts from human patients and animal models. (3) Inhibition of CaMKII activity has been shown to mitigate hypertrophy, prevent functional remodeling and

  13. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-09-22

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between -295 to -300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  14. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between −295 to −300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26320171

  15. Calmodulin disrupts the structure of the HIV-1 MA protein†

    PubMed Central

    Chow, John Y. H.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Kwan, Ann H.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill

    2010-01-01

    The MA protein from HIV-1 is a small, multifunctional protein responsible for regulating various stages of the viral replication cycle. To achieve its diverse tasks MA interacts with host cell proteins and it has been reported that one of these is the ubiquitous calcium -sensing calmodulin (CaM) which is up-regulated upon HIV-1 infection. The nature of the CaM-MA interaction has been the subject of structural studies using peptides based on the MA sequence that have led to conflicting conclusions. The results presented here show that CaM binds intact MA with 1:1 stoichiometry in a Ca2+-dependent manner and that the complex adopts a highly extended conformation in solution as revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering. Alterations in tryptophan fluorescence suggest that the two tryptophans at the N-terminus of MA mediate the CaM interaction. Major chemical shift changes occur in the NMR spectrum of MA upon complex formation, while chemical shift changes in the CaM spectrum are quite modest and are assigned to residues within the target-protein binding hydrophobic clefts of CaM. The NMR data indicate that CaM binds MA via its N-and C-terminal lobes and induces a dramatic conformational change involving a significant loss of secondary and tertiary structure within MA. Circular dichroism experiments suggest that MA looses ~20% of its α-helical content upon CaM binding. Thus CaM binding is expected to impact upon the accessibility of interaction sites within MA that are involved in its various functions. PMID:20488189

  16. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  17. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vaka S; Ali, Gul S; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2002-03-22

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  18. Modulation of Calmodulin Plasticity by the Effect of Macromolecular Crowding

    PubMed Central

    Homouz, Dirar; Sanabria, Hugo; Waxham, M. Neal; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In vitro biochemical reactions are most often studied in dilute solution, a poor mimic of the intracellular space of eukaryotic cells which are crowded with mobile and immobile macromolecules. Such crowded conditions exert volume exclusion and other entropic forces that have the potential to impact chemical equilibria and reaction rates. In this article, we used the well characterized and ubiquitous molecule calmodulin (CaM) and a combination of theoretical and experimental approaches to address how crowding impacts CaM’s conformational plasticity. CaM is a dumbbell shaped molecule that contains four EF hands (two in the N-lobe and two in the C-lobe) that each could bind Ca2+ leading to stabilization of certain substates that favor interactions with other target proteins. Using coarse-grained molecular simulations, we explored the distribution of CaM conformations in the presence of crowding agents. These predictions in which crowding effects enhances the population of compact structures were then confirmed in experimental measurements using fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques of donor/acceptor labeled CaM under normal and crowded conditions. We further explored the folding energy landscape and examined the structural characteristics of CaM at free energy basins using protein reconstruction methods. We discovered that crowding stabilizes several different compact conformations, which reflects the inherent plasticity in CaM’s structure. From these results, we suggest that the EF hands in the C-lobe are flexible and can be thought of as a switch, while those in the N-lobe are stiff as analogous to a rheostat. New combinatorial signaling properties may arise from the product of the differential plasticity of the two distinct lobes of CaM in the presence of crowding. We discuss the implications of these results for modulating CaM’s ability to bind Ca2+ and target proteins. PMID:19577574

  19. Preparation, characterization and biological properties of biotinylated derivatives of calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Polli, J W; Billingsley, M L

    1991-01-01

    Biotinylated derivatives of calmodulin (CaM) were prepared and their biological properties characterized by using enzyme assays, affinity and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. Several N-hydroxysuccinimidobiotin derivatives [sulphosuccinimidobiotin (sulpho-NHS) and sulphosuccinimido-6-(biotinamido)hexanoate (BNHS-LC)] differing in spacer arm length were used to modify CaM. The shorter-spacer-arm CaM derivative (sulpho-CaM) activated CaM-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and CaM-dependent protein kinase II; preincubation with avidin blocked its ability to activate these enzymes. The extended-spacer-arm derivative (BNHS-LC-CaM) activated CaM-dependent enzymes both in the presence and in the absence of avidin, suggesting that the longer spacer arm diminished steric effects from avidin preincubation. Other biotinylated CaM derivatives were prepared with biotinylated tyrosine and/or histidine residues (diazobenzoylbiocytin; DBB-CaM) or nucleophilic sites (photobiotin acetate; photo-CaM). These derivatives activated CaM-dependent enzymes in the presence and in the absence of avidin. Oriented affinity columns were constructed with covalently immobilized avidin complexed to each biotinylated CaM derivative. The chromatographic profiles obtained revealed that each column interacted with a specific subset of CaM-binding proteins. Elution profiles of biotinyl CaM derivatives on phenyl-Sepharose hydrophobic-interaction chromatography suggested that several derivatives displayed diminished binding to the matrix in the presence of Ca2+. Development and characterization of a series of biotinylated CaM molecules can be used to identify domains of CaM that interact with specific CaM-dependent enzymes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1645521

  20. Preparation, characterization and biological properties of biotinylated derivatives of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Polli, J W; Billingsley, M L

    1991-05-01

    Biotinylated derivatives of calmodulin (CaM) were prepared and their biological properties characterized by using enzyme assays, affinity and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. Several N-hydroxysuccinimidobiotin derivatives [sulphosuccinimidobiotin (sulpho-NHS) and sulphosuccinimido-6-(biotinamido)hexanoate (BNHS-LC)] differing in spacer arm length were used to modify CaM. The shorter-spacer-arm CaM derivative (sulpho-CaM) activated CaM-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and CaM-dependent protein kinase II; preincubation with avidin blocked its ability to activate these enzymes. The extended-spacer-arm derivative (BNHS-LC-CaM) activated CaM-dependent enzymes both in the presence and in the absence of avidin, suggesting that the longer spacer arm diminished steric effects from avidin preincubation. Other biotinylated CaM derivatives were prepared with biotinylated tyrosine and/or histidine residues (diazobenzoylbiocytin; DBB-CaM) or nucleophilic sites (photobiotin acetate; photo-CaM). These derivatives activated CaM-dependent enzymes in the presence and in the absence of avidin. Oriented affinity columns were constructed with covalently immobilized avidin complexed to each biotinylated CaM derivative. The chromatographic profiles obtained revealed that each column interacted with a specific subset of CaM-binding proteins. Elution profiles of biotinyl CaM derivatives on phenyl-Sepharose hydrophobic-interaction chromatography suggested that several derivatives displayed diminished binding to the matrix in the presence of Ca2+. Development and characterization of a series of biotinylated CaM molecules can be used to identify domains of CaM that interact with specific CaM-dependent enzymes.

  1. Ligand binding and thermodynamic stability of a multidomain protein, calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Masino, L.; Martin, S. R.; Bayley, P. M.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical and thermal denaturation of calmodulin has been monitored spectroscopically to determine the stability for the intact protein and its two isolated domains as a function of binding of Ca2+ or Mg2+. The reversible urea unfolding of either isolated apo-domain follows a two-state mechanism with relatively low deltaG(o)20 values of approximately 2.7 (N-domain) and approximately 1.9 kcal/mol (C-domain). The apo-C-domain is significantly unfolded at normal temperatures (20-25 degrees C). The greater affinity of the C-domain for Ca2+ causes it to be more stable than the N-domain at [Ca2+] > or = 0.3 mM. By contrast, Mg2+ causes a greater stabilization of the N- rather than the C-domain, consistent with measured Mg2+ affinities. For the intact protein (+/-Ca2+), the bimodal denaturation profiles can be analyzed to give two deltaG(o)20 values, which differ significantly from those of the isolated domains, with one domain being less stable and one domain more stable. The observed stability of the domains is strongly dependent on solution conditions such as ionic strength, as well as specific effects due to metal ion binding. In the intact protein, different folding intermediates are observed, depending on the ionic composition. The results illustrate that a protein of low intrinsic stability is liable to major perturbation of its unfolding properties by environmental conditions and liganding processes and, by extension, mutation. Hence, the observed stability of an isolated domain may differ significantly from the stability of the same structure in a multidomain protein. These results address questions involved in manipulating the stability of a protein or its domains by site directed mutagenesis and protein engineering. PMID:10975573

  2. Loss of conformational stability in calmodulin upon methionine oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Yin, D H; Yao, Y; Sun, H; Qin, Z; Schöneich, C; Williams, T D; Squier, T C

    1998-01-01

    We have used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the secondary and tertiary structural consequences that result from oxidative modification of methionine residues in wheat germ calmodulin (CaM), and prevent activation of the plasma membrane Ca-ATPase. Using ESI-MS, we have measured rates of modification and molecular mass distributions of oxidatively modified CaM species (CaMox) resulting from exposure to H2O2. From these rates, we find that oxidative modification of methionine to the corresponding methionine sulfoxide does not predispose CaM to further oxidative modification. These results indicate that methionine oxidation results in no large-scale alterations in the tertiary structure of CaMox, because the rates of oxidative modification of individual methionines are directly related to their solvent exposure. Likewise, CD measurements indicate that methionine oxidation results in little change in the apparent alpha-helical content at 28 degrees C, and only a small (0.3 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1)) decrease in thermal stability, suggesting the disruption of a limited number of specific noncovalent interactions. Fluorescence lifetime, anisotropy, and quenching measurements of N-(1-pyrenyl)-maleimide (PMal) covalently bound to Cys26 indicate local structural changes around PMal in the amino-terminal domain in response to oxidative modification of methionine residues in the carboxyl-terminal domain. Because the opposing globular domains remain spatially distant in both native and oxidatively modified CaM, the oxidative modification of methionines in the carboxyl-terminal domain are suggested to modify the conformation of the amino-terminal domain through alterations in the structural features involving the interdomain central helix. The structural basis for the linkage between oxidative modification and these global conformational changes is discussed in terms of possible alterations in

  3. Calcium fingerprints induced by calmodulin interactors in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Dagher, Rania; Brière, Christian; Fève, Marie; Zeniou, Maria; Pigault, Claire; Mazars, Christian; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Ranjeva, Raoul; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Haiech, Jacques

    2009-06-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is a ubiquitous second messenger which promotes cell responses through transient changes in intracellular concentrations. The prominent role of Ca2+ in cell physiology is mediated by a whole set of proteins constituting a Ca2+-signalling toolkit involved in Ca2+-signal generation, deciphering and arrest. The different Ca2+-signalosomes deliver Ca2+-signals with spatial and temporal dynamics to control the function of specific cell types. Among the intracellular proteins involved in Ca2+-signal deciphering, calmodulin (CaM) plays a pivotal role in controlling Ca2+-homeostasis and downstream Ca2+-based signalling events. Due to its ubiquitous expression in eukaryotic cells and the variety of proteins it interacts with, CaM is central in Ca2+-signalling networks. For these reasons, it is expected that disrupting or modifying CaM interactions with its target proteins will affect Ca2+-homeostasis and cellular responses. The resulting calcium response will vary depending on which interactions between CaM and target proteins are altered by the molecules and on the specific Ca2+-toolkit expressed in a given cell, even in the resting state. In the present paper, the effect of six classical CaM interactors (W5, W7, W12, W13, bifonazole and calmidazolium) was studied on Ca2+-signalling in tumor initiating cells isolated from human glioblastoma (TG1) and tobacco cells (BY-2) using the fluorescent Ca2+-sensitive Indo-1 dye and aequorin, respectively. Various Ca2+-fingerprints were obtained depending both on the CaM interactor used and the cell type investigated. These data demonstrate that interaction between the antagonists and CaM results in a differential inhibition of CaM-dependent proteins involved in Ca2+-signal regulation. In addition, the distinct Ca2+-fingerprints in tobacco and human tumor initiating glioblastoma cells induced by a given CaM interactor highlight the specificity of the Ca2+-signalosome in eukaryotic cells.

  4. Regulation of Polycystin-1 Function by Calmodulin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Nicholas; Wang, Yidi; Kipp, Kevin R.; Liu, Guangyi; Benza, Jesse J.; Pletnev, Vladimir; Pavlov, Tengis S.; Staruschenko, Alexander; Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; Takahashi, Maki; Nauli, Surya M.; Weimbs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a common genetic disease that leads to progressive renal cyst growth and loss of renal function, and is caused by mutations in the genes encoding polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), respectively. The PC1/PC2 complex localizes to primary cilia and can act as a flow-dependent calcium channel in addition to numerous other signaling functions. The exact functions of the polycystins, their regulation and the purpose of the PC1/PC2 channel are still poorly understood. PC1 is an integral membrane protein with a large extracytoplasmic N-terminal domain and a short, ~200 amino acid C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Most proteins that interact with PC1 have been found to bind via the cytoplasmic tail. Here we report that the PC1 tail has homology to the regulatory domain of myosin heavy chain including a conserved calmodulin-binding motif. This motif binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Disruption of the CaM-binding motif in PC1 does not affect PC2 binding, cilia targeting, or signaling via heterotrimeric G-proteins or STAT3. However, disruption of CaM binding inhibits the PC1/PC2 calcium channel activity and the flow-dependent calcium response in kidney epithelial cells. Furthermore, expression of CaM-binding mutant PC1 disrupts cellular energy metabolism. These results suggest that critical functions of PC1 are regulated by its ability to sense cytosolic calcium levels via binding to CaM. PMID:27560828

  5. Calcium-dependent binding of Myc to calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Raffeiner, Philipp; Schraffl, Andrea; Schwarz, Thomas; Röck, Ruth; Ledolter, Karin; Hartl, Markus; Konrat, Robert; Stefan, Eduard; Bister, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The bHLH-LZ (basic region/helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper) oncoprotein Myc and the bHLH-LZ protein Max form a binary transcription factor complex controlling fundamental cellular processes. Deregulated Myc expression leads to neoplastic transformation and is a hallmark of most human cancers. The dynamics of Myc transcription factor activity are post-translationally coordinated by defined protein-protein interactions. Here, we present evidence for a second messenger controlled physical interaction between the Ca2+ sensor calmodulin (CaM) and all Myc variants (v-Myc, c-Myc, N-Myc, and L-Myc). The predominantly cytoplasmic Myc:CaM interaction is Ca2+-dependent, and the binding site maps to the conserved bHLH domain of Myc. Ca2+-loaded CaM binds the monomeric and intrinsically disordered Myc protein with high affinity, whereas Myc:Max heterodimers show less, and Max homodimers no affinity for CaM. NMR spectroscopic analyses using alternating mixtures of 15N-labeled and unlabeled preparations of CaM and a monomeric Myc fragment containing the bHLH-LZ domain corroborate the biochemical results on the Myc:CaM interaction and confirm the interaction site mapping. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, addition of CaM does not affect high-affinity DNA-binding of Myc:Max heterodimers. However, cell-based reporter analyses and cell transformation assays suggest that increasing CaM levels enhance Myc transcriptional and oncogenic activities. Our results point to a possible involvement of Ca2+ sensing CaM in the fine-tuning of Myc function. PMID:27926480

  6. Altered Purkinje cell responses and calmodulin expression in the spontaneously ataxic mouse, Pogo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwan Young; Kim, Jin Seong; Kim, Se Hoon; Park, Hyung Seo; Jeong, Young-Gil; Lee, Nam-Seob; Kim, Dong Kwan

    2011-04-01

    Ataxia is often associated with altered cerebellar motor control, a process in which Purkinje cells (PCs) play a principal role. Pogo mice display severe motor deficits characterized by an ataxic gait accompanying hindlimb hyperextension. Here, using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we show that parallel fiber (PF)-excitatory post-synaptic currents (PF-EPSCs) are reduced, paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) is increased and PF-PC long-term depression (LTD) is impaired in Pogo mice; in contrast, climbing-fiber EPSCs are preserved. In control mice, treatment with the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium (5 μm) impaired PPF and LTD. Notably, cerebellar calmodulin expression was significantly reduced in Pogo mice compared with control mice. Control PCs predominantly exhibited a tonic firing pattern, whereas the firing pattern in Pogo PCs was mainly a complex burst type. These results implicate alterations in PC responses and calmodulin content in the abnormal cerebellar function of Pogo mice.

  7. Effects of Calcium and Calmodulin on Spore Germination and Appressorium Development in Colletotrichum trifolii

    PubMed Central

    Warwar, V.; Dickman, M. B.

    1996-01-01

    Spore germination and appressorium formation are important steps in the process of fungal development and pathogenesis. These prepenetration events, which begin with spore attachment and culminate with appressorium maturation, a common scheme for many pathogenic fungi, are prerequisites for penetration of host external barriers and subsequent colonization. Conditions for in vitro spore germination and appressorium development in Colletotrichum trifolii are described. In addition, effects of Ca(sup2+) and calmodulin on these processes have been examined. Results indicate that, as for other pathogenic fungi, appressorium development is induced on a hard surface. The data suggest that disturbance of calcium homeostasis, by ethylene-bis(oxy-ethylenenitrolo)tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or calcium channel blockers, impairs appressorium development. Moreover, calmodulin inhibitors affect both germination and differentiation, implying that the Ca(sup2+)/calmodulin signal transduction pathway is important in the early development of C. trifolii on the plant host surface. PMID:16535223

  8. Interaction with calmodulin is required for the function of Spc110p, an essential component of the yeast spindle pole body.

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, D A; Welch, K A; Stark, M J

    1994-01-01

    NUF1/SPC110, encoding a nuclear filament-related protein which is a component of the yeast spindle pole body (SPB), has been identified in a screen designed to isolate genes encoding targets of yeast calmodulin. Spc110p interacts with calmodulin by two different criteria and the calmodulin interacting region has been localized within the C-terminus of the protein. Point mutations between residues 898 and 917 further define the calmodulin binding site within this region. Mutations in this domain which abolish calmodulin binding in vitro prevent Spc110p function in vivo, demonstrating that calmodulin binding by Spc110p has important functional consequences. In keeping with a role for calmodulin in Spc110p function, we show that calmodulin localizes to the yeast SPB when cells are prepared under appropriate conditions. Non-functional mutant Spc110 proteins which cannot bind calmodulin are present at lowered steady-state levels in the cell; when their level is increased by elevated gene dosage, partial recovery of Spc110p function is seen. Overexpression of calmodulin suppresses the defect(s) associated with the mutant Spc110 proteins, supporting the notion that Spc110p stability is a consequence of its ability to bind calmodulin and pointing to a direct role for calmodulin in Spc110p function. Images PMID:7925277

  9. Altered binding of /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin to a 46. 5-kilodalton protein in skin fibroblasts cultured from patients with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1987-02-01

    The levels of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins have been determined in cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and age- and sex-matched controls. Calmodulin ranged from 0.20 to 0.76 microgram/mg protein; there was no difference between calmodulin concentration in fibroblasts from CF patients and controls. Calmodulin-binding proteins of 230, 212, 204, 164, 139, 70, 59, 46.5, and 41 kD were identified. A protein with a mobility identical to the 59-kD calmodulin-binding protein was labeled by antiserum against calmodulin-dependent phosphatase. Although Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-dependent phosphatase activity was detected, there was no different in activity between control and CF fibroblasts or in the level of phosphatase protein as determined by radioimmunoassay. Lower amounts of /sup 125/I-calmodulin were bound to the 46.5-kD calmodulin-binding protein in CF fibroblasts as compared with controls. The 46.5-kD calmodulin-binding protein may be reduced in CF fibroblasts or its structure may be altered resulting in a reduced binding capacity and/or affinity for calmodulin and perhaps reflecting, either directly or indirectly, the genetic defect responsible for cystic fibrosis.

  10. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  11. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  12. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca(2+)/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca(2+)/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca(2+) concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca(2+) range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca(2+) signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca(2+) regulation in anoctamin Cl(-) channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types.

  13. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca2+/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca2+/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca2+ concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca2+ range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca2+ signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca2+ regulation in anoctamin Cl− channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types. PMID:24081981

  14. Ca2+ and Calmodulin Dynamics during Photopolarization in Fucus serratus Zygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Love, J.; Brownlee, C.; Trewavas, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    The role of Ca2+ in zygote polarization in fucoid algae (Fucus, Ascophyllum, and Pelvetia species) zygote polarization is controversial. Using a local source of Fucus serratus, we established that zygotes form a polar axis relative to unilateral light (photopolarization) between 8 and 14 h after fertilization (AF), and become committed to this polarity at approximately 15 to 18 h AF. We investigated the role of Ca2+, calmodulin, and actin during photopolarization by simultaneously exposing F. serratus zygotes to polarizing light and various inhibitors. Neither removal of Ca2+ from the culture medium or high concentrations of EGTA and LaCl3 had any effect on photopolarization. Bepridil, 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino) octyl ester, nifedipine, and verapamil, all of which block intracellular Ca2 release, reduced photopolarization from 75 to 30%. The calmodulin antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-L-naphthalenesulfonamide and trifluoperazine inhibited photopolarization in all zygotes, whereas N-(6-aminohexyl)-L-naphthalenesulfonamide had no effect. Cytochalasin B, cytochalasin D, and latrunculin B, all of which inhibit actin polymerization, had no effect on photopolarization, but arrested polar axis fixation. The role of calmodulin during polarization was investigated further. Calmodulin mRNA from the closely related brown alga Macrocystis pyrifera was cloned and the protein was expressed in bacteria. Photopolarization was enhanced following microinjections of this recombinant calmodulin into developing zygotes. Confocal imaging of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled recombinant calmodulin in photopolarized zygotes showed a homogenous signal distribution at 13 h AF, which localized to the presumptive rhizoid site at 15 h AF. PMID:12223805

  15. Cloning and expression of the gene for a novel protein from Mycobacterium smegmatis with functional similarity to eukaryotic calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Prasad T; Prasad, C Rama; Reddy, P Hemalatha; Reeder, Dennis; McKenney, Keith; Jaffe, Howard; Dimitrova, Mariana N; Ginsburg, Ann; Peterkofsky, Alan; Murthy, P Suryanarayana

    2003-09-01

    A calmodulin-like protein (CAMLP) from Mycobacterium smegmatis was purified to homogeneity and partially sequenced; these data were used to produce a full-length clone, whose DNA sequence contained a 55-amino-acid open reading frame. M. smegmatis CAMLP, expressed in Escherichia coli, exhibited properties characteristic of eukaryotic calmodulin: calcium-dependent stimulation of eukaryotic phosphodiesterase, which was inhibited by the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine, and reaction with anti-bovine brain calmodulin antibodies. Consistent with the presence of nine acidic amino acids (16%) in M. smegmatis CAMLP, there is one putative calcium-binding domain in this CAMLP, compared to four such domains for eukaryotic calmodulin, reflecting the smaller molecular size (approximately 6 kDa) of M. smegmatis CAMLP. Ultracentrifugation and mass spectral studies excluded the possibility that calcium promotes oligomerization of purified M. smegmatis CAMLP.

  16. Characterization and identification of calmodulin and calmodulin binding proteins in hemocyte of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Sengprasert, Panjana; Amparyup, Piti; Tassanakajorn, Anchalee; Wongpanya, Ratree

    2015-06-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) sensor in all eukaryotic cells, is one of the well-known signaling proteins. Previously, CaM gene has shown a high transcriptional level in hemocyte of the pathogen infected shrimp, suggesting that shrimp CaM does not only regulate Ca(2+) metabolism, but is also involved in immune response cascade. In the present study, the CaM gene of shrimp Penaeus monodon was identified and the recombinant P.monodon CaM (rPmCaM) was produced and biochemically characterized. The identification of CaM-binding proteins was also performed. The PmCaM cDNA consisted of an open reading frame of 447 bp encoding for 149 amino acid residues with a calculated mass of 16,810 Da and an isoelectric point of 4.09. Tissue distribution showed that the PmCaM transcript was expressed in all examined tissues. The results of gel mobility shift assay, circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy all confirmed that the conformational changes of the rPmCaM were observed after the calcium binding. According to the gene silencing of PmCaM transcript levels, the shrimp's susceptibility to pathogenic Vibrio harveyi infection increased in comparison with that of the control groups. Protein pull-down assay and LC-MS/MS analysis were performed to identify rPmCaM-binding proteins involved in shrimp immune responses and transglutaminase, elongation factor 1-alpha, elongation factor 2 and actin were found. However, by computational analysis, only the first three proteins contained CaM-binding domain. These findings suggested that PmCaM may play an important role in regulation of shrimp immune system.

  17. Evidence of a role for calmodulin in the regulation of calcium release from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, G.

    1986-01-14

    The effect of calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors on the Ca2+ release channel of heavy skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles was investigated. SR vesicles were passively loaded with 45Ca2+ in the presence of calmodulin and its inhibitors, followed by measurement of 45Ca2+ release rates by means of a rapid-quench-Millipore filtration method. Calmodulin at a concentration of 2-10 microM reduced 45Ca2+ efflux rates from passively loaded vesicles by a factor of 2-3 in media containing 10(-6)-10(-3) M Ca2+. At 10(-9) M Ca2+, calmodulin was without effect. 45Ca2+ release rates were varied 1000-fold (k1 approximately equal to 0.1-100 s-1) by using 10(-5) M Ca2+ with either Mg2+ or the ATP analogue adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-methylenetriphosphate) in the release medium. In all instances, a similar 2-3-fold reduction in release rates was observed. At 10(-5) M Ca2+, 45Ca2+ release was half-maximally inhibited by about 2 X 10(-7) M calmodulin, and this inhibition was reversible. Heavy SR vesicle fractions contained 0.1-02 micrograms of endogenous calmodulin/mg of vesicle protein. However, the calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine, calmidazolium, and compound 48/80 were without significant effect on 45Ca2+ release at concentrations which inhibit calmodulin-mediated reactions in other systems. Studies with actively loaded vesicles also suggested that heavy SR vesicles contain a Ca2+ permeation system that is inhibited by calmodulin.

  18. Immuno-detection of aluminium and aluminium induced conformational changes in calmodulin--implications in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Levi, R; Wolf, T; Fleminger, G; Solomon, B

    1998-12-01

    Binding of calcium to calmodulin (CAM) induces specific structural rearrangements in the whole protein molecule. Ca2+ organizes and stabilizes the four-domains structure of calmodulin in a helical, active conformation that can bind to its target proteins; the central helix remaining flexible is an essential condition for their bio-recognition. The conformation of calmodulin, and its efficacy to interact with target proteins, is profoundly altered when bound to metal ions other than calcium. As recently reported, the local structural changes of CaM, which occur upon aluminium binding, lead to the impairment of protein flexibility and to the loss of its ability to interact with several other proteins, which may decrease or inhibit the regulatory character of calmodulin. In this study we followed conformational changes occurring in the calmodulin molecule after aluminium binding using highly specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) able to differentiate between the conformational states of calmodulin, as well as mAbs which recognize aluminium free or bound to proteins. Under the same experimental conditions, mAb CAM-1, a Ca2+ conformation sensitive antibody raised against calmodulin, fails to recognize the calmodulin-aluminium complex, despite the presence of Ca2+, while the anti-Al antibodies show a maximal binding pattern towards their antigen. These data suggest that Al3+ ions bind to calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+ ions, leading to an inactive, reversible conformation, instead of its physiological active form. Alteration of the conformation of calmodulin imposed by Al binding may have possible implications in the neurotoxicity mechanism related to Alzheimer's disease.

  19. A change in configuration of the calmodulin-KCNQ channel complex underlies Ca2+-dependent modulation of KCNQ channel activity.

    PubMed

    Kosenko, Anastasia; Hoshi, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    All subtypes of KCNQ channel subunits (KCNQ1-5) require calmodulin as a co-factor for functional channels. It has been demonstrated that calmodulin plays a critical role in KCNQ channel trafficking as well as calcium-mediated current modulation. However, how calcium-bound calmodulin suppresses the M-current is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of KCNQ2 current suppression mediated by calcium-bound calmodulin. We show that calcium induced slow calmodulin dissociation from the KCNQ2 channel subunit. In contrast, in homomeric KCNQ3 channels, calcium facilitated calmodulin binding. We demonstrate that this difference in calmodulin binding was due to the unique cysteine residue in the KCNQ2 subunit at aa 527 in Helix B, which corresponds to an arginine residue in other KCNQ subunits including KCNQ3. In addition, a KCNQ2 channel associated protein AKAP79/150 (79 for human, 150 for rodent orthologs) also preferentially bound calcium-bound calmodulin. Therefore, the KCNQ2 channel complex was able to retain calcium-bound calmodulin either through the AKPA79/150 or KCNQ3 subunit. Functionally, increasing intracellular calcium by ionomycin suppressed currents generated by KCNQ2, KCNQ2(C527R) or heteromeric KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels to an equivalent extent. This suggests that a change in the binding configuration, rather than dissociation of calmodulin, is responsible for KCNQ current suppression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that KCNQ current suppression was accompanied by reduced KCNQ affinity toward phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) when assessed by a voltage-sensitive phosphatase, Ci-VSP. These results suggest that a rise in intracellular calcium induces a change in the configuration of CaM-KCNQ binding, which leads to the reduction of KCNQ affinity for PIP2 and subsequent current suppression.

  20. Temperature dependent conformation studies of Calmodulin Protein using Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneja, Sahil; Bhartiya, Vivek Kumar; Negi, Sunita

    2016-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) protein plays a very crucial role in the calcium signaling inside the eukaryotic cell structure [1, 2]. It can also bind to other proteins/targets and facilitate various activities inside the cell [3, 4]. Temperature dependent conformation changes in the CaM protein are studied with extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The quantitative comparison of simulation data with various forms of experimental results probing different aspects of the folding process can facilitate robust assessment of the accuracy of the calculations. It can also provide a detailed structural interpretation for the experimental observations as well as physical interpretation for theory behind different aspects of the experiment. Earlier these kinds of studies have been performed experimentally using fluorescence measurements as in [5]. The calcium bound form of CaM is observed to undergo a reversible conformation change in the range 295-301 K at calcium ion concentration 150 mM. The transition temperature was observed to depend on the calcium ion concentration of the protein. Leap-dynamics approach was used earlier to study the temperature dependent conformation change of CaM [6]. At 290 K, both the N- and C-lobes were stable, at 325 K, the C-lobe unfolds whereas at 360 both the lobes unfold [6]. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of 100 ns each for the temperatures 325 K and 375 K on the apo form of CaM, 3CLN and 1CFD. A remarkable dependence of the temperature is observed on the overall dynamics of both the forms of the protein as reported in our earlier study [7, 8]. 1CFD shows a much flexible linker as compared to 3CLN whereas the overall dynamics of the lobes mainly N-lobe is observed to be more in later case. Salt bridge formation between the residues 2 (ASP) and 148 (LYS) leads to a more compact form of 1CFD at 325 K. The unfolding of the protein is observed to increase with the increase in the temperature similar to the earlier reported

  1. Impact of Methionine Oxidation on Calmodulin Structural Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Megan R.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Nitu, Florentin; Moen, Rebecca J.; Olenek, Michael J.; Klein, Jennifer C.; Thomas, David D.

    2014-01-01

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous x-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM’s structural heterogeneity in solution: In both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ~4 nm (closed) and another at ~6 nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each population ranging from 1.5 to 3 nm. Both mutations (M109Q and M124Q) decrease the effect of Ca on the structure of CaM, primarily by decreasing the closed-to-open equilibrium constant in the presence of Ca. We propose that Met oxidation alters CaM’s functional interaction with its target proteins by perturbing this Ca-dependent structural shift. PMID:25478640

  2. The Actin Nucleator Cobl Is Controlled by Calcium and Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Natja; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Actin nucleation triggers the formation of new actin filaments and has the power to shape cells but requires tight control in order to bring about proper morphologies. The regulation of the members of the novel class of WASP Homology 2 (WH2) domain-based actin nucleators, however, thus far has largely remained elusive. Our study reveals signal cascades and mechanisms regulating Cordon-Bleu (Cobl). Cobl plays some, albeit not fully understood, role in early arborization of neurons and nucleates actin by a mechanism that requires a combination of all three of its actin monomer–binding WH2 domains. Our experiments reveal that Cobl is regulated by Ca2+ and multiple, direct associations of the Ca2+ sensor Calmodulin (CaM). Overexpression analyses and rescue experiments of Cobl loss-of-function phenotypes with Cobl mutants in primary neurons and in tissue slices demonstrated the importance of CaM binding for Cobl’s functions. Cobl-induced dendritic branch initiation was preceded by Ca2+ signals and coincided with local F-actin and CaM accumulations. CaM inhibitor studies showed that Cobl-mediated branching is strictly dependent on CaM activity. Mechanistic studies revealed that Ca2+/CaM modulates Cobl’s actin binding properties and furthermore promotes Cobl’s previously identified interactions with the membrane-shaping F-BAR protein syndapin I, which accumulated with Cobl at nascent dendritic protrusion sites. The findings of our study demonstrate a direct regulation of an actin nucleator by Ca2+/CaM and reveal that the Ca2+/CaM-controlled molecular mechanisms we discovered are crucial for Cobl’s cellular functions. By unveiling the means of Cobl regulation and the mechanisms, by which Ca2+/CaM signals directly converge on a cellular effector promoting actin filament formation, our work furthermore sheds light on how local Ca2+ signals steer and power branch initiation during early arborization of nerve cells—a key process in neuronal network formation. PMID

  3. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone signalling downstream of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Melamed, P; Savulescu, D; Lim, S; Wijeweera, A; Luo, Z; Luo, M; Pnueli, L

    2012-12-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) regulates reproduction via binding a G-protein coupled receptor on the surface of the gonadotroph, through which it transmits signals, mostly via the mitogen-activated protein (MAPK) cascade, to increase synthesis of the gonadotrophin hormones: luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Activation of the MAPK cascade requires an elevation in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, which is a result of both calcium influx and mobilisation from intracellular stores. However, Ca(2+) also transmits signals via an MAPK-independent pathway, through binding calmodulin (CaM), which is then able to bind a number of proteins to impart diverse downstream effects. Although the ability of GnRH to activate CaM was recognised over 20 years ago, only recently have some of the downstream effects been elucidated. GnRH was shown to activate the CaM-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, which targets gonadotrophin gene expression both directly and indirectly via transcription factors such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells and Nur77, the Transducer of Regulated CREB (TORC) co-activators and also the prolyl isomerase, Pin1. Gonadotrophin gene expression is also regulated by GnRH-induced CaM-dependent kinases (CaMKs); CaMKI is able to derepress the histone deacetylase-inhibition of β-subunit gene expression, whereas CaMKII appears to be essential for the GnRH-activation of all three subunit genes. Asides from activating gonadotrophin gene expression, GnRH also exerts additional effects on gonadotroph function, some of which clearly occur via CaM, including the proliferation of immature gonadotrophs, which is dependent on calcineurin. In this review, we summarise these pathways, and discuss the additional functions that have been proposed for CaM with respect to modifying GnRH-induced signalling pathways via the regulation of the small GTP-binding protein, Gem, and/or the regulator of G-protein signalling protein 2.

  4. Direct detection of calmodulin tuning by ryanodine receptor channel targets using a Ca2+-sensitive acrylodan-labeled calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Fruen, Bradley R; Balog, Edward M; Schafer, Janet; Nitu, Florentin R; Thomas, David D; Cornea, Razvan L

    2005-01-11

    Calmodulin (CaM) activates the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) at nanomolar Ca(2+) concentrations but inhibits it at micromolar Ca(2+) concentrations, indicating that binding of Ca(2+) to CaM may provide a molecular switch for modulating RyR1 channel activity. To directly examine the Ca(2+) sensitivity of RyR1-complexed CaM, we used an environment-sensitive acrylodan adduct of CaM. The resulting (ACR)CaM probe displayed high-affinity binding to, and Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of, RyR1 similar to that of unlabeled wild-type (WT) CaM. Upon addition of Ca(2+), (ACR)CaM exhibited a substantial (>50%) decrease in fluorescence (K(Ca) = 2.7 +/- 0.8 microM). A peptide derived from the RyR1 CaM binding domain (RyR1(3614)(-)(43)) caused an even more pronounced Ca(2+)-dependent fluorescence decrease, and a >or=10-fold leftward shift in its K(Ca) (0.2 +/- 0.1 microM). In the presence of intact RyR1 channels in SR vesicles, (ACR)CaM fluorescence spectra were distinct from those in the presence of RyR1(3614)(-)(43), although a Ca(2+)-dependent decrease in fluorescence was still observed. The K(Ca) for (ACR)CaM fluorescence in the presence of SR (0.8 +/- 0.4 microM) was greater than in the presence of RyR1(3614)(-)(43) but was consistent with functional determinations showing the conversion of (ACR)CaM from channel activator (apoCaM) to inhibitor (Ca(2+)CaM) at Ca(2+) concentrations between 0.3 and 1 microM. These results indicate that binding to RyR1 targets evokes significant changes in the CaM structure and Ca(2+) sensitivity (i.e., CaM tuning). However, changes resulting from binding of CaM to the full-length, tetrameric channels are clearly distinct from changes caused by the RyR1-derived peptide. We suggest that the Ca(2+) sensitivity of CaM when in complex with full-length channels may be tuned to respond to physiologically relevant changes in Ca(2+).

  5. Regulated Expression of a Calmodulin Isoform Alters Growth and Development in Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Takezawa, D.; An, G.; Han, T.-J.

    1996-01-01

    A transgene approach was taken to study the consequences of altered expression of a calmodutin iso-form on plant growth and development. Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM 1 to 8) have been isolated and characterized. Among the potato calmodulin isoforms studied, PCM 1 differs from the other isoforms because of its unique amino acid substitutions. Transgenic potato plants were produced carrying sense construct of PCM 1 fused to the CAMV 35S promoter. Transgenic plants showing a moderate increase in PCM 1 MRNA exhibited strong apical dominance, produced elongated tubers, and were taller than the controls. Interestingly, the plants expressing the highest level of PCM 1 MRNA did not form underground tubers. Instead, these transgenic plants produced aerial tubers when allowed to grow for longer periods. The expression of different calmodulin isoforms (PCM 1, 5, 6, and 8) was studied in transgenic plants. Among the four potato calmodulin isoforms, only the expression of PCM 1 MRNA was altered in transgenic plants, while the expression of other isoforms was not significantly altered. Western analysis revealed increased PCM 1 protein in transgenic plants, indicating that the expression of both MRNA and protein are altered in transgenic plants. These results suggest that increasing the expression of PCM 1 alters growth and development in potato plants.

  6. Transient dissociation of polyribosomes and concurrent recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts in gravistimulated maize pulvini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilmann, I.; Shin, J.; Huang, J.; Perera, I. Y.; Davies, E.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of polyribosome abundance were studied in gravistimulated maize (Zea mays) stem pulvini. During the initial 15 min of gravistimulation, the amount of large polyribosomes transiently decreased. The transient decrease in polyribosome levels was accompanied by a transient decrease in polyribosome-associated mRNA. After 30 min of gravistimulation, the levels of polyribosomes and the amount of polyribosome-associated mRNA gradually increased over 24 h up to 3- to 4-fold of the initial value. Within 15 min of gravistimulation, total levels of transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were elevated 5-fold in maize pulvinus total RNA. Transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were recruited into polyribosomes within 15 min of gravistimulation. Over 4 h of gravistimulation, a gradual increase in the association of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts with polyribosomes was seen predominantly in the lower one-half of the maize pulvinus; the association of transcripts for vacuolar invertase with polyribosomes did not change over this period. Our results suggest that within 15 min of gravistimulation, the translation of the majority of transcripts associated with polyribosomes decreased, resembling a general stress response. Recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts into polyribosomes occurred predominantly in the lower pulvinus one-half during the first 4 h when the presentation time for gravistimulation in the maize pulvinus is not yet complete.

  7. Transient dissociation of polyribosomes and concurrent recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts in gravistimulated maize pulvini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilmann, I.; Shin, J.; Huang, J.; Perera, I. Y.; Davies, E.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of polyribosome abundance were studied in gravistimulated maize (Zea mays) stem pulvini. During the initial 15 min of gravistimulation, the amount of large polyribosomes transiently decreased. The transient decrease in polyribosome levels was accompanied by a transient decrease in polyribosome-associated mRNA. After 30 min of gravistimulation, the levels of polyribosomes and the amount of polyribosome-associated mRNA gradually increased over 24 h up to 3- to 4-fold of the initial value. Within 15 min of gravistimulation, total levels of transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were elevated 5-fold in maize pulvinus total RNA. Transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were recruited into polyribosomes within 15 min of gravistimulation. Over 4 h of gravistimulation, a gradual increase in the association of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts with polyribosomes was seen predominantly in the lower one-half of the maize pulvinus; the association of transcripts for vacuolar invertase with polyribosomes did not change over this period. Our results suggest that within 15 min of gravistimulation, the translation of the majority of transcripts associated with polyribosomes decreased, resembling a general stress response. Recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts into polyribosomes occurred predominantly in the lower pulvinus one-half during the first 4 h when the presentation time for gravistimulation in the maize pulvinus is not yet complete.

  8. Characterisation of two calmodulin-like proteins from the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Russell, Sean L; McFerran, Neil V; Hoey, Elizabeth M; Trudgett, Alan; Timson, David J

    2007-06-01

    Calmodulin is a calcium ion-sensing signalling protein found in eukaryotics. Two calmodulin-like gene sequences were identified in an EST library from adult liver flukes. One codes for a protein (FhCaM1) homologous to mammalian calmodulins (98% identity), whereas the other protein (FhCaM2) has only 41% identity. These genes were cloned into expression vectors and the recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. Gel shift assays showed that both proteins bind to calcium, magnesium and zinc ions. Homology models have been built for both proteins. As expected, FhCaM1 has a highly similar structure to other calmodulins. Although FhCaM2 has a similar fold, its surface charge is higher than FhCaM1. One of the potential metal ion-binding sites has lower metal-ion co-ordination capability, while another has an adjacent lysine residue, both of which may decrease the metal-binding affinity. These differences may reflect a specialised role for FhCaM2 in the liver fluke.

  9. Transient dissociation of polyribosomes and concurrent recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts in gravistimulated maize pulvini.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, I; Shin, J; Huang, J; Perera, I Y; Davies, E

    2001-11-01

    The dynamics of polyribosome abundance were studied in gravistimulated maize (Zea mays) stem pulvini. During the initial 15 min of gravistimulation, the amount of large polyribosomes transiently decreased. The transient decrease in polyribosome levels was accompanied by a transient decrease in polyribosome-associated mRNA. After 30 min of gravistimulation, the levels of polyribosomes and the amount of polyribosome-associated mRNA gradually increased over 24 h up to 3- to 4-fold of the initial value. Within 15 min of gravistimulation, total levels of transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were elevated 5-fold in maize pulvinus total RNA. Transcripts coding for calreticulin and calmodulin were recruited into polyribosomes within 15 min of gravistimulation. Over 4 h of gravistimulation, a gradual increase in the association of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts with polyribosomes was seen predominantly in the lower one-half of the maize pulvinus; the association of transcripts for vacuolar invertase with polyribosomes did not change over this period. Our results suggest that within 15 min of gravistimulation, the translation of the majority of transcripts associated with polyribosomes decreased, resembling a general stress response. Recruitment of calreticulin and calmodulin transcripts into polyribosomes occurred predominantly in the lower pulvinus one-half during the first 4 h when the presentation time for gravistimulation in the maize pulvinus is not yet complete.

  10. B-cell receptor activation inhibits AID expression through calmodulin inhibition of E-proteins.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Jannek; Sveshnikova, Natalia; Wallenius, Anders; Baradaran, Sanna; Saarikettu, Juha; Grundström, Thomas

    2008-01-29

    Upon encountering antigens, B-lymphocytes can adapt to produce a highly specific and potent antibody response. Somatic hypermutation, which introduces point mutations in the variable regions of antibody genes, can increase the affinity for antigen, and antibody effector functions can be altered by class switch recombination (CSR), which changes the expressed constant region exons. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the mutagenic antibody diversification enzyme that is essential for both somatic hypermutation and CSR. The mutagenic AID enzyme has to be tightly controlled. Here, we show that engagement of the membrane-bound antibodies of the B-cell receptor (BCR), which signals that good antibody affinity has been reached, inhibits AID gene expression and that calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling is essential for this inhibition. Moreover, we show that overexpression of the Ca(2+) sensor protein calmodulin inhibits AID gene expression, and that the transcription factor E2A is required for regulation of the AID gene by the BCR. E2A mutated in the binding site for calmodulin, and thus showing calmodulin-resistant DNA binding, makes AID expression resistant to the inhibition through BCR activation. Thus, BCR activation inhibits AID gene expression through Ca(2+)/calmodulin inhibition of E2A.

  11. Microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis for the discovery and characterisation of calmodulin binding partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herling, Therese; Linse, Sara; Knowles, Tuomas

    2015-03-01

    Non-covalent and transient protein-ligand interactions are integral to cellular function and malfunction. Key steps in signalling and regulatory pathways rely on reversible non-covalent protein-protein binding or ion chelation. Here we present a microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis method for detecting and characterising protein-ligand interactions in solution. We apply this method to probe the binding equilibria of calmodulin, a central protein to calcium signalling pathways. In this study we characterise the specific binding of calmodulin to phosphorylase kinase, a known target, and creatine kinase, which we identify as a putative binding partner through a protein array screen and surface plasmon resonance experiments. We verify the interaction between calmodulin and creatine kinase in solution using free-flow electrophoresis and investigate the effect of calcium and sodium chloride on the calmodulin-ligand binding affinity in free solution without the presence of a potentially interfering surface. Our results demonstrate the general applicability of quantitative microfluidic electrophoresis to characterise binding equilibria between biomolecules in solution.

  12. Phosphorylation of GRK2 by protein kinase C abolishes its inhibition by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Krasel, C; Dammeier, S; Winstel, R; Brockmann, J; Mischak, H; Lohse, M J

    2001-01-19

    G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are important regulators of G-protein-coupled receptor function. Two members of this family L, GRK2 and GRK5 L, have been shown to be substrates for protein kinase C (PKC). Whereas PKC-mediated phosphorylation results in inhibition of GRK5, it increases the activity of GRK2 toward its substrates probably through increased affinity for receptor-containing membranes. We show here that this increase in activity may be caused by relieving a tonic inhibition of GRK2 by calmodulin. In vitro, GRK2 was preferentially phosphorylated by PKC isoforms alpha, gamma, and delta. Two-dimensional peptide mapping of PKCalpha-phosphorylated GRK2 showed a single site of phosphorylation, which was identified as serine 29 by HPLC-MS. A S29A mutant of GRK2 was not phosphorylated by PKC in vitro and showed no phorbol ester-stimulated phosphorylation when transfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells. Serine 29 is located in the calmodulin-binding region of GRK2, and binding of calmodulin to GRK2 results in inhibition of kinase activity. This inhibition was almost completely abolished in vitro when GRK2 was phosphorylated by PKC. These data suggest that calmodulin may be an inhibitor of GRK2 whose effects can be abolished with PKC-mediated phosphorylation of GRK2.

  13. Absolute configuration of acremoxanthone C, a potent calmodulin inhibitor from Purpureocillium lilacinum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of an extract prepared from the culture medium and mycelium of Purpureocillium lilacinum allowed the isolation of two calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors, namely, acremoxanthone C (1) and acremonidin A (2). The absolute configuration of 1 was established as 2R, 3R, 1'S, 11'S, ...

  14. Structural plasticity of calmodulin on the surface of CaF2 nanoparticles preserves its biological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astegno, Alessandra; Maresi, Elena; Marino, Valerio; Dominici, Paola; Pedroni, Marco; Piccinelli, Fabio; Dell'Orco, Daniele

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly used in biomedical applications and are especially attractive as biocompatible and biodegradable protein delivery systems. Herein, the interaction between biocompatible 25 nm CaF2 nanoparticles and the ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin has been investigated in order to assess the potential of these particles to serve as suitable surface protein carriers. Calmodulin is a multifunctional messenger protein that activates a wide variety of signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells by changing its conformation in a calcium-dependent manner. Isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism studies have shown that the interaction between calmodulin and CaF2 nanoparticles occurs with physiologically relevant affinity and that the binding process is fully reversible, occurring without significant alterations in protein secondary and tertiary structures. Experiments performed with a mutant form of calmodulin having an impaired Ca2+-binding ability in the C-terminal lobe suggest that the EF-hand Ca2+-binding motifs are directly involved in the binding of calmodulin to the CaF2 matrix. The residual capability of nanoparticle-bound calmodulin to function as a calcium sensor protein, binding to and altering the activity of a target protein, was successfully probed by biochemical assays. Even if efficiently carried by CaF2 nanoparticles, calmodulin may dissociate, thus retaining the ability to bind the peptide encompassing the putative C-terminal calmodulin-binding domain of glutamate decarboxylase and activate the enzyme. We conclude that the high flexibility and structural plasticity of calmodulin are responsible for the preservation of its function when bound in high amounts to a nanoparticle surface.Nanoparticles are increasingly used in biomedical applications and are especially attractive as biocompatible and biodegradable protein delivery systems. Herein, the interaction between biocompatible 25 nm CaF2 nanoparticles and the ubiquitous

  15. Apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin bind to the same region on the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C. P.; Rodney, G.; Zhang, J. Z.; Santacruz-Toloza, L.; Strasburg, G.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    The skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (RYR1) is regulated by calmodulin in both its Ca2+-free (apocalmodulin) and Ca2+-bound (Ca2+ calmodulin) states. Apocalmodulin is an activator of the channel, and Ca2+ calmodulin is an inhibitor of the channel. Both apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin binding sites on RYR1 are destroyed by a mild tryptic digestion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes, but calmodulin (either form), bound to RYR1 prior to tryptic digestion, protects both the apocalmodulin and Ca2+ calmodulin sites from tryptic destruction. The protected sites are after arginines 3630 and 3637 on RYR1. These studies suggest that both Ca2+ calmodulin and apocalmodulin bind to the same or overlapping regions on RYR1 and block access of trypsin to sites at amino acids 3630 and 3637. This sequence is part of a predicted Ca2+ CaM binding site of amino acids 3614-3642 [Takeshima, H., et al. (1989) Nature 339, 439-445].

  16. Nonconserved Ca2+/Calmodulin Binding Sites in Munc13s Differentially Control Synaptic Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lipstein, Noa; Schaks, Sabine; Dimova, Kalina; Kalkhof, Stefan; Ihling, Christian; Kölbel, Knut; Ashery, Uri; Rhee, JeongSeop; Brose, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Munc13s are presynaptic proteins that mediate synaptic vesicle priming and thereby control the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles. During high synaptic activity, Munc13-1 and its closely related homolog, ubMunc13-2, bind Ca2+/calmodulin, resulting in enhanced priming activity and in changes of short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. Here, we studied whether bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, two remote isoforms of Munc13-1 with a neuronal subtype-specific expression pattern, mediate synaptic vesicle priming and regulate short-term synaptic plasticity in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. We identified a single functional Ca2+/calmodulin binding site in these isoforms and provide structural evidence that all Munc13s employ a common mode of interaction with calmodulin despite the lack of sequence homology between their Ca2+/calmodulin binding sites. Electrophysiological analysis showed that, during high-frequency activity, Ca2+/calmodulin binding positively regulates the priming activity of bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, resulting in an increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles and subsequently in strong short-term synaptic enhancement of neurotransmission. We conclude that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent regulation of priming activity is structurally and functionally conserved in all Munc13 proteins, and that the composition of Munc13 isoforms in a neuron differentially controls its short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. PMID:22966208

  17. A flow-dialysis method for obtaining relative measures of association constants in calmodulin-metal-ion systems.

    PubMed

    Buccigross, J M; O'Donnell, C L; Nelson, D J

    1986-05-01

    A flow-dialysis apparatus suitable for the study of high-affinity metal-binding proteins has been utilized to study calmodulin-metal exchange as a measure of relative calmodulin-metal association constants. Calmodulin labelled with radioactive 153Gd was dialysed against buffer containing various competing metal ions. The rate of label exchange was monitored by a gamma-ray scintillation detector. Competing metals used were Ca2+ and Cd2+, and the lanthanides Gd3+, Eu3+, La3+ and Lu3+. All exchange processes were first-order, and two categories of metal were found: Ca2+ and Cd2+ in one, the lanthanides comprising the other. In addition calmodulin-metal complexes with radioactive 109Cd and 45Ca released the bound label without any competing metal being added to the buffer. The kinetics of this metal loss can be described by two consecutive first-order processes, and the fraction of label associated with each rate can be determined. Studies of phosphodiesterase activation by calmodulin show Cd2+ and calmodulin to cause 80% of the maximum activation found when Ca2+ and calmodulin are used.

  18. The essential mitotic target of calmodulin is the 110-kilodalton component of the spindle pole body in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, J R; Sundberg, H A; Chang, B H; Muller, E G; Davis, T N

    1993-01-01

    Two independent methods identified the spindle pole body component Nuf1p/Spc110p as the essential mitotic target of calmodulin. Extragenic suppressors of cmd1-1 were isolated and found to define three loci, XCM1, XCM2, and XCM3 (extragenic suppressor of cmd1-1). The gene encoding a dominant suppressor allele of XCM1 was cloned. On the basis of DNA sequence analysis, genetic cosegregation, and mutational analysis, XCM1 was identified as NUF1/SPC110. Independently, a C-terminal portion of Nuf1p/Spc110p, amino acid residues 828 to 944, was isolated as a calmodulin-binding protein by the two-hybrid system. As assayed by the two-hybrid system, Nuf1p/Spc110p interacts with wild-type calmodulin and triple-mutant calmodulins defective in binding Ca2+ but not with two mutant calmodulins that confer a temperature-sensitive phenotype. Deletion analysis by the two-hybrid system mapped the calmodulin-binding site of Nuf1p/Spc110p to amino acid residues 900 to 927. Direct binding between calmodulin and Nuf1p/Spc110p was demonstrated by a modified gel overlay assay. Furthermore, indirect immunofluorescence with fixation procedures known to aid visualization of spindle pole body components localized calmodulin to the spindle pole body. Sequence analysis of five suppressor alleles of NUF1/SPC110 indicated that suppression of cmd1-1 occurs by C-terminal truncation of Nuf1p/Spc110p at amino acid residues 856, 863, or 881, thereby removing the calmodulin-binding site. Images PMID:8247006

  19. UBE3B Is a Calmodulin-regulated, Mitochondrion-associated E3 Ubiquitin Ligase.

    PubMed

    Braganza, Andrea; Li, Jianfeng; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A; Dey, Nupur B; Andrews, Joel; Clark, Jennifer; Zamani, Leila; Wang, Xiao-Hong; St Croix, Claudette; O'Sullivan, Roderick; Garcia-Exposito, Laura; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Sobol, Robert W

    2017-02-10

    Recent genome-wide studies found that patients with hypotonia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, congenital anomalies, characteristic facial dysmorphic features, and low cholesterol levels suffer from Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome (KOS, also reported as blepharophimosis-ptosis-intellectual disability syndrome). The primary cause of KOS is autosomal recessive mutations in the gene UBE3B However, to date, there are no studies that have determined the cellular or enzymatic function of UBE3B. Here, we report that UBE3B is a mitochondrion-associated protein with homologous to the E6-AP Cterminus (HECT) E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutating the catalytic cysteine (C1036A) or deleting the entire HECT domain (amino acids 758-1068) results in loss of UBE3B's ubiquitylation activity. Knockdown of UBE3B in human cells induces changes in mitochondrial morphology and physiology, a decrease in mitochondrial volume, and a severe suppression of cellular proliferation. We also discovered that UBE3B interacts with calmodulin via its N-terminal isoleucine-glutamine (IQ) motif. Deletion of the IQ motif (amino acids 29-58) results in loss of calmodulin binding and a significant increase in the in vitro ubiquitylation activity of UBE3B. In addition, we found that changes in calcium levels in vitro disrupt the calmodulin-UBE3B interaction. These studies demonstrate that UBE3B is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and reveal that the enzyme is regulated by calmodulin. Furthermore, the modulation of UBE3B via calmodulin and calcium implicates a role for calcium signaling in mitochondrial protein ubiquitylation, protein turnover, and disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Ca2+-dependent inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Haga, K; Tsuga, H; Haga, T

    1997-02-11

    Agonist- or light-dependent phosphorylation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) or rhodopsin by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) was found to be inhibited by calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The phosphorylation was fully inhibited in the absence of G protein betagamma subunits and partially inhibited in the presence of betagamma subunits. The dose-response curve for stimulation by betagamma subunits of the m2 and rhodopsin phosphorylation was shifted to the higher concentration of betagamma subunits by addition of Ca2+-calmodulin. The phosphorylation by GRK2 of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing a peptide corresponding to the central part of the third intracellular loop of m2 receptors (I3-GST) was not affected by Ca2+-calmodulin in the presence or absence of betagamma subunits, but the agonist-dependent stimulation of I3-GST phosphorylation by an I3-deleted m2 receptor mutant in the presence of betagamma subunits was suppressed by Ca2+-calmodulin. These results indicate that Ca2+-calmodulin does not directly interact with the catalytic site of GRK2 but inhibits the kinase activity of GRK2 by interfering with the activation of GRK2 by agonist-bound m2 receptors and G protein betagamma subunits. In agreement with the assumption that GRK2 activity is suppressed by the increase in intracellular Ca2+, the sequestration of m2 receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was found to be attenuated by the treatment with a Ca2+ ionophore, A23187.

  1. Role of Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants. Progress report, FY91

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-12-31

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  2. Inhibitory effects of calmodulin antagonists on urinary enzyme excretion in rats after nephrotoxic doses of mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S.D. Jr.; Cox, J.L.; Giles, R.C. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    Prochlorperazine, a phenothiazine antiemetic, has been reported to protect rats against mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/)-induced nephrotoxicity. Mercuric ion and 12 other divalent metal ions of toxicologic importance inhibit the activity of calmodulin, a ubiquitous intracellular calcium receptor and regulatory protein, at physiologically relevant concentrations. Phenothiazines, including prochlorperazine, are reversible calmodulin antagonists, and as such they interact with divalent calcium at the level of calmodulin. It was of interest therefore to evaluate the comparative effects of several phenothiazines on HgCl/sub 2/-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

  3. Direct interaction between the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine brain with /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin and /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Minocherhomjee, A.M.; Selfe, S.; Flowers, N.J.; Storm, D.R.

    1987-07-14

    A calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase has been purified to apparent homogeneity from bovine cerebral cortex using calmodulin-Sepharose followed by forskolin-Sepharose and wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose. The final product appeared as one major polypeptide of approximately 135,000 daltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. This polypeptide was a major component of the protein purified through calmodulin-Sepharose. The catalytic subunit was stimulated 3-4-fold by calmodulin (CaM) with a turnover number greater than 1000 min/sup -1/ and was directly inhibited by adenosine. The catalytic subunit of the enzyme interacted directly with /sup 125/I-CaM on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay system, and this interaction was Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration dependent. In addition, the catalytic subunit was shown to directly bind /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin using a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay technique, and N-acetylglucosamine inhibited binding of the lectin to the catalytic subunit. Calmodulin did not inhibit binding of wheat germ agglutinin to the catalytic subunit, and the binding of calmodulin was unaffected by wheat germ agglutinin. These data illustrate that the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase is a glycoprotein which interacts directly with calmodulin and that adenosine can inhibit the enzyme without intervening receptors or G coupling proteins. It is concluded that the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase is a transmembrane protein with a domain accessible from the outer surface of the cell.

  4. Interaction between the C-terminal region of human myelin basic protein and calmodulin: analysis of complex formation and solution structure.

    PubMed

    Majava, Viivi; Petoukhov, Maxim V; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Pirilä, Päivi; Svergun, Dmitri I; Kursula, Petri

    2008-02-19

    The myelin sheath is a multilamellar membrane structure wrapped around the axon, enabling the saltatory conduction of nerve impulses in vertebrates. Myelin basic protein, one of the most abundant myelin-specific proteins, is an intrinsically disordered protein that has been shown to bind calmodulin. In this study, we focus on a 19-mer synthetic peptide from the predicted calmodulin-binding segment near the C-terminus of human myelin basic protein. The interaction of native human myelin basic protein with calmodulin was confirmed by affinity chromatography. The binding of the myelin basic protein peptide to calmodulin was tested with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in different temperatures, and Kd was observed to be in the low muM range, as previously observed for full-length myelin basic protein. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the peptide bound to calmodulin, and binding was accompanied by a conformational change; furthermore, gel filtration chromatography indicated a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of calmodulin in the presence of the peptide. NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding area to reside mainly within the hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin. The solution structure obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering indicates binding of the myelin basic protein peptide into the interlobal groove of calmodulin, while calmodulin remains in an extended conformation. Taken together, our results give a detailed structural insight into the interaction of calmodulin with a C-terminal segment of a major myelin protein, the myelin basic protein. The used 19-mer peptide interacts mainly with the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin, and a conformational change accompanies binding, suggesting a novel mode of calmodulin-target protein interaction. Calmodulin does not collapse and wrap around the peptide tightly; instead, it remains in an extended conformation in the solution structure. The observed affinity can be physiologically relevant

  5. Behavior of a fluorescent analogue of calmodulin in living 3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have prepared and partially characterized a lissamine-rhodamine B fluorescent analogue of calmodulin, LRB-CM. The analogue had a dye/protein ratio of approximately 1.0 and contained no free dye or contaminating labeled proteins. LRB-CM was indistinguishable from native calmodulin upon SDS PAGE and in assays of phosphodiesterase and myosin light chain kinase. The emission spectrum of LRB-CM was insensitive to changes in pH, ionic strength, and temperature over the physiological range, but the apparent quantum yield was influenced somewhat by divalent cation concentration. LRB-CM injected into living Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts became associated with nitrobenzoxadiazole- phallacidin staining stress fibers in some interphase cells. LRB-CM and acetamidofluorescein-labeled actin co-injected into the same cell both became associated with fibers in some cells, but in most cases association of the two analogues with fibers was mutually exclusive. This suggests that calmodulin may differ from actin in the timing of incorporation into stress fibers or that we have distinguished distinct populations of stress fibers. We were able to detect no direct interaction of LRB-CM with actin by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FRAP) of aqueous solutions. Interaction of LRB-CM with myosin light chain kinase also was not detected by FRAP. This suggests that the mean lifetime of the calmodulin-myosin light chain kinase complex is too short to affect the diffusion coefficient of calmodulin. We examined various fluorescent derivatives of proteins and dextrans as suitable control molecules for quantitative fluorescent analogue cytochemistry in living cells. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans were found to be preferable to all the proteins tested, since their mobilities in cytoplasm were inversely dependent on molecular size and there was no evidence of binding to intracellular components. In contrast, FRAP of LRB-CM in the cytoplasm of living 3T3 cells suggested that the analogue

  6. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  7. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  8. Polarized Axonal Surface Expression of Neuronal KCNQ Potassium Channels Is Regulated by Calmodulin Interaction with KCNQ2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwan Young; Kim, Edward H.; Issema, Rodal S.; Chung, Hee Jung

    2014-01-01

    KCNQ potassium channels composed of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 subunits give rise to the M-current, a slow-activating and non-inactivating voltage-dependent potassium current that limits repetitive firing of action potentials. KCNQ channels are enriched at the surface of axons and axonal initial segments, the sites for action potential generation and modulation. Their enrichment at the axonal surface is impaired by mutations in KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail that cause benign familial neonatal convulsion and myokymia, suggesting that their correct surface distribution and density at the axon is crucial for control of neuronal excitability. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating enrichment of KCNQ channels at the neuronal axon remain elusive. Here, we show that enrichment of KCNQ channels at the axonal surface of dissociated rat hippocampal cultured neurons is regulated by ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin. Using immunocytochemistry and the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) membrane protein as a trafficking reporter, we demonstrate that fusion of KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail is sufficient to target CD4 protein to the axonal surface whereas inhibition of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 abolishes axonal surface expression of CD4 fusion proteins by retaining them in the endoplasmic reticulum. Disruption of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 also impairs enrichment of heteromeric KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels at the axonal surface by blocking their trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the axon. Consistently, hippocampal neuronal excitability is dampened by transient expression of wild-type KCNQ2 but not mutant KCNQ2 deficient in calmodulin binding. Furthermore, coexpression of mutant calmodulin, which can interact with KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels but not calcium, reduces but does not abolish their enrichment at the axonal surface, suggesting that apo calmodulin but not calcium-bound calmodulin is necessary for their preferential targeting to the axonal surface. These findings

  9. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress disrupts calcium binding on calmodulin: More evidence for oxidative stress in vitiligo

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, K.U. . E-mail: k.schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, N.C.J.; Zothner, C.; Abou Elloof, M.M.; Wood, J.M.

    2007-08-17

    Patients with acute vitiligo have low epidermal catalase expression/activities and accumulate 10{sup -3} M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. One consequence of this severe oxidative stress is an altered calcium homeostasis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Here, we show decreased epidermal calmodulin expression in acute vitiligo. Since 10{sup -3}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidises methionine and tryptophan residues in proteins, we examined calcium binding to calmodulin in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} utilising {sup 45}calcium. The results showed that all four calcium atoms exchanged per molecule of calmodulin. Since oxidised calmodulin looses its ability to activate calcium ATPase, enzyme activities were followed in full skin biopsies from lesional skin of patients with acute vitiligo (n = 6) and healthy controls (n = 6). The results yielded a 4-fold decrease of ATPase activities in the patients. Computer simulation of native and oxidised calmodulin confirmed the loss of all four calcium ions from their specific EF-hand domains. Taken together H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation affects calcium binding in calmodulin leading to perturbed calcium homeostasis and perturbed L-phenylalanine-uptake in the epidermis of acute vitiligo.

  10. Calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Li, L; Yang, P; Ma, Z

    2017-02-01

    The migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) shows aggregative traits in nymph marching bands and swarm formations through mutual olfactory attraction of conspecifics. However, olfactory preference in different nymph stages in gregarious locusts is not sufficiently explored. In this study, we found that the nymph olfactory preference for gregarious volatiles exhibited obvious variations at different developmental stages. The gregarious locusts show attractive response to conspecific volatiles from the third stadium. Transcriptome comparison between third- and fourth-stadium nymphs showed that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) pathways are significantly enriched. Amongst the genes present in GPCR pathways, the expression level of calmodulin in locust brains significantly increased from the third- to the fourth-stadium nymphs. Amongst the four octopamine receptors (OARs) belonging to the GPCR family, only OAR α1 showed similar expression patterns to those of calmodulin, and knockdown of OAR α1 reduced the expression level of calmodulin. RNA interference of calmodulin decreased locomotion and induced the loss of olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Moreover, the activation of OAR α1 in calmodulin-knockdown locusts did not induce olfactory attraction of the nymphs to gregarious volatiles. Thus, calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 (OA-OAR α1) signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Overall, this study provides novel insights into the mechanism of OA-OAR α1 signalling involved in olfactory attraction of gregarious locusts.

  11. Calcium binding peptide motifs from calmodulin confer divalent ion selectivity to elastin-like polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Hassouneh, Wafa; Nunalee, Michelle L.; Shelton, M. Coleman; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    Calcium sensitive elastin-like polypeptides (CELPs) were synthesized by periodically interspersing a calcium-binding peptide sequence from calmodulin within an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP), with the goal of creating thermal and calcium responsive peptide polymers. The CELPs exhibit high sensitivity to calcium compared to monovalent cations but do not exhibit the exquisite selectivity for calcium over other divalent cations such as magnesium that is displayed by calmodulin. The CELPs were further used as a building block for the synthesis of calcium sensitive nanoparticles by fusing a hydrophilic, non-calcium sensitive ELP block with a CELP block that becomes more hydrophobic upon calcium binding. We show that addition of calcium at concentrations between 50–500 mM imparts sufficient amphiphilicity to the diblock polypeptide between 33 and 46 °C to trigger its self-assembly into monodisperse spherical micelles with a hydrodynamic radius of ~50 nm. PMID:23705904

  12. Towards a Unified Theory of Calmodulin Regulation (Calmodulation) of Voltage-Gated Calcium and Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Dick, Ivy E; Sang, Lingjie; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Kang, Po Wei; Niu, Jacqueline; Banerjee, Rahul; Yang, Wanjun; Babich, Jennifer S; Issa, John B; Lee, Shin Rong; Namkung, Ho; Li, Jiangyu; Zhang, Manning; Yang, Philemon S; Bazzazi, Hojjat; Adams, Paul J; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, Daniel N; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca(2+) channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca(2+) and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms.

  13. Towards a unified theory of calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+ channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca2+ and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms. PMID:25966688

  14. Distribution of calmodulin in corn seedlings - Immunocytochemical localization in coleoptiles and root apices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Immunofluorescence techniques have been used to study the distribution of calmodulin in several tissues in etiolated corn (Zea mays, var. Bear Hybrid) seedlings. Uniform staining was seen in the background cytoplasm of most cell types. Cell walls and vacuoles were not stained. In coleoptile mesophyll cells the nucleoplasm of most nuclei was stained as was the stroma of most amyloplasts. The lumen border of mature tracheary elements in coleoptiles also stained. In the rootcap the most intensely stained regions were the cytoplasms of columella cells and of the outermost cells enmeshed in the layer of secreted slime. Nuclei in the rootcap cells did not stain distinctly, but those in all cell types of the root meristem did. Also in the root meristem, the cytoplasm of metaxylem elements stained brightly. These results are compared and contrasted with previous data on the localization of calmodulin in pea root apices and epicotyls and discussed in relation to current hypotheses on mechanisms of gravitropism.

  15. Distribution of calmodulin in corn seedlings - Immunocytochemical localization in coleoptiles and root apices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Immunofluorescence techniques have been used to study the distribution of calmodulin in several tissues in etiolated corn (Zea mays, var. Bear Hybrid) seedlings. Uniform staining was seen in the background cytoplasm of most cell types. Cell walls and vacuoles were not stained. In coleoptile mesophyll cells the nucleoplasm of most nuclei was stained as was the stroma of most amyloplasts. The lumen border of mature tracheary elements in coleoptiles also stained. In the rootcap the most intensely stained regions were the cytoplasms of columella cells and of the outermost cells enmeshed in the layer of secreted slime. Nuclei in the rootcap cells did not stain distinctly, but those in all cell types of the root meristem did. Also in the root meristem, the cytoplasm of metaxylem elements stained brightly. These results are compared and contrasted with previous data on the localization of calmodulin in pea root apices and epicotyls and discussed in relation to current hypotheses on mechanisms of gravitropism.

  16. Synthesis and decay of calmodulin-ubiquitin conjugates in cell-free extracts of various rabbit tissues.

    PubMed

    Laub, M; Jennissen, H P

    1997-06-27

    Calmodulin is the natural substrate for ubiquitin-ligation by the enzyme ubiquitin-calmodulin ligase (uCaM-synthetase; EC 6.3.2.21). The activity of this ligase is regulated by the binding of the second messenger Ca2+ to the substrate calmodulin, which increases the activity ca. 10-fold. Up till now, two components of the ligase could be identified: uCaM Syn-F1 and uCaM Syn-F2, the first of which binds to ubiquitin and the second which binds to calmodulin. Since the physiological role of this enzyme is still unclear, this study was designed to examine whether the activity of uCaM-Synthetase in 40,000 x g tissue supernatants correlates with the calmodulin content in the various tissues. In reticulocytes, spleen, erythrocytes, testis and brain, which are rich in uCaM synthetase, the tissue contents calculated on the basis of activity measurements were between 4-80-fold higher than in red and white skeletal muscle. These activities did not correlate with the respective calmodulin contents of the tissues indicating that other factors were determining these enzyme levels. A second aim was to gain information on the role of the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway in those tissues displaying uCaM synthetase activity. In the reticulocyte system which contains the classical ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway as measured with 125I-BSA, no ubiquitin-dependent degradation of calmodulin could be detected. We therefore examined the other tissues of the rabbit with the substrate 125I-BSA and succeeded in finding a ubiquitin-independent ATP-dependent proteolytic activity in every case but no ubiquitin-dependent activity. The ubiquitin-independent activity was highest in smooth muscle and red skeletal muscle being ca. 3-4-fold higher than in lung and testis. In 50% of the tissue crude extracts the time curve of calmodulin ubiquitylation progressed through a maximum indicating a dynamic steady state based on conjugate synthesis and decay. If a ubiquitylation pulse

  17. Mechanistic Basis of Calmodulin Mediated Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activation and Antiestrogen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    cancers . Calmodulin (CaM) is an obligatory ERa activator. Moreover, antiestrogens (tamoxifen) bind tightly to CaM, and some therapeutic benefits of...antiestrogens for breast cancers are hypothesized to derive from this interaction. The purpose and scope of the research is to define the structural...antiestrogens, including the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent for estrogen-dependent breast cancers , tamoxifen (TAM). The therapeutic effects of

  18. Mechanistic Basis of Calmodulin Mediated Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activation and Antiestrogen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    2002) Calmodulin in action : diversity in target recognition and activation mechanisms , Cell 108, 739-742. 7. Yap, K. L., Kim, J., Truong, K., Sherman... Mechanism of Malic Enzyme Using (2R,3R)-erythro-Fluoromalate as a Slow Alternate Substrate. Biochemistry 37, 18018-18025. Urbauer, J. L., Bradshaw, D. E...Proteins. J. Biomol. NMR 9, 437-440. Edens, W. A., Urbauer, J. L., and Cleland, W. W. (1997) Determination of the Chemical Mechanism of Malic Enzyme

  19. The Effects of Hydrazines and Related Compounds on Calcium Calmodulin Regulated Synaptic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    1REPORT NUMBER 2.GOVT ACCESSION NO. S. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUM0ER 4.TTE(and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED The Effects of Hydrazines and...4F -631 0 1984 E IS. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side if necessary and identify by block nunmber) Calmodulin, protein kinase, adenylate cyclase...hydrazines, organophosphates, C) calcium, synaptic processes, protein phosphorylation. 20. BSTRACT (Continue an reverse side it necessary mid Identify

  20. Human erythrocyte membranes exhibit a cooperative calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-ATPase of high calcium sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Peter; Michell, Robert H.

    1981-03-01

    It is thought that the ionized Ca2+ concentration in the cytosol of healthy erythrocytes is in the range 0.01-0.1 µM (ref. 1) and that this low concentration is maintained by an ATP-driven calmodulin-dependent Ca2+ pump in the plasma membrane2,3. The Ca2+-stimulated ATPase which is the enzymatic expression of this pump varies in its calcium sensitivity between different preparations of erythrocyte ghosts, with activation generally occurring in a concentration range between ~1 and 10 µM Ca2+ (refs 2-5). This is a higher range of Ca2+ concentrations than might be anticipated for activation of a pump that sustains intracellular concentrations of Ca2+ below 0.1 µM, and recent reports have suggested activation in some membrane preparations at Ca2+ concentrations in the range 0.1-1.0 µM (refs 6, 7). We report here a simple method for preparing human erythrocyte membranes in 2.5 mM HEPES/1 mM EGTA at pH 7.0 (see Fig. 1 legend) in which the activation of the Ca2+-ATPase by Ca2+ and intracellular concentrations of calmodulin is highly cooperative and is complete by ~1 µM Ca2+. Unlike other available erythrocyte membrane preparations, the pattern of activation by Ca2+ and calmodulin is not complicated by partial resealing of the ghosts during and after isolation. We suggest that this cooperative activation of the Ca2+ pump may explain how healthy erythrocytes maintain their normal cytosol Ca2+ concentration at a threshold value at or below ~0.1 µM. We also note that several other calmodulin-dependent enzymes display similar cooperative activation kinetics.

  1. Endogenous Polysialic Acid Based Micelles for Calmodulin Antagonist Delivery against Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Gao, Yin-Ping; Lu, Nan-Nan; Li, Wei-Shuo; Xu, Ji-Fang; Ying, Xiao-Ying; Wu, Gang; Liao, Mei-Hua; Tan, Chao; Shao, Ling-Xiao; Lu, Ying-Mei; Zhang, Chen; Fukunaga, Kohji; Han, Feng; Du, Yong-Zhong

    2016-12-28

    Clinical treatment for vascular dementia still remains a challenge mainly due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, a micelle based on polysialic acid (PSA), which is a hydrophilic and endogenous carbohydrate polymer, was designed to deliver calmodulin antagonist for therapy of vascular dementia. PSA was first chemically conjugated with octadecylamine (ODA), and the obtained PSA-ODA copolymer could self-assemble into micelle in aqueous solution with a 120.0 μg/mL critical micelle concentration. The calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle, featuring sustained drug release behavior over a period of 72 h with a 3.6% (w/w) drug content and a 107.0 ± 4.0 nm size was then fabricated. The PSA-ODA micelle could cross the BBB mainly via active endocytosis by brain endothelial cells followed by transcytosis. In a water maze test for spatial learning, calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle significantly reduced the escape latencies of right unilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (rUCCAO) mice with dosage significantly reduced versus free drug. The decrease of hippocampal phospho-CaMKII (Thr286/287) and phospho-synapsin I (Ser603) was partially restored in rUCCAO mice following calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle treatment. Consistent with the restored CaMKII phosphorylation, the elevation of BrdU/NeuN double-positive cells in the same context was also observed. Overall, the PSA-ODA micelle developed from the endogenous material might promote the development of therapeutic approaches for improving the efficacy of brain-targeted drug delivery and have great potential for vascular dementia treatment.

  2. Identification of a calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase in the endoplasmic reticulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, B.; Ichida, A.; Wang, Y.; Gens, J. S.; Pickard, B. G.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    A unique subfamily of calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-ATPases was recently identified in plants. In contrast to the most closely related pumps in animals, plasma membrane-type Ca2+-ATPases, members of this new subfamily are distinguished by a calmodulin-regulated autoinhibitor located at the N-terminal instead of a C-terminal end. In addition, at least some isoforms appear to reside in non-plasma membrane locations. To begin delineating their functions, we investigated the subcellular localization of isoform ACA2p (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2 protein) in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ACA2p resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In buoyant density sucrose gradients performed with and without Mg2+, ACA2p cofractionated with an ER membrane marker and a typical "ER-type" Ca2+-ATPase, ACA3p/ECA1p. To visualize its subcellular localization, ACA2p was tagged with a green fluorescence protein at its C terminus (ACA2-GFPp) and expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. We collected fluorescence images from live root cells using confocal and computational optical-sectioning microscopy. ACA2-GFPp appeared as a fluorescent reticulum, consistent with an ER location. In addition, we observed strong fluorescence around the nuclei of mature epidermal cells, which is consistent with the hypothesis that ACA2p may also function in the nuclear envelope. An ER location makes ACA2p distinct from all other calmodulin-regulated pumps identified in plants or animals.

  3. Modulation of radiation induced lipid peroxidation by phospholipase A 2 and calmodulin antagonists: Relevance to detoxification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1995-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with 0.9 Gy s -1. Lipid peroxidation initiated by ionizing radiation was enhanced by phospholipase A 2, and required both phospholipase A 2 and GSH-peroxidase for consecutive action to convert fatty acid peroxides into corresponding alcohols. The ability of phospholipase A 2 to enhance lipid peroxidation was increased in presence of Ca 2+. However, in combination, phospholipase A 2 and GSH-peroxidase were effective in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. These findings show that free fatty acid peroxides considerably increase the peroxidation. Calmodulin antagonists inhibit lipid peroxidation and decrease the radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from the membranes. Our results suggest the importance of Ca 2+ dependent phospholipase A 2 in detoxification of fatty acid peroxides in the membranes. It is quite possible that scavenging of free radicals by calmodulin antagonists lower the formation of hydroperoxides, resulting in the decrease in activity of phospholipase A 2. Alternatively, decrease in Ca 2+ release due to the calmodulin antagonists might have affected the activity of phospholipase A 2. Our observations might be of considerable significance in the understanding of post irradiation effect on biological membranes.

  4. Structural analysis of Uranyl complexation by the EF-hand motif of calmodulin: effect of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Berthomieu, Catherine; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Brulfert, Florian; Pardoux, Romain; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Lemaire, David; Safi, Samir; Guilbaud, Philippe; Simoni, Eric; Merroun, Mohamed Larbi

    2017-09-04

    Better understanding of uranyl-protein interactions is a prerequisite to predict uranium chemical toxicity in cells. The EF-hand motif of calmodulin site I is about thousand times more affine for uranyl than for calcium, and threonine phosphorylation increases uranyl affinity by two orders of magnitude at pH 7. In this study, we confront X-rays absorption spectroscopy with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and structural models obtained by molecular dynamics simulations to analyze uranyl coordination in native and phosphorylated calmodulin site I. For native site I, Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data evidence a short U-Oeq distance, in addition to distances compatible with mono and bidentate coordination by carboxylate groups. Further analysis of uranyl speciation by TRLFS and thorough investigation of the fluorescence decay kinetics strongly support the presence of a hydroxide uranyl ligand. For phosphorylated site I, EXAFS and FTIR data support monodentate uranyl coordination by the phosphoryl group and strong interaction with monodentate and bidentate carboxylate ligands. This study confirms the important role of a phosphoryl ligand in the stability of uranyl-protein interactions. By evidencing a hydroxide uranyl ligand in calmodulin site I, this study also highlights the possible role of less studied ligands as water or hydroxide anions in the stability of protein-uranyl complexes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  6. Calcium transport in vesicles from carrot cells: Stimulation by calmodulin and phosphatidylserine. [Daucus carota cv. Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Wenling Hsieh; Sze, Heven )

    1991-05-01

    The transport properties of Ca-pumping ATPases from carrot (Daucus carota cv. Danvers) tissue culture cells were studied. ATP dependent Ca transport in vesicles that comigrated with an ER marker, was stimulated 3-4 fold by calmodulin. Cyclopiazonic acid (a specific inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase) partially inhibited oxalate-stimulated Ca transport activity; however, it had little or not effect on calmodulin-stimulated Ca uptake. The results suggested the presence of two types of Ca ATPases, and ER- and a plasma membrane-type. Incubation of membranes with (gamma{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the formation of a single acyl ({sup 32}P) phosphoprotein of 120 kDa. Formation of this phosphoprotein was dependent on Ca, and enhanced by La {sup 3+}, characteristic of the plasma membrane CaATPase. Acidic phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, stimulated Ca transport, similar to their effect on the erythrocyte plasma membrane CaATPase. These results would indicate that the calmodulin-stimulated Ca transport originated in large part from a plasma membrane-type Ca pump of 120 kDa.

  7. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize.

    PubMed

    Stinemetz, C L; Hasenstein, K H; Young, L M; Evans, M L

    1992-11-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  8. Structural and Functional Consequences of Connexin 36 (Cx36) Interaction with Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Ryan C. F.; Smirnova, Ekaterina; Brown, Cherie A.; Zoidl, Christiane; Spray, David C.; Donaldson, Logan W.; Zoidl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Functional plasticity of neuronal gap junctions involves the interaction of the neuronal connexin36 with calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). The important relationship between Cx36 and CaMKII must also be considered in the context of another protein partner, Ca2+ loaded calmodulin, binding an overlapping site in the carboxy-terminus of Cx36. We demonstrate that CaM and CaMKII binding to Cx36 is calcium-dependent, with Cx36 able to engage with CaM outside of the gap junction plaque. Furthermore, Ca2+ loaded calmodulin activates Cx36 channels, which is different to other connexins. The NMR solution structure demonstrates that CaM binds Cx36 in its characteristic compact state with major hydrophobic contributions arising from W277 at anchor position 1 and V284 at position 8 of Cx36. Our results establish Cx36 as a hub binding Ca2+ loaded CaM and they identify this interaction as a critical step with implications for functions preceding the initiation of CaMKII mediated plasticity at electrical synapses. PMID:27917108

  9. Identification of a calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase in the endoplasmic reticulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, B.; Ichida, A.; Wang, Y.; Gens, J. S.; Pickard, B. G.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    A unique subfamily of calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-ATPases was recently identified in plants. In contrast to the most closely related pumps in animals, plasma membrane-type Ca2+-ATPases, members of this new subfamily are distinguished by a calmodulin-regulated autoinhibitor located at the N-terminal instead of a C-terminal end. In addition, at least some isoforms appear to reside in non-plasma membrane locations. To begin delineating their functions, we investigated the subcellular localization of isoform ACA2p (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2 protein) in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ACA2p resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In buoyant density sucrose gradients performed with and without Mg2+, ACA2p cofractionated with an ER membrane marker and a typical "ER-type" Ca2+-ATPase, ACA3p/ECA1p. To visualize its subcellular localization, ACA2p was tagged with a green fluorescence protein at its C terminus (ACA2-GFPp) and expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. We collected fluorescence images from live root cells using confocal and computational optical-sectioning microscopy. ACA2-GFPp appeared as a fluorescent reticulum, consistent with an ER location. In addition, we observed strong fluorescence around the nuclei of mature epidermal cells, which is consistent with the hypothesis that ACA2p may also function in the nuclear envelope. An ER location makes ACA2p distinct from all other calmodulin-regulated pumps identified in plants or animals.

  10. [Effect of calmodulin antagonist EBB on invasion of human fibrosarcoma cell HT1080].

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Zhou, Yuan; Qi, Jing; Xiong, Dong-sheng; Liu, Jie-wen; Qi, Shu-ling; Cheng, Yan-hong; Yang, Chun-zheng; Zhu, Hui-fang

    2005-06-01

    To investigate the potential effect of EBB, a calmodulin antagonist, on invasion of human fibrosarcoma cells HT1080. The antitumor effect of EBB was assessed by 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were measured by Zymogrophy analysis. The mRNA levels, of MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 were evaluated by reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Transwell chamber assay was applied to measure the effect of EBB on the invasion of HT1080 cells. Calmodulin antagonist EBB inhibited the proliferation of HT1080 cells with an IC50 of (8.2 +/- 1.2) microg/ml. EBB down-regulated the activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and down-regulated the mRNA levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9, while up-regulated the mRNA levels of TIMP-1. The invasive ability of HT1080 cells was decreased to (31.13 +/- 2.265)%, (59.91 +/- 2.566)%, and (71.58 +/- 0.5960)% after exposure of the cells with 2, 5, and 10 microg/ml EBB, respectively. Treatment with calmodulin antagonist EBB is effective in suppressing tumor invasion. The possible mechanism is the down-regulation of MMPs.

  11. Functional consequences of single amino acid substitutions in calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, P; Munier, H; Gilles, A M; Krin, E; Porumb, T; Bârzu, O; Sarfati, R; Pellecuer, C; Danchin, A

    1991-01-01

    Calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis and Bacillus anthracis are two cognate bacterial toxins. Three short regions of 13-24 amino acid residues in these proteins exhibit between 66 and 80% identity. Site-directed mutagenesis of four residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase situated in the second (Asp188, Asp190) and third (His298, Glu301) segments of identity were accompanied by important decrease, or total loss, of enzyme activity. The calmodulin-binding properties of mutated proteins showed no important differences when compared to the wild-type enzyme. Apart from the loss of enzymatic activity, the most important change accompanying replacement of Asp188 by other amino acids was a dramatic decrease in binding of 3'-anthraniloyl-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, a fluorescent analogue of ATP. From these results we concluded that the two neighbouring aspartic acid residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase, conserved in many other ATP-utilizing enzymes, are essential for binding the Mg(2+)-nucleotide complex, and for subsequent catalysis. Replacement of His298 and Glu301 by other amino acid residues affected the nucleotide-binding properties of adenylate cyclase to a lesser degree suggesting that they might be important in the mechanism of enzyme activation by calmodulin, rather than being involved directly in catalysis. PMID:2050107

  12. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  13. Calcium-sensitive MRI contrast agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Shusteff, Maxim; Fam, Peter; Jasanoff, Alan

    2006-10-03

    We describe a family of calcium indicators for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), formed by combining a powerful iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast mechanism with the versatile calcium-sensing protein calmodulin and its targets. Calcium-dependent protein-protein interactions drive particle clustering and produce up to 5-fold changes in T2 relaxivity, an indication of the sensors' potency. A variant based on conjugates of wild-type calmodulin and the peptide M13 reports concentration changes near 1 microM Ca(2+), suitable for detection of elevated intracellular calcium levels. The midpoint and cooperativity of the response can be tuned by mutating the protein domains that actuate the sensor. Robust MRI signal changes are achieved even at nanomolar particle concentrations (<1 microM in calmodulin) that are unlikely to buffer calcium levels. When combined with technologies for cellular delivery of nanoparticulate agents, these sensors and their derivatives may be useful for functional molecular imaging of biological signaling networks in live, opaque specimens.

  14. The bell-shaped Ca2+ dependence of the inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate-induced Ca2+ release is modulated by Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Missiaen, L; Parys, J B; Weidema, A F; Sipma, H; Vanlingen, S; De Smet, P; Callewaert, G; De Smedt, H

    1999-05-14

    Calmodulin inhibits inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) binding to the IP3 receptor in both a Ca2+-dependent and a Ca2+-independent way. Because there are no functional data on the modulation of the IP3-induced Ca2+ release by calmodulin at various Ca2+ concentrations, we have studied how cytosolic Ca2+ and Sr2+ interfere with the effects of calmodulin on the IP3-induced Ca2+ release in permeabilized A7r5 cells. We now report that calmodulin inhibited Ca2+ release through the IP3 receptor with an IC50 of 4.6 microM if the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration was 0.3 microM or higher. This inhibition was particularly pronounced at low IP3 concentrations. In contrast, calmodulin did not affect IP3-induced Ca2+ release if the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration was below 0.3 microM. Calmodulin also inhibited Ca2+ release through the IP3 receptor in the presence of at least 10 microM Sr2+. We conclude that cytosolic Ca2+ or Sr2+ are absolutely required for the calmodulin-induced inhibition of the IP3-induced Ca2+ release and that this dependence represents the formation of the Ca2+/calmodulin or Sr2+/calmodulin complex.

  15. Identification of calmodulin and MlcC as light chains for Dictyostelium myosin-I isozymes.

    PubMed

    Crawley, Scott W; Liburd, Janine; Shaw, Kristopher; Jung, Yoojin; Smith, Steven P; Côté, Graham P

    2011-08-02

    Dictyostelium discoideum express seven single-headed myosin-I isozymes (MyoA-MyoE and MyoK) that drive motile processes at the cell membrane. The light chains for MyoA and MyoE were identified by expressing Flag-tagged constructs consisting of the motor domain and the two IQ motifs in the neck region in Dictyostelium. The MyoA and MyoE constructs both copurified with calmodulin. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) showed that apo-calmodulin bound to peptides corresponding to the MyoA and MyoE IQ motifs with micromolar affinity. In the presence of calcium, calmodulin cross-linked two IQ motif peptides, with one domain binding with nanomolar affinity and the other with micromolar affinity. The IQ motifs were required for the actin-activated MgATPase activity of MyoA but not MyoE; however, neither myosin exhibited calcium-dependent activity. A Flag-tagged construct consisting of the MyoC motor domain and the three IQ motifs in the adjacent neck region bound a novel 8.6 kDa two EF-hand protein named MlcC, for myosin light chain for MyoC. MlcC is most similar to the C-terminal domain of calmodulin but does not bind calcium. ITC studies showed that MlcC binds IQ1 and IQ2 but not IQ3 of MyoC. IQ3 contains a proline residue that may render it nonfunctional. Each long-tailed Dictyostelium myosin-I has now been shown to have a unique light chain (MyoB-MlcB, MyoC-MlcC, and MyoD-MlcD), whereas the short-tailed myosins-I, MyoA and MyoE, have the multifunctional calmodulin as a light chain. The diversity in light chain composition is likely to contribute to the distinct cellular functions of each myosin-I isozyme.

  16. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  17. Kinetic analysis of the calmodulin-binding region of the plasma membrane calcium pump isoform 4b.

    PubMed

    Penheiter, Alan R; Filoteo, Adelaida G; Penniston, John T; Caride, Ariel J

    2005-02-15

    The sequence L(1086)RRGQILWFRGLNRIQTQIKVVKAFHSS(1113) (peptide C28) is responsible for calmodulin binding to PMCA4b. In this work, peptides following the above sequence were progressively shortened either at the N-terminus (C28NDelta3, C28NDelta5, or C28NDelta6) or at the C-terminus (C20, C22, C23, and C25). Competitive inhibition of PMCA activity was used to measure apparent dissociation constants of the complexes between calmodulin and C28 or progressively shortened peptides. Additionally, equilibrium titrations were used to measure the apparent dissociation constants of the various peptides with TA-calmodulin by changes in TA-calmodulin fluorescence and Trp fluorescence of the peptides. At the N-terminus, deletion of five residues did not change calmodulin affinity, but deletion of six residues resulted in a 5-fold decrease in affinity. There were no major differences in the time course of TA-CaM binding, but C28NDelta6 exhibited a different time course of Trp fluorescence change. At the C-terminus, deletion of five residues (C23) or more resulted in a net increase in fluorescence of TA-CaM upon binding, while longer peptides (C25 and C28) produced both a transient increase and a net decrease in the fluorescence of TA-CaM. Global regression analysis revealed that binding of TA-CaM to the C23 peptide could be fit by a two-step model, while longer peptides required three-step models for adequate fitting. TA-calmodulin dissociated rapidly from C23, C22, and C20, resulting in a marked increase in apparent K(d). Thus, the sequence I(1091)LWFRGLNRIQTQIKVVKAF(1110) (C25NDelta5) is required to reproduce the calmodulin-binding properties of C28. When F(1110) was replaced by A, the TA-calmodulin association and dissociation kinetics resembled C23 kinetics, but changing V(1107) to A produced a smaller effect, suggesting that F(1110), rather than V(1107), is the main anchor for the N-terminal lobe of calmodulin in PMCA4b.

  18. Calmodulin concentration in mucus of rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, exposed to combinations of acid, aluminum, and calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.E. ); Yuan, Shixing; Haug, A. )

    1990-03-01

    As a result of increasing acidification in various watersheds elevated levels of aluminum have been observed in soil and surface water. The toxicity of Al to fish has been shown to be positively correlated with the concentration of inorganic monomeric. The exact mechanism(s) of Al toxicity is not fully understood. Recently, the presence of calmodulin (CaM), a calcium-regulating protein, has been reported in fish gills and mucus. Calmodulin selectively binds inorganic monomeric Al causing conformational changes in the protein. Aluminum-induced conformational changes cause a reduction in the ability of calmodulin to mediate Ca-dependent phosphodiesterase and ATPase activity. Calmodulin also plays a key role in coordinating the effects of secondary messenger systems in response to cellular stimulation. Given the involvement of calmodulin in numerous biochemical pathways, its interaction with aluminum may be a key lesion in the broadly defined syndrome of aluminum toxicity. The present study was undertaken to establish a relationship between Al concentration in aqueous solution and the quantity and activity of CaM in the mucus of adult rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri). Fish were exposed to various levels of pH, Ca, and Al. Mucus was collected and the amount of CaM was determined. The ability of the Al-exposed CaM to activate the phosphodiesterase enzyme system was also evaluated.

  19. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  20. Increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by morphine-sensitization in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Mehdi; Farahmandfar, Maryam; Ranjbar, Faezeh Esmaeli; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-07-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse, such as morphine, elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect long-lasting changes in some of the important molecules involved in memory processing such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In the present study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression of α and β isoforms and activity of CaMKII in the hippocampus of male rats. Animals were treated for 3 days with saline or morphine (20mg/kg) and following a washout period of 5 days, a challenge dose of morphine (5mg/kg) were administered. The results indicate that morphine administration in pre-treated animals produces behavioral sensitization, as determined by significant increase in locomotion and oral stereotypy behavior. In addition, repeated morphine treatment increased mRNA expression of both α and β isoforms of CaMKII in the hippocampus. The present study also showed that induction of morphine sensitization significantly increased both Ca2+/calmodulin-independent and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent activities of CaMK II in the rat hippocampus. However, acute administration of morphine (5mg/kg) did not alter either α and β CaMKII mRNA expression or CaMKII activity in the hippocampus. The stimulation effects of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression and activity of CaMKII were completely abolished by administration of naloxone, 30min prior to s.c. injections of morphine (20mg/kg/day×3 days). Our data demonstrated that induction of morphine sensitization could effectively modulate the activity and the mRNA expression of CaMKII in the hippocampus and this effect of morphine was exerted by the activation of opioid receptors.

  1. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  2. Autophosphorylation-dependent inactivation of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by the presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain unlike other known calmodulin- dependent kinases. Ca(2+)-Binding to the visinin-like domain leads to autophosphorylation and changes in the affinity for calmodulin [Sathyanarayanan P.V., Cremo C.R. & Poovaiah B.W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422]. Here, we report that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK results in time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. This time-dependent loss of activity or self-inactivation due to autophosphorylation is also dependent on reaction pH and ATP concentration. Inactivation of the enzyme resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme due to self-association. Specifically, autophosphorylation in the presence of 200 microm ATP at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme with a 33% loss in enzyme activity. Under similar conditions at pH 6.5, the enzyme lost 67% of its activity and at pH 8.5, 84% enzyme activity was lost. Furthermore, autophosphorylation at either acidic or alkaline reaction pH lead to the formation of a sedimentable enzyme. Transmission electron microscopic studies on autophosphorylated kinase revealed particles that clustered into branched complexes. The autophosphorylation of wild-type kinase in the presence of AMP-PNP (an unhydrolyzable ATP analog) or the autophosphorylation-site mutant, T267A, did not show formation of branched complexes under the electron microscope. Autophosphorylation- dependent self-inactivation may be a mechanism of modulating the signal transduction pathway mediated by CCaMK.

  3. Catalase activity is modulated by calcium and calmodulin in detached mature leaves of sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Afiyanti, Mufidah; Chen, Hsien-Jung

    2014-01-15

    Catalase (CAT) functions as one of the key enzymes in the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and affects the H2O2 homeostasis in plants. In sweet potato, a major catalase isoform was detected, and total catalase activity showed the highest level in mature leaves (L3) compared to immature (L1) and completely yellow, senescent leaves (L5). The major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity were strongly suppressed by ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). This inhibition could be specifically and significantly mitigated in mature L3 leaves by exogenous CaCl2, but not MgCl2 or CoCl2. EGTA also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Furthermore, chlorpromazine (CPZ), a calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor, drastically suppressed the major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity, and this suppression was alleviated by exogenous sweet potato calmodulin (SPCAM) fusion protein in L3 leaves. CPZ also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Protein blot hybridization showed that both anti-catalase SPCAT1 and anti-calmodulin SPCAM antibodies detect a band at the same position, which corresponds to the activity of the major catalase isoform from unboiled, but not boiled crude protein extract of L3 leaves. An inverse correlation between the major catalase isoform/total enzymatic activity and the H2O2 level was also observed. These data suggest that sweet potato CAT activity is modulated by CaCl2 and SPCAM, and plays an important role in H2O2 homeostasis in mature leaves. Association of SPCAM with the major CAT isoform is required and regulates the in-gel CAT activity band. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Autophosphorylation-dependent inactivation of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by the presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain unlike other known calmodulin- dependent kinases. Ca(2+)-Binding to the visinin-like domain leads to autophosphorylation and changes in the affinity for calmodulin [Sathyanarayanan P.V., Cremo C.R. & Poovaiah B.W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422]. Here, we report that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK results in time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. This time-dependent loss of activity or self-inactivation due to autophosphorylation is also dependent on reaction pH and ATP concentration. Inactivation of the enzyme resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme due to self-association. Specifically, autophosphorylation in the presence of 200 microm ATP at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme with a 33% loss in enzyme activity. Under similar conditions at pH 6.5, the enzyme lost 67% of its activity and at pH 8.5, 84% enzyme activity was lost. Furthermore, autophosphorylation at either acidic or alkaline reaction pH lead to the formation of a sedimentable enzyme. Transmission electron microscopic studies on autophosphorylated kinase revealed particles that clustered into branched complexes. The autophosphorylation of wild-type kinase in the presence of AMP-PNP (an unhydrolyzable ATP analog) or the autophosphorylation-site mutant, T267A, did not show formation of branched complexes under the electron microscope. Autophosphorylation- dependent self-inactivation may be a mechanism of modulating the signal transduction pathway mediated by CCaMK.

  5. Purification and sequencing of radish seed calmodulin antagonists phosphorylated by calcium-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Polya, G M; Chandra, S; Condron, R

    1993-02-01

    A family of radish (Raphanus sativus) calmodulin antagonists (RCAs) was purified from seeds by extraction, centrifugation, batch-wise elution from carboxymethyl-cellulose, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on an SP5PW cation-exchange column. This RCA fraction was further resolved into three calmodulin antagonist polypeptides (RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3) by denaturation in the presence of guanidinium HCl and mercaptoethanol and subsequent reverse-phase HPLC on a C8 column eluted with an acetonitrile gradient in the presence of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and other radish seed proteins are phosphorylated by wheat embryo Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). The RCA preparation contains other CDPK substrates in addition to RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 inhibit chicken gizzard calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase assayed with a myosin-light chain-based synthetic peptide substrate (fifty percent inhibitory concentrations of RCA2 and RCA3 are about 7 and 2 microM, respectively). N-terminal sequencing by sequential Edman degradation of RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 revealed sequences having a high homology with the small subunit of the storage protein napin from Brassica napus and with related proteins. The deduced amino acid sequences of RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and RCA3' (a subform of RCA3) have agreement with average molecular masses from electrospray mass spectrometry of 4537, 4543, 4532, and 4560 kD, respectively. The only sites for serine phosphorylation are near or at the C termini and hence adjacent to the sites of proteolytic precursor cleavage.

  6. Resveratrol Increases Nitric Oxide Production in the Rat Thick Ascending Limb via Ca2+/Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Vicente, Agustin; Cabral, Pablo D.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    The thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle reabsorbs 30% of the NaCl filtered through the glomerulus. Nitric oxide (NO) produced by NO synthase 3 (NOS3) inhibits NaCl absorption by this segment. Resveratrol, a polyphenol, has beneficial cardiovascular and renal effects, many of which are mediated by NO. Resveratrol increases intracellular Ca2+ (Cai) and AMP kinase (AMPK) and NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin1 (SIRT1) activities, all of which could activate NO production. We hypothesized that resveratrol stimulates NO production by thick ascending limbs via a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent mechanism. To test this, the effect of resveratrol on NO bioavailability was measured in thick ascending limb suspensions. Cai was measured in single perfused thick ascending limbs. SIRT1 activity and expression were measured in thick ascending limb lysates. Resveratrol (100 µM) increased NO bioavailability in thick ascending limb suspensions by 1.3±0.2 AFU/mg/min (p<0.03). The NOS inhibitor L-NAME blunted resveratrol-stimulated NO bioavailability by 96±11% (p<0.03). The superoxide scavenger tempol had no effect. Resveratrol elevated Cai from 48±7 to 135±24 nM (p<0.01) in single tubules. In Ca2+-free media, the resveratrol-induced increase in NO was blunted by 60±20% (p<0.05) and the rise in Cai reduced by 80%. Calmodulin inhibition prevented the resveratrol-induced increase in NO (p<0.002). AMPK inhibition had no effect. Resveratrol did not increase SIRT1 activity. We conclude that resveratrol increases NO production in thick ascending limbs via a Ca2+/calmodulin dependent mechanism, and SIRT1 and AMPK do not participate. Resveratrol-stimulated NO production in thick ascending limbs may account for part of its beneficial effects. PMID:25314136

  7. Phospholipids and calmodulin modulate the inhibition of PMCA activity by tau.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, María; Corbacho, Isaac; Sepulveda, M Rosario; Gutierrez-Merino, Carlos; Mata, Ana M

    2017-06-01

    The disruption of Ca(2+) signaling in neurons, together with a failure to keep optimal intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations, have been proposed as significant factors for neuronal dysfunction in the Ca(2+) hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau is a protein that plays an essential role in axonal transport and can form abnormal structures such as neurofibrillary tangles that constitute one of the hallmarks of AD. We have recently shown that plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), a key enzyme in the maintenance of optimal cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in cells, is inhibited by tau in membrane vesicles. In the present study we show that tau inhibits synaptosomal PMCA purified from pig cerebrum, and reconstituted in phosphatidylserine-containing lipid bilayers, with a Ki value of 1.5±0.2nM tau. Noteworthy, the inhibitory effect of tau is dependent on the charge of the phospholipid used for PMCA reconstitution. In addition, nanomolar concentrations of calmodulin, the major endogenous activator of PMCA, protects against inhibition of the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity by tau. Our results in a cellular model such as SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells yielded an inhibition of PMCA by nanomolar tau concentrations and protection by calmodulin against this inhibition similar to those obtained with purified synaptosomal PMCA. Functional studies were also performed with native and truncated versions of human cerebral PMCA4b, an isoform that has been showed to be functionally regulated by amyloid peptides, whose aggregates constitutes another hallmark of AD. Kinetic assays point out that tau binds to the C-terminal tail of PMCA, at a site distinct but close to the calmodulin binding domain. In conclusion, PMCA can be seen as a molecular target for tau-induced cytosolic calcium dysregulation in synaptic terminals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification and characterization of CKLiK, a novel granulocyte Ca(++)/calmodulin-dependent kinase.

    PubMed

    Verploegen, S; Lammers, J W; Koenderman, L; Coffer, P J

    2000-11-01

    Human granulocytes are characterized by a variety of specific effector functions involved in host defense. Several widely expressed protein kinases have been implicated in the regulation of these effector functions. A polymerase chain reaction-based strategy was used to identify novel granulocyte-specific kinases. A novel protein kinase complementary DNA with an open reading frame of 357 amino acids was identified with homology to calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase I (CaMKI). This has been termed CaMKI-like kinase (CKLiK). Analysis of CKLiK messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in hematopoietic cells demonstrated an almost exclusive expression in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). Up-regulation of CKLiK mRNA occurs during neutrophilic differentiation of CD34(+) stem cells. CKLiK kinase activity was dependent on Ca(++) and calmodulin as analyzed by in vitro phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator (CREM). Furthermore, CKLiK- transfected cells treated with ionomycin demonstrated an induction of CRE- binding protein (CREB) transcriptional activity compared to control cells. Additionally, CaMK-kinasealpha enhanced CKLiK activity. In vivo activation of CKLiK was shown by addition of interleukin (IL)-8 to a myeloid cell line stably expressing CKLiK. Furthermore inducible activation of CKLiK was sufficient to induce extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. These data identify a novel Ca(++)/calmodulin-dependent PMN- specific kinase that may play a role in Ca(++)-mediated regulation of human granulocyte functions.

  9. MIPS: a calmodulin-binding protein of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Huiyue; Zang, Xiaonan; Gong, Le; Sun, Hengyi; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2014-08-01

    To study the Ca(2+)/Calmodulin (CaM) signal transduction pathway of Gracilaria lemaneiformis under heat stress, myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS), a calmodulin-binding protein, was isolated using the yeast two-hybrid system. cDNA and DNA sequences of mips were cloned from G. lemaneiformis by using 5'RACE and genome walking procedures. The MIPS DNA sequence was 2,067 nucleotides long, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,623 nucleotides with no intron. The mips ORF was predicted to encode 540 amino acids, which included the conserved MIPS domain and was 61-67 % similar to that of other species. After analyzing the amino acid sequence of MIPS, the CaM-Binding Domain (CaMBD) was inferred to be at a site spanning from amino acid 212 to amino acid 236. The yeast two-hybrid results proved that MIPS can interact with CaM and that MIPS is a type of calmodulin-binding protein. Next, the expression of CaM and MIPS in wild-type G. lemaneiformis and a heat-tolerant G. lemaneiformis cultivar, "981," were analyzed using real-time PCR under a heat shock of 32 °C. The expression level displayed a cyclical upward trend. Compared with wild type, the CaM expression levels of cultivar 981 were higher, which might directly relate to its resistance to high temperatures. This paper indicates that MIPS and CaM may play important roles in the high-temperature resistance of G. lemaneiformis.

  10. Purification and sequencing of radish seed calmodulin antagonists phosphorylated by calcium-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Polya, G M; Chandra, S; Condron, R

    1993-01-01

    A family of radish (Raphanus sativus) calmodulin antagonists (RCAs) was purified from seeds by extraction, centrifugation, batch-wise elution from carboxymethyl-cellulose, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on an SP5PW cation-exchange column. This RCA fraction was further resolved into three calmodulin antagonist polypeptides (RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3) by denaturation in the presence of guanidinium HCl and mercaptoethanol and subsequent reverse-phase HPLC on a C8 column eluted with an acetonitrile gradient in the presence of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and other radish seed proteins are phosphorylated by wheat embryo Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). The RCA preparation contains other CDPK substrates in addition to RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 inhibit chicken gizzard calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase assayed with a myosin-light chain-based synthetic peptide substrate (fifty percent inhibitory concentrations of RCA2 and RCA3 are about 7 and 2 microM, respectively). N-terminal sequencing by sequential Edman degradation of RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 revealed sequences having a high homology with the small subunit of the storage protein napin from Brassica napus and with related proteins. The deduced amino acid sequences of RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and RCA3' (a subform of RCA3) have agreement with average molecular masses from electrospray mass spectrometry of 4537, 4543, 4532, and 4560 kD, respectively. The only sites for serine phosphorylation are near or at the C termini and hence adjacent to the sites of proteolytic precursor cleavage. PMID:8278508

  11. Activation of ERK1/2 and TNF-α production are regulated by calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway during Penicillium marneffei infection within human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renqiong; Ji, Guangquan; Wang, Ling; Ren, Hong; Xi, Liyan

    2016-04-01

    Previous study have shown that Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei)-induced TNF-α production via an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism is an important host defence mechanism against P. marneffei in human macrophages. Therefore, we explore signaling pathway that regulates TNF-α secretion and activation of ERK1/2 by intracellular signaling mechanisms during P. marneffei infection. We found that ERK1/2 activation was dependent on the calcium/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ pathway in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages. In contrast, P. marneffei-induced p38 MAPK activation was negatively regulated by calcium/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ signaling pathway. Furthermore, TNF-α production in P. marneffei-infected human macrophages was also dependent on Ca(2+)/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ pathway. These data suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin/calmodulin kinase Ⅱ pathway plays vital regulatory roles in macrophage activation and subsequent cytokine production during P. marneffei infection.

  12. DISPLACEMENT OF α-ACTININ FROM THE NMDA RECEPTOR NR1 C0 DOMAIN BY Ca2+/CALMODULIN PROMOTES CAMKII BINDING

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Michelle A.; Malik, Zulfiqar; Akyol, Zeynep; Bartos, Jason A.; Leonard, A. Soren; Hudmon, Andy; Shea, Madeline A.; Hell, Johannes W.

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ influx through the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor triggers activation and postsynaptic accumulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). CaMKII, calmodulin, and α-actinin directly bind to the short membrane proximal C0 domain of the C-terminal region of the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit. In a negative feedback loop, calmodulin mediates Ca2+-dependent inactivation of the NMDA receptor by displacing α-actinin from NR1 C0 upon Ca2+ influx. We show that Ca2+-depleted calmodulin and α-actinin simultaneously bind to NR1 C0. Upon addition of Ca2+, calmodulin dislodges α-actinin. Either the N- or C-terminal half of calmodulin is sufficient for Ca2+-induced displacement of α-actinin. While α-actinin directly antagonizes CaMKII binding to NR1 C0, the addition of Ca2+/calmodulin shifts binding of NR1 C0 toward CaMKII by displacing α-actinin. Displacement of α-actinin results in the simultaneous binding of calmodulin and CaMKII to NR1 C0. Our results reveal an intricate mechanism whereby Ca2+ functions to govern the complex interactions between the two most prevalent signaling molecules in synaptic plasticity, the NMDA receptor and CaMKII. PMID:17602661

  13. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  14. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  15. [Study of the calmodulin-dependent regulation of calcium adenosine triphosphatase of erythrocyte membranes in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Malaia, L T; Petruniaka, V V; Rudyk, Iu S

    1991-01-01

    The inhibitor calmodulin (R 24571) was examined for effects on the activity of red blood cell Ca-ATPases in patients with coronary heart disease during the treatment with nitrates, beta-blockers and calcium antagonists. The maximum activity of Ca-ATPase was measured in the erythrocytes perforated with saponine in the presence of endogenous regulators at a concentration of Ca2+ of 3-5 microM. Patients with high and low Ca-ATPase activity were identified. In the control group R24571 failed to affect Ca-ATPase activity. In patients, the calmodulin inhibitor caused both Ca-ATPase activation and inhibition. The effects of R 24571 correlated with the severity of the patients' condition. In effective therapy, the action of the calmodulin inhibitor became lower on Ca-ATPase activity. It was concluded that there was Ca-ATPase regulation imbalance in patients with coronary heart diseases.

  16. Structure of myosin-1c tail bound to calmodulin provides insights into calcium-mediated conformational coupling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Li, Jianchao; Ye, Fei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2015-01-01

    Class I myosins can sense cellular mechanical forces and function as tension-sensitive anchors or transporters. How mechanical load is transduced from the membrane-binding tail to the force-generating head in myosin-1 is unknown. Here we determined the crystal structure of the entire tail of mouse myosin-1c in complex with apocalmodulin, showing that myosin-1c adopts a stable monomer conformation suited for force transduction. The lever-arm helix and the C-terminal extended PH domain of the motor are coupled by a stable post-IQ domain bound to calmodulin in a highly unusual mode. Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin induces major conformational changes in both IQ motifs and the post-IQ domain and increases flexibility of the myosin-1c tail. Our study provides a structural blueprint for the neck and tail domains of myosin-1 and expands the target binding modes of the master Ca(2+)-signal regulator calmodulin.

  17. [Calmodulin can induce and control damping oscillations in the plasma membrane Ca2+ -ATPase activity: a kinetic model].

    PubMed

    Gol'dshtein, B N; Aksirov, A M; Zakrzhevskaia, D T

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase is the calcium pump that extrudes calcium ions from cells using ATP hydrolisis for the maintenance of low Ca2+ concentrations in the cell. Calmodulin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase by binding to the autoinhibitory enzyme domain, which allows the access of cytoplasmic ATP and Ca2+ to the active and transport cites. Our kinetic model predicts damped oscillations in the enzyme activity and interprets the known nonmonotonous kinetic behavior of the enzyme in the presence of calmodulin. For the parameters close to the experimental ones, the kinetic model explains the changes in frequency and damping factor of the oscillatory enzyme activity, as dependent on calmodulin concentration. The calculated pre-steady-state curves fit well the known experimental data. The kinetic analysis allows us to assign Ca2+-ATPase to the hysteretic enzymes exhibiting activity oscillations in open systems.

  18. Cytokinesis is not controlled by calmodulin or myosin light chain kinase in the Caenorhabditis elegans early embryo

    PubMed Central

    Batchelder, Ellen L.; Thomas–Virnig, Christina L.; Hardin, Jeffery D.; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Furrow ingression in animal cell cytokinesis is controlled by phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain (mRLC). In C. elegans embryos, Rho-dependent Kinase (RhoK) is involved in, but not absolutely required for, this phosphorylation. The calmodulin effector Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) can also phosphorylate mRLC and is widely regarded as a candidate for redundant function with RhoK. However, our results show that RNAi against C. elegans calmodulin and candidate MLCKs had no effect on cytokinesis in wild type or RhoK mutant embryos, ruling out the calmodulin/MLCK pathway as the missing regulator of cytokinesis in the C. elegans early embryo. PMID:17716666

  19. Cytokinesis is not controlled by calmodulin or myosin light chain kinase in the Caenorhabditis elegans early embryo.

    PubMed

    Batchelder, Ellen L; Thomas-Virnig, Christina L; Hardin, Jeffery D; White, John G

    2007-09-04

    Furrow ingression in animal cell cytokinesis is controlled by phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain (mRLC). In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, Rho-dependent Kinase (RhoK) is involved in, but not absolutely required for, this phosphorylation. The calmodulin effector myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) can also phosphorylate mRLC and is widely regarded as a candidate for redundant function with RhoK. However, our results show that RNA mediated interference against C. elegans calmodulin and candidate MLCKs had no effect on cytokinesis in wild-type or RhoK mutant embryos, ruling out the calmodulin/MLCK pathway as the missing regulator of cytokinesis in the C. elegans early embryo.

  20. Comparison of the crystal and solution structures of calmodulin and troponin C

    SciTech Connect

    Heidorn, D.B.; Trewhella, J.

    1988-02-09

    X-ray solution scattering data from skeletal muscle troponin C and from calmodulin have been measured. Modeling studies based on the crystal structure coordinates for these proteins show discrepancies between the solution data and the crystal structure that indicate that if the size and shape of the globular domains are the same in solution as in the crystal, the distances between them must be smaller by several angstroms. Bringing the globular domains closer together requires structural changes in the interconnecting helix that joins them.

  1. Calmodulin 4 is dispensable for epidermal barrier formation and wound healing in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Juliane C.; Kalinin, Alexandr; Bible, Paul; Morasso, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-mediated signals play important roles in epidermal barrier formation, skin homeostasis, and wound repair. Calmodulin 4 (Calm4) is a small, Ca2+ binding protein with strong expression in suprabasal keratinocytes. In mice, Calm4 first appears in the skin at the time of barrier formation and its expression increases in response to epidermal barrier challenges. In this study, we report the generation of Calm4 knockout mice and provide evidence that Calm4 is dispensable for epidermal barrier formation, maintenance, and repair. PMID:25316000

  2. Dependence upon conditions of the properties of specifically located fluorescent probes on wheat germ calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Robert F.; Waldron, Richard; Juminaga, D.

    1992-04-01

    The single tyrosine, Tyr-139, of wheat germ calmodulin provides an intrinsic fluorescent probe to monitor Ca2+-binding domain 4, while the single cysteine, Cys-27, provides a site for the attachment of an extrinsic fluorescent label to monitor the N-terminal lobe. This has resulted in a means of comparing the response of the N- and C- terminal regions to pH, ionic strength, and Ca2+ level. Ca2+ ligation decreases the mobility sensed by Tyr-139 at neutral pH, while a shift in pH to 5.2 results in a further decrease.

  3. Developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism impair spatial memory in adolescent rat hippocampus: involvement of CaMKII, calmodulin and calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Liu, Wanyang; Wang, Yi; Hou, Yi; Xu, Hongde; Gong, Jian; Xi, Qi; Chen, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Developmental iodine deficiency (ID) leads to inadequate thyroid hormone that impairs learning and memory with an unclear mechanism. Here, we show that hippocampal calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), calmodulin and calcineurin are implicated in the impaired spatial memory in adolescent rats following developmental ID and hypothyroidism. Three developmental rat models were created by administrating dam rats with either iodine-deficient diet or propylthiouracil (PTU, 5 or 15 ppm)-added drinking water from gestational day (GD) 6 till postnatal day (PN) 28. Then, the spatial memory to a water maze test was studied in pups before PN42. After testing periods, the latency to platform and the number of error in iodine-deficient and 15 ppm PTU-treatment groups were significantly higher than those in the controls (P < 0.05). Total and phosphorylated CaMKII, calmodulin, and calcineurin in the hippocampus were detected with both the immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Without going through water maze test, iodine-deficient and 15 ppm PTU-treatment groups showed significantly lower CaMKII and calmodulin and significantly higher calcineurin than the controls in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions (P < 0.05). After trials of water maze task, however, CaMKII and calmodulin were up-regulated and calcineurin was down-regulated in control group (P < 0.05), but not in iodine-deficient and 15 ppm PTU-treatment groups. Data indicate that hippocampal CaMKII, calmodulin, and calcineurin are involved in the impaired spatial memory induced by developmental ID and hypothyroidism.

  4. A calmodulin-like protein (LCALA) is a new Leishmania amazonensis candidate for telomere end-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Morea, Edna G O; Viviescas, Maria Alejandra; Fernandes, Carlos A H; Matioli, Fabio F; Lira, Cristina B B; Fernandez, Maribel F; Moraes, Barbara S; da Silva, Marcelo S; Storti, Camila B; Fontes, Marcos R M; Cano, Maria Isabel N

    2017-11-01

    Leishmania spp. telomeres are composed of 5'-TTAGGG-3' repeats associated with proteins. We have previously identified LaRbp38 and LaRPA-1 as proteins that bind the G-rich telomeric strand. At that time, we had also partially characterized a protein: DNA complex, named LaGT1, but we could not identify its protein component. Using protein-DNA interaction and competition assays, we confirmed that LaGT1 is highly specific to the G-rich telomeric single-stranded DNA. Three protein bands, with LaGT1 activity, were isolated from affinity-purified protein extracts in-gel digested, and sequenced de novo using mass spectrometry analysis. In silico analysis of the digested peptide identified them as a putative calmodulin with sequences identical to the T. cruzi calmodulin. In the Leishmania genome, the calmodulin ortholog is present in three identical copies. We cloned and sequenced one of the gene copies, named it LCalA, and obtained the recombinant protein. Multiple sequence alignment and molecular modeling showed that LCalA shares homology to most eukaryotes calmodulin. In addition, we demonstrated that LCalA is nuclear, partially co-localizes with telomeres and binds in vivo the G-rich telomeric strand. Recombinant LCalA can bind specifically and with relative affinity to the G-rich telomeric single-strand and to a 3'G-overhang, and DNA binding is calcium dependent. We have described a novel candidate component of Leishmania telomeres, LCalA, a nuclear calmodulin that binds the G-rich telomeric strand with high specificity and relative affinity, in a calcium-dependent manner. LCalA is the first reported calmodulin that binds in vivo telomeric DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  6. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  7. A calcium/calmodulin-regulated member of the receptor-like kinase family confers cold tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianbao; Chaudhuri, Shubho; Yang, Lihua; Du, Liqun; Poovaiah, B W

    2010-03-05

    Cold is a limiting environmental factor that adversely affects plant growth and productivity. Calcium/calmodulin-mediated signaling is believed to play a pivotal role in plant response to cold stress, but its exact role is not clearly understood. Here, we report that CRLK1, a novel calcium/calmodulin-regulated receptor-like kinase, is crucial for cold tolerance in plants. CRLK1 has two calmodulin-binding sites with different affinities as follows: one located at residues 369-390 with a K(d) of 25 nm, and the other located at residues 28-112 with a K(d) of 160 nm. Calcium/calmodulin stimulated the kinase activity, but the addition of chlorpromazine, a calmodulin antagonist, blocked its stimulation. CRLK1 is mainly localized in the plasma membrane, and its expression is stimulated by cold and hydrogen peroxide treatments. Under normal growth conditions, there is no noticeable phenotypic difference between wild-type and crlk1 knock-out mutant plants. However, as compared with wild-type plants, the crlk1 knock-out mutants exhibited an increased sensitivity to chilling and freezing temperatures. Northern analysis showed that the induction of cold-responsive genes, including CBF1, RD29A, COR15a, and KIN1 in crlk1 mutants, is delayed as compared with wild-type plants. These results indicate that CRLK1 is a positive regulator of cold tolerance in plants. Furthermore, our results suggest that CRLK1 plays a role in bridging calcium/calmodulin signaling and cold signaling.

  8. Does a calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-regulated Mg2+-dependent ATPase contribute to hepatic microsomal calcium uptake?

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, S; Söling, H D

    1987-01-01

    Solubilization of microsomal proteins followed by calmodulin affinity chromatography resulted in the separation of two distinct Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPases (Ca2+-regulated Mg2+-dependent ATPases), one being insensitive to calmodulin (ATPase-1), the other being stimulated about 5-fold by calmodulin (ATPase-2). ATPase-2 accounts for only 8% of total microsomal Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase-activity. ATPase-1 and -2 can also be distinguished by different pH optima, different sensitivity towards inhibition by vanadate and LaCl3, and different apparent Mr values of the phosphoenzyme intermediates (115,000 and 150,000 for ATPase-1 and ATPase-2 respectively). ATPase-1 from liver co-migrated with Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase from rat skeletal-muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum, whereas ATPase-2 from liver co-migrated with calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase derived from rat skeletal-muscle sarcolemma. After separation of parenchymal and nonparenchymal liver cells, a calmodulin-dependent Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase of Mr 150,000 was found only in the non-parenchymal cells. The kinetic parameters of ATPase-2 and the similarity of the apparent Mr of its phosphoenzyme intermediate to that of skeletal-muscle sarcolemma Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase makes it likely that the calmodulin-sensitive Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase found in rat liver microsomal fractions reflects a contamination with plasma membranes (possibly from non-parenchymal cells) rather than a true location in the endoplasmic reticulum of parenchymal liver cells. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2959269

  9. Down-regulation of a calmodulin-related gene during transformation of human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yaswen, P.; Smoll, A.; Stampfer, M.R. ); Peehl, D.M. ); Trask, D.K.; Sager, R. )

    1990-10-01

    A human cDNA library obtained from cultured normal mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) was searched by subtractive hybridization for genes whose decrease in expression might be relevant to epithelial transformation. One clone identified by this procedure corresponded to a 1.4 kilobase mRNA, designated NB-1, whose expression was decreased >50-fold in HMECs tumorigenically transformed in vitro after exposure to benzo({alpha})pyrene and Kirsten sarcoma virus. Sequence analysis of NB-1 cDNA revealed an open reading frame with a high degree of homology to calmodulin. NB-1 expression could be demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction amplification in normal breast, prostate, cervix, and epidermal tissues. The presence of NB-1 transcripts was variable in primary breast carcinoma tissues and undetectable in tumor-derived cell lines of breast, prostate, or other origins. NB-1 mRNA expression could be down-regulated in cultured HMECs by exposure to reconstituted extracellular matrix material, while exposure to transforming growth factor type {beta} increased its relative abundance. The protein encoded by NB-1 may have Ca{sup 2{sup plus}} binding properties and perform functions similar to those of authentic calmodulin. Its possible roles in differentiation and/or suppression of tumorigenicity in epithelial tissues remain to be examined.

  10. Molecular Insights into the Mechanism of Calmodulin Inhibition of the EAG1 Potassium Channel.

    PubMed

    Marques-Carvalho, Maria João; Oppermann, Johannes; Muñoz, Eva; Fernandes, Andreia S; Gabant, Guillaume; Cadene, Martine; Heinemann, Stefan H; Schönherr, Roland; Morais-Cabral, João Henrique

    2016-10-04

    The human EAG1 potassium channel belongs to the superfamily of KCNH voltage-gated potassium channels that have roles in cardiac repolarization and neuronal excitability. EAG1 is strongly inhibited by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) through a mechanism that is not understood. We determined the binding properties of CaM with each one of three previously identified binding sites (BDN, BDC1, and BDC2), analyzed binding to protein stretches that include more than one site, and determined the effect of neighboring globular domains on the binding properties. The determination of the crystal structure of CaM bound to BDC2 shows the channel fragment interacting with only the C lobe of calmodulin and adopting an unusual bent conformation. Based on this structure and on a functional and biochemical analysis of mutants, we propose a model for the mechanism of inhibition whereby the local conformational change induced by CaM binding at BDC2 lies at the basis of channel modulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Autolytic activation of calpain 3 proteinase is facilitated by calmodulin protein.

    PubMed

    Ermolova, Natalia; Kramerova, Irina; Spencer, Melissa J

    2015-01-09

    Calpains are broadly distributed, calcium-dependent enzymes that induce limited proteolysis in a wide range of substrates. Mutations in the gene encoding the muscle-specific family member calpain 3 (CAPN3) underlie limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A. We have shown previously that CAPN3 knockout muscles exhibit attenuated calcium release, reduced calmodulin kinase (CaMKII) signaling, and impaired muscle adaptation to exercise. However, neither the precise role of CAPN3 in these processes nor the mechanisms of CAPN3 activation in vivo have been fully elucidated. In this study, we identify calmodulin (CaM), a known transducer of the calcium signal, as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 autolytic activity. CaM was shown to bind CAPN3 at two sites located in the C2L domain. Biochemical studies using muscle extracts from transgenic mice overexpressing CAPN3 or its inactive mutant revealed that CaM binding enhanced CAPN3 autolytic activation. Furthermore, CaM facilitated CAPN3-mediated cleavage of its in vivo substrate titin in tissue extracts. Therefore, these studies reveal a novel interaction between CAPN3 and CaM and identify CaM as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 activity.

  12. Autolytic Activation of Calpain 3 Proteinase Is Facilitated by Calmodulin Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Ermolova, Natalia; Kramerova, Irina; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Calpains are broadly distributed, calcium-dependent enzymes that induce limited proteolysis in a wide range of substrates. Mutations in the gene encoding the muscle-specific family member calpain 3 (CAPN3) underlie limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A. We have shown previously that CAPN3 knockout muscles exhibit attenuated calcium release, reduced calmodulin kinase (CaMKII) signaling, and impaired muscle adaptation to exercise. However, neither the precise role of CAPN3 in these processes nor the mechanisms of CAPN3 activation in vivo have been fully elucidated. In this study, we identify calmodulin (CaM), a known transducer of the calcium signal, as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 autolytic activity. CaM was shown to bind CAPN3 at two sites located in the C2L domain. Biochemical studies using muscle extracts from transgenic mice overexpressing CAPN3 or its inactive mutant revealed that CaM binding enhanced CAPN3 autolytic activation. Furthermore, CaM facilitated CAPN3-mediated cleavage of its in vivo substrate titin in tissue extracts. Therefore, these studies reveal a novel interaction between CAPN3 and CaM and identify CaM as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 activity. PMID:25389288

  13. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-01-01

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca[sup ++] as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca[sup ++]/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  14. Isolation of Hybridomas for Golgi-associated Proteins and a Plant Calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmanoff, K. M.; Ray, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    The demonstration of a role for calcium in the mechanism of the gravitropic response indicates a role for calmodulin. Localization studies indicate that plant cell walls have a high content of calmodulin which suggests a regulatory role for CaM in both gravitropic curvature and auxin-induced growth. Auxin regulation of cell wall loosening and elongation is the basis for most models of this phenomenon. Auxin treatment of pea stem tissue rapidly increases the ctivity of Golgi-localized B-1,4-glucan synthase (GS), an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of wall xyloglucan which apparently constitutes the substrate for the wall loosening process. In order to determine whether auxin stimulates GS activity either by modulation of existing enzyme or induces de novo formation of Golgi glucan synthase, a study was undertaken to isolate and quantitate glucan synthase. This enzyme appears to be an integral protein of the Golgi membrane and has resisted isolation with retention of activity. The production of monoclonal antibody for glucan synthase was undertaken due to the inability to isolate GS by standard detergent/liposome techniques.

  15. Isolation of Hybridomas for Golgi-associated Proteins and a Plant Calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmanoff, K. M.; Ray, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    The demonstration of a role for calcium in the mechanism of the gravitropic response indicates a role for calmodulin. Localization studies indicate that plant cell walls have a high content of calmodulin which suggests a regulatory role for CaM in both gravitropic curvature and auxin-induced growth. Auxin regulation of cell wall loosening and elongation is the basis for most models of this phenomenon. Auxin treatment of pea stem tissue rapidly increases the ctivity of Golgi-localized B-1,4-glucan synthase (GS), an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of wall xyloglucan which apparently constitutes the substrate for the wall loosening process. In order to determine whether auxin stimulates GS activity either by modulation of existing enzyme or induces de novo formation of Golgi glucan synthase, a study was undertaken to isolate and quantitate glucan synthase. This enzyme appears to be an integral protein of the Golgi membrane and has resisted isolation with retention of activity. The production of monoclonal antibody for glucan synthase was undertaken due to the inability to isolate GS by standard detergent/liposome techniques.

  16. Binding of calmodulin changes the calcineurin regulatory region to a less dynamic conformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Cuiping; Zhang, Junting; Zheng, Ye; Xu, Hongbing; Yu, Shaoning

    2015-08-01

    Calcineurin (CN) is a Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) activated serine/threonine phosphatase, and its regulatory region (CNRR) plays a critical role in the coupling of Ca(2+) signals to cellular responses. Ca(2+)/CaM binds to the CNRR, resulting in a conformational change that removes an autoinhibitory domain (CN467-486) from the active site of the phosphatase and activates the enzyme. However, almost the entire regulatory region (CN374-521) is not visible in the electron density maps of reported structures. In this study, we produced separate CN fragments corresponding to the CNRR (CNRR381-521, CN residues 381-521) and determined the binding affinity of CNRR381-521 for Ca(2+)/CaM using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The structural change in CNRR381-521 induced by Ca(2+)/CaM binding was also investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results indicate that Ca(2+)/CaM binding to CNRR381-521 is an exothermic reaction with a dissociation constant of 2.0×10(-6) M. Binding of calmodulin changes the calcineurin regulatory region to a less dynamic conformation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Metal binding affinity and structural properties of calmodulin-like protein 14 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Rosario; La Verde, Valentina; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola; Astegno, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin, plants possess many calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that are predicted to have specific roles in the cell. Herein, we described the biochemical and biophysical characterization of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana CML14. We applied isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze the energetics of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) binding to CML14, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, together with intrinsic and ANS-based fluorescence, to evaluate the structural effects of metal binding and metal-induced conformational changes. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and limited proteolysis were used to characterize protein thermal and local stability. Our data demonstrate that CML14 binds one Ca(2+) ion with micromolar affinity (Kd ∼ 12 µM) and the presence of 10 mM Mg(2+) decreases the Ca(2+) affinity by ∼5-fold. Although binding of Ca(2+) to CML14 increases protein stability, it does not result in a more hydrophobic protein surface and does not induce the large conformational rearrangement typical of Ca(2+) sensors, but causes only localized structural changes in the unique functional EF-hand. Our data, together with a molecular modelling prediction, provide interesting insights into the biochemical properties of Arabidopsis CML14 and may be useful to direct additional studies aimed at understanding its physiological role. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  18. The Effect of Macromolecular Crowding, Ionic Strength and Calcium Binding on Calmodulin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Liang, Kao-Chen; Czader, Arkadiusz; Waxham, M. Neal; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2011-01-01

    The flexibility in the structure of calmodulin (CaM) allows its binding to over 300 target proteins in the cell. To investigate the structure-function relationship of CaM, we combined methods of computer simulation and experiments based on circular dichroism (CD) to investigate the structural characteristics of CaM that influence its target recognition in crowded cell-like conditions. We developed a unique multiscale solution of charges computed from quantum chemistry, together with protein reconstruction, coarse-grained molecular simulations, and statistical physics, to represent the charge distribution in the transition from apoCaM to holoCaM upon calcium binding. Computationally, we found that increased levels of macromolecular crowding, in addition to calcium binding and ionic strength typical of that found inside cells, can impact the conformation, helicity and the EF hand orientation of CaM. Because EF hand orientation impacts the affinity of calcium binding and the specificity of CaM's target selection, our results may provide unique insight into understanding the promiscuous behavior of calmodulin in target selection inside cells. PMID:21829336

  19. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the interaction of melatonin with calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Adrián G.; Estrin, Darío A.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.; McCormick, John E.; Martin, Stephen R.; Pastore, Annalisa; Biekofsky, Rodolfo R.; Martorana, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Pineal hormone melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is thought to modulate the calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway either by changing intracellular Ca2+ concentration via activation of its G-protein–coupled membrane receptors, or through a direct interaction with calmodulin (CaM). The present work studies the direct interaction of melatonin with intact calcium-saturated CaM both experimentally, by fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and theoretically, by molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the interaction is calcium-dependent. The affinity, as obtained from monitoring 15N and 1H chemical shift changes for a melatonin titration, is weak (in the millimolar range) and comparable for the N- and C-terminal domains. Partial replacement of diamagnetic Ca2+ by paramagnetic Tb3+ allowed the measurement of interdomain NMR pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings, indicating that each domain movement in the complex is not correlated with the other one. Molecular dynamics simulations allow us to follow the dynamics of melatonin in the binding pocket of CaM. Overall, this study provides an example of how a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches can shed light on a weakly interacting system of biological and pharmacological significance. PMID:15498938

  20. Calmodulin-mediated signal transduction pathways in Arabidopsis are fine-tuned by methylation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Joydeep; Magnani, Roberta; Nair, Meera; Dirk, Lynnette M; DeBolt, Seth; Maiti, Indu B; Houtz, Robert L

    2013-11-01

    Calmodulin N-methyltransferase (CaM KMT) is an evolutionarily conserved enzyme in eukaryotes that transfers three methyl groups to a highly conserved lysyl residue at position 115 in calmodulin (CaM). We sought to elucidate whether the methylation status of CaM plays a role in CaM-mediated signaling pathways by gene expression analyses of CaM KMT and phenotypic characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana lines wherein CaM KMT was overexpressed (OX), partially silenced, or knocked out. CaM KMT was expressed in discreet spatial and tissue-specific patterns, most notably in root tips, floral buds, stamens, apical meristems, and germinating seeds. Analysis of transgenic plants with genetic dysfunction in CaM KMT revealed a link between the methylation status of CaM and root length. Plants with suppressed CaM methylation had longer roots and CaM KMT OX lines had shorter roots than wild type (Columbia-0). CaM KMT was also found to influence the root radial developmental program. Protein microarray analyses revealed a number of proteins with specificity for methylated forms of CaM, providing candidate functional intermediates between the observed phenotypes and the target pathways. This work demonstrates that the functionality of the large CaM family in plants is fine-tuned by an overarching methylation mechanism.

  1. Calmodulin-Mediated Signal Transduction Pathways in Arabidopsis Are Fine-Tuned by Methylation[W

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Joydeep; Magnani, Roberta; Nair, Meera; Dirk, Lynnette M.; DeBolt, Seth; Maiti, Indu B.; Houtz, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Calmodulin N-methyltransferase (CaM KMT) is an evolutionarily conserved enzyme in eukaryotes that transfers three methyl groups to a highly conserved lysyl residue at position 115 in calmodulin (CaM). We sought to elucidate whether the methylation status of CaM plays a role in CaM-mediated signaling pathways by gene expression analyses of CaM KMT and phenotypic characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana lines wherein CaM KMT was overexpressed (OX), partially silenced, or knocked out. CaM KMT was expressed in discreet spatial and tissue-specific patterns, most notably in root tips, floral buds, stamens, apical meristems, and germinating seeds. Analysis of transgenic plants with genetic dysfunction in CaM KMT revealed a link between the methylation status of CaM and root length. Plants with suppressed CaM methylation had longer roots and CaM KMT OX lines had shorter roots than wild type (Columbia-0). CaM KMT was also found to influence the root radial developmental program. Protein microarray analyses revealed a number of proteins with specificity for methylated forms of CaM, providing candidate functional intermediates between the observed phenotypes and the target pathways. This work demonstrates that the functionality of the large CaM family in plants is fine-tuned by an overarching methylation mechanism. PMID:24285794

  2. Reduced expressions of calmodulin genes and protein and reduced ability of calmodulin to activate plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase in the brain of protein undernourished rats: modulatory roles of selenium and zinc supplementation.

    PubMed

    Adebayo, Olusegun L; Khera, Alka; Sandhir, Rajat; Adenuga, Gbenga A

    2016-03-01

    The roles of protein undernutrition as well as selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) supplementation on the ability of calmodulin (CaM) to activate erythrocyte ghost membrane (EGM) Ca(2+)-ATPase and the calmodulin genes and protein expressions in rat's cortex and cerebellum were investigated. Rats on adequate protein diet and protein-undernourished (PU) rats were fed with diet containing 16% and 5% casein, respectively, for a period of 10 weeks. The rats were then supplemented with Se and Zn at a concentration of 0.15 and 227 mg l(-1), respectively, in drinking water for 3 weeks. The results obtained from the study showed significant reductions in synaptosomal plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) activity, Ca(2+)/CaM activated EGM Ca(2+) ATPase activity and calmodulin genes and protein expressions in PU rats. Se or Zn supplementation improved the ability of Ca(2+)/CaM to activate EGM Ca(2+)-ATPase and protein expressions. Se or Zn supplementation improved gene expression in the cerebellum but not in the cortex. Also, the activity of PMCA was significantly improved by Zn. In conclusion, it is postulated that Se and Zn might be beneficial antioxidants in protecting against neuronal dysfunction resulting from reduced level of calmodulin such as present in protein undernutrition. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Role of Calmodulin-Calmodulin Kinase II, cAMP/Protein Kinase A and ERK 1/2 on Aeromonas hydrophila-Induced Apoptosis of Head Kidney Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Chaitali; Khatri, Preeti; Raman, Rajagopal; Bhatia, Himanshi; Datta, Malabika; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2014-01-01

    The role of calcium (Ca2+) and its dependent protease calpain in Aeromonas hydrophila-induced head kidney macrophage (HKM) apoptosis has been reported. Here, we report the pro-apoptotic involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin kinase II gamma (CaMKIIg) in the process. We observed significant increase in CaM levels in A. hydrophila-infected HKM and the inhibitory role of BAPTA/AM, EGTA, nifedipine and verapamil suggested CaM elevation to be Ca2+-dependent. Our studies with CaM-specific siRNA and the CaM inhibitor calmidazolium chloride demonstrated CaM to be pro-apoptotic that initiated the downstream expression of CaMKIIg. Using the CaMKIIg-targeted siRNA, specific inhibitor KN-93 and its inactive structural analogue KN-92 we report CaM-CaMKIIg signalling to be critical for apoptosis of A. hydrophila-infected HKM. Inhibitor studies further suggested the role of calpain-2 in CaMKIIg expression. CaMK Kinase (CaMKK), the other CaM dependent kinase exhibited no role in A. hydrophila-induced HKM apoptosis. We report increased production of intracellular cAMP in infected HKM and our results with KN-93 or KN-92 implicate the role of CaMKIIg in cAMP production. Using siRNA to PKACA, the catalytic subunit of PKA, anti-PKACA antibody and H-89, the specific inhibitor for PKA we prove the pro-apoptotic involvement of cAMP/PKA pathway in the pathogenicity of A. hydrophila. Our inhibitor studies coupled with siRNA approach further implicated the role of cAMP/PKA in activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK 1/2). We conclude that the alteration in intracellular Ca2+ levels initiated by A. hydrophila activates CaM and calpain-2; both pathways converge on CaMKIIg which in turn induces cAMP/PKA mediated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation leading to caspase-3 mediated apoptosis of infected HKM. PMID:24763432

  4. Crystal Structure of Calmodulin Binding Domain of Orai1 in Complex with Ca2+•Calmodulin Displays a Unique Binding Mode*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanshun; Zheng, Xunhai; Mueller, Geoffrey A.; Sobhany, Mack; DeRose, Eugene F.; Zhang, Yingpei; London, Robert E.; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    Orai1 is a plasma membrane protein that in its tetrameric form is responsible for calcium influx from the extracellular environment into the cytosol in response to interaction with the Ca2+-depletion sensor STIM1. This is followed by a fast Ca2+·calmodulin (CaM)-dependent inhibition, resulting from CaM binding to an Orai1 region called the calmodulin binding domain (CMBD). The interaction between Orai1 and CaM at the atomic level remains unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a CaM·Orai1-CMBD complex showing one CMBD bound to the C-terminal lobe of CaM, differing from other CaM-target protein complexes, in which both N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM (CaM-N and CaM-C) are involved in target binding. Orai1-CMBD binds CaM-C mainly through hydrophobic interactions, primarily involving residue Trp76 of Orai1-CMBD, which interacts with the hydrophobic pocket of CaM-C. However, NMR data, isothermal titration calorimetry data, and pulldown assays indicated that CaM-N and CaM-C both can bind Orai1-CMBD, with CaM-N having ∼4 times weaker affinity than CaM-C. Pulldown assays of a Orai1-CMBD(W76E) mutant, gel filtration chromatography data, and NOE signals indicated that CaM-N and CaM-C can each bind one Orai1-CMBD. Thus our studies support an unusual, extended 1:2 binding mode of CaM to Orai1-CMBDs, and quantify the affinity of Orai1 for CaM. We propose a two-step mechanism for CaM-dependent Orai1 inactivation initiated by binding of the C-lobe of CaM to the CMBD of one Orai1 followed by the binding of the N-lobe of CaM to the CMBD of a neighboring Orai1. PMID:23109337

  5. Identification of kinesin-C, a calmodulin-binding carboxy-terminal kinesin in animal (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G C; Hart, C L; Wedaman, K P; Scholey, J M

    1999-11-19

    Several novel members of the kinesin superfamily, until now identified only in plants, are unique in their ability to bind calmodulin in the presence of Ca(2+). Here, we identify the first such kinesin in an animal system. Sequence analysis of this new motor, called kinesin-C, predicts that it is a large carboxy-terminal kinesin, 1624 amino acid residues in length, with a predicted molecular mass of 181 kDa. Kinesin-C is predicted to contain a kinesin motor domain at its carboxy terminus, linked to a segment of alpha-helical coiled-coil 950 amino acid residues long, ending with an amino-terminal proline-rich tail domain. A putative calmodulin-binding domain resides at the extreme carboxy terminus of the motor polypeptide, and recombinant kinesin-C binds to a calmodulin-affinity column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion. The presence of this novel calmodulin-binding motor in sea urchin embryos suggests that it plays a critical role in Ca(2+)-dependent events during early sea urchin development.

  6. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA gene family during tomato fruit development and ripening

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is well established that calcium treatment delays fruit ripening and senescence. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have shown that calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA genes are important for modulation of disease resistance, cold sensitivity and wound...

  7. SPLICE VARIANT SPECIFIC UPREGULATIONOF CA+2/CALMODULIN DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE 1G BY PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides induce neurotoxicity in mammals by interfering with ion channel function in excitable neuronal membranes. Previous work demonstrated dose-dependent increases in expression of Ca+2/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (Camk1g) mRNA following acute deltameth...

  8. SPLICE VARIANT SPECIFIC UPREGULATIONOF CA+2/CALMODULIN DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE 1G BY PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides induce neurotoxicity in mammals by interfering with ion channel function in excitable neuronal membranes. Previous work demonstrated dose-dependent increases in expression of Ca+2/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (Camk1g) mRNA following acute deltameth...

  9. Calmodulin binding proteins of the cholinergic electromotor synapse: synaptosomes, synaptic vesicles, receptor-enriched membranes, and cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Walker, J H; Stadler, H; Witzemann, V

    1984-02-01

    Calmodulin binding proteins (CBPs) have been identified using a gel overlay technique for fractions isolated from Torpedo electromotor nerve endings. Different fractions possessed characteristic patterns of CBPs. Synaptosomes showed five major CBPs--Mr 220,000, 160,000, 125,000, 55,000, and 51,000. Polypeptides of Mr 55,000 and 51,000 were found in the cytoplasm and the others are membrane-associated. The Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeleton of synaptosomes was isolated in the presence or absence of calcium. The major CBPs had Mr of 19,000, 18,000, and 16,000. In the presence of calcium, no other CBPs were seen. In the absence of calcium, an Mr 160,000 polypeptide was present in the Triton cytoskeleton. Synaptic vesicles showed CBPs of Mr 160,000, 25,000, and 20,000. Membrane fragments enriched in acetylcholine receptors contained two major CBPs, Mr 160,000 and 125,000, together with a less prominent protein at Mr 26,000. A protein of Mr similar to that of fodrin was present in synaptosomes and acetylcholine receptor membrane fragments, but only in small amounts relative to the other polypeptides observed. The heavy and light chains of clathrin-coated vesicles from pig brain did not bind calmodulin, although strong labelling of an Mr 47,000 polypeptide was found. Results showed that calelectrin does not bind calmodulin. The possible identity of the calmodulin binding proteins is discussed.

  10. Controlled Proteolysis Activates the Plasma Membrane Ca2+ Pump of Higher Plants (A Comparison with the Effect of Calmodulin in Plasma Membrane from Radish Seedlings).

    PubMed Central

    Rasi-Caldogno, F.; Carnelli, A.; De Michelis, M. I.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of calmodulin and of controlled trypsin treatments on the activity of the Ca2+ pump were investigated in plasma membrane purified from radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings. Treatment of the plasma membrane with ethylenediaminetetra-acetate (EDTA), which removed about two-thirds of the plasma membrane-associated calmodulin, markedly increased the stimulation of the Ca2+ pump by calmodulin. In EDTA-treated plasma membrane, stimulation by calmodulin of the Ca2+ pump activity was maximal at low free Ca2+ (2-5 [mu]M) and decreased with the increase of free Ca2+ concentration. The Ca2+ pump activity was stimulated also by a controlled treatment of the plasma membrane with trypsin: the effect of trypsin treatment depended on the concentration of both trypsin and plasma membrane proteins and on the duration of incubation. Stimulation of the Ca2+ pump activity by trypsin treatment of the plasma membrane was similar to that induced by calmodulin both in extent and in dependence on the free Ca2+ concentration in the assay medium. Moreover, the Ca2+ pump of trypsin-treated plasma membrane was insensitive to further stimulation by calmodulin, suggesting that limited proteolysis preferentially cleaves a regulatory domain of the enzyme that is involved in its activation by calmodulin. PMID:12231945

  11. Channel-anchored Protein Kinase CK2 and Protein Phosphatase 1 Reciprocally Regulate KCNQ2-containing M-channels via Phosphorylation of Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seungwoo; Xu, Mingxuan; Cooper, Edward C.; Hoshi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    M-type potassium channels, encoded by the KCNQ family genes (KCNQ2–5), require calmodulin as an essential co-factor. Calmodulin bound to the KCNQ2 subunit regulates channel trafficking and stabilizes channel activity. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of calmodulin by protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) rapidly and reversibly modulated KCNQ2 current. CK2-mediated phosphorylation of calmodulin strengthened its binding to KCNQ2 channel, caused resistance to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate depletion, and increased KCNQ2 current amplitude. Accordingly, application of CK2-selective inhibitors suppressed KCNQ2 current. This suppression was prevented by co-expression of CK2 phosphomimetic calmodulin mutants or pretreatment with a protein phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin A. We also demonstrated that functional CK2 and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) were selectively tethered to the KCNQ2 subunit. We identified a functional KVXF consensus site for PP1 binding in the N-terminal tail of KCNQ2 subunit: mutation of this site augmented current density. CK2 inhibitor treatment suppressed M-current in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons, an effect negated by overexpression of phosphomimetic calmodulin or pretreatment with calyculin A Furthermore, CK2 inhibition diminished the medium after hyperpolarization by suppressing the M-current. These findings suggest that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of calmodulin regulates the M-current, which is tonically regulated by CK2 and PP1 anchored to the KCNQ2 channel complex. PMID:24627475

  12. Sequential assignment of 1H, 15N, 13C resonances and secondary structure of human calmodulin-like protein determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, H.; Rogers, M. S.; Schleucher, J.; Edlund, U.; Strehler, E. E.; Sethson, I.

    1998-01-01

    Human calmodulin-like protein (CLP) is closely related to vertebrate calmodulin, yet its unique cell specific expression pattern, overlapping but divergent biochemical properties, and specific target proteins suggest that it is not an isoform of calmodulin. To gain insight into the structural differences that may underlie the difference target specificities and biochemical properties of CLP when compared to calmodulin, we determined the sequential backbone assignment and associated secondary structure of 144 out of the 148 residues of Ca2+-CLP by using multinuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Despite a very high overall degree of structural similarity between CLP and calmodulin, a number of significant differences were found mainly in the length of alpha-helices and in the central nonhelical flexible region. Interestingly, the regions of greatest primary sequence divergence between CLP and calmodulin in helices III and VIII displayed only minor secondary structure differences. The data suggest that the distinct differences in target specificity and biochemical properties of CLP and calmodulin result from the sum of several minor structural and side-chain changes spread over multiple domains in these proteins. PMID:9828009

  13. Channel-anchored protein kinase CK2 and protein phosphatase 1 reciprocally regulate KCNQ2-containing M-channels via phosphorylation of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seungwoo; Xu, Mingxuan; Cooper, Edward C; Hoshi, Naoto

    2014-04-18

    M-type potassium channels, encoded by the KCNQ family genes (KCNQ2-5), require calmodulin as an essential co-factor. Calmodulin bound to the KCNQ2 subunit regulates channel trafficking and stabilizes channel activity. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of calmodulin by protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) rapidly and reversibly modulated KCNQ2 current. CK2-mediated phosphorylation of calmodulin strengthened its binding to KCNQ2 channel, caused resistance to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate depletion, and increased KCNQ2 current amplitude. Accordingly, application of CK2-selective inhibitors suppressed KCNQ2 current. This suppression was prevented by co-expression of CK2 phosphomimetic calmodulin mutants or pretreatment with a protein phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin A. We also demonstrated that functional CK2 and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) were selectively tethered to the KCNQ2 subunit. We identified a functional KVXF consensus site for PP1 binding in the N-terminal tail of KCNQ2 subunit: mutation of this site augmented current density. CK2 inhibitor treatment suppressed M-current in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons, an effect negated by overexpression of phosphomimetic calmodulin or pretreatment with calyculin A Furthermore, CK2 inhibition diminished the medium after hyperpolarization by suppressing the M-current. These findings suggest that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of calmodulin regulates the M-current, which is tonically regulated by CK2 and PP1 anchored to the KCNQ2 channel complex.

  14. Activation of the Edema Factor of Bacillus anthracis by Calmodulin: Evidence of an Interplay between the EF-Calmodulin Interaction and Calcium Binding

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Elodie; Martínez, Leandro; Blondel, Arnaud; Malliavin, Thérèse E.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a remarkably flexible protein which can bind multiple targets in response to changes in intracellular calcium concentration. It contains four calcium-binding sites, arranged in two globular domains. The calcium affinity of CaM N-terminal domain (N-CaM) is dramatically reduced when the complex with the edema factor (EF) of Bacillus anthracis is formed. Here, an atomic explanation for this reduced affinity is proposed through molecular dynamics simulations and free energy perturbation calculations of the EF-CaM complex starting from different crystallographic models. The simulations show that electrostatic interactions between CaM and EF disfavor the opening of N-CaM domains usually induced by calcium binding. Relative calcium affinities of the N-CaM binding sites are probed by free energy perturbation, and dissociation probabilities are evaluated with locally enhanced sampling simulations. We show that EF impairs calcium binding on N-CaM through a direct conformational restraint on Site 1, by an indirect destabilization of Site 2, and by reducing the cooperativity between the two sites. PMID:20923661

  15. Increased intracellular calcium activates serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) through a calmodulin-calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase pathway in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Seiji; Okayama, Naotsuka; Shimizu, Manabu; Itoh, Makoto

    2003-04-04

    SGK1 is one of the protein-serine/threonine kinases that is activated by insulin in a PI3K-dependent manner. Although SGK1 mediates a variety of biological activities, the mechanisms regulating its activity remain unclear. In this study, we examined the potential roles of calcium signaling in the activation of SGK1. Treatment of CHO-IR cells with a cell-permeable calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM, abolished the insulin-induced activation of SGK1. Increasing intracellular calcium concentration by treating cells with thapsigargin or ionomycin induced a 6-8 fold increase in SGK1 activation. This was not affected by a PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin, but was completely inhibited by the calmodulin inhibitors, W 7 and W 5. Co-transfection of CHO cells with FLAG-SGK1 and CaMKK revealed the direct association of CaMKK with SGK1. These results suggest a calcium-triggered signaling cascade in which an increase in intracellular calcium concentration directly stimulates SGK1 through CaMKK.

  16. A general strategy to characterize calmodulin-calcium complexes involved in CaM-target recognition: DAPK and EGFR calmodulin binding domains interact with different calmodulin-calcium complexes.

    PubMed

    Dagher, Rania; Peng, Shan; Gioria, Sophie; Fève, Marie; Zeniou, Maria; Zimmermann, Michael; Pigault, Claire; Haiech, Jacques; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2011-05-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca(2+) sensor regulating many biochemical processes in eukaryotic cells. Its interaction with a great variety of different target proteins has led to the fundamental question of its mechanism of action. CaM exhibits four "EF hand" type Ca(2+) binding sites. One way to explain CaM functioning is to consider that the protein interacts differently with its target proteins depending on the number of Ca(2+) ions bound to it. To test this hypothesis, the binding properties of three entities known to interact with CaM (a fluorescent probe and two peptide analogs to the CaM binding sites of death associated protein kinase (DAPK) and of EGFR) were investigated using a quantitative approach based on fluorescence polarization (FP). Probe and peptide interactions with CaM were studied using a titration matrix in which both CaM and calcium concentrations were varied. Experiments were performed with SynCaM, a hybrid CaM able to activate CaM dependent enzymes from mammalian and plant cells. Results show that the interaction between CaM and its targets is regulated by the number of calcium ions bound to the protein, namely one for the DAPK peptide, two for the probe and four for the EGFR peptide. The approach used provides a new tool to elaborate a typology of CaM-targets, based on their recognition by the various CaM-Ca(n) (n=0-4) complexes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium.

  17. GsCBRLK, a calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase, is a positive regulator of plant tolerance to salt and ABA stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Ji, Wei; Zhu, Yanming; Gao, Peng; Li, Yong; Cai, Hua; Bai, Xi; Guo, Dianjing

    2010-05-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases play vital roles in protein phosphorylation in eukaryotes, yet little is known about the phosphorylation process of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and its role in stress signal transduction in plants. A novel plant-specific calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase (GsCBRLK) has been isolated from Glycine soja. A subcellular localization study using GFP fusion protein indicated that GsCBRLK is localized in the plasma membrane. Binding assays demonstrated that calmodulin binds to GsCBRLK with an affinity of 25.9 nM in a calcium-dependent manner and the binding motif lies between amino acids 147 to169 within subdomain II of the kinase domain. GsCBRLK undergoes autophosphorylation and Myelin Basis Protein phosphorylation in the presence of calcium. It was also found that calcium/calmodulin positively regulates GsCBRLK kinase activity through direct interaction between the calmodulin-binding domain and calmodulin. So, it is likely that GsCBRLK responds to an environmental stimulus in two ways: by increasing the protein expression level and by regulating its kinase activity through the calcium/calmodulin complex. Furthermore, cold, salinity, drought, and ABA stress induce GsCBRLK gene transcripts. Over-expression of GsCBRLK in transgenic Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced plant tolerance to high salinity and ABA and increased the expression pattern of a number of stress gene markers in response to ABA and high salt. These results identify GsCBRLK as a molecular link between the stress- and ABA-induced calcium/calmodulin signal and gene expression in plant cells.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Calcium- and Phosphorylation-dependentCalmodulin Complexes in Mammalian Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Wang, Daojing

    2006-05-26

    Protein conformational changes due to cofactor binding (e.g. metal ions, heme) and/or posttranslational modifications (e.g. phosphorylation) modulate dynamic protein complexes. Calmodulin (CaM) plays an essential role in regulating calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) signaling and homeostasis. No systematic approach on the identification of phosphorylation-dependent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM binding proteins has been published. Herein, we report a proteome-wide study of phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins from mammalian cells. This method, termed 'Dynamic Phosphoprotein Complex Trapping', 'DPPC Trapping' for short, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays. The basic strategy is to drastically shift the equilibrium towards endogenous phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr at the global scale by inhibiting corresponding phosphatases in vivo. The phosphorylation-dependent calmodulin-binding proteins are then trapped in vitro in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. Finally, the isolated calmodulin-binding proteins are separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by LC/MS/MS. In parallel, the phosphorylation-dependent binding is visualized by silver staining and/or Western blotting. Using this method, we selectively identified over 120 CaM-associated proteins including many previously uncharacterized. We verified ubiquitin-protein ligase EDD1, inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (IP{sub 3}R1), and ATP-dependent RNA helicase DEAD box protein 3 (DDX3), as phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins. To demonstrate the utilities of our method in understanding biological pathways, we showed that pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 in vivo by staurosporine-sensitive kinase(s), but not by PKA/PKG/PKC, significantly reduced the affinity of its Ca{sup 2+}-dependent CaM binding. However, pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 did not substantially affect its Ca{sup 2+}-independent CaM binding. We further showed that phosphatase PP1, but not PP2A or PP2B, plays a critical role in

  19. Interaction of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase with a homolog of eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    A chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was previously cloned and characterized in this laboratory. To investigate the biological functions of CCaMK, the yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with CCaMK. One of the cDNA clones obtained from the screening (LlEF-1alpha1) has high similarity with the eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha). CCaMK phosphorylated LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The phosphorylation site for CCaMK (Thr-257) was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, Thr-257 is located in the putative tRNA-binding region of LlEF-1alpha1. An isoform of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) phosphorylated multiple sites of LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-dependent but calmodulin-independent manner. Unlike CDPK, CCaMK phosphorylated only one site, and this site is different from CDPK phosphorylation sites. This suggests that the phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by these two kinases may have different functional significance. Although the phosphorylation of LlEF-1alpha1 by CCaMK is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, in vitro binding assays revealed that CCaMK binds to LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-independent manner. This was further substantiated by coimmunoprecipitation of CCaMK and EF-1alpha using the protein extract from lily anthers. Dissociation of CCaMK from EF-1alpha by Ca2+ and phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by CCaMK in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner suggests that these interactions may play a role in regulating the biological functions of EF-1alpha.

  20. Interaction of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase with a homolog of eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    A chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was previously cloned and characterized in this laboratory. To investigate the biological functions of CCaMK, the yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with CCaMK. One of the cDNA clones obtained from the screening (LlEF-1alpha1) has high similarity with the eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha). CCaMK phosphorylated LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The phosphorylation site for CCaMK (Thr-257) was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, Thr-257 is located in the putative tRNA-binding region of LlEF-1alpha1. An isoform of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) phosphorylated multiple sites of LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-dependent but calmodulin-independent manner. Unlike CDPK, CCaMK phosphorylated only one site, and this site is different from CDPK phosphorylation sites. This suggests that the phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by these two kinases may have different functional significance. Although the phosphorylation of LlEF-1alpha1 by CCaMK is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, in vitro binding assays revealed that CCaMK binds to LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-independent manner. This was further substantiated by coimmunoprecipitation of CCaMK and EF-1alpha using the protein extract from lily anthers. Dissociation of CCaMK from EF-1alpha by Ca2+ and phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by CCaMK in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner suggests that these interactions may play a role in regulating the biological functions of EF-1alpha.

  1. Human Adenosine A2A Receptor Binds Calmodulin with High Affinity in a Calcium-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Piirainen, Henni; Hellman, Maarit; Tossavainen, Helena; Permi, Perttu; Kursula, Petri; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how ligands bind to G-protein-coupled receptors and how binding changes receptor structure to affect signaling is critical for developing a complete picture of the signal transduction process. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a particularly interesting example, as it has an exceptionally long intracellular carboxyl terminus, which is predicted to be mainly disordered. Experimental data on the structure of the A2AR C-terminus is lacking, because published structures of A2AR do not include the C-terminus. Calmodulin has been reported to bind to the A2AR C-terminus, with a possible binding site on helix 8, next to the membrane. The biological meaning of the interaction as well as its calcium dependence, thermodynamic parameters, and organization of the proteins in the complex are unclear. Here, we characterized the structure of the A2AR C-terminus and the A2AR C-terminus-calmodulin complex using different biophysical methods, including native gel and analytical gel filtration, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We found that the C-terminus is disordered and flexible, and it binds with high affinity (Kd = 98 nM) to calmodulin without major conformational changes in the domain. Calmodulin binds to helix 8 of the A2AR in a calcium-dependent manner that can displace binding of A2AR to lipid vesicles. We also predicted and classified putative calmodulin-binding sites in a larger group of G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:25692595

  2. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  3. CLONING AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF TWO CALMODULIN GENES DURING LARVAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE PARASITIC FLATWORM SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Andrew S.; Yoshino, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is endemic in over 70 countries in which more than 200 million people are infected with the various schistosome species. Understanding the physiological processes underlying key developmental events could be useful in developing novel chemotherapeutic reagents or infection intervention strategies. Calmodulin is a small, calcium-sensing protein found in all eukaryotes and, although the protein has been previously identified in various Schistosoma mansoni stages and implicated in egg hatching and miracidia transformation, little molecular and functional data are available for this essential protein. Herein, we report the molecular cloning, expression, and functional characterization of calmodulin in the miracidia and primary sporocyst stages of S. mansoni. Two transcripts, SmCaM1 and SmCaM2, were cloned and sequenced, and a recombinant SmCaM1 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and used to generate anti-CaM antibodies. The 2 protein sequences were highly conserved when compared to other model organisms. The alignment of the predicted proteins of both SmCaM1 and SmCaM2 exhibited 99% identity to each other and 97–98% identity with mammalian calmodulins. Analysis of steady-state transcript abundance indicate that the 2 calmodulin transcripts differ in their stage-associated expression patterns, although the CaM protein isotype appears to be constitutively expressed during early larval development. Application of RNAi to larval parasites results in a “stunted growth” phenotype in sporocysts with 30% and 35% reduction in transcript abundance for SmCaM1 and SmCaM2, respectively, and a corresponding 35% reduction in protein level after incubation in double-stranded RNA. Differential expression of CaM transcripts during early larval development and a growth defect-inducing effect associated with partial transcript and protein inhibition as a result of RNAi, suggest a potentially important role of calmodulin during early larval development. PMID

  4. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  5. Calcium signaling-mediated and differential induction of calmodulin gene expression by stress in Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Phean-O-Pas, Srivilai; Punteeranurak, Pornpimon; Buaboocha, Teerapong

    2005-07-31

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin transduction pathways have been implicated in mediating stress response and tolerance in plants. Here, three genes encoding calmodulin (Cam) members of the EF-hand family of Ca(2+)-binding proteins were identified from Oryza sativa L. databases. Complementary DNA for each of the calmodulin genes, OsCam1, OsCam2, and OsCam3 were sequenced. OsCam1 and OsCam2 encode a conventional 148-amino acid calmodulin protein that contains four characteristic Ca(2+)-binding motifs. OsCam3 encode a similar protein with a 38-amino-acid extension containing a putative prenylation site (CVIL) at the carboxyl terminus. RT-PCR showed that each of the genes is expressed in leaves and roots of 2-week old rice seedlings. By RNA gel blot analysis, OsCam1 mRNA levels strongly increased in response to NaCl, mannitol and wounding treatments. In contrast, OsCam2 mRNA levels were relatively unchanged under all conditions investigated. NaCl treatment and wounding also increased the OsCam3 mRNA level, but in a more transient manner. Our results indicate that although the expression of genes encoding different calmodulin isoforms is ubiquitous, they are differentially regulated by various stress signals. In addition, we have demonstrated that the calcium-channel blocker lanthanum chloride inhibited the induction of OsCam1 gene expression by both NaCl and mannitol treatments. These results suggest that osmotic stressinduced expression of OsCam1 gene requires the [Ca(2+)]cyt elevation that is known to occur in response to these stimuli.

  6. Hydrophobic Peptides Affect Binding of Calmodulin and Ca2+ as Explored by H/D Amide Exchange and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sperry, Justin B.; Huang, Richard Y-C.; Zhu, Mei M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous intracellular sensor protein, binds Ca2+ and interacts with various targets as part of signal transduction. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/DX) and a high resolution PLIMSTEX (Protein-Ligand Interactions by Mass Spectrometry, Titration, and H/D Exchange) protocol, we examined five different states of calmodulin: calcium-free, calcium-loaded, and three states of calcium-loaded in the presence of either melittin, mastoparan, or skeletal myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK). When CaM binds Ca2+, the extent of HDX decreased, consistent with the protein becoming stabilized upon binding. Furthermore, Ca2+-saturated calmodulin exhibits increased protection when bound to the peptides, forming high affinity complexes. The protocol reveals significant changes in EF hands 1, 3, and 4 with saturating levels of Ca2+. Titration of the protein using PLIMSTEX provides the binding affinity of Ca2+ to calmodulin within previously reported values. The affinities of calmodulin to Ca2+ increase by factors of 300 and 1000 in the presence of melittin and mastoparan, respectively. A modified PLIMSTEX protocol whereby the protein is digested to component peptides gives a region-specific titration. The titration data taken in this way show a decrease in the root mean square fit of the residuals, indicating a better fit of the data. The global H/D exchange results and those obtained in a region-specific way provide new insight into the Ca2+-binding properties of this well-studied protein. PMID:21765646

  7. A novel calmodulin-β-PIX interaction and its implication in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay K; Munro, Kim; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, regulates numerous cellular processes, primarily in response to calcium flux. We have identified and characterized a novel interaction between CaM and β-p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor (β-PIX), a putative guanine exchange factor implicated in cell signaling, using affinity pull-down assays, co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization and circular dichroism studies. Fluorescence-based titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed a Ca(2+)-dependent binding mechanism (K(D)≤10μM). Further, we show that CaM participates in a multi-protein complex involving β-PIX and E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl (casitas B-cell lymphoma), which may play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation and downstream signaling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Calmodulin-binding protein CBP60g functions as a negative regulator in Arabidopsis anthocyanin accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Bo; Wan, Dongli; Li, Ruili; Han, Xiaomin; Li, Guojing; Wang, Ruigang

    2017-01-01

    Anthocyanins, a kind of flavonoid, normally accumulate in the flowers and fruits and make them colorful. Anthocyanin accumulation is regulated via the different temporal and spatial expression of anthocyanin regulatory and biosynthetic genes. CBP60g, a calmodulin binding protein, has previously been shown to have a role in pathogen resistance, drought tolerance and ABA sensitivity. In this study, we found that CBP60g repressed anthocyanin accumulation induced by drought, sucrose and kinetin. The expression pattern of CBP60g was in accordance with the anthocyanin accumulation tissues. Real-time qPCR analysis revealed that the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes CHS, CHI and DFR, as well as two members of MBW complex, PAP1, a MYB transcription factor, and TT8, a bHLH transcription factor, were down regulated by CBP60g. PMID:28253311

  9. Isolation of calcium-binding proteins on selective adsorbents. Application to purification of bovine calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G S; Ersson, B; Porath, J O

    1996-05-03

    We report the fractionation of calcium-binding proteins using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) with hard metal ions. Various hard metal ions (Mn2+, La3+, Nd3+, Eu(3 were immobilized on cross-linked agarose substituted with Tris(carboxymethyl)ethylenediamine (TED) and used as an adsorbent. After systematic studies, europium was selected for further work on the fractionation of calcium-binding proteins. It was found that the presence of Ca2+ in the sample and the solvent strongly promoted the adsorption and selectivity. Selective elution was accomplished in stepwise mode by the addition of calcium chelators such as malonate, citrate and phosphate. Calmodulin of high purity was isolated from a crude extract. Similar behavior of other calcium-binding proteins indicates that the reported chromatographic procedure can be generally applied to such proteins.

  10. Quantitation of chlorpromazine-bound calmodulin during chlorpromazine inhibition of gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.; Biro, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM), controls the activity of a plasma membrane localized ATPase in plants which serves to pump calcium out of cells. Recent data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of this pump is one of the early steps necessary for gravitropism. Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a CaM antagonist, reversibly inhibits gravitropism in oat coleoptiles at concentrations which permit normal growth rates. C-14-labeled CPZ was used to photo-affinity label endogenous CaM in vivo to learn whether the drug is actually binding to some portion of endogenous CaM when it inhibits gravitropism. Under conditions in which CPZ inhibits gravitropism for over an hour, at least 11% of the CaM in gravitropically stimulated coleoptiles is bound to CPZ. In a given CPZ experiment the degree of inhibition of gravitropism correlates well with the amount of CaM bound to CPZ.

  11. The origin and function of calmodulin regulated Ca2+ pumps in plants.

    PubMed

    Boursiac, Yann; Harper, Jeffrey F

    2007-12-01

    While Ca2+ signaling plays an important role in both plants and animals, the machinery that codes and decodes these signals have evolved to show interesting differences and similarities. For example, typical plant and animal cells both utilize calmodulin (CaM)-regulated Ca2+ pumps at the plasma membrane to help control cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels. However, in flowering plants this family of pumps has evolved with a unique structural arrangement in which the regulatory domain is located at the N-terminal instead of C-terminal end. In addition, some of the plant isoforms have evolved to function at endomembrane locations. For the 14 Ca2+ pumps present in the model plant Arabidopsis, molecular genetic analyses are providing exciting insights into their function in diverse aspects of plant growth and development.

  12. Quantitation of chlorpromazine-bound calmodulin during chlorpromazine inhibition of gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.; Biro, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM), controls the activity of a plasma membrane localized ATPase in plants which serves to pump calcium out of cells. Recent data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of this pump is one of the early steps necessary for gravitropism. Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a CaM antagonist, reversibly inhibits gravitropism in oat coleoptiles at concentrations which permit normal growth rates. C-14-labeled CPZ was used to photo-affinity label endogenous CaM in vivo to learn whether the drug is actually binding to some portion of endogenous CaM when it inhibits gravitropism. Under conditions in which CPZ inhibits gravitropism for over an hour, at least 11% of the CaM in gravitropically stimulated coleoptiles is bound to CPZ. In a given CPZ experiment the degree of inhibition of gravitropism correlates well with the amount of CaM bound to CPZ.

  13. The Ca(2+)/Calmodulin/CaMKK2 Axis: Nature's Metabolic CaMshaft.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, Kathrina L; Means, Anthony R; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an essential ligand that binds its primary intracellular receptor calmodulin (CaM) to trigger a variety of downstream processes and pathways. Central to the actions of Ca(2+)/CaM is the activation of a highly conserved Ca(2+)/CaM kinase (CaMK) cascade that amplifies Ca(2+) signals through a series of subsequent phosphorylation events. Proper regulation of Ca(2+) flux is necessary for whole-body metabolism and disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis has been linked to various metabolic diseases. Here we provide a synthesis of recent advances that highlight the roles of the Ca(2+)/CaMK axis in key metabolic tissues. An appreciation of this information is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent signaling contributes to metabolic homeostasis and disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Parvulin 17-catalyzed Tubulin Polymerization Is Regulated by Calmodulin in a Calcium-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Schmidt, Andreas; Manns, Annika; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Jahreis, Günther; Lin, Yi-Jan; Schulze, Bianca; Masch, Antonia; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recently we have shown that the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase parvulin 17 (Par17) interacts with tubulin in a GTP-dependent manner, thereby promoting the formation of microtubules. Microtubule assembly is regulated by Ca2+-loaded calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) both in the intact cell and under in vitro conditions via direct interaction with microtubule-associated proteins. Here we provide the first evidence that Ca2+/CaM interacts also with Par17 in a physiologically relevant way, thus preventing Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. In contrast, parvulin 14 (Par14), which lacks only the first 25 N-terminal residues of the Par17 sequence, does not interact with Ca2+/CaM, indicating that this interaction is exclusive for Par17. Pulldown experiments and chemical shift perturbation analysis with 15N-labeled Par17 furthermore confirmed that calmodulin (CaM) interacts in a Ca2+-dependent manner with the Par17 N terminus. The reverse experiment with 15N-labeled Ca2+/CaM demonstrated that the N-terminal Par17 segment binds to both CaM lobes simultaneously, indicating that Ca2+/CaM undergoes a conformational change to form a binding channel between its two lobes, apparently similar to the structure of the CaM-smMLCK796–815 complex. In vitro tubulin polymerization assays furthermore showed that Ca2+/CaM completely suppresses Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. The results imply that Ca2+/CaM binding to the N-terminal segment of Par17 causes steric hindrance of the Par17 active site, thus interfering with the Par17/tubulin interaction. This Ca2+/CaM-mediated control of Par17-assisted microtubule assembly may provide a mechanism that couples Ca2+ signaling with microtubule function. PMID:25940090

  15. Energy transfer as a probe of protein dynamics in the proteins transferrin and calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, P B; Gorski, K M; Rosen, M A

    1988-01-01

    We have initiated an investigation into the usefulness of fluorescence energy transfer in probing protein dynamics. Our analysis involves measuring the energy transfer efficiency while perturbing the protein conformational equilibrium with heat. As the temperature increases, the amplitudes of vibrations increase, and fluorescence energy transfer should also increase if the donor and acceptor are in a flexible region of the protein. A theoretical analysis developed by Somogyi and co-workers for the temperature dependence of dipole-dipole energy transfer (Somogyi, B., J. Matko, S. Papp, J. Hevessey, G. R. Welch, and S. Damjanovich. 1984. Biochemistry. 23:3403-3411) was tested by the authors in one protein system. Energy transfer from tryptophan to a pyridoxamine derivatized side group in RNase increased 40% over 25 degrees C. Here we report further testing of this model in two additional protein systems: calmodulin, a calcium activated regulatory protein, and transferrin, a blood serum iron shuttle. Our studies show a slight differential sensitivity of the transfer efficiency to heat for the two systems. Normalized energy transfer over 6.5 A in calmodulin from a tyrosine donor to a Tb(III) acceptor increases 40% from 295 to 320 K. Normalized energy transfer over 42 A in transferrin from a Tb(III) donor to an Fe(III) acceptor increases 35% over the same temperature range. Whereas these results demonstrate that thermally induced fluctuations do increase energy transfer as predicted by Somogyi, they also appear rather insensitive to the nature of the protein host environment. In contrast to the Förster processes examined above, energy transfer over very short distances has shown an anomalously high temperature dependence. PMID:3395656

  16. Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Debanne, Dominique; Alcaraz, Gisele

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

  17. CaMELS: In silico prediction of calmodulin binding proteins and their binding sites.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Wajid Arshad; Asif, Amina; Andleeb, Saiqa; Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir Afsar

    2017-09-01

    Due to Ca(2+) -dependent binding and the sequence diversity of Calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins, identifying CaM interactions and binding sites in the wet-lab is tedious and costly. Therefore, computational methods for this purpose are crucial to the design of such wet-lab experiments. We present an algorithm suite called CaMELS (CalModulin intEraction Learning System) for predicting proteins that interact with CaM as well as their binding sites using sequence information alone. CaMELS offers state of the art accuracy for both CaM interaction and binding site prediction and can aid biologists in studying CaM binding proteins. For CaM interaction prediction, CaMELS uses protein sequence features coupled with a large-margin classifier. CaMELS models the binding site prediction problem using multiple instance machine learning with a custom optimization algorithm which allows more effective learning over imprecisely annotated CaM-binding sites during training. CaMELS has been extensively benchmarked using a variety of data sets, mutagenic studies, proteome-wide Gene Ontology enrichment analyses and protein structures. Our experiments indicate that CaMELS outperforms simple motif-based search and other existing methods for interaction and binding site prediction. We have also found that the whole sequence of a protein, rather than just its binding site, is important for predicting its interaction with CaM. Using the machine learning model in CaMELS, we have identified important features of protein sequences for CaM interaction prediction as well as characteristic amino acid sub-sequences and their relative position for identifying CaM binding sites. Python code for training and evaluating CaMELS together with a webserver implementation is available at the URL: http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/software.html#camels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Interaction of a plant pseudo-response regulator with a calmodulin-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Perochon, Alexandre; Dieterle, Stefan; Pouzet, Cecile; Aldon, Didier; Galaud, Jean-Philippe

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} The pseudo-response regulator PRR2 specifically binds CML9, a calmodulin-like protein {yields} The interaction is confirmed in plant cell nuclei {yields} The interaction requires an intact PRR2 protein. -- Abstract: Calmodulin (CaM) plays a crucial role in the regulation of diverse cellular processes by modulating the activities of numerous target proteins. Plants possess an extended CaM family including numerous CaM-like proteins (CMLs), most of which appear to be unique to plants. We previously demonstrated a role for CML9 in abiotic stress tolerance and seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. We report here the isolation of PRR2, a pseudo-response regulator as a CML9 interacting protein by screening an expression library prepared from Arabidopsis seedlings with CML9 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid system. PRR2 is similar to the response regulators of the two-component system, but lacks the invariant residue required for phosphorylation by which response regulators switch their output response, suggesting the existence of alternative regulatory mechanisms. PRR2 was found to bind CML9 and closely related CMLs but not a canonical CaM. Mapping analyses indicate that an almost complete form of PRR2 is required for interaction with CML9, suggesting a recognition mode different from the classical CaM-target peptide complex. PRR2 contains several features that are typical of transcription factors, including a GARP DNA recognition domain, a Pro-rich region and a Golden C-terminal box. PRR2 and CML9 as fusion proteins with fluorescent tags co-localized in the nucleus of plant cells, and their interaction in the nuclear compartment was validated in planta by using a fluorophore-tagged protein interaction assay. These findings suggest that binding of PRR2 to CML9 may be an important mechanism to modulate the physiological role of this transcription factor in plants.

  19. Calmodulin and calcium interplay in the modulation of TRPC5 channel activity. Identification of a novel C-terminal domain for calcium/calmodulin-mediated facilitation.

    PubMed

    Ordaz, Benito; Tang, Jisen; Xiao, Rui; Salgado, Alfonso; Sampieri, Alicia; Zhu, Michael X; Vaca, Luis

    2005-09-02

    TRPC5 forms Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channels important for neurite outgrowth and growth cone morphology of hippocampal neurons. Here we studied the activation of mouse TRPC5 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary and human embryonic kidney 293 cells by agonist stimulation of several receptors that couple to the phosphoinositide signaling cascade and the role of calmodulin (CaM) on the activation. We showed that exogenous application of 10 microM CaM through patch pipette accelerated the agonist-induced channel activation by 2.8-fold, with the time constant for half-activation reduced from 4.25 +/- 0.4 to 1.56 +/- 0.85 min. We identified a novel CaM-binding site located at the C terminus of TRPC5, 95 amino acids downstream from the previously determined common CaM/IP3R-binding (CIRB) domain for all TRPC proteins. Deletion of the novel CaM-binding site attenuated the acceleration in channel activation induced by CaM. However, disruption of the CIRB domain from TRPC5 rendered the channel irresponsive to agonist stimulation without affecting the cell surface expression of the channel protein. Furthermore, we showed that high (>5 microM) intracellular free Ca2+ inhibited the current density without affecting the time course of TRPC5 activation by receptor agonists. These results demonstrated that intracellular Ca2+ has dual and opposite effects on the activation of TRPC5. The novel CaM-binding site is important for the Ca2+/CaM-mediated facilitation, whereas the CIRB domain is critical for the overall response of receptor-induced TRPC5 channel activation.

  20. Analysis of a soluble calmodulin binding protein from fava bean roots: identification of glutamate decarboxylase as a calmodulin-activated enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, V; Snedden, W A; Shelp, B J; Assmann, S M

    1994-01-01

    The identity of a soluble 62-kD Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding protein (CaM-BP) from fava bean seedlings was determined. Using 125I-CaM overlay assays, a class of soluble CaM-BPs was detected in extracts of tissues comprising the axis of 1.5-week-old seedlings, excluding the root tip and emergent leaves. The size of these CaM-BPs was not uniform within all parts of the plant; the apparent molecular masses were 62 kD in roots, 60 kD in stems, and 64 kD in nodules. The root 62-kD CaM-BP was purified, and internal microsequence analysis was performed on the protein. A tryptic peptide derived from the CaM-BP consisted of a 13-residue sequence corresponding to a highly conserved region of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the alpha-decarboxylation of glutamate to form the stress-related metabolite gamma-aminobutyrate. Activity assays of partially purified, desalted, root GAD revealed a 50% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+, a 100% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+ plus 100 nM CaM, and no appreciable stimulation by CaM in the absence of added Ca2+. The demonstration that plant GAD is a Ca(2+)-CaM-stimulated enzyme provides a model in which stress-linked metabolism is modulated by a Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathway. PMID:7919983

  1. Analysis of a soluble calmodulin binding protein from fava bean roots: identification of glutamate decarboxylase as a calmodulin-activated enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ling, V; Snedden, W A; Shelp, B J; Assmann, S M

    1994-08-01

    The identity of a soluble 62-kD Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding protein (CaM-BP) from fava bean seedlings was determined. Using 125I-CaM overlay assays, a class of soluble CaM-BPs was detected in extracts of tissues comprising the axis of 1.5-week-old seedlings, excluding the root tip and emergent leaves. The size of these CaM-BPs was not uniform within all parts of the plant; the apparent molecular masses were 62 kD in roots, 60 kD in stems, and 64 kD in nodules. The root 62-kD CaM-BP was purified, and internal microsequence analysis was performed on the protein. A tryptic peptide derived from the CaM-BP consisted of a 13-residue sequence corresponding to a highly conserved region of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the alpha-decarboxylation of glutamate to form the stress-related metabolite gamma-aminobutyrate. Activity assays of partially purified, desalted, root GAD revealed a 50% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+, a 100% stimulation by the addition of 100 microM Ca2+ plus 100 nM CaM, and no appreciable stimulation by CaM in the absence of added Ca2+. The demonstration that plant GAD is a Ca(2+)-CaM-stimulated enzyme provides a model in which stress-linked metabolism is modulated by a Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathway.

  2. 2,5-hexanedione (HD) treatment alters calmodulin, Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and protein kinase C in rats' nerve tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qingshan Hou Liyan; Zhang Cuili; Zhao Xiulan; Yu Sufang; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-10-01

    Calcium-dependent mechanisms, particularly those mediated by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), have been implicated in neurotoxicant-induced neuropathy. However, it is unknown whether similar mechanisms exist in 2,5-hexanedione (HD)-induced neuropathy. For that, we investigated the changes of CaM, CaMKII, protein kinase C (PKC) and polymerization ratios (PRs) of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H in cerebral cortex (CC, including total cortex and some gray), spinal cord (SC) and sciatic nerve (SN) of rats treated with HD at a dosage of 1.75 or 3.50 mmol/kg for 8 weeks (five times per week). The results showed that CaM contents in CC, SC and SN were significantly increased, which indicated elevation of Ca{sup 2+} concentrations in nerve tissues. CaMKII contents and activities were also increased in CC and were positively correlated with gait abnormality, but it could not be found in SC and SN. The increases of PKC contents and activities were also observed in SN and were positively correlated with gait abnormality. Except for that of NF-M in CC, the PRs of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H were also elevated in nerve tissues, which was consistent with the activation of protein kinases. The results suggested that CaMKII might be partly (in CC but not in SC and SN) involved in HD-induced neuropathy. CaMKII and PKC might mediate the HD neurotoxicity by altering the NF phosphorylation status and PRs.

  3. A new and potent calmodulin antagonist, HF-2035, which inhibits vascular relaxation induced by nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Win, N H; Ishikawa, T; Saito, N; Kato, M; Yokokura, H; Watanabe, Y; Iida, Y; Hidaka, H

    1996-03-28

    HF-2035, 2-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2,4,5-trichlorobenzenesulfonyl)] amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine, was synthesized and its effects on calmodulin-dependent enzymes were investigated. HF-2035 inhibited calmodulin kinase I, calmodulin kinase II and myosin light-chain kinase with IC50 values of 1.3 microM, 1.6 microM and 68 microM, respectively. HF-2035 also inhibited the activity of recombinant rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase, one of the calmodulin-dependent enzymes, with a Ki of 0.78 microM. Partially purified nitric oxide synthase of rat brain was also inhibited by HF-2035 with an IC50 of 3.2 microM. Kinetic analysis indicated that this inhibitory effect of HF-2035 was competitive with respect to calmodulin. We examined the effects of HF-2035 on constitutive nitric oxide synthase in a bioassay using vascular strips of rabbit carotid artery with and without endothelium. HF-2035 inhibited acetylcholine- and calcium ionophore, A23187 (6S-[6 alpha (2S*,3S*),8 beta (R*),9 beta, 11 alpha]-5- (methylamino)-2-[[3,9,11-trimethyl-8-[1-methyl-2-oxo-2-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)- ethyl]-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undec-2-yl]methyl]-4-benzoxazol ecarboxylic acid)-induced relaxation of endothelium-intact strips with an ED50 of 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 2.8 +/- 1 microM, respectively. This compound, however, did not inhibit N-nitroso-N-morpholinoaminoacetonitrile (SIN-1A), an exogenous nitric oxide donor, -induced relaxation of endothelium-denuded strips. W-7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1- naphthalenesulfonamide) inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation with an ED50 of 46 +/- 7 microM, which was 30-fold less potent than HF-2035. HF-2035 was unable to inhibit the activity of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase in isolated thoracic aorta of rat treated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. These findings suggest that HF-2035 is a new and potent calmodulin antagonist, and may be used as a mother compound to develop more selective inhibitors of constitutive nitric oxide

  4. Neutron and x-ray scattering studies of the interactions between Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins and their regulatory targets: Comparisons of troponin C and calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Olah, G.A.

    1993-11-01

    The regulatory proteins calmodulin and troponin C share a strikingly unusual overall structure. Their crystal structures show each protein consists of two structurally homologous globular domains connected by an extended, solvent exposed alpha-helix of = 8 turns. Calmodulin regulates a variety of enzymes that show remarkable functional and structural diversity. This diversity extends to the amino acid sequences of the calmodulin-binding domains in the target enzymes. In contrast with calodulin, troponin C appears to have a single very specialized function. It is an integral part of the troponin complex, and Ca{sup 2+} binding to troponin c results in the release of the inhibitory function of troponin I, which eventually leads to actin-binding to myosin and the triggering of muscle contraction. Small-angle scattering has been particularly useful for studying the dumbbell shaped proteins because the technique is very sensitive to changes in the relative dispositions of the two globular domains. Small-angle scattering, using x-rays or neutrons, gives information on the overall shapes of proteins in solution. Small-angle scattering studies of calmodulin and its complexes with calmodulin-binding domains from various target enzymes have played an important role in helping us understand the functional role of its unusual solvent exposed helix. Likewise, small-angle scattering has been used to study troponin C with various peptides, to shed light on the similarities and differences between calmodulin and troponin C.

  5. Molecular and biochemical characterization of dNOS: a Drosophila Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Regulski, M; Tully, T

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger involved with various aspects of mammalian physiology ranging from vasodilation and macrophage cytotoxicity to neuronal transmission. NO is synthesized from L-arginine by NO synthase (NOS). Here, we report the cloning of a Drosophila NOS gene, dNOS, located at cytological position 32B. The dNOS cDNA encodes a protein of 152 kDa, with 43% amino acid sequence identity to rat neuronal NOS. Like mammalian NOSs, DNOS protein contains putative binding sites for calmodulin, FMN, FAD, and NADPH. DNOS activity is Ca2+/calmodulin dependent when expressed in cell culture. An alternative RNA splicing pattern also exists for dNOS, which is identical to that for vertebrate neuronal NOS. These structural and functional observations demonstrate remarkable conservation of NOS between vertebrates and invertebrates. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7568075

  6. Isolation of NPY-25 (neuropeptide Y[12-36]), a potent inhibitor of calmodulin, from porcine brain.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, K; Kangawa, K; Tanaka, K; Matsuo, H

    1990-06-29

    In the present purification of low molecular weight fractions (Mr: 2000-4000) containing basic peptides, twenty nmol of novel calmodulin binding peptide, possessing a potent affinity for calmodulin, was isolated from 18 kg of porcine brain. By analysis with gas phase sequencer, the sequence was determined to be APAEDLARYYSALRHYINLITRQRY. Carboxy terminus of the peptide was determined to be Tyr-NH2. The peptide was a carboxy terminal pentacosanepeptide of neuropeptide Y and was termed NPY-25. NPY-25 competitively inhibited the activation of cAMP-phosphodiesterase through CaM binding in a Ca++ dependent fashion, but did not inhibit the basal activity of cAMP phosphodiesterase. NPY-25 elicited a more potent activity than did neuropeptide Y. IC50 values of NPY-25 and Neuropeptide Y were 0.06 microM and 0.54 microM respectively.

  7. Effect of inhibitors of auxin transport and of calmodulin on a gravisensing-dependent current in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Some characteristics of the gravity sensing mechanism in maize root caps were investigated using a bioelectric current as an indicator of gravity sensing. This technique involves the measurement of a change in the current density which arises at the columella region coincidently with the presentation time. Two inhibitors of auxin transport, triiodobenzoic acid and naphthylphthalamic acid, blocked gravitropic curvature but not the change in current density. Two inhibitors of calmodulin activity, compound 48/80 and calmidazolium, blocked both curvature and gravity-induced current. The results suggest that auxin transport is not a component of gravity sensing in the root cap. By contrast, the results suggest that calmodulin plays an intrinsic role in gravity sensing.

  8. Effect of Inhibitors of Auxin Transport and of Calmodulin on a Gravisensing-Dependent Current in Maize Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, Thomas; Leopold, A. Carl

    1987-01-01

    Some characteristics of the gravity sensing mechanism in maize root caps were investigated using a bioelectric current as an indicator of gravity sensing. This technique involves the measurement of a change in the current density which arises at the columella region coincidently with the presentation time. Two inhibitors of auxin transport, triiodobenzoic acid and naphthylphthalamic acid, blocked gravitropic curvature but not the change in current density. Two inhibitors of calmodulin activity, compound 48/80 and calmidazolium, blocked both curvature and gravity-induced current. The results suggest that auxin transport is not a component of gravity sensing in the root cap. By contrast, the results suggest that calmodulin plays an intrinsic role in gravity sensing. PMID:11539682

  9. A mechanism for tunable autoinhibition in the structure of a human Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II holoenzyme

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Luke H.; Stratton, Margaret M.; Lee, Il-Hyung; Rosenberg, Oren S.; Levitz, Joshua; Mandell, Daniel J.; Kortemme, Tanja; Groves, Jay T.; Schulman, Howard; Kuriyan, John

    2011-01-01

    Summary Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) forms a highly conserved dodecameric assembly that is sensitive to the frequency of calcium pulse trains. Neither the structure of the dodecameric assembly nor how it regulates CaMKII are known. We present the crystal structure of an autoinhibited full-length human CaMKII holoenzyme, revealing an unexpected compact arrangement of kinase domains docked against a central hub, with the calmodulin binding sites completely inaccessible. We show that this compact docking is important for the autoinhibition of the kinase domains and for setting the calcium response of the holoenzyme. Comparison of CaMKII isoforms, which differ in the length of the linker between the kinase domain and the hub, demonstrates that these interactions can be strengthened or weakened by changes in linker length. This equilibrium between autoinhibited states provides a simple mechanism for tuning the calcium response without changes in either the hub or the kinase domains. PMID:21884935

  10. Effect of inhibitors of auxin transport and of calmodulin on a gravisensing-dependent current in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Some characteristics of the gravity sensing mechanism in maize root caps were investigated using a bioelectric current as an indicator of gravity sensing. This technique involves the measurement of a change in the current density which arises at the columella region coincidently with the presentation time. Two inhibitors of auxin transport, triiodobenzoic acid and naphthylphthalamic acid, blocked gravitropic curvature but not the change in current density. Two inhibitors of calmodulin activity, compound 48/80 and calmidazolium, blocked both curvature and gravity-induced current. The results suggest that auxin transport is not a component of gravity sensing in the root cap. By contrast, the results suggest that calmodulin plays an intrinsic role in gravity sensing.

  11. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA gene family during tomato fruit development and ripening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianbao; Peng, Hui; Whitaker, Bruce D; Conway, William S

    2012-02-13

    Fruit ripening is a complicated development process affected by a variety of external and internal cues. It is well established that calcium treatment delays fruit ripening and senescence. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have shown that calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTAs are important for modulation of disease resistance, cold sensitivity and wounding response in vegetative tissues. To study the possible roles of this gene family in fruit development and ripening, we cloned seven SR/CAMTAs, designated as SlSRs, from tomato, a model fruit-bearing crop. All seven genes encode polypeptides with a conserved DNA-binding domain and a calmodulin-binding site. Calmodulin specifically binds to the putative targeting site in a calcium-dependent manner. All SlSRs were highly yet differentially expressed during fruit development and ripening. Most notably, the expression of SlSR2 was scarcely detected at the mature green and breaker stages, two critical stages of fruit development and ripening; and SlSR3L and SlSR4 were expressed exclusively in fruit tissues. During the developmental span from 10 to 50 days post anthesis, the expression profiles of all seven SlSRs were dramatically altered in ripening mutant rin compared with wildtype fruit. By contrast, only minor alterations were noted for ripening mutant nor and Nr fruit. In addition, ethylene treatment of mature green wildtype fruit transiently stimulated expression of all SlSRs within one to two hours. This study indicates that SlSR expression is influenced by both the Rin-mediated developmental network and ethylene signaling. The results suggest that calcium signaling is involved in the regulation of fruit development and ripening through calcium/calmodulin/SlSR interactions.

  12. Reconstitution and Characterization of a Calmodulin-Stimulated Ca2+-Pumping ATPase Purified from Brassica oleracea L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Askerlund, Per; Evans, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Purification and functional reconstitution of a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+-ATPase from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) is described. Activity was purified about 120-fold from a microsomal fraction using calmodulin-affinity chromatography. The purified fraction showed a polypeptide at 115 kD, which formed a phosphorylated intermediate in the presence of Ca2+, together with a few polypeptides with lower molecular masses that were not phosphorylated. The ATPase was reconstituted into liposomes by 3-([cholamidopropyl]-dimethylammonio-)1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) dialysis. The proteoliposomes showed ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake and ATPase activity, both of which were stimulated about 4-fold by calmodulin. Specific ATPase activity was about 5 μmol min−1 (mg protein)−1, and the Ca2+/ATP ratio was 0.1 to 0.5 when the ATPase was reconstituted with entrapped oxalate. The purified, reconstituted Ca2+-ATPase was inhibited by vanadate and erythrosin B, but not by cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin. Activity was supported by ATP (100%) and GTP (50%) and had a pH optimum of about 7.0. The effect of monovalent and divalent cations (including Ca2+) on activity is described. Assay of membranes purified by two-phase partitioning indicated that approximately 95% of the activity was associated with intracellular membranes, but only about 5% with plasma membranes. Sucrose gradient centrifugation suggests that the endoplasmic reticulum is the major cellular location of calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+-pumping ATPase in Brassica oleracea inflorescences. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16653183

  13. Specific nuclear localizing sequence directs two myosin isoforms to the cell nucleus in calmodulin-sensitive manner.

    PubMed

    Dzijak, Rastislav; Yildirim, Sukriye; Kahle, Michal; Novák, Petr; Hnilicová, Jarmila; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear myosin I (NM1) was the first molecular motor identified in the cell nucleus. Together with nuclear actin, they participate in crucial nuclear events such as transcription, chromatin movements, and chromatin remodeling. NM1 is an isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) that was identified earlier and is known to act in the cytoplasm. NM1 differs from the "cytoplasmic" myosin 1c only by additional 16 amino acids at the N-terminus of the molecule. This amino acid stretch was therefore suggested to direct NM1 into the nucleus. We investigated the mechanism of nuclear import of NM1 in detail. Using over-expressed GFP chimeras encoding for truncated NM1 mutants, we identified a specific sequence that is necessary for its import to the nucleus. This novel nuclear localization sequence is placed within calmodulin-binding motif of NM1, thus it is present also in the Myo1c. We confirmed the presence of both isoforms in the nucleus by transfection of tagged NM1 and Myo1c constructs into cultured cells, and also by showing the presence of the endogenous Myo1c in purified nuclei of cells derived from knock-out mice lacking NM1. Using pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays we identified importin beta, importin 5 and importin 7 as nuclear transport receptors that bind NM1. Since the NLS sequence of NM1 lies within the region that also binds calmodulin we tested the influence of calmodulin on the localization of NM1. The presence of elevated levels of calmodulin interfered with nuclear localization of tagged NM1. We have shown that the novel specific NLS brings to the cell nucleus not only the "nuclear" isoform of myosin I (NM1 protein) but also its "cytoplasmic" isoform (Myo1c protein). This opens a new field for exploring functions of this molecular motor in nuclear processes, and for exploring the signals between cytoplasm and the nucleus.

  14. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA gene family during tomato fruit development and ripening

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fruit ripening is a complicated development process affected by a variety of external and internal cues. It is well established that calcium treatment delays fruit ripening and senescence. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Results Previous studies have shown that calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTAs are important for modulation of disease resistance, cold sensitivity and wounding response in vegetative tissues. To study the possible roles of this gene family in fruit development and ripening, we cloned seven SR/CAMTAs, designated as SlSRs, from tomato, a model fruit-bearing crop. All seven genes encode polypeptides with a conserved DNA-binding domain and a calmodulin-binding site. Calmodulin specifically binds to the putative targeting site in a calcium-dependent manner. All SlSRs were highly yet differentially expressed during fruit development and ripening. Most notably, the expression of SlSR2 was scarcely detected at the mature green and breaker stages, two critical stages of fruit development and ripening; and SlSR3L and SlSR4 were expressed exclusively in fruit tissues. During the developmental span from 10 to 50 days post anthesis, the expression profiles of all seven SlSRs were dramatically altered in ripening mutant rin compared with wildtype fruit. By contrast, only minor alterations were noted for ripening mutant nor and Nr fruit. In addition, ethylene treatment of mature green wildtype fruit transiently stimulated expression of all SlSRs within one to two hours. Conclusions This study indicates that SlSR expression is influenced by both the Rin-mediated developmental network and ethylene signaling. The results suggest that calcium signaling is involved in the regulation of fruit development and ripening through calcium/calmodulin/SlSR interactions. PMID:22330838

  15. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13405.001 PMID:26949248

  16. The Plasma Membrane Ca(2+) ATPase: Purification by Calmodulin Affinity Chromatography, and Reconstitution of the Purified Protein.

    PubMed

    Niggli, Verena; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases (PMCA pumps) are key regulators of cytosolic Ca(2+) in eukaryotes. They extrude Ca(2+) from the cytosol, using the energy of ATP hydrolysis and operate as Ca(2+)-H(+) exchangers. They are activated by the Ca(2+)-binding protein calmodulin, by acidic phospholipids and by other mechanisms, among them kinase-mediated phosphorylation. Isolation of the PMCA in pure and active form is essential for the analysis of its structure and function. In this chapter, the purification of the pump, as first achieved from erythrocyte plasma membranes by calmodulin-affinity chromatography, is described in detail. The reversible, high-affinity, Ca(2+)-dependent interaction of the pump with calmodulin is the basis of the procedure. Either phospholipids or glycerol have to be present in the isolation buffers to keep the pump active during the isolation procedure. After the isolation of the PMCA pump from human erythrocytes the pump was purified from other cell types, e.g., heart sarcolemma, plant microsomal fractions, and cells that express it ectopically. The reconstitution of the purified pump into phospholipid vesicles using the cholate dialysis method will also be described. It allows studies of transport mechanism and of regulation of pump activity. The purified pump can be stored in the reconstituted form for several days at 4 °C with little loss of activity, but it rapidly loses activity when stored in the detergent-solubilized form.

  17. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M.; Going, Catherine C.; ...

    2016-03-07

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts themore » hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones.« less

  18. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M.; Going, Catherine C.; McSpadden, Ethan D.; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C.; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L.; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R.; Kuriyan, John

    2016-03-07

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones.

  19. Ca(2+)-dependent phosphorylation of the tail domain of myosin-V, a calmodulin-binding myosin in vertebrate brain.

    PubMed

    Coelho, M V; Larson, R E

    1993-05-01

    1. Myosin-V from vertebrate brain is a novel molecular motor with a myosin-like head domain, a calmodulin-binding neck region and a unique tail domain of unknown function. Previous studies showed brain myosin-V to be a phosphoprotein substrate for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase associated with actomyosin. In the present study we describe the preparation of a specific actin-cytoskeletal fraction which is enriched in brain myosin-V. 2. We show that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity is also associated with this preparation and phosphorylates brain myosin-V. 3. Calpain, a Ca(2+)-dependent protease, generates a M(r) 80,000 fragment from the COOH terminal region of brain myosin-V containing most or all of the phosphorylation sites. 4. These results suggest that the unique tail domain of this novel myosin is subject to Ca2+ control via phosphorylation by kinase activity associated with the actin cytoskeleton.

  20. W-7 inhibits voltage-dependent K(+) channels independent of calmodulin activity in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Choi, Il-Whan; Hong, Da Hye; Son, Youn Kyoung; Na, Sung Hun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Firth, Amy L; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Park, Won Sun

    2015-03-05

    We investigated the effect of W-7, a calmodulin inhibitor, on voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels in freshly isolated coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. The amplitude of Kv currents was inhibited by W-7 in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 3.38±0.47μM and a Hill coefficient of 0.84±0.10. W-7 shifted the activation curve to a more positive potential but had no significant effect on the inactivation curve, which indicated that W-7 inhibited the Kv current in a closed state of the Kv channel. Another calmodulin inhibitor, W-13, had no significant effect on Kv currents and did not change the inhibitory effect of W-7 on Kv channels. From these results, we conclude that W-7 inhibited the Kv current in a dose-dependent manner, but this inhibition occurred independent of calmodulin activity and in a closed (inactivated) state of the Kv channels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Calmodulin and immunophilin are required as functional partners of a ryanodine receptor in ascidian oocytes at fertilization.

    PubMed

    Albrieux, M; Moutin, M J; Grunwald, D; Villaz, M

    2000-09-01

    Fertilization of oocytes incites numerous changes relying on Ca(2+) signaling. In inseminated ascidian eggs, an increase in the egg surface membrane, monitored by a change in electrical capacitance, is recorded at the onset of meiosis resumption. This membrane addition to the cell surface is controlled by calcium release through a ryanodine receptor (RyR), sensitive to cyclic ADP-ribose. Using confocal microscopy analysis of ascidian oocytes immunostained with anti-RyR antibody, we show here that this calcium channel is asymmetrically located in the vegetal cortical zone. Interestingly, the increase in cell capacitance occurring at fertilization is correlated with a fluorescent signal, imaged by the marker of vesicle trafficking FM 1-43, located close to the RyR region. Two putative partners of RyR, namely an FKBP-like protein and a calmodulin, are identified in these oocyte extracts by detection of enzyme activity and PCR amplification. Both are necessary to sustain ryanodine receptor activity in these oocytes since the membrane insertion triggered by fertilization is inhibited by the FKBP ligand rapamycin and by a calmodulin antagonist peptide. These findings suggest that exocytosis in ascidian eggs is triggered at fertilization by a functional Ca(2+) release unit operating as a complex of several proteins, including a calmodulin and an immunophilin, around the intracellular calcium channel itself. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  2. Cloning and expression of a pivotal calcium metabolism regulator: calmodulin involved in shell formation from pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata).

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Cen; Zhang, Yong; Gu, Mianzhi; Zhang, Rongqing

    2004-07-01

    The shells of bivalves are mainly composed of calcium carbonate, a product of calcium metabolism. In the process of shell formation, the uptake, transport and recruitment of calcium ion are highly regulated and involved in many factors. Among these regulatory factors, calmodulin (CaM), a pivotal multifunction regulator of calcium metabolism in nearly all organisms, is thought to play an important role in the calcium metabolism involved in shell formation. In this study, a full-length CaM cDNA was isolated from the pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata). The oyster calmodulin encodes a 16.8 kDa protein which shares high similarity with vertebrate calmodulin. The oyster CaM mRNA shows the highest level of expression in the gill, a key organ involved in calcium uptake in oyster calcium metabolism. In situ hybridization results revealed that oyster CaM mRNA is expressed at the folds and the outer epithelial cells of the dorsal region of the mantle, suggesting that CaM is involved in regulation of calcium transport and secretion. Oyster CaM also showed a typical Ca2+ dependent electrophoretic shift characterization and calcium binding activity. Taken together, we have identified and characterized a pivotal calcium metabolism regulator of the oyster that may play an important role in regulation of calcium uptake, transport and secretion in the process of shell formation.

  3. Presynaptic kainate receptor-mediated facilitation of glutamate release involves Ca2+ -calmodulin at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Duque-Feria, Paloma; Negrete-Díaz, José Vicente; Sihra, Talvinder S; Flores, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs) modulate the release of glutamate at synapses established between mossy fibers (MF) and CA3 pyramidal cells in the hippocampus. The activation of KAR by low, nanomolar, kainate concentrations facilitates glutamate release. KAR-mediated facilitation of glutamate release involves the activation of an adenylate cyclase/cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A cascade at MF-CA3 synapses. Here, we studied the mechanisms by which KAR activation produces this facilitation of glutamate release in slices and synaptosomes. We find that the facilitation of glutamate release mediated by KAR activation requires an increase in Ca(2+) levels in the cytosol and the formation of a Ca(2+) -calmodulin complex to activate adenylate cyclase. The increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) underpinning this modulation is achieved, both, by Ca(2+) entering via Ca(2+) -permeable KARs and, by the mobilization of intraterminal Ca(2+) stores. Finally, we find that, congruent with the Ca(2+) -calmodulin support of KAR-mediated facilitation of glutamate release, induction of long-term potentiation at MF-CA3 synapses has an obligate requirement for Ca(2+) -calmodulin activity. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Innate immunity signaling: cytosolic Ca2+ elevation is linked to downstream nitric oxide generation through the action of calmodulin or a calmodulin-like protein.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Smigel, Andries; Tsai, Yu-Chang; Braam, Janet; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2008-10-01

    Ca(2+) rise and nitric oxide (NO) generation are essential early steps in plant innate immunity and initiate the hypersensitive response (HR) to avirulent pathogens. Previous work from this laboratory has demonstrated that a loss-of-function mutation of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable inwardly conducting ion channel impairs HR and that this phenotype could be rescued by the application of a NO donor. At present, the mechanism linking cytosolic Ca(2+) rise to NO generation during pathogen response signaling in plants is still unclear. Animal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation is Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) dependent. Here, we present biochemical and genetic evidence consistent with a similar regulatory mechanism in plants: a pathogen-induced Ca(2+) signal leads to CaM and/or a CaM-like protein (CML) activation of NOS. In wild-type Arabidopsis plants, the use of a CaM antagonist prevents NO generation and the HR. Application of a CaM antagonist does not prevent pathogen-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation, excluding the possibility of CaM acting upstream from Ca(2+). The CaM antagonist and Ca(2+) chelation abolish NO generation in wild-type Arabidopsis leaf protein extracts as well, suggesting that plant NOS activity is Ca(2+)/CaM dependent in vitro. The CaM-like protein CML24 has been previously associated with NO-related phenotypes in Arabidopsis. Here, we find that innate immune response phenotypes (HR and [avirulent] pathogen-induced NO elevation in leaves) are inhibited in loss-of-function cml24-4 mutant plants. Pathogen-associated molecular pattern-mediated NO generation in cells of cml24-4 mutants is impaired as well. Our work suggests that the initial pathogen recognition signal of Ca(2+) influx into the cytosol activates CaM and/or a CML, which then acts to induce downstream NO synthesis as intermediary steps in a pathogen perception signaling cascade, leading to innate immune responses, including the HR.

  5. Interactions of Bordetella pertussis adenylyl cyclase toxin CyaA with calmodulin mutants and calmodulin antagonists: comparison with membranous adenylyl cyclase I.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Dominik; Lübker, Carolin; Lushington, Gerald H; Tang, Wei-Jen; Shen, Yuequan; Richter, Mark; Seifert, Roland

    2012-04-01

    The adenylyl cyclase (AC) toxin CyaA from Bordetella pertussis constitutes an important virulence factor for the pathogenesis of whooping cough. CyaA is activated by calmodulin (CaM) and compromises host defense by excessive cAMP production. Hence, pharmacological modulation of the CyaA/CaM interaction could constitute a promising approach to treat whooping cough, provided that interactions of endogenous effector proteins with CaM are not affected. As a first step toward this ambitious goal we examined the interactions of CyaA with wild-type CaM and four CaM mutants in which most methionine residues were replaced by leucine residues and studied the effects of the CaM antagonists calmidazolium, trifluoperazine and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7). CyaA/CaM interaction was monitored by CaM-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between tryptophan residues in CyaA and 2'-(N-methylanthraniloyl)-3'-deoxy-adenosine 5'-triphosphate and catalytic activity. Comparison of the concentration/response curves of CaM and CaM mutants for FRET and catalysis revealed differences, suggesting a two-step activation mechanism of CyaA by CaM. Even in the absence of CaM, calmidazolium inhibited catalysis, and it did so according to a biphasic function. Trifluoperazine and W-7 did not inhibit FRET or catalysis. In contrast to CyaA, some CaM mutants were more efficacious than CaM at activating membranous AC isoform 1. The slope of CyaA activation by CaM was much steeper than of AC1 activation. Collectively, the two-step activation mechanism of CyaA by CaM offers opportunities for pharmacological intervention. The failure of classic CaM inhibitors to interfere with CyaA/CaM interactions and the different interactions of CaM mutants with CyaA and AC1 point to unique CyaA/CaM interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Loss of the Calmodulin-Dependent Inhibition of RyR1 Calcium Release Channel Upon Oxidation of Methionines in Calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Boschek, Curt B.; Jones, Terry E.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2008-01-08

    The oxidation of methionines in calmodulin (CaM) can affect the activity of calcium pumps and channels to modulate the amplitude and duration of calcium signals. We have therefore investigated the possible oxidation of CaM in skeletal muscle and its affect on the CaM-dependent regulation of the RyR1 calcium release channel. Taking advantage of characteristic reductions in electrophoretic mobility by SDS-PAGE, we find that approximately two methionines are oxidized in CaM from skeletal muscle. The functional effect of CaM oxidation on the open probability of the RyR1 calcium release channel was assessed through measurements of 3[H]-ryanodine binding using a heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation enriched in RyR1. There is a biphasic regulation of RyR1 by unoxidized CaM, where calcium-activated CaM acts to enhance the calcium-sensitivity of channel closure, while apo-CaM functions to enhance channel activity at resting calcium levels. We find that physiological levels of CaM oxidation preferentially diminish the CaM-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel observed at activating micromolar levels of calcium. In contrast, the oxidation of CaM resulted in a minimal functional changes in the CaM-dependent activation of RyR1 at resting nanomolar calcium levels. Oxidation does not affect the high-affinity binding of calcium-activated CaM to the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1; rather, methionine oxidation disrupts interdomain interactions between the opposing domains of CaM in complex with the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1 that normally function as a conformational switch associated with RyR1 inhibition. These results suggest that the oxidation of CaM can contribute to observed elevations in intracellular calcium levels in response to conditions of oxidative stress. We suggest that the sensitivity of RyR1 channel activity to CaM oxidation may function as part of an adaptive cellular response to enhance the duration of calcium transients to promote enhanced

  7. Loss of the calmodulin-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel upon oxidation of methionines in calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Smallwood, Heather S; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2008-01-08

    The oxidation of methionines in calmodulin (CaM) can affect the activity of calcium pumps and channels to modulate the amplitude and duration of calcium signals. We have therefore investigated the possible oxidation of CaM in skeletal muscle and its effect on the CaM-dependent regulation of the RyR1 calcium release channel. Taking advantage of characteristic reductions in electrophoretic mobility determined by SDS-PAGE, we find that approximately two methionines are oxidized in CaM from skeletal muscle. The functional effect of CaM oxidation on the open probability of the RyR1 calcium release channel was assessed through measurements of [3H]ryanodine binding using a heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation enriched in RyR1. There is a biphasic regulation of RyR1 by unoxidized CaM, in which calcium-activated CaM acts to enhance the calcium sensitivity of channel closure, while apo-CaM functions to enhance channel activity at resting calcium levels. We find that physiological levels of CaM oxidation preferentially weaken the CaM-dependent inhibition of the RyR1 calcium release channel observed at activating micromolar levels of calcium. In contrast, the oxidation of CaM resulted in minimal functional changes in the CaM-dependent activation of RyR1 at resting nanomolar calcium levels. Oxidation does not significantly affect the high-affinity binding of calcium-activated CaM to the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1; rather, methionine oxidation disrupts interdomain interactions between the opposing domains of CaM in complex with the CaM-binding sequence of RyR1 that normally function as part of a conformational switch associated with RyR1 inhibition. These results suggest that the oxidation of CaM can contribute to observed elevations in intracellular calcium levels in response to conditions of oxidative stress observed during biological aging. We suggest that the sensitivity of RyR1 channel activity to CaM oxidation may function as part of an adaptive cellular response

  8. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2010-05-28

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca{sup 2+} leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes (Hamada et al., 2009 ). The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca{sup 2+} spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca{sup 2+} events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional

  9. The Arrhythmogenic Calmodulin p.Phe142Leu Mutation Impairs C-domain Ca2+ Binding but Not Calmodulin-dependent Inhibition of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Mads Toft; Liu, Yingjie; Larsen, Kamilla Taunsig; Nani, Alma; Tian, Xixi; Holt, Christian; Wang, Ruiwu; Wimmer, Reinhard; Van Petegem, Filip; Fill, Michael; Chen, S R Wayne; Overgaard, Michael Toft

    2017-01-27

    A number of point mutations in the intracellular Ca(2+)-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) are arrhythmogenic, yet their underlying mechanisms are not clear. These mutations generally decrease Ca(2+) binding to CaM and impair inhibition of CaM-regulated Ca(2+) channels like the cardiac Ca(2+) release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR2), and it appears that attenuated CaM Ca(2+) binding correlates with impaired CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Here, we investigated the RyR2 inhibitory action of the CaM p.Phe142Leu mutation (F142L; numbered including the start-Met), which markedly reduces CaM Ca(2+) binding. Surprisingly, CaM-F142L had little to no aberrant effect on RyR2-mediated store overload-induced Ca(2+) release in HEK293 cells compared with CaM-WT. Furthermore, CaM-F142L enhanced CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition at the single channel level compared with CaM-WT. This is in stark contrast to the actions of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations N54I, D96V, N98S, and D130G, which all diminish CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Thermodynamic analysis showed that apoCaM-F142L converts an endothermal interaction between CaM and the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of RyR2 into an exothermal one. Moreover, NMR spectra revealed that the CaM-F142L-CaMBD interaction is structurally different from that of CaM-WT at low Ca(2+) These data indicate a distinct interaction between CaM-F142L and the RyR2 CaMBD, which may explain the stronger CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition by CaM-F142L, despite its reduced Ca(2+) binding. Collectively, these results add to our understanding of CaM-dependent regulation of RyR2 as well as the mechanistic effects of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations. The unique properties of the CaM-F142L mutation may provide novel clues on how to suppress excessive RyR2 Ca(2+) release by manipulating the CaM-RyR2 interaction. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. The Arrhythmogenic Calmodulin p.Phe142Leu Mutation Impairs C-domain Ca2+ Binding but Not Calmodulin-dependent Inhibition of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingjie; Larsen, Kamilla Taunsig; Nani, Alma; Tian, Xixi; Holt, Christian; Wang, Ruiwu; Fill, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A number of point mutations in the intracellular Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) are arrhythmogenic, yet their underlying mechanisms are not clear. These mutations generally decrease Ca2+ binding to CaM and impair inhibition of CaM-regulated Ca2+ channels like the cardiac Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR2), and it appears that attenuated CaM Ca2+ binding correlates with impaired CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Here, we investigated the RyR2 inhibitory action of the CaM p.Phe142Leu mutation (F142L; numbered including the start-Met), which markedly reduces CaM Ca2+ binding. Surprisingly, CaM-F142L had little to no aberrant effect on RyR2-mediated store overload-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells compared with CaM-WT. Furthermore, CaM-F142L enhanced CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition at the single channel level compared with CaM-WT. This is in stark contrast to the actions of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations N54I, D96V, N98S, and D130G, which all diminish CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition. Thermodynamic analysis showed that apoCaM-F142L converts an endothermal interaction between CaM and the CaM-binding domain (CaMBD) of RyR2 into an exothermal one. Moreover, NMR spectra revealed that the CaM-F142L-CaMBD interaction is structurally different from that of CaM-WT at low Ca2+. These data indicate a distinct interaction between CaM-F142L and the RyR2 CaMBD, which may explain the stronger CaM-dependent RyR2 inhibition by CaM-F142L, despite its reduced Ca2+ binding. Collectively, these results add to our understanding of CaM-dependent regulation of RyR2 as well as the mechanistic effects of arrhythmogenic CaM mutations. The unique properties of the CaM-F142L mutation may provide novel clues on how to suppress excessive RyR2 Ca2+ release by manipulating the CaM-RyR2 interaction. PMID:27927985

  11. Modulating Uranium Binding Affinity in Engineered Calmodulin EF-Hand Peptides: Effect of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pardoux, Romain; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Delangle, Pascale; Guilloreau, Luc; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of uranium toxicity, the determinants of uranyl affinity in proteins must be better characterized. In this work, we analyzed the contribution of a phosphoryl group on uranium binding affinity in a protein binding site, using the site 1 EF-hand motif of calmodulin. The recombinant domain 1 of calmodulin from A. thaliana was engineered to impair metal binding at site 2 and was used as a structured template. Threonine at position 9 of the loop was phosphorylated in vitro, using the recombinant catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2. Hence, the T9TKE12 sequence was substituted by the CK2 recognition sequence TAAE. A tyrosine was introduced at position 7, so that uranyl and calcium binding affinities could be determined by following tyrosine fluorescence. Phosphorylation was characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, and the phosphorylated peptide was purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography. The binding constants for uranyl were determined by competition experiments with iminodiacetate. At pH 6, phosphorylation increased the affinity for uranyl by a factor of ∼5, from Kd = 25±6 nM to Kd = 5±1 nM. The phosphorylated peptide exhibited a much larger affinity at pH 7, with a dissociation constant in the subnanomolar range (Kd = 0.25±0.06 nM). FTIR analyses showed that the phosphothreonine side chain is partly protonated at pH 6, while it is fully deprotonated at pH 7. Moreover, formation of the uranyl-peptide complex at pH 7 resulted in significant frequency shifts of the νas(P-O) and νs(P-O) IR modes of phosphothreonine, supporting its direct interaction with uranyl. Accordingly, a bathochromic shift in νas(UO2)2+ vibration (from 923 cm−1 to 908 cm−1) was observed upon uranyl coordination to the phosphorylated peptide. Together, our data demonstrate that the phosphoryl group plays a determining role in uranyl binding affinity to proteins at physiological pH. PMID:22870263

  12. A pollen-specific novel calmodulin-binding protein with tetratricopeptide repeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safadi, F.; Reddy, V. S.; Reddy, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium is essential for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. A large body of information has established a link between elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) at the pollen tube tip and its growth. Since the action of Ca(2+) is primarily mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM), identification of CaM-binding proteins in pollen should provide insights into the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, a CaM-binding protein from maize pollen (maize pollen calmodulin-binding protein, MPCBP) was isolated in a protein-protein interaction-based screening using (35)S-labeled CaM as a probe. MPCBP has a molecular mass of about 72 kDa and contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) suggesting that it is a member of the TPR family of proteins. MPCBP protein shares a high sequence identity with two hypothetical TPR-containing proteins from Arabidopsis. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-Sepharose binding, we show that the bacterially expressed MPCBP binds to bovine CaM and three CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To map the CaM-binding domain several truncated versions of the MPCBP were expressed in bacteria and tested for their ability to bind CaM. Based on these studies, the CaM-binding domain was mapped to an 18-amino acid stretch between the first and second TPR regions. Gel and fluorescence shift assays performed with CaM and a CaM-binding synthetic peptide further confirmed MPCBP binding to CaM. Western, Northern, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis have shown that MPCBP expression is specific to pollen. MPCBP was detected in both soluble and microsomal proteins. Immunoblots showed the presence of MPCBP in mature and germinating pollen. Pollen-specific expression of MPCBP, its CaM-binding properties, and the presence of TPR motifs suggest a role for this protein in Ca(2+)-regulated events during pollen germination and growth.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a novel calmodulin-binding protein from potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Anireddy S N.; Day, Irene S.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Safadi, Farida; Reddy, Vaka S.; Golovkin, Maxim; Harnly, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    Tuberization in potato is controlled by hormonal and environmental signals. Ca(2+), an important intracellular messenger, and calmodulin (CaM), one of the primary Ca(2+) sensors, have been implicated in controlling diverse cellular processes in plants including tuberization. The regulation of cellular processes by CaM involves its interaction with other proteins. To understand the role of Ca(2+)/CaM in tuberization, we have screened an expression library prepared from developing tubers with biotinylated CaM. This screening resulted in isolation of a cDNA encoding a novel CaM-binding protein (potato calmodulin-binding protein (PCBP)). Ca(2+)-dependent binding of the cDNA-encoded protein to CaM is confirmed by (35)S-labeled CaM. The full-length cDNA is 5 kb long and encodes a protein of 1309 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed significant similarity with a hypothetical protein from another plant, Arabidopsis. However, no homologs of PCBP are found in nonplant systems, suggesting that it is likely to be specific to plants. Using truncated versions of the protein and a synthetic peptide in CaM binding assays we mapped the CaM-binding region to a 20-amino acid stretch (residues 1216-1237). The bacterially expressed protein containing the CaM-binding domain interacted with three CaM isoforms (CaM2, CaM4, and CaM6). PCBP is encoded by a single gene and is expressed differentially in the tissues tested. The expression of CaM, PCBP, and another CaM-binding protein is similar in different tissues and organs. The predicted protein contained seven putative nuclear localization signals and several strong PEST motifs. Fusion of the N-terminal region of the protein containing six of the seven nuclear localization signals to the reporter gene beta-glucuronidase targeted the reporter gene to the nucleus, suggesting a nuclear role for PCBP.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a novel calmodulin-binding protein from potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Anireddy S N.; Day, Irene S.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Safadi, Farida; Reddy, Vaka S.; Golovkin, Maxim; Harnly, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    Tuberization in potato is controlled by hormonal and environmental signals. Ca(2+), an important intracellular messenger, and calmodulin (CaM), one of the primary Ca(2+) sensors, have been implicated in controlling diverse cellular processes in plants including tuberization. The regulation of cellular processes by CaM involves its interaction with other proteins. To understand the role of Ca(2+)/CaM in tuberization, we have screened an expression library prepared from developing tubers with biotinylated CaM. This screening resulted in isolation of a cDNA encoding a novel CaM-binding protein (potato calmodulin-binding protein (PCBP)). Ca(2+)-dependent binding of the cDNA-encoded protein to CaM is confirmed by (35)S-labeled CaM. The full-length cDNA is 5 kb long and encodes a protein of 1309 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed significant similarity with a hypothetical protein from another plant, Arabidopsis. However, no homologs of PCBP are found in nonplant systems, suggesting that it is likely to be specific to plants. Using truncated versions of the protein and a synthetic peptide in CaM binding assays we mapped the CaM-binding region to a 20-amino acid stretch (residues 1216-1237). The bacterially expressed protein containing the CaM-binding domain interacted with three CaM isoforms (CaM2, CaM4, and CaM6). PCBP is encoded by a single gene and is expressed differentially in the tissues tested. The expression of CaM, PCBP, and another CaM-binding protein is similar in different tissues and organs. The predicted protein contained seven putative nuclear localization signals and several strong PEST motifs. Fusion of the N-terminal region of the protein containing six of the seven nuclear localization signals to the reporter gene beta-glucuronidase targeted the reporter gene to the nucleus, suggesting a nuclear role for PCBP.

  15. A pollen-specific novel calmodulin-binding protein with tetratricopeptide repeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safadi, F.; Reddy, V. S.; Reddy, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium is essential for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. A large body of information has established a link between elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) at the pollen tube tip and its growth. Since the action of Ca(2+) is primarily mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM), identification of CaM-binding proteins in pollen should provide insights into the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, a CaM-binding protein from maize pollen (maize pollen calmodulin-binding protein, MPCBP) was isolated in a protein-protein interaction-based screening using (35)S-labeled CaM as a probe. MPCBP has a molecular mass of about 72 kDa and contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) suggesting that it is a member of the TPR family of proteins. MPCBP protein shares a high sequence identity with two hypothetical TPR-containing proteins from Arabidopsis. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-Sepharose binding, we show that the bacterially expressed MPCBP binds to bovine CaM and three CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To map the CaM-binding domain several truncated versions of the MPCBP were expressed in bacteria and tested for their ability to bind CaM. Based on these studies, the CaM-binding domain was mapped to an 18-amino acid stretch between the first and second TPR regions. Gel and fluorescence shift assays performed with CaM and a CaM-binding synthetic peptide further confirmed MPCBP binding to CaM. Western, Northern, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis have shown that MPCBP expression is specific to pollen. MPCBP was detected in both soluble and microsomal proteins. Immunoblots showed the presence of MPCBP in mature and germinating pollen. Pollen-specific expression of MPCBP, its CaM-binding properties, and the presence of TPR motifs suggest a role for this protein in Ca(2+)-regulated events during pollen germination and growth.

  16. Molecular characterization of a calmodulin involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Daiker, Viktor; Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2010-04-01

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis shows a negative gravitactic behavior. This is based on physiological mechanisms which in the past have been indirectly assessed. Meanwhile, it was possible to isolate genes involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis. The DNA sequences of five calmodulins were found in Euglena, one of which was only known in its protein structure (CaM.1); the other four are new. The biosynthesis of the corresponding proteins of CaM.1-CaM.5 was inhibited by means of RNA interference to determine their involvement in the gravitactic signal transduction chain. RNAi of CaM.1 inhibits free swimming of the cells and pronounced cell-form aberrations. The division of cells was also hampered. After recovery from RNAi the cell showed precise negative gravitaxis again. Blockage of CaM.3 to CaM. 5 did not impair gravitaxis. In contrast, the blockage of CaM.2 has only a transient and not pronounced influence on motility and cell form, but leads to a total loss of gravitactic orientation for more than 30 days. This indicates that CaM.2 is an element in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in E. gracilis. The results are discussed with regard to the current working model of gravitaxis in E. gracilis.

  17. Responses of plant calmodulin to endocytosis induced by rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Cheng, Mengzhu; Chu, Yunxia; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, David D Y; Huang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Qing

    2016-07-01

    The wide application of rare earth elements (REEs) have led to their diffusion and accumulation in the environment. The activation of endocytosis is the primary response of plant cells to REEs. Calmodulin (CaM), as an important substance in calcium (Ca) signaling systems, regulating almost all of the physiological activities in plants, such as cellular metabolism, cell growth and division. However, the response of CaM to endocytosis activated by REEs remains unknown. By using immunofluorescence labeling and a confocal laser scanning microscope, we found that trivalent lanthanum [La(III)], an REE ion, affected the expression of CaM in endocytosis. Using circular dichroism, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and computer simulations, we demonstrated that a low concentration of La(III) could interact with extracellular CaM by electrostatic attraction and was then bound to two Ca-binding sites of CaM, making the molecular structure more compact and orderly, whereas a high concentration of La(III) could be coordinated with cytoplasmic CaM or bound to other Ca-binding sites, making the molecular structure more loose and disorderly. Our results provide a reference for revealing the action mechanisms of REEs in plant cells.

  18. Bcl10 is phosphorylated on Ser138 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Xavier, Ramnik

    2007-03-01

    Ordered assembly of scaffold proteins Carma1-Bcl10-Malt1 determines NF-kappaB activation following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. Carma1-Bcl10 interaction and the signaling pathway are controlled by Carma1 phosphorylation, which are induced by PKCtheta and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In addition to Carma1 phosphorylation, previous studies have demonstrated that Bcl10 is phosphorylated in the C-terminal Ser/Thr rich region following TCR engagement. However the kinases that phosphorylate Bcl10 are incompletely understood. Here we show that CaMKII phosphorylates Bcl10 on Ser138. Furthermore, a CaMKII inhibitor, KN93, and CaMKII siRNA substantially reduce Bcl10 phosphorylation induced by phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin. S138A mutation prolongs Bcl10-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting that Bcl10 phosphorylation is involved in attenuation of NF-kappaB activation. These findings suggest that CaMKII modulates NF-kappaB activation via phosphorylating Bcl10 as well as Carma1.

  19. Calmodulin-binding proteins and protein phosphorylation in corn root tips

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, M.; Mannan, R.M.; Poovaiah, B.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a mediator of Ca{sup 2+} action, can regulate enzyme activities either directly or indirectly through protein phosphorylation by activating protein kinases. To detect CaM-binding proteins, microsomal fractions were obtained from the tip and base of corn roots (Zea mays L.) and analyzed for CaM-binding proteins using a ({sup 125}I)CaM gel overlay assay. A distinct difference with respect to number and abundance of CaM-binding proteins was observed between the microsomal membrane fractions fromt he tip an the base of the root. The root tips were found to have more CaM and also more CaM-binding proteins. These results suggest the existence of coordinated regulation in the expression of CaM and its target peptides. Changing the orientation of roots from a vertical to a horizontal position increased the phosphorylation of specific polypeptides. These changes were observed within 3 min after changing the orientation. Likewise, depletion of Ca{sup 2+} with EGTA reduced this phosphorylation, and replenishment of Ca{sup 2+} restored it.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  1. Cloning and analysis of calmodulin gene from Porphyra yezoensis Ueda (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengqiang; Mao, Yunxiang; Zhuang, Yunyun; Kong, Fanna; Sui, Zhenghong

    2009-09-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of signal transduction and anti-desiccation mechanisms of Porphyra yezoensis, cDNA and its genomic sequence of Calmodulin gene (CaM) was cloned by the technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the analysis of P. yezoensis ESTs from dbEST database. The result shows that the full-length cDNA of CaM consists of 603 bps including an ORF encoding for 151 amino acids and a terminate codon UGA, while the length of genomic sequence is 1231 bps including 2 exons and 1 intron. The average GC content of the coding region is 58.77%, while the GC content of the third position of this gene is as high as 82.23%. Four Ca2+ binding sites (EF-hand) are found in this gene. The predicted molecular mass of the deduced peptide is 16688.72 Da and the pI is 4.222. By aligning with known CaM genes, the similarity of CaM gene sequence with homologous genes in Chlamydomonas incerta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is 72.7% and 72.2% respectively, and the similarity of the deduced amino acid sequence of CaM gene with homologous genes in C. incerta and C. reinhardtii are both 71.5%. This is the first report on CaM from a species of Rhodophyta.

  2. Structural and thermodynamic studies of the tobacco calmodulin-like rgs-CaM protein.

    PubMed

    Makiyama, Rodrigo K; Fernandes, Carlos A H; Dreyer, Thiago R; Moda, Bruno S; Matioli, Fabio F; Fontes, Marcos R M; Maia, Ivan G

    2016-11-01

    The tobacco calmodulin-like protein rgs-CaM is involved in host defense against virus and is reported to possess an associated RNA silencing suppressor activity. Rgs-CaM is also believed to act as an antiviral factor by interacting and targeting viral silencing suppressors for autophagic degradation. Despite these functional data, calcium interplay in the modulation of rgs-CaM is still poorly understood. Here we show that rgs-CaM displays a prevalent alpha-helical conformation and possesses three functional Ca(2+)-binding sites. Using computational modeling and molecular dynamics simulation, we demonstrate that Ca(2+) binding to rgs-CaM triggers expansion of its tertiary structure with reorientation of alpha-helices within the EF-hands. This conformational change leads to the exposure of a large negatively charged region that may be implicated in the electrostatic interactions between rgs-CaM and viral suppressors. Moreover, the kd values obtained for Ca(2+) binding to the three functional sites are not within the affinity range of a typical Ca(2+) sensor.

  3. A calmodulin-dependent protein kinase from lower eukaryote Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akio; Hanyuda, Yuki; Okagaki, Tuyoshi; Takagi, Takashi; Kohama, Kazuhiro

    2005-03-25

    A full-length cDNA coding a calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase gene was cloned from Physarum plasmodia poly(A)-RNA by polymerase chain reaction with the oligonucleotide primers that were designed after the amino acid sequence of highly conserved regions of myosin light-chain kinase. Sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed that this Physarum kinase was a 42,519-Da protein with an ATP-binding domain, Ser/Thr kinase active site signature, and CaM-binding domain. Expression of the cDNA in Escherichia coli demonstrated that the Physarum kinase in the presence of Ca2+ and CaM phosphorylated the recombinant phosphorylatable light chain (PLc) of Physarum myosin II. The peptide analysis after proteolysis of the phosphorylated PLc indicated that Ser 18 was phosphorylated. The site was confirmed by the failure of phosphorylation of PLc, the Ser 18 of which was replaced by Ala. The physiological role of the kinase will be discussed with special reference to the 55-kDa kinase, which had been previously purified from Physarum plasmodia for phosphorylated PLc.

  4. Defective calmodulin-dependent rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish sensory hair cell mutants.

    PubMed

    Seiler, C; Nicolson, T

    1999-11-15

    Vertebrate mechanosensory hair cells contain a narrow "pericuticular" zone which is densely populated with small vesicles between the cuticular plate and cellular junctions near the apical surface. The presence of many cytoplasmic vesicles suggests that the apical surface of hair cells has a high turnover rate. The significance of intense membrane trafficking at the apical surface is not known. Using a marker of endocytosis, the styryl dye FM1-43, this report shows that rapid apical endocytosis in zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells is calcium and calmodulin dependent and is partially blocked by the presence of amiloride and dihydrostreptomycin, known inhibitors of mechanotransduction channels. As seen in lateral line hair cells, sensory hair cells within the larval otic capsule also exhibit rapid apical endocytosis. Defects in internalization of the dye in both lateral line and inner ear hair cells were found in five zebrafish auditory/vestibular mutants: sputnik, mariner, orbiter, mercury, and skylab. In addition, lateral line hair cells in these mutants were not sensitive to prolonged exposure to streptomycin, which is toxic to hair cells. The presence of endocytic defects in the majority of zebrafish mechanosensory mutants points to a important role of apical endocytosis in hair cell function. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Regulation of mTORC1 by lysosomal calcium and calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruo-Jing; Xu, Jing; Fu, Chenglai; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Yujun George; Jia, Hao; Liu, Jun O

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of lysosomal calcium release due to lysosomal lipid accumulation has been shown to inhibit mTORC1 signaling. However, the mechanism by which lysosomal calcium regulates mTORC1 has remained undefined. Herein we report that proper lysosomal calcium release through the calcium channel TRPML1 is required for mTORC1 activation. TRPML1 depletion inhibits mTORC1 activity, while overexpression or pharmacologic activation of TRPML1 has the opposite effect. Lysosomal calcium activates mTORC1 by inducing association of calmodulin (CaM) with mTOR. Blocking the interaction between mTOR and CaM by antagonists of CaM significantly inhibits mTORC1 activity. Moreover, CaM is capable of stimulating the kinase activity of mTORC1 in a calcium-dependent manner in vitro. These results reveal that mTOR is a new type of CaM-dependent kinase, and TRPML1, lysosomal calcium and CaM play essential regulatory roles in the mTORC1 signaling pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19360.001 PMID:27787197

  6. [Cloning of Eleutherococcus senticosus calmodulin gene and effect of endophytic fungus on expression amount of gene].

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhaobin; Long, Yuehong; Li, Baocai; Zhu, Jinli; He, Shan

    2012-08-01

    To clone calmodulin (CaM) gene in Eleutherococcus senticosus, and study the effect of endophytic fungi on expression amount of CaM gene. The CaM full length cDNA sequence was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The gene was analyzed and corresponding structure and functions were predicted by the bioinformatics methods. The expression amount of CaM gene affected of endophytic fungus P116-1a, P116-1b, P1094 and P312-1 was detected by RT-PCR. The full length of CaM cDNA was 856 bp containing an ORF of 450 bp that encoded a protein of 149 amino acids. The homologous of predicted protein was almost 100% with plants like Panax ginseng and Daucus carota. RT-PCR results showed that endophytic fungus improved CaM expression amount significantly (P<0.05). The highest expression amount of CaM occurred 90 d after reinoculated with endophytic fungi P1094, up to 2.96 times of the control. The CaM gene of E. senticosus was successfully cloned for the first time. The results demonstrated that endophytic fungus of E. senticosus improved CaM expression amount significantly.

  7. Selective Nitration of Tyr(99) in Calmodulin as a Marker of Cellular Conditions of Oxidative Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S. ); Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Bartlett, Ryan K.; Urbauer, Ramona J.; Williams, Todd D.; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Squier, Thomas C. )

    2003-01-01

    We examined the possible role of methionines as oxidant scavengers that prevent the peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosines within calmodulin (CaM). We used mass spectrometry to investigate the reactivity of peroxynitrite with CaM at physiological pH. The possible role of methionines in scavenging peroxynitrite(ONOO-)was assessed in wild-type CaM and following substitution of all nine methionines in CaM with leucines. We find that peroxynitrite selectively nitrates Tyr-99 at physiological pH resulting in the formation of between 0.05 and 0.25 mol of nitrotyrosine/mol of CaM when the added molar ratio of peroxynitrite per CaM was varied between 2.5 and 15. In wild-type CaM there is a corresponding oxidation of between 0.8 and 2.8 mol of methionine to form methionine sulfoxide. However, following site-directed substitution of all nine methionines in wild-type CaM with leucines, the extent of nitration by peroxynitrite was unchanged. These results indicate that Tyr-99 is readily nitrated by perioxynitrite and that methionine side chains do not function as an antioxidant in scavenging perioxynitrite. Thus, separate reactive species are involved in the oxidation of

  8. A loss-of-function mutation in Calmodulin2 gene affects pollen germination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Landoni, Michela; De Francesco, Alessandra; Galbiati, Massimo; Tonelli, Chiara

    2010-10-01

    Calmodulin (CAM) is an ubiquitous calcium binding protein whose function is to translate the signals, perceived as calcium concentration variations, into the appropriate cellular responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are 4 CAM isoforms which are highly similar, encoded by 7 genes, and one possible explanation proposed for the evolutionary conservation of the CAM gene family is that the different genes have acquired different functions so that they play possibly overlapping but non-identical roles. Here we report the characterization of the Arabidopsis mutant cam2-2, identified among the lines of the gene-trapping collection EXOTIC because of a distorted segregation of kanamycin resistance. Phenotypic analysis showed that in normal growth conditions cam2-2 plants were indistinguishable from the wild type while genetic analysis showed a reduced transmission of the cam2-2 allele through the male gametophyte and in vitro pollen germination revealed a reduced level of germination in comparison with the wild type. These results provide genetic evidence of the involvement of a CAM gene in pollen germination and support the theory of functional diversification of the CAM gene family.

  9. Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel alters calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J. Z.; Wu, Y.; Williams, B. Y.; Rodney, G.; Mandel, F.; Strasburg, G. M.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    This study presents evidence for a close relationship between the oxidation state of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (RyR1) and its ability to bind calmodulin (CaM). CaM enhances the activity of RyR1 in low Ca2+ and inhibits its activity in high Ca2+. Oxidation, which activates the channel, blocks the binding of 125I-labeled CaM at both micromolar and nanomolar Ca2+ concentrations. Conversely, bound CaM slows oxidation-induced cross-linking between subunits of the RyR1 tetramer. Alkylation of hyperreactive sulfhydryls (<3% of the total sulfhydryls) on RyR1 with N-ethylmaleimide completely blocks oxidant-induced intersubunit cross-linking and inhibits Ca2+-free 125I-CaM but not Ca2+/125I-CaM binding. These studies suggest that 1) the sites on RyR1 for binding apocalmodulin have features distinct from those of the Ca2+/CaM site, 2) oxidation may alter the activity of RyR1 in part by altering its interaction with CaM, and 3) CaM may protect RyR1 from oxidative modifications during periods of oxidative stress.

  10. Calmodulin Activation by Calcium Transients in the Postsynaptic Density of Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Daniel X.; Franks, Kevin M.; Bartol, Thomas M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2008-01-01

    The entry of calcium into dendritic spines can trigger a sequence of biochemical reactions that begins with the activation of calmodulin (CaM) and ends with long-term changes to synaptic strengths. The degree of activation of CaM can depend on highly local elevations in the concentration of calcium and the duration of transient increases in calcium concentration. Accurate measurement of these local changes in calcium is difficult because the spaces are so small and the numbers of molecules are so low. We have therefore developed a Monte Carlo model of intracellular calcium dynamics within the spine that included calcium binding proteins, calcium transporters and ion channels activated by voltage and glutamate binding. The model reproduced optical recordings using calcium indicator dyes and showed that without the dye the free intracellular calcium concentration transient was much higher than predicted from the fluorescent signal. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials induced large, long-lasting calcium gradients across the postsynaptic density, which activated CaM. When glutamate was released at the synapse 10 ms before an action potential occurred, simulating activity patterns that strengthen hippocampal synapses, the calcium gradient and activation of CaM in the postsynaptic density were much greater than when the order was reversed, a condition that decreases synaptic strengths, suggesting a possible mechanism underlying the induction of long-term changes in synaptic strength. The spatial and temporal mechanisms for selectivity in CaM activation demonstrated here could be used in other signaling pathways. PMID:18446197

  11. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  12. The Cotton Kinesin-Like Calmodulin-Binding Protein Associates with Cortical Microtubles in Cotton Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Preuss, Mary L.; Delmar, Deborah P.; Liu, Bo

    2003-05-01

    Microtubules in interphase plant cells form a cortical array, which is critical for plant cell morphogenesis. Genetic studies imply that the minus end-directed microtubule motor kinesin-like calmodulin-binding protein (KCBP) plays a role in trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis. However, it was not clear whether this motor interacted with interphase microtubules. In cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers, cortical microtubules undergo dramatic reorganization during fiber development. In this study, cDNA clones of the cotton KCBP homolog GhKCBP were isolated from a cotton fiber-specific cDNA library. During cotton fiber development from 10 to 21 DPA, the GhKCBP protein level gradually decreases. By immunofluorescence, GhKCBP was detected as puncta along cortical microtubules in fiber cells of different developmental stages. Thus the results provide evidence that GhKCBP plays a role in interphase cell growth likely by interacting with cortical microtubules. In contrast to fibers, in dividing cells of cotton, GhKCBP localized to the nucleus, the microtubule preprophase band, mitotic spindle, and the phragmoplast. Therefore KCBP likely exerts multiple roles in cell division and cell growth in flowering plants.

  13. Matrin 3 is a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-binding protein cleaved by caspases

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Valencia, C.; Ju, Wujian; Liu, Rihe . E-mail: rihe_liu@unc.edu

    2007-09-21

    Matrin 3 is a nuclear matrix protein that has been implicated in interacting with other nuclear proteins to anchor hyperedited RNAs to the nuclear matrix, in modulating the activity of proximal promoters, and as the main PKA substrate following NMDA receptor activation. In our proteome-wide selections for calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins and for caspase substrates using mRNA-displayed human proteome libraries, matrin 3 was identified as both a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent CaM-binding protein and a downstream substrate of caspases. We report here, the in vitro characterization of the CaM-binding motif and the caspase cleavage site on matrin 3. Significantly, the Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-binding motif is partially overlapped by the RRM of matrin 3 and is also very close to the bipartite NLS that is essential for its nuclear localization. The caspase cleavage site is downstream of the NLS but upstream of the second U1-like zinc finger. Our results suggest that the functions of matrin 3 could be regulated by both Ca{sup 2+}-dependent interaction with CaM and caspase-mediated cleavage.

  14. Distinguishing Unfolding and Functional Conformational Transitions of Calmodulin Using Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Squier, Thomas C.; Spiro, Thomas

    2014-06-14

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous moderator protein for calcium signaling in all eukaryotic cells. This small calcium-binding protein exhibits a broad range of structural transitions, including domain opening and folding-unfolding, that allow it to recognize a wide variety of binding partners in vivo. While the static structures of CaM associated with its various binding activities are fairly well known, it has been challenging to examine the dynamics of transition between these structures in real-time, due to a lack of suitable spectroscopic probes of CaM structure. In this paper, we examine the potential of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy for clarifying the nature of structural transitions in CaM. We find that the UVRR spectral change (with 229 nm excitation) due to thermal unfolding of CaM is qualitatively different from that associated with opening of the C-terminal domain in response to Ca2+ binding. This spectral difference is entirely due to differences in teritary contacts at the inter-domain tyrosine residue Tyr138, toward which other spectroscopic methods are not sensitive. We conclude that UVRR is ideally suited to identifying the different types of structural transitions in CaM and other proteins with conformation-sensitive tyrosine residues, opening a path to time-resolved studies of CaM dynamics using Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Calcium/calmodulin kinase II activity of hippocampus in kainate-induced epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M. C.; Ban, S. S.; Woo, Y. J.; Kim, S. U.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) activity related to long-standing neuronal injury of the hippocampus in kainate (KA)-induced experimental temporal lobe epilepsy. Epileptic seizure was induced by injection of KA (1 microg/microL) dissolved in phosphate buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4) into the left amygdala. Clinical seizures, histopathologic changes and CaMKII activity of the hippocampus were evaluated. Characteristic early limbic and late seizures were developed. Hippocampal CaMKII activity increased significantly 4 and 8 weeks after intra-amygdaloid injection of KA, when late seizures developed. The histopathologic changes of the hippocampus included swelling of neuronal cytoplasm with nuclear pyknosis and loss of neurons in CA3 during this period. The increased activity of CaMKII may correlate with appearance of distant damage in the hippocampus. The above results indicate that intra-amygdaloid injection of KA produces excitatory signals for ipsilateral CA3 neurons in the hippocampus and that subsequently increased levels of CaMKII in postsynaptic neurons induce neuronal injury via phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate type glutamate receptor. PMID:11641537

  16. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Love, Nick R; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-02-03

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD(+) kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms.

  17. Hunting increases phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II in adult barn owls.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is "off" in adults.

  18. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults. PMID:25789177

  19. Distribution of calmodulin in pea seedlings: immunocytochemical localization in plumules and root apices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.; Hardison, L.

    1986-01-01

    Immunofluorescence techniques have been used to study the distribution of calmodulin in several tissues in young etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings. A fairly uniform staining was seen in the nucleoplasm and background cytoplasm of most cell types. Cell walls and nucleoli were not stained. In addition, patterned staining reactions were seen in many cells. In cells of the plumule, punctate staining of the cytoplasm was common, and in part this stain appeared to be associated with the plastids. A very distinctive staining of amyloplasts was seen in the columella of the root cap. Staining associated with cytoskeletal elements could be shown in division stages. By metaphase, staining of the spindle region was quite evident. In epidermal cells of the stem and along the underside of the leaf there was an intense staining of the vacuolar contents. Guard cells lacked this vacuolar stain. Vacuolar staining was sometimes seen in cells of the stele, but the most distinctive pattern in the stele was associated with young conducting cells of the xylem. These staining patterns are consistent with the idea that the interactions of plastids and the cytoskeletal may be one of the Ca(2+)-mediated steps in the response of plants to environmental stimuli. Nuclear functions may also be controlled, at least in part, by Ca2+.

  20. Calcium release through P2X4 activates calmodulin to promote endolysosomal membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qi; Zhong, Xi Zoë; Zou, Yuanjie; Murrell-Lagnado, Ruth; Zhu, Michael X.

    2015-01-01

    Intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release is required for endolysosomal membrane fusion with intracellular organelles. However, the molecular mechanisms for intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release and the downstream Ca2+ targets involved in the fusion remain elusive. Previously, we demonstrated that endolysosomal P2X4 forms channels activated by luminal adenosine triphosphate in a pH-dependent manner. In this paper, we show that overexpression of P2X4, as well as increasing endolysosomal P2X4 activity by alkalinization of endolysosome lumen, promoted vacuole enlargement in cells and endolysosome fusion in a cell-free assay. These effects were prevented by inhibiting P2X4, expressing a dominant-negative P2X4 mutant, and disrupting the P2X4 gene. We further show that P2X4 and calmodulin (CaM) form a complex at endolysosomal membrane where P2X4 activation recruits CaM to promote fusion and vacuolation in a Ca2+-dependent fashion. Moreover, P2X4 activation-triggered fusion and vacuolation were suppressed by inhibiting CaM. Our data thus suggest a new molecular mechanism for endolysosomal membrane fusion involving P2X4-mediated endolysosomal Ca2+ release and subsequent CaM activation. PMID:26101220

  1. Secreted calmodulin-like skin protein ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaaki; Tajima, Hirohisa; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2014-06-18

    Humanin, a short bioactive peptide, inhibits cell death in a variety of cell-based death models through Humanin receptors in vitro. In vivo, Humanin ameliorates both muscarinic receptor antagonist-induced memory impairment in normal mice and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-relevant mouse models including aged transgenic mice expressing a familial AD-linked gene. Recently, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP) has been shown to be secreted from skin tissues, contain a region minimally similar to the core region of Humanin, and inhibit AD-related neuronal death through the heterotrimeric Humanin receptor on the cell surface in vitro. As CLSP is much more potent than Humanin and efficiently transported through blood circulation across the blood-brain barrier to the central nervous system, CLSP is considered as a physiological agonist that binds to the heterotrimeric Humanin receptor and triggers the Humanin-induced signals in central nervous system. However, it remains unknown whether CLSP ameliorates memory impairment in mouse dementia models as Humanin does. In this study, we show that recombinant CLSP, administered intracerebroventricularly or intraperitoneally, ameliorates scopolamine-induced dementia in mice.

  2. Intracerebroventricular administration of morphine confers remote cardioprotection--role of opioid receptors and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Irwin, Michael G; Lu, Yao; Mei, Bin; Zuo, You-Mei; Chen, Zhi-Wu; Wong, Tak-Ming

    2011-04-10

    The current study aimed to delineate the mechanism of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine (RMPC) against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intracerebroventricular morphine injection before myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Ischemia-reperfusion injury was achieved by 30min of left coronary artery occlusion followed by 120min of reperfusion. The effects of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine preconditioning were also determined upon selective blockade of the δ, κ or μ-opioid receptors, or calmodulin (CaM). The infarct size, as a percentage of the area at risk, was determined by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium staining. Remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine reduced infarct size in the ischemic/reperfused myocardium, and the effect was abolished by the selective blockade of any one of the three δ, κ and μ opioid receptors or CaM. Furthermore, remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine increased the expression of CaM in the hippocampus and the plasma level of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The results of the present study provide evidence that the cardioprotection of remote preconditioning by intracerebroventricular morphine involves not only all three types of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, but also CaM, which releases CGRP, one of the mediators of remote preconditioning.

  3. Divergent Soybean Calmodulins Respond Similarly to Calcium Transients: Insight into Differential Target Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Shane D.; Chakravarthy, Harshini; Shettigar, Vikram; O’Neil, Andrew J.; Siddiqui, Jalal K.; Jones, Benjamin R.; Tikunova, Svetlana B.; Davis, Jonathan P.

    2017-01-01

    Plants commonly respond to stressors by modulating the expression of a large family of calcium binding proteins including isoforms of the ubiquitous signaling protein calmodulin (CaM). The various plant CaM isoforms are thought to differentially regulate the activity of specific target proteins to modulate cellular stress responses. The mechanism(s) behind differential target activation by the plant CaMs is unknown. In this study, we used steady-state and stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the strategy by which two soybean CaMs (sCaM1 and sCaM4) have evolved to differentially regulate NAD kinase (NADK), which is activated by sCaM1 but inhibited by sCaM4. Although the isolated proteins have different cation binding properties, in the presence of Mg2+ and the CaM binding domains from proteins that are differentially regulated, the two plant CaMs respond nearly identically to rapid and slow Ca2+ transients. Our data suggest that the plant CaMs have evolved to bind certain targets with comparable affinities, respond similarly to a particular Ca2+ signature, but achieve different structural states, only one of which can activate the enzyme. Understanding the basis for differential enzyme regulation by the plant CaMs is the first step to engineering a vertebrate CaM that will selectively alter the CaM signaling network. PMID:28261258

  4. Conservation of Ca2+/Calmodulin Regulation across Na and Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Yang, Philemon S.; Niu, Jacqueline; Yang, Wanjun; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, David T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+channels comprise distinct ion-channel superfamilies, yet the carboxy tails of these channels exhibit high homology hinting at a long-shared and purposeful module. For different Ca2+ channels, carboxyl-tail inter actions with calmodulin do elaborate robust and similar forms of Ca2+ regulation. However, Na channels have only shown subtler Ca2+modulation that differs among reports, challenging attempts at unified understanding. Here, by rapid Ca2+photoreleaseon to Na channels, we reset this view of Na channel regulation. For cardiac muscle channels (NaV1.5), reported effects from which most mechanistic proposals derive, we observe no Ca2+modulation. Conversely, for skeletal-muscle channels (NaV1.4), we uncover fast Ca2+ regulation eerily similar to that of Ca2+ channels. Channel opathic myotonia mutations halve NaV1.4 Ca2+ regulation, and transplanting the NaV1.4 carboxy tail onto Ca2+ channels recapitulates Ca2+ regulation. Thus we argue for the persistence and physiological relevance of an ancient Ca2+ regulatory module across Na and Ca2+ channels. PMID:24949975

  5. Physiological calcium concentrations regulate calmodulin binding and catalysis of adenylyl cyclase exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuequan; Lee, Young-Sam; Soelaiman, Sandriyana; Bergson, Pamela; Lu, Dan; Chen, Alice; Beckingham, Kathy; Grabarek, Zenon; Mrksich, Milan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2002-12-16

    Edema factor (EF) and CyaA are calmodulin (CaM)-activated adenylyl cyclase exotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of anthrax and whooping cough, respectively. Using spectroscopic, enzyme kinetic and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy analyses, we show that low Ca(2+) concentrations increase the affinity of CaM for EF and CyaA causing their activation, but higher Ca(2+) concentrations directly inhibit catalysis. Both events occur in a physiologically relevant range of Ca(2+) concentrations. Despite the similarity in Ca(2+) sensitivity, EF and CyaA have substantial differences in CaM binding and activation. CyaA has 100-fold higher affinity for CaM than EF. CaM has N- and C-terminal globular domains, each binding two Ca(2+) ions. CyaA can be fully activated by CaM mutants with one defective C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding site or by either terminal domain of CaM while EF cannot. EF consists of a catalytic core and a helical domain, and both are required for CaM activation of EF. Mutations that decrease the interaction of the helical domain with the catalytic core create an enzyme with higher sensitivity to Ca(2+)-CaM activation. However, CyaA is fully activated by CaM without the domain corresponding to the helical domain of EF.

  6. Structural analysis of calmodulin binding by nNOS inhibitory amphibian peptides.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Antonio N; Bowie, John H; Pukala, Tara L

    2015-01-20

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous protein in nature and plays a regulatory role in numerous biological processes, including the upregulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in vivo. Several peptides that prevent NO production by interacting with CaM have been isolated in the cutaneous secretions of Australian amphibians, and are thought to serve as a defense mechanism against predators. In this work, we probe the mechanism by which three of these peptides, namely, caerin 1.8, dahlein 5.6, and a synthetic modification of citropin 1.1, interact with CaM to inhibit NO signaling. Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to determine thermodynamic parameters of the binding interactions and revealed that all the peptides bind to CaM in a similar fashion, with the peptide encapsulated between the two lobes of CaM. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry was used to investigate the changes in collision cross section that occur as a result of complexation, providing additional evidence for this binding mode. Finally, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to track chemical shift changes upon binding. The results obtained confirm that these complexes adopt canonical collapsed structures and demonstrate the strength of the interaction between the peptides and CaM. An understanding of these molecular recognition events provides insights into the underlying mechanism of the amphibian host-defense system.

  7. Calmodulin-like protein from M. tuberculosis H37Rv is required during infection

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Meeta J.; Rajagopalan, Malini; Reddy, P. Hemalatha

    2014-01-01

    M. tuberculosis constitutes very sophisticated signaling systems that convert the environment signals into appropriate cellular response and helps the bacilli to overcome the onslaught of host defence mechanisms. Although mycobacterial two-component systems and STPKs have gained lot of attention as virulence factors, mycobacterial calcium signaling has not been very well studied. Calcium signaling has been the primary mechanism in eukaryotes for regulation of kinases, however in prokaryotes auto-phosphorylation of number of kinases has been reported. We have previously reported a small calmodulin-like-protein (CAMLP) from M. tuberculosis regulating enzymes of heterogeneous origin. To understand its role in both viability and virulence, we have assessed the effect of reduced expression of CAMLP coding gene Rv1211 on M. tb growth in vitro and ex vivo. Further, we have also studied the expression profile of Rv1211 in various conditions simulating host microenvironments. Our results highlight the possible role of CAMLP in growth and survival of M. tb during infection. PMID:25359006

  8. Calmodulin-dependent kinase II regulates osteoblast differentiation through regulation of Osterix.

    PubMed

    Choi, You Hee; Choi, Jun-Ha; Oh, Jae-Wook; Lee, Kwang-Youl

    2013-03-08

    Osterix (Osx), a zinc-finger transcription factor, is required for osteoblast differentiation and new bone formation during embryonic development. Calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) acts as a key regulator of osteoblast differentiation. However, the precise molecular signaling mechanisms between Osterix and CaMKII are not known. In this study, we focused on the relationship between Osterix and CaMKII during osteoblast differentiation. We examined the role of the CaMKII pathway in the regulation of protein levels and its transcriptional activity on Osterix. We showed that CaMKII interacts with Osterix by increasing the protein levels and enhancing the transcriptional activity of Osterix. Conversely, CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 decreases the protein levels and increases the stability of Osterix. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKII decreased the protein levels and transcriptional activity of Osterix. These results suggest that Osterix is a novel target of CaMKII and the activity of Osterix can be modulated by a novel mechanism involving CaMKII during osteoblast differentiation.

  9. Calmodulin-mediated suppression of 2-ketoisovalerate reductase in Beauveria bassiana beauvericin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Yoon, Deok-Hyo; Oh, Junsang; Hyun, Min-Woo; Han, Jae-Gu; Sung, Gi-Ho

    2016-11-01

    Ketoisovalerate reductase (KIVR, E.C. 1.2.7.7) mediates the specific reduction of 2-ketoisovalerate (2-Kiv) to d-hydroxyisovalerate (d-Hiv), a precursor for beauvericin biosynthesis. Beauvericin, a famous mycotoxin produced by many fungi, is a cyclooligomer depsipeptide, which has insecticidal, antimicrobial, antiviral, and cytotoxic activities. In this report, we demonstrated that Beauveria bassiana 2-ketoisovalerate reductase (BbKIVR) acts as a typical KIVR enzyme in the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana. In addition, we found that BbKIVR interacts with calmodulin (CaM) in vitro and in vivo. The functional role of CaM-binding to BbKIVR was to negatively regulate the BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress suppressed BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Interestingly, this negative effect of BbKIVR activity by light and salt stress was recovered by CaM inhibitors, suggesting that the inhibitory mechanism is mediated through stimulation of CaM activity. Therefore, this work suggests that BbKIVR plays an important role in the beauvericin biosynthetic pathway mediated by environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress via the CaM signaling pathway.

  10. Calcium-modulated conformational affinity chromatography. Application to the purification of calmodulin and S100 proteins.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, G; Neufeld, T; Star-Weinstock, M; Litvak, M; Solomon, B

    1992-04-24

    The purification of proteins by affinity chromatography is based on their highly specific interaction with an immobilized ligand followed by elution under conditions where their affinity towards the ligand is markedly reduced. Thus, a high-degree purification by a single chromatographic step is achieved. However, when several proteins in the crude mixture share affinity to a common immobilized ligand, they may not be resolved by affinity chromatography and subsequent "real" chromatographic purification steps may be required. It is shown that by using properly selected gradient elution conditions, the affinities of the various proteins towards the immobilized ligand may be gradually modulated and their separation may be achieved. This is exemplified by the isolation and separation of a group of Ca(2+)-activated proteins, Calmodulin, S100a and S100b, from bovine brain extract, using a melittin-Eupergit C affinity column which is developed with Ca(2+)-chelator gradients. As expected, separation of the three proteins into individual peaks, eluted in order of increasing affinity to the matrix, was obtained. Sigmoid selectivity curves calculated from the elution volumes under different elution conditions for each of the proteins were obtained, illustrating the chromatographic behaviour of the gradient affinity separation system.

  11. Role of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinases in skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Chin, Eva R

    2005-08-01

    In skeletal muscle, the increase in intracellular Ca(2+) resulting from motor activation plays a key role in both contractile activity-dependent and fiber type-specific gene expression. These motor activation-dependent signals are linked to the amplitude and duration of the Ca(2+) transients that are decoded downstream by Ca(2+)-dependent transcriptional pathways. Evidence is mounting that the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKs) such as CaMKII play an important role in regulating oxidative enzyme expression, mitochondrial biogenesis, and expression of fiber type-specific myofibrillar proteins. CaMKIV has been shown to promote mitochondrial biogenesis and a mild fast-to-slow fiber type transition but has recently been shown to not be required for activity-dependent changes in muscle phenotype. CaMKII is known to decode frequency-dependent information and is activated during hypertrophic growth and endurance adaptations and also is upregulated during muscle atrophy. CaMKII has also been shown to remain active in a Ca(2+)-independent manner after acute and prolonged exercise, and, therefore, is implicated as a mechanism for muscle memory. This mechanism can sense altered functional demands and trigger activation of an adaptational response that is dose dependently related to the activation level. This class of enzymes may therefore be the ideal decoders of information encoded by the intensity, frequency, and duty cycle of muscle activation and thus translate level of muscle activation into phenotypic adaptations through regulation of important muscle genes.

  12. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II function in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Singer, Harold A

    2012-03-15

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM) undergoes a phenotypic switch in response to injury, a process that contributes to pathophysiological vascular wall remodelling. VSM phenotype switching is a consequence of changes in gene expression, including an array of ion channels and pumps affecting spatiotemporal features of intracellular Ca(2+) signals. Ca(2+) signalling promotes vascular wall remodelling by regulating cell proliferation, motility, and/or VSM gene transcription, although the mechanisms are not clear. In this review, the functions of multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in VSM phenotype switching and synthetic phenotype function are considered. CaMKII isozymes have complex structural and autoregulatory properties. Vascular injury in vivo results in rapid changes in CaMKII isoform expression with reduced expression of CaMKIIγ and upregulation of CaMKIIδ in medial wall VSM. SiRNA-mediated suppression of CaMKIIδ or gene deletion attenuates VSM proliferation and consequent neointimal formation. In vitro studies support functions for CaMKII in the regulation of cell proliferation, motility and gene expression via phosphorylation of CREB1 and HDACIIa/MEF2 complexes. These studies support the concept, and provide potential mechanisms, whereby Ca(2+) signalling through CaMKIIδ promotes VSM phenotype transitions and vascular remodelling.

  13. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II function in vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Harold A

    2012-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM) undergoes a phenotypic switch in response to injury, a process that contributes to pathophysiological vascular wall remodelling. VSM phenotype switching is a consequence of changes in gene expression, including an array of ion channels and pumps affecting spatiotemporal features of intracellular Ca2+ signals. Ca2+ signalling promotes vascular wall remodelling by regulating cell proliferation, motility, and/or VSM gene transcription, although the mechanisms are not clear. In this review, the functions of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in VSM phenotype switching and synthetic phenotype function are considered. CaMKII isozymes have complex structural and autoregulatory properties. Vascular injury in vivo results in rapid changes in CaMKII isoform expression with reduced expression of CaMKIIγ and upregulation of CaMKIIδ in medial wall VSM. SiRNA-mediated suppression of CaMKIIδ or gene deletion attenuates VSM proliferation and consequent neointimal formation. In vitro studies support functions for CaMKII in the regulation of cell proliferation, motility and gene expression via phosphorylation of CREB1 and HDACIIa/MEF2 complexes. These studies support the concept, and provide potential mechanisms, whereby Ca2+ signalling through CaMKIIδ promotes VSM phenotype transitions and vascular remodelling. PMID:22124148

  14. [Gene expression and activity regulation of two calmodulin binding protein kinases in tobacco seedling].

    PubMed

    Hua, Wei; Li, Rong-Jun; Liang, Shu-Ping; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2005-06-01

    Two different calmodulin-binding protein kinase cDNAs (NtCBK1/2) have been isolated from tobacco. To understand the CBK protein activity regulation, we compared the activity regulation of NtCBK1 and NtCBK2 by pH, Mg(2+) concentration and Na(+) concentration. We found the autophosphorylation of NtCBK1/2 reached the maximum in pH 7.5 and 8 respectively; Mg(2+) and Na(+) shown different effects on the activity of NtCBKs, high and low Mg(2+) concentrations both inhibited the activity of NtCBKs, but Na+ had little effect on the kinase activity. In addition, to obtain further insight about the physiological roles of individual NtCBKs, we detected the expression profiles of CBKs. The results revealed different patterns of expression of NtCBK1 and NtCBK2. Both are largely expressed in leaf and flower; but in stem and root, NtCBK1 gene had stronger expression than NtCBK2. NtCBK2 expression was induced by GA treatment, while NtCBK1 expression remained unchanged under GA treatment. Expression of both NtCBK1 and NtCBK2 increased in response to salt stress, the former to a greater extent, and both expressions did not change under high/low temperature, drought, NAA and ABA treatments.

  15. Regulation of gastrointestinal motility by Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Perrino, Brian A

    2011-06-15

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility ultimately depends upon the contractile activity of the smooth muscle cells of the tunica muscularis. Integrated functioning of multiple tissues and cell types, including enteric neurons and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) is necessary to generate coordinated patterns of motor activity that control the movement of material through the digestive tract. The neurogenic mechanisms that govern GI motility patterns are superimposed upon intrinsic myogenic mechanisms regulating smooth muscle cell excitability. Several mechanisms regulate smooth muscle cell responses to neurogenic inputs, including the multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII). CaMKII can be activated by Ca(2+) transients from both extracellular and intracellular sources. Prolonging the activities of Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels in the plasma membrane of GI smooth muscle cells is an important regulatory mechanism carried out by CaMKII. Phospholamban (PLN) phosphorylation by CaMKII activates the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), increasing both the rate of Ca(2+) clearance from the myoplasm and the frequency of localized Ca(2+) release events from intracellular stores. Overall, CaMKII appears to moderate GI smooth muscle cell excitability. Finally, transcription factor activities may be facilitated by the neutralization of HDAC4 by CaMKII phosphorylation, which may contribute to the phenotypic plasticity of GI smooth muscle cells.

  16. Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel alters calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J. Z.; Wu, Y.; Williams, B. Y.; Rodney, G.; Mandel, F.; Strasburg, G. M.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    This study presents evidence for a close relationship between the oxidation state of the skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (RyR1) and its ability to bind calmodulin (CaM). CaM enhances the activity of RyR1 in low Ca2+ and inhibits its activity in high Ca2+. Oxidation, which activates the channel, blocks the binding of 125I-labeled CaM at both micromolar and nanomolar Ca2+ concentrations. Conversely, bound CaM slows oxidation-induced cross-linking between subunits of the RyR1 tetramer. Alkylation of hyperreactive sulfhydryls (<3% of the total sulfhydryls) on RyR1 with N-ethylmaleimide completely blocks oxidant-induced intersubunit cross-linking and inhibits Ca2+-free 125I-CaM but not Ca2+/125I-CaM binding. These studies suggest that 1) the sites on RyR1 for binding apocalmodulin have features distinct from those of the Ca2+/CaM site, 2) oxidation may alter the activity of RyR1 in part by altering its interaction with CaM, and 3) CaM may protect RyR1 from oxidative modifications during periods of oxidative stress.

  17. Calmodulin activation of Aurora-A kinase (AURKA) is required during ciliary disassembly and in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, Olga V; Nikonova, Anna S; Loskutov, Yuri V; Kozyulina, Polina Y; Pugacheva, Elena N; Golemis, Erica A

    2012-07-01

    The centrosomal Aurora-A kinase (AURKA) regulates mitotic progression, and overexpression and hyperactivation of AURKA commonly promotes genomic instability in many tumors. Although most studies of AURKA focus on its role in mitosis, some recent work identified unexpected nonmitotic activities of AURKA. Among these, a role for basal body-localized AURKA in regulating ciliary disassembly in interphase cells has highlighted a role in regulating cellular responsiveness to growth factors and mechanical cues. The mechanism of AURKA activation involves interactions with multiple partner proteins and is not well understood, particularly in interphase cells. We show here that AURKA activation at the basal body in ciliary disassembly requires interactions with Ca(2+) and calmodulin (CaM) and that Ca(2+)/CaM are important mediators of the ciliary disassembly process. We also show that Ca(2+)/CaM binding is required for AURKA activation in mitosis and that inhibition of CaM activity reduces interaction between AURKA and its activator, NEDD9. Finally, mutated derivatives of AURKA impaired for CaM binding and/or CaM-dependent activation cause defects in mitotic progression, cytokinesis, and ciliary resorption. These results define Ca(2+)/CaM as important regulators of AURKA activation in mitotic and nonmitotic signaling.

  18. Calmodulin kinase II is required for angiotensin II-mediated vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Li, Weiwei; Gupta, Arun K.; Mohler, Peter J.; Anderson, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite our understanding that medial smooth muscle hypertrophy is a central feature of vascular remodeling, the molecular pathways underlying this pathology are still not well understood. Work over the past decade has illustrated a potential role for the multifunctional calmodulin-dependent kinase CaMKII in smooth muscle cell contraction, growth, and migration. Here we demonstrate that CaMKII is enriched in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and that CaMKII inhibition blocks ANG II-dependent VSM cell hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, systemic CaMKII inhibition with KN-93 prevented ANG II-mediated hypertension and medial hypertrophy in vivo. Adenoviral transduction with the CaMKII peptide inhibitor CaMKIIN abrogated ANG II-induced VSM hypertrophy in vitro, which was augmented by overexpression of CaMKII-δ2. Finally, we identify the downstream signaling components critical for ANG II- and CaMKII-mediated VSM hypertrophy. Specifically, we demonstrate that CaMKII induces VSM hypertrophy by regulating histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) activity, thereby stimulating activity of the hypertrophic transcription factor MEF2. MEF2 transcription is activated by ANG II in vivo and abrogated by the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93. Together, our studies identify a complete pathway for ANG II-triggered arterial VSM hypertrophy and identify new potential therapeutic targets for chronic human hypertension. PMID:20023119

  19. Calmodulin kinase II is required for angiotensin II-mediated vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Li, Weiwei; Gupta, Arun K; Mohler, Peter J; Anderson, Mark E; Grumbach, Isabella M

    2010-02-01

    Despite our understanding that medial smooth muscle hypertrophy is a central feature of vascular remodeling, the molecular pathways underlying this pathology are still not well understood. Work over the past decade has illustrated a potential role for the multifunctional calmodulin-dependent kinase CaMKII in smooth muscle cell contraction, growth, and migration. Here we demonstrate that CaMKII is enriched in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and that CaMKII inhibition blocks ANG II-dependent VSM cell hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, systemic CaMKII inhibition with KN-93 prevented ANG II-mediated hypertension and medial hypertrophy in vivo. Adenoviral transduction with the CaMKII peptide inhibitor CaMKIIN abrogated ANG II-induced VSM hypertrophy in vitro, which was augmented by overexpression of CaMKII-delta2. Finally, we identify the downstream signaling components critical for ANG II- and CaMKII-mediated VSM hypertrophy. Specifically, we demonstrate that CaMKII induces VSM hypertrophy by regulating histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) activity, thereby stimulating activity of the hypertrophic transcription factor MEF2. MEF2 transcription is activated by ANG II in vivo and abrogated by the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93. Together, our studies identify a complete pathway for ANG II-triggered arterial VSM hypertrophy and identify new potential therapeutic targets for chronic human hypertension.

  20. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  1. Quantum Chemical Studies on Stability and Chemical Activities in Calcium Ion Bound Calmodulin Loops.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Samapan; Ghosh, Mahua; De Raychaudhury, Molly; Chakrabarti, J

    2015-11-19

    Quantum chemical (QC) calculations for macromolecules require truncation of the molecule, highlighting the portion of interest due to heavy computation cost. As a result, an estimation of the effects of truncation is important to interpret the energy spectrum of such calculations. We perform density functional theory based QC calculations on calcium ion bound EF-hand loops of Calmodulin isolated from the crystal structure in an implicit solvent. We find that the terminal contributions of neutral capping are negligible across the entire ground-state energy spectrum. The coordination energy range and the nature of hybridization of the coordination state molecular orbitals remain qualitatively similar across these loops. While the HOMO and LUMO of loops in the N-terminal domain are dominated by the acidic aspartates, and the polar/hydrophobic residues, respectively, these levels of the C-terminal domain loops show strong localized electron density on the phenyl rings of the tyrosines. The Fukui index calculation identifies the hydroxyl oxygen in the phenyl ring of Y99 as a potent nucleophile. Our analysis indicates a general way of interpreting the electronic energy spectra to understand stability and functions of large biomolecules where the truncation of the molecule and, hence, the terminal capping effects are inevitable.

  2. Gangliosides stimulate bradykinin B2 receptors to promote calmodulin kinase II-mediated neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kanatsu, Yoshinori; Chen, Nai Hong; Mitoma, Junya; Nakagawa, Tetsuto; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Higashi, Hideyoshi

    2012-07-01

    Gangliosides mediate neuronal differentiation and maturation and are indispensable for the maintenance of brain function and survival. As part of our ongoing efforts to understand signaling pathways related to ganglioside function, we recently demonstrated that neuronal cells react to exogenous gangliosides GT1b and GD1b. Both of these gangliosides are enriched in the synapse-forming area of the brain and induce Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and activation of cdc42 to promote reorganization of cytoskeletal actin and dendritic differentiation. Here, we show that bradykinin B2 receptors transduce these reactions as a mediator for ganglioside glycan signals. The B2 antagonist Hoe140 inhibited ganglioside-induced CaMKII activation, actin reorganization and early development of axon- and dendrite-like processes of primary cultured hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we confirmed by yeast reporter assay that major b-series gangliosides, GT1b, GD1b and GD3, stimulated B2 bradykinin receptors. We hypothesize that this B2 receptor-mediated ganglioside signal transduction pathway is one mechanism that modulates neuronal differentiation and maturation.

  3. Distribution of calmodulin in pea seedlings: immunocytochemical localization in plumules and root apices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.; Hardison, L.

    1986-01-01

    Immunofluorescence techniques have been used to study the distribution of calmodulin in several tissues in young etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings. A fairly uniform staining was seen in the nucleoplasm and background cytoplasm of most cell types. Cell walls and nucleoli were not stained. In addition, patterned staining reactions were seen in many cells. In cells of the plumule, punctate staining of the cytoplasm was common, and in part this stain appeared to be associated with the plastids. A very distinctive staining of amyloplasts was seen in the columella of the root cap. Staining associated with cytoskeletal elements could be shown in division stages. By metaphase, staining of the spindle region was quite evident. In epidermal cells of the stem and along the underside of the leaf there was an intense staining of the vacuolar contents. Guard cells lacked this vacuolar stain. Vacuolar staining was sometimes seen in cells of the stele, but the most distinctive pattern in the stele was associated with young conducting cells of the xylem. These staining patterns are consistent with the idea that the interactions of plastids and the cytoskeletal may be one of the Ca(2+)-mediated steps in the response of plants to environmental stimuli. Nuclear functions may also be controlled, at least in part, by Ca2+.

  4. Novel Role of Calmodulin in Regulating Protein Transport to Mitochondria in a Unicellular Eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Lower eukaryotes like the kinetoplastid parasites are good models to study evolution of cellular pathways during steps to eukaryogenesis. In this study, a kinetoplastid parasite, Leishmania donovani, was used to understand the process of mitochondrial translocation of a nucleus-encoded mitochondrial protein, the mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase (mTXNPx). We report the presence of an N-terminal cleavable mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) validated through deletion and grafting experiments. We also establish a novel finding of calmodulin (CaM) binding to the MTS of mTXNPx through specific residues. Mutation of CaM binding residues, keeping intact the residues involved in mitochondrial targeting and biochemical inhibition of CaM activity both in vitro and in vivo, prevented mitochondrial translocation. Through reconstituted import assays, we demonstrate obstruction of mitochondrial translocation either in the absence of CaM or Ca2+ or in the presence of CaM inhibitors. We also demonstrate the prevention of temperature-driven mTXNPx aggregation in the presence of CaM. These findings establish the idea that CaM is required for the transport of the protein to mitochondria through maintenance of translocation competence posttranslation. PMID:24043313

  5. Calmodulin binding proteins provide domains of local Ca2+ signaling in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J; Bers, Donald M

    2012-02-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) acts as a common Ca(2+) sensor for many signaling pathways, transducing local Ca(2+) signals into specific cellular outcomes. Many of CaM's signaling functions can be explained by its unique biochemical properties, including high and low affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites with slow and fast kinetics, respectively. CaM is expected to have a limited spatial range of action, emphasizing its role in local Ca(2+) signaling. Interactions with target proteins further fine-tune CaM signal transduction. Here, we focus on only three specific cellular targets for CaM signaling in cardiac myocytes: the L-type Ca(2+) channel, the ryanodine receptor, and the IP(3) receptor. We elaborate a working hypothesis that each channel is regulated by two distinct functional populations of CaM: dedicated CaM and promiscuous CaM. Dedicated CaM is typically tethered to each channel and directly regulates channel activity. In addition, a local pool of promiscuous CaM appears poised to sense local Ca(2+) signals and trigger downstream pathways such as Ca(2+)/CaM dependent-protein kinase II and calcineurin. Understanding how promiscuous CaM coordinates multiple distinct signaling pathways remains a challenge, but is aided by the use of mathematical modeling and a new generation of fluorescent biosensors. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes."

  6. Capping of the N-terminus of PSD-95 by calmodulin triggers its postsynaptic release

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghong; Matt, Lucas; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Malik, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Park, Deborah K; Renieri, Alessandra; Ames, James B; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-01-01

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is a central element of the postsynaptic architecture of glutamatergic synapses. PSD-95 mediates postsynaptic localization of AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors and plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. PSD-95 is released from postsynaptic membranes in response to Ca2+ influx via NMDA receptors. Here, we show that Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) binds at the N-terminus of PSD-95. Our NMR structure reveals that both lobes of CaM collapse onto a helical structure of PSD-95 formed at its N-terminus (residues 1–16). This N-terminal capping of PSD-95 by CaM blocks palmitoylation of C3 and C5, which is required for postsynaptic PSD-95 targeting and the binding of CDKL5, a kinase important for synapse stability. CaM forms extensive hydrophobic contacts with Y12 of PSD-95. The PSD-95 mutant Y12E strongly impairs binding to CaM and Ca2+-induced release of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane in dendritic spines. Our data indicate that CaM binding to PSD-95 serves to block palmitoylation of PSD-95, which in turn promotes Ca2+-induced dissociation of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane. PMID:24705785

  7. Calmodulin regulation of TMEM16A and 16B Ca2+-activated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tingting; Colecraft, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+-activated chloride channels encoded by TMEM16A and 16B are important for regulating epithelial mucus secretion, cardiac and neuronal excitability, smooth muscle contraction, olfactory transduction, and cell proliferation. Whether and how the ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor calmodulin (CaM) regulates the activity of TMEM16A and 16B channels has been controversial and the subject of an ongoing debate. Recently, using a bioengineering approach termed ChIMP (Channel Inactivation induced by Membrane-tethering of an associated Protein) we argued that Ca2+-free CaM (apoCaM) is pre-associated with functioning TMEM16A and 16B channel complexes in live cells. Further, the pre-associated apoCaM mediates Ca2+-dependent sensitization of activation (CDSA) and Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) of some TMEM16A splice variants. In this review, we discuss these findings in the context of previous and recent results relating to Ca2+-dependent regulation of TMEM16A/16B channels and the putative role of CaM. We further discuss potential future directions for these nascent ideas on apoCaM regulation of TMEM16A/16B channels, noting that such future efforts will benefit greatly from the pioneering work of Dr. David T. Yue and colleagues on CaM regulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. PMID:26083059

  8. Dissecting cooperative calmodulin binding to CaM kinase II: a detailed stochastic model.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Michael J; Putkey, John A; Waxham, M Neal; Kubota, Yoshihisa

    2009-12-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a major Ca(2+) binding protein involved in two opposing processes of synaptic plasticity of CA1 pyramidal neurons: long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD). The N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM bind to its target separately but cooperatively and introduce complex dynamics that cannot be well understood by experimental measurement. Using a detailed stochastic model constructed upon experimental data, we have studied the interaction between CaM and Ca(2+)-CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), a key enzyme underlying LTP. The model suggests that the accelerated binding of one lobe of CaM to CaMKII, when the opposing lobe is already bound to CaMKII, is a critical determinant of the cooperative interaction between Ca(2+), CaM, and CaMKII. The model indicates that the target-bound Ca(2+) free N-lobe has an extended lifetime and may regulate the Ca(2+) response of CaMKII during LTP induction. The model also reveals multiple kinetic pathways which have not been previously predicted for CaM-dissociation from CaMKII.

  9. Coping with Stresses: Roles of Calcium- and Calcium/Calmodulin-Regulated Gene Expression[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anireddy S.N.; Ali, Gul S.; Celesnik, Helena; Day, Irene S.

    2011-01-01

    Abiotic and biotic stresses are major limiting factors of crop yields and cause billions of dollars of losses annually around the world. It is hoped that understanding at the molecular level how plants respond to adverse conditions and adapt to a changing environment will help in developing plants that can better cope with stresses. Acquisition of stress tolerance requires orchestration of a multitude of biochemical and physiological changes, and most of these depend on changes in gene expression. Research during the last two decades has established that different stresses cause signal-specific changes in cellular Ca2+ level, which functions as a messenger in modulating diverse physiological processes that are important for stress adaptation. In recent years, many Ca2+ and Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) binding transcription factors (TFs) have been identified in plants. Functional analyses of some of these TFs indicate that they play key roles in stress signaling pathways. Here, we review recent progress in this area with emphasis on the roles of Ca2+- and Ca2+/CaM-regulated transcription in stress responses. We will discuss emerging paradigms in the field, highlight the areas that need further investigation, and present some promising novel high-throughput tools to address Ca2+-regulated transcriptional networks. PMID:21642548

  10. Calcium-dependent interaction of calmodulin with human 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes.

    PubMed

    Behnen, Petra; Davis, Elizabeth; Delaney, Erin; Frohm, Birgitta; Bauer, Mikael; Cedervall, Tommy; O'Connell, David; Åkerfeldt, Karin S; Linse, Sara

    2012-08-28

    Ribosomes are the protein factories of every living cell. The process of protein translation is highly complex and tightly regulated by a large number of diverse RNAs and proteins. Earlier studies indicate that Ca(2+) plays a role in protein translation. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous Ca(2+)-binding protein, regulates a large number of proteins participating in many signaling pathways. Several 40S and 60S ribosomal proteins have been identified to interact with CaM, and here, we report that CaM binds with high affinity to 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. No binding is observed in buffer with 6 mM Mg(2+) and 1 mM EGTA that chelates Ca(2+), suggesting high specificity of the CaM-ribosome interaction dependent on the Ca(2+) induced conformational change of CaM. The interactions between CaM and ribosomes are inhibited by synthetic peptides comprising putative CaM-binding sites in ribosomal proteins S2 and L14. Using a cell-free in vitro translation system, we further found that these synthetic peptides are potent inhibitors of protein synthesis. Our results identify an involvement of CaM in the translational activity of ribosomes.

  11. Calmodulin physically interacts with the erythropoietin receptor and enhances Jak2-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Masahide; Iiyama, Mitsuko; Miura, Osamu . E-mail: miura.hema@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-09-23

    Stimulation of the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) induces a transient increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} level as well as activation of the Jak2 tyrosine kinase to stimulate various downstream signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that the universal Ca{sup 2+} receptor calmodulin (CaM) binds EpoR in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner in vitro. Binding studies using various EpoR mutants in hematopoietic cells showed that CaM binds the membrane-proximal 65-amino-acid cytoplasmic region (amino acids 258-312) of EpoR that is critical for activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling. Structurally unrelated CaM antagonists, W-13 and CMZ, inhibited activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling pathways, whereas W-12, a W-13 analog, did not show any significant inhibitory effect. Moreover, overexpression of CaM augmented Epo-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the EpoR. W-13, but not W-12, also inhibited Epo-induced proliferation and survival. Together, these results indicate that CaM binds to the membrane-proximal EpoR cytoplasmic region and plays an essential role in activation of Jak2-mediated EpoR signaling.

  12. Calmodulin inhibition contributes to sensitize TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mi-kyung; Min, Yong Ki; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2009-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially triggers apoptosis in tumor cells versus normal cells. However, TRAIL alone is not effective in treating TRAIL-resistant tumors. We evaluated the effect of 180 enzyme inhibitors on TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer H1299 cells, and found fluphenazine-N-2-chloroethane (a calmodulin (CaM) antagonist) sensitized TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, in the presence of TRAIL, it increased caspase-8 binding to the Fas-associated death domain (FADD), but decreased binding of FADD-like interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme inhibitory proteins (FLIPs). Additionally, its combination with TRAIL inhibited Akt phosphorylation. These results were consistently observed in cells treated with CaM siRNA. We suggested the blockade of CaM could sensitize lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in at least 2 ways: (i) it can activate death-inducing signaling complex mediated apoptosis by inhibiting TRAIL-induced binding of FLIP and TRAIL-enhanced binding of caspase-8 to FADD; (ii) it can inhibit Akt phosphorylation, consequently leading to decreased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules such as FLIP and members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family. This study suggests the combination of CaM antagonists with TRAIL may have the therapeutic potential to overcome the resistance of lung cancers to apoptosis.

  13. Synthesis of calmodulin-binding proteins during heat shock in tobacco cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yingtang; Harrington, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Heat shock treatment induces the synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs), but little is known about the functions of these proteins in the heat shock response. Here we report isolation and analysis of heat-shock induced or enhanced calmodulin-binding proteins (CaMBPs) from cultured tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Wisconsin-38) using CaM-sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses of {sup 35}S-methionine-labeled proteins by SDS-PAGE indicate that at least 12 HSP bands with apparent molecular weights ranging from 105 to 17 kD exhibit Ca{sup 2+}-dependent binding to CaM sepharose even in the presence of 0.3M NaCl. Thee proteins do not bind to sepharose 4B suggesting a specific interaction with CaM. Gel overlay analysis of HSPs binding to CaM-sepharose indicates that not all of these peptides bind to {sup 125}I-CaM in this assay. This may be due to the structural modification of {sup 125}I-CaM, the resolution of the assay, or the small amount of the CaMBPs synthesized during heat shock. An alternative approach is being employed using {sup 35}S-labeled CaM made from a synthetic CaM gene (VUC-1) to confirm the CaMBP/HSP by overlay analysis and to screen a heat shock cDNA expression library.

  14. Capping of the N-terminus of PSD-95 by calmodulin triggers its postsynaptic release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Matt, Lucas; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Malik, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Park, Deborah K; Renieri, Alessandra; Ames, James B; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-06-17

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is a central element of the postsynaptic architecture of glutamatergic synapses. PSD-95 mediates postsynaptic localization of AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors and plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. PSD-95 is released from postsynaptic membranes in response to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA receptors. Here, we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) binds at the N-terminus of PSD-95. Our NMR structure reveals that both lobes of CaM collapse onto a helical structure of PSD-95 formed at its N-terminus (residues 1-16). This N-terminal capping of PSD-95 by CaM blocks palmitoylation of C3 and C5, which is required for postsynaptic PSD-95 targeting and the binding of CDKL5, a kinase important for synapse stability. CaM forms extensive hydrophobic contacts with Y12 of PSD-95. The PSD-95 mutant Y12E strongly impairs binding to CaM and Ca(2+)-induced release of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane in dendritic spines. Our data indicate that CaM binding to PSD-95 serves to block palmitoylation of PSD-95, which in turn promotes Ca(2+)-induced dissociation of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane. © 2014 The Authors.

  15. Genome-wide identification and analyses of the rice calmodulin and related potential calcium sensor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boonburapong, Bongkoj; Buaboocha, Teerapong

    2007-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli evoke rapid and transient increases in [Ca2+]cyt in plant cells which are transmitted by protein sensors that contain EF-hand motifs. Here, a group of Oryza sativa L. genes encoding calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-like (CML) proteins that do not possess functional domains other than the Ca2+-binding EF-hand motifs was analyzed. Results By functional analyses and BLAST searches of the TIGR rice database, a maximum number of 243 proteins that possibly have EF-hand motifs were identified in the rice genome. Using a neighbor-joining tree based on amino acid sequence similarity, five loci were defined as Cam genes and thirty two additional CML genes were identified. Extensive analyses of the gene structures, the chromosome locations, the EF-hand motif organization, expression characteristics including analysis by RT-PCR and a comparative analysis of Cam and CML genes in rice and Arabidopsis are presented. Conclusion Although many proteins have unknown functions, the complexity of this gene family indicates the importance of Ca2+-signals in regulating cellular responses to stimuli and this family of proteins likely plays a critical role as their transducers. PMID:17263873

  16. Structural Environment and Stability of the Complexes Formed Between Calmodulin and Actinyl Ions.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, Florian; Safi, Samir; Jeanson, Aurélie; Martinez-Baez, Ernesto; Roques, Jérôme; Berthomieu, Catherine; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Simoni, Éric

    2016-03-21

    Because of their presence in the nuclear fuel cycle, neptunium and uranium are two actinides of main interest in case of internal contamination. Complexation of U(VI) and Np(V) by the target protein calmodulin (CaM(WT)) was therefore studied herein. Both actinides have two axial oxygen atoms, which, charge aside, makes them very similar structurally wise. This work combines spectroscopy and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Structural characterization was performed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the L(III)-edge for each studied actinide. Models for the binding site of the protein were developed and then refined by using DFT to fit the obtained experimental EXAFS data. The effect of hydrolysis was also considered for both actinides (the uranyl experiment was performed at pH 3 and 6, while the neptunyl experiment was conducted at pH 7 and 9). The effect of the pH variation was apparent on the coordination sphere of the uranyl complexes, while the neptunyl complex characteristics remained stable under both studied conditions. The DFT calculations showed that at near physiological pH the complex formed by CaM(WT) with the neptunium ion is more stable than the one formed with uranyl.

  17. Regulation of the NaV1.5 cytoplasmic domain by calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabelli, Sandra B.; Boto, Agedi; Kuhns, Victoria Halperin; Bianchet, Mario A.; Farinelli, Federica; Aripirala, Srinivas; Yoder, Jesse; Jakoncic, Jean; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2014-11-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) underlie the rapid upstroke of action potentials in excitable tissues. Binding of channel-interactive proteins is essential for controlling fast and long-term inactivation. In the structure of the complex of the carboxy-terminal portion of Nav1.5 (CTNav1.5) with calmodulin (CaM)-Mg2+ reported here, both CaM lobes interact with the CTNav1.5. On the basis of the differences between this structure and that of an inactivated complex, we propose that the structure reported here represents a non-inactivated state of the CTNav, that is, the state that is poised for activation. Electrophysiological characterization of mutants further supports the importance of the interactions identified in the structure. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that CaM binds to CTNav1.5 with high affinity. The results of this study provide unique insights into the physiological activation and the pathophysiology of Nav channels.

  18. Regulation of the NaV1.5 cytoplasmic domain by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Boto, Agedi; Kuhns, Victoria Halperin; Bianchet, Mario A; Farinelli, Federica; Aripirala, Srinivas; Yoder, Jesse; Jakoncic, Jean; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Amzel, L Mario

    2014-11-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) underlie the rapid upstroke of action potentials in excitable tissues. Binding of channel-interactive proteins is essential for controlling fast and long-term inactivation. In the structure of the complex of the carboxy-terminal portion of Na(v)1.5 (CTNa(v)1.5) with calmodulin (CaM)-Mg(2+) reported here, both CaM lobes interact with the CTNa(v)1.5. On the basis of the differences between this structure and that of an inactivated complex, we propose that the structure reported here represents a non-inactivated state of the CTNa(v), that is, the state that is poised for activation. Electrophysiological characterization of mutants further supports the importance of the interactions identified in the structure. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that CaM binds to CTNa(v)1.5 with high affinity. The results of this study provide unique insights into the physiological activation and the pathophysiology of Na(v) channels.

  19. Calmodulin Binds a Highly Extended HIV-1 MA Protein That Refolds Upon Its Release

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, James E.; Chow, John Y.H.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Kwan, Ann H.; Duff, Anthony P.; Hamilton, William A.; Trewhella, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) expression is upregulated upon HIV-1 infection and interacts with proteins involved in viral processing, including the multifunctional HIV-1 MA protein. We present here the results of studies utilizing small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation that, when considered in the light of earlier fluorescence and NMR data, show CaM binds MA in an extended open-clamp conformation via interactions with two tryptophans that are widely spaced in sequence and space. The interaction requires a disruption of the MA tertiary fold such that MA becomes highly extended in a long snakelike conformation. The CaM-MA interface is extensive, covering ∼70% of the length of the MA such that regions known to be important in MA interactions with critical binding partners would be impacted. The CaM conformation is semiextended and as such is distinct from the classical CaM-collapse about short α-helical targets. NMR data show that upon dissociation of the CaM-MA complex, either by the removal of Ca2+ or increasing ionic strength, MA reforms its native tertiary contacts. Thus, we observe a high level of structural plasticity in MA that may facilitate regulation of its activities via intracellular Ca2+-signaling during viral processing. PMID:22947870

  20. Glucocorticoid interactions with ethanol effects on synaptic plasma membranes: influence on [125I]calmodulin binding.

    PubMed

    Sze, P Y

    1996-02-01

    Ca(++)-dependent binding of calmodulin (CaM) to brain synaptic plasma membranes is known to be inhibited by ethanol and stimulated by glucocorticoids. These opposite neurochemical actions between ethanol and the steroids in vitro are consistent with glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol-induced sedation reported to occur in vivo. The present study was undertaken to characterize the interactions of corticosterone with ethanol effects on [125I]CaM binding in synaptic plasma membranes. From the shift of concentration-response curves when corticosterone and ethanol were present in combination, the interaction between steroid stimulation and ethanol inhibition occurred in an additive relationship over the range of their effective concentrations. From Scatchard analyses, ethanol-induced decrease in membrane affinity for [125I]CaM was antagonized by steroid-induced increase in the membrane affinity, indicating that the convergent event in their interaction was the alteration of membrane affinity for CaM. Glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol inhibition of [125I]CaM binding exhibited a high degree of steroid specificity; steroids with glucocorticoid activity including cortisol, dexamethasone and triamcinolone were effective, whereas gonadal steroids and excitatory neuroactive steroid metabolites were ineffective. The demonstration that glucocorticoids antagonized the inhibition of CaM binding by ethanol provides support for the hypothesis that these steroids are among the endogenous factors that modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol.

  1. Native and engineered sensors for Ca(2+) and Zn(2+): lessons from calmodulin and MTF1.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Margaret C; Palmer, Amy E

    2017-05-09

    Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) dynamics have been identified as important drivers of physiological processes. In order for these dynamics to encode function, the cell must have sensors that transduce changes in metal concentration to specific downstream actions. Here we compare and contrast the native metal sensors: calmodulin (CaM), the quintessential Ca(2+) sensor and metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF1), a candidate Zn(2+) sensor. While CaM recognizes and modulates the activity of hundreds of proteins through allosteric interactions, MTF1 recognizes a single DNA motif that is distributed throughout the genome regulating the transcription of many target genes. We examine how the different inorganic chemistries of these two metal ions may shape these different mechanisms transducing metal ion concentration into changing physiologic activity. In addition to native metal sensors, scientists have engineered sensors to spy on the dynamic changes of metals in cells. The inorganic chemistry of the metals shapes the possibilities in the design strategies of engineered sensors. We examine how different strategies to tune the affinities of engineered sensors mirror the strategies nature developed to sense both Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) in cells. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Calmodulin and S100A1 protein interact with N terminus of TRPM3 channel.

    PubMed

    Holakovska, Blanka; Grycova, Lenka; Jirku, Michaela; Sulc, Miroslav; Bumba, Ladislav; Teisinger, Jan

    2012-05-11

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 ion channel (TRPM3) belongs to the TRP family of cation-permeable ion channels involved in many important biological functions such as pain transduction, thermosensation, and mechanoregulation. The channel was reported to play an important role in Ca(2+) homeostasis, but its gating mechanisms, functions, and regulation are still under research. Utilizing biophysical and biochemical methods, we characterized two independent domains, Ala-35-Lys-124 and His-291-Gly-382, on the TRPM3 N terminus, responsible for interactions with the Ca(2+)-binding proteins calmodulin (CaM) and S100A1. We identified several positively charged residues within these domains as having a crucial impact on CaM/S100A1 binding. The data also suggest that the interaction is calcium-dependent. We also performed competition assays, which suggested that CaM and S100A1 are able to compete for the same binding sites within the TRPM3 N terminus. This is the first time that such an interaction has been shown for TRP family members.

  3. Calmodulin and CaMKII modulate ENaC activity by regulating the association of MARCKS and the cytoskeleton with the apical membrane.

    PubMed

    Alli, Abdel A; Bao, Hui-Fang; Liu, Bing-Chen; Yu, Ling; Aldrugh, Summer; Montgomery, Darrice S; Ma, He-Ping; Eaton, Douglas C

    2015-09-01

    Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) regulates epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) open probability. In turn, myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) protein or MARCKS-like protein 1 (MLP-1) at the plasma membrane regulates the delivery of PIP2 to ENaC. MARCKS and MLP-1 are regulated by changes in cytosolic calcium; increasing calcium promotes dissociation of MARCKS from the membrane, but the calcium-regulatory mechanisms are unclear. However, it is known that increased intracellular calcium can activate calmodulin and we show that inhibition of calmodulin with calmidazolium increases ENaC activity presumably by regulating MARCKS and MLP-1. Activated calmodulin can regulate MARCKS and MLP-1 in two ways. Calmodulin can bind to the effector domain of MARCKS or MLP-1, inactivating both proteins by causing their dissociation from the membrane. Mutations in MARCKS that prevent calmodulin association prevent dissociation of MARCKS from the membrane. Calmodulin also activates CaM kinase II (CaMKII). An inhibitor of CaMKII (KN93) increases ENaC activity, MARCKS association with ENaC, and promotes MARCKS movement to a membrane fraction. CaMKII phosphorylates filamin. Filamin is an essential component of the cytoskeleton and promotes association of ENaC, MARCKS, and MLP-1. Disruption of the cytoskeleton with cytochalasin E reduces ENaC activity. CaMKII phosphorylation of filamin disrupts the cytoskeleton and the association of MARCKS, MLP-1, and ENaC, thereby reducing ENaC open probability. Taken together, these findings suggest calmodulin and CaMKII modulate ENaC activity by destabilizing the association between the actin cytoskeleton, ENaC, and MARCKS, or MLP-1 at the apical membrane. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  5. Calmodulin and CaMKII modulate ENaC activity by regulating the association of MARCKS and the cytoskeleton with the apical membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hui-Fang; Liu, Bing-Chen; Yu, Ling; Aldrugh, Summer; Montgomery, Darrice S.; Ma, He-Ping; Eaton, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) regulates epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) open probability. In turn, myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) protein or MARCKS-like protein 1 (MLP-1) at the plasma membrane regulates the delivery of PIP2 to ENaC. MARCKS and MLP-1 are regulated by changes in cytosolic calcium; increasing calcium promotes dissociation of MARCKS from the membrane, but the calcium-regulatory mechanisms are unclear. However, it is known that increased intracellular calcium can activate calmodulin and we show that inhibition of calmodulin with calmidazolium increases ENaC activity presumably by regulating MARCKS and MLP-1. Activated calmodulin can regulate MARCKS and MLP-1 in two ways. Calmodulin can bind to the effector domain of MARCKS or MLP-1, inactivating both proteins by causing their dissociation from the membrane. Mutations in MARCKS that prevent calmodulin association prevent dissociation of MARCKS from the membrane. Calmodulin also activates CaM kinase II (CaMKII). An inhibitor of CaMKII (KN93) increases ENaC activity, MARCKS association with ENaC, and promotes MARCKS movement to a membrane fraction. CaMKII phosphorylates filamin. Filamin is an essential component of the cytoskeleton and promotes association of ENaC, MARCKS, and MLP-1. Disruption of the cytoskeleton with cytochalasin E reduces ENaC activity. CaMKII phosphorylation of filamin disrupts the cytoskeleton and the association of MARCKS, MLP-1, and ENaC, thereby reducing ENaC open probability. Taken together, these findings suggest calmodulin and CaMKII modulate ENaC activity by destabilizing the association between the actin cytoskeleton, ENaC, and MARCKS, or MLP-1 at the apical membrane. PMID:26136560

  6. A calcium-dependent protein kinase can inhibit a calmodulin-stimulated Ca2+ pump (ACA2) located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The magnitude and duration of a cytosolic Ca(2+) release can potentially be altered by changing the rate of Ca(2+) efflux. In plant cells, Ca(2+) efflux from the cytoplasm is mediated by H(+)/Ca(2+)-antiporters and two types of Ca(2+)-ATPases. ACA2 was recently identified as a calmodulin-regulated Ca(2+)-pump located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that phosphorylation of its N-terminal regulatory domain by a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK isoform CPK1), inhibits both basal activity ( approximately 10%) and calmodulin stimulation ( approximately 75%), as shown by Ca(2+)-transport assays with recombinant enzyme expressed in yeast. A CDPK phosphorylation site was mapped to Ser(45) near a calmodulin binding site, using a fusion protein containing the N-terminal domain as an in vitro substrate for a recombinant CPK1. In a full-length enzyme, an Ala substitution for Ser(45) (S45/A) completely blocked the observed CDPK inhibition of both basal and calmodulin-stimulated activities. An Asp substitution (S45/D) mimicked phosphoinhibition, indicating that a negative charge at this position is sufficient to account for phosphoinhibition. Interestingly, prior binding of calmodulin blocked phosphorylation. This suggests that, once ACA2 binds calmodulin, its activation state becomes resistant to phosphoinhibition. These results support the hypothesis that ACA2 activity is regulated as the balance between the initial kinetics of calmodulin stimulation and CDPK inhibition, providing an example in plants for a potential point of crosstalk between two different Ca(2+)-signaling pathways.

  7. Kinetic studies show that Ca2+ and Tb3+ have different binding preferences toward the four Ca2+-binding sites of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L; Leavis, P C; Gergely, J

    1984-12-18

    The stepwise addition of Tb3+ to calmodulin yields a large tyrosine-sensitized Tb3+ luminescence enhancement as the third and fourth ions bind to the protein [Wang, C.-L. A., Aquaron, R. R., Leavis, P. C., & Gergely, J. (1982) Eur. J. Biochem. 124, 7-12]. Since the only tyrosine residues in calmodulin are located within binding sites III and IV, these results suggest that Tb3+ binds first to sites I and II. Recent NMR studies have provided evidence that Ca2+, on the other hand, binds preferentially to sites III and IV. Kinetic studies using a stopped-flow apparatus also show that the preferential binding of Ca2+ and lanthanide ions is different. Upon rapid mixing of 2Ca-calmodulin with two Tb3+ ions, there was a small and rapid tyrosine fluorescence change, but no Tb3+ luminescence was observed, indicating that Tb3+ binds to sites I and II but not sites III and IV. When two Tb3+ ions are mixed with 2Dy-calmodulin, Tb3+ luminescence rises rapidly as Tb3+ binds to the empty sites III and IV, followed by a more gradual decrease (k = 0.4 s-1 as the ions redistribute themselves over the four sites. These results indicate that (i) both Tb3+ and Dy3+ prefer binding to sites I and II of calmodulin and (ii) the binding of Tb3+ to calmodulin is not impeded by the presence of two Ca2+ ions initially bound to the protein. Thus, the Ca2+ and lanthanide ions must exhibit opposite preferences for the four sites of calmodulin: sites III and IV are the high-affinity sites for Ca2+, whereas Tb3+ and Dy3+ prefer sites I and II.

  8. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of tyrosine environment and ligand binding of plant calmodulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Gautam; Thompson, Faith; Puett, David

    1990-05-01

    Recent studies in our laboratories have focused on using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence of calmodulin (CaM) and tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence of CaM-bound peptdies as intrinsic probes of structure and interactions of this Ca2+ regulatory protein. Plant CaM contains a single Tyr (Tyr.-l38) and vertebrate CaM contains two (Tyr-99 and Tyr-.l38). Neither protein contains Trp. The fluorescence properties of Tyr-138 of wheat-germ CaM is sensitive to conformational changes induced by perturbations such as Ca2+ ligation or depletion, and pH changes. Effects of these perturbations on quantum yield, lifetime and dynamic quenching of Tyr-l38 fluorescence are reported. We have also studied binding of amphiphilic peptides to wheat-germ CaM. A comparison of wheat CaM induced changes in the fluorescence properties of a single Trp of these peptides with those induced by bovine testes CaM indicate general similarities of the peptide binding surfaces of plant and mammalian CaMs. Frequency domain measurements of decay of intensity and anisotropy have suggested some orientational freedom and local motion of the Trp residue of CaM-bound peptide, independent of the overall protein motion, even when the Trp is expected to be buried in the doubly apolar protein-peptide interface. Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous calcium binding protein which is believed to regulate several different enzymes in diverse cells (Klee et al., 1982). Much of the structural work to date has been carried out on mammalian CaM. However, CaM has also been isolated from plant and invertebrate sources, and a high degree of sequence homology with vertebrate CaM has been found. The amino acid sequence of wheat germ CaM shows eleven substitutions, two insertions and one deletion compared with the 148.-residue bovine brain CaM (Toda et al., 1985). Specific differences with mammalian CaM at two sites make plant CaM attractive for fluorescence spectroscopic studies. These are: (1) The presence of a single tyrosine residue (Tyr

  9. Enhanced binding of calmodulin to the ryanodine receptor corrects contractile dysfunction in failing hearts.

    PubMed

    Hino, Akihiro; Yano, Masafumi; Kato, Takayoshi; Fukuda, Masakazu; Suetomi, Takeshi; Ono, Makoto; Murakami, Wakako; Susa, Takehisa; Okuda, Shinichi; Doi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Koseki, Noritaka; Kyushiki, Hiroyuki; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Matsuzaki, Masunori

    2012-12-01

    The channel function of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is modulated by calmodulin (CaM). However, the involvement of CaM in aberrant Ca(2+) release in diseased hearts remains unclear. Here, we investigated the pathogenic role of defective CaM binding to the RyR2 in the channel dysfunction associated with heart failure. The involvement of CaM in aberrant Ca(2+) release was assessed in normal and pacing-induced failing canine hearts. The apparent affinity of CaM for RyR2 was considerably lower in failing sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) compared with normal SR. Thus, the amount of CaM bound to RyR2 was markedly decreased in failing myocytes. Expression of the CaM isoform Gly-Ser-His-CaM (GSH-CaM), which has much higher binding affinity than wild-type CaM for RyR1, restored normal CaM binding to RyR2 in both SR and myocytes of failing hearts. The Ca(2+) spark frequency (SpF) was markedly higher and the SR Ca(2+) content was lower in failing myocytes compared with normal myocytes. The incorporation of GSH-CaM into the failing myocytes corrected the aberrant SpF and SR Ca(2+) content to normal levels. Reduced CaM binding to RyR2 seems to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of aberrant Ca(2+) release in failing hearts. Correction of the reduced CaM binding to RyR2 stabilizes the RyR2 channel function and thereby restores normal Ca(2+) handling and contractile function to failing hearts.

  10. Autonomous CaMKII requires further stimulation by Ca2+/calmodulin for enhancing synaptic strength.

    PubMed

    Barcomb, Kelsey; Buard, Isabelle; Coultrap, Steven J; Kulbe, Jacqueline R; O'Leary, Heather; Benke, Timothy A; Bayer, K Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    A hallmark feature of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is generation of autonomous (Ca(2+)-independent) activity by T286 autophosphorylation. Biochemical studies have shown that "autonomous" CaMKII is ∼5-fold further stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM, but demonstration of a physiological function for such regulation within cells has remained elusive. In this study, CaMKII-induced enhancement of synaptic strength in rat hippocampal neurons required both autonomous activity and further stimulation. Synaptic strength was decreased by CaMKIIα knockdown and rescued by reexpression, but not by mutants impaired for autonomy (T286A) or binding to NMDA-type glutamate receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B; formerly NR2B; I205K). Full rescue was seen with constitutively autonomous mutants (T286D), but only if they could be further stimulated (additional T305/306A mutation), and not with two other mutations that additionally impair Ca(2+)/CaM binding. Compared to rescue with wild-type CaMKII, the CaM-binding-impaired mutants even had reduced synaptic strength. One of these mutants (T305/306D) mimicked an inhibitory autophosphorylation of CaMKII, whereas the other one (Δstim) abolished CaM binding without introducing charged residues. Inhibitory T305/306 autophosphorylation also reduced GluN2B binding, but this effect was independent of reduced Ca(2+)/CaM binding and was not mimicked by T305/306D mutation. Thus, even autonomous CaMKII activity must be further stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM for enhancement of synaptic strength.

  11. Effects of calmodulin on expression of lignin-modifying enzymes in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Suetomi, Takashi; Sakamoto, Takaiku; Tokunaga, Yoshitaka; Kameyama, Toru; Honda, Yoichi; Kamitsuji, Hisatoshi; Kameshita, Isamu; Izumitsu, Kousuke; Suzuki, Kazumi; Irie, Toshikazu

    2015-05-01

    Previously, we suppressed the expression of genes encoding isozymes of lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) using a calmodulin (CaM) inhibitor, W7, in the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium; this suggested that CaM positively regulates their expression. Here, we studied the role of CaM in another white-rot fungus, Pleurotus ostreatus, which produces MnP and versatile peroxidase (VP), but not LiP. W7 upregulated Mn(2+)-dependent oxidation of guaiacol, suggesting that CaM negatively regulates the production of the enzymes. Suppression of CaM in P. ostreatus using RNAi also led to upregulation of enzyme activity, whereas overexpression of CaM in P. ostreatus caused downregulation. Real-time RT-PCR showed that MnP1-6 and VP3 levels in the CaM-knockdown strain were higher than those in the wild-type strain, while MnP-5 and -6 and VP1 and 2 levels in the CaM-overexpressing strain were lower than in the wild type. Moreover, we also found that another ligninolytic enzyme, laccase, which is not produced by P. chrysosporium, was negatively regulated by CaM in P. ostreatus similar to MnP and VP. Although overexpression of CaM did not reduce the ability of P. ostreatus to digest beech wood powder, the percentage of lignin remaining in the digest was slightly higher than in the wild-type strain digest.

  12. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin signaling in cercosporin toxin biosynthesis by Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2003-02-01

    Cercosporin is a non-host-selective, perylenequinone toxin produced by many phytopathogenic Cercospora species. The involvement of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) signaling in cercosporin biosynthesis was investigated by using pharmacological inhibitors. The results suggest that maintaining endogenous Ca(2+) homeostasis is required for cercosporin biosynthesis in Cercospora nicotianae. The addition of excess Ca(2+) to the medium slightly increased fungal growth but resulted in a reduction in cercosporin production. The addition of Ca(2+) chelators [EGTA and 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid] also reduced cercosporin production. Ca(2+) channel blockers exhibited a strong inhibition of cercosporin production only at higher concentrations (>2 mM). Cercosporin production was reduced greatly by Ca(2+) ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin) and internal Ca(2+) blocker [3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino)octyl ester]. Phospholipase C inhibitors (lithium, U73122, and neomycin) led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of cercosporin biosynthesis. Furthermore, the addition of CaM inhibitors (compound 48/80, trifluoperazine, W-7, and chlorpromazine) also markedly reduced cercosporin production. In contrast to W-7, W-5, with less specificity for CaM, led to only minor inhibition of cercosporin production. The inhibitory effects of Ca(2+)/CaM inhibitors were partially or completely reversed by the addition of external Ca(2+). As assessed with Fluo-3/AM (a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator), the Ca(2+) content in the cytoplasm decreased significantly when fungal cultures were grown in a medium containing Ca(2+)/CaM antagonists, confirming the specificity of those Ca(2+)/CaM antagonists in C. nicotianae. Taken together, the results suggest that Ca(2+)/CaM signal transduction may play a pivotal role in cercosporin biosynthesis in C. nicotianae.

  13. Calmodulin enhances ribbon replenishment and shapes filtering of synaptic transmission by cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Parmelee, Caitlyn M.; Chen, Minghui; Cork, Karlene M.; Curto, Carina; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2014-01-01

    At the first synapse in the vertebrate visual pathway, light-evoked changes in photoreceptor membrane potential alter the rate of glutamate release onto second-order retinal neurons. This process depends on the synaptic ribbon, a specialized structure found at various sensory synapses, to provide a supply of primed vesicles for release. Calcium (Ca2+) accelerates the replenishment of vesicles at cone ribbon synapses, but the mechanisms underlying this acceleration and its functional implications for vision are unknown. We studied vesicle replenishment using paired whole-cell recordings of cones and postsynaptic neurons in tiger salamander retinas and found that it involves two kinetic mechanisms, the faster of which was diminished by calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors. We developed an analytical model that can be applied to both conventional and ribbon synapses and showed that vesicle resupply is limited by a simple time constant, τ = 1/(Dρδs), where D is the vesicle diffusion coefficient, δ is the vesicle diameter, ρ is the vesicle density, and s is the probability of vesicle attachment. The combination of electrophysiological measurements, modeling, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of single synaptic vesicles suggested that CaM speeds replenishment by enhancing vesicle attachment to the ribbon. Using electroretinogram and whole-cell recordings of light responses, we found that enhanced replenishment improves the ability of cone synapses to signal darkness after brief flashes of light and enhances the amplitude of responses to higher-frequency stimuli. By accelerating the resupply of vesicles to the ribbon, CaM extends the temporal range of synaptic transmission, allowing cones to transmit higher-frequency visual information to downstream neurons. Thus, the ability of the visual system to encode time-varying stimuli is shaped by the dynamics of vesicle replenishment at photoreceptor synaptic ribbons. PMID:25311636

  14. Charge Isomers of Myelin Basic Protein: Structure and Interactions with Membranes, Nucleotide Analogues, and Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chaozhan; Neugebauer, Ute; Bürck, Jochen; Myllykoski, Matti; Baumgärtel, Peter; Popp, Jürgen; Kursula, Petri

    2011-01-01

    As an essential structural protein required for tight compaction of the central nervous system myelin sheath, myelin basic protein (MBP) is one of the candidate autoantigens of the human inflammatory demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis, which is characterized by the active degradation of the myelin sheath. In this work, recombinant murine analogues of the natural C1 and C8 charge components (rmC1 and rmC8), two isoforms of the classic 18.5-kDa MBP, were used as model proteins to get insights into the structure and function of the charge isomers. Various biochemical and biophysical methods such as size exclusion chromatography, calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering, Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy, and conventional as well as synchrotron radiation circular dichroism were used to investigate differences between these two isoforms, both from the structural point of view, and regarding interactions with ligands, including calmodulin (CaM), various detergents, nucleotide analogues, and lipids. Overall, our results provide further proof that rmC8 is deficient both in structure and especially in function, when compared to rmC1. While the CaM binding properties of the two forms are very similar, their interactions with membrane mimics are different. CaM can be used to remove MBP from immobilized lipid monolayers made of synthetic lipids - a phenomenon, which may be of relevance for MBP function and its regulation. Furthermore, using fluorescently labelled nucleotides, we observed binding of ATP and GTP, but not AMP, by MBP; the binding of nucleoside triphosphates was inhibited by the presence of CaM. Together, our results provide important further data on the interactions between MBP and its ligands, and on the differences in the structure and function between MBP charge isomers. PMID:21647440

  15. Structural Insights into the M-Channel Proximal C-Terminus/Calmodulin Complex.

    PubMed

    Strulovich, Roi; Tobelaim, William Sam; Attali, Bernard; Hirsch, Joel A

    2016-09-27

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) channel family, comprising voltage-gated potassium channels, plays major roles in fine-tuning cellular excitability by reducing firing frequency and controlling repolarization. Kv7 channels have a unique intracellular C-terminal (CT) domain bound constitutively by calmodulin (CaM). This domain plays key functions in channel tetramerization, trafficking, and gating. CaM binds to the proximal CT, comprising helices A and B. Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 are expressed in neural tissues. Together, they form the heterotetrameric M channel. We characterized Kv7.2, Kv7.3, and chimeric Kv7.3 helix A-Kv7.2 helix B (Q3A-Q2B) proximal CT/CaM complexes by solution methods at various Ca(2+)concentrations and determined them all to have a 1:1 stoichiometry. We then determined the crystal structure of the Q3A-Q2B/CaM complex at high Ca(2+) concentration to 2.0 Å resolution. CaM hugs the antiparallel coiled coil of helices A and B, braced together by an additional helix. The structure displays a hybrid apo-Ca(2+) CaM conformation even though four Ca(2+) ions are bound. Our results pinpoint unique interactions enabling the possible intersubunit pairing of Kv7.3 helix A and Kv7.2 helix B while underlining the potential importance of Kv7.3 helix A's role in stabilizing channel oligomerization. Also, the structure can be used to rationalize various channelopathic mutants. Functional testing of the chimeric channel found it to have a voltage-dependence similar to the M channel, thereby demonstrating helix A's importance in imparting gating properties.

  16. Ca+2/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Mediates Glucose Toxicity-Induced Cardiomyocyte Contractile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong-Huai; Guo, Haitao; Kandadi, Machender R.; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    (1) Hyperglycemia leads to cytotoxicity in the heart. Although several theories are postulated for glucose toxicity-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction, the precise mechanism still remains unclear. (2) This study was designed to evaluate the impact of elevated extracellular Ca2+ on glucose toxicity-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca2+ anomalies as well as the mechanism(s) involved with a focus on Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase. Isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes were maintained in normal (NG, 5.5 mM) or high glucose (HG, 25.5 mM) media for 6-12 hours. Contractile indices were measured including peak shortening (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (±dL/dt), time-to-PS (TPS), and time-to-90% relengthening (TR90). (3) Cardiomyocytes maintained with HG displayed abnormal mechanical function including reduced PS, ±dL/dt, and prolonged TPS, TR90 and intracellular Ca2+ clearance. Expression of intracellular Ca2+ regulatory proteins including SERCA2a, phospholamban and Na+-Ca2+ exchanger were unaffected whereas SERCA activity was inhibited by HG. Interestingly, the HG-induced mechanical anomalies were abolished by elevated extracellular Ca2+ (from 1.0 to 2.7 mM). Interestingly, the high extracellular Ca2+-induced beneficial effect against HG was abolished by the CaM kinase inhibitor KN93. (4) These data suggest that elevated extracellular Ca2+ protects against glucose toxicity-induced cardiomyocyte contractile defects through a mechanism associated with CaM kinase. PMID:22745633

  17. Reduced Arrhythmia Inducibility with Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Inhibition in Heart Failure Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hoeker, Gregory S.; Hanafy, Mohamed A.; Oster, Robert A.; Bers, Donald M.; Pogwizd, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is activated in heart failure (HF) and can contribute to arrhythmias induced by β-adrenergic receptor-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak. Objective To evaluate the effect of CaMKII inhibition on ventricular tachycardia (VT) induction in conscious HF and naïve rabbits. Methods and Results Nonischemic HF was induced by aortic insufficiency and constriction. Electrocardiograms were recorded in rabbits pretreated with vehicle (saline) or the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (300 μg/kg); VT was induced by infusion of increasing doses of norepinephrine (NE, 1.56-25 μg/kg/min) in naïve (n = 8) and HF (n = 7) rabbits. With saline, median VT dose threshold in HF was 6.25 versus 12.5 μg/kg/min NE in naïve rabbits (p = 0.06). Pretreatment with KN-93 significantly increased VT threshold in HF and naïve rabbits (median = 25 μg/kg/min, p < 0.05 versus saline for both groups). Mean cycle length of VT initiation was shorter in HF (221 ± 20 ms) than naïve (296 ± 23 ms, p < 0.05) rabbits with saline; this difference was not significant after treatment with KN-93. Conclusions KN-93 significantly reduced arrhythmia inducibility and slowed initiation of VT, suggesting that CaMKII inhibition may have antiarrhythmic effects in the failing human heart. PMID:26650851

  18. Dynamics of Ca2+-saturated calmodulin D129N mutant studied by multiple molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Likić, Vladimir A; Strehler, Emanuel E; Gooley, Paul R

    2003-10-01

    Fifteen independent 1-nsec MD simulations of fully solvated Ca(2+) saturated calmodulin (CaM) mutant D129N were performed from different initial conditions to provide a sufficient statistical basis to gauge the significance of observed dynamical properties. In all MD simulations the four Ca(2+) ions remained in their binding sites, and retained a single water ligand as observed in the crystal structure. The coordination of Ca(2+) ions in EF-hands I, II, and III was sevenfold. In EF-hand IV, which was perturbed by the mutation of a highly conserved Asp129, an anomalous eightfold Ca(2+) coordination was observed. The Ca(2+) binding loop in EF-hand II was observed to dynamically sample conformations related to the Ca(2+)-free form. Repeated MD simulations implicate two well-defined conformations of Ca(2+) binding loop II, whereas similar effect was not observed for loops I, III, and IV. In 8 out of 15 MD simulations Ca(2+) binding loop II adopted an alternative conformation in which the Thr62 >C=O group was displaced from the Ca(2+) coordination by a water molecule, resulting in the Ca(2+) ion ligated by two water molecules. The alternative conformation of the Ca(2+) binding loop II appears related to the "closed" state involved in conformational exchange previously detected by NMR in the N-terminal domain fragment of CaM and the C-terminal domain fragment of the mutant E140Q. MD simulations suggest that conformations involved in microsecond exchange exist partially preformed on the nanosecond time scale.

  19. Essential Role of Calmodulin in RyR Inhibition by Dantrolene

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Ye Win; Gomez-Hurtado, Nieves; Walweel, Kafa; van Helden, Dirk F.; Imtiaz, Mohammad S.; Knollmann, Bjorn C.

    2015-01-01

    Dantrolene is the first line therapy of malignant hyperthermia. Animal studies suggest that dantrolene also protects against heart failure and arrhythmias caused by spontaneous Ca2+ release. Although dantrolene inhibits Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal and cardiac muscle preparations, its mechanism of action has remained controversial, because dantrolene does not inhibit single ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ release channels in lipid bilayers. Here we test the hypothesis that calmodulin (CaM), a physiologic RyR binding partner that is lost during incorporation into lipid bilayers, is required for dantrolene inhibition of RyR channels. In single channel recordings (100 nM cytoplasmic [Ca2+] + 2 mM ATP), dantrolene caused inhibition of RyR1 (rabbit skeletal muscle) and RyR2 (sheep) with a maximal inhibition of Po (Emax) to 52 ± 4% of control only after adding physiologic [CaM] = 100 nM. Dantrolene inhibited RyR2 with an IC50 of 0.16 ± 0.03 µM. Mutant N98S-CaM facilitated dantrolene inhibition with an IC50 = 5.9 ± 0.3 nM. In mouse cardiomyocytes, dantrolene had no effect on cardiac Ca2+ release in the absence of CaM, but reduced Ca2+ wave frequency (IC50 = 0.42 ± 0.18 µM, Emax = 47 ± 4%) and amplitude (IC50 = 0.19 ± 0.04 µM, Emax = 66 ± 4%) in the presence of 100 nM CaM. We conclude that CaM is essential for dantrolene inhibition of RyR1 and RyR2. Its absence explains why dantrolene inhibition of single RyR channels has not been previously observed. PMID:25920678

  20. Impaired calcium calmodulin kinase signaling and muscle adaptation response in the absence of calpain 3.

    PubMed

    Kramerova, I; Kudryashova, E; Ermolova, N; Saenz, A; Jaka, O; López de Munain, A; Spencer, M J

    2012-07-15

    Mutations in the non-lysosomal, cysteine protease calpain 3 (CAPN3) result in the disease limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A). CAPN3 is localized to several subcellular compartments, including triads, where it plays a structural, rather than a proteolytic, role. In the absence of CAPN3, several triad components are reduced, including the major Ca(2+) release channel, ryanodine receptor (RyR). Furthermore, Ca(2+) release upon excitation is impaired in the absence of CAPN3. In the present study, we show that Ca-calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling is compromised in CAPN3 knockout (C3KO) mice. The CaMK pathway has been previously implicated in promoting the slow skeletal muscle phenotype. As expected, the decrease in CaMKII signaling that was observed in the absence of CAPN3 is associated with a reduction in the slow versus fast muscle fiber phenotype. We show that muscles of WT mice subjected to exercise training activate the CaMKII signaling pathway and increase expression of the slow form of myosin; however, muscles of C3KO mice do not exhibit these adaptive changes to exercise. These data strongly suggest that skeletal muscle's adaptive response to functional demand is compromised in the absence of CAPN3. In agreement with our mouse studies, RyR levels were also decreased in biopsies from LGMD2A patients. Moreover, we observed a prefe