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Sample records for caloric restriction shortens

  1. Maternal caloric restriction prior to pregnancy increases the body weight of the second-generation male offspring and shortens their longevity in rats.

    PubMed

    Araminaite, Violeta; Zalgeviciene, Violeta; Simkunaite-Rizgeliene, Renata; Stukas, Rimantas; Kaminskas, Arvydas; Tutkuviene, Janina

    2014-01-01

    Maternal undernutrition can affect offspring's physical status and various health parameters that might be transmittable across several generations. Many studies have focused on undernutrition throughout pregnancy, whereas maternal undernutrition prior to pregnancy is not sufficiently studied. The objective of our study was to explore the effects of food restriction prior to and during pregnancy on body weight and longevity of the second generation offspring. Adult female Wistar rats ("F0" generation) were 50% food restricted for one month prior to pregnancy (pre-pregnancy) or during pre-pregnancy and pregnancy. The third group was fed normally (control). The first generation offspring were normally fed until the 6(th) month of age to produce the second generation offspring; namely, the first-generation female rats were mated with male breeders from outside the experiment. The second generation offspring thus obtained were observed until natural death (up to 36 months). Compared to the controls, the second-generation male offspring whose "grandmothers (F0 females)" undernourished only during pre-pregnancy were significantly heavier from the 8(th) month of age, whereas no significant weight difference was found in the male offspring whose "grandmothers" were food-restricted during pre-pregnancy and pregnancy. Shorter lifespan was observed in the second-generation male offspring of "grandmothers" that were food-restricted either during pre-pregnancy or during pre-pregnancy and pregnancy. By contrast, no differences in body weight and lifespan were observed in all second-generation female offspring. In conclusion, maternal caloric restriction prior to pregnancy increases the body weight and shortens the longevity of the second-generation male offspring, indicating the sex-dependent transgenerational effect of maternal caloric restriction.

  2. Caloric restriction, SIRT1 and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    More than 70 years after its initial report, caloric restriction stands strong as the most consistent non-pharmacological intervention increasing lifespan and protecting against metabolic disease. Among the different mechanisms by which caloric restriction may act, Sir2/SIRT1 (Silent information regulator 2/Silent information regulator T1) has gained major attention due to its ability to integrate the sensing of the metabolic status with adaptative transcriptional outputs. This review focuses on gathered evidence suggesting that Sir2/SIRT1 is a key mediator of the beneficial effects of caloric restriction and addresses the main questions that still need to be answered to consolidate this hypothesis. PMID:19713122

  3. Fasting or caloric restriction for Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Stephen; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with a host of biological changes that contribute to a progressive decline in cognitive and physical function, ultimately leading to a loss of independence, and increased risk of mortality. To date, prolonged caloric restriction (i.e., a reduction in caloric intake without malnutrition) is the only non-genetic intervention that has consistently been found to extend both mean and maximal life span across a variety of species. Most individuals have difficulty sustaining prolonged caloric restriction, which has led to a search for alternative approaches that can produce similar to benefits as caloric restriction. A growing body of evidence indicates that fasting periods and intermittent fasting regimens in particular can trigger similar biological pathways as caloric restriction. For this reason, there is increasing scientific interest in further exploring the biological and metabolic effects of intermittent fasting periods, as well as whether long-term compliance may be improved by this type of dietary approach. This special will highlight the latest scientific findings related to the effects of both caloric restriction and intermittent fasting across various species including yeast, fruit flies, worms, rodents, primates, and humans. A specific emphasis is placed on translational research with findings from basic bench to bedside reviewed and practical clinical implications discussed. PMID:23639403

  4. Caloric restriction mimetics: towards a molecular definition.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Frank; Pietrocola, Federico; Eisenberg, Tobias; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Caloric restriction, be it constant or intermittent, is reputed to have health-promoting and lifespan-extending effects. Caloric restriction mimetics (CRMs) are compounds that mimic the biochemical and functional effects of caloric restriction. In this Opinion article, we propose a unifying definition of CRMs as compounds that stimulate autophagy by favouring the deacetylation of cellular proteins. This deacetylation process can be achieved by three classes of compounds that deplete acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA; the sole donor of acetyl groups), that inhibit acetyl transferases (a group of enzymes that acetylate lysine residues in an array of proteins) or that stimulate the activity of deacetylases and hence reverse the action of acetyl transferases. A unifying definition of CRMs will be important for the continued development of this class of therapeutic agents.

  5. Dietary restriction with and without caloric restriction for healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changhan; Longo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention known to regulate aging and increase the healthy lifespan in various model organisms, ranging from the unicellular yeast to worms, flies, rodents, and primates. However, caloric restriction, which in most cases entails a 20–40% reduction of food consumption relative to normal intake, is a severe intervention that results in both beneficial and detrimental effects. Specific types of chronic, intermittent, or periodic dietary restrictions without chronic caloric restriction have instead the potential to provide a significant healthspan increase while minimizing adverse effects. Improved periodic or targeted dietary restriction regimens that uncouple the challenge of food deprivation from the beneficial effects will allow a safe intervention feasible for a major portion of the population. Here we focus on healthspan interventions that are not chronic or do not require calorie restriction. PMID:26918181

  6. Caloric restriction, metabolic rate, and entropy.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, Lloyd

    2004-09-01

    Caloric restriction increases life span in many types of animals. This article proposes a mechanism for this effect based on the hypothesis that metabolic stability, the capacity of an organism to maintain steady state values of redox couples, is a prime determinant of longevity. We integrate the stability-longevity hypothesis with a molecular model of metabolic activity (quantum metabolism), and an entropic theory of evolutionary change (directionality theory), to propose a proximate mechanism and an evolutionary rationale for aging. The mechanistic features of the new theory of aging are invoked to predict that caloric restriction extends life span by increasing metabolic stability. The evolutionary model is exploited to predict that the large increases in life span under caloric restriction observed in rats, a species with early sexual maturity, narrow reproductive span and large litter size, and hence low entropy, will not hold for primates. We affirm that in the case of humans, a species with late sexual maturity, broad reproductive span and small litter size, and hence high entropy, the response of life span to caloric restriction will be negligible.

  7. Patterns of intraspecific variability in the response to caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Kristin E.; Kaido, Oksana; Jarvis, George; Mark Welch, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is cited as the most robust means of increasing lifespan across a range of taxa, yet there is a high degree of variability in the response to CR, both within and between species. To examine the intraspecific evolutionary conservation of lifespan extension by CR, we tested the effects of chronic caloric restriction (CCR) at multiple food levels and of intermittent fasting (IF) in twelve isolates from the Brachionus plicatilis species complex of monogonont rotifers. While CCR generally increased or did not change lifespan and total fecundity, IF caused increased, unchanged, or decreased lifespan, depending upon the isolate, and decreased total fecundity in all but one isolate. Lifespan under ad libitum (AL) feeding varied among isolates and predicted the lifespan response to CR: longer-lived isolates under AL were less likely to have a significant increase in lifespan under CCR and were more likely to have a significantly shortened lifespan under IF. Lifespan under AL conditions and the response to CR were not correlated with hydroperiodicity of native habitat or with time in culture. Lack of trade-off between lifespan and fecundity under CCR, and differences in lifespan and fecundity under CCR and IF, even when average food intake was similar, suggest that longevity changes are not always directly determined by energy intake and that CCR and IF regimens extend lifespan through diverse genetic mechanisms. PMID:24384399

  8. [Caloric restriction: about its positive metabolic effects and cellular impact].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Bautista, Raúl Julián; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos Alberto; Monroy-Guzmán, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Caloric restriction, as a 30 to 60% decrease of ad libitum balanced caloric intake, without malnutrition, is the non-genetic strategy that has consistently extended the average and maximum lifespan of most living beings, and it has been tested from unicellular organisms like yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Rhesus primates. In addition, various genetic and pharmacological caloric restriction models have shown to protect against cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Primate studies suggest that this intervention delays the onset of age-related diseases; in humans, it has physiological, biochemical and metabolic effects decreasing diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factor. Although currently the mechanism by which caloric restriction has its positive effects at the cellular level is unknown, it has been reported to decrease oxidative stress and increase in mitochondrial biogenesis.

  9. Development of adherence metrics for caloric restriction interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective measures are needed to quantify dietary adherence during caloric restriction (CR) while participants are freeliving. One method to monitor adherence is to compare observed weight loss to the expected weight loss during a prescribed level of CR. Normograms (graphs) of expected weight loss c...

  10. Development of adherence metrics for caloric restriction interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective measures are needed to quantify dietary adherence during caloric restriction (CR) while participants are freeliving. One method to monitor adherence is to compare observed weight loss to the expected weight loss during a prescribed level of CR. Normograms (graphs)of expected weight loss ca...

  11. Caloric restriction as a mechanism mediating resistance to environmental disease.

    PubMed Central

    Frame, L T; Hart, R W; Leakey, J E

    1998-01-01

    It has been observed that susceptibility to many degenerative diseases increases concurrently with industrialization and rising living standards. Although epidemiologic studies suggest that specific environmental and dietary factors may be important, caloric intake alone (as reflected in body size) may account for much of the differential risk observed among diverse human populations. It has been suggested from animal studies that caloric intake may be the primary effector for many hormonal, metabolic, physiologic, and behavioral responses that coordinate reproductive strategy to apparent availability of food. When caloric intake is excessive, particularly at critical developmental stages, physiologic priorities are set for body growth and fecundity rather than for endurance and longevity. The converse occurs during periods of famine, thus increasing the probability that sufficient individuals survive to restore the population when conditions improve. Calorically restricted rodents have significantly longer reproductive and total life spans than their ad libitum-fed controls and exhibit a spectrum of biochemical and physiologic alterations that characterize their adaptation to reduced intake. These include reduced stature, hypercorticism in the absence of elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone levels, increased metabolic efficiency, decreased mitogenic response coupled with increased rates of apoptosis, reduced inflammatory response, induction of stress proteins and DNA repair enzymes, altered drug-metabolizing enzyme expression, and modified cell-mediated immune function. The overall profile of these changes is one of improved defense against environmental stress. This has been suggested as the mechanistic basis for the protective effects of low body weight on radiation and chemically induced cancers in experimental animals. It may also explain the significantly higher thresholds of acute toxicity observed when calorically restricted rodents are exposed to certain

  12. Aging, Neurogenesis, and Caloric Restriction in Different Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Arslan-Ergul, Ayca; Ozdemir, A Tugrul; Adams, Michelle M

    2013-01-01

    Brain aging is a multifactorial process that is occurring across multiple cognitive domains. A significant complaint that occurs in the elderly is a decrement in learning and memory ability. Both rodents and zebrafish exhibit a similar problem with memory during aging. The neurobiological changes that underlie this cognitive decline are complex and undoubtedly influenced by many factors. Alterations in the birth of new neurons and neuron turnover may contribute to age-related cognitive problems. Caloric restriction is the only non-genetic intervention that reliably increases life span and healthspan across multiple organisms although the molecular mechanisms are not well-understood. Recently the zebrafish has become a popular model organism for understanding the neurobiological consequences but to date very little work has been performed. Similarly, few studies have examined the effects of dietary restriction in zebrafish. Here we review the literature related to memory decline, neurogenesis, and caloric restriction across model organisms and suggest that zebrafish has the potential to be an important animal model for understanding the complex interactions between age, neurobiological changes in the brain, and dietary regimens or their mimetics as interventions. PMID:23936746

  13. Caloric Restriction Chronically Impairs Metabolic Programming in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Henriette; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Fischer-Rosinský, Antje; Hembree, Jazzminn; Abplanalp, William; Ottaway, Nickki; Donelan, Elizabeth; Krishna, Radha; Woods, Stephen C.; Müller, Timo D.; Spranger, Joachim; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul T.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Habegger, Kirk M.

    2012-01-01

    Although obesity rates are rapidly rising, caloric restriction remains one of the few safe therapies. Here we tested the hypothesis that obesity-associated disorders are caused by increased adipose tissue as opposed to excess dietary lipids. Fat mass (FM) of lean C57B6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD; FMC mice) was “clamped” to match the FM of mice maintained on a low-fat diet (standard diet [SD] mice). FMC mice displayed improved glucose and insulin tolerance as compared with ad libitum HFD mice (P < 0.001) or SD mice (P < 0.05). These improvements were associated with fewer signs of inflammation, consistent with the less-impaired metabolism. In follow-up studies, diet-induced obese mice were food restricted for 5 weeks to achieve FM levels identical with those of age-matched SD mice. Previously, obese mice exhibited improved glucose and insulin tolerance but showed markedly increased fasting-induced hyperphagia (P < 0.001). When mice were given ad libitum access to the HFD, the hyperphagia of these mice led to accelerated body weight gain as compared with otherwise matched controls without a history of obesity. These results suggest that although caloric restriction on a HFD provides metabolic benefits, maintaining those benefits may require lifelong continuation, at least in individuals with a history of obesity. PMID:22787140

  14. Caloric restriction improves health and survival of rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Julie A.; Colman, Ricki J.; Beasley, T. Mark; Allison, David B.; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Roth, George S.; Ingram, Donald K.; Weindruch, Richard; de Cabo, Rafael; Anderson, Rozalyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition extends lifespan and delays the onset of age-related disorders in most species but its impact in nonhuman primates has been controversial. In the late 1980s two parallel studies were initiated to determine the effect of CR in rhesus monkeys. The University of Wisconsin study reported a significant positive impact of CR on survival, but the National Institute on Aging study detected no significant survival effect. Here we present a direct comparison of longitudinal data from both studies including survival, bodyweight, food intake, fasting glucose levels and age-related morbidity. We describe differences in study design that could contribute to differences in outcomes, and we report species specificity in the impact of CR in terms of optimal onset and diet. Taken together these data confirm that health benefits of CR are conserved in monkeys and suggest that CR mechanisms are likely translatable to human health. PMID:28094793

  15. Development of liver fibrosis during aging: effects of caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Horrillo, D; Gallardo, N; Lauzurica, N; Barrus, M T; San Frutos, M G; Andres, A; Ros, M; Fernandez-Agullo, T

    2013-01-01

    Liver is the central metabolic organ of the body and diet is considered one of the main environmental factors that can impact on aging liver. In the elderly stage liver function is relatively well conserved although there are a variety of not well defined morphological changes related to liver fibrosis which is commonly associated with an inflammatory state. The aim of this paper is to study these alterations during the physiological process of aging in Wistar rats and also test if caloric restriction (CR) could ameliorate them. As fibrosis is associated to hepatic stellate cell (HSC) function we also analyzed these cells during aging. Livers from five groups of male Wistar rats (3-, 8-, 24-months old ad libitum and 8- and 24-months caloric restricted rats) were used in this study. Histological analysis, expression of genes implicated in liver fibrosis and the status of inflammatory step-pathways as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) isoforms, p50 and p65, in cytosolic and nuclear fractions were performed. During elderly, associated with morphological change of HSC, there is a progressive increase in collagen deposition due to an inhibition in collagen degradation. Higher expression of cytokines and the activation of inflammatory pathways are associated with aging. CR ameliorates these circumstances being more effective when it started in middle age. In conclusion elderly stage is associated to a mild fibrotic and inflammatory state in the liver which could be ameliorated after CR.

  16. Caloric Restriction in Lean and Obese Strains of Laboratory ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    NEW FINDINGS: What is the central question of this study? How do lean and obese rats respond physiologically to caloric restriction? What is the main finding and its importance? Obese rats show marked benefits compared with lean animals. Reduced body fat is associated with improved longevity with caloric restriction (CR) in rodents. Little is known regarding effects of CR in genetically lean versus obese strains. Long-Evans (LE) and Brown Norway (BN) rats make an ideal comparison for a CR study because the percentage body fat of young adult LE rats is double that of BN rats. Male LE and BN rats were either fed ad libitum (AL) or were caloricallyrestricted to 80 or 90% of their AL weight. The percentages of fat, lean and fluid mass were measured non-invasively at 2- to 4-week intervals. Metabolic rate and respiratory quotient were measured after 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of CR. Overall health was scored monthly. The percentage of fat of the LE strain decreased with CR, whereas the percentage of fat of the BN strain remained above the AL group for several months. The percentage of lean mass increased above the AL for both strains subjected to CR. The percentage offluid was unaffected by CR. The average metabolic rate over 22 h of the BN rats subjected to CR was reduced, whereas that of LE rats was increased slightly above the AL group. The respiratory quotient of BN rats wasdecreased with CR. Overall health of the CR LE group was significantly improved compared with t

  17. Fasting and Caloric Restriction in Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Brandhorst, Sebastian; Longo, Valter D

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA and among the leading major diseases in the world. It is anticipated to continue to increase because of the growth of the aging population and prevalence of risk factors such as obesity, smoking, and/or poor dietary habits. Cancer treatment has remained relatively similar during the past 30 years with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in combination with surgery remaining the standard therapies although novel therapies are slowly replacing or complementing the standard ones. According to the American Cancer Society, the dietary recommendation for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy is to increase calorie and protein intake. In addition, there are no clear guidelines on the type of nutrition that could have a major impact on cancer incidence. Yet, various forms of reduced caloric intake such as calorie restriction (CR) or fasting demonstrate a wide range of beneficial effects able to help prevent malignancies and increase the efficacy of cancer therapies. Whereas chronic CR provides both beneficial and detrimental effects as well as major compliance challenges, periodic fasting (PF), fasting-mimicking diets (FMDs), and dietary restriction (DR) without a reduction in calories are emerging as interventions with the potential to be widely used to prevent and treat cancer. Here, we review preclinical and preliminary clinical studies on dietary restriction and fasting and their role in inducing cellular protection and chemotherapy resistance.

  18. Caloric restriction enhances fear extinction learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Megan C; McKenna, Morgan C; Yoon, Yone J; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Santos, Patricia Mae G; Casey, B J; Glatt, Charles E

    2013-05-01

    Fear extinction learning, the ability to reassess a learned cue of danger as safe when it no longer predicts aversive events, is often dysregulated in anxiety disorders. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's) enhance neural plasticity and their ability to enhance fear extinction learning may explain their anxiolytic properties. Caloric restriction (CR) has SSRI-like effects on neural plasticity and anxiety-related behavior. We implemented CR in mice to determine its effects on conditioned-fear responses. Wild type and serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout mice underwent CR for 7 days leading to significant weight loss. Mice were then tested for cued fear learning and anxiety-related behavior. CR markedly enhanced fear extinction learning and its retention in adolescent female mice, and adults of both sexes. These effects of CR were absent in SERT knockout mice. Moreover, CR phenocopied behavioral and molecular effects of chronic fluoxetine, but there was no additive effect of CR in fluoxetine-treated mice. These results demonstrate that CR enhances fear extinction learning through a SERT-dependent mechanism. These results may have implications for eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa (AN), in which there is a high prevalence of anxiety before the onset of dietary restriction and support proposals that in AN, CR is a motivated effort to control dysregulated fear responses and elevated anxiety.

  19. Caloric Restriction and Rapamycin Differentially Alter Energy Metabolism in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Mi; Hong, Seok-Jin; van Deursen, Jan M; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2017-03-08

    Rapamycin (RM), a drug that inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and responds to nutrient availability, seemingly mimics the effects of caloric restriction (CR) on healthy life span. However, the extent of the mechanistic overlap between RM and CR remains incompletely understood. Here, we compared the impact of CR and RM on cellular metabolic status. Both regimens maintained intracellular ATP through the chronological aging process and showed enhanced mitochondrial capacity. Comparative transcriptome analysis showed that CR had a stronger impact on global gene expression than RM. We observed a like impact on the metabolome and identified distinct metabolites affected by CR and RM. CR severely reduced the level of energy storage molecules including glycogen and lipid droplets, whereas RM did not. RM boosted the production of enzymes responsible for the breakdown of glycogen and lipid droplets. Collectively, these results provide insights into the distinct energy metabolism mechanisms induced by CR and RM, suggesting that these two anti-aging regimens might extend life span through distinctive pathways.

  20. Redox-regulating sirtuins in aging, caloric restriction, and exercise.

    PubMed

    Radak, Zsolt; Koltai, Erika; Taylor, Albert W; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Kumagai, Shuzo; Ohno, Hideki; Goto, Sataro; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-05-01

    The consequence of decreased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) levels as a result of oxidative challenge is altered activity of sirtuins, which, in turn, brings about a wide range of modifications in mammalian cellular metabolism. Sirtuins, especially SIRT1, deacetylate important transcription factors such as p53, forkhead homeobox type O proteins, nuclear factor κB, or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (which controls the transcription of pro- and antioxidant enzymes, by which the cellular redox state is affected). The role of SIRT1 in DNA repair is enigmatic, because it activates Ku70 to cope with double-strand breaks, but deacetylation of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 and probably of 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1 decreases the activity of these DNA repair enzymes. The protein-stabilizing effects of the NAD+-dependent lysine deacetylases are readily related to housekeeping and redox regulation. The role of sirtuins in caloric restriction (CR)-related longevity in yeast is currently under debate. However, in mammals, it seems certain that sirtuins are involved in many cellular processes that mediate longevity and disease prevention via the effects of CR through the vascular, neuronal, and muscular systems. Regular physical exercise-mediated health promotion also involves sirtuin-regulated pathways including the antioxidant-, macromolecular damage repair-, energy-, mitochondrial function-, and neuronal plasticity-associated pathways. This review critically evaluates these findings and points out the age-associated role of sirtuins.

  1. Ageing and Caloric Restriction in a Marine Planktonic Copepod

    PubMed Central

    Saiz, Enric; Calbet, Albert; Griffell, Kaiene; Bersano, José Guilherme F.; Isari, Stamatina; Solé, Montserrat; Peters, Janna; Alcaraz, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic copepods are a key group in the marine pelagic ecosystem, linking primary production with upper trophic levels. Their abundance and population dynamics are constrained by the life history tradeoffs associated with resource availability, reproduction and predation pressure. The tradeoffs associated with the ageing process and its underlying biological mechanisms are, however, poorly known. Our study shows that ageing in copepods involves a deterioration of their vital rates and a rise in mortality associated with an increase in oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation); the activity of the cell-repair enzymatic machinery also increases with age. This increase in oxidative damage is associated with an increase in the relative content of the fatty acid 22:6(n-3), an essential component of cell membranes that increases their susceptibility to peroxidation. Moreover, we show that caloric (food) restriction in marine copepods reduces their age-specific mortality rates, and extends the lifespan of females and their reproductive period. Given the overall low production of the oceans, this can be a strategy, at least in certain copepod species, to enhance their chances to reproduce in a nutritionally dilute, temporally and spatially patchy environment. PMID:26455575

  2. Ageing and Caloric Restriction in a Marine Planktonic Copepod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Enric; Calbet, Albert; Griffell, Kaiene; Bersano, José Guilherme F.; Isari, Stamatina; Solé, Montserrat; Peters, Janna; Alcaraz, Miquel

    2015-10-01

    Planktonic copepods are a key group in the marine pelagic ecosystem, linking primary production with upper trophic levels. Their abundance and population dynamics are constrained by the life history tradeoffs associated with resource availability, reproduction and predation pressure. The tradeoffs associated with the ageing process and its underlying biological mechanisms are, however, poorly known. Our study shows that ageing in copepods involves a deterioration of their vital rates and a rise in mortality associated with an increase in oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation); the activity of the cell-repair enzymatic machinery also increases with age. This increase in oxidative damage is associated with an increase in the relative content of the fatty acid 22:6(n-3), an essential component of cell membranes that increases their susceptibility to peroxidation. Moreover, we show that caloric (food) restriction in marine copepods reduces their age-specific mortality rates, and extends the lifespan of females and their reproductive period. Given the overall low production of the oceans, this can be a strategy, at least in certain copepod species, to enhance their chances to reproduce in a nutritionally dilute, temporally and spatially patchy environment.

  3. Molecular bases of caloric restriction regulation of neuronal synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fontán-Lozano, Angela; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Delgado-García, José María; Navas, Placido; Carrión, Angel Manuel

    2008-10-01

    Aging is associated with the decline of cognitive properties. This situation is magnified when neurodegenerative processes associated with aging appear in human patients. Neuronal synaptic plasticity events underlie cognitive properties in the central nervous system. Caloric restriction (CR; either a decrease in food intake or an intermittent fasting diet) can extend life span and increase disease resistance. Recent studies have shown that CR can have profound effects on brain function and vulnerability to injury and disease. Moreover, CR can stimulate the production of new neurons from stem cells (neurogenesis) and can enhance synaptic plasticity, which modulate pain sensation, enhance cognitive function, and may increase the ability of the brain to resist aging. The beneficial effects of CR appear to be the result of a cellular stress response stimulating the production of proteins that enhance neuronal plasticity and resistance to oxidative and metabolic insults; they include neurotrophic factors, neurotransmitter receptors, protein chaperones, and mitochondrial biosynthesis regulators. In this review, we will present and discuss the effect of CR in synaptic processes underlying analgesia and cognitive improvement in healthy, sick, and aging animals. We will also discuss the possible role of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by CR in regulation of neuronal synaptic plasticity.

  4. Medicinal Chemistry of the Epigenetic Diet and Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S.L.; Hardy, T.M.; Tollefsbol, T.O.

    2013-01-01

    The pronounced effects of the epigenetic diet (ED) and caloric restriction (CR) have on epigenetic gene regulation have been documented in many pre-clinical and clinical studies. Understanding epigenetics is of high importance because of the concept that external factors such as nutrition and diet may possess the ability to alter gene expression without modifying the DNA sequence. The ED introduces bioactive medicinal chemistry compounds such as sulforaphane (SFN), curcumin (CCM), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and resveratrol (RSV) that are thought to aid in extending the human lifespan. CR, although similar to ED in the target of longevity, mildly reduces the total daily calorie intake while concurrently providing all beneficial nutrients. Both CR and ED may act as epigenetic modifiers to slow the aging process through histone modification, DNA methylation, and by modulating microRNA expression. CR and ED have been proposed as two important mechanisms that modulate and potentially slow the progression of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, obesity, Alzheimer’s and osteoporosis to name a few. While many investigators have examined CR and ED as separate entities, this review will primarily focus on both as they relate to age-related diseases, their epigenetic effects and their medicinal chemistry. PMID:23895687

  5. Evolution of Human Longevity Uncoupled from Caloric Restriction Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guodong; Guo, Song; Somel, Mehmet; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) and chemical agents, such as resveratrol and rapamycin that partially mimic the CR effect, can delay morbidity and mortality across a broad range of species. In humans, however, the effects of CR or other life-extending agents have not yet been investigated systematically. Human maximal lifespan is already substantially greater compared to that of closely related primate species. It is therefore possible that humans have acquired genetic mutations that mimic the CR effect. Here, we tested this notion by comparing transcriptome differences between humans and other primates, with the transcriptome changes observed in mice subjected to CR. We show that the human transcriptome state, relative to other primate transcriptomes, does not match that of the CR mice or mice treated with resveratrol, but resembles the transcriptome state of ad libitum fed mice. At the same time, the transcriptome changes induced by CR in mice are enriched among genes showing age-related changes in primates, concentrated in specific expression patterns, and can be linked with specific functional pathways, including insulin signalling, cancer, and the immune response. These findings indicate that the evolution of human longevity was likely independent of CR-induced lifespan extension mechanisms. Consequently, application of CR or CR-mimicking agents may yet offer a promising direction for the extension of healthy human lifespan. PMID:24400080

  6. Repletion of TNFα or leptin in calorically restricted mice suppresses post-restriction hyperphagia

    PubMed Central

    Hambly, Catherine; Duncan, Jacqueline S.; Archer, Zoë A.; Moar, Kim M.; Mercer, Julian G.; Speakman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The causes of post-restriction hyperphagia (PRH) represent a target for drug-based therapies to prevent obesity. However, the factors causing PRH are poorly understood. We show that, in mice, the extent of PRH was independent of the time under restriction, but depended on its severity, suggesting that PRH was driven by signals from altered body composition. Signals related to fat mass were important drivers. Circulating levels of leptin and TNFα were significantly depleted following caloric restriction (CR). We experimentally repleted their levels to match those of controls, and found that in both treatment groups the level of PRH was significantly blunted. These data establish a role for TNFα and leptin in the non-pathological regulation of energy homeostasis. Signals from adipose tissue, including but not limited to leptin and TNFα, regulate PRH and might be targets for therapies that support people engaged in CR to reduce obesity. PMID:21954068

  7. A Human Thrifty Phenotype Associated With Less Weight Loss During Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Thearle, Marie S.; Ibrahim, Mostafa; Hohenadel, Maximilian G.; Bogardus, Clifton; Krakoff, Jonathan; Votruba, Susanne B.

    2015-01-01

    Successful weight loss is variable for reasons not fully elucidated. Whether effective weight loss results from smaller reductions in energy expenditure during caloric restriction is not known. We analyzed whether obese individuals with a “thrifty” phenotype, that is, greater reductions in 24-h energy expenditure during fasting and smaller increases with overfeeding, lose less weight during caloric restriction than those with a “spendthrift” phenotype. During a weight-maintaining period, 24-h energy expenditure responses to fasting and 200% overfeeding were measured in a whole-room indirect calorimeter. Volunteers then underwent 6 weeks of 50% caloric restriction. We calculated the daily energy deficit (kilocalories per day) during caloric restriction, incorporating energy intake and waste, energy expenditure, and daily activity. We found that a smaller reduction in 24-h energy expenditure during fasting and a larger response to overfeeding predicted more weight loss over 6 weeks, even after accounting for age, sex, race, and baseline weight, as well as a greater rate of energy deficit accumulation. The success of dietary weight loss efforts is influenced by the energy expenditure response to caloric restriction. Greater decreases in energy expenditure during caloric restriction predict less weight loss, indicating the presence of thrifty and spendthrift phenotypes in obese humans. PMID:25964395

  8. A Human Thrifty Phenotype Associated With Less Weight Loss During Caloric Restriction.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Martin; Thearle, Marie S; Ibrahim, Mostafa; Hohenadel, Maximilian G; Bogardus, Clifton; Krakoff, Jonathan; Votruba, Susanne B

    2015-08-01

    Successful weight loss is variable for reasons not fully elucidated. Whether effective weight loss results from smaller reductions in energy expenditure during caloric restriction is not known. We analyzed whether obese individuals with a "thrifty" phenotype, that is, greater reductions in 24-h energy expenditure during fasting and smaller increases with overfeeding, lose less weight during caloric restriction than those with a "spendthrift" phenotype. During a weight-maintaining period, 24-h energy expenditure responses to fasting and 200% overfeeding were measured in a whole-room indirect calorimeter. Volunteers then underwent 6 weeks of 50% caloric restriction. We calculated the daily energy deficit (kilocalories per day) during caloric restriction, incorporating energy intake and waste, energy expenditure, and daily activity. We found that a smaller reduction in 24-h energy expenditure during fasting and a larger response to overfeeding predicted more weight loss over 6 weeks, even after accounting for age, sex, race, and baseline weight, as well as a greater rate of energy deficit accumulation. The success of dietary weight loss efforts is influenced by the energy expenditure response to caloric restriction. Greater decreases in energy expenditure during caloric restriction predict less weight loss, indicating the presence of thrifty and spendthrift phenotypes in obese humans.

  9. Early postnatal caloric restriction protects adult male intrauterine growth-restricted offspring from obesity.

    PubMed

    Garg, Meena; Thamotharan, Manikkavasagar; Dai, Yun; Thamotharan, Shanthie; Shin, Bo-Chul; Stout, David; Devaskar, Sherin U

    2012-06-01

    Postnatal ad libitum caloric intake superimposed on intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with adult-onset obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We hypothesized that this paradigm of prenatal nutrient deprivation-induced programming can be reversed with the introduction of early postnatal calorie restriction. Ten-month-old male rats exposed to either prenatal nutrient restriction with ad libitum postnatal intake (IUGR), pre- and postnatal nutrient restriction (IPGR), or postnatal nutrient restriction limited to the suckling phase (50% from postnatal [PN]1 to PN21) (PNGR) were compared with age-matched controls (CON). Visceral adiposity, metabolic profile, and insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were examined. The 10-month-old male IUGR group had a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in subcutaneous and visceral fat (P < 0.0002) while remaining euglycemic, insulin sensitive, inactive, and exhibiting metabolic inflexibility (Vo(2)) versus CON. The IPGR group remained lean, euglycemic, insulin sensitive, and active while maintaining metabolic flexibility. The PNGR group was insulin sensitive, similar to IPGR, but less active while maintaining metabolic flexibility. We conclude that IUGR resulted in obesity without insulin resistance and energy metabolic perturbations prior to development of glucose intolerance and T2DM. Postnatal nutrient restriction superimposed on IUGR was protective, restoring metabolic normalcy to a lean and active phenotype.

  10. The effect of caloric restriction and glycemic load on measures of oxidative stress and antioxidants in humans: results from the calerie trial of human caloric restriction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing oxidative stress and increasing antioxidant defense is suggested as one mechanism by which caloric restriction (CR) increases longevity in animals. A total of 46 moderately overweight volunteers (BMI: 25-30 kg/m2), ages 20-42 yr were randomized to either high glycemic (HG) or low glycemic ...

  11. Caloric restriction in primates and relevance to humans.

    PubMed

    Roth, G S; Ingram, D K; Lane, M A

    2001-04-01

    Dietary caloric restriction (CR) is the only intervention conclusively and reproducibly shown to slow aging and maintain health and vitality in mammals. Although this paradigm has been known for over 60 years, its precise biological mechanisms and applicability to humans remain unknown. We began addressing the latter question in 1987 with the first controlled study of CR in primates (rhesus and squirrel monkeys, which are evolutionarily much closer to humans than the rodents most frequently employed in CR studies). To date, our results strongly suggest that the same beneficial "antiaging" and/or "antidisease" effects observed in CR rodents also occur in primates. These include lower plasma insulin levels and greater sensitivity; lower body temperatures; reduced cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and arterial stiffness; elevated HDL; and slower age-related decline in circulating levels of DHEAS. Collectively, these biomarkers suggest that CR primates will be less likely to incur diabetes, cardiovascular problems, and other age-related diseases and may in fact be aging more slowly than fully fed counterparts. Despite these very encouraging results, it is unlikely that most humans would be willing to maintain a 30% reduced diet for the bulk of their adult life span, even if it meant more healthy years. For this reason, we have begun to explore CR mimetics, agents that might elicit the same beneficial effects as CR, without the necessity of dieting. Our initial studies have focused on 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), a sugar analogue with a limited metabolism that actually reduces glucose/energy flux without decreasing food intake in rats. In a six-month pilot study, 2DG lowered plasma insulin and body temperature in a manner analagous to that of CR. Thus, metabolic effects that mediate the CR mechanism can be attained pharmacologically. Doses were titrated to eliminate toxicity; a long-term longevity study is now under way. In addition, data from other laboratories

  12. Effects of Caloric Restriction on Inflammatory Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Mark A.; Dawson, Dolphus R.; Novak, Karen F.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Gunsolley, John C.; Branch-Mays, Grishondra L.; Holt, Stanley C.; Mattison, Julie A.; Ingram, Donald K.; Novak, M. John

    2008-01-01

    Objective Dietary caloric restriction (CR) has been found to reduce systemic markers of inflammation and may attenuate the effects of chronic inflammatory conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of long-term CR on naturally occurring chronic inflammatory periodontal disease in a nonhuman primate model. Methods The effects of long-term CR on extent and severity of naturally occurring chronic periodontal disease, local inflammatory and immune responses, and periodontal microbiology, were evaluated in a cohort of 81 (35 female and 46 male; 13–40 years of age) rhesus monkeys (M. mulatta) with no previous exposure to routine oral hygiene. The CR monkeys had been subjected to 30% CR for 13–17 years relative to control-fed (CON) animals starting at 3–5 years of age. Clinical and laboratory parameters were submitted to analysis of covariance, including Tukey's test for post hoc comparisons, linear regression analysis, and nonparametric correlation analysis. Results Same sex CR and CON monkeys exhibited comparable mean scores for plaque index, calculus index, and bleeding on probing. Among CON animals, males showed significantly greater periodontal breakdown, as reflected by higher mean clinical attachment level (CAL) and periodontal probing depth (PD) scores, than females (p ≤ 0.05). CR males had significantly less periodontal pocketing compared to CON males (p ≤ 0.05). CR males demonstrated a significantly lower IgG antibody response and lower levels of IL-8 and β-glucuronidase in gingival crevicular fluid compared to control males. A similar but nonsignificant reduction was found for IL-1β in CR male monkeys. In contrast, CR females exhibited mean PD and CAL scores comparable to CON females. CR females had a lower IgG antibody response but comparable levels of inflammatory markers in GCF compared to CON females. The CR diet had no demonstrable effects on the periodontal microbiota in male or female monkeys. Conclusion Males exhibited

  13. Adaptations of intestinal nutrient transport to chronic caloric restriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Casirola, D M; Rifkin, B; Tsai, W; Ferraris, R P

    1996-07-01

    Lifelong caloric restriction increases median and maximum life span and retards the aging process in many organ systems of rodents. Because the small intestine absorbs a reduced amount of nutrients each day, does lifelong caloric restriction induce adaptations in intestinal nutrient transport? We initially compared intestinal transport of sugars and amino acids between 24-mo-old mice allowed free access to food [ad libitum (AL)] and those provided a calorically restricted [40% less than ad libitum (CR)] diet since 3 mo of age. We found that CR mice had significantly greater transport rates for D-glucose, D-fructose, and several amino acids and had significantly lower villus heights. Total intestinal absorptive capacities for D-glucose, D-fructose, and L-proline were each 40-50% greater in CR mice; absorptive capacity normalized to metabolic mass (body weight 0.75) was approximately 80% greater in CR mice. Comparison of uptakes in aged AL and CR mice with previously published results in young AL mice suggests that caloric restriction delays age-related decreases in nutrient transport. In contrast to published studies in hibernation and starvation, chronic caloric restriction enhances not only uptake per milligram but also uptake per centimeter. We then switched 24-mo-old AL mice to a calorie-restricted diet for 1 mo and found that short-term caloric restriction has no effect on intestinal nutrient transport, intestinal mass, and total absorptive capacity. Thus chronic but not short-term caloric restriction increases intestinal nutrient transport rates in aged mice, and the main mechanism underlying these increases is enhanced transport rates per unit intestinal tissue weight.

  14. Metabolic Aspects of Caloric Restriction (500 Calories): Body Composition Changes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    adjusted to Increased caloric intake. Allen and Musgrave (20) felt that decreases in body fat and water in a two-component system were adequate for...about 73% of body muscle weight). Body water - The total amount of water in the body, 72% of the lean body mass. Creatinine - Urinary excretory product

  15. The effects of a discretionary food allowance during a caloric restriction regimen with provided food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of self-selected discretionary foods in a structured energy restricted diet on adherence to a caloric restriction (CR) regimen, dietary satisfaction, and weight loss were studied in 32 healthy, overweight (BMI 25-30 kg/m2) adults, aged 20-42y participating in the CALERIE trial. Subjects ...

  16. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation

    PubMed Central

    Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; de Almeida, Luís Pereira; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  17. Benefits of caloric restriction for cardiometabolic health, including type 2 diabetes mellitus risk.

    PubMed

    Soare, Andreea; Weiss, Edward P; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    In the United States, life expectancy has markedly increased during the past century, and population ageing is expected to double within the next 25 years. The process of ageing in a population is associated with the development of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, that can be prevented, and even reversed, with the implementation of healthy lifestyle interventions. The evidence to date, consolidated by the numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials conducted, suggests that caloric restriction is an effective nutritional intervention for preventing most of these age-related conditions. At a metabolic level, caloric restriction with adequate nutrition has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, reduce fasting glucose and insulin concentration and prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and chronic inflammation. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge of the metabolic and clinical implications of caloric restriction with adequate nutrition for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  18. Caloric restriction and exercise “mimetics”: ready for prime time?

    PubMed Central

    Handschin, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Exercise and diet are powerful interventions to prevent and ameliorate various pathologies. The development of pharmacological agents that confer exercise- or caloric restriction-like phenotypic effects is thus an appealing therapeutic strategy in diseases or even when used as life-style and longevity drugs. Such so-called exercise or caloric restriction “mimetics” have so far mostly been described in pre-clinical, experimental settings with limited translation into humans. Interestingly, many of these compounds activate related signaling pathways, most often postulated to act on the common downstream effector peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in skeletal muscle. In this review, resveratrol and other exercise- and caloric restriction “mimetics” are discussed with a special focus on feasibility, chances and limitations of using such compounds in patients as well as in healthy individuals. PMID:26658171

  19. Sex-related differences in energy balance in response to caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Valle, A; Català-Niell, A; Colom, B; García-Palmer, F J; Oliver, J; Roca, P

    2005-07-01

    Sex-related differences in energy balance were studied in young Wistar rats fed standard chow pellets either ad libitum or in restricted amounts (60% of ad libitum intake) for 100 days. Caloric intake, indirect calorimetry, organ and adipose tissue weights, energy efficiency, liver mitochondrial respiration rate, and brown adipose tissue (BAT) uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) content were measured. Ad libitum-fed females showed greater oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) and carbon dioxide production (Vco(2)) and lower energy efficiency than males. Caloric restriction induced a chronic drop of Vo(2) and Vco(2) in females but not in males over the period studied. Restricted females showed a better conservation of metabolic active organ mass and a greater decrease in adipose depots than restricted males. Moreover, changes of BAT size and UCP1 content suggest that BAT may be the main cause responsible for sex differences in the response of energy balance to caloric restriction. In conclusion, our results indicate that females under caloric restriction conditions deactivate facultative thermogenesis to a greater degree than males. This ability may have obvious advantages for female survival and therefore the survival of the species when food is limiting.

  20. SirT1 Regulates Energy Metabolism and Response to Caloric Restriction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boily, Gino; Seifert, Erin L.; Bevilacqua, Lisa; He, Xiao Hong; Sabourin, Guillaume; Estey, Carmen; Moffat, Cynthia; Crawford, Sean; Saliba, Sarah; Jardine, Karen; Xuan, Jian; Evans, Meredith; Harper, Mary-Ellen; McBurney, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    The yeast sir2 gene and its orthologues in Drosophila and C. elegans have well-established roles in lifespan determination and response to caloric restriction. We have studied mice carrying two null alleles for SirT1, the mammalian orthologue of sir2, and found that these animals inefficiently utilize ingested food. These mice are hypermetabolic, contain inefficient liver mitochondria, and have elevated rates of lipid oxidation. When challenged with a 40% reduction in caloric intake, normal mice maintained their metabolic rate and increased their physical activity while the metabolic rate of SirT1-null mice dropped and their activity did not increase. Moreover, CR did not extend lifespan of SirT1-null mice. Thus, SirT1 is an important regulator of energy metabolism and, like its orthologues from simpler eukaryotes, the SirT1 protein appears to be required for a normal response to caloric restriction. PMID:18335035

  1. Effect of Modest Caloric Restriction on Oxidative Stress in Women, a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Buchowski, Maciej S.; Hongu, Nobuko; Acra, Sari; Wang, Li; Warolin, Joshua; Roberts, L. Jackson

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It is not established to what extent caloric intake must be reduced to lower oxidative stress in humans. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of short-term, moderate caloric restriction on markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in overweight and obese premenopausal women. Materials/Methods Randomized trial comparison of 25% caloric restriction (CR) or control diet in 40 overweight or obese women (body mass index 32±5.8 kg/m2) observed for 28 days and followed for the next 90 days. Weight, anthropometry, validated markers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostane) and inflammation (C-reactive protein), adipokines, hormones, lipids, interleukins, and blood pressure were assessed at baseline, during the intervention, and at follow-up. Results Baseline median F2-isoprostane concentration (57.0, IQR = 40.5–79.5) in the CR group was 1.75-fold above average range for normal weight women (32.5 pg/ml). After starting of the caloric restriction diet, F2-isoprostane levels fell rapidly in the CR group, reaching statistical difference from the control group by day 5 (median 33.5, IQR = 26.0–48.0, P<0.001) and remained suppressed while continuing on the caloric restriction diet. Three months after resuming a habitual diet, concentrations of F2-isoprostane returned to baseline elevated levels in ∼80% of the women. Conclusions Oxidative stress can be rapidly reduced and sustained through a modest reduction in caloric intake suggesting potential health benefits in overweight and obese women. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00808275 PMID:23071718

  2. Thermoregulatory, Cardiovascular, and Metabolic Responses to Mild Caloric Restriction in the Brown Norway Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been demonstrated to prolong the life span of a variety of species. CR-induced reduction in core temperature (Tc) is considered a key mechanism responsible for prolonging life span in rodents; however, little is known on the regulation of CR-induced h...

  3. SIRT2 deacetylates FOXO3a in response to oxidative stress and caloric restriction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sirtuin family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent (NAD) deacetylases plays an important role in aging and metabolic regulation. In yeast, the Sir2 gene and its homolog Hst2 independently mediate the action of caloric restriction on lifespan extension. The mammalian Sir2 ortholog, SIR...

  4. Long–term effects of caloric restriction on total and resting energy expenditure in healthy adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of long-term caloric restriction (CR) on resting metabolic rate (RMR) and total energy expenditure (TEE) in humans is uncertain. Objective To examine the effects of a 30% CR regimen on TEE and RMR. Methods One year randomized controlled trial of 30% CR in 29 healthy overweight adults (me...

  5. Benefits of caloric restriction in the myenteric neuronal plasticity in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joice N B; Mari, Renata B; Stabille, Sandra R; de Faria, Haroldo G; Mota, Thais F M; Ferreira, Walter M

    2014-09-01

    Aging is a biologic process characterized by progressive damage of structures and functions of organic systems. In gastrointestinal tract, it can involve enteric nervous system, which plays an important role in digestion and absorption of nutrients, causing hastening of intestinal transit thus reducing its absorptive function. Caloric restriction has been used in several studies with the intention of delaying deleterious effects of aging. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of caloric restriction on myenteric neurons of ileum by aging in rats. 30 Wistar rats were grouped as follows: GI (animals aged 6 months fed with normal diet), GII (animals aged 18 months fed with normal diet) and GIII (animals aged 18 months subject to 31% of caloric restriction). The rats of the GI group were euthanized at 6 months of age and after experimental period of 12 months animals of the group GII and GIII were euthanized, the ileum of all groups were collected, measured and processed by NADPH-dp and Acetylcholinesterase. Quantitative analysis of neurons revealed that aging promotes the increasing of myenteric neurons NADPH-dp and reduces Acetylcholinesterase neuronal population. However, in the cellular profile area, were not observed significant differences between the groups. The caloric restriction has been efficient and can be used preventively because it minimizes quantitative changes associated with aging on ileum myenteric plexuses.

  6. Dietary restriction, caloric value and the accumulation of hepatic fat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies using laboratory animals under what are considered to be "standard" conditions normally offer unrestricted amounts of food to the animals, which can lead to metabolic disorders. Moreover, standard diets have different compositions. Aim Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the effects of two non-isocaloric diets (commercial Purina® and AIN-93M), which are considered standard diets, on the accumulation of fat in the liver of rats when offered ad libitum or in a restricted amount. Methods Thus, 40 Wistar rats (90 days old) were separated into 4 groups according to the amount of food offered (ad libitum or dietary restriction) and the type of diet (commercial diet, 3,028.0 kcal/g or AIN-93M, 3,802.7 kcal/g): animals fed the commercial Purina® diet ad libitum (AP), animals fed restricted amounts of the commercial Purina® diet (RP), animals fed the AIN-93M diet ad libitum (AD), and animals fed restricted amounts of the AIN-93M diet (RD). Dietary restriction consisted of pair-feeding the RP and RD groups with 60% of the total food consumed by the corresponding ad libitum groups. Results Because of its higher carbohydrate and calorie content, AIN-93M was found to accelerate weight gain, reduce glucose tolerance and peripheral insulin sensitivity, and increase the amount of fat in the liver when compared to the commercial diet. Conversely, a 40% dietary restriction assisted in weight loss without causing malnutrition, contributing to an improved glucose tolerance and higher levels of HDL cholesterol. Conclusion Therefore, differences in the amount of carbohydrates and calories provided by the diet can lead to important metabolic disorders, such as impaired tolerance and accumulation of hepatic fat, and dietary restriction improves serum and tissue lipid profiles in laboratory animals. PMID:22221448

  7. Molecular Links between Caloric Restriction and Sir2/SIRT1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ageing is the most significant risk factor for a range of prevalent diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Accordingly, interventions are needed for delaying or preventing disorders associated with the ageing process, i.e., promotion of healthy ageing. Calorie restriction is the only nongenetic and the most robust approach to slow the process of ageing in evolutionarily divergent species, ranging from yeasts, worms, and flies to mammals. Although it has been known for more than 80 years that calorie restriction increases lifespan, a mechanistic understanding of this phenomenon remains elusive. Yeast silent information regulator 2 (Sir2), the founding member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases, and its mammalian homologue Sir2-like protein 1 (SIRT1), have been suggested to promote survival and longevity of organisms. SIRT1 exerts protective effects against a number of age-associated disorders. Caloric restriction increases both Sir2 and SIRT1 activity. This review focuses on the mechanistic insights between caloric restriction and Sir2/SIRT1 activation. A number of molecular links, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, biotin, and related metabolites, are suggested to be the most important conduits mediating caloric restriction-induced Sir2/SIRT1 activation and lifespan extension. PMID:25349818

  8. Mitochondrial respiratory thresholds regulate yeast chronological life span and its extension by caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Alejandro; Liu, Jingjing; Schroeder, Elizabeth A; Shadel, Gerald S; Barrientos, Antoni

    2012-07-03

    We have explored the role of mitochondrial function in aging by genetically and pharmacologically modifying yeast cellular respiration production during the exponential and/or stationary growth phases and determining how this affects chronological life span (CLS). Our results demonstrate that respiration is essential during both growth phases for standard CLS, but that yeast have a large respiratory capacity, and only deficiencies below a threshold (~40% of wild-type) significantly curtail CLS. Extension of CLS by caloric restriction also required respiration above a similar threshold during exponential growth and completely alleviated the need for respiration in the stationary phase. Finally, we show that supplementation of media with 1% trehalose, a storage carbohydrate, restores wild-type CLS to respiratory-null cells. We conclude that mitochondrial respiratory thresholds regulate yeast CLS and its extension by caloric restriction by increasing stress resistance, an important component of which is the optimal accumulation and mobilization of nutrient stores.

  9. Weight cycling and cancer: weighing the evidence of intermittent caloric restriction and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Henry J; McTiernan, Anne

    2011-11-01

    Overweight and obese individuals frequently restrict caloric intake to lose weight. The resultant weight loss, however, typically is followed by an equal or greater weight gain, a phenomenon called weight cycling. Most attention to weight cycling has focused on identifying its detrimental effects, but preclinical experiments indicating that intermittent caloric restriction or fasting can reduce cancer risk have raised interest in potential benefits of weight cycling. Although hypothesized adverse effects of weight cycling on energy metabolism remain largely unsubstantiated, there is also a lack of epidemiologic evidence that intentional weight loss followed by regain of weight affects chronic-disease risk. In the limited studies of weight cycling and cancer, no independent effect on postmenopausal breast cancer but a modest enhancement of risk for renal cell carcinoma, endometrial cancer, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma have been reported. An effect of either intermittent caloric restriction or fasting in protecting against cancer is not supported by the majority of rodent carcinogenesis experiments. Collectively, the data argue against weight cycling and indicate that the objective of energy balance-based approaches to reduce cancer risk should be to strive to prevent adult weight gain and maintain body weight within the normal range defined by body mass index.

  10. Caloric restriction-induced life extension of rats and mice: a critique of proposed mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Masoro, Edward J

    2009-10-01

    In 1935, Clive McCay and colleagues reported that decreasing the food intake of rats extends their life. This finding has been confirmed many times using rat and mouse models. The responsible dietary factor in rats is the reduced intake of energy; thus, this phenomenon is frequently referred to as caloric restriction. Although many hypotheses have been proposed during the past 74 years regarding the underlying mechanism, it is still not known. It is proposed that this lack of progress relates to the fact that most of these hypotheses have been based on a single underlying mechanism and that this is too narrow a focus. Rather, a broad framework is needed. Hormesis has been suggested as providing such a framework. Although it is likely that hormesis is involved in the actions of caloric restriction, it also is probably too narrowly focused. Based on currently available data, a provisional broad framework is presented depicting the complex of mechanisms that likely underlie the life-extending and other anti-aging actions of caloric restriction.

  11. Caloric restriction experience reprograms stress and orexegenic pathways and promotes binge-eating

    PubMed Central

    Pankevich, Diana E.; Teegarden, Sarah L.; Hedin, Andrew D.; Jensen, Catherine L.; Bale, Tracy L.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term weight management by dieting has a high failure rate. Pharmacological targets have focused on appetite reduction, while less is understood as to the potential contributions of the stress state during dieting in long-term behavioral modification. In a mouse model of moderate caloric restriction in which a 10–15% weight loss similar to human dieting is produced, we examined physiological and behavioral stress measures. Following three weeks of restriction, mice showed significant increases in immobile time in a tail suspension test and stress-induced corticosterone levels. Increased stress was associated with brain region specific alterations of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) expression and promoter methylation, changes that were not normalized with re-feeding. Similar outcomes were produced by high fat diet withdrawal, an additional component of human dieting. In examination of long-term behavioral consequences, previously restricted mice showed a significant increase in binge-eating of a palatable high fat food during stress exposure. Orexegenic hormones, melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and orexin, were significantly elevated in response to the high fat diet only in previously restricted mice. Further, administration of the MCH receptor-1 antagonist GSK-856464 significantly reduced total caloric intake in these mice during high fat access. These results reveal reprogramming of key central pathways involved in regulating stress responsivity and orexegenic drives by moderate caloric restriction experience. In humans, such changes would be expected to reduce treatment success by promoting behaviors resulting in weight re-gain, and suggest that management of stress during dieting may be beneficial in long-term maintenance. PMID:21123586

  12. Caloric restriction and resveratrol promote longevity through the Sirtuin-1-dependent induction of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Morselli, E; Maiuri, M C; Markaki, M; Megalou, E; Pasparaki, A; Palikaras, K; Criollo, A; Galluzzi, L; Malik, S A; Vitale, I; Michaud, M; Madeo, F; Tavernarakis, N; Kroemer, G

    2010-01-01

    Caloric restriction and autophagy-inducing pharmacological agents can prolong lifespan in model organisms including mice, flies, and nematodes. In this study, we show that transgenic expression of Sirtuin-1 induces autophagy in human cells in vitro and in Caenorhabditis elegans in vivo. The knockdown or knockout of Sirtuin-1 prevented the induction of autophagy by resveratrol and by nutrient deprivation in human cells as well as by dietary restriction in C. elegans. Conversely, Sirtuin-1 was not required for the induction of autophagy by rapamycin or p53 inhibition, neither in human cells nor in C. elegans. The knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of Sirtuin-1 enhanced the vulnerability of human cells to metabolic stress, unless they were stimulated to undergo autophagy by treatment with rapamycin or p53 inhibition. Along similar lines, resveratrol and dietary restriction only prolonged the lifespan of autophagy-proficient nematodes, whereas these beneficial effects on longevity were abolished by the knockdown of the essential autophagic modulator Beclin-1. We conclude that autophagy is universally required for the lifespan-prolonging effects of caloric restriction and pharmacological Sirtuin-1 activators.

  13. Caloric restriction and resveratrol promote longevity through the Sirtuin-1-dependent induction of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, E; Maiuri, M C; Markaki, M; Megalou, E; Pasparaki, A; Palikaras, K; Criollo, A; Galluzzi, L; Malik, S A; Vitale, I; Michaud, M; Madeo, F; Tavernarakis, N; Kroemer, G

    2010-01-01

    Caloric restriction and autophagy-inducing pharmacological agents can prolong lifespan in model organisms including mice, flies, and nematodes. In this study, we show that transgenic expression of Sirtuin-1 induces autophagy in human cells in vitro and in Caenorhabditis elegans in vivo. The knockdown or knockout of Sirtuin-1 prevented the induction of autophagy by resveratrol and by nutrient deprivation in human cells as well as by dietary restriction in C. elegans. Conversely, Sirtuin-1 was not required for the induction of autophagy by rapamycin or p53 inhibition, neither in human cells nor in C. elegans. The knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of Sirtuin-1 enhanced the vulnerability of human cells to metabolic stress, unless they were stimulated to undergo autophagy by treatment with rapamycin or p53 inhibition. Along similar lines, resveratrol and dietary restriction only prolonged the lifespan of autophagy-proficient nematodes, whereas these beneficial effects on longevity were abolished by the knockdown of the essential autophagic modulator Beclin-1. We conclude that autophagy is universally required for the lifespan-prolonging effects of caloric restriction and pharmacological Sirtuin-1 activators. PMID:21364612

  14. The calorically restricted ketogenic diet, an effective alternative therapy for malignant brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weihua; Mukherjee, Purna; Kiebish, Michael A; Markis, William T; Mantis, John G; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2007-01-01

    Background Malignant brain cancer persists as a major disease of morbidity and mortality in adults and is the second leading cause of cancer death in children. Many current therapies for malignant brain tumors fail to provide long-term management because they ineffectively target tumor cells while negatively impacting the health and vitality of normal brain cells. In contrast to brain tumor cells, which lack metabolic flexibility and are largely dependent on glucose for growth and survival, normal brain cells can metabolize both glucose and ketone bodies for energy. This study evaluated the efficacy of KetoCal®, a new nutritionally balanced high fat/low carbohydrate ketogenic diet for children with epilepsy, on the growth and vascularity of a malignant mouse astrocytoma (CT-2A) and a human malignant glioma (U87-MG). Methods Adult mice were implanted orthotopically with the malignant brain tumors and KetoCal® was administered to the mice in either unrestricted amounts or in restricted amounts to reduce total caloric intake according to the manufacturers recommendation for children with refractory epilepsy. The effects KetoCal® on tumor growth, vascularity, and mouse survival were compared with that of an unrestricted high carbohydrate standard diet. Results KetoCal® administered in restricted amounts significantly decreased the intracerebral growth of the CT-2A and U87-MG tumors by about 65% and 35%, respectively, and significantly enhanced health and survival relative to that of the control groups receiving the standard low fat/high carbohydrate diet. The restricted KetoCal® diet reduced plasma glucose levels while elevating plasma ketone body (β-hydroxybutyrate) levels. Tumor microvessel density was less in the calorically restricted KetoCal® groups than in the calorically unrestricted control groups. Moreover, gene expression for the mitochondrial enzymes, β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA: 3-ketoacid CoA transferase, was lower in the

  15. Caloric Restriction Effect on Proinflammatory Cytokines, Growth Hormone, and Steroid Hormone Concentrations during Exercise in Judokas

    PubMed Central

    Abedelmalek, Salma; Chtourou, Hamdi; Souissi, Nizar; Tabka, Zouhair

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caloric restriction on the immune and hormonal responses during exercise in judo athletes. In a randomised order, 11 male judokas (age: 20.45 ± 0.51; height: 1.71 ± 0.3 m; and body weight: 75.9 ± 3.1 kg) participate in this study during a period of weight maintenance (baseline) and after 7 days of caloric restriction (CR). All subjects performed the Special Judo Fitness Test (SJFT) during the two conditions. Values for nutrient intakes were obtained from a 7 d food record kept during a period of weight maintenance and after a 7-day food restriction (−5~6 MJ/day). Our results showed that CR resulted in significant decreases in body weight (P < 0.05) and performance (P < 0.05). However, heart rate and SJFT index (P < 0.05) increase significantly during CR in comparison to baseline. Moreover, exercise leads to a significant increase in testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone (GH), leukocytes, neutrophils, TNF-α, and IL-6, in both CR and baseline conditions. Compared to baseline, TNF-α and IL-6 were significantly higher during CR condition (P < 0.05). Additionally, CR leads to an increase in cortisol and GH (P < 0.05) and a decrease in testosterone concentrations (P < 0.05). PMID:26075039

  16. Effect of high fat, fiber and caloric restriction on rat mammary tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Magrane, D.; Van Sant, J.; Butler, B.

    1986-03-05

    Female rats given 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were placed on diets of control fat (CF-4.5%) or high fat (HF-20%) with either control fiber (6%) or high fiber (FB-12%). A 60% reduction in the CF diet was used to study the effects of caloric restriction on tumorigenesis. Results showed that HF diets had a shorter latency period than CF rats. The respective average number of tumors per rat and tumor volume were 7.3 +/- 1.3 and 23694 mm/sup 2/ for rats on a HF diet and 5.1+/-1.1 and 9144 mm/sup 3/ for CF rats. Addition of high fiber to the diets reduced the tumor incidence from 95% to 70% in the CF group but did not reduce the incidence in HF group. Although tumor number was reduced to 3.7+/-1.5 in CF+FB rats, the tumor volumes were not reduced (8950 mm/sup 3/). Rats fed HF+FB did not have fewer tumors (7.0+/-1.1), but did show a 53% reduction in tumor load. The estrogen dependent enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was not affected by dietary levels of fat, which suggests that the promotional effects of fat may not be through estrogen stimulation. None of the caloric restricted rats had tumors 12 weeks post-DMBA. These restricted rats all had significantly elevated levels of serum corticosterone.

  17. Increasing longevity through caloric restriction or rapamycin feeding in mammals: common mechanisms for common outcomes?

    PubMed

    Cox, Lynne S; Mattison, Julie A

    2009-09-01

    Significant extension of lifespan in important mammalian species is bound to attract the attention not only of the aging research community, but also the media and the wider public. Two recent papers published by Harrison et al. (2009) in Nature and by Colman et al. (2009) in Science report increased longevity of mice fed with rapamycin and of rhesus monkeys undergoing caloric restriction, respectively. These papers have generated considerable debate in the aging community. Here we assess what is new about these findings, how they fit with our knowledge of lifespan extension from other studies and what prospects this new work holds out for improvements in human longevity and human health span.

  18. Age-Related Synapse Loss In Hippocampal CA3 Is Not Reversed By Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michelle M.; Donohue, Howard S.; Linville, M. Constance; Iversen, Elizabeth A.; Newton, Isabel G.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2010-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is a reduction of total caloric intake without a decrease in micronutrients or a disproportionate reduction of any one dietary component. While CR attenuates age-related cognitive deficits in tasks of hippocampal-dependent memory, the cellular mechanisms by which CR improves this cognitive decline are poorly understood. Previously, we have reported age-related decreases in key synaptic proteins in the CA3 region of the hippocampus that are stabilized by lifelong CR. In the present study, we examined possible age-related changes in the functional microcircuitry of the synapses in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare (SL-M) of the CA3 region of the hippocampus, and whether lifelong CR might prevent these age-related alterations. We used serial electron microscopy to reconstruct and classify SL-M synapses and their postsynaptic spines. We analyzed synapse number and size as well as spine surface area and volume in young (10 mos.) and old (29 mos) ad libitum fed rats and in old rats that were calorically restricted from 4 months of age. We limited our analysis to SL-M because previous work demonstrated age-related decreases in synaptophysin confined to this specific layer and region of the hippocampus. The results revealed an age-related decrease in macular axo-spinous synapses that was not reversed by CR that occurred in the absence of changes in the size of synapses or spines. Thus, the benefits of CR for CA3 function and synaptic plasticity may involve other biological effects including the stabilization of synaptic proteins levels in the face of age-related synapse loss. PMID:20854882

  19. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MICROARRAY DATA IDENTIFIES COMMON RESPONSES TO CALORIC RESTRICTION AMONG MOUSE TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Caloric restriction has been extensively investigated as an intervention that both extends lifespan and delays age-related disease in mammals. In mice, much interest has centered on evaluating gene expression changes induced by caloric restriction (CR) in particular tissue types, but the overall systemic effect of CR among multiple tissues has been examined less extensively. This study presents a comparative analysis of microarray datasets that have collectively examined the effects of CR in ten different tissue types (liver, heart, muscle, hypothalamus, hippocampus, white adipose tissue, colon, kidney, lung, cochlea). Using novel methods for comparative analysis of microarray data, detailed comparisons of the effects of CR among tissues are provided, and 28 genes for which expression response to CR is most shared among tissues are identified. These genes characterize common responses to CR, which consist of both activation and inhibition of stress-response pathways. With respect to liver tissue, transcriptional effects of CR exhibited surprisingly little overlap with those of aging, and a variable degree of overlap with the potential CR-mimetic drug resveratrol. These analyses shed light on the systemic transcriptional activity associated with CR diets, and also illustrate new approaches for comparative analysis of microarray datasets in the context of aging biology. PMID:18155270

  20. Caloric restriction promotes cell survival in a mouse model of normal tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoli; Kimura, Atsuko; Azuchi, Yuriko; Akiyama, Goichi; Noro, Takahiko; Harada, Chikako; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Harada, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by progressive degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons. We previously reported that loss of glutamate transporters (EAAC1 or GLAST) in mice leads to RGC degeneration that is similar to normal tension glaucoma and these animal models are useful in examining potential therapeutic strategies. Caloric restriction has been reported to increase longevity and has potential benefits in injury and disease. Here we investigated the effects of every-other-day fasting (EODF), a form of caloric restriction, on glaucomatous pathology in EAAC1−/− mice. EODF suppressed RGC death and retinal degeneration without altering intraocular pressure. Moreover, visual impairment was ameliorated with EODF, indicating the functional significance of the neuroprotective effect of EODF. Several mechanisms associated with this neuroprotection were explored. We found that EODF upregulated blood β-hydroxybutyrate levels and increased histone acetylation in the retina. Furthermore, it elevated retinal mRNA expression levels of neurotrophic factors and catalase, whereas it decreased oxidative stress levels in the retina. Our findings suggest that EODF, a safe, non-invasive, and low-cost treatment, may be available for glaucoma therapy. PMID:27669894

  1. Voluntary exercise and caloric restriction enhance hippocampal dendritic spine density and BDNF levels in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Stranahan, Alexis M; Lee, Kim; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Golden, Erin; Cutler, Roy G; Mattson, Mark P

    2009-10-01

    Diabetes may adversely affect cognitive function, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. To investigate whether manipulations that enhance neurotrophin levels will also restore neuronal structure and function in diabetes, we examined the effects of wheel running and dietary energy restriction on hippocampal neuron morphology and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in db/db mice, a model of insulin resistant diabetes. Running wheel activity, caloric restriction, or the combination of the two treatments increased levels of BDNF in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Enhancement of hippocampal BDNF was accompanied by increases in dendritic spine density on the secondary and tertiary dendrites of dentate granule neurons. These studies suggest that diabetes exerts detrimental effects on hippocampal structure, and that this state can be attenuated by increasing energy expenditure and decreasing energy intake.

  2. Microarray profiling of gene expression in aging and its alteration by caloric restriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Weindruch, R; Kayo, T; Lee, C K; Prolla, T A

    2001-03-01

    An active research area in biological gerontology concerns the mechanisms by which caloric restriction (CR) retards the aging process in laboratory rodents. We used high density oligonucleotide arrays representing 6347 genes to determine the gene expression profile of the aging process in gastrocnemius muscle of male C57BL/6 mice. Aging resulted in a differential gene expression pattern indicative of a marked stress response and lower expression of metabolic and biosynthetic genes. Most alterations were completely or partially prevented by CR. Transcriptional patterns of muscle from calorie-restricted animals suggest that CR retards the aging process by causing a metabolic shift toward increased protein turnover and decreased macromolecular damage. The use of high density oligonucleotide microarrays provides a new tool to measure biological age on a tissue-specific basis and to evaluate at the molecular level the efficacy of nutritional interventions designed to retard the aging process.

  3. Voluntary exercise and caloric restriction enhance hippocampal dendritic spine density and BDNF levels in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Lee, Kim; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Golden, Erin; Cutler, Roy G.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes may adversely affect cognitive function, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. To investigate whether manipulations that enhance neurotrophin levels will also restore neuronal structure and function in diabetes, we examined the effects of wheel running and dietary energy restriction on hippocampal neuron morphology and BDNF levels in db/db mice, a model of insulin resistant diabetes. Running wheel activity, caloric restriction, or the combination of the two treatments increased levels of BDNF in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Enhancement of hippocampal BDNF was accompanied by increases in dendritic spine density on the secondary and tertiary dendrites of dentate granule neurons. These studies suggest that diabetes exerts detrimental effects on hippocampal structure, and that this state can be attenuated by increasing energy expenditure and decreasing energy intake. PMID:19280661

  4. Sex-dependent cognitive performance in baboon offspring following maternal caloric restriction in pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jesse S; Bartlett, Thad Q; Keenan, Kathryn E; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Nijland, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    In humans a suboptimal diet during development has negative outcomes in offspring. We investigated the behavioral outcomes in baboons born to mothers undergoing moderate maternal nutrient restriction (MNR). Maternal nutrient restriction mothers (n = 7) were fed 70% of food eaten by controls (CTR, n = 12) fed ad libitum throughout gestation and lactation. At 3.3 ± 0.2 (mean ± standard error of the mean [SEM]) years of age offspring (controls: female [FC, n = 8], male [MC, n = 4]; nutrient restricted: female [FR, n = 3] and male [MR, n = 4]) were administered progressive ratio, simple discrimination, intra-/extra-dimension set shift and delayed matching to sample tasks to assess motivation, learning, attention, and working memory, respectively. A treatment effect was observed in MNR offspring who demonstrated less motivation and impaired working memory. Nutrient-restricted female offspring showed improved learning, while MR offspring showed impaired learning and attentional set shifting and increased impulsivity. In summary, 30% restriction in maternal caloric intake has long lasting neurobehavioral outcomes in adolescent male baboon offspring.

  5. Artemisinin mimics calorie restriction to trigger mitochondrial biogenesis and compromise telomere shortening in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Ting; He, Jiang; Wu, Ming; Li, Si-Ming; Gao, Qian; Zeng, Qing-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction is known to extend lifespan among organisms by a debating mechanism underlying nitric oxide-driven mitochondrial biogenesis. We report here that nitric oxide generators including artemisinin, sodium nitroprusside, and L-arginine mimics calorie restriction and resembles hydrogen peroxide to initiate the nitric oxide signaling cascades and elicit the global antioxidative responses in mice. The large quantities of antioxidant enzymes are correlated with the low levels of reactive oxygen species, which allow the down-regulation of tumor suppressors and accessory DNA repair partners, eventually leading to the compromise of telomere shortening. Accompanying with the up-regulation of signal transducers and respiratory chain signatures, mitochondrial biogenesis occurs with the elevation of adenosine triphosphate levels upon exposure of mouse skeletal muscles to the mimetics of calorie restriction. In conclusion, calorie restriction-triggered nitric oxide provides antioxidative protection and alleviates telomere attrition via mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby maintaining chromosomal stability and integrity, which are the hallmarks of longevity.

  6. Effects of caloric restriction and overnight fasting on cycling endurance performance.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lisa M; Rossi, Kelly A; Ward, Emily; Jadwin, Emily; Miller, Todd A; Miller, Wayne C

    2009-03-01

    In addition to aerobic endurance and anaerobic capacity, high power-to-weight ratio (PWR) is important for cycling performance. Cyclists often try to lose weight before race season to improve body composition and optimize PWR. Research has demonstrated body fat-reducing benefits of exercise after fasting overnight. We hypothesized that fasted-state exercise in calorie-restricted trained cyclists would not result in performance decrements and that their PWR would improve significantly. We also hypothesized that substrate use during fasted-state submaximal endurance cycling would shift to greater reliance on fat. Ten trained, competitive cyclists completed a protocol consisting of baseline testing, 3 weeks of caloric restriction (CR), and post-CR testing. The testing sessions measured pre- and post-CR values for resting metabolic rate (RMR), body composition, VO2, PWR and power-to-lean weight ratio (PLWR), and power output, as well as 2-hour submaximal cycling performance, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and respiratory exchange ratio (RER). There were no significant differences between baseline and post-CR for submaximal trial RER, power output, VO2, RMR, VO2max, or workload at VO2max. However, RPE was significantly lower, and PWR was significantly higher post-CR, whereas RER did not change. The cyclists' PWR and body composition improved significantly, and their overall weight, fat weight, and body fat percentage decreased. Lean mass was maintained. The cyclists' RPE decreased significantly during 2 hours of submaximal cycling post-CR, and there was no decrement in submaximal or maximal cycling performance after 3 weeks of CR combined with overnight fasting. Caloric restriction (up to 40% for 3 weeks) and exercising after fasting overnight can improve a cyclist's PWR without compromising endurance cycling performance.

  7. Caloric restriction reduces the systemic progression of mouse AApoAII amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xin; Yang, Mu; Xu, Zhe; Miyahara, Hiroki; Mori, Masayuki; Higuchi, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    In mouse senile amyloidosis, apolipoprotein (Apo) A-II is deposited extracellularly in many organs in the form of amyloid fibrils (AApoAII). Reduction of caloric intake, known as caloric restriction (CR), slows the progress of senescence and age-related disorders in mice. In this study, we intravenously injected 1 μg of isolated AApoAII fibrils into R1.P1-Apoa2c mice to induce experimental amyloidosis and investigated the effects of CR for the next 16 weeks. In the CR group, AApoAII amyloid deposits in the liver, tongue, small intestine and skin were significantly reduced compared to those of the ad libitum feeding group. CR treatment led to obvious reduction in body weight, improvement in glucose metabolism and reduction in the plasma concentration of ApoA-II. Our molecular biological analyses of the liver suggested that CR treatment might improve the symptoms of inflammation, the unfolded protein response induced by amyloid deposits and oxidative stress. Furthermore, we suggest that CR treatment might improve mitochondrial functions via the sirtuin 1-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (SIRT1-PGC-1α) pathway. We suggest that CR is a promising approach for treating the onset and/or progression of amyloidosis, especially for systemic amyloidosis such as senile AApoAII amyloidosis. Our analysis of CR treatment for amyloidosis should provide useful information for determining the cause of amyloidosis and developing effective preventive treatments. PMID:28225824

  8. Mechanism by Which Caloric Restriction Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Sedentary Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew L.; Distelmaier, Klaus; Lanza, Ian R.; Irving, Brian A.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Konopka, Adam R.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) improves insulin sensitivity and reduces the incidence of diabetes in obese individuals. The underlying mechanisms whereby CR improves insulin sensitivity are not clear. We evaluated the effect of 16 weeks of CR on whole-body insulin sensitivity by pancreatic clamp before and after CR in 11 obese participants (BMI = 35 kg/m2) compared with 9 matched control subjects (BMI = 34 kg/m2). Compared with the control subjects, CR increased the glucose infusion rate needed to maintain euglycemia during hyperinsulinemia, indicating enhancement of peripheral insulin sensitivity. This improvement in insulin sensitivity was not accompanied by changes in skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity or oxidant emissions, nor were there changes in skeletal muscle ceramide, diacylglycerol, or amino acid metabolite levels. However, CR lowered insulin-stimulated thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) levels and enhanced nonoxidative glucose disposal. These results support a role for TXNIP in mediating the improvement in peripheral insulin sensitivity after CR. PMID:26324180

  9. Facts and controversies in our understanding of how caloric restriction impacts the mitochondrion.

    PubMed

    Gouspillou, Gilles; Hepple, Russell T

    2013-10-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has pronounced benefits in promoting healthy aging. Amongst the most frequently implicated physiological mechanisms implicated in this benefit is altered mitochondrial function. Whereas a reduction in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is a widely consistent effect of CR, an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis, which is accepted by many as fact, is contradicted on several levels, most critically by a lack of increase in mitochondrial protein synthesis rate in vivo. Furthermore, an increase in PGC-1α protein and markers of mitochondrial content with CR is a highly variable observation between studies. On the other hand, deacetylation of several mitochondrial proteins by the sirtuin, Sirt3, is an increasingly reported observation and at least so far, this observation is consistent between studies. Notwithstanding this point, the controversies evident in the published literature underscore the significant questions that remain in our understanding of how CR impacts the mitochondrion and suggest we have yet to fully understand the complexities herein.

  10. Caloric Restriction as a Strategy to Improve Vascular Dysfunction in Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    García-Prieto, Concha F.; Fernández-Alfonso, María S.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has proved to be the most effective and reproducible dietary intervention to increase healthy lifespan and aging. A reduction in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in obese subjects can be already achieved by a moderate and sustainable weight loss. Since pharmacological approaches for body weight reduction have, at present, a poor long-term efficacy, CR is of great interest in the prevention and/or reduction of CVD associated with obesity. Other dietary strategies changing specific macronutrients, such as altering carbohydrates, protein content or diet glycemic index have been also shown to decrease the progression of CVD in obese patients. In this review, we will focus on the positive effects and possible mechanisms of action of these strategies on vascular dysfunction. PMID:27314388

  11. Effects of Caloric Restriction on Cardiovascular Aging in Non-human Primates and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cruzen, Christina; Colman, Ricki J.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Approximately one in three Americans has some form of cardiovascular disease (CVD), accounting for one of every 2.8 deaths in the United States in 2004. Two of the major risk factors for CVD are advancing age and obesity. An intervention able to positively impact both aging and obesity, such as caloric restriction (CR), may prove extremely useful in the fight against CVD. CR is the only environmental or lifestyle intervention that has repeatedly been shown to increase maximum life span and to retard aging in laboratory rodents. In this article, we review evidence that CR in nonhuman primates and humans has a positive effect on risk factors for CVD. PMID:19944270

  12. Characterization of global gene expression during assurance of lifespan extension by caloric restriction in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Mi; Kwon, Young-Yon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2013-12-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is the best-studied intervention known to delay aging and extend lifespan in evolutionarily distant organisms ranging from yeast to mammals in the laboratory. Although the effect of CR on lifespan extension has been investigated for nearly 80years, the molecular mechanisms of CR are still elusive. Consequently, it is important to understand the fundamental mechanisms of when and how lifespan is affected by CR. In this study, we first identified the time-windows during which CR assured cellular longevity by switching cells from culture media containing 2% or 0.5% glucose to water, which allows us to observe CR and non-calorically-restricted cells under the same conditions. We also constructed time-dependent gene expression profiles and selected 646 genes that showed significant changes and correlations with the lifespan-extending effect of CR. The positively correlated genes participated in transcriptional regulation, ribosomal RNA processing and nuclear genome stability, while the negatively correlated genes were involved in the regulation of several metabolic pathways, endoplasmic reticulum function, stress response and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, we discovered major upstream regulators of those significantly changed genes, including AZF1 (YOR113W), HSF1 (YGL073W) and XBP1 (YIL101C). Deletions of two genes, AZF1 and XBP1 (HSF1 is essential and was thus not tested), were confirmed to lessen the lifespan extension mediated by CR. The absence of these genes in the tor1Δ and ras2Δ backgrounds did show non-overlapping effects with regard to CLS, suggesting differences between the CR mechanism for Tor and Ras signaling.

  13. Caloric restriction improves efficiency and capacity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Joon-Seok; Choi, Kyung-Mi; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Calorie restriction (CR) increases electron transport chain (ETC) at both RNA and protein level. {yields} CR enhances mitochondrial membrane potential, and, regardless of ages, reduces reactive oxygen species. {yields} CR increases both efficiency and capacity of the ETC. {yields} CR induces intensive modulation at mitochondrial ETC where might be a major site leading to extension of lifespan. -- Abstract: Caloric restriction (CR) is known to extend lifespan in a variety of species; however, the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we found that CR potentiated the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Indeed, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was increased by CR, and, regardless of ages, overall reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was decreased by CR. With these changes, overall growth rate of cells was maintained under various CR conditions, just like cells under a non-restricted condition. All of these data support increased efficiency and capacity of the ETC by CR, and this change might lead to extension of lifespan.

  14. Caloric Restriction in Humans: Impact on Physiological, Psychological, and Behavioral Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ravussin, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The current societal environment is marked by overabundant accessibility of food coupled with a strong trend of reduced physical activity, both leading to the development of a constellation of disorders, including central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension (metabolic syndrome). Prolonged calorie restriction (CR) has been shown to extend both the median and maximal lifespan in a variety of lower species such as yeast, worms, fish, rats, and mice. Mechanisms of this CR-mediated lifespan extension are not fully elucidated, but possibly involve significant alterations in energy metabolism, oxidative damage, insulin sensitivity, inflammation, and functional changes in both the neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous systems. Here we review some of the major physiological, psychological, and behavioral changes after 6 months of CR in overweight otherwise healthy volunteers. Special emphasis is given to the first completed clinical studies that have investigated the effects of controlled, high-quality energy-restricted diets on both biomarkers of longevity and on the development of chronic diseases related to age in humans. With the incremental expansion of research endeavors in the area of energy or caloric restriction, data on the effects of CR in animal models and human subjects are becoming more accessible. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 275–287. PMID:20518700

  15. Daily exercise vs. caloric restriction for prevention of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the OLETF rat model.

    PubMed

    Rector, R Scott; Uptergrove, Grace M; Morris, E Matthew; Borengasser, Sarah J; Laughlin, M Harold; Booth, Frank W; Thyfault, John P; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2011-05-01

    The maintenance of normal body weight either through dietary modification or being habitually more physically active is associated with reduced incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the means by which weight gain is prevented and potential mechanisms activated remain largely unstudied. Here, we sought to determine the effects of obesity prevention by daily exercise vs. caloric restriction on NAFLD in the hyperphagic, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat. At 4 wk of age, male OLETF rats (n = 7-8/group) were randomized to groups of ad libitum fed, sedentary (OLETF-SED), voluntary wheel running exercise (OLETF-EX), or caloric restriction (OLETF-CR; 70% of SED) until 40 wk of age. Nonhyperphagic, control strain Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were kept in sedentary cage conditions for the duration of the study (LETO-SED). Both daily exercise and caloric restriction prevented obesity and the development of type 2 diabetes observed in the OLETF-SED rats, with glucose tolerance during a glucose tolerance test improved to a greater extent in the OLETF-EX animals (30-50% lower glucose and insulin areas under the curve, P < 0.05). Both daily exercise and caloric restriction also prevented excess hepatic triglyceride and diacylglycerol accumulation (P < 0.001), hepatocyte ballooning and nuclear displacement, and the increased perivenular fibrosis and collagen deposition that occurred in the obese OLETF-SED animals. However, despite similar hepatic phenotypes, OLETF-EX rats also exhibited increased hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, enhanced oxidative enzyme function and protein content, and further suppression of hepatic de novo lipogenesis proteins compared with OLETF-CR. Prevention of obesity by either daily exercise or caloric restriction attenuates NAFLD development in OLETF rats. However, daily exercise may offer additional health benefits on glucose homeostasis and hepatic mitochondrial function compared with

  16. Caloric Restriction in Lean and Obese Strains of Laboratory Rat: Effects on Body Composition, Metabolism, Growth, and Overall Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    NEW FINDINGS: What is the central question of this study? How do lean and obese rats respond physiologically to caloric restriction? What is the main finding and its importance? Obese rats show marked benefits compared with lean animals. Reduced body fat is associated with improv...

  17. A two year randomized controlled trial of human caloric restriction: feasibility and effects on predictors of health span and longevity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Caloric restriction (CR), energy intake reduced below ad libitum (AL) intake, increases life span in many species. The implications for humans can be clarified by randomized controlled trials of CR. Methods: To determine CRs feasibility, safety, and effects on predictors of longevity, di...

  18. Metabolic Alterations Due to Caloric Restriction and Every Other Day Feeding in Normal and Growth Hormone Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mutations causing decreased somatotrophic signaling are known to increase insulin sensitivity and extend life span in mammals. Caloric restriction and every other day (EOD) dietary regimens are associated with similar improvements to insulin signaling and longevity in normal mice; however, these interventions fail to increase insulin sensitivity or life span in growth hormone receptor knockout (GHRKO) mice. To investigate the interactions of the GHRKO mutation with caloric restriction and EOD dietary interventions, we measured changes in the metabolic parameters oxygen consumption (VO2) and respiratory quotient produced by either long-term caloric restriction or EOD in male GHRKO and normal mice. GHRKO mice had increased VO2, which was unaltered by diet. In normal mice, EOD diet caused a significant reduction in VO2 compared with ad libitum (AL) mice during fed and fasted conditions. In normal mice, caloric restriction increased both the range of VO2 and the difference in minimum VO2 between fed and fasted states, whereas EOD diet caused a relatively static VO2 pattern under fed and fasted states. No diet significantly altered the range of VO2 of GHRKO mice under fed conditions. This provides further evidence that longevity-conferring diets cause major metabolic changes in normal mice, but not in GHRKO mice. PMID:23833202

  19. Caloric Restriction and the Aging Process: A Critique 5/15pm/2014

    PubMed Central

    Sohal, Rajindar S.; Forster, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this review is to provide an appraisal of the current status of the relationship between energy intake and the life span of animals. The concept, that a reduction in food intake, or caloric restriction (CR), retards the aging process, delays the age-associated decline in physiological fitness and extends the life span of organisms of diverse phylogenetic groups, is one of the leading paradigms in gerontology. However, emerging evidence disputes some of the primary tenets of this conception. One disparity is that the CR-related increase in longevity is not universal and may not even be shared among different strains of the same species. A further misgiving is that the control animals, fed ad-libitum (AL), become overweight, prone to early onset of diseases and death, and thus may not be the ideal control animals for studies concerned with comparisons of longevity. Re-examination of body weight and longevity data from a study involving over 60,000 mice and rats, conducted by a National Institute on Aging-sponsored project, suggests that CR-related increase in life span of specific genotypes is directly related to the gain in body weight under the AL feeding regimen. Additionally, CR in mammals and “dietary restriction” in organisms, such as Drosophila, are dissimilar phenomena, albeit they are often presented to be the very same. The latter involves a reduction in yeast rather than caloric intake, which is inconsistent with the notion of a common, conserved mechanism of CR action in different species. Although specific mechanisms by which CR affects longevity are not well understood, existing evidence supports the view that CR increases the life span of those particular genotypes that develop energy imbalance due to AL feeding. In such groups, CR lowers body temperature, rate of metabolism and oxidant production, and retards the age-related pro-oxidizing shift in the redox state. PMID:24941891

  20. Higher Caloric Refeeding Is Safe in Hospitalised Adolescent Patients with Restrictive Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Elizabeth K.; Faruquie, Sahrish S.; Anderson, Gail; Gomes, Linette; Kennedy, Andrew; Wearne, Christine M.; Kohn, Michael R.; Clarke, Simon D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study examines weight gain and assesses complications associated with refeeding hospitalised adolescents with restrictive eating disorders (EDs) prescribed initial calories above current recommendations. Methods. Patients admitted to an adolescent ED structured “rapid refeeding” program for >48 hours and receiving ≥2400 kcal/day were included in a 3-year retrospective chart review. Results. The mean (SD) age of the 162 adolescents was 16.7 years (0.9), admission % median BMI was 80.1% (10.2), and discharge % median BMI was 93.1% (7.0). The mean (SD) starting caloric intake was 2611.7 kcal/day (261.5) equating to 58.4 kcal/kg (10.2). Most patients (92.6%) were treated with nasogastric tube feeding. The mean (SD) length of stay was 3.6 weeks (1.9), and average weekly weight gain was 2.1 kg (0.8). No patients developed cardiac signs of RFS or delirium; complications included 4% peripheral oedema, 1% hypophosphatemia (<0.75 mmol/L), 7% hypomagnesaemia (<0.70 mmol/L), and 2% hypokalaemia (<3.2 mmol/L). Caloric prescription on admission was associated with developing oedema (95% CI 1.001 to 1.047; p = 0.039). No statistical significance was found between electrolytes and calories provided during refeeding. Conclusion. A rapid refeeding protocol with the inclusion of phosphate supplementation can safely achieve rapid weight restoration without increased complications associated with refeeding syndrome. PMID:27293884

  1. Maintenance of cellular ATP level by caloric restriction correlates chronological survival of budding yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Joon-Seok; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •CR decreases total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide during the chronological aging. •CR does not affect the levels of oxidative damage on protein and DNA. •CR contributes extension of chronological lifespan by maintenance of ATP level -- Abstract: The free radical theory of aging emphasizes cumulative oxidative damage in the genome and intracellular proteins due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is a major cause for aging. Caloric restriction (CR) has been known as a representative treatment that prevents aging; however, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we show that CR extends the chronological lifespan (CLS) of budding yeast by maintaining cellular energy levels. CR reduced the generation of total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide; however, CR did not reduce the oxidative damage in proteins and DNA. Subsequently, calorie-restricted yeast had higher mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and it sustained consistent ATP levels during the process of chronological aging. Our results suggest that CR extends the survival of the chronologically aged cells by improving the efficiency of energy metabolism for the maintenance of the ATP level rather than reducing the global oxidative damage of proteins and DNA.

  2. Effect of caloric restriction on myenteric neuroplasticity in the rat duodenum during aging.

    PubMed

    da Silva Porto, Gisele; Bertaglia Pereira, Joice Naiara; Tibúrcio, Vanessa Graciele; Stabille, Sandra Regina; Garcia de Faria, Haroldo; de Melo Germano, Ricardo; de Britto Mari, Renata

    2012-05-21

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of caloric restriction (CR) on myenteric neurons in the duodenum of Wistar rats during aging. Thirty rats were divided into three groups: the C group (six-month-old animals that were fed a normal diet from weaning until six months of age), the SR group (18-month-old animals that were fed a normal diet from weaning until 18 months of age) and the CR group (18-month-old animals that were fed a 30% CR diet after six months of age). After 12 months, the animals were euthanized. Whole-mount preparations of the duodenums were either stained with Giemsa or underwent NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry to determine the general myenteric neuron population and the nitrergic neuron subpopulation (NADPH-d+), respectively. The NADPH-d-negative (NADPH-d-) neuron population was estimated based on the difference between the Giemsa-stained and NADPH-d+ neurons. The neurons were counted, and the cell body areas were measured. Aging was associated with neuronal loss in the SR group, which was minimized by caloric restriction in the CR group. The density (mm(2)) of the Giemsa-stained neurons was higher in the SR group (79.09 ± 6.25) than in the CR (92.37 ± 11.6) and C (111.68 ± 15.26) groups. The density of the NADPH-d+ neurons was higher in the SR group (44.90 ± 5.88) than in the C (35.75 ± 1.6) and RC (39.14 ± 7.02) groups. The density of NADPH-d- neurons was higher in the CR (49.73 ± 12.08) and C (75.64 ± 17.05) groups than in the SR group (33.82 ± 4.5). In the C group, 32% and 68% of the Giemsa-stained myenteric neurons were NADPH-d+ or NADPH-d-, respectively. With aging (SR group), the percentage of nitrergic neurons (56.77%) increased, whereas the percentage of NADPH-d- neurons (43.22%) decreased. In the CR group, the change in the percentage of nitrergic (42.37%) and NADPH-d- (57.62%) neurons was lower. As NADPH-d- neurons will be mostly cholinergic neurons, CR appears to reduce the loss of cholinergic neurons during

  3. Maternal caloric restriction partially rescues the deleterious effects of advanced maternal age on offspring

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Kristin E; Jarvis, George; Bock, Martha; Mark Welch, David B

    2014-01-01

    While many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of advanced maternal age and harmful prenatal environments on progeny, little is known about the role of beneficial non-Mendelian maternal inheritance on aging. Here, we report the effects of maternal age and maternal caloric restriction (CR) on the life span and health span of offspring for a clonal culture of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. Mothers on regimens of chronic CR (CCR) or intermittent fasting (IF) had increased life span compared with mothers fed ad libitum (AL). With increasing maternal age, life span and fecundity of female offspring of AL-fed mothers decreased significantly and life span of male offspring was unchanged, whereas body size of both male and female offspring increased. Maternal CR partially rescued these effects, increasing the mean life span of AL-fed female offspring but not male offspring and increasing the fecundity of AL-fed female offspring compared with offspring of mothers of the same age. Both maternal CR regimens decreased male offspring body size, but only maternal IF decreased body size of female offspring, whereas maternal CCR caused a slight increase. Understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of these different maternal effects on aging may guide effective interventions to improve health span and life span. PMID:24661622

  4. Effects of aging and caloric restriction on dentate gyrus synapses and glutamate receptor subunits

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Isabel G.; Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Linville, M. Constance; Pang, Hui; Tucker, Elizabeth M.; Riddle, David R.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2009-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) attenuates aging-related degenerative processes throughout the body. It is less clear, however, whether CR has a similar effect in the brain, particularly in the hippocampus, an area important for learning and memory processes that often are compromised in aging. In order to evaluate the effect of CR on synapses across lifespan, we quantified synapses stereologically in the middle molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) of young, middle aged, and old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rats fed ad libitum (AL) or a CR diet from 4 months of age. The results indicate that synapses are maintained across lifespan in both AL and CR rats. In light of this stability, we addressed whether aging and CR influence neurotransmitter receptor levels by measuring subunits of NMDA (NR1, NR2A, and NR2B) and AMPA (GluR1, GluR2) receptors in the DG of a second cohort of AL and CR rats across lifespan. The results reveal that the NR1 and GluR1 subunits decline with age in AL, but not CR rats. The absence of an aging-related decline in these subunits in CR rats, however, does not arise from increased levels in old CR rats. Instead, it is due to subunit decreases in young CR rats to levels that are sustained in CR rats throughout lifespan, but that are reached in AL rats only in old age. PMID:17433502

  5. Pathways for ischemic cytoprotection: Role of sirtuins in caloric restriction, resveratrol, and ischemic preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kahlilia C; Lin, Hung Wen; Thompson, John W; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), resveratrol, and ischemic preconditioning (IPC) have been shown to promote protection against ischemic injury in the heart and brain, as well as in other tissues. The activity of sirtuins, which are enzymes that modulate diverse biologic processes, seems to be vital in the ability of these therapeutic modalities to prevent against cellular dysfunction and death. The protective mechanisms of the yeast Sir2 and the mammalian homolog sirtuin 1 have been extensively studied, but the involvement of other sirtuins in ischemic protection is not yet clear. We examine the roles of mammalian sirtuins in modulating protective pathways against oxidative stress, energy depletion, excitotoxicity, inflammation, DNA damage, and apoptosis. Although many of these sirtuins have not been directly implicated in ischemic protection, they may have unique roles in enhancing function and preventing against stress-mediated cellular damage and death. This review will include in-depth analyses of the roles of CR, resveratrol, and IPC in activating sirtuins and in mediating protection against ischemic damage in the heart and brain. PMID:21224864

  6. Caloric restriction preserves memory and reduces anxiety of aging mice with early enhancement of neurovascular functions

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Ishita; Guo, Janet; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Zhong, Yu; Rempe, Ralf G.; Hoffman, Jared D.; Armstrong, Rachel; Bauer, Björn; Hartz, Anika M.S.; Lin, Ai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Neurovascular integrity plays an important role in protecting cognitive and mental health in aging. Lifestyle interventions that sustain neurovascular integrity may thus be critical on preserving brain functions in aging and reducing the risk for age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Here we show that caloric restriction (CR) had an early effect on neurovascular enhancements, and played a critical role in preserving vascular, cognitive and mental health in aging. In particular, we found that CR significantly enhanced cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood-brain barrier function in young mice at 5-6 months of age. The neurovascular enhancements were associated with reduced mammalian target of rapamycin expression, elevated endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling, and increased ketone bodies utilization. With age, CR decelerated the rate of decline in CBF. The preserved CBF in hippocampus and frontal cortex were highly correlated with preserved memory and learning, and reduced anxiety, of the aging mice treated with CR (18-20 months of age). Our results suggest that dietary intervention started in the early stage (e.g., young adults) may benefit cognitive and mental reserve in aging. Understanding nutritional effects on neurovascular functions may have profound implications in human brain aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27829242

  7. Krebs cycle enzymes from livers of old mice are differentially regulated by caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, Kevork; Ramsey, Jon J; Weindruch, Richard

    2004-08-01

    Krebs cycle enzyme activities and levels of five metabolites were determined from livers of old mice (30 months) maintained either on control or on long-term caloric restriction (CR) diets (28 months). In CR mice, the cycle was divided into two major blocks, the first containing citrate synthase, aconitase and NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase which showed decreased activities, while the second block, containing the remaining enzymes, displayed increased activity (except for fumarase, which was unchanged). CR also resulted in decreased levels of citrate, glutamate and alpha-ketoglutarate, increased levels of malate, and unchanged levels of aspartate. The alpha-ketoglutarate/glutamate and malate/alpha-ketoglutarate ratios were higher in CR, in parallel with previously reported increases with CR in pyruvate carboxylase activity and glucagon levels, respectively. The results indicate that long-term CR induces a differential regulation of Krebs cycle in old mice and this regulation may be the result of changes in gene expression levels, as well as a complex interplay between enzymes, hormones and other effectors. Truncation of Krebs cycle by CR may be an important adaptation to utilize available substrates for the gluconeogenesis necessary to sustain glycolytic tissues, such as brain.

  8. Caloric Restriction Protects against Lactacystin-Induced Degeneration of Dopamine Neurons Independent of the Ghrelin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Coppens, Jessica; Bentea, Eduard; Bayliss, Jacqueline A.; Demuyser, Thomas; Walrave, Laura; Albertini, Giulia; Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Deneyer, Lauren; Aourz, Najat; Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Portelli, Jeanelle; Andrews, Zane B.; Massie, Ann; De Bundel, Dimitri; Smolders, Ilse

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by a loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to exert ghrelin-dependent neuroprotective effects in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrathydropyridine (MPTP)-based animal model for PD. We here investigated whether CR is neuroprotective in the lactacystin (LAC) mouse model for PD, in which proteasome disruption leads to the destruction of the DA neurons of the SNc, and whether this effect is mediated via the ghrelin receptor. Adult male ghrelin receptor wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) mice were maintained on an ad libitum (AL) diet or on a 30% CR regimen. After 3 weeks, LAC was injected unilaterally into the SNc, and the degree of DA neuron degeneration was evaluated 1 week later. In AL mice, LAC injection significanty reduced the number of DA neurons and striatal DA concentrations. CR protected against DA neuron degeneration following LAC injection. However, no differences were observed between ghrelin receptor WT and KO mice. These results indicate that CR can protect the nigral DA neurons from toxicity related to proteasome disruption; however, the ghrelin receptor is not involved in this effect. PMID:28273852

  9. Measuring aging rates of mice subjected to caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Jacob J E; van Heemst, Diana; van Bodegom, David; Bonkowski, Michael S; Sun, Liou Y; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling have been shown to counteract aging in mice. The effects of these interventions on aging are examined through age-dependent survival or through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale fitted to the Gompertz model. However, these methods have limitations that impede a fully comprehensive disclosure of these effects. Here we examine the effects of these interventions on murine aging through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale without fitting them to a model like the Gompertz model. Whereas these interventions negligibly and non-consistently affected the aging rates when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale, they caused the aging rates to increase at higher ages and to higher levels when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale. These results add to the debate whether these interventions postpone or slow aging and to the understanding of the mechanisms by which they affect aging. Since different methods yield different results, it is worthwhile to compare their results in future research to obtain further insights into the effects of dietary, genetic, and other interventions on the aging of mice and other species.

  10. Adipose-immune interactions during obesity and caloric restriction: reciprocal mechanisms regulating immunity and health span

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a tight coupling of metabolic and immune systems. This cross-talk mediated by neuroendocrine peptides as well as numerous cytokines and chemokines is believed to be responsible for integrating energy balance to immune function. These neuroendocrine-immune interactions are heightened during the state of chronic positive energy balance, as seen during obesity, and negative energy balance caused by caloric restriction (CR). Emerging evidence suggests that obesity may be associated with an immunodeficient state and chronic inflammation, which contribute to an increased risk of premature death. The direct interactions between expanded leukocyte populations within the adipose tissue during obesity and an increased number of adipocytes within an aging lymphoid microenvironment may constitute an important adaptive or pathological response as a result of change in energy balance. In stark contrast to obesity, CR causes negative energy balance and robustly prolongs a healthy lifespan in all of the species studied to date. Therefore, the endogenous neuroendocrine-metabolic sensors elevated or suppressed as a result of changes in energy balance may offer an important mechanism in understanding the antiaging and potential immune-enhancing nature of CR. Ghrelin, one such sensor of negative energy balance, is reduced during obesity and increased by CR. Ghrelin also regulates immune function by reducing proinflammatory cytokines and promotes thymopoiesis during aging and thus, may be a new CR mimetic target. The identification of immune effects and molecular pathways used by such orexigenic metabolic factors could offer potentially novel approaches to enhance immunity and increase healthy lifespan. PMID:18579754

  11. Caloric restriction reveals a metabolomic and lipidomic signature in liver of male mice.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Naudí, Alba; Ramírez-Núñez, Omar; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Selman, Colin; Withers, Dominic J; Pamplona, Reinald

    2014-10-01

    Lipid composition, particularly membrane unsaturation, has been proposed as being a lifespan determinant, but it is currently unknown whether caloric restriction (CR), an accepted life-extending intervention, affects cellular lipid profiles. In this study, we employ a liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight-based methodology to demonstrate that CR in the liver of male C57BL/6 mice: (i) induces marked changes in the cellular lipidome, (ii) specifically reduces levels of a phospholipid peroxidation product, 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaryl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine, (iii) alters cellular phosphoethanolamine and triglyceride distributional profiles, (iv) affects mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes, increasing complex II and decreasing complex III and (v) is associated with specific changes in liver metabolic pathways. These data demonstrate that CR induces a specific lipidome and metabolome reprogramming event in mouse liver which is associated with lower protein oxidative damage, as assessed by mass spectrometry-based measurements. Such changes may be critical to the increased lifespan and healthspan observed in C57BL/6 mice following CR.

  12. Metabolic shifts due to long-term caloric restriction revealed in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Rezzi, Serge; Martin, François-Pierre J.; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Colman, Ricki J.; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Weindruch, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The long-term health benefits of caloric restriction (CR) are well known but the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood despite increasing knowledge of transcriptional and related metabolic changes. We report new metabolic insights into long-term CR in nonhuman primates revealed by the holistic inspection of plasma 1H-NMR spectroscopic metabolic and lipoprotein profiles. The results revealed attenuation of aging-dependant alterations of lipoprotein and energy metabolism by CR, noted by relative increase in HDL and reduction in VLDL levels. Metabonomic analysis also revealed animals exhibiting distinct metabolic trajectories from aging that correlated with higher insulin sensitivity. The plasma profiles of insulin-sensitive animals were marked by higher levels of gluconate and acetate suggesting a CR-modulated increase in metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. The metabonomic findings, particularly those that parallel improved insulin sensitivity, are consistent with diminished adiposity in CR monkeys despite aging. The metabolic profile and the associated pathways are compatible with our previous findings that CR-induced gene transcriptional changes in tissue suggest the critical regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors as a key mechanism. The metabolic phenotyping provided in this study can be used to define a reference molecular profile of CR-associated health benefits and longevity in symbiotic superorganisms and man. PMID:19264119

  13. Measuring aging rates of mice subjected to caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Jacob J.E.; van Heemst, Diana; van Bodegom, David; Bonkowski, Michael S.; Sun, Liou Y.; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction and genetic disruption of growth hormone signaling have been shown to counteract aging in mice. The effects of these interventions on aging are examined through age-dependent survival or through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale fitted to the Gompertz model. However, these methods have limitations that impede a fully comprehensive disclosure of these effects. Here we examine the effects of these interventions on murine aging through the increase in age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale without fitting them to a model like the Gompertz model. Whereas these interventions negligibly and non-consistently affected the aging rates when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a logarithmic scale, they caused the aging rates to increase at higher ages and to higher levels when examined through the age-dependent mortality rates on a linear scale. These results add to the debate whether these interventions postpone or slow aging and to the understanding of the mechanisms by which they affect aging. Since different methods yield different results, it is worthwhile to compare their results in future research to obtain further insights into the effects of dietary, genetic, and other interventions on the aging of mice and other species. PMID:26959761

  14. Gene Expression in the Hippocampus: Regionally Specific Effects of Aging and Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Zeier, Zane; Madorsky, Irina; Xu, Ying; Ogle, William O.; Notterpek, Lucia; Foster, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    We measured changes in gene expression, induced by aging and caloric restriction (CR), in three hippocampal subregions. When analysis included all regions, aging was associated with expression of genes linked to mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, and stress responses, and in some cases, expression was reversed by CR. An age-related increase in ubiquintination was observed, including increased expression of ubiquitin conjugating enzyme genes and cytosolic ubiquitin immunoreactivity. CR decreased cytosolic ubiquitin and upregulated deubiquitinating genes. Region specific analyses indicated that CA1 was more susceptible to aging stress, exhibiting a greater number of altered genes relative to CA3 and the dentate gyrus (DG), and an enrichment of genes related to the immune response and apoptosis. CA3 and the DG were more responsive to CR, exhibiting marked changes in the total number of genes across diet conditions, reversal of age-related changes in p53 signaling, glucocorticoid receptor signaling, and enrichment of genes related to cell survival and neurotrophic signaling. Finally, CR differentially influenced genes for synaptic plasticity in CA1 and CA3. It is concluded that regional disparity in response to aging and CR relates to differences in vulnerability to stressors, the availability of neurotrophic, and cell survival mechanisms, and differences in cell function. PMID:21055414

  15. Impact of 6-month caloric restriction on autonomic nervous system activity in healthy, overweight, individuals.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Lilian; Moreira, Emilia A M; Martin, Corby K; Ravussin, Eric

    2010-02-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) increases maximum lifespan but the mechanisms are unclear. Dominance of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) over the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) has been shown to be a strong risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity and aging are associated with increased SNS activity, and weight loss and/or exercise seem to have positive effects on this balance. We therefore evaluated the effect of different approaches of CR on autonomic function in 28 overweight individuals participating in the Comprehensive Assessment of Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy (CALERIE) trial. Participants were randomized to either control, CR: 25% decrease in energy intake, CREX: 12.5% CR + 12.5% increase in energy expenditure, or LCD: low-calorie diet until 15% weight reduction followed by weight maintenance. Autonomic function was assessed by spectral analysis of heart-rate variability (HRV) while fasting and after a meal. Measurements were performed at baseline and 6 months. HR and SNS index decreased and PNS index increased in all intervention groups but reached significance only in CREX. HR and SNS index increased and PNS index decreased in response to the meal in all intervention groups. The results therefore suggest that weight loss improved SNS/PNS balance especially when CR is combined with exercise.

  16. Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting: two potential diets for successful brain aging.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bronwen; Mattson, Mark P; Maudsley, Stuart

    2006-08-01

    The vulnerability of the nervous system to advancing age is all too often manifest in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In this review article we describe evidence suggesting that two dietary interventions, caloric restriction (CR) and intermittent fasting (IF), can prolong the health-span of the nervous system by impinging upon fundamental metabolic and cellular signaling pathways that regulate life-span. CR and IF affect energy and oxygen radical metabolism, and cellular stress response systems, in ways that protect neurons against genetic and environmental factors to which they would otherwise succumb during aging. There are multiple interactive pathways and molecular mechanisms by which CR and IF benefit neurons including those involving insulin-like signaling, FoxO transcription factors, sirtuins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. These pathways stimulate the production of protein chaperones, neurotrophic factors and antioxidant enzymes, all of which help cells cope with stress and resist disease. A better understanding of the impact of CR and IF on the aging nervous system will likely lead to novel approaches for preventing and treating neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Intestinal PPARγ signalling is required for sympathetic nervous system activation in response to caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Duszka, Kalina; Picard, Alexandre; Ellero-Simatos, Sandrine; Chen, Jiapeng; Defernez, Marianne; Paramalingam, Eeswari; Pigram, Anna; Vanoaica, Liviu; Canlet, Cécile; Parini, Paolo; Narbad, Arjan; Guillou, Hervé; Thorens, Bernard; Wahli, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor PPARγ has been proven to affect metabolism in multiple tissues, and has received considerable attention for its involvement in colon cancer and inflammatory disease. However, its role in intestinal metabolism has been largely ignored. To investigate this potential aspect of PPARγ function, we submitted intestinal epithelium-specific PPARγ knockout mice (iePPARγKO) to a two-week period of 25% caloric restriction (CR), following which iePPARγKO mice retained more fat than their wild type littermates. In attempting to explain this discrepancy, we analysed the liver, skeletal muscle, intestinal lipid trafficking, and the microbiome, none of which appeared to contribute to the adiposity phenotype. Interestingly, under conditions of CR, iePPARγKO mice failed to activate their sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and increase CR-specific locomotor activity. These KO mice also manifested a defective control of their body temperature, which was overly reduced. Furthermore, the white adipose tissue of iePPARγKO CR mice showed lower levels of both hormone-sensitive lipase, and its phosphorylated form. This would result from impaired SNS signalling and possibly cause reduced lipolysis. We conclude that intestinal epithelium PPARγ plays an essential role in increasing SNS activity under CR conditions, thereby contributing to energy mobilization during metabolically stressful episodes. PMID:27853235

  18. Changes in behavior and gene expression induced by caloric restriction in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuta; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Kawai, Tomoko; Chikahisa, Sachiko; Katsuura, Sakurako; Nishida, Kensei; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Sei, Hiroyoshi; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2009-11-06

    Caloric restriction (CR) is an effective method for prevention of age-associated diseases as well as overweight and obesity; however, there is controversy regarding the effects of dieting regimens on behavior. In this study, we investigated two different dieting regimens: repeated fasting and refeeding (RFR) and daily feeding of half the amount of food consumed by RFR mice (CR). CR and RFR mice had an approximate 20% reduction in food intake compared with control mice. Open field, light-dark transition, elevated plus maze, and forced swimming tests indicated that CR, but not RFR, reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, with a reduction peak on day 8. Using a mouse whole genome microarray, we analyzed gene expression in the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and hypothalamus. In addition to the CR-responsive genes commonly modified by RFR and CR, each regimen differentially changed the expression of distinct genes in each region. The most profound change was observed in the amygdalas of CR mice: 884 genes were specifically upregulated. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that these 884 genes significantly modified nine canonical pathways in the amygdala. alpha-Adrenergic and dopamine receptor signalings were the two top-scoring pathways. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the upregulation of six genes in these pathways. Western blotting confirmed that CR specifically increased dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (Darpp-32), a key regulator of dopamine receptor signaling, in the amygdala. Our results suggest that CR may change behavior through altered gene expression.

  19. SIRT1 and Caloric Restriction: An Insight Into Possible Trade-Offs Between Robustness and Frailty

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Shin-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This review aims to summarize the importance of the mammalian NAD-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 as a critical mediator that coordinates metabolic responses to caloric restriction (CR) and the recent progress in the development of SIRT1-targeted CR mimetics. It also discusses possible trade-offs between robustness and frailty in CR and the applicability of CR or SIRT1-targeted CR mimetics to humans. Recent findings Loss- and gain-of-function mouse studies have provided genetic evidence that SIRT1 is a key mediator that orchestrates the physiological response to CR. SIRT1-activating compounds function as potential CR mimetics, at least in part, through the activation of SIRT1 in vivo. Summary Increasing SIRT1 dosage/activity is effective to provide significant protection from high-fat diet-induced metabolic complications, suggesting that SIRT1 activation likely promotes robustness in the regulation of metabolism. However, CR itself and CR mimicry through systemic SIRT1 activation might also generate frailty in response to unexpected environmental stimuli, such as bacterial and viral infections. It will be of great importance to understand the principles of systemic robustness and its spatial and temporal dynamics for the regulation of aging and longevity in mammals in order to achieve an optimal balance between robustness and frailty in our complex physiological system. PMID:19474721

  20. Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting: Two potential diets for successful brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bronwen; Mattson, Mark P.; Maudsley, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    The vulnerability of the nervous system to advancing age is all too often manifest in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In this review article we describe evidence suggesting that two dietary interventions, caloric restriction (CR) and intermittent fasting (IF), can prolong the health-span of the nervous system by impinging upon fundamental metabolic and cellular signaling pathways that regulate life-span. CR and IF affect energy and oxygen radical metabolism, and cellular stress response systems, in ways that protect neurons against genetic and environmental factors to which they would otherwise succumb during aging. There are multiple interactive pathways and molecular mechanisms by which CR and IF benefit neurons including those involving insulin-like signaling, FoxO transcription factors, sirtuins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. These pathways stimulate the production of protein chaperones, neurotrophic factors and antioxidant enzymes, all of which help cells cope with stress and resist disease. A better understanding of the impact of CR and IF on the aging nervous system will likely lead to novel approaches for preventing and treating neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:16899414

  1. Caloric restriction increases ketone bodies metabolism and preserves blood flow in aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Xiaoli; Watts, Lora

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase the life span and health span of a broad range of species. However, CR effects on in vivo brain functions are far from explored. In this study, we used multimetric neuroimaging methods to characterize the CR-induced changes of brain metabolic and vascular functions in aging rats. We found that old rats (24 months of age) with CR diet had reduced glucose uptake and lactate concentration, but increased ketone bodies level, compared with the age-matched and young (5 months of age) controls. The shifted metabolism was associated with preserved vascular function: old CR rats also had maintained cerebral blood flow relative to the age-matched controls. When investigating the metabolites in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle, we found that citrate and α-ketoglutarate were preserved in the old CR rats. We suggest that CR is neuroprotective; ketone bodies, cerebral blood flow, and α-ketoglutarate may play important roles in preserving brain physiology in aging. PMID:25896951

  2. Better Living through Chemistry: Caloric Restriction (CR) and CR Mimetics Alter Genome Function to Promote Increased Health and Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Zoe E.; Pickering, Joshua; Eskiw, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), defined as decreased nutrient intake without causing malnutrition, has been documented to increase both health and lifespan across numerous organisms, including humans. Many drugs and other compounds naturally occurring in our diet (nutraceuticals) have been postulated to act as mimetics of caloric restriction, leading to a wave of research investigating the efficacy of these compounds in preventing age-related diseases and promoting healthier, longer lifespans. Although well studied at the biochemical level, there are still many unanswered questions about how CR and CR mimetics impact genome function and structure. Here we discuss how genome function and structure are influenced by CR and potential CR mimetics, including changes in gene expression profiles and epigenetic modifications and their potential to identify the genetic fountain of youth. PMID:27588026

  3. Caloric restriction blocks neuropathology and motor deficits in Machado–Joseph disease mouse models through SIRT1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Santos, Janete; Duarte-Neves, Joana; Carmona, Vitor; Guarente, Leonard; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Machado–Joseph disease (MJD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by an abnormal expansion of the CAG triplet in the ATXN3 gene, translating into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin-3 protein. The available treatments only ameliorate symptomatology and do not block disease progression. In this study we find that caloric restriction dramatically rescues the motor incoordination, imbalance and the associated neuropathology in transgenic MJD mice. We further show that caloric restriction rescues SIRT1 levels in transgenic MJD mice, whereas silencing SIRT1 is sufficient to prevent the beneficial effects on MJD pathology. In addition, the re-establishment of SIRT1 levels in MJD mouse model, through the gene delivery approach, significantly ameliorates neuropathology, reducing neuroinflammation and activating autophagy. Furthermore, the pharmacological activation of SIRT1 with resveratrol significantly reduces motor incoordination of MJD mice. The pharmacological SIRT1 activation could provide important benefits to treat MJD patients. PMID:27165717

  4. Effects of age and caloric restriction in the vascular response of renal arteries to endothelin-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Amor, Sara; García-Villalón, Angel Luis; Rubio, Carmen; Carrascosa, Jose Ma; Monge, Luis; Fernández, Nuria; Martín-Carro, Beatriz; Granado, Miriam

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular alterations are the most prevalent cause of impaired physiological function in aged individuals with kidney being one the most affected organs. Aging-induced alterations in renal circulation are associated with a decrease in endothelium-derived relaxing factors such as nitric oxide (NO) and with an increase in contracting factors such as endothelin-1(ET-1). As caloric restriction (CR) exerts beneficial effects preventing some of the aging-induced alterations in cardiovascular system, the aim of this study was to analyze the effects of age and caloric restriction in the vascular response of renal arteries to ET-1 in aged rats. Vascular function was studied in renal arteries from 3-month-old Wistar rats fed ad libitum (3m) and in renal arteries from 8-and 24-month-old Wistar rats fed ad libitum (8m and 24m), or subjected to 20% caloric restriction during their three last months of life (8m-CR and 24m-CR). The contractile response to ET-1 was increased in renal arteries from 8m and 24m compared to 3m rats. ET-1-induced contraction was mediated by ET-A receptors in all experimental groups and also by ET-B receptors in 24m rats. Caloric restriction attenuated the increased contraction to ET-1 in renal arteries from 8m but not from 24m rats possibly through NO release proceeding from ET-B endothelial receptors. In 24m rats, CR did not attenuate the aging-increased response of renal arteries to ET-1, but it prevented the aging-induced increase in iNOS mRNA levels and the aging-induced decrease in eNOS mRNA levels in arterial tissue. In conclusion, aging is associated with an increased response to ET-1 in renal arteries that is prevented by CR in 8m but not in 24m rats.

  5. Caloric restriction and calcium's effect on bone metabolism and body composition in overweight and obese premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Radak, Tim L

    2004-12-01

    Obesity results in numerous preventable deaths and comorbidities. Unfortunately, a reduction of body weight has been correlated with a reduction in bone mass, the reasons for which have not been fully elucidated. The importance of maximizing peak bone mass during premenopausal years is well known. Most studies demonstrate a positive relationship between calcium intake and bone mass. However, during caloric restriction, which is commonly used for weight loss, calcium intake has shown mixed results. Calcium from dairy sources has received additional attention, beyond its importance to bone, for its role in regulating body weight and composition. Dairy foods are perceived as high fat, and therefore, are generally minimized or avoided during caloric restriction. The current calcium intake for premenopausal women is significantly below recommendations, and even if met during caloric restriction, may not be adequate. This review underscores the need for maintaining at least adequate intake levels of calcium, if not more, during weight loss regimens to minimize potential long-term detrimental effects on bone metabolism.

  6. Late-onset caloric restriction alters skeletal muscle metabolism by modulating pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Lin, Shang-Ying; Liao, Yi-Hung; Li, Zhen-Jie; Wong, Alice May-Kuen

    2015-06-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) attenuates age-related muscle loss. However, the underlying mechanism responsible for this attenuation is not fully understood. This study evaluated the role of energy metabolism in the CR-induced attenuation of muscle loss. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to evaluate the effect of CR on energy metabolism and determine its relationship with muscle mass, and 2) to determine whether the effects of CR are age dependent. Young and middle-aged rats were randomized into either 40% CR or ad libitum (AL) diet groups for 14 wk. Major energy-producing pathways in muscles, i.e., glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), were examined. We found that the effects of CR were age dependent. CR improved muscle metabolism and normalized muscle mass in middle-aged animals but not young animals. CR decreased glycolysis and increased the cellular dependency for OXPHOS vs. glycolysis in muscles of middle-aged rats, which was associated with the improvement of normalized muscle mass. The metabolic reprogramming induced by CR was related to modulation of pyruvate metabolism and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Compared with animals fed AL, middle-aged animals with CR had lower lactate dehydrogenase A content and greater mitochondrial pyruvate carrier content. Markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, including AMPK activation levels and SIRT1 and COX-IV content, also showed increased levels. In conclusion, 14 wk of CR improved muscle metabolism and preserved muscle mass in middle-aged animals but not in young developing animals. CR-attenuated age-related muscle loss is associated with reprogramming of the metabolic pathway from glycolysis to OXPHOS.

  7. Mild caloric restriction up-regulates the expression of prohibitin: A proteome study

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Shoko; Masuda, Junko; Shimagami, Hiroshi; Ohta, Yutaka; Kanda, Tomomasa; Saito, Kenji; Kato, Hisanori

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Proteomic analysis was performed to elucidate physiological alterations induced by mild CR. {yields} The results suggest good reproducibility and possibility to grasp the important response of CR. {yields} The increase in prohibitin abundance was observed in CR groups by proteomic analysis. {yields} We hypothesize that prohibitin might be involved in the longevity induced by CR. -- Abstract: Caloric restriction (CR) is well known to expand lifespan in a variety of species and to retard many age-related diseases. The effects of relatively mild CR on the proteome profile in relation to lifespan have not yet been reported, despite the more extensive studies of the stricter CR conditions. Thus, the present study was conducted to elucidate the protein profiles in rat livers after mild CR for a relatively short time. Young growing rats were fed CR diets (10% and 30% CR) for 1 month. We performed the differential proteomic analysis of the rat livers using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The most remarkable protein among the differentially expressed proteins was found to be prohibitin, the abundance of which was increased by 30% CR. Prohibitin is a ubiquitously expressed protein shown to suppress cell proliferation and to be related to longevity. The increase in prohibitin was observed both in 10% and 30% CR by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, induction of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) protein, related to the actions of prohibitin in promoting longevity, was observed. The increased prohibitin level in response to subtle CR suggests that this increase may be one of the early events leading to the expansion of lifespan in response to CR.

  8. Mimetics of caloric restriction include agonists of lipid-activated nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Corton, J Christopher; Apte, Udayan; Anderson, Steven P; Limaye, Pallavi; Yoon, Lawrence; Latendresse, John; Dunn, Corrie; Everitt, Jeffrey I; Voss, Kenneth A; Swanson, Cynthia; Kimbrough, Carie; Wong, Jean S; Gill, Sarjeet S; Chandraratna, Roshantha A S; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W; Stulnig, Thomas M; Steffensen, Knut R; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Mehendale, Harihara M

    2004-10-29

    The obesity epidemic in industrialized countries is associated with increases in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and certain types of cancer. In animal models, caloric restriction (CR) suppresses these diseases as well as chemical-induced tissue damage. These beneficial effects of CR overlap with those altered by agonists of nuclear receptors (NR) under control of the fasting-responsive transcriptional co-activator, peroxisome proliferator-activated co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha). In a screen for compounds that mimic CR effects in the liver, we found statistically significant overlaps between the CR transcript profile in wild-type mice and the profiles altered by agonists of lipid-activated NR, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), liver X receptor, and their obligate heterodimer partner, retinoid X receptor. The overlapping genes included those involved in CVD (lipid metabolism and inflammation) and cancer (cell fate). Based on this overlap, we hypothesized that some effects of CR are mediated by PPARalpha. As determined by transcript profiling, 19% of all gene expression changes in wild-type mice were dependent on PPARalpha, including Cyp4a10 and Cyp4a14, involved in fatty acid omega-oxidation, acute phase response genes, and epidermal growth factor receptor but not increases in PGC-1alpha. CR protected the livers of wild-type mice from damage induced by thioacetamide, a liver toxicant and hepatocarcinogen. CR protection was lost in PPARalpha-null mice due to inadequate tissue repair. These results demonstrate that PPARalpha mediates some of the effects of CR and indicate that a pharmacological approach to mimicking many of the beneficial effects of CR may be possible.

  9. Caloric Restriction and Formalin-Induced Inflammation: An Experimental Study in Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Nozad, Aisan; Safari, Mir Bahram; Saboory, Ehsan; Derafshpoor, Leila; Mohseni Moghaddam, Parvaneh; Ghaffari, Farzaneh; Naseri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute and chronic inflammations are difficult to control. Using chemical anti-inflammatory medications along with their complications considerably limit their use. According to Traditional Iranian Medicine (TIM), there is an important relation between inflammation and Imtila (food and blood accumulation in the body); food reduction or its more modern equivalent Caloric Restriction (CR) may act against both Imtila and inflammation. Objectives: This experimental study aimed to investigate the effect of 30% reduction in daily calorie intake on inflammation in rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 male rats (Rattus rattus) weighing 220 to 270 g were obtained. Then, the inflammation was induced by injecting formalin in their paws. Next, the rats were randomized by generating random numbers into two equal groups (9 + 9) putting on either normal diet (controls) or a similar diet with 30% reduction of calorie (cases). Paw volume changes were recorded twice per day by one observer in both groups using a standard plethysmometer for 8 consecutive days. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), complete blood count (erythrocyte, platelet, and white blood cell) and hemoglobin were compared between the groups. Results: Decline of both body weight and paw volume was significantly more prominent in the case than in the control rats within the study period (P < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively). Paw volume decrease was more prominent after day 3. On day 8, serum CRP-positive (1 or 2 +) rats were more frequent in ad libitum fed group comparing with those received CR (33.3% vs. 11.1%). This difference, however, was insignificant (P = 0.58). At the same time, mean ESR was significantly higher in the control rats comparing with that in the case group (29.00 ± 2.89 h vs. 14.00 ± 1.55 h; P = 0.001). Other serum parameters were not significantly different between the two groups at endpoint. Conclusions: Rats fed with a 30% calorie-restricted

  10. Long-term intermittent feeding, but not caloric restriction, leads to redox imbalance, insulin receptor nitration, and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Fernanda M; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Caldeira da Silva, Camille C; Chausse, Bruno; Romano, Renato L; Garcia, Camila C M; Colepicolo, Pio; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2011-10-01

    Calorie restriction is a dietary intervention known to improve redox state, glucose tolerance, and animal life span. Other interventions have been adopted as study models for caloric restriction, including nonsupplemented food restriction and intermittent, every-other-day feedings. We compared the short- and long-term effects of these interventions to ad libitum protocols and found that, although all restricted diets decrease body weight, intermittent feeding did not decrease intra-abdominal adiposity. Short-term calorie restriction and intermittent feeding presented similar results relative to glucose tolerance. Surprisingly, long-term intermittent feeding promoted glucose intolerance, without a loss in insulin receptor phosphorylation. Intermittent feeding substantially increased insulin receptor nitration in both intra-abdominal adipose tissue and muscle, a modification associated with receptor inactivation. All restricted diets enhanced nitric oxide synthase levels in the insulin-responsive adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. However, whereas calorie restriction improved tissue redox state, food restriction and intermittent feedings did not. In fact, long-term intermittent feeding resulted in largely enhanced tissue release of oxidants. Overall, our results show that restricted diets are significantly different in their effects on glucose tolerance and redox state when adopted long-term. Furthermore, we show that intermittent feeding can lead to oxidative insulin receptor inactivation and glucose intolerance.

  11. Effect of Ames dwarfism and caloric restriction on spontaneous DNA mutation frequency in different mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ana Maria; Busuttil, Rita A; Calder, R Brent; Dollé, Martijn E T; Diaz, Vivian; McMahan, C Alex; Bartke, Andrzej; Nelson, James; Reddick, Robert; Vijg, Jan

    2008-09-01

    Genetic instability has been implicated as a causal factor in cancer and aging. Caloric restriction (CR) and suppression of the somatotroph axis significantly increase life span in the mouse and reduce multiple symptoms of aging, including cancer. To test if in vivo spontaneous mutation frequency is reduced by such mechanisms, we crossed long-lived Ames dwarf mice with a C57BL/6J line harboring multiple copies of the lacZ mutation reporter gene as part of a plasmid that can be recovered from tissues and organs into Escherichia coli to measure mutant frequencies. Four cohorts were studied: (1) ad lib wild-type; (2) CR wild-type; (3) ad lib dwarf; and (4) CR dwarf. While both CR wild-type and ad lib dwarf mice lived significantly longer than the ad lib wild-type mice, under CR conditions dwarf mice did not live any longer than ad lib wild-type mice. While this may be due to an as yet unknown adverse effect of the C57BL/6J background, it did not prevent an effect on spontaneous mutation frequencies at the lacZ locus, which were assessed in liver, kidney and small intestine of 7- and 15-month-old mice of all four cohorts. A lower mutant frequency in the ad lib dwarf background was observed in liver and kidney at 7 and 15 months of age and in small intestine at 15 months of age as compared to the ad lib wild-type. CR also significantly reduced spontaneous mutant frequency in kidney and small intestine, but not in liver. In a separate cohort of lacZ-C57BL/6J mice CR was also found to significantly reduce spontaneous mutant frequency in liver and small intestine, across three age levels. These results indicate that two major pro-longevity interventions in the mouse are associated with a reduced mutation frequency. This could be responsible, at least in part, for the enhanced longevity associated with Ames dwarfism and CR.

  12. Acute effects of different diet compositions on skeletal muscle insulin signalling in obese individuals during caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cecilia C.L.; Adochio, Rebecca L.; Leitner, J. Wayne; Abeyta, Ian M.; Draznin, Boris; Cornier, Marc-Andre

    2012-01-01

    Objective The cellular effects of restricting fat versus carbohydrate during a low-calorie diet are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine acute effects of energy and macronutrient restriction on skeletal muscle insulin signalling in obesity. Materials/Methods Eighteen obese individuals without diabetes underwent euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and skeletal muscle biopsy after: (a) 5 days of eucaloric diet (30% fat, 50% carbohydrate), and (b) 5 days of a 30% calorie-restricted diet, either low fat/high carbohydrate (LF/HC: 20% fat, 60% carbohydrate) or high-fat/low carbohydrate (HF/LC: 50% fat, 30% carbohydrate). Results Weight, body composition, and insulin sensitivity were similar between groups after eucaloric diet. Weight loss was similar between groups after hypocaloric diet, 1.3 ± 1.3 kg (p<0.0001 compared with eucaloric). Whole-body insulin sensitivity was unchanged after calorie restriction and similar between groups. However, ex vivo skeletal muscle insulin signalling differed depending on macronutrient composition of calorie-restricted diet. Skeletal muscle of the LF/HC group had increased insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1, decreased insulin-stimulated Ser 307 phosphorylation of IRS-1, and increased IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol (PI)3-kinase activity. Conversely, insulin stimulation of tyrosine phosphorylated IRS-1 was absent and serine 307 phosphorylation of IRS-1 was increased on HF/LC, with blunting of IRS-1-associated PI3-kinase activity. Conclusion Acute caloric restriction with a LF/HC diet alters skeletal muscle insulin signalling in a way that improves insulin sensitivity, while acute caloric restriction with a HF/LC diet induces changes compatible with insulin resistance. In both cases, ex vivo changes in skeletal muscle insulin signalling appear prior to changes in whole body insulin sensitivity. PMID:23174405

  13. Feed restriction and a diet's caloric value: The influence on the aerobic and anaerobic capacity of rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The influence of feed restriction and different diet's caloric value on the aerobic and anaerobic capacity is unclear in the literature. Thus, the objectives of this study were to determine the possible influences of two diets with different caloric values and the influence of feed restriction on the aerobic (anaerobic threshold: AT) and anaerobic (time to exhaustion: Tlim) variables measured by a lactate minimum test (LM) in rats. Methods We used 40 adult Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups: ad libitum commercial Purina® diet (3028.0 Kcal/kg) (ALP), restricted commercial Purina® diet (RAP), ad libitum semi-purified AIN-93 diet (3802.7 Kcal/kg) (ALD) and restricted semi-purified AIN-93 diet (RAD). The animals performed LM at the end of the experiment, 48 h before euthanasia. Comparisons between groups were performed by analysis of variance (p < 0,05). Results At the end of the experiment, the weights of the rats in the groups with the restricted diets were significantly lower than those in the groups with ad libitum diet intakes. In addition, the ALD group had higher amounts of adipose tissue. With respect to energetic substrates, the groups subjected to diet restriction had significantly higher levels of liver and muscle glycogen. There were no differences between the groups with respect to AT; however, the ALD group had lower lactatemia at the AT intensity and higher Tlim than the other groups. Conclusions We conclude that dietary restriction induces changes in energetic substrates and that ad libitum intake of a semi-purified AIN-93 diet results in an increase in adipose tissue, likely reducing the density of the animals in water and favouring their performance during the swimming exercises. PMID:22448911

  14. Moderate caloric restriction during gestation in rats alters adipose tissue sympathetic innervation and later adiposity in offspring.

    PubMed

    García, Ana Paula; Palou, Mariona; Sánchez, Juana; Priego, Teresa; Palou, Andreu; Picó, Catalina

    2011-02-18

    Maternal prenatal undernutrition predisposes offspring to higher adiposity in adulthood. Mechanisms involved in these programming effects, apart from those described in central nervous system development, have not been established. Here we aimed to evaluate whether moderate caloric restriction during early pregnancy in rats affects white adipose tissue (WAT) sympathetic innervation in the offspring, and its relationship with adiposity development. For this purpose, inguinal and retroperitoneal WAT (iWAT and rpWAT, respectively) were analyzed in male and female offspring of control and 20% caloric-restricted (from 1-12 d of pregnancy) (CR) dams. Body weight (BW), the weight, DNA-content, morphological features and the immunoreactive tyrosine hydroxylase and Neuropeptide Y area (TH+ and NPY+ respectively, performed by immunohistochemistry) of both fat depots, were studied at 25 d and 6 m of age, the latter after 2 m exposure to high fat diet. At 6 m of life, CR males but not females, exhibited greater BW, and greater weight and total DNA-content in iWAT, without changes in adipocytes size, suggesting the development of hyperplasia in this depot. However, in rpWAT, CR males but not females, showed larger adipocyte diameter, with no changes in DNA-content, suggesting the development of hypertrophy. These parameters were not different between control and CR animals at the age of 25 d. In iWAT, both at 25 d and 6 m, CR males but not females, showed lower TH(+) and NPY(+), suggesting lower sympathetic innervation in CR males compared to control males. In rpWAT, at 6 m but not at 25 d, CR males but not females, showed lower TH(+) and NPY(+). Thus, the effects of caloric restriction during gestation on later adiposity and on the differences in the adult phenotype between internal and subcutaneous fat depots in the male offspring may be associated in part with specific alterations in sympathetic innervation, which may impact on WAT architecture.

  15. Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting alter hepatic lipid droplet proteome and diacylglycerol species and prevent diabetes in NZO mice.

    PubMed

    Baumeier, Christian; Kaiser, Daniel; Heeren, Jörg; Scheja, Ludger; John, Clara; Weise, Christoph; Eravci, Murat; Lagerpusch, Merit; Schulze, Gunnar; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schwenk, Robert Wolfgang; Schürmann, Annette

    2015-05-01

    Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are known to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance in several species including humans. The aim of this study was to unravel potential mechanisms by which these interventions improve insulin sensitivity and protect from type 2 diabetes. Diabetes-susceptible New Zealand Obese mice were either 10% calorie restricted (CR) or fasted every other day (IF), and compared to ad libitum (AL) fed control mice. AL mice showed a diabetes prevalence of 43%, whereas mice under CR and IF were completely protected against hyperglycemia. Proteomic analysis of hepatic lipid droplets revealed significantly higher levels of PSMD9 (co-activator Bridge-1), MIF (macrophage migration inhibitor factor), TCEB2 (transcription elongation factor B (SIII), polypeptide 2), ACY1 (aminoacylase 1) and FABP5 (fatty acid binding protein 5), and a marked reduction of GSTA3 (glutathione S-transferase alpha 3) in samples of CR and IF mice. In addition, accumulation of diacylglycerols (DAGs) was significantly reduced in livers of IF mice (P=0.045) while CR mice showed a similar tendency (P=0.062). In particular, 9 DAG species were significantly reduced in response to IF, of which DAG-40:4 and DAG-40:7 also showed significant effects after CR. This was associated with a decreased PKCε activation and might explain the improved insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, our data indicate that protection against diabetes upon caloric restriction and intermittent fasting associates with a modulation of lipid droplet protein composition and reduction of intracellular DAG species.

  16. Formation of S-(carboxymethyl)-cysteine in rat liver mitochondrial proteins: effects of caloric and methionine restriction.

    PubMed

    Naudí, Alba; Jové, Mariona; Cacabelos, Daniel; Ayala, Victoria; Cabre, Rosanna; Caro, Pilar; Gomez, José; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Barja, Gustavo; Pamplona, Reinald

    2013-02-01

    Maillard reaction contributes to the chemical modification and cross-linking of proteins. This process plays a significant role in the aging process and determination of animal longevity. Oxidative conditions promote the Maillard reaction. Mitochondria are the primary site of oxidants due to the reactive molecular species production. Mitochondrial proteome cysteine residues are targets of oxidative attack due to their specific chemistry and localization. Their chemical, non-enzymatic modification leads to dysfunctional proteins, which entail cellular senescence and organismal aging. Previous studies have consistently shown that caloric and methionine restrictions, nutritional interventions that increase longevity, decrease the rate of mitochondrial oxidant production and the physiological steady-state levels of markers of oxidative damage to macromolecules. In this scenario, we have detected S-(carboxymethyl)-cysteine (CMC) as a new irreversible chemical modification in mitochondrial proteins. CMC content in mitochondrial proteins significantly correlated with that of the lysine-derived analog N (ε)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine. The concentration of CMC is, however, one order of magnitude lower compared with CML likely due in part to the lower content of cysteine with respect to lysine of the mitochondrial proteome. CMC concentrations decreases in liver mitochondrial proteins of rats subjected to 8.5 and 25 % caloric restriction, as well as in 40 and 80 % methionine restriction. This is associated with a concomitant and significant increase in the protein content of sulfhydryl groups. Data presented here evidence that CMC, a marker of Cys-AGE formation, could be candidate as a biomarker of mitochondrial damage during aging.

  17. Effects of immobilisation and caloric restriction on antioxidant parameters and T-cell apoptosis in healthy young men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinger, S.; Arendt, B. M.; Boese, A.; Juschus, M.; Schaefer, S.; Stoffel-Wagner, B.; Goerlich, R.

    Background: Astronauts are exposed to oxidative stress due to radiation and microgravity, which might impair immune functions. Effects of hypocaloric nutrition as often observed in astronauts on oxidative stress and immune functions are not clear. We investigated, if microgravity, simulated by 6 Head-down tilt (HDT) and caloric restriction (-25%, fat reduced) with adequate supply of micronutrients affect DNA-damage in peripheral leukocytes, antioxidant parameters in plasma, and T-cell apoptosis. Material & Methods: 10 healthy male non-smokers were subjected to 4 different interventions (normocaloric diet or caloric restriction (CR) in upright position (UP) or HDT) for 14 days each (cross-over). DNA-damage in peripheral leukocytes (Comet Assay), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and uric acid in plasma were measured before, after 5, 10, and 13 days of intervention, and after 2 days recovery. T-cell apoptosis (Annexin V binding test) was assessed before and after intervention. Results: Preliminary results show that only endogenous, but not ex vivo H2O2-induced DNA strand breaks were reduced by CR compared to normocaloric diet. In upright position, endogenous DNA strand breaks decreased continuously during CR, reaching significance after recovery. During HDT, caloric restriction seems to counteract a temporary increase in DNA strand breaks observed in subjects receiving normocaloric diet. TEAC was reduced during HDT compared to UP in subjects under caloric restriction. An increase in plasma uric acid related to intervention occurred only after 5 days HDT in CR vs. normocaloric diet. T-cell apoptosis was not affected by any kind of intervention. Conclusion: Neither HDT nor CR with sufficient supply of micronutrients seem to induce oxidative stress or T-cell apoptosis in healthy young men. In contrast, CR might prevent endogenous DNA-damage in peripheral leukocytes. As DNA-damage is a risk factor for carcinogenesis, protective effects of energy reduction are

  18. Caloric stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Caloric test; Bithermal caloric testing; Cold water calorics; Warm water calorics; Air caloric testing ... your acoustic nerve by delivering cold or warm water or air into your ear canal. When cold ...

  19. Long-term Effects of Two Levels of Caloric Restriction on Body Composition, and Diet Satisfaction in CALERIE, a One Year Randomized Controlled Trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is little information on whether the extent of dietary energy restriction in a weight loss program influences long-term weight change. We examined the effects of two levels of caloric restriction (CR) over 12 months on body weight and fat loss, total energy expenditure (TEE), resting metabolic...

  20. Impact of caloric and dietary restriction regimens on markers of health and longevity in humans and animals: a summary of available findings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Considerable interest has been shown in the ability of caloric restriction (CR) to improve multiple parameters of health and to extend lifespan. CR is the reduction of caloric intake - typically by 20 - 40% of ad libitum consumption - while maintaining adequate nutrient intake. Several alternatives to CR exist. CR combined with exercise (CE) consists of both decreased caloric intake and increased caloric expenditure. Alternate-day fasting (ADF) consists of two interchanging days; one day, subjects may consume food ad libitum (sometimes equaling twice the normal intake); on the other day, food is reduced or withheld altogether. Dietary restriction (DR) - restriction of one or more components of intake (typically macronutrients) with minimal to no reduction in total caloric intake - is another alternative to CR. Many religions incorporate one or more forms of food restriction. The following religious fasting periods are featured in this review: 1) Islamic Ramadan; 2) the three principal fasting periods of Greek Orthodox Christianity (Nativity, Lent, and the Assumption); and 3) the Biblical-based Daniel Fast. This review provides a summary of the current state of knowledge related to CR and DR. A specific section is provided that illustrates related work pertaining to religious forms of food restriction. Where available, studies involving both humans and animals are presented. The review includes suggestions for future research pertaining to the topics of discussion. PMID:21981968

  1. Effect of exercise and caloric restriction on DMBA induced mammary tumorigenesis and plasma lipids in rats fed high fat diets

    SciTech Connect

    Magrane, D. )

    1991-03-15

    Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single 10 mg dose of 7, 12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and grouped as follows: (1) low fat-sedentary (LF-SED), (2) low fat-exercised (LF-EX), (3) high fat-sedentary (HF-SED), (4) high fat-exercised (HF-EX), (5) high fat-caloric restricted (HF-RES). Diets were isocaloric and contained 3.9% (LF) and 19.4% (HF) of corn oil. Group 5 was fed a 25% caloric restricted diet but with 24.6% fat content to equalize fat intake to HF-SED. After 12 weeks of diet or treadmill exercise, tumor data and plasma lipid profiles were determined. Results show that rats on HF-EX had more total tumors, % of tumors and tumors per tumor bearing rat than rats on HF-SED. The effect of exercise was also evident in LF-EX rats, when compared to LF-SED. Average tumor size and tumor volumes were not affected. The HF-RES group showed reduced tumor profiles compared to HF-SED. HDL, LDL, triglycerides and total cholesterol were unaffected by HF or LF diets or exercise. These data suggest that tumorigenesis is increased by moderate and constant exercise.

  2. Metformin and caloric restriction induce an AMPK-dependent restoration of mitochondrial dysfunction in fibroblasts from Fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Bullón, Pedro; Marín-Aguilar, Fabiola; Cotán, David; Carrión, Angel M; Alvarez-Suarez, José Miguel; Giampieri, Francesca; Sánchez-Alcazar, José Antonio; Battino, Maurizio; Cordero, Mario D

    2015-07-01

    Impaired AMPK is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical and pathological conditions, ranging from obesity, altered responses to exercise or metabolic syndrome, to inflammation, disturbed mitochondrial biogenesis and defective response to energy stress. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a world-wide diffused musculoskeletal chronic pain condition that affects up to 5% of the general population and comprises all the above mentioned pathophysiological states. Here, we tested the involvement of AMPK activation in fibroblasts derived from FM patients. AMPK was not phosphorylated in fibroblasts from FM patients and was associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis, reduced oxygen consumption, decreased antioxidant enzymes expression levels and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, mtDNA sequencing analysis did not show any important alterations which could justify the mitochondrial defects. AMPK activation in FM fibroblast was impaired in response to moderate oxidative stress. In contrast, AMPK activation by metformin or incubation with serum from caloric restricted mice improved the response to moderate oxidative stress and mitochondrial metabolism in FM fibroblasts. These results suggest that AMPK plays an essential role in FM pathophysiology and could represent the basis for a valuable new therapeutic target/strategy. Furthermore, both metformin and caloric restriction could be an interesting therapeutic approach in FM.

  3. Effect of aging and anti-aging caloric restriction on the endocrine regulation of rat liver autophagy.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessio; Recchia, Gianluca; Cavallini, Gabriella; Bergamini, Ettore

    2008-06-01

    Autophagy is a process that sequesters and degrades altered organelles and macromolecular cytoplasmic constituents for cellular restructuring and repair, and as a source of nutrients for metabolic use in early starvation it may be involved in anti-aging mechanisms of caloric restriction. The effects of 40% daily dietary restriction (DR) and intermittent feeding (EOD) on the age-related changes in the endocrine regulation of autophagic proteolysis were studied by monitoring the rate of valine release from isolated rat liver cells. Results show that in ad libitum-fed rats sensitivity of autophagy to glucagon and insulin declines by one order of magnitude in older rats. Both DR and EOD maintain the sensitivity to glucagon at juvenile levels, whereas only EOD can fully maintain response to insulin. It is concluded that changes in the sensitivity to glucagon may have a role in the aging process.

  4. Curcumin Mimics the Neurocognitive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Caloric Restriction in a Mouse Model of Midlife Obesity.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Marjana Rahman; Franks, Susan; Sumien, Nathalie; Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Filipetto, Frank; Forster, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Dietary curcumin was studied for its potential to decrease adiposity and reverse obesity- associated cognitive impairment in a mouse model of midlife sedentary obesity. We hypothesized that curcumin intake, by decreasing adiposity, would improve cognitive function in a manner comparable to caloric restriction (CR), a weight loss regimen. 15-month-old male C57BL/6 mice were assigned in groups to receive the following dietary regimens for 12 weeks: (i) a base diet (Ain93M) fed ad libitum (AL), (ii) the base diet restricted to 70% of ad libitum (CR) or (iii) the base diet containing curcumin fed AL (1000 mg/kg diet, CURAL). Blood markers of inflammation, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as an indicator of redox stress (GSH: GSSG ratio), were determined at different time points during the treatments, and visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue were measured upon completion of the experiment. After 8 weeks of dietary treatment, the mice were tested for spatial cognition (Morris water maze) and cognitive flexibility (discriminated active avoidance). The CR group showed significant weight loss and reduced adiposity, whereas CURAL mice had stable weight throughout the experiment, consumed more food than the AL group, with no reduction of adiposity. However, both CR and CURAL groups took fewer trials than AL to reach criterion during the reversal sessions of the active avoidance task, suggesting an improvement in cognitive flexibility. The AL mice had higher levels of CRP compared to CURAL and CR, and GSH as well as the GSH: GSSG ratio were increased during curcumin intake, suggesting a reducing shift in the redox state. The results suggest that, independent of their effects on adiposity; dietary curcumin and caloric restriction have positive effects on frontal cortical functions that could be linked to anti-inflammatory or antioxidant actions.

  5. Curcumin Mimics the Neurocognitive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Caloric Restriction in a Mouse Model of Midlife Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Susan; Sumien, Nathalie; Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Filipetto, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Dietary curcumin was studied for its potential to decrease adiposity and reverse obesity- associated cognitive impairment in a mouse model of midlife sedentary obesity. We hypothesized that curcumin intake, by decreasing adiposity, would improve cognitive function in a manner comparable to caloric restriction (CR), a weight loss regimen. 15-month-old male C57BL/6 mice were assigned in groups to receive the following dietary regimens for 12 weeks: (i) a base diet (Ain93M) fed ad libitum (AL), (ii) the base diet restricted to 70% of ad libitum (CR) or (iii) the base diet containing curcumin fed AL (1000 mg/kg diet, CURAL). Blood markers of inflammation, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as an indicator of redox stress (GSH: GSSG ratio), were determined at different time points during the treatments, and visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue were measured upon completion of the experiment. After 8 weeks of dietary treatment, the mice were tested for spatial cognition (Morris water maze) and cognitive flexibility (discriminated active avoidance). The CR group showed significant weight loss and reduced adiposity, whereas CURAL mice had stable weight throughout the experiment, consumed more food than the AL group, with no reduction of adiposity. However, both CR and CURAL groups took fewer trials than AL to reach criterion during the reversal sessions of the active avoidance task, suggesting an improvement in cognitive flexibility. The AL mice had higher levels of CRP compared to CURAL and CR, and GSH as well as the GSH: GSSG ratio were increased during curcumin intake, suggesting a reducing shift in the redox state. The results suggest that, independent of their effects on adiposity; dietary curcumin and caloric restriction have positive effects on frontal cortical functions that could be linked to anti-inflammatory or antioxidant actions. PMID:26473740

  6. Long-term caloric restriction reduces metabolic rate and heart rate under cool and thermoneutral conditions in FBNF1 rats.

    PubMed

    Knight, W David; Witte, M M; Parsons, A D; Gierach, M; Overton, J Michael

    2011-05-01

    The long-term metabolic and cardiovascular responses to caloric restriction (CR) are poorly understood. We examined the responses to one year of CR in FBNF1 rats housed in cool (COOL; T(a)=15 °C) or thermoneutral (TMN; T(a)=30 °C) conditions. Rats were acclimated to COOL or TMN for 2 months, instrumented for cardiovascular telemetry and studied in calorimeters. Baseline caloric intake, oxygen consumption (VO(2)), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were determined prior to assignment to ad lib (AL) or CR groups (30-40% CR) within each T(a) (n = 8). Groups of rats were studied after 10 weeks CR, one year CR, and after 4 days of re-feeding. Both 10 weeks and one year of CR reduced HR and VO(2) irrespective of T(a). Evaluation of the relationship between metabolic organ mass (liver, heart, brain, and kidney mass) and energy expenditure revealed a clear shift induced by CR to reduce expenditure per unit metabolic mass in both COOL and TMN groups. Re-feeding resulted in prompt elevations of HR and VO(2) to levels observed in control rats. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that long term CR produces sustained reductions in metabolic rate and heart rate in rats.

  7. Hunger in the absence of caloric restriction improves cognition and attenuates Alzheimer's disease pathology in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Dhurandhar, Emily J; Allison, David B; van Groen, Thomas; Kadish, Inga

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that caloric restriction (CR) delays aging and possibly delays the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We conjecture that the mechanism may involve interoceptive cues, rather than reduced energy intake per se. We determined that hunger alone, induced by a ghrelin agonist, reduces AD pathology and improves cognition in the APP-SwDI mouse model of AD. Long-term treatment with a ghrelin agonist was sufficient to improve the performance in the water maze. The treatment also reduced levels of amyloid beta (Aβ) and inflammation (microglial activation) at 6 months of age compared to the control group, similar to the effect of CR. Thus, a hunger-inducing drug attenuates AD pathology, in the absence of CR, and the neuroendocrine aspects of hunger also prevent age-related cognitive decline.

  8. Inaccessible food cues affect stress and weight gain in calorically-restricted and ad lib fed rats.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Jennifer S; Polivy, Janet; Fleming, Alison; Hargreaves, Duane; Herman, C Peter; Lao, Grace

    2010-02-01

    Research suggests that caloric restriction (CR) is beneficial; however, the effects of CR in the context of food cues are unclear. A 2 (food cue vs. no cue)x2 (CR vs. ad lib) between-subjects design was employed to test these effects in 40 rats. It was predicted that cue exposure and CR would induce stress, and that these factors might interact synergistically. The results demonstrated that cue-exposed CR rats weighed less than did non-exposed CR rats. A blunted stress response was evident in CR rats relative to ad lib rats. Finally, cue-exposed rats had higher corticosterone levels and body weight during ad lib feeding than did non-cued rats. These results suggest that both CR and chronic food-cue exposure can be stressful, and the implications of this research are discussed in the context of humans' 'obesigenic' environment.

  9. A Multi-stage Carcinogenesis Model to Investigate Caloric Restriction as a Potential Tool for Post-irradiation Mitigation of Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Shusuke; Blyth, Benjamin John; Shang, Yi; Morioka, Takamitsu; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    The risk of radiation-induced cancer adds to anxiety in low-dose exposed populations. Safe and effective lifestyle changes which can help mitigate excess cancer risk might provide exposed individuals the opportunity to pro-actively reduce their cancer risk, and improve mental health and well-being. Here, we applied a mathematical multi-stage carcinogenesis model to the mouse lifespan data using adult-onset caloric restriction following irradiation in early life. We re-evaluated autopsy records with a veterinary pathologist to determine which tumors were the probable causes of death in order to calculate age-specific mortality. The model revealed that in both irradiated and unirradiated mice, caloric restriction reduced the age-specific mortality of all solid tumors and hepatocellular carcinomas across most of the lifespan, with the mortality rate dependent more on age owing to an increase in the number of predicted rate-limiting steps. Conversely, irradiation did not significantly alter the number of steps, but did increase the overall transition rate between the steps. We show that the extent of the protective effect of caloric restriction is independent of the induction of cancer from radiation exposure, and discuss future avenues of research to explore the utility of caloric restriction as an example of a potential post-irradiation mitigation strategy. PMID:27390741

  10. Effects of aerobic versus resistance exercise without caloric restriction on abdominal fat, intrahepatic lipid, and insulin sensitivity in obese adolescent boys: a randomized, controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The optimal exercise modality for reductions of abdominal obesity and risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth is unknown. We examined the effects of aerobic exercise (AE) versus resistance exercise (RE) without caloric restriction on abdominal adiposity, ectopic fat, and insulin sensitivity and se...

  11. Caloric Restriction reduces inflammation and improves T cell-mediated immune response in obese mice but concomitant consumption of curcumin/piperine adds no further benefit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and impaired immune response. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory response and enhance cell-mediated immune function. Curcumin, the bioactive phenolic component of turmeric spice, is proposed to have anti-obesity and anti-...

  12. Early Shifts of Brain Metabolism by Caloric Restriction Preserve White Matter Integrity and Long-Term Memory in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Janet; Bakshi, Vikas; Lin, Ai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of brain integrity with age is highly associated with lifespan determination. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase longevity and healthspan in various species; however, its effects on preserving living brain functions in aging remain largely unexplored. In the study, we used multimodal, non-invasive neuroimaging (PET/MRI/MRS) to determine in vivo brain glucose metabolism, energy metabolites, and white matter structural integrity in young and old mice fed with either control or 40% CR diet. In addition, we determined the animals' memory and learning ability with behavioral assessments. Blood glucose, blood ketone bodies, and body weight were also measured. We found distinct patterns between normal aging and CR aging on brain functions - normal aging showed reductions in brain glucose metabolism, white matter integrity, and long-term memory, resembling human brain aging. CR aging, in contrast, displayed an early shift from glucose to ketone bodies metabolism, which was associated with preservations of brain energy production, white matter integrity, and long-term memory in aging mice. Among all the mice, we found a positive correlation between blood glucose level and body weight, but an inverse association between blood glucose level and lifespan. Our findings suggest that CR could slow down brain aging, in part due to the early shift of energy metabolism caused by lower caloric intake, and we were able to identify the age-dependent effects of CR non-invasively using neuroimaging. These results provide a rationale for CR-induced sustenance of brain health with extended longevity.

  13. Early Shifts of Brain Metabolism by Caloric Restriction Preserve White Matter Integrity and Long-Term Memory in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Janet; Bakshi, Vikas; Lin, Ai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of brain integrity with age is highly associated with lifespan determination. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase longevity and healthspan in various species; however, its effects on preserving living brain functions in aging remain largely unexplored. In the study, we used multimodal, non-invasive neuroimaging (PET/MRI/MRS) to determine in vivo brain glucose metabolism, energy metabolites, and white matter structural integrity in young and old mice fed with either control or 40% CR diet. In addition, we determined the animals’ memory and learning ability with behavioral assessments. Blood glucose, blood ketone bodies, and body weight were also measured. We found distinct patterns between normal aging and CR aging on brain functions – normal aging showed reductions in brain glucose metabolism, white matter integrity, and long-term memory, resembling human brain aging. CR aging, in contrast, displayed an early shift from glucose to ketone bodies metabolism, which was associated with preservations of brain energy production, white matter integrity, and long-term memory in aging mice. Among all the mice, we found a positive correlation between blood glucose level and body weight, but an inverse association between blood glucose level and lifespan. Our findings suggest that CR could slow down brain aging, in part due to the early shift of energy metabolism caused by lower caloric intake, and we were able to identify the age-dependent effects of CR non-invasively using neuroimaging. These results provide a rationale for CR-induced sustenance of brain health with extended longevity. PMID:26617514

  14. The effect of caloric restriction interventions on growth hormone secretion in non-obese men and women

    PubMed Central

    Redman, Leanne M.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Rood, Jennifer; Smith, Steven R.; Williamson, Donald; Ravussin, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Summary Lifespan in rodents is prolonged by caloric restriction (CR) and by mutations affecting the somatotropic axis. It is not known if CR can alter the age-associated decline in GH, IGF-1 and GH secretion. Aim To evaluate the effect of caloric restriction on GH secretory dynamics. Methods Forty-three young (36.8±1.0y), overweight (BMI 27.8±0.7) men (n=20) and women (n=23) were randomized into four groups; Control=100% of energy requirements; CR=25% calorie restriction; CR+EX=12.5% CR+12.5% increase in energy expenditure by structured exercise; LCD=low calorie diet until 15% weight reduction followed by weight maintenance. At baseline and after six months, body composition (DXA), abdominal visceral fat (CT) 11-h GH secretion (blood sampling every 10 min for 11 hours; 2100h-0800h) and deconvolution analysis were measured. Results After six months, weight (Control:−1±1%, CR:−10±1%, CR+EX:−10±1%, LCD:−14±1%), fat mass (Control:−2±3%, CR:−24±3%, CR+EX:−25±3%, LCD:−31±2%), and visceral fat (Control: −2±4%, CR:−28±4%, CR+EX:−27±3%, LCD:−36±2%) were significantly (p<.001) reduced in the three intervention groups compared to control. Mean 11-h GH concentrations were not changed in CR or control but increased in CR+EX (p<.0001) and LCD (p<.0001) because of increased secretory burst mass (CR+EX: 34±13%, LCD: 27±22%, p<0.05) and amplitude (CR+EX: 34±14%, LCD: 30±20%, p<0.05) but not to changes in secretory burst frequency or GH half-life. Fasting ghrelin was significantly increased from baseline in all three intervention groups however total IGF-1 concentrations were increased only in CR+EX (10±7%, p<0.05) and LCD (19±4%, p<0.001). Conclusion A 25% CR diet for 6 months does not change GH, GH secretion or IGF-1 in non-obese men and women. PMID:19878147

  15. Different effects on bone strength and cell differentiation in pre pubertal caloric restriction versus hypothalamic suppression.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R N; Safadi, F F; Barbe, M F; Del Carpio-Cano, Fe; Popoff, S N; Yingling, V R

    2011-10-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea and energy restriction during puberty affect peak bone mass accrual. One hypothesis suggests energy restriction alters hypothalamic function resulting in suppressed estradiol levels leading to bone loss. However, both positive and negative results have been reported regarding energy restriction and bone strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate energy restriction and hypothalamic suppression during pubertal onset on bone mechanical strength and the osteogenic capacity of bone marrow-derived cells in two models: female rats treated with gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonists (GnRH-a) or 30% energy restriction. At 23 days of age, female Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to three groups: control group (C, n=10), GnRH-a group (n=10), and Energy Restriction (ER, n=12) group. GnRH-a animals received daily injections for 27 days. The animals in the ER group received 70% of the control animals' intake. After sacrifice (50 days of age), body weight, uterine and muscle weights were measured. Bone marrow-derived stromal cells were cultured and assayed for proliferation and differentiation into osteoblasts. Outcome measures included bone strength, bone histomorphometry and architecture, serum IGF-1 and osteocalcin. GnRH-a suppressed uterine weight, decreased osteoblast proliferation, bone strength, trabecular bone volume and architecture compared to control. Elevated serum IGF-1 and osteocalcin levels and body weight were found. The ER model had an increase in osteoblast proliferation compared to the GnRH-a group, similar bone strength relative to body weight and increased trabecular bone volume in the lumbar spine compared to control. The ER animals were smaller but had developed bone strength sufficient for their size. In contrast, suppressed estradiol via hypothalamic suppression resulted in bone strength deficits and trabecular bone volume loss. In summary, our results support the hypothesis that during periods of

  16. Impact of caloric restriction on myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury and new therapeutic options to mimic its effects

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbach, Susanne; Aslam, Muhammad; Niemann, Bernd; Schulz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is the most reliable intervention to extend lifespan and prevent age-related disorders in various species from yeast to rodents. Short- and long-term CR confers cardio protection against ischaemia/reperfusion injury in young and even in aged rodents. A few human trials suggest that CR has the potential to mediate improvement of cardiac or vascular function and induce retardation of cardiac senescence also in humans. The underlying mechanisms are diverse and have not yet been clearly defined. Among the known mediators for the benefits of CR are NO, the AMP-activated PK, sirtuins and adiponectin. Mitochondria, which play a central role in such complex processes within the cell as apoptosis, ATP-production or oxidative stress, are centrally involved in many aspects of CR-induced protection against ischaemic injury. Here, we discuss the relevant literature regarding the protection against myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury conferred by CR. Furthermore, we will discuss drug targets to mimic CR and the possible role of calorie restriction in preserving cardiovascular function in humans. PMID:24611611

  17. Glycemic effects of intensive caloric restriction and isocaloric refeeding in noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Henry, R R; Scheaffer, L; Olefsky, J M

    1985-11-01

    To assess the effects of very low caloric (VLC) diets on glucose homeostasis in noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, 30 obese subjects with NIDDM were studied for 40 days while eating a 330 Cal/day diet, with a subgroup of 12 subjects further evaluated during 40 days of refeeding. All subjects successfully lost weight, with an average weight loss of 4.6 +/- 0.2 kg (+/- SEM) after 10 days, 7.1 +/- 0.3 kg after 20 days, and 10.5 +/- 0.4 kg after 40 days of VLC diet therapy. Thus, weight loss was steady and progressive throughout the diet period. In contrast, the majority (87%) of the reduction in mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels (297 +/- 13 to 158 +/- 10 mg/dl; P less than 0.001) occurred after 10 days of VLC diet therapy, with a further reduction in glucose levels to 138 +/- 9 mg/dl on day 40. The FPG response measured after 10 days of VLC diet was unrelated to the degree of obesity, rate or extent of weight loss, or prevailing insulin levels, but did correlate significantly with the initial FPG level (r = 0.37; P less than 0.05) and duration of diabetes (r = 0.42; P less than 0.05). After discontinuation of the VLC diet and refeeding of an isocaloric (weight maintenance) diet in 12 subjects, a variable increase in the FPG occurred, with an average increase of 80% after 40 days of refeeding. However, the mean FPG level after 40 days of refeeding was still markedly lower than that before VLC diet therapy (254 +/- 20 vs. 167 +/- 14 mg/dl; P less than 0.02) despite withdrawal of antidiabetic medication in all subjects. The basal hepatic glucose output (HGO) fell rapidly from 149 +/- 13 to 81 +/- 5 mg/M2 X min (P less than 0.001) after 10 days of VLC diet and rose from 67 +/- 4 to 88 +/- 7 mg/M2 X min (P less than 0.001) after 10 days of refeeding. Basal HGO demonstrated a highly significant positive correlation with FPG levels (r = 0.89; P less than 0.001) before and during both VLC diet therapy and refeeding. A significant correlation was also found between

  18. Combined effect of gender and caloric restriction on liver proteomic expression profile.

    PubMed

    Valle, Adamo; Silvestri, Elena; Moreno, Maria; Chambery, Angela; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar; Goglia, Fernando

    2008-07-01

    We analyzed the combined effect of gender and CR on protein expression profile in liver. We identified 27 differentially expressed proteins involved in several cellular functions such as substrate metabolism, antioxidant systems, stress response, iron homeostasis and cardiovascular protection. This study reveals new cellular pathways liable to be similarly regulated in females and calorie restricted rats and which could be related with the greater longevity in these animals.

  19. Cardiac Sirt1 mediates the cardioprotective effect of caloric restriction by suppressing local complement system activation after ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsunehisa; Tamaki, Kayoko; Shirakawa, Kohsuke; Ito, Kentaro; Yan, Xiaoxiang; Katsumata, Yoshinori; Anzai, Atsushi; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Endo, Jin; Inaba, Takaaki; Tsubota, Kazuo; Sano, Motoaki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Shinmura, Ken

    2016-04-15

    Caloric restriction (CR) confers cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. We previously found the essential roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the development of CR-induced cardioprotection and Sirt1 activation during CR (Shinmura K, Tamaki K, Ito K, Yan X, Yamamoto T, Katsumata Y, Matsuhashi T, Sano M, Fukuda K, Suematsu M, Ishii I. Indispensable role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in caloric restriction-induced cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injury.Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 308: H894-H903, 2015). However, the exact mechanism by which Sirt1 in cardiomyocytes mediates the cardioprotective effect of CR remains undetermined. We subjected cardiomyocyte-specific Sirt1 knockout (CM-Sirt1(-/-)) mice and the corresponding control mice to either 3-mo ad libitum feeding or CR (-40%). Isolated perfused hearts were subjected to 25-min global ischemia, followed by 60-min reperfusion. The recovery of left ventricle function after I/R was improved, and total lactate dehydrogenase release into the perfusate during reperfusion was attenuated in the control mice treated with CR, but a similar cardioprotective effect of CR was not observed in the CM-Sirt1(-/-)mice. The expression levels of cardiac complement component 3 (C3) at baseline and the accumulation of C3 and its fragments in the ischemia-reperfused myocardium were attenuated by CR in the control mice, but not in the CM-Sirt1(-/-)mice. Resveratrol treatment also attenuated the expression levels of C3 protein in cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Moreover, the degree of myocardial I/R injury in conventional C3 knockout (C3(-/-)) mice treated with CR was similar to that in the ad libitum-fed C3(-/-)mice, although the expression levels of Sirt1 were enhanced by CR. These results demonstrate that cardiac Sirt1 plays an essential role in CR-induced cardioprotection against I/R injury by suppressing cardiac C3 expression. This is the first report suggesting

  20. Caloric restriction increases internal iliac artery and penil nitric oxide synthase expression in rat: comparison of aged and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Emin; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Ozbek, Mustafa; Somay, Adnan

    2013-09-26

    Because of the positive corelation between healthy cardiovascular system and sexual life we aimed to evaluate the effect of caloric restriction (CR) on endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, nNOS) expression in cavernousal tissues and eNOS expression in the internal iliac artery in young and aged rats. Young (3 mo, n = 7) and aged (24 mo, n = 7) male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 40% CR and were allowed free access to water for 3 months. Control rats (n = 14) fed ad libitum had free access to food and water at all times. On day 90, rats were sacrificed and internal iliac arteries and penis were removed and parafinized, eNOS and nNOS expression evaluated with immunohistochemistry. Results were evaluated semiquantitatively. eNOS and nNOS expression in cavernousal tis- sue in CR rats were more strong than in control group in both young and old rats. eNOS expression was also higher in the internal iliac arteries of CR rats than in control in young and old rats. As a result of our study we can say that there is a positive link between CR and neurotransmitter of erection in cavernousal tissues and internal iliac arteries. CR has beneficial effect to prevent sexual dysfunction in young and old animals and possible humans.

  1. Caloric Restriction Is More Efficient than Physical Exercise to Protect from Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity via PPAR-Alpha Activation.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Gabriel R; Wasinski, Frederick; Batista, Rogério O; Hiyane, Meire I; Felizardo, Raphael J F; Cunha, Flavia; de Almeida, Danilo C; Malheiros, Denise M A C; Câmara, Niels O S; Barros, Carlos C; Bader, Michael; Araujo, Ronaldo C

    2017-01-01

    The antineoplastic drug cisplatin promotes renal injury, which limits its use. Protocols that reduce renal cisplatin toxicity will allow higher doses to be used in cisplatin treatment. Here, we compare physical exercise and caloric restriction (CR) as protocols to reduce cisplatin renal injury in mice. Male C57BL/6 were divided into four groups: Control, cisplatin, exercise + cisplatin, and 30% CR + cisplatin. Animals were injected with a single dose of cisplatin (20 mg/kg i.p.) and sacrificed 96 h after injection. Quantitative real time PCR, histological analyses, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical measurements were performed to investigate renal injury, necrosis, apoptosis, and inflammatory mechanisms. Both protocols protected against cisplatin renal injury, but CR was more effective in reducing uraemia and renal necrosis. The CR + Cisplatin group exhibited reduced serum IL-1β and TNF-α levels. No differences were noted in the renal mRNA expression of cytokines. Both interventions reduced apoptosis, but only the CR + Cisplatin group decreased TNFR2 protein expression. PPAR-α was activated in mice after CR. An antagonist of PPAR-α blocked the protective effect of CR. Both interventions attenuated the nephrotoxicity caused by cisplatin injection, but CR + Cisplatin showed a better response by modulating TNFR2. Moreover, part of the CR benefit depends on PPAR-α activation.

  2. Caloric Restriction Is More Efficient than Physical Exercise to Protect from Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity via PPAR-Alpha Activation

    PubMed Central

    Estrela, Gabriel R.; Wasinski, Frederick; Batista, Rogério O.; Hiyane, Meire I.; Felizardo, Raphael J. F.; Cunha, Flavia; de Almeida, Danilo C.; Malheiros, Denise M. A. C.; Câmara, Niels O. S.; Barros, Carlos C.; Bader, Michael; Araujo, Ronaldo C.

    2017-01-01

    The antineoplastic drug cisplatin promotes renal injury, which limits its use. Protocols that reduce renal cisplatin toxicity will allow higher doses to be used in cisplatin treatment. Here, we compare physical exercise and caloric restriction (CR) as protocols to reduce cisplatin renal injury in mice. Male C57BL/6 were divided into four groups: Control, cisplatin, exercise + cisplatin, and 30% CR + cisplatin. Animals were injected with a single dose of cisplatin (20 mg/kg i.p.) and sacrificed 96 h after injection. Quantitative real time PCR, histological analyses, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical measurements were performed to investigate renal injury, necrosis, apoptosis, and inflammatory mechanisms. Both protocols protected against cisplatin renal injury, but CR was more effective in reducing uraemia and renal necrosis. The CR + Cisplatin group exhibited reduced serum IL-1β and TNF-α levels. No differences were noted in the renal mRNA expression of cytokines. Both interventions reduced apoptosis, but only the CR + Cisplatin group decreased TNFR2 protein expression. PPAR-α was activated in mice after CR. An antagonist of PPAR-α blocked the protective effect of CR. Both interventions attenuated the nephrotoxicity caused by cisplatin injection, but CR + Cisplatin showed a better response by modulating TNFR2. Moreover, part of the CR benefit depends on PPAR-α activation. PMID:28303105

  3. Gastric bypass surgery, but not caloric restriction, decreases dipeptidyl peptidase-4 activity in obese patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alam, M. L.; Van der Schueren, B. J.; Ahren, B.; Wang, G. C.; Swerdlow, N. J.; Arias, S.; Bose, M.; Gorroochurn, P.; Teixeira, J.; McGinty, J.; Laferrère, B.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which incretins and their effect on insulin secretion increase markedly following gastric bypass (GBP) surgery is not fully elucidated. We hypothesized that a decrease in the activity of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), the enzyme which inactivates incretins, may explain the rise in incretin levels post-GBP. Fasting plasma DPP-4 activity was measured after 10-kg equivalent weight loss by GBP (n = 16) or by caloric restriction (CR, n = 14) in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. DPP-4 activity decreased after GBP by 11.6% (p = 0.01), but not after CR. The increased peak glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) response to oral glucose after GBP did not correlate with DPP-4 activity. The decrease in fasting plasma DPP-4 activity after GBP occurred by a mechanism independent of weight loss and did not relate to change in incretin concentrations. Whether the change in DPP-4 activity contributes to improved diabetes control after GBP remains therefore to be determined. PMID:21210936

  4. Effect of long-term caloric restriction on oxygen consumption and body temperature in two different strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Melissa; Sohal, Barbara H; Forster, Michael J; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2007-10-01

    The hypothesis, that a decrease in metabolic rate mediates the life span prolonging effect of caloric restriction (CR), was tested using two strains of mice, one of which, C57BL/6, exhibits life span extension as a result of CR, while the other, DBA/2, shows little or no effect. Comparisons of the rate of resting oxygen consumption and body temperature were made between the strains after they were fed ad libitum (AL) or maintained under 40% CR, from 4 to 16 months of age. Ad libitum-fed mice of the two strains weighed the same when young and consumed similar amounts of food throughout the experiment; however, the C57BL/6 mice weighed 25% more than DBA/2 mice at 15 months of age. The rate of oxygen consumption was normalized as per gram body weight, lean body mass or organ weight as well as per animal. The body temperature and the rate of oxygen consumption, expressed according to all of the four criteria, were decreased in the DBA/2 mice following CR. The C57BL/6 mice also showed a CR-related decrease in body temperature and in the rate of oxygen consumption per animal and when normalized according to lean body mass or organ weight. The results of this study indicate that CR indeed lowers the rate of metabolism; however, this effect by CR does not necessarily entail the prolongation of the life span of mice.

  5. Caloric restriction of db/db mice reverts hepatic steatosis and body weight with divergent hepatic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Jung, Youngae; Min, Soonki; Nam, Miso; Heo, Rok Won; Jeon, Byeong Tak; Song, Dae Hyun; Yi, Chin-ok; Jeong, Eun Ae; Kim, Hwajin; Kim, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Seon-Yong; Kwak, Woori; Ryu, Do Hyun; Horvath, Tamas L.; Roh, Gu Seob; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most frequent causes of liver disease and its prevalence is a serious and growing clinical problem. Caloric restriction (CR) is commonly recommended for improvement of obesity-related diseases such as NAFLD. However, the effects of CR on hepatic metabolism remain unknown. We investigated the effects of CR on metabolic dysfunction in the liver of obese diabetic db/db mice. We found that CR of db/db mice reverted insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, body weight and adiposity to those of db/m mice. 1H-NMR- and UPLC-QTOF-MS-based metabolite profiling data showed significant metabolic alterations related to lipogenesis, ketogenesis, and inflammation in db/db mice. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that lipogenesis pathway enzymes in the liver of db/db mice were reduced by CR. In addition, CR reversed ketogenesis pathway enzymes and the enhanced autophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, collagen deposition and endoplasmic reticulum stress in db/db mice. In particular, hepatic inflammation-related proteins including lipocalin-2 in db/db mice were attenuated by CR. Hepatic metabolomic studies yielded multiple pathological mechanisms of NAFLD. Also, these findings showed that CR has a therapeutic effect by attenuating the deleterious effects of obesity and diabetes-induced multiple complications. PMID:27439777

  6. A dietary regimen of caloric restriction or pharmacological activation of SIRT1 to delay the onset of neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gräff, Johannes; Kahn, Martin; Samiei, Alireza; Gao, Jun; Ota, Kristie T.; Rei, Damien; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2013-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is a dietary regimen known to promote lifespan by slowing down the occurrence of age-dependent diseases. The greatest risk factor for neurodegeneration in the brain is age, from which follows that CR might also attenuate the progressive loss of neurons that is often associated with impaired cognitive capacities. In this study, we used a transgenic mouse model that allows for a temporally and spatially controlled onset of neurodegeneration to test the potentially beneficial effects of CR. We found that in this model, CR significantly delayed the onset of neurodegeneration, synaptic loss and dysfunction, and thereby preserved cognitive capacities. Mechanistically, CR induced the expression of the known lifespan-regulating protein SIRT1, prompting us to test whether a pharmacological activation of SIRT1 might recapitulate CR. We found that oral administration of a SIRT1-activating compound essentially replicated the beneficial effects of CR. Thus, SIRT1-activating compounds might provide a pharmacological alternative to the regimen of CR against neurodegeneration and its associated ailments. PMID:23699506

  7. Expansion of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue During Caloric Restriction Is Associated With Increased Circulating Glucocorticoids and Not With Hypoleptinemia.

    PubMed

    Cawthorn, William P; Scheller, Erica L; Parlee, Sebastian D; Pham, H An; Learman, Brian S; Redshaw, Catherine M H; Sulston, Richard J; Burr, Aaron A; Das, Arun K; Simon, Becky R; Mori, Hiroyuki; Bree, Adam J; Schell, Benjamin; Krishnan, Venkatesh; MacDougald, Ormond A

    2016-02-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (MAT) accounts for up to 70% of bone marrow volume in healthy adults and increases further in clinical conditions of altered skeletal or metabolic function. Perhaps most strikingly, and in stark contrast to white adipose tissue, MAT has been found to increase during caloric restriction (CR) in humans and many other species. Hypoleptinemia may drive MAT expansion during CR but this has not been demonstrated conclusively. Indeed, MAT formation and function are poorly understood; hence, the physiological and pathological roles of MAT remain elusive. We recently revealed that MAT contributes to hyperadiponectinemia and systemic adaptations to CR. To further these observations, we have now performed CR studies in rabbits to determine whether CR affects adiponectin production by MAT. Moderate or extensive CR decreased bone mass, white adipose tissue mass, and circulating leptin but, surprisingly, did not cause hyperadiponectinemia or MAT expansion. Although this unexpected finding limited our subsequent MAT characterization, it demonstrates that during CR, bone loss can occur independently of MAT expansion; increased MAT may be required for hyperadiponectinemia; and hypoleptinemia is not sufficient for MAT expansion. We further investigated this relationship in mice. In females, CR increased MAT without decreasing circulating leptin, suggesting that hypoleptinemia is also not necessary for MAT expansion. Finally, circulating glucocorticoids increased during CR in mice but not rabbits, suggesting that glucocorticoids might drive MAT expansion during CR. These observations provide insights into the causes and consequences of CR-associated MAT expansion, knowledge with potential relevance to health and disease.

  8. Time-restricted feeding without reducing caloric intake prevents metabolic diseases in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Megumi; Vollmers, Christopher; Zarrinpar, Amir; DiTacchio, Luciano; Bushong, Eric A; Gill, Shubhroz; Leblanc, Mathias; Chaix, Amandine; Joens, Matthew; Fitzpatrick, James A J; Ellisman, Mark H; Panda, Satchidananda

    2012-06-06

    While diet-induced obesity has been exclusively attributed to increased caloric intake from fat, animals fed a high-fat diet (HFD) ad libitum (ad lib) eat frequently throughout day and night, disrupting the normal feeding cycle. To test whether obesity and metabolic diseases result from HFD or disruption of metabolic cycles, we subjected mice to either ad lib or time-restricted feeding (tRF) of a HFD for 8 hr per day. Mice under tRF consume equivalent calories from HFD as those with ad lib access yet are protected against obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis, and inflammation and have improved motor coordination. The tRF regimen improved CREB, mTOR, and AMPK pathway function and oscillations of the circadian clock and their target genes' expression. These changes in catabolic and anabolic pathways altered liver metabolome and improved nutrient utilization and energy expenditure. We demonstrate in mice that tRF regimen is a nonpharmacological strategy against obesity and associated diseases.

  9. Circulating factors induced by caloric restriction in the nonhuman primate Macaca mulatta activate angiogenic processes in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Csiszar, Anna; Sosnowska, Danuta; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Gautam, Tripti; Toth, Peter; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Colman, Ricki J; Weindruch, Richard; Anderson, Rozalyn M; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2013-03-01

    Moderate caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition increases healthspan in virtually every species studied, including nonhuman primates. In mice, CR exerts significant microvascular protective effects resulting in increased microvascular density in the heart and the brain, which likely contribute to enhanced tolerance to ischemia and improved cardiac performance and cognitive function. Yet, the underlying mechanisms by which CR confer microvascular protection remain elusive. To test the hypothesis that circulating factors triggered by CR regulate endothelial angiogenic capacity, we treated cultured human endothelial cells with sera derived from Macaca mulatta on long-term (over 10 years) CR. Cells treated with sera derived from ad-libitum-fed control monkeys served as controls. We found that factors present in CR sera upregulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling and stimulate angiogenic processes, including endothelial cell proliferation and formation of capillary-like structures. Treatment with CR sera also tended to increase cellular migration (measured by a wound-healing assay using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing [ECIS] technology) and adhesion to collagen. Collectively, we find that circulating factors induced by CR promote endothelial angiogenic processes, suggesting that increased angiogenesis may be a potential mechanism by which CR improves cardiac function and prevents vascular cognitive impairment.

  10. Expansion of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue During Caloric Restriction Is Associated With Increased Circulating Glucocorticoids and Not With Hypoleptinemia

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, Erica L.; Parlee, Sebastian D.; Pham, H. An; Learman, Brian S.; Redshaw, Catherine M. H.; Sulston, Richard J.; Burr, Aaron A.; Das, Arun K.; Simon, Becky R.; Mori, Hiroyuki; Bree, Adam J.; Schell, Benjamin; Krishnan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (MAT) accounts for up to 70% of bone marrow volume in healthy adults and increases further in clinical conditions of altered skeletal or metabolic function. Perhaps most strikingly, and in stark contrast to white adipose tissue, MAT has been found to increase during caloric restriction (CR) in humans and many other species. Hypoleptinemia may drive MAT expansion during CR but this has not been demonstrated conclusively. Indeed, MAT formation and function are poorly understood; hence, the physiological and pathological roles of MAT remain elusive. We recently revealed that MAT contributes to hyperadiponectinemia and systemic adaptations to CR. To further these observations, we have now performed CR studies in rabbits to determine whether CR affects adiponectin production by MAT. Moderate or extensive CR decreased bone mass, white adipose tissue mass, and circulating leptin but, surprisingly, did not cause hyperadiponectinemia or MAT expansion. Although this unexpected finding limited our subsequent MAT characterization, it demonstrates that during CR, bone loss can occur independently of MAT expansion; increased MAT may be required for hyperadiponectinemia; and hypoleptinemia is not sufficient for MAT expansion. We further investigated this relationship in mice. In females, CR increased MAT without decreasing circulating leptin, suggesting that hypoleptinemia is also not necessary for MAT expansion. Finally, circulating glucocorticoids increased during CR in mice but not rabbits, suggesting that glucocorticoids might drive MAT expansion during CR. These observations provide insights into the causes and consequences of CR-associated MAT expansion, knowledge with potential relevance to health and disease. PMID:26696121

  11. Caloric restriction increases neurotrophic factor levels and attenuates neurochemical and behavioral deficits in a primate model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Maswood, Navin; Young, Jennifer; Tilmont, Edward; Zhang, Zhiming; Gash, Don M; Gerhardt, Greg A; Grondin, Richard; Roth, George S; Mattison, Julie; Lane, Mark A; Carson, Richard E; Cohen, Robert M; Mouton, Peter R; Quigley, Christopher; Mattson, Mark P; Ingram, Donald K

    2004-12-28

    We report that a low-calorie diet can lessen the severity of neurochemical deficits and motor dysfunction in a primate model of Parkinson's disease. Adult male rhesus monkeys were maintained for 6 months on a reduced-calorie diet [30% caloric restriction (CR)] or an ad libitum control diet after which they were subjected to treatment with a neurotoxin to produce a hemiparkinson condition. After neurotoxin treatment, CR monkeys exhibited significantly higher levels of locomotor activity compared with control monkeys as well as higher levels of dopamine (DA) and DA metabolites in the striatal region. Increased survival of DA neurons in the substantia nigra and improved manual dexterity were noted but did not reach statistical significance. Levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, which is known to promote the survival of DA neurons, were increased significantly in the caudate nucleus of CR monkeys, suggesting a role for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in the anti-Parkinson's disease effect of the low-calorie diet.

  12. Reducing Liver Fat by Low Carbohydrate Caloric Restriction Targets Hepatic Glucose Production in Non-Diabetic Obese Adults with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haoyong; Jia, Weiping; Guo, ZengKui

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) impairs liver functions, the organ responsible for the regulation of endogenous glucose production and thus plays a key role in glycemic homeostasis. Therefore, interventions designed to normalize liver fat content are needed to improve glucose metabolism in patients affected by NAFLD such as obesity. Objective: this investigation is designed to determine the effects of caloric restriction on hepatic and peripheral glucose metabolism in obese humans with NAFLD. Methods: eight non-diabetic obese adults were restricted for daily energy intake (800 kcal) and low carbohydrate (<10%) for 8 weeks. Body compositions, liver fat and hepatic glucose production (HGP) and peripheral glucose disposal before and after the intervention were determined. Results: the caloric restriction reduced liver fat content by 2/3 (p = 0.004). Abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat, body weight, BMI, waist circumference and fasting plasma triglyceride and free fatty acid concentrations all significantly decreased (p < 0.05). The suppression of post-load HGP was improved by 22% (p = 0.002) whereas glucose disposal was not affected (p = 0.3). Fasting glucose remained unchanged and the changes in the 2-hour plasma glucose and insulin concentration were modest and statistically insignificant (p > 0.05). Liver fat is the only independent variable highly correlated to HGP after the removal of confounders. Conclusion: NAFLD impairs HGP but not peripheral glucose disposal; low carbohydrate caloric restriction effectively lowers liver fat which appears to directly correct the HGP impairment. PMID:25411646

  13. Endocrine responses to acute and chronic high-altitude exposure (4,300 meters): modulating effects of caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Barnholt, Kimberly E; Hoffman, Andrew R; Rock, Paul B; Muza, Stephen R; Fulco, Charles S; Braun, Barry; Holloway, Leah; Mazzeo, Robert S; Cymerman, Allen; Friedlander, Anne L

    2006-06-01

    High-altitude anorexia leads to a hormonal response pattern modulated by both hypoxia and caloric restriction (CR). The purpose of this study was to compare altitude-induced neuroendocrine changes with or without energy imbalance and to explore how energy sufficiency alters the endocrine acclimatization process. Twenty-six normal-weight, young men were studied for 3 wk. One group [hypocaloric group (HYPO), n = 9] stayed at sea level and consumed 40% fewer calories than required to maintain body weight. Two other groups were deployed to 4,300 meters (Pikes Peak, CO), where one group (ADQ, n = 7) was adequately fed to maintain body weight and the other [deficient group (DEF), n = 10] had calories restricted as above. HYPO experienced a typical CR-induced reduction in many hormones such as insulin, testosterone, and leptin. At altitude, fasting glucose, insulin, and epinephrine exhibited a muted rise in DEF compared with ADQ. Free thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and norepinephrine showed similar patterns between the two altitude groups. Morning cortisol initially rose higher in DEF than ADQ at 4,300 meters, but the difference disappeared by day 5. Testosterone increased in both altitude groups acutely but declined over time in DEF only. Adiponectin and leptin did not change significantly from sea level baseline values in either altitude group regardless of energy intake. These data suggest that hypoxia tends to increase blood hormone concentrations, but anorexia suppresses elements of the endocrine response. Such suppression results in the preservation of energy stores but may sacrifice the facilitation of oxygen delivery and the use of oxygen-efficient fuels.

  14. Combining metformin therapy with caloric restriction for the management of type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Melissa A.; Lopez, Kristi T.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Morris, E. Matthew; Meers, Grace M.; Siddique, Sameer; Laughlin, M. Harold; Sowers, James R.; Thyfault, John P.; Ibdah, Jamal A.; Rector, R. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Weight loss is recommended for patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), while metformin may lower liver enzymes in type 2 diabetics. Yet, the efficacy of the combination of weight loss and metformin in the treatment of NAFLD is unclear. We assessed the effects of metformin, caloric restriction, and their combination on NAFLD in diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Male OLETF rats (age 20 weeks; n = 6–8 per group) were fed ad libitum (AL), given metformin (300 mg·kg−1·day−1; Met), calorically restricted (70% of AL; CR), or calorically restricted and given metformin (CR+Met) for 12 weeks. Met lowered adiposity compared with AL but not to the same magnitude as CR or CR+Met (p < 0.05). Although only CR improved fasting insulin and glucose, the combination of CR+Met was needed to improve post-challenge glucose tolerance. All treatments lowered hepatic triglycerides, but further improvements were observed in the CR groups (p < 0.05, Met vs. CR or CR+Met) and a further reduction in serum alanine aminotransferases was observed in CR+Met rats. CR lowered markers of hepatic de novo lipogenesis (fatty acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1)) and increased hepatic mitochondrial activity (palmitate oxidation and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD) activity). Changes were enhanced in the CR+Met group for ACC, SCD-1, β-HAD, and the mitophagy marker BNIP3. Met decreased total hepatic mTOR content and inhibited mTOR complex 1, which may have contributed to Met-induced reductions in de novo lipogenesis. These findings in the OLETF rat suggest that the combination of caloric restriction and metformin may provide a more optimal approach than either treatment alone in the management of type 2 diabetes and NAFLD. PMID:26394261

  15. Combining metformin therapy with caloric restriction for the management of type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Linden, Melissa A; Lopez, Kristi T; Fletcher, Justin A; Morris, E Matthew; Meers, Grace M; Siddique, Sameer; Laughlin, M Harold; Sowers, James R; Thyfault, John P; Ibdah, Jamal A; Rector, R Scott

    2015-10-01

    Weight loss is recommended for patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), while metformin may lower liver enzymes in type 2 diabetics. Yet, the efficacy of the combination of weight loss and metformin in the treatment of NAFLD is unclear. We assessed the effects of metformin, caloric restriction, and their combination on NAFLD in diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Male OLETF rats (age 20 weeks; n = 6-8 per group) were fed ad libitum (AL), given metformin (300 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1); Met), calorically restricted (70% of AL; CR), or calorically restricted and given metformin (CR+Met) for 12 weeks. Met lowered adiposity compared with AL but not to the same magnitude as CR or CR+Met (p < 0.05). Although only CR improved fasting insulin and glucose, the combination of CR+Met was needed to improve post-challenge glucose tolerance. All treatments lowered hepatic triglycerides, but further improvements were observed in the CR groups (p < 0.05, Met vs. CR or CR+Met) and a further reduction in serum alanine aminotransferases was observed in CR+Met rats. CR lowered markers of hepatic de novo lipogenesis (fatty acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1)) and increased hepatic mitochondrial activity (palmitate oxidation and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD) activity). Changes were enhanced in the CR+Met group for ACC, SCD-1, β-HAD, and the mitophagy marker BNIP3. Met decreased total hepatic mTOR content and inhibited mTOR complex 1, which may have contributed to Met-induced reductions in de novo lipogenesis. These findings in the OLETF rat suggest that the combination of caloric restriction and metformin may provide a more optimal approach than either treatment alone in the management of type 2 diabetes and NAFLD.

  16. Effects of the dietary approaches to stop hypertension diet alone and in combination with exercise and caloric restriction on insulin sensitivity and lipids.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, James A; Babyak, Michael A; Sherwood, Andrew; Craighead, Linda; Lin, Pao-Hwa; Johnson, Julie; Watkins, Lana L; Wang, Jenny T; Kuhn, Cynthia; Feinglos, Mark; Hinderliter, Alan

    2010-05-01

    This study examined the effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet on insulin sensitivity and lipids. In a randomized control trial, 144 overweight (body mass index: 25 to 40) men (n=47) and women (n=97) with high blood pressure (130 to 159/85 to 99 mm Hg) were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: (1) DASH diet alone; (2) DASH diet with aerobic exercise and caloric restriction; or (3) usual diet controls (UC). Body composition, fitness, insulin sensitivity, and fasting lipids were measured before and after 4 months of treatment. Insulin sensitivity was estimated on the basis of glucose and insulin levels in the fasting state and after an oral glucose load. Participants in the DASH diet with aerobic exercise and caloric restriction condition lost weight (-8.7 kg [95% CI: -2.0 to -9.7 kg]) and exhibited a significant increase in aerobic capacity, whereas the DASH diet alone and UC participants maintained their weight (-0.3 kg [95% CI: -1.2 to 0.5 kg] and +0.9 kg [95% CI: 0.0 to 1.7 kg], respectively) and had no improvement in exercise capacity. DASH diet with aerobic exercise and caloric restriction demonstrated lower glucose levels after the oral glucose load, improved insulin sensitivity, and lower total cholesterol and triglycerides compared with both DASH diet alone and UC, as well as lower fasting glucose and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with UC. DASH diet alone participants generally did not differ from UC in these measures. Combining the DASH diet with exercise and weight loss resulted in significant improvements in insulin sensitivity and lipids. Despite clinically significant reductions in blood pressure, the DASH diet alone, without caloric restriction or exercise, resulted in minimal improvements in insulin sensitivity or lipids.

  17. Vildagliptin and caloric restriction for cardioprotection in pre-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Tanajak, Pongpan; Pintana, Hiranya; Siri-Angkul, Natthaphat; Khamseekaew, Juthamas; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2017-02-01

    Long-term high-fat diet (HFD) consumption causes cardiac dysfunction. Although calorie restriction (CR) has been shown to be useful in obesity, we hypothesized that combined CR with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor provides greater efficacy than monotherapy in attenuating cardiac dysfunction and metabolic impairment in HFD-induced obese-insulin resistant rats. Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups to be fed on either a normal diet (ND, n = 6) or a HFD (n = 24) for 12 weeks. Then, HFD rats were divided into 4 subgroups (n = 6/subgroup) to receive just the vehicle, CR diet (60% of mean energy intake and changed to ND), vildagliptin (3 mg/kg/day) or combined CR and vildagliptin for 4 weeks. Metabolic parameters, heart rate variability (HRV), cardiac mitochondrial function, left ventricular (LV) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21 signaling pathway were determined. Rats on a HFD developed insulin and FGF21 resistance, oxidative stress, cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired LV function. Rats on CR alone showed both decreased body weight and visceral fat accumulation, whereas vildagliptin did not alter these parameters. Rats in CR, vildagliptin and CR plus vildagliptin subgroups had improved insulin sensitivity and oxidative stress. However, vildagliptin improved heart rate variability (HRV), cardiac mitochondrial function and LV function better than the CR. Chronic HFD consumption leads to obese-insulin resistance and FGF21 resistance. Although CR is effective in improving metabolic regulation, vildagliptin provides greater efficacy in preventing cardiac dysfunction by improving anti-apoptosis and FGF21 signaling pathways and attenuating cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction in obese-insulin-resistant rats.

  18. Long-Term Hyperphagia and Caloric Restriction Caused by Low- or High-Density Husbandry Have Differential Effects on Zebrafish Postembryonic Development, Somatic Growth, Fat Accumulation and Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Leibold, Sandra; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as an alternative vertebrate model for energy homeostasis and metabolic diseases, including obesity and anorexia. It has been shown that diet-induced obesity (DIO) in zebrafish shares multiple pathophysiological features with obesity in mammals. However, a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the different pathways of energy expenditure in obese and starved fish had been missing thus far. Here, we carry out long-term ad libitum feeding (hyperphagia) and caloric restriction studies induced by low- or high-density husbandry, respectively, to investigate the impact of caloric intake on the timing of scale formation, a crucial step of postembryonic development and metamorphosis, and on somatic growth, body weight, fat storage and female reproduction. We show that all of them are positively affected by increased caloric intake, that middle-aged fish develop severe DIO, and that the body mass index (BMI) displays a strict linear correlation with whole-body triglyceride levels in adult zebrafish. Interestingly, juvenile fish are largely resistant to DIO, while BMI and triglyceride values drop in aged fish, pointing to aging-associated anorexic effects. Histological analyses further indicate that increased fat storage in white adipose tissue involves both hyperplasia and hypertrophy of adipocytes. Furthermore, in ovaries, caloric intake primarily affects the rate of oocyte growth, rather than total oocyte numbers. Finally, comparing the different pathways of energy expenditure with each other, we demonstrate that they are differentially affected by caloric restriction / high-density husbandry. In juvenile fish, scale formation is prioritized over somatic growth, while in sexually mature adults, female reproduction is prioritized over somatic growth, and somatic growth over fat storage. Our data will serve as a template for future functional studies to dissect the neuroendocrine regulators of energy homeostasis

  19. Long-term hyperphagia and caloric restriction caused by low- or high-density husbandry have differential effects on zebrafish postembryonic development, somatic growth, fat accumulation and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Leibold, Sandra; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as an alternative vertebrate model for energy homeostasis and metabolic diseases, including obesity and anorexia. It has been shown that diet-induced obesity (DIO) in zebrafish shares multiple pathophysiological features with obesity in mammals. However, a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the different pathways of energy expenditure in obese and starved fish had been missing thus far. Here, we carry out long-term ad libitum feeding (hyperphagia) and caloric restriction studies induced by low- or high-density husbandry, respectively, to investigate the impact of caloric intake on the timing of scale formation, a crucial step of postembryonic development and metamorphosis, and on somatic growth, body weight, fat storage and female reproduction. We show that all of them are positively affected by increased caloric intake, that middle-aged fish develop severe DIO, and that the body mass index (BMI) displays a strict linear correlation with whole-body triglyceride levels in adult zebrafish. Interestingly, juvenile fish are largely resistant to DIO, while BMI and triglyceride values drop in aged fish, pointing to aging-associated anorexic effects. Histological analyses further indicate that increased fat storage in white adipose tissue involves both hyperplasia and hypertrophy of adipocytes. Furthermore, in ovaries, caloric intake primarily affects the rate of oocyte growth, rather than total oocyte numbers. Finally, comparing the different pathways of energy expenditure with each other, we demonstrate that they are differentially affected by caloric restriction / high-density husbandry. In juvenile fish, scale formation is prioritized over somatic growth, while in sexually mature adults, female reproduction is prioritized over somatic growth, and somatic growth over fat storage. Our data will serve as a template for future functional studies to dissect the neuroendocrine regulators of energy homeostasis

  20. The effects of exercise training and caloric restriction on the cardiac oxytocin natriuretic peptide system in the diabetic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Tom L; Jankowski, Marek; Gutkowska, Jolanta

    2017-01-01

    Background Regular exercise training (ET) and caloric restriction (CR) are the frontline strategies in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus with the aim at reducing cardiometabolic risk. ET and CR improve body weight and glycemic control, and experimental studies indicate that these paradigms afford cardioprotection. In this study, the effects of combined ET and CR on the cardioprotective oxytocin (OT)–natriuretic peptide (NP) system were determined in the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes associated with insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and obesity. Methods Five-week-old male db/db mice were assigned to the following groups: sedentary, ET, and ET + CR. Nonobese heterozygote littermates served as controls. ET was performed on a treadmill at moderate intensity, and CR was induced by reducing food intake by 30% of that consumed by sedentary db/db mice for a period of 8 weeks. Results After 8 weeks, only ET + CR, but not ET, slightly improved body weight compared to sedentary db/db mice. Regardless of the treatment, db/db mice remained hyperglycemic. Hearts from db/db mice demonstrated reduced expression of genes linked to the cardiac OT–NP system. In fact, compared to control mice, mRNA expression of GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4), OT receptor, OT, brain NP, NP receptor type C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was decreased in hearts from sedentary db/db mice. Both ET alone and ET + CR increased the mRNA expression of GATA4 compared to sedentary db/db mice. Only ET combined with CR produced increased eNOS mRNA and protein expression. Conclusion Our data indicate that enhancement of eNOS by combined ET and CR may improve coronary endothelial vasodilator dysfunction in type 2 diabetes but did not prevent the downregulation of cardiac expression in the OT–NP system, possibly resulting from the sustained hyperglycemia and obesity in diabetic mice. PMID:28138261

  1. Caloric restriction increases adiponectin expression by adipose tissue and prevents the inhibitory effect of insulin on circulating adiponectin in rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qi; Ash, Catherine; Mracek, Tomas; Merry, Brian; Bing, Chen

    2012-08-01

    Aging is associated with redistribution of body fat and the development of insulin resistance. White adipose tissue emerges as an important organ in controlling life span. Caloric restriction (CR) delays the rate of aging possibly modulated partly by altering the amount and function of adipose tissue. Adiponectin is a major adipose-derived adipokine that has anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing properties. This study examined the effects of CR on adiposity and gene expression of adiponectin, its receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) in adipose tissue and in isolated adipocytes of Brown Norway rats that had undergone CR for 4 months or fed ad libitum. The study also determined plasma concentrations of adiponectin and insulin in these animals and whether insulin infusion for 7 days affects adiponectin expression and its circulating concentrations under CR conditions. CR markedly reduced body weight as anticipated, epididymal fat mass and adipocyte size. CR led to an increase in plasma free fatty acid and glycerol (both twofold), and adipose triglyceride lipase messenger RNA (mRNA) in adipose tissue and isolated adipocytes (both >2-fold). Adiponectin mRNA levels were elevated in adipose tissue and adipocytes (both >2-fold) as was plasma adiponectin concentration (2.8-fold) in CR rats. However, CR did not alter tissue or cellular AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 expression. Seven days of insulin infusion decreased adiponectin mRNA in adipose tissue but did not reverse the CR-induced up-regulation of circulating adiponectin levels. Our results suggest that the benefits of CR could be, at least in part, dependent on enhanced expression and secretion of adiponectin by adipocytes.

  2. Effects of Intermittent Fasting, Caloric Restriction, and Ramadan Intermittent Fasting on Cognitive Performance at Rest and During Exercise in Adults.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Anissa; Roelands, Bart; Meeusen, Romain; Chamari, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to highlight the potent effects of intermittent fasting on the cognitive performance of athletes at rest and during exercise. Exercise interacts with dietary factors and has a positive effect on brain functioning. Furthermore, physical activity and exercise can favorably influence brain plasticity. Mounting evidence indicates that exercise, in combination with diet, affects the management of energy metabolism and synaptic plasticity by affecting molecular mechanisms through brain-derived neurotrophic factor, an essential neurotrophin that acts at the interface of metabolism and plasticity. The literature has also shown that certain aspects of physical performance and mental health, such as coping and decision-making strategies, can be negatively affected by daylight fasting. However, there are several types of intermittent fasting. These include caloric restriction, which is distinct from fasting and allows subjects to drink water ad libitum while consuming a very low-calorie food intake. Another type is Ramadan intermittent fasting, which is a religious practice of Islam, where healthy adult Muslims do not eat or drink during daylight hours for 1 month. Other religious practices in Islam (Sunna) also encourage Muslims to practice intermittent fasting outside the month of Ramadan. Several cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have shown that intermittent fasting has crucial effects on physical and intellectual performance by affecting various aspects of bodily physiology and biochemistry that could be important for athletic success. Moreover, recent findings revealed that immunological variables are also involved in cognitive functioning and that intermittent fasting might impact the relationship between cytokine expression in the brain and cognitive deficits, including memory deficits.

  3. Caloric restriction protects against electrical kindling of the amygdala by inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Farfán, Bryan V.; Rubio Osornio, María del Carmen; Custodio Ramírez, Verónica; Paz Tres, Carlos; Carvajal Aguilera, Karla G.

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to possess antiepileptic properties; however its mechanism of action is poorly understood. CR might inhibit the activity of the mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling cascade, which seems to participate crucially in the generation of epilepsy. Thus, we investigated the effect of CR on the mTOR pathway and whether CR modified epilepsy generation due to electrical amygdala kindling. The former was studied by analyzing the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B and the ribosomal protein S6. The mTOR cascade is regulated by energy and by insulin levels, both of which may be changed by CR; thus we investigated if CR altered the levels of energy substrates in the blood or the level of insulin in plasma. Finally, we studied if CR modified the expression of genes that encode proteins participating in the mTOR pathway. CR increased the after-discharge threshold and tended to reduce the after-discharge duration, indicating an anti-convulsive action. CR diminished the phosphorylation of protein kinase B and ribosomal protein S6, suggesting an inhibition of the mTOR cascade. However, CR did not change glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate or insulin levels; thus the effects of CR were independent from them. Interestingly, CR also did not modify the expression of any investigated gene. The results suggest that the anti-epileptic effect of CR may be partly due to inhibition of the mTOR pathway. PMID:25814935

  4. Seven-Day Caloric and Saturated Fat Restriction Increases Myocardial Dietary Fatty Acid Partitioning in Impaired Glucose-Tolerant Subjects.

    PubMed

    Noll, Christophe; Kunach, Margaret; Frisch, Frédérique; Bouffard, Lucie; Dubreuil, Stéphanie; Jean-Denis, Farrah; Phoenix, Serge; Cunnane, Stephen C; Guérin, Brigitte; Turcotte, Eric E; Carpentier, André C

    2015-11-01

    Subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) have increased myocardial partitioning of dietary fatty acids (DFAs) with left ventricular dysfunction, both of which are improved by modest weight loss over 1 year induced by lifestyle changes. Here, we determined the effects of a 7-day hypocaloric diet (-500 kcal/day) low in saturated fat (<7% of energy) (LOWCAL study) versus isocaloric with the usual amount saturated fat (∼10% of energy) diet (ISOCAL) on DFA metabolism in subjects with IGT. Organ-specific DFA partitioning and cardiac and hepatic DFA fractional uptake rates were measured in 15 IGT subjects (7 males/8 females) using the oral 14(R,S)-[18F]-fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid positron emission tomography method after 7 days of an ISOCAL diet versus a LOWCAL diet using a randomized crossover design. The LOWCAL diet led to reductions in weight and postprandial insulin area under the curve. Myocardial DFA partitioning over 6 h was increased after the LOWCAL diet (2.3 ± 0.1 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 mean standard uptake value, P < 0.04). However, the early (90-120 min) myocardial DFA fractional uptake was unchanged after the LOWCAL diet (0.055 ± 0.025 vs. 0.046 ± 0.009 min(-1), P = 0.7). Liver DFA partitioning was unchanged, but liver fractional uptake of DFA tended to be increased. Very short-term caloric and saturated fat dietary restrictions do not lead to the same changes in organ-specific DFA metabolism as those associated with weight loss in subjects with IGT.

  5. Regulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 following caloric restriction and re-feeding is species dependent.

    PubMed

    Loerz, Christine; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia; Huebbe, Patricia; Giller, Katrin; Metges, Cornelia; Rimbach, Gerald; Maser, Edmund

    2017-02-27

    Evidence in the current literature suggests that expression and activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), a key regulatory enzyme in glucocorticoid metabolism, is elevated in the liver and reduced in visceral adipose tissue and skeletal muscle following caloric restriction (CR). In order to investigate the influence of CR on 11β-HSD1 in more detail, we assessed expression and activity of 11β-HSD1 in several tissues in two independent CR and re-feeding animal models. Levels and activity of 11β-HSD1 after CR and re-feeding were measured [mouse liver and pig liver, pig visceral adipose tissue and pig skeletal muscle] using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, Western Blot analysis, and HPLC. After CR, no significant difference on mRNA levels was detected in mouse liver. But 11β-HSD1 mRNA expression was upregulated after subsequent re-feeding. In contrast, 11β-HSD1 protein expression after CR was significantly up-regulated, while no difference was detected after re-feeding. Interestingly, upregulation of protein after CR (1.4-fold) was lower than the increase in enzymatic activity (2.6-fold). Furthermore, while no difference was observed in protein levels after two weeks re-feeding, 11β-HSD1 activity increased 2.5-fold. In pig tissues neither 11β-HSD1 mRNA levels, protein expression or enzyme activity were influenced after CR and re-feeding. Overall, the results demonstrate species-dependent differences in regulation of 11β-HSD1 following CR and suggest the presence of an additional regulation step for 11β-HSD1 activity in mouse liver.

  6. Behavioural changes are a major contributing factor in the reduction of sarcopenia in caloric-restricted ageing mice

    PubMed Central

    van Norren, Klaske; Rusli, Fenni; van Dijk, Miriam; Lute, Carolien; Nagel, Jolanda; Dijk, Francina J; Dwarkasing, Jvalini; Boekschoten, Mark V; Luiking, Yvette; Witkamp, Renger F; Müller, Michael; Steegenga, Wilma T

    2015-01-01

    Background In rodent models, caloric restriction (CR) with maintenance of adequate micronutrient supply has been reported to increase lifespan and to reduce age-induced muscle loss (sarcopenia) during ageing. In the present study, we further investigated effects of CR on the onset and severity of sarcopenia in ageing male C57BL/6 J mice. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CR induces changes in behaviour of the animals that could contribute to the pronounced health-promoting effects of CR in rodents. In addition, we aimed to investigate in more detail the effects of CR on the onset and severity of sarcopenia. Methods The mice received either an ad libitum diet (control) or a diet matching 70 E% of the control diet (C). Daily activity, body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), grip strength, insulin sensitivity, and general agility and balance were determined at different ages. Mice were killed at 4, 12, 24, and 28 months. Skeletal muscles of the hind limb were dissected, and the muscle extensor digitorum longus muscle was used for force-frequency measurements. The musculus tibialis was used for real-time quantitative PCR analysis. Results From the age of 12 months, CR animals were nearly half the weight of the control animals, which was mainly related to a lower fat mass. In the control group, the hind limb muscles showed a decline in mass at 24 or 28 months of age, which was not present in the CR group. Moreover, insulin sensitivity (oral glucose tolerance test) was higher in this group and the in vivo and ex vivo grip strength did not differ between the two groups. In the hours before food was provided, CR animals were far more active than control animals, while total daily activity was not increased. Moreover, agility test indicated that CR animals were better climbers and showed more climbing behaviours. Conclusions Our study confirms earlier findings that in CR animals less sarcopenia is present. The mice on the CR diet, however, showed

  7. Effect of age and caloric restriction on bleomycin-chelatable and nonheme iron in different tissues of C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Sohal, R S; Wennberg-Kirch, E; Jaiswal, K; Kwong, L K; Forster, M J

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the widely observed age-associated increase in the amounts of macromolecular oxidative damage is due to an elevation in the availability of redox-active iron, that is believed to catalyze the scission of H2O2 to generate the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. Concentrations of bleomycin-chelatable iron and nonheme iron were measured in various tissues and different regions of the brain of mice fed on ad libitum (AL) or a calorically restricted (to 60% of AL) diet at different ages. The concentrations of these two pools of iron varied markedly as a function of tissue, age, and caloric intake. There was no consistent ratio between the amounts of nonheme and the bleomycin-chelatable iron pools across these conditions. Nonheme iron concentration increased with age in the liver, kidney, heart, striatum, hippocampus, midbrain and cerebellum of AL animals, whereas bleomycin-chelatable iron increased significantly with age only in the liver. Amounts of both nonheme and bleomycin-chelatable iron remained unaltered during aging in the cerebral cortex and hindbrain of AL mice. Caloric restriction had no effect on iron concentration in the brain or heart, but caused a marked increase in the concentration of both bleomycin-chelatable and nonheme iron in the liver and the kidney. The results do not support the hypothesis that accumulation of oxidative damage with age, or its attenuation by CR, are associated with corresponding variations in redox-active iron.

  8. Tackling the aging process with bio-molecules: a possible role for caloric restriction, food-derived nutrients, vitamins, amino acids, peptides, and minerals.

    PubMed

    Dabhade, Prachi; Kotwal, Swati

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process leading to general deterioration in many tissues and organs, accompanied by an increased incidence and severity of a wide variety of chronic, incurable, and often fatal diseases. A possibility of slowing down the aging process and improving the quality of life in old age by nutritional intervention has renewed the interest of the scientific world in anti-aging therapies. These include potential dietary interventions, adherence to nutrition, hormonal and cell-based therapies, genetic manipulations, and anti-aging supplements or nutrients. This review addresses strategies to slow the aging process by caloric restriction and the use of nutritional supplements.

  9. Oral leptin treatment in suckling rats ameliorates detrimental effects in hypothalamic structure and function caused by maternal caloric restriction during gestation.

    PubMed

    Konieczna, Jadwiga; García, Ana Paula; Sánchez, Juana; Palou, Mariona; Palou, Andreu; Picó, Catalina

    2013-01-01

    A poor prenatal environment brings about perturbations in leptin surge and hypothalamic circuitry that program impaired ability to regulate energy homeostasis in adulthood. Here, using a rat model of moderate maternal caloric restriction during gestation, we aimed to investigate whether leptin supplementation with physiological doses throughout lactation is able to ameliorate the adverse developmental malprogramming effects exerted in offspring hypothalamus structure and function. Three groups of male and female rats were studied: the offspring of ad libitum fed dams (controls), the offspring of 20% calorie restricted dams during the first part of pregnancy (CR), and CR rats supplemented with physiological doses of leptin throughout lactation (CR-Leptin). Animals were sacrificed on postnatal day 25. Morphometric and immunohistochemical studies on arcuate (ARC) and paraventicular (PVN) nucleus were performed and hypothalamic expression levels of selected genes were determined. In CR males, leptin treatment restored, at least in part, the number of immunoreactive neuropeptide Y (NPY(+)) cells in ARC, the total number of cells in PVN, hypothalamic NPY, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and suppressor of cytokine signalling-3 (SOCS-3) mRNA levels, and plasma leptin levels, which were decreased in CR animals. CR-Leptin males showed higher hypothalamic long-form leptin receptor (ObRb) mRNA levels, compared to control and CR animals. In CR females, leptin treatment reverted the increased number of cells in ARC and cell density in ARC and PVN, and reduced hypothalamic SOCS-3 mRNA expression to levels similar to controls. Leptin treatment also reverted the increased relative area of NPY(+) fibers in the PVN occurring in CR animals. In conclusion, leptin supplementation throughout lactation is able to revert, at least partly, most of the developmental effects on hypothalamic structure and function caused by moderate maternal caloric restriction during

  10. Effects of a caloric restriction weight loss diet and exercise on inflammatory biomarkers in overweight/obese postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Imayama, Ikuyo; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Alfano, Catherine M; Wang, Chiachi; Xiao, Liren; Wener, Mark H; Campbell, Kristin L; Duggan, Catherine; Foster-Schubert, Karen E; Kong, Angela; Mason, Caitlin E; Wang, Ching-Yun; Blackburn, George L; Bain, Carolyn E; Thompson, Henry J; McTiernan, Anne

    2012-05-01

    Obese and sedentary persons have increased risk for cancer; inflammation is a hypothesized mechanism. We examined the effects of a caloric restriction weight loss diet and exercise on inflammatory biomarkers in 439 women. Overweight and obese postmenopausal women were randomized to 1-year: caloric restriction diet (goal of 10% weight loss, N = 118), aerobic exercise (225 min/wk of moderate-to-vigorous activity, N = 117), combined diet + exercise (N = 117), or control (N = 87). Baseline and 1-year high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), leukocyte, and neutrophil levels were measured by investigators blind to group. Inflammatory biomarker changes were compared using generalized estimating equations. Models were adjusted for baseline body mass index (BMI), race/ethnicity, and age. Four hundred and thirty-eight (N = 1 in diet + exercise group was excluded) were analyzed. Relative to controls, hs-CRP decreased by geometric mean (95% confidence interval, P value): 0.92 mg/L (0.53-1.31, P < 0.001) in the diet and 0.87 mg/L (0.51-1.23, P < 0.0001) in the diet + exercise groups. IL-6 decreased by 0.34 pg/mL (0.13-0.55, P = 0.001) in the diet and 0.32 pg/mL (0.15-0.49, P < 0.001) in the diet + exercise groups. Neutrophil counts decreased by 0.31 × 10(9)/L (0.09-0.54, P = 0.006) in the diet and 0.30 × 10(9)/L (0.09-0.50, P = 0.005) in the diet + exercise groups. Diet and diet + exercise participants with 5% or more weight loss reduced inflammatory biomarkers (hs-CRP, SAA, and IL-6) compared with controls. The diet and diet + exercise groups reduced hs-CRP in all subgroups of baseline BMI, waist circumference, CRP level, and fasting glucose. Our findings indicate that a caloric restriction weight loss diet with or without exercise reduces biomarkers of inflammation in postmenopausal women, with potential clinical significance for cancer risk reduction.

  11. Immune potentiation after fractionated exposure to very low doses of ionizing radiation and/or caloric restriction in autoimmune-prone and normal C57Bl/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    James, S.J.; Enger, S.M.; Peterson, W.J.; Makinodan, T. )

    1990-06-01

    Very low doses of ionizing radiation can enhance immune responsiveness and extend life span in normal mice. Total lymphoid irradiation at relatively high doses of radiation can retard autoimmune disease in genetically susceptible mice, but may impair immune function. In order to determine whether fractionated low dose exposure would enhance immune response and retard lymphadenopathy in autoimmune-prone mice, groups of C57B1/6 lpr/lpr mice were sham irradiated, exposed 5 days/week for 4 weeks to 0.04 Gy/day, or to 0.1 Gy/day. After the radiation protocol, the mice were evaluated for splenic T cell proliferative capacity, T cell subset distribution, and total spleen cell numbers. The independent and additive effect of caloric restriction was additionally assessed since this intervention has been shown to increase immune responsiveness and retard disease progression in autoimmune-prone mice. The congenic C57B1/6 +/+ immunologically normal strain was evaluated in parallel as congenic control. The results indicated that mitogen-stimulated proliferation was up-regulated in both strains of mice after exposure to 0.04 Gy/day. The proliferative capacity was additively enhanced when radiation at this dose level was combined with caloric restriction. Exposure to 0.1 Gy/day resulted in further augmentation of proliferative response in the lpr/lpr mice, but was depressive in the +/+ mice. Although the proportions of the various T cell subpopulations were altered in both strains after exposure to LDR, the specific subset alterations were different within each strain. Additional experiments were subsequently performed to assess whether the thymus is required for LDR-induced immune potentiation. Thymectomy completely abrogated the LDR effect in the +/+ mice, suggesting that thymic processing and/or trafficking is adaptively altered with LDR in this strain.

  12. Effects of the dietary approaches to stop hypertension diet, exercise, and caloric restriction on neurocognition in overweight adults with high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick J; Blumenthal, James A; Babyak, Michael A; Craighead, Linda; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Browndyke, Jeffrey N; Strauman, Timothy A; Sherwood, Andrew

    2010-06-01

    High blood pressure increases the risks of stroke, dementia, and neurocognitive dysfunction. Although aerobic exercise and dietary modifications have been shown to reduce blood pressure, no randomized trials have examined the effects of aerobic exercise combined with dietary modification on neurocognitive functioning in individuals with high blood pressure (ie, prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension). As part of a larger investigation, 124 participants with elevated blood pressure (systolic blood pressure 130 to 159 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure 85 to 99 mm Hg) who were sedentary and overweight or obese (body mass index: 25 to 40 kg/m(2)) were randomized to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet alone, DASH combined with a behavioral weight management program including exercise and caloric restriction, or a usual diet control group. Participants completed a battery of neurocognitive tests of executive function-memory-learning and psychomotor speed at baseline and again after the 4-month intervention. Participants on the DASH diet combined with a behavioral weight management program exhibited greater improvements in executive function-memory-learning (Cohen's D=0.562; P=0.008) and psychomotor speed (Cohen's D=0.480; P=0.023), and DASH diet alone participants exhibited better psychomotor speed (Cohen's D=0.440; P=0.036) compared with the usual diet control. Neurocognitive improvements appeared to be mediated by increased aerobic fitness and weight loss. Also, participants with greater intima-medial thickness and higher systolic blood pressure showed greater improvements in executive function-memory-learning in the group on the DASH diet combined with a behavioral weight management program. In conclusion, combining aerobic exercise with the DASH diet and caloric restriction improves neurocognitive function among sedentary and overweight/obese individuals with prehypertension and hypertension.

  13. Areal and volumetric bone mineral density and geometry at two levels of protein intake during caloric restriction: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, Deeptha; Ambia-Sobhan, Hasina; Zurfluh, Robert; Schlussel, Yvette; Stahl, Theodore J; Gordon, Chris L; Shapses, Sue A

    2011-06-01

    Weight reduction induces bone loss by several factors, and the effect of higher protein (HP) intake during caloric restriction on bone mineral density (BMD) is not known. Previous study designs examining the longer-term effects of HP diets have not controlled for total calcium intake between groups and have not examined the relationship between bone and endocrine changes. In this randomized, controlled study, we examined how BMD (areal and volumetric), turnover markers, and hormones [insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and estradiol] respond to caloric restriction during a 1-year trial using two levels of protein intake. Forty-seven postmenopausal women (58.0 ± 4.4 years; body mass index of 32.1 ± 4.6 kg/m(2) ) completed the 1-year weight-loss trial and were on a higher (HP, 24%, n = 26) or normal protein (NP, 18%, n = 21) and fat intake (28%) with controlled calcium intake of 1.2 g/d. After 1 year, subjects lost 7.0% ± 4.5% of body weight, and protein intake was 86 and 60 g/d in the HP and NP groups, respectively. HP compared with NP diet attenuated loss of BMD at the ultradistal radius, lumbar spine, and total hip and trabecular volumetric BMD and bone mineral content of the tibia. This is consistent with the higher final values of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 and lower bone-resorption marker (deoxypyridinoline) in the HP group than in the NP group (p < .05). These data show that a higher dietary protein during weight reduction increases serum IGF-1 and attenuates total and trabecular bone loss at certain sites in postmenopausal women.

  14. The effect of alternate-day caloric restriction on the metabolic consequences of 8 days of bed rest in healthy lean men: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Harder-Lauridsen, Nina Majlund; Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Mann, Sebastian Porsdam; Lyngbæk, Mark Preben; Benatti, Fabiana Braga; Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Law, Ian; Wedell-Neergaard, Anne-Sophie; Thomsen, Carsten; Møller, Kirsten; Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke

    2017-02-01

    Physical activity and alternate-day fasting/caloric restriction may both ameliorate aspects of the metabolic syndrome, such as insulin resistance, visceral fat mass accumulation, and cognitive impairment by overlapping mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that alternate-day caloric restriction (ADCR) with overall energy balance would reduce insulin resistance and accumulation of visceral fat, in addition to improving cognitive functions, after 8 consecutive days in bed. Healthy, lean men (n = 20) were randomized to 1) 8 days of bed rest with three daily isoenergetic meals (control group, n = 10); and 2) 8 days of bed rest with 25% of total energy requirements every other day and 175% of total energy requirements every other day (ADCR group). Oral glucose tolerance testing, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and brain, V̇o2max, and tests for cognitive function were performed before and after bed rest. In addition, daily fasting blood samples and 24-h glucose profiles by continuous glucose monitoring system were assessed during the 8 days of bed rest period. Bed rest induced insulin resistance, visceral fat accumulation, and worsening of mood. No positive effects emerged from ADCR on these negative health outcomes. Compared with the control group, ADCR was associated with improved and steadier glycemic control on fasting days and higher glycemic fluctuation and indexes of insulin resistance on overeating days. In contrast to our hypothesis, the metabolic impairment induced by 8 days of bed rest was not counteracted by ADCR with overall energy balance.

  15. Areal and Volumetric Bone Mineral Density and Geometry at Two Levels of Protein Intake During Caloric Restriction: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, Deeptha; Ambia-Sobhan, Hasina; Zurfluh, Robert; Schlussel, Yvette; Stahl, Theodore J; Gordon, Chris L; Shapses, Sue A

    2011-01-01

    Weight reduction induces bone loss by several factors, and the effect of higher protein (HP) intake during caloric restriction on bone mineral density (BMD) is not known. Previous study designs examining the longer-term effects of HP diets have not controlled for total calcium intake between groups and have not examined the relationship between bone and endocrine changes. In this randomized, controlled study, we examined how BMD (areal and volumetric), turnover markers, and hormones [insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and estradiol] respond to caloric restriction during a 1-year trial using two levels of protein intake. Forty-seven postmenopausal women (58.0 ± 4.4 years; body mass index of 32.1 ± 4.6 kg/ m2) completed the 1-year weight-loss trial and were on a higher (HP, 24%, n =26) or normal protein (NP, 18%, n =21) and fat intake (28%) with controlled calcium intake of 1.2 g/d. After 1 year, subjects lost 7.0% ± 4.5% of body weight, and protein intake was 86 and 60 g/d in the HP and NP groups, respectively. HP compared with NP diet attenuated loss of BMD at the ultradistal radius, lumbar spine, and total hip and trabecular volumetric BMD and bone mineral content of the tibia. This is consistent with the higher final values of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 and lower bone-resorption marker (deoxypyridinoline) in the HP group than in the NP group ( p <.05). These data show that a higher dietary protein during weight reduction increases serum IGF-1 and attenuates total and trabecular bone loss at certain sites in postmenopausal women. PMID:21611972

  16. Longevity, aging, and caloric restriction: Clive Maine McCay and the construction of a multidisciplinary research program.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Wook

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1930s scientists from fields such as biochemistry, pathology, immunology, genetics, neuroscience, and nutrition have studied the relation of dietary caloric intake to longevity and aging. This paper discusses how Clive Maine McCay, a professor of animal husbandry at Cornell University, began his investigation of the topic and promoted it as a productive research program in the multidisciplinary science of gerontology. Initially, McCay observed the effect of reduced-calorie diets on life span and senescence while pursuing his nutrition research in the context of animal husbandry and agriculture. But when he received funding from the Rockefeller Foundation and started to participate in the establishment of gerontology during the 1930s, the scope of his research was considerably expanded beyond his original disciplinary domain. It became a multidisciplinary research program that attracted scholars from a variety of scientific and medical disciplines. This paper argues that through this expansion McCay's research created a means of maintaining cooperation among the diverse and heterogeneous academic fields constituting gerontology.

  17. Mild and Short-Term Caloric Restriction Prevents Obesity-Induced Cardiomyopathy in Young Zucker Rats without Changing in Metabolites and Fatty Acids Cardiac Profile.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; García-Prieto, Concha F; Pulido-Olmo, Helena; Velasco-Martín, Juan P; Villa-Valverde, Palmira; Fernández-Valle, María E; Boscá, Lisardo; Fernández-Velasco, María; Regadera, Javier; Somoza, Beatriz; Fernández-Alfonso, María S

    2017-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) ameliorates cardiac dysfunction associated with obesity. However, most of the studies have been performed under severe CR (30-65% caloric intake decrease) for several months or even years in aged animals. Here, we investigated whether mild (20% food intake reduction) and short-term (2-weeks) CR prevented the obese cardiomyopathy phenotype and improved the metabolic profile of young (14 weeks of age) genetically obese Zucker fa/fa rats. Heart weight (HW) and HW/tibia length ratio was significantly lower in fa/fa rats after 2 weeks of CR than in counterparts fed ad libitum. Invasive pressure measurements showed that systolic blood pressure, maximal rate of positive left ventricle (LV) pressure, LV systolic pressure and LV end-diastolic pressure were all significantly higher in obese fa/fa rats than in lean counterparts, which were prevented by CR. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the increase in LV end-systolic volume, stroke volume and LV wall thickness observed in fa/fa rats was significantly lower in animals on CR diet. Histological analysis also revealed that CR blocked the significant increase in cardiomyocyte diameter in obese fa/fa rats. High resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of the LV revealed a global decrease in metabolites such as taurine, creatine and phosphocreatine, glutamate, glutamine and glutathione, in obese fa/fa rats, whereas lactate concentration was increased. By contrast, fatty acid concentrations in LV tissue were significantly elevated in obese fa/fa rats. CR failed to restore the LV metabolomic profile of obese fa/fa rats. In conclusion, mild and short-term CR prevented an obesity-induced cardiomyopathy phenotype in young obese fa/fa rats independently of the cardiac metabolic profile.

  18. Comparison of the effects of resveratrol and caloric restriction on learning and memory in juvenile C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bao-Lei; Wang, Rong; Ma, Li-Na; Dong, Wen; Zhao, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Jing-Shuang; Wang, Yu-Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Both caloric restriction (CR) and resveratrol (RSV) have been shown to improve learning and memory, but their potential effects in juvenile animals were unknown. Here, we evaluated the effects of RSV and CR on learning and memory function in juvenile mice and investigated potential molecular mechanisms. Methods: Six-week-old C57BL/6J mice were assigned to one of three different dietary groups: normal control (stock diet) (n=12), CR diet (30% caloric reduction diet) (n=12), and RSV diet (stock diet supplemented with 18.6 mg/kg RSV) (n=12), for 6 months. Body weight and blood glucose were measured every 4 weeks. Serum cholesterol and serum triglyceride levels were examined using biochemical methods. Serum insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels were evaluated using enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA), and protein expression of silent mating type information regulation 2 homology 1 (SIRT1), p53, p16, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K), phosphorylated-cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB), and IGF-1 were examined with immunohistochemistry. Results: Although long-term CR diet did not alter physiological conditions in juvenile mice relative to control, RSV supplementation slightly elevated blood glucose, serum triglyceride, and serum insulin levels. Both CR and RSV improved learning and memory function, although the effect of CR was significantly greater. Both CR and RSV downregulated p53 and upregulated IGF-1 in hippocampal CA1 region of mice. Conclusion: We demonstrate that CR and RSV may improve learning and memory by downregulating p53 and upregulating IGF-1 in hippocampal CA1 region of juvenile mice. PMID:26949500

  19. Mild and Short-Term Caloric Restriction Prevents Obesity-Induced Cardiomyopathy in Young Zucker Rats without Changing in Metabolites and Fatty Acids Cardiac Profile

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; García-Prieto, Concha F.; Pulido-Olmo, Helena; Velasco-Martín, Juan P.; Villa-Valverde, Palmira; Fernández-Valle, María E.; Boscá, Lisardo; Fernández-Velasco, María; Regadera, Javier; Somoza, Beatriz; Fernández-Alfonso, María S.

    2017-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) ameliorates cardiac dysfunction associated with obesity. However, most of the studies have been performed under severe CR (30–65% caloric intake decrease) for several months or even years in aged animals. Here, we investigated whether mild (20% food intake reduction) and short-term (2-weeks) CR prevented the obese cardiomyopathy phenotype and improved the metabolic profile of young (14 weeks of age) genetically obese Zucker fa/fa rats. Heart weight (HW) and HW/tibia length ratio was significantly lower in fa/fa rats after 2 weeks of CR than in counterparts fed ad libitum. Invasive pressure measurements showed that systolic blood pressure, maximal rate of positive left ventricle (LV) pressure, LV systolic pressure and LV end-diastolic pressure were all significantly higher in obese fa/fa rats than in lean counterparts, which were prevented by CR. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the increase in LV end-systolic volume, stroke volume and LV wall thickness observed in fa/fa rats was significantly lower in animals on CR diet. Histological analysis also revealed that CR blocked the significant increase in cardiomyocyte diameter in obese fa/fa rats. High resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of the LV revealed a global decrease in metabolites such as taurine, creatine and phosphocreatine, glutamate, glutamine and glutathione, in obese fa/fa rats, whereas lactate concentration was increased. By contrast, fatty acid concentrations in LV tissue were significantly elevated in obese fa/fa rats. CR failed to restore the LV metabolomic profile of obese fa/fa rats. In conclusion, mild and short-term CR prevented an obesity-induced cardiomyopathy phenotype in young obese fa/fa rats independently of the cardiac metabolic profile. PMID:28203206

  20. Caloric restriction and the adipokine leptin alter the SDF-1 signaling axis in bone marrow and in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Herberg, Samuel; Arounleut, Phonepasong; Upadhyay, Sunil; Dukes, Amy; Davis, Colleen; Johnson, Maribeth; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan; Hamrick, Mark W; Isales, Carlos M; Hill, William D

    2015-07-15

    Growing evidence suggests that the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is essential in regulating bone marrow (BM) derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (BMSC) survival, and differentiation to either a pro-osteogenic or pro-adipogenic fate. This study investigates the effects of caloric restriction (CR) and leptin on the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in bone and BM tissues in the context of age-associated bone loss. For in vivo studies, we collected bone, BM cells and BM interstitial fluid from 12 and 20 month-old C57Bl6 mice fed ad-libitum (AL), and 20-month-old mice on long-term CR with, or without, intraperitoneal injection of leptin for 10 days (10 mg/kg). To mimic conditions of CR in vitro, 18 month murine BMSCs were treated with (1) control (Ctrl): normal proliferation medium, (2) nutrient restriction (NR): low glucose, low serum medium, or (3) NR + leptin: NR medium + 100 ng/ml leptin for 6-48 h. In BMSCs both protein and mRNA expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4 were increased by CR and CR + leptin. In contrast, the alternate SDF-1 receptor CXCR7 was decreased, suggesting a nutrient signaling mediated change in SDF-1 axis signaling in BMSCs. However, in bone SDF-1, CXCR4 and 7 gene expression increase with age and this is reversed with CR, while addition of leptin returns this to the "aged" level. Histologically bone formation was lower in the calorically restricted mice and BM adipogenesis increased, both effects were reversed with the 10 day leptin treatment. This suggests that in bone CR and leptin alter the nutrient signaling pathways in different ways to affect the local action of the osteogenic cytokine SDF-1. Studies focusing on the molecular interaction between nutrient signaling by CR, leptin and SDF-1 axis may help to address age-related musculoskeletal changes.

  1. ABCG1 regulates mouse adipose tissue macrophage cholesterol levels and ratio of M1 to M2 cells in obesity and caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hao; Tarling, Elizabeth J; McMillen, Timothy S; Tang, Chongren; LeBoeuf, Renée C

    2015-12-01

    In addition to triacylglycerols, adipocytes contain a large reserve of unesterified cholesterol. During adipocyte lipolysis and cell death seen during severe obesity and weight loss, free fatty acids and cholesterol become available for uptake and processing by adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). We hypothesize that ATMs become cholesterol enriched and participate in cholesterol clearance from adipose tissue. We previously showed that ABCG1 is robustly upregulated in ATMs taken from obese mice and further enhanced by caloric restriction. Here, we found that ATMs taken from obese and calorie-restricted mice derived from transplantation of WT or Abcg1-deficient bone marrow are cholesterol enriched. ABCG1 levels regulate the ratio of classically activated (M1) to alternatively activated (M2) ATMs and their cellular cholesterol content. Using WT and Abcg1(-/-) cultured macrophages, we found that Abcg1 is most highly expressed by M2 macrophages and that ABCG1 deficiency is sufficient to retard macrophage chemotaxis. However, changes in myeloid expression of Abcg1 did not protect mice from obesity or impaired glucose homeostasis. Overall, ABCG1 modulates ATM cholesterol content in obesity and weight loss regimes leading to an alteration in M1 to M2 ratio that we suggest is due to the extent of macrophage egress from adipose tissue.

  2. The data do not seem to support a benefit to BCAA supplementation during periods of caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Dieter, Brad P; Schoenfeld, Brad Jon; Aragon, Alan A

    2016-01-01

    J Int Soc Sports Nutr 13:1-015-0112-9, 2016 describe the efficacy of branched chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation and resistance training for maintaining lean body mass during a calorie-restricted diet, and claim that this occurs with concurrent losses in fat mass. However, the reported results appear to be at odds with the data presented on changes in fat mass. This letter discusses the issues with the paper.

  3. Life-Span Extension by Caloric Restriction Is Determined by Type and Level of Food Reduction and by Reproductive Mode in Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We measured life span and fecundity of three reproductive modes in a clone of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas subjected to chronic caloric restriction (CCR) over a range of food concentrations or to intermittent fasting (IF). IF increased life span 50%–70% for all three modes, whereas CCR increased life span of asexual females derived from sexually or asexually produced eggs, but not that of sexual females. The main effect of CR on both asexual modes was to delay death at young ages, rather than to prevent death at middle ages or to greatly extend maximum life span; in contrast CR in sexual females greatly increased the life span of a few long-lived individuals. Lifetime fecundity did not decrease with CCR, suggesting a lack of resource allocation trade-off between somatic maintenance and reproduction. Multiple outcomes for a clonal lineage indicate that different responses are established through epigenetic programming, whereas differences in life-span allocations suggest that multiple genetic mechanisms mediate life-span extension. PMID:22904096

  4. Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 Ameliorates Oxidative and Metabolic Parameters by Increasing Intestinal Feruloyl Esterase Activity and Modulating Microbiota in Caloric-Restricted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Matias; Fabersani, Emanuel; Abeijón-Mukdsi, María C.; Ross, Romina; Fontana, Cecilia; Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Gauffin-Cano, Paola; Medina, Roxana B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the administration of the feruloyl esterase (FE)-producing strain Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 enhances metabolic and oxidative parameters in caloric-restricted (CR) mice. Balb/c male mice were divided into ad libitum fed Group (ALF Group), CR diet Group (CR Group) and CR diet plus L. fermentum Group (CR-Lf Group). CR diet was administered during 45 days and CRL1446 strain was given in the dose of 108 cells/mL/day/mouse. FE activity was determined in intestinal mucosa and content at Day 1, 20 and 45. Triglyceride, total cholesterol, glucose, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels and glutathione reductase activity were determined in plasma. Gut microbiota was evaluated by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. At Day 45, total intestinal FE activity in CR-Lf Group was higher (p = 0.020) than in CR and ALF groups and an improvement in both metabolic (reductions in triglyceride (p = 0.0025), total cholesterol (p = 0.005) and glucose (p < 0.0001) levels) and oxidative (decrease of TBARS levels and increase of plasmatic glutathione reductase activity (p = 0.006)) parameters was observed, compared to ALF Group. CR diet increased abundance of Bacteroidetes and CRL1446 administration increased abundance of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genus. L. fermentun CRL1446 exerted a bifidogenic effect under CR conditions. PMID:27399766

  5. Long-term caloric restriction in ApoE-deficient mice results in neuroprotection via Fgf21-induced AMPK/mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Blümel, Tobias; Stahn, Laura; Vollmar, Brigitte; Kuhla, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) decelerates the aging process, extends lifespan and exerts neuroprotective effects in diverse species by so far unknown mechanisms. Based on known neuroprotective effects of fibroblastic growth factor 21 (Fgf21) we speculate that CR upregulates Fgf21, which phosphorylates neuronal AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to a decrease of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling activity and an inhibition of tau-hyperphosphorylation. This in turn reduces the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. ApoE-deficient mice (ApoE−/−), serving as a model of neurodegeneration, showed upon CR vs. ad libitum feeding increased Fgf21 levels in both, plasma and brain as well as higher phosphorylation of fibroblastic growth factor receptor 1c (Fgfr1c), extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and AMPK in brain, lower activity of mTOR and decreased Tau-phosphorylation. Finally, CR in ApoE−/− mice caused neuroprotection as indicated by a higher synaptic plasticity shown by immunohistochemical analysis with increased numbers of PSD95-positive neurons and a better cognitive performance as analyzed with Morris water maze test. These data provide substantial evidence that neuroprotection upon CR seems to be Fgf21-dependent. Further experiments are necessary to evaluate Fgf21 as a therapeutic tool to treat tauopathy for improvement of cognitive performance. PMID:27902456

  6. Caloric restriction alleviates alpha-synuclein toxicity in aged yeast cells by controlling the opposite roles of Tor1 and Sir2 on autophagy.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Ana; Ludovico, Paula; Sampaio-Marques, Belém

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (syn) is the main component of proteinaceous inclusions known as Lewy bodies (LBs), which are implicated in the pathogenesis of the neurodegenerative diseases known as synucleinopathies, like Parkinson's disease (PD). Aging is a major risk factor for PD and thus, interventions that delay aging will have promising effects in PD and other synucleinopathies. Caloric restriction (CR) is the only non-genetic intervention shown to promote lifespan extension in several model organisms. CR has been shown to alleviate syn toxicity and herein we confirmed the same effect on the yeast model for synucleinopathies during chronological lifespan. The data gathered showed that TOR1 deletion also results in similar longevity extension and abrogation of syn toxicity. Intriguingly, these interventions were associated with decreased autophagy, which was maintained at homeostatic levels. Autophagy maintenance at homeostatic levels promoted by CR or TOR1 abrogation in syn-expressing cells was achieved by decreasing Sir2 levels and activity. Furthermore, the opposite function of Tor1 and Sir2 in autophagy is probably associated with the maintenance of autophagy activity at homeostatic levels, a central event linked to abrogation of syn toxicity promoted by CR.

  7. Mild caloric restriction reduces blood pressure and activates endothelial AMPK-PI3K-Akt-eNOS pathway in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, C F; Pulido-Olmo, H; Ruiz-Hurtado, G; Gil-Ortega, M; Aranguez, I; Rubio, M A; Ruiz-Gayo, M; Somoza, B; Fernández-Alfonso, M S

    2015-01-01

    Genetic obesity models exhibit endothelial dysfunction associated to adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) dysregulation. This study aims to assess if mild short-term caloric restriction (CR) restores endothelial AMPK activity leading to an improvement in endothelial function. Twelve-week old Zucker lean and obese (fa/fa) male rats had access to standard chow either ad libitum (AL, n=8) or 80% of AL (CR, n=8) for two weeks. Systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in fa/fa AL rats versus lean AL animals, but was normalized by CR. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh, 10(-9) to 10(-4) M) was reduced in fa/fa AL compared to control lean AL rats (p<0.001), and restored by CR. The AMPK activator AICAR (10(-5) to 8·10(-3) M) elicited a lower relaxation in fa/fa AL rings that was normalized by CR (p<0.001). Inhibition of PI3K (wortmannin, 10(-7) M), Akt (triciribine, 10(-5) M), or eNOS (L-NAME, 10(-4) M) markedly reduced AICAR-induced relaxation in lean AL, but not in fa/fa AL rats. These inhibitions were restored by CR in Zucker fa/fa rings. These data show that mild short-term CR improves endothelial function and lowers blood pressure in obesity due to the activation of the AMPK-PI3K-Akt-eNOS pathway.

  8. Life-span extension by caloric restriction is determined by type and level of food reduction and by reproductive mode in Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Gribble, Kristin E; Welch, David B Mark

    2013-04-01

    We measured life span and fecundity of three reproductive modes in a clone of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas subjected to chronic caloric restriction (CCR) over a range of food concentrations or to intermittent fasting (IF). IF increased life span 50%-70% for all three modes, whereas CCR increased life span of asexual females derived from sexually or asexually produced eggs, but not that of sexual females. The main effect of CR on both asexual modes was to delay death at young ages, rather than to prevent death at middle ages or to greatly extend maximum life span; in contrast CR in sexual females greatly increased the life span of a few long-lived individuals. Lifetime fecundity did not decrease with CCR, suggesting a lack of resource allocation trade-off between somatic maintenance and reproduction. Multiple outcomes for a clonal lineage indicate that different responses are established through epigenetic programming, whereas differences in life-span allocations suggest that multiple genetic mechanisms mediate life-span extension.

  9. Evaluation of candidate reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in three metabolism related tissues of mice after caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Huan; Sun, Liang; Chen, Beidong; Han, Yiwen; Pang, Jing; Wu, Wei; Qi, Ruomei; Zhang, Tie-mei

    2016-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a routine method for gene expression analysis, and reliable results depend on proper normalization by stable reference genes. Caloric restriction (CR) is a robust lifestyle intervention to slow aging and delay onset of age-associated diseases via inducing global changes in gene expression. Reliable normalization of RT-qPCR data becomes crucial in CR studies. In this study, the expression stability of 12 candidate reference genes were evaluated in inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT), skeletal muscle (Sk.M) and liver of CR mice by using three algorithms, geNorm, NormFinder, and Bestkeeper. Our results showed β2m, Ppia and Hmbs as the most stable genes in iWAT, Sk.M and liver, respectively. Moreover, two reference genes were sufficient to normalize RT-qPCR data in each tissue and the suitable pair of reference genes was β2m-Hprt in iWAT, Ppia-Gusb in Sk.M and Hmbs-β2m in liver. By contrast, the least stable gene in iWAT or Sk.M was Gapdh, and in liver was Pgk1. Furthermore, the expression of Leptin and Ppar-γ were profiled in these tissues to validate the selected reference genes. Our data provided a basis for gene expression analysis in future CR studies. PMID:27922100

  10. Differential Development of Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Different Adipose Tissue Depots Along Aging in Wistar Rats: Effects of Caloric Restriction.

    PubMed

    Sierra Rojas, Johanna X; García-San Frutos, Miriam; Horrillo, Daniel; Lauzurica, Nuria; Oliveros, Eva; Carrascosa, Jose María; Fernández-Agulló, Teresa; Ros, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes increases with aging and these disorders are associated with inflammation. Insulin resistance and inflammation do not develop at the same time in all tissues. Adipose tissue is one of the tissues where inflammation and insulin resistance are established earlier during aging. Nevertheless, the existence of different fat depots states the possibility of differential roles for these depots in the development of age-associated inflammation and insulin resistance. To explore this, we analyzed insulin signaling and inflammation in epididymal, perirenal, subcutaneous, and brown adipose tissues during aging in Wistar rats. Although all tissues showed signs of inflammation and insulin resistance with aging, epididymal fat was the first to develop signs of inflammation and insulin resistance along aging among white fat tissues. Subcutaneous adipose tissue presented the lowest degree of inflammation and insulin resistance that developed latter with age. Brown adipose tissue also presented latter insulin resistance and inflammation but with lower signs of macrophage infiltration. Caloric restriction ameliorated insulin resistance and inflammation in all tissues, being more effective in subcutaneous and brown adipose tissues. These data demonstrate differential susceptibility of the different adipose depots to the development of age-associated insulin resistance and inflammation.

  11. Life span extension and H(2)O(2) resistance elicited by caloric restriction require the peroxiredoxin Tsa1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Molin, Mikael; Yang, Junsheng; Hanzén, Sarah; Toledano, Michel B; Labarre, Jean; Nyström, Thomas

    2011-09-02

    Caloric restriction (CR) extends the life span of organisms ranging from yeast to primates. Here, we show that the thiol-dependent peroxiredoxin Tsa1 and its partner sulfiredoxin, Srx1, are required for CR to extend the replicative life span of yeast cells. Tsa1 becomes hyperoxidized/inactive during aging, and CR mitigates such oxidation by elevating the levels of Srx1, which is required to reduce/reactivate hyperoxidized Tsa1. CR, by lowering cAMP-PKA activity, enhances Gcn2-dependent SRX1 translation, resulting in increased resistance to H(2)O(2) and life span extension. Moreover, an extra copy of the SRX1 gene is sufficient to extend the life span of cells grown in high glucose concentrations by 20% in a Tsa1-dependent and Sir2-independent manner. The data demonstrate that Tsa1 is required to ensure yeast longevity and that CR extends yeast life span, in part, by counteracting age-induced hyperoxidation of this peroxiredoxin.

  12. Metabolic Benefit of Chronic Caloric Restriction and Activation of Hypothalamic AGRP/NPY Neurons in Male Mice Is Independent of Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicole H; Walsh, Heidi; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Park, Seongjoon; Gaylinn, Bruce; Thorner, Michael O; Smith, Roy G

    2016-04-01

    Aging is associated with attenuated ghrelin signaling. During aging, chronic caloric restriction (CR) produces health benefits accompanied by enhanced ghrelin production. Ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor 1a) agonists administered to aging rodents and humans restore the young adult phenotype; therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the metabolic benefits of CR are mediated by endogenous ghrelin. Three month-old male mice lacking ghrelin (Ghrelin-/-) or ghrelin receptor (Ghsr-/-), and their wild-type (WT) littermates were randomly assigned to 2 groups: ad libitum (AL) fed and CR, where 40% food restriction was introduced gradually to allow Ghrelin-/- and Ghsr-/- mice to metabolically adapt and avoid severe hypoglycemia. Twelve months later, plasma ghrelin, metabolic parameters, ambulatory activity, hypothalamic and liver gene expression, as well as body composition were measured. CR increased plasma ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin concentrations in WT and Ghsr-/- mice. CR of WT, Ghsr-/-, and Ghrelin-/- mice markedly improved metabolic flexibility, enhanced ambulatory activity, and reduced adiposity. Inactivation of Ghrelin or Ghsr had no effect on AL food intake or food anticipatory behavior. In contrast to the widely held belief that endogenous ghrelin regulates food intake, CR increased expression of hypothalamic Agrp and Npy, with reduced expression of Pomc across genotypes. In the AL context, ablation of ghrelin signaling markedly inhibited liver steatosis, which correlated with reduced Pparγ expression and enhanced Irs2 expression. Although CR and administration of GH secretagogue receptor 1a agonists both benefit the aging phenotype, we conclude the benefits of chronic CR are a consequence of enhanced metabolic flexibility independent of endogenous ghrelin or des-acyl ghrelin signaling.

  13. Vitamin E and caloric restriction promote hepatic homeostasis through expression of connexin 26, N-cad, E-cad and cholesterol metabolism genes.

    PubMed

    Santolim, Leonardo Vinícius; Amaral, Maria Esméria Corezola do; Fachi, José Luís; Mendes, Maíra Felonato; Oliveira, Camila Andréa de

    2017-01-01

    Connexins (Cx) and cadherins are responsible for cell homeostasis. The Cx activity is directly related to cholesterol. The present work investigates whether vitamin E, with or without caloric restriction (CR), alters the mRNA expression of Cx26, Cx32, Cx43, N-cadherins (N-cads), E-cadherins (E-cads) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and evaluates their relation to cholesterol metabolism in rat liver. Animals were divided into different groups: control with ad libitum diet (C), control+vitamin E (CV), aloric restriction with intake to 60% of group C (CR), and the intake of group CR+vitamin E (RV). There were increases of manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and glutathione S-transferase mu 1, indicating antioxidant effects of CR and vitamin E. An increase of nitric oxide in the CR group was in agreement with the Mn-SOD data. Supplementation with vitamin E, with or without CR, upregulated the expression of Cx26 mRNA and increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) in the CV group. Reductions of Cx32 and Cx43 were associated with lower LDL-c. Increases in Hmgcr and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) in the CV and RV groups could be explained by the effect of vitamin E. A reduction of LDLr in the CR group was due to the reduced dietary intake. Increases in cadherins in the CV, CR and RV groups were indicative of tissue maintenance, which was also supported by increases of α-SMA in groups CV and RV. Finally, vitamin E, with or without CR, increased Cx26, probably modulated by expression of the Hmgcr and LDLr genes. This suggests important relationship of Cxs and cholesterol metabolism genes.

  14. Management of multifactorial idiopathic epilepsy in EL mice with caloric restriction and the ketogenic diet: role of glucose and ketone bodies

    PubMed Central

    Mantis, John G; Centeno, Nicole A; Todorova, Mariana T; McGowan, Richard; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2004-01-01

    Background The high fat, low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) was developed as an alternative to fasting for seizure management. While the mechanisms by which fasting and the KD inhibit seizures remain speculative, alterations in brain energy metabolism are likely involved. We previously showed that caloric restriction (CR) inhibits seizure susceptibility by reducing blood glucose in the epileptic EL mouse, a natural model for human multifactorial idiopathic epilepsy. In this study, we compared the antiepileptic and anticonvulsant efficacy of the KD with that of CR in adult EL mice with active epilepsy. EL mice that experienced at least 15 recurrent complex partial seizures were fed either a standard diet unrestricted (SD-UR) or restricted (SD-R), and either a KD unrestricted (KD-UR) or restricted (KD-R). All mice were fasted for 14 hrs prior to diet initiation. A new experimental design was used where each mouse in the diet-restricted groups served as its own control to achieve a 20–23% body weight reduction. Seizure susceptibility, body weights, and the levels of plasma glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate were measured once/week over a nine-week treatment period. Results Body weights and blood glucose levels remained high over the testing period in the SD-UR and the KD-UR groups, but were significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in the SD-R and KD-R groups. Plasma β-hydroxybutyrate levels were significantly (p < 0.001) increased in the SD-R and KD-R groups compared to their respective UR groups. Seizure susceptibility remained high in both UR-fed groups throughout the study, but was significantly reduced after three weeks in both R-fed groups. Conclusions The results indicate that seizure susceptibility in EL mice is dependent on plasma glucose levels and that seizure control is more associated with the amount than with the origin of dietary calories. Also, CR underlies the antiepileptic and anticonvulsant action of the KD in EL mice. A transition from glucose to ketone

  15. Lifespan-extending caloric restriction or mTOR inhibition impair adaptive immunity of old mice by distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Emily L; Romero-Aleshire, Melissa J; Renkema, Kristin R; Ventevogel, Melissa S; Chew, Wade M; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L; Smithey, Megan J; Limesand, Kirsten H; Sempowski, Gregory D; Brooks, Heddwen L; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko

    2015-01-01

    Aging of the world population and a concomitant increase in age-related diseases and disabilities mandates the search for strategies to increase healthspan, the length of time an individual lives healthy and productively. Due to the age-related decline of the immune system, infectious diseases remain among the top 5–10 causes of mortality and morbidity in the elderly, and improving immune function during aging remains an important aspect of healthspan extension. Calorie restriction (CR) and more recently rapamycin (rapa) feeding have both been used to extend lifespan in mice. Preciously few studies have actually investigated the impact of each of these interventions upon in vivo immune defense against relevant microbial challenge in old organisms. We tested how rapa and CR each impacted the immune system in adult and old mice. We report that each intervention differentially altered T-cell development in the thymus, peripheral T-cell maintenance, T-cell function and host survival after West Nile virus infection, inducing distinct but deleterious consequences to the aging immune system. We conclude that neither rapa feeding nor CR, in the current form/administration regimen, may be optimal strategies for extending healthy immune function and, with it, lifespan. PMID:25424641

  16. Protein-Pacing Caloric-Restriction Enhances Body Composition Similarly in Obese Men and Women during Weight Loss and Sustains Efficacy during Long-Term Weight Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Arciero, Paul J; Edmonds, Rohan; He, Feng; Ward, Emery; Gumpricht, Eric; Mohr, Alex; Ormsbee, Michael J; Astrup, Arne

    2016-07-30

    Short-Term protein-pacing (P; ~6 meals/day, >30% protein/day) and caloric restriction (CR, ~25% energy deficit) improves total (TBF), abdominal (ABF) and visceral (VAT) fat loss, energy expenditure, and biomarkers compared to heart healthy (HH) recommendations (3 meals/day, 15% protein/day) in obese adults. Less is known whether obese men and women respond similarly to P-CR during weight loss (WL) and whether a modified P-CR (mP-CR) is more efficacious than a HH diet during long-term (52 week) weight maintenance (WM). The purposes of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of: (1) P-CR on TBF, ABF, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and biomarkers between obese men and women during WL (weeks 0-12); and (2) mP-CR compared to a HH diet during WM (weeks 13-64). During WL, men (n = 21) and women (n = 19) were assessed for TBF, ABF, VAT, RMR, and biomarkers at weeks 0 (pre) and 12 (post). Men and women had similar reductions (p < 0.01) in weight (10%), TBF (19%), ABF (25%), VAT (33%), glucose (7%-12%), insulin (40%), leptin (>50%) and increase in % lean body mass (9%). RMR (kcals/kg bodyweight) was unchanged and respiratory quotient decreased 9%. Twenty-four subjects (mP-CR, n = 10; HH, n = 14) completed WM. mP-CR regained significantly less body weight (6%), TBF (12%), and ABF (17%) compared to HH (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrate P-CR enhances weight loss, body composition and biomarkers, and maintains these changes for 52-weeks compared to a traditional HH diet.

  17. Green tea supplementation benefits body composition and improves bone properties in obese female rats fed with high-fat diet and caloric restricted diet.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Han, Jia; Wang, Shu; Chung, Eunhee; Chyu, Ming-Chien; Cao, Jay J

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of green tea polyphenols (GTP) supplementation on body composition, bone properties, and serum markers in obese rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a caloric restricted diet (CRD). Forty-eight female rats were fed an HFD ad libitum for 4 months, and then either continued on the HFD or the CRD with or without 0.5% GTP in water. Body composition, bone efficacy, and serum markers were measured. We hypothesized that GTP supplementation would improve body composition, mitigate bone loss, and restore bone microstructure in obese animals fed either HFD or CRD. CRD lowered percent fat mass; bone mass and trabecular number of tibia, femur and lumbar vertebrae; femoral strength; trabecular and cortical thickness of tibia; insulin-like growth factor-I and leptin. CRD also increased percent fat-free mass; trabecular separation of tibia and femur; eroded surface of tibia; bone formation rate and erosion rate at tibia shaft; and adiponectin. GTP supplementation increased femoral mass and strength (P = .026), trabecular thickness (P = .012) and number (P = .019), and cortical thickness of tibia (P < .001), and decreased trabecular separation (P = .021), formation rate (P < .001), and eroded surface (P < .001) at proximal tibia, and insulin-like growth factor-I and leptin. There were significant interactions (diet type × GTP) on osteoblast surface/bone surface, mineral apposition rate at periosteal and endocortical bones, periosteal bone formation rate, and trabecular thickness at femur and lumbar vertebrate (P < .05). This study demonstrates that GTP supplementation for 4 months benefited body composition and improved bone microstructure and strength in obese rats fed with HFD or HFD followed by CRD diet.

  18. Metabolically distinct weight loss by 10,12 CLA and caloric restriction highlight the importance of subcutaneous white adipose tissue for glucose homeostasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shari; Goodspeed, Leela; Wietecha, Tomasz; Houston, Barbara; Omer, Mohamed; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Subramanian, Savitha; Gowda, G. A. Nagana; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Kaiyala, Karl J.; Morton, Gregory J.; Chait, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Background Widely used as a weight loss supplement, trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (10,12 CLA) promotes fat loss in obese mice and humans, but has also been associated with insulin resistance. Objective We therefore sought to directly compare weight loss by 10,12 CLA versus caloric restriction (CR, 15–25%), an acceptable healthy method of weight loss, to determine how 10,12 CLA-mediated weight loss fails to improve glucose metabolism. Methods Obese mice with characteristics of human metabolic syndrome were either supplemented with 10,12 CLA or subjected to CR to promote weight loss. Metabolic endpoints such as energy expenditure, glucose and insulin tolerance testing, and trunk fat distribution were measured. Results By design, 10,12 CLA and CR caused equivalent weight loss, with greater fat loss by 10,12 CLA accompanied by increased energy expenditure, reduced respiratory quotient, increased fat oxidation, accumulation of alternatively activated macrophages, and browning of subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT). Moreover, 10,12 CLA-supplemented mice better defended their body temperature against a cold challenge. However, 10,12 CLA concurrently induced the detrimental loss of subcutaneous WAT without reducing visceral WAT, promoted reduced plasma and WAT adipokine levels, worsened hepatic steatosis, and failed to improve glucose metabolism. Obese mice undergoing CR were protected from subcutaneous-specific fat loss, had improved hepatic steatosis, and subsequently showed the expected improvements in WAT adipokines, glucose metabolism and WAT inflammation. Conclusions These results suggest that 10,12 CLA mediates the preferential loss of subcutaneous fat that likely contributes to hepatic steatosis and maintained insulin resistance, despite significant weight loss and WAT browning in mice. Collectively, we have shown that weight loss due to 10,12 CLA supplementation or CR results in dramatically different metabolic phenotypes, with the latter

  19. Protein-Pacing Caloric-Restriction Enhances Body Composition Similarly in Obese Men and Women during Weight Loss and Sustains Efficacy during Long-Term Weight Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, Paul J.; Edmonds, Rohan; He, Feng; Ward, Emery; Gumpricht, Eric; Mohr, Alex; Ormsbee, Michael J.; Astrup, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Short-Term protein-pacing (P; ~6 meals/day, >30% protein/day) and caloric restriction (CR, ~25% energy deficit) improves total (TBF), abdominal (ABF) and visceral (VAT) fat loss, energy expenditure, and biomarkers compared to heart healthy (HH) recommendations (3 meals/day, 15% protein/day) in obese adults. Less is known whether obese men and women respond similarly to P-CR during weight loss (WL) and whether a modified P-CR (mP-CR) is more efficacious than a HH diet during long-term (52 week) weight maintenance (WM). The purposes of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of: (1) P-CR on TBF, ABF, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and biomarkers between obese men and women during WL (weeks 0–12); and (2) mP-CR compared to a HH diet during WM (weeks 13–64). During WL, men (n = 21) and women (n = 19) were assessed for TBF, ABF, VAT, RMR, and biomarkers at weeks 0 (pre) and 12 (post). Men and women had similar reductions (p < 0.01) in weight (10%), TBF (19%), ABF (25%), VAT (33%), glucose (7%–12%), insulin (40%), leptin (>50%) and increase in % lean body mass (9%). RMR (kcals/kg bodyweight) was unchanged and respiratory quotient decreased 9%. Twenty-four subjects (mP-CR, n = 10; HH, n = 14) completed WM. mP-CR regained significantly less body weight (6%), TBF (12%), and ABF (17%) compared to HH (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrate P-CR enhances weight loss, body composition and biomarkers, and maintains these changes for 52-weeks compared to a traditional HH diet. PMID:27483317

  20. Effects of resistance training with and without caloric restriction on physical function and mobility in overweight and obese older adults: a randomized controlled trial1234

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, Barbara J; Chmelo, Elizabeth; Delbono, Osvaldo; Carr, J Jeffrey; Lyles, Mary F; Marsh, Anthony P

    2015-01-01

    Background: Resistance training (RT) improves muscle strength and overall physical function in older adults. RT may be particularly important in the obese elderly who have compromised muscle function. Whether caloric restriction (CR) acts synergistically with RT to enhance function is unknown. Objective: As the primary goal of the Improving Muscle for Functional Independence Trial (I’M FIT), we determined the effects of adding CR for weight loss on muscle and physical function responses to RT in older overweight and obese adults. Design: I’M FIT was a 5-mo trial in 126 older (65–79 y) overweight and obese men and women who were randomly assigned to a progressive, 3-d/wk, moderate-intensity RT intervention with a weight-loss intervention (RT+CR) or without a weight-loss intervention (RT). The primary outcome was maximal knee extensor strength; secondary outcomes were muscle power and quality, overall physical function, and total body and thigh compositions. Results: Body mass decreased in the RT+CR group but not in the RT group. Fat mass, percentage of fat, and all thigh fat volumes decreased in both groups, but only the RT+CR group lost lean mass. Adjusted postintervention body- and thigh-composition measures were all lower with RT+CR except intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT). Knee strength, power, and quality and the 4-m gait speed increased similarly in both groups. Adjusted postintervention means for a 400-m walk time and self-reported disability were better with RT+CR with no group differences in other functional measures, including knee strength. Participants with a lower percentage of fat and IMAT at baseline exhibited a greater improvement in the 400-m walk and knee strength and power. Conclusions: RT improved body composition (including reducing IMAT) and muscle strength and physical function in obese elderly, but those with higher initial adiposity experienced less improvement. The addition of CR during RT improves mobility and does not compromise

  1. Effect of Two-Year Caloric Restriction on Bone Metabolism and Bone Mineral Density in Non-Obese Younger Adults: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Villareal, Dennis T; Fontana, Luigi; Das, Sai Krupa; Redman, Leanne; Smith, Steven R; Saltzman, Edward; Bales, Connie; Rochon, James; Pieper, Carl; Huang, Megan; Lewis, Michael; Schwartz, Ann V

    2016-01-01

    Although caloric restriction (CR) could delay biologic aging in humans, it is unclear if this would occur at the cost of significant bone loss. We evaluated the effect of prolonged CR on bone metabolism and bone mineral density (BMD) in healthy younger adults. Two-hundred eighteen non-obese (body mass index [BMI] 25.1 ± 1.7 kg/m(2) ), younger (age 37.9 ± 7.2 years) adults were randomly assigned to 25% CR (CR group, n = 143) or ad libitum (AL group, n = 75) for 2 years. Main outcomes were BMD and markers of bone turnover. Other outcomes included body composition, bone-active hormones, nutrient intake, and physical activity. Body weight (-7.5 ± 0.4 versus 0.1 ± 0.5 kg), fat mass (-5.3 ± 0.3 versus 0.4 ± 0.4 kg), and fat-free mass (-2.2 ± 0.2 versus -0.2 ± 0.2 kg) decreased in the CR group compared with AL (all between group p < 0.001). Compared with AL, the CR group had greater changes in BMD at 24 months: lumbar spine (-0.013 ± 0.003 versus 0.007 ± 0.004 g/cm(2) ; p < 0.001), total hip (-0.017 ± 0.002 versus 0.001 ± 0.003 g/cm(2) ; p < 0.001), and femoral neck (-0.015 ± 0.003 versus -0.005 ± 0.004 g/cm(2) ; p = 0.03). Changes in bone markers were greater at 12 months for C-telopeptide (0.098 ± 0.012 versus 0.025 ± 0.015 μg/L; p < 0.001), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (0.4 ± 0.1 versus 0.2 ± 0.1 U/L; p = 0.004), and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) (-1.4 ± 0.4 versus -0.3 ± 0.5 U/L; p = 0.047) but not procollagen type 1 N-propeptide; at 24 months, only BSAP differed between groups (-1.5 ± 0.4 versus 0.9 ± 0.6 U/L; p = 0.001). The CR group had larger increases in 25-hydroxyvitamin D, cortisol, and adiponectin and decreases in leptin and insulin compared with AL. However, parathyroid hormone and IGF-1 levels did not differ between groups. The CR group also had lower levels of physical activity

  2. Maternal Caloric Restriction Implemented during the Preconceptional and Pregnancy Period Alters Hypothalamic and Hippocampal Endocannabinoid Levels at Birth and Induces Overweight and Increased Adiposity at Adulthood in Male Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Vázquez, Mariam; Bindila, Laura; Lomazzo, Ermelinda; Hofmann, Clementine; Blanco, Rosarío Noemí; Alén, Francisco; Antón, María; Decara, Juan; Arco, Rocío; Ouro, Daniel; Orio, Laura; Suárez, Juan; Lutz, Beat; Gómez de Heras, Raquel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to inadequate nutritional conditions in critical windows of development has been associated to disturbances on metabolism and behavior in the offspring later in life. The role of the endocannabinoid system, a known regulator of energy expenditure and adaptive behaviors, in the modulation of these processes is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the impact of exposing rat dams to diet restriction (20% less calories than standard diet) during pre-gestational and gestational periods on: (a) neonatal outcomes; (b) endocannabinoid content in hypothalamus, hippocampus and olfactory bulb at birth; (c) metabolism-related parameters; and (d) behavior in adult male offspring. We found that calorie-restricted dams tended to have a reduced litter size, although the offspring showed normal weight at birth. Pups from calorie-restricted dams also exhibited a strong decrease in the levels of anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), arachidonic acid (AA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in the hypothalamus at birth. Additionally, pups from diet-restricted dams displayed reduced levels of AEA in the hippocampus without significant differences in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, offspring exhibited increased weight gain, body weight and adiposity in adulthood as well as increased anxiety-related responses. We propose that endocannabinoid signaling is altered by a maternal caloric restriction implemented during the preconceptional and pregnancy periods, which might lead to modifications of the hypothalamic and hippocampal circuits, potentially contributing to the long-term effects found in the adult offspring.

  3. Maternal Caloric Restriction Implemented during the Preconceptional and Pregnancy Period Alters Hypothalamic and Hippocampal Endocannabinoid Levels at Birth and Induces Overweight and Increased Adiposity at Adulthood in Male Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Vázquez, Mariam; Bindila, Laura; Lomazzo, Ermelinda; Hofmann, Clementine; Blanco, Rosarío Noemí; Alén, Francisco; Antón, María; Decara, Juan; Arco, Rocío; Ouro, Daniel; Orio, Laura; Suárez, Juan; Lutz, Beat; Gómez de Heras, Raquel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to inadequate nutritional conditions in critical windows of development has been associated to disturbances on metabolism and behavior in the offspring later in life. The role of the endocannabinoid system, a known regulator of energy expenditure and adaptive behaviors, in the modulation of these processes is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the impact of exposing rat dams to diet restriction (20% less calories than standard diet) during pre-gestational and gestational periods on: (a) neonatal outcomes; (b) endocannabinoid content in hypothalamus, hippocampus and olfactory bulb at birth; (c) metabolism-related parameters; and (d) behavior in adult male offspring. We found that calorie-restricted dams tended to have a reduced litter size, although the offspring showed normal weight at birth. Pups from calorie-restricted dams also exhibited a strong decrease in the levels of anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), arachidonic acid (AA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in the hypothalamus at birth. Additionally, pups from diet-restricted dams displayed reduced levels of AEA in the hippocampus without significant differences in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, offspring exhibited increased weight gain, body weight and adiposity in adulthood as well as increased anxiety-related responses. We propose that endocannabinoid signaling is altered by a maternal caloric restriction implemented during the preconceptional and pregnancy periods, which might lead to modifications of the hypothalamic and hippocampal circuits, potentially contributing to the long-term effects found in the adult offspring. PMID:27847471

  4. The Effects of Caloric Density of the Food on Running Endurance and General Condition of Rats and Hamsters Restricted in Food Intake or Fed Ad Libitum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    triglyceride levels were 76Z and plasma total cholesterol levels 22X (significant) higher in non-exercised than in regularly exercised animals...right after running to exhaustion. In the hamsters kept at tropical climatic conditions, plasma total cholesterol at both food intake levels was...than on day 8 of the restricted intake. In the hamsters, average plasma triglyceride levels were 76% and plasma total cholesterol levels Z2

  5. A weekly alternating diet between caloric restriction and medium fat protects the liver from fatty liver development in middle-aged C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Rusli, Fenni; Boekschoten, Mark V; Zubia, Arantza Aguirre; Lute, Carolien; Müller, Michael; Steegenga, Wilma T

    2015-01-01

    Scope We investigated whether a novel dietary intervention consisting of an every-other-week calorie-restricted diet could prevent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) development induced by a medium-fat (MF) diet. Methods and results Nine-week-old male C57BL/6J mice received either a (i) control (C), (ii) 30E% calorie restricted (CR), (iii) MF (25E% fat), or (iv) intermittent (INT) diet, a diet alternating weekly between 40E% CR and an ad libitum MF diet until sacrifice at the age of 12 months. The metabolic, morphological, and molecular features of NAFLD were examined. The INT diet resulted in healthy metabolic and morphological features as displayed by the continuous CR diet: glucose tolerant, low hepatic triglyceride content, low plasma alanine aminotransferase. In contrast, the C- and MF-exposed mice with high body weight developed signs of NAFLD. However, the gene expression profiles of INT-exposed mice differed to those of CR-exposed mice and showed to be more similar with those of C- and MF-exposed mice with a comparable body weight. Conclusions Our study reveals that the INT diet maintains metabolic health and reverses the adverse effects of the MF diet, thus effectively prevents the development of NAFLD in 12-month-old male C57BL/6J mice. PMID:25504628

  6. Global Metabolic Profiling of Plasma Shows that Three-Year Mild-Caloric Restriction Lessens an Age-Related Increase in Sphingomyelin and Reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in Overweight and Obese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjoo; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-12-01

    The effect of weight loss from long-term, mild-calorie diets (MCD) on plasma metabolites is unknown. This study was to examine whether MCD-induced weight reduction caused changes in the extended plasma metabolites. Overweight and obese subjects aged 40-59 years consumed a MCD (approximately 100 kcal/day deficit, n=47) or a weight-maintenance diet (control, n=47) in a randomized, controlled design with a three-year clinical intervention period and plasma samples were analyzed by using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. The three-year MCD intervention resulted in weight loss (-8.87%) and significant decreases in HOMA-IR and TG. The three-year follow-up of the MCD group showed reductions in the following 13 metabolites: L-leucine; L-phenylalanine; 9 lysoPCs; PC (18:0/20:4); and SM (d18:0/16:1). The three-year MCD group follow-up identified increases in palmitic amide, oleamide, and PC (18:2/18:2). Considering the age-related alterations in the identified metabolites, the MCD group showed a greater decrease in L-leucine, L-phenylalanine, and SM (d18:0/16:1) compared with those of the control group. Overall, the change (Δ) in BMI positively correlated with the ΔTG, ΔHOMA-IR, ΔL-leucine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The ΔHOMA-IR positively correlated with ΔTG, ΔL-leucine, ΔL-phenylalanine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The weight loss resulting from three-year mild-caloric restriction lessens the age-related increase in SM and reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in overweight and obese subjects. These changes were coupled with improved insulin resistance (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02081898).

  7. Global Metabolic Profiling of Plasma Shows that Three-Year Mild-Caloric Restriction Lessens an Age-Related Increase in Sphingomyelin and Reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in Overweight and Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minjoo; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-01-01

    The effect of weight loss from long-term, mild-calorie diets (MCD) on plasma metabolites is unknown. This study was to examine whether MCD-induced weight reduction caused changes in the extended plasma metabolites. Overweight and obese subjects aged 40-59 years consumed a MCD (approximately 100 kcal/day deficit, n=47) or a weight-maintenance diet (control, n=47) in a randomized, controlled design with a three-year clinical intervention period and plasma samples were analyzed by using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. The three-year MCD intervention resulted in weight loss (-8.87%) and significant decreases in HOMA-IR and TG. The three-year follow-up of the MCD group showed reductions in the following 13 metabolites: L-leucine; L-phenylalanine; 9 lysoPCs; PC (18:0/20:4); and SM (d18:0/16:1). The three-year MCD group follow-up identified increases in palmitic amide, oleamide, and PC (18:2/18:2). Considering the age-related alterations in the identified metabolites, the MCD group showed a greater decrease in L-leucine, L-phenylalanine, and SM (d18:0/16:1) compared with those of the control group. Overall, the change (Δ) in BMI positively correlated with the ΔTG, ΔHOMA-IR, ΔL-leucine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The ΔHOMA-IR positively correlated with ΔTG, ΔL-leucine, ΔL-phenylalanine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The weight loss resulting from three-year mild-caloric restriction lessens the age-related increase in SM and reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in overweight and obese subjects. These changes were coupled with improved insulin resistance (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02081898). PMID:28053823

  8. Caloric restriction confers persistent anti-oxidative, pro-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects and promotes anti-aging miRNA expression profile in cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Csiszar, Anna; Gautam, Tripti; Sosnowska, Danuta; Tarantini, Stefano; Banki, Eszter; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Koller, Akos; Reglodi, Dora; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2014-08-01

    In rodents, moderate caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition exerts significant cerebrovascular protective effects, improving cortical microvascular density and endothelium-dependent vasodilation, but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain elusive. To elucidate the persisting effects of CR on cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells (CMVECs), primary CMVECs were isolated from young (3 mo old) and aged (24 mo old) ad libitum-fed and aged CR F344xBN rats. We found an age-related increase in cellular and mitochondrial oxidative stress, which is prevented by CR. Expression and transcriptional activity of Nrf2 are both significantly reduced in aged CMVECs, whereas CR prevents age-related Nrf2 dysfunction. Expression of miR-144 was upregulated in aged CMVECs, and overexpression of miR-144 significantly decreased expression of Nrf2 in cells derived from both young animals and aged CR rats. Overexpression of a miR-144 antagomir in aged CMVECs significantly decreases expression of miR-144 and upregulates Nrf2. We found that CR prevents age-related impairment of angiogenic processes, including cell proliferation, adhesion to collagen, and formation of capillary-like structures and inhibits apoptosis in CMVECs. CR also exerts significant anti-inflammatory effects, preventing age-related increases in the transcriptional activity of NF-κB and age-associated pro-inflammatory shift in the endothelial secretome. Characterization of CR-induced changes in miRNA expression suggests that they likely affect several critical functions in endothelial cell homeostasis. The predicted regulatory effects of CR-related differentially expressed miRNAs in aged CMVECs are consistent with the anti-aging endothelial effects of CR observed in vivo. Collectively, we find that CR confers persisting anti-oxidative, pro-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory cellular effects, preserving a youthful phenotype in rat cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells, suggesting that through these effects CR may

  9. Effect of shortened sleep on energy expenditure, core body temperature, and appetite: a human randomised crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, Masanobu; Kubota, Chie; Mizuno, Tomohito; Aritake, Sayaka; Mitsui, Yuki; Katashima, Mitsuhiro; Uchida, Sunao

    2017-01-01

    The effects of sleep restriction on energy metabolism and appetite remain controversial. We examined the effects of shortened sleep duration on energy metabolism, core body temperature (CBT), and appetite profiles. Nine healthy men were evaluated in a randomised crossover study under two conditions: a 3.5-h sleep duration and a 7-h sleep duration for three consecutive nights followed by one 7-h recovery sleep night. The subjects’ energy expenditure (EE), substrate utilisation, and CBT were continually measured for 48 h using a whole-room calorimeter. The subjects completed an appetite questionnaire every hour while in the calorimeter. Sleep restriction did not affect total EE or substrate utilisation. The 48-h mean CBT decreased significantly during the 3.5-h sleep condition compared with the 7-h sleep condition (7-h sleep, 36.75 ± 0.11 °C; 3.5-h sleep, 36.68 ± 0.14 °C; p = 0.016). After three consecutive nights of sleep restriction, fasting peptide YY levels and fullness were significantly decreased (p = 0.011), whereas hunger and prospective food consumption were significantly increased, compared to those under the 7-h sleep condition. Shortened sleep increased appetite by decreasing gastric hormone levels, but did not affect EE, suggesting that greater caloric intake during a shortened sleep cycle increases the risk of weight gain. PMID:28071649

  10. Sublethal mitochondrial stress with an attendant stoichiometric augmentation of reactive oxygen species may precipitate many of the beneficial alterations in cellular physiology produced by caloric restriction, intermittent fasting, exercise and dietary phytonutrients: "Mitohormesis" for health and vitality.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Patrick C

    2006-01-01

    The precise mechanistic sequence producing the beneficial effects on health and lifespan seen with interventions as diverse as caloric restriction, intermittent fasting, exercise, and consumption of dietary phytonutrients is still under active characterization, with large swaths of the research community kept in relative isolation from one another. Among the explanatory models capable of assisting in the identification of precipitating elements responsible for beneficial influences on physiology seen in these states, the hormesis perspective on biological systems under stress has yielded considerable insight into likely evolutionarily consistent organizing principles functioning in all four conditions. Recent experimental findings provide the tantalizing initial lodestones for an entirely new research front examining molecular substrates of stress resistance. In this novel body of research, a surprising new twist has emerged: Reactive oxygen species, derived from the mitochondrial electron transport system, may be necessary triggering elements for a sequence of events that result in benefits ranging from the transiently cytoprotective to organismal-level longevity. With the recent appreciation that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species function as signaling elements in a interconnected matrix of signal transduction, the entire basis of many widely accepted theories of aging that predominated in the past may need to be reconsidered to facilitate the formulation of an new perspective more correctly informed by the most contemporaneous experimental findings. This perspective, the mitohormesis theory, can be used in many disparate domains of inquiry to potentially explain previous findings, as well as point to new targets of research. The utility of this perspective for research on aging is significant, but beyond that this perspective emphasizes the pressing need to rigorously characterize the specific contribution of the stoichiometry of reactive

  11. Caloric density affects food hoarding and intake by Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wood, A D; Bartness, T J

    1996-01-01

    Siberian hamsters respond to food deprivation or restriction by increasing their food hoarding and do so proportionately to the degree of body mass (fat) loss. These data suggest that Siberian hamsters integrate their internally stored energy as body fat with their externally stored energy as hoarded food such that when internal energy stores are decreased, external stores are increased. The purpose of the present experiments was to test whether the caloric value of the food hoard is regulated. This was accomplished by challenging the hamsters with diets of varying caloric density and assessing whether their hoarded food is changed accordingly. Specifically, in Experiment 1 hamsters were switched from the control food pellets to a diet where the caloric density was increased by creating a high fat diet (HFD). In Experiment 2, the caloric density of the control diet was decreased by diluting it with cellulose such that 25% and 50% (kcal/wt) reduced calorie diets (RCDs) were created. HFD-fed hamsters decreased their food hoarding, increased their body mass, and decreased the grams of food eaten, but not enough to compensate exactly for the increased caloric density of the diet. When refed the control diet, food hoarding increased to pre-HFD levels as body mass and food intake decreased. RCD feeding resulted in caloric density-dependent effects on all measures. Food hoarding and intake (grams and calories) increased when hamsters were given the 25% RCD and did so to an even greater degree when given the 50% RCD. Thus, Siberian hamsters responded to increases or decreases in the caloric density of their food by attempting to regulate the number of calories hoarded and eaten; however, the adjustments in food hoarding: 1) were not precise, 2) were largely opposite of food intake, 3) tended to be inversely related to body mass and 4) were caloric density dependent.

  12. Lengthenings and Shortenings in Germanic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaden, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Many languages have processes which lengthen or shorten a vowel or consonant. In this dissertation, I concentrate on Open Syllable Lengthening, Closed Syllable Shortening, Monosyllabic Lengthening and Trochaic Lengthening, and present a formal model which captures these lengthenings and shortening as the insertion, deletion or reassignment of a…

  13. The CALOR93 code system

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a program package, CALOR93, that has been developed to design and analyze different detector systems, in particular, calorimeters which are used in high energy physics experiments to determine the energy of particles. One`s ability to design a calorimeter to perform a certain task can have a strong influence upon the validity of experimental results. The validity of the results obtained with CALOR93 has been verified many times by comparison with experimental data. The codes (HETC93, SPECT93, LIGHT, EGS4, MORSE, and MICAP) are quite generalized and detailed enough so that any experimental calorimeter setup can be studied. Due to this generalization, some software development is necessary because of the wide diversity of calorimeter designs.

  14. Mechano-caloric cooling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Luna, Jack; Abbassi, P.; Carandang, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    The mechano-caloric effect is potentially useful in the He II temperature range. Aside from demonstration work, little quantification effort appears to have been known since other refrigeration possibilities have been available for some time. Successful He II use-related system examples are as follows: in space, the utilization of the latent heat of vaporization has been quite successful in vapor-liquid phase separation (VLPS) in conjunction with thermomechanical force application in plugs. In magnet cooling systems, the possibility of using the mechano-caloric cooling effect in conjunction with thermo-mechanical circulation pump schemes, has been assessed (but not quantified yet to the extent desirable). A third example is quoted in conjunction with superfluid wind tunnel studies and liquid helium tow tank for surface vessels respectively. In all of these (partially future) R and D areas, the question of refrigerator effectiveness using the mechano-caloric effect appears to be relevant, possibly in conjunction with questions of reliability and simplicity. The present work is concerned with quantification of phenomena including simplified thermodynamic cycle calculations.

  15. Comparison of standardized versus individualized caloric prescriptions in the nutritional rehabilitation of inpatients with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Haynos, Ann F.; Snipes, Cassandra; Guarda, Angela; Mayer, Laurel E.; Attia, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sparse research informs how caloric prescriptions should be advanced during nutritional rehabilitation of inpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN). This study compared the impact of a standardized caloric increase approach, in which increases occurred on a predetermined schedule, to an individualized approach, in which increases occurred only following insufficient weight gain, on rate, pattern, and cumulative amount of weight gain and other weight restoration outcomes. Method This study followed a natural experiment design comparing AN inpatients consecutively admitted before (n = 35) and after (n = 35) an institutional change from individualized to standardized caloric prescriptions. Authors examined the impact of prescription plan on weekly weight gain in the first treatment month using multilevel modeling. Within a subsample remaining inpatient through weight restoration (n = 40), multiple regressions examined the impact of caloric prescription plan on time to weight restoration, length of hospitalization, maximum caloric prescription, discharge BMI, and incidence of activity restriction and edema. Results There were significant interactions between prescription plan and quadratic time on average weekly weight gain (p = .03) and linear time on cumulative weekly weight gain (p < .001). Under the standardized plan, patients gained in an accelerated curvilinear pattern (p = .04) and, therefore, gained cumulatively greater amounts of weight over time (p < .001). Additionally, 30% fewer patients required activity restriction under the standardized plan. Discussion Standardized caloric prescriptions may confer advantage by facilitating accelerated early weight gain and lower incidence of bed rest without increasing the incidence of refeeding syndrome. PMID:26769581

  16. Carnot to Clausius: caloric to entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses how the Carnot engine led to the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics and entropy. The operation of the engine is analysed both in terms of heat as the caloric fluid and heat as a form of energy. A keystone of Carnot's thinking was the absolute conservation of caloric. Although the Carnot analysis was partly incorrect, Clausius showed that by reinterpreting Carnot's caloric as entropy he was able to formulate the second law.

  17. [Caloric substrates in postoperative parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    De Salvo, L; Romairone, E; Ansaldo, G L; Mattioli, G

    1991-05-31

    The paper describes the carbohydrate, lipidic and nitrogen metabolism of the postoperative period which is subdivided into an early and a late phase. Since the metabolism of caloric substrates in the early postoperative period is a stress metabolism with glucose intolerance and wide protein catabolism, the authors emphasise that an insufficient caloric intake is worse than the fasting state and suggest that alternative caloric sources, such as branched chain amino acids, fatty acids and, even, ketonic bodies, should be used.

  18. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  19. Carnot to Clausius: Caloric to Entropy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses how the Carnot engine led to the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics and entropy. The operation of the engine is analysed both in terms of heat as the caloric fluid and heat as a form of energy. A keystone of Carnot's thinking was the absolute conservation of caloric. Although the Carnot analysis was partly…

  20. Drunkorexia: Calorie Restriction Prior to Alcohol Consumption among College Freshman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Sloane C.; Cremeens, Jennifer; Vail-Smith, Karen; Woolsey, Conrad

    2010-01-01

    Using a sample of 692 freshmen at a southeastern university, this study examined caloric restriction among students prior to planned alcohol consumption. Participants were surveyed for self-reported alcohol consumption, binge drinking, and caloric intake habits prior to drinking episodes. Results indicated that 99 of 695 (14%) of first year…

  1. Macronutrients and caloric intake in health and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Solon-Biet, Samantha M.; Mitchell, Sarah J.; de Cabo, Rafael; Raubenheimer, David; Le Couteur, David G.; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Both lifespan and healthspan are influenced by nutrition, with nutritional interventions proving to be robust across a wide range of species. However, the relationship between nutrition, health and aging is still not fully understood. Caloric restriction is the most studied dietary intervention known to extend life in many organisms, but recently the balance of macronutrients has been shown to play a critical role. In this review, we discuss the current understanding regarding the impact of calories and macronutrient balance in mammalian health and longevity and highlight the key nutrient-sensing pathways that mediate the effects of nutrition on health and ageing. PMID:26021555

  2. Systematic review and meta-analysis reveals acutely elevated plasma cortisol following fasting but not less severe calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuko; Walker, Brian R; Ikuta, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma cortisol has been reported following caloric restriction, and may contribute to adverse effects including stress-induced overeating, but results from published studies are inconsistent. To clarify the effects of caloric restriction on plasma cortisol, and to assess cortisol as an indicator of stress during caloric restriction, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies in which cortisol was measured following caloric restriction without other manipulations in humans. We further compared effects of fasting, very low calorie diet (VLCD), and other less intense low calorie diet (LCD), as well as the duration of caloric restriction by meta-regression. Overall, caloric restriction significantly increased serum cortisol level in 13 studies (357 total participants). Fasting showed a very strong effect in increasing serum cortisol, while VLCD and LCD did not show significant increases. The meta-regression analysis showed a negative association between the serum cortisol level and the duration of caloric restriction, indicating serum cortisol is increased in the initial period of caloric restriction but decreased to the baseline level after several weeks. These results suggest that severe caloric restriction causes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which may be transient, but results in elevated cortisol which could mediate effects of starvation on brain and metabolic function as well as ameliorate weight loss.

  3. Caloric curve of star clusters.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results.

  4. Caloric curve of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results.

  5. Caloric beverage consumption patterns in Mexican children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mexico has seen a very steep increase in child obesity level. Little is known about caloric beverage intake in this country as well as all other countries outside a few high income countries. This study examines overall patterns and trends in all caloric beverages from two nationally representative surveys from Mexico. Methods The two nationally representative dietary intake surveys (1999 and 2006) from Mexico are used to study caloric beverage intake in 17, 215 children. The volume (ml) and caloric energy (kcal) contributed by all beverages consumed by the sample subjects were measured. Results are weighted to be nationally representative. Results The trends from the dietary intake surveys showed very large increases in caloric beverages among pre-school and school children. The contribution of whole milk and sugar-sweetened juices was an important finding. Mexican pre-school children consumed 27.8% of their energy from caloric beverages in 2006 and school children consumed 20.7% of their energy from caloric beverages during the same time. The three major categories of beverage intake are whole milk, fruit juice with various sugar and water combinations and carbonated and noncarbonated sugared-beverages. Conclusion The Mexican government, greatly concerned about obesity, has identified the large increase in caloric beverages from whole milk, juices and soft drinks as a key target and is initiating major changes to address this problem. They have already used the data to shift 20 million persons in their welfare and feeding programs from whole to 1.5% fat milk and in a year will shift to nonfat milk. They are using these data to revise school beverage policies and national regulations and taxation policies related to an array of less healthful caloric beverages. PMID:20964842

  6. Asymmetry Dependence of the Nuclear Caloric Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-03-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. Two independent thermometers, the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer and the Albergo yield ratio thermometer, are used to extract the caloric curve. For both methods, the caloric curve extracted shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry For the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer, an increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  7. Shortening anomalies in supersymmetric theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, Jaume; Komargodski, Zohar; Ooguri, Hirosi; Seiberg, Nathan; Wang, Yifan

    2017-01-01

    We present new anomalies in two-dimensional N=(2,2) superconformal theories. They obstruct the shortening conditions of chiral and twisted chiral multiplets at coincident points. This implies that marginal couplings cannot be promoted to background superfields in short representations. Therefore, standard results that follow from N=(2,2) spurion analysis are invalidated. These anomalies appear only if supersymmetry is enhanced beyond N=(2,2) . These anomalies explain why the conformal manifolds of the K3 and T 4 sigma models are not Kähler and do not factorize into chiral and twisted chiral moduli spaces and why there are no N=(2,2) gauged linear sigma models that cover these conformal manifolds. We also present these results from the point of view of the Riemann curvature of conformal manifolds.

  8. Asymmetry dependence of the nuclear caloric curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-02-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. The caloric curve extracted with the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry N-Z/A. An increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  9. New developments in caloric materials for cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, S.; Mathur, N. D.; Moya, X.

    2015-06-01

    Caloric materials are in the spotlight as candidates for future environmentally friendly cooling technologies. We describe stimulating recent developments in the three caloric strands that are now being studied collectively, namely magnetocaloric, electrocaloric and mechanocaloric (elastocaloric or barocaloric) effects.

  10. 10 CFR 590.316 - Shortened proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shortened proceedings. 590.316 Section 590.316 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.316 Shortened proceedings. In...

  11. 10 CFR 590.316 - Shortened proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shortened proceedings. 590.316 Section 590.316 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.316 Shortened proceedings. In...

  12. Report on Time-Shortened Degree Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magill, Samuel H.

    Since January 1971, a number of colleges and universities have announced time-shortened degree programs. In the interest of examining and clarifying the various approaches to and understanding of time-shortened degrees, this brief analysis is offered. There appear to be 4 approaches to the reduction of time spent on the way to the B.A. degree, one…

  13. 10 CFR 590.316 - Shortened proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shortened proceedings. 590.316 Section 590.316 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.316 Shortened proceedings. In...

  14. 18 CFR 41.3 - Shortened procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Shortened procedure. 41.3 Section 41.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... both, in any combination, by the shortened procedure, the Commission shall thereupon issue a...

  15. Autophagy involving age-related cognitive behavior and hippocampus injury is modulated by different caloric intake in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wen; Wang, Rong; Ma, Li-Na; Xu, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Jing-Shuang; Zhao, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Yu-Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicated that different caloric intake may influence neuronal function. Excessive caloric intake associated with accelerated aging of the brain and increased the risk of neurodegenerative disorders. And low caloric intake (caloric restriction, CR) could delay aging, and protect the central nervous system from neurodegenerative disorders. The underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, thirty six-week-old male C57/BL male mice were randomly divided into three different dietary groups: normal control (NC) group (fed standard diet), CR group (fed low-caloric diet) and high-calorie (HC) group (fed high-caloric diet). After 10 months, spatial memory ability was determined by Morris water maze. Pathological changes of the hippocampus cells were detected with HE and Nissl staining. The expression of proteins involved in autophagy in the hippocampus was determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. The result of Morris water maze showed that the learning and memory capacity significantly increased in the CR group, and significantly decreased in the HC group. HE and Nissl staining showed cells damaged obviously in the HC group. The expression of mTOR and p62 was increased in the HC group, and decreased in the CR group. The expression of Beclin1, LC3 and cathepsin B was decreased in the HC group, and increased in the CR group. Our findings demonstrate that long-term high caloric intake is a risk factor that can significantly contribute to the development of neurological disease via suppressing autophagy, and CR may prevent age-related learning ability impairment via activating autophagy in mice. PMID:26380026

  16. 17 CFR 10.92 - Shortened procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... section, the term “statement” includes (1) Statements of fact signed and sworn to by persons having... shortened procedure must be sworn to by persons having knowledge thereof and, except under...

  17. 17 CFR 10.92 - Shortened procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section, the term “statement” includes (1) Statements of fact signed and sworn to by persons having... shortened procedure must be sworn to by persons having knowledge thereof and, except under...

  18. Shortening reaction of human tibialis anterior.

    PubMed

    Berardelli, A; Hallett, M

    1984-02-01

    The shortening reaction of tibialis anterior was observed in 6 of 25 normal subjects, in 6 of 40 patients with upper motor neuron syndromes, and in 11 of 17 patients with Parkinson's disease. The latency of the shortening reaction was comparable with that of the latter part of the long-latency stretch reflexes. The magnitude of the shortening reaction increased with the velocity of the movement that produced it and increased with background voluntary force of plantar flexion in all but the patients with Parkinson's disease. It was not affected by vibration in the patients with Parkinson's disease. The presence of the shortening reaction was not correlated with the clinical impression of increased tone.

  19. On the characteristics of caloric nystagmus in healthy persons. [in response to caloric stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, D.; Baranova, V. P.; Matsnev, E. I.; Yakovleva, M. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The asymmetry of reflex activity of labyrinths and directional preponderance of the reaction were studied on healthy persons subjected to caloric tests. Calorization with hot water was accompanied by less pronounced reactions in all parameters of nystagmus than analogous indices at cold water stimulation. The symmetry of labyrinth function shifted to the right in individuals with greater activity of the left central vestibular formations, analogous to right handedness behavior. It is concluded that asymmetry of reflex nystagmus in healthy persons can be due to a certain preponderance of functional activity in structures of the left hemisphere of the brain.

  20. Energy restriction and potential energy restriction mimetics.

    PubMed

    Nikolai, Sibylle; Pallauf, Kathrin; Huebbe, Patricia; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    Energy restriction (ER; also known as caloric restriction) is the only nutritional intervention that has repeatedly been shown to increase lifespan in model organisms and may delay ageing in humans. In the present review we discuss current scientific literature on ER and its molecular, metabolic and hormonal effects. Moreover, criteria for the classification of substances that might induce positive ER-like changes without having to reduce energy intake are summarised. Additionally, the putative ER mimetics (ERM) 2-deoxy-d-glucose, metformin, rapamycin, resveratrol, spermidine and lipoic acid and their suggested molecular targets are discussed. While there are reports on these ERM candidates that describe lifespan extension in model organisms, data on longevity-inducing effects in higher organisms such as mice remain controversial or are missing. Furthermore, some of these candidates produce detrimental side effects such as immunosuppression or lactic acidosis, or have not been tested for safety in long-term studies. Up to now, there are no known ERM that could be recommended without limitations for use in humans.

  1. Caloric intake and Alzheimer's disease. Experimental approaches and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Pasinetti, Giulio Maria; Zhao, Zhong; Qin, Weiping; Ho, Lap; Shrishailam, Yemul; Macgrogan, Donal; Ressmann, Wendy; Humala, Nelson; Liu, Xunxian; Romero, Carmen; Stetka, Breton; Chen, Linghong; Ksiezak-Reding, Hanna; Wang, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a rapidly growing public health concern with potentially devastating effects. Presently, there are no known cures or effective preventive strategies. While genetic factors are relevant in early-onset cases, they appear to play less of a role in late-onset sporadic AD cases, the most common form of AD. Due to the fact that the disease typically strikes very late in life, delaying symptoms could be as good as a cure for many people. For example, it is now widely accepted that if the onset of the disease could be delayed by even 5 years, the incidence could be cut in half. Both clinical and epidemiological evidence suggests that modification of lifestyle factors such as nutrition may prove crucial to AD management given the mounting experimental evidence suggesting that brain cells are remarkably responsive to "what somebody is doing". Among other nongenetic factors influencing AD, recent studies strongly support the evidence that caloric intake may play a role in the relative risk for AD clinical dementia. Indeed, the effect of diet in AD has been an area of research that has produced promising results, at least experimentally. Most importantly, as mechanistic pathways are defined and their biochemical functions scrutinized, the evidence supporting a direct link between nutrition and AD neuropathology continues to grow. Our work, as well as that of others, has recently resulted in the development of experimental dietary regimens that might promote, attenuate or even reverse features of AD. Most remarkably, while we found that high caloric intake based on saturated fat promotes AD type Beta-amyloidosis, conversely we found that dietary restriction based on reduced carbohydrate intake is able to prevent it. This evidence is very exciting and is, in part, consistent with current epidemiological studies suggesting that obesity and diabetes are associated with a >4-fold increased risk of developing AD. The clarification of the mechanisms

  2. A new light on caloric test--what was disclosed by three dimensional analysis of caloric nystagmus?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Y.

    2001-01-01

    For better understanding of caloric nystagmus, this phenomenon will be reviewed historically in three stages. 1) The first light on caloric nystagmus was thrown by Barany 1906. Through direct observation of eye movements, Barany established the caloric test as an important tool to determine the side of lesion for vertigo. 2) The second light is shed by electrooculogram (EOG) from the late 1950th. EOG enabled qualitative analysis of caloric nystagmus, and proved Barany's convection theory, but resulted in neglect of vertical and roll eye movements. 3) The third light is gained by 3D recording of eye movements started from the late 1980th. 3D recordings of eye movements enabled us to analyze the spatial orientation of caloric nystagmus, and disclose the close correlation of the nystagmus components in the head vertical and the space vertical planes, suggesting a contribution of the velocity storage integrator. The 3D property of caloric nystagmus will be explained in detail.

  3. A new light on caloric test--what was disclosed by three dimensional analysis of caloric nystagmus?

    PubMed

    Arai, Y

    2001-12-01

    For better understanding of caloric nystagmus, this phenomenon will be reviewed historically in three stages. 1) The first light on caloric nystagmus was thrown by Barany 1906. Through direct observation of eye movements, Barany established the caloric test as an important tool to determine the side of lesion for vertigo. 2) The second light is shed by electrooculogram (EOG) from the late 1950th. EOG enabled qualitative analysis of caloric nystagmus, and proved Barany's convection theory, but resulted in neglect of vertical and roll eye movements. 3) The third light is gained by 3D recording of eye movements started from the late 1980th. 3D recordings of eye movements enabled us to analyze the spatial orientation of caloric nystagmus, and disclose the close correlation of the nystagmus components in the head vertical and the space vertical planes, suggesting a contribution of the velocity storage integrator. The 3D property of caloric nystagmus will be explained in detail.

  4. Modeling microscale heat transfer using Calore.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Wong, Chung-Nin Channy; Bainbridge, Bruce L.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2005-09-01

    Modeling microscale heat transfer with the computational-heat-transfer code Calore is discussed. Microscale heat transfer problems differ from their macroscopic counterparts in that conductive heat transfer in both solid and gaseous materials may have important noncontinuum effects. In a solid material, three noncontinuum effects are considered: ballistic transport of phonons across a thin film, scattering of phonons from surface roughness at a gas-solid interface, and scattering of phonons from grain boundaries within the solid material. These processes are modeled for polycrystalline silicon, and the thermal-conductivity values predicted by these models are compared to experimental data. In a gaseous material, two noncontinuum effects are considered: ballistic transport of gas molecules across a thin gap and accommodation of gas molecules to solid conditions when reflecting from a solid surface. These processes are modeled for arbitrary gases by allowing the gas and solid temperatures across a gas-solid interface to differ: a finite heat transfer coefficient (contact conductance) is imposed at the gas-solid interface so that the temperature difference is proportional to the normal heat flux. In this approach, the behavior of gas in the bulk is not changed from behavior observed under macroscopic conditions. These models are implemented in Calore as user subroutines. The user subroutines reside within Sandia's Source Forge server, where they undergo version control and regression testing and are available to analysts needing these capabilities. A Calore simulation is presented that exercises these models for a heated microbeam separated from an ambient-temperature substrate by a thin gas-filled gap. Failure to use the noncontinuum heat transfer models for the solid and the gas causes the maximum temperature of the microbeam to be significantly underpredicted.

  5. A Dissociation Between Recognition and Hedonic Value in Caloric and Non-caloric Carbonated Soft Drinks.

    PubMed

    Delogu, Franco; Huddas, Claire; Steven, Katelyn; Hachem, Souheila; Lodhia, Luv; Fernandez, Ryan; Logerstedt, Macee

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is considered to be a contributor to diabetes and the epidemic of obesity in many countries. The popularity of non-caloric carbonated soft drinks as an alternative to SSBs may be a factor in reducing the health risks associated with SSBs consumption. This study focuses on the perceptual discrimination of SSBs from artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs). Fifty-five college students rated 14 commercially available carbonated soft drinks in terms of sweetness and likeability. They were also asked to recognize, if the drinks contained sugar or a non-caloric artificial sweetener. Overall, participants showed poor accuracy in discriminating drinks' sweeteners, with significantly lower accuracy for SSBs than ASBs. Interestingly, we found a dissociation between sweetener recognition and drink pleasantness. In fact, in spite of a chance-level discrimination accuracy of SSBs, their taste was systematically preferred to the taste of non-caloric beverages. Our findings support the idea that hedonic value of carbonated soft drinks is dissociable from its identification and that the activation of the pleasure system seems not to require explicit recognition of the sweetener contained in the soft drink. We hypothesize that preference for carbonated soft drinks containing sugar over non-caloric alternatives might be modulated by metabolic factors that are independent from conscious and rational consumers' choices.

  6. A Dissociation Between Recognition and Hedonic Value in Caloric and Non-caloric Carbonated Soft Drinks

    PubMed Central

    Delogu, Franco; Huddas, Claire; Steven, Katelyn; Hachem, Souheila; Lodhia, Luv; Fernandez, Ryan; Logerstedt, Macee

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is considered to be a contributor to diabetes and the epidemic of obesity in many countries. The popularity of non-caloric carbonated soft drinks as an alternative to SSBs may be a factor in reducing the health risks associated with SSBs consumption. This study focuses on the perceptual discrimination of SSBs from artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs). Fifty-five college students rated 14 commercially available carbonated soft drinks in terms of sweetness and likeability. They were also asked to recognize, if the drinks contained sugar or a non-caloric artificial sweetener. Overall, participants showed poor accuracy in discriminating drinks’ sweeteners, with significantly lower accuracy for SSBs than ASBs. Interestingly, we found a dissociation between sweetener recognition and drink pleasantness. In fact, in spite of a chance-level discrimination accuracy of SSBs, their taste was systematically preferred to the taste of non-caloric beverages. Our findings support the idea that hedonic value of carbonated soft drinks is dissociable from its identification and that the activation of the pleasure system seems not to require explicit recognition of the sweetener contained in the soft drink. We hypothesize that preference for carbonated soft drinks containing sugar over non-caloric alternatives might be modulated by metabolic factors that are independent from conscious and rational consumers’ choices. PMID:26858681

  7. Discriminating between energetic content and dietary composition as an explanation for dietary restriction effects.

    PubMed

    Ellers, Jacintha; Ruhe, Bas; Visser, Bertanne

    2011-12-01

    A reduction in dietary calories has been shown to prolong life span in a wide variety of taxa, but there has been much debate about confounding factors such as nutritional composition of the diet, or reallocation of nutrients from reduced reproduction. To disentangle the contribution of these different mechanisms to extension of life span, we study the effect of caloric restriction on longevity and fecundity in two species of sugar-feeding parasitoid wasps. They have a simple diet that consists of carbohydrates only, and they do not resorb eggs, which rules out the proposed alternative explanations for beneficial effects of caloric restriction. Two caloric restriction treatments were applied: first, dietary dilution to investigate the effect of carbohydrate concentration in the diet; and second, intermittent feeding to examine the effect of feeding frequency on longevity and fecundity. Only the dietary dilution treatment showed an effect of caloric restriction with the highest longevity recorded at 80% sucrose (w/v). No effect of dietary regime was found on fecundity. We also measured the weight increase of the parasitoids after feeding to obtain an estimate of consumption. A constant quantity of the sugar solution was consumed in all dietary dilution treatments, hence caloric intake was proportional to sucrose concentrations. Although the present study does not disqualify the relevance of nutrient composition in other species, our data unequivocally demonstrate that caloric restriction alone is sufficient to extend life span and invalidate alternative explanations.

  8. Caloric intake and expenditure of obese boys.

    PubMed

    Waxman, M; Stunkard, A J

    1980-02-01

    Caloric intake and expenditure of children in four families were assessed by nonparticipant observations of family dinners and school lunches. In each family there were one obese boy and one nonobese brother whose ages were within two years of each other. For family dinners the nonobese brother served as a control; for school lunches, a nonobese peer served as a control. The obese boys consumed more calories (766 +/- 290) than did their nonobese brothers at dinner (504 +/- 183) and far more (907 +/- 217) than their nonobese peers at lunch (500 +/- 386). The obese boys also ate faster (65.7 +/- 37.0 kcal/minute) than their brothers at dinner (31.7 +/- 13.8 kcal/minute) and far faster (103.5 +/- 40.9 kcal/minute) than their nonobese peers at lunch (46.2 +/- 22.5 kcal/minute). Time-sampled activity assessments showed the obese boys far less active than their controls inside the home, slightly less active outside the home, and equally active at school. When these activity values were converted into energy expenditure by measurement of oxygen consumption, obese boys expended more calories in moving than did their controls; as a result, there was no difference in energy expenditure between obese and nonobese boys at home and greater energy expenditure outside the home and at school. Increased intake, thus, and not decreased caloric output maintained the obesity of these four boys. In this respect, obesity in childhood may differ from obesity in adult life.

  9. Quantifying food intake in socially housed monkeys: social status effects on caloric consumption

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark E.; Fisher, Jeff; Fischer, Andrew; Lee, Vanessa; Harris, Ruth B.; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Obesity results from a number of factors including socio-environmental influences and rodent models show that several different stressors increase the preference for calorically dense foods leading to an obese phenotype. We present here a non-human primate model using socially housed adult female macaques living in long-term stable groups given access to diets of different caloric density. Consumption of a low fat (LFD; 15% of calories from fat) and a high fat diet (HFD; 45% of calories from fat) was quantified by means of a custom-built, automated feeder that dispensed a pellet of food when activated by a radiofrequency chip implanted subcutaneously in the animal’s wrist. Socially subordinate females showed indices of chronic psychological stress having reduced glucocorticoid negative feedback and higher frequencies of anxiety-like behavior. Twenty-four hour intakes of both the LFD and HFD were significantly greater in subordinates than dominates, an effect that persisted whether standard monkey chow (13% of calories from fat) was present or absent. Furthermore, although dominants restricted their food intake to daylight, subordinates continued to feed at night. Total caloric intake was significantly correlated with body weight change. Collectively, these results show that food intake can be reliably quantified in non-human primates living in complex social environments and suggest that socially-subordinate females consume more calories, suggesting this ethologically relevant model may help understand how psychosocial stress changes food preferences and consumption leading to obesity. PMID:18486158

  10. Caloric stress alters fat characteristics and Hsp70 expression in milk somatic cells of lactating beef cows.

    PubMed

    Eitam, Harel; Brosh, Arieh; Orlov, Alla; Izhaki, Ido; Shabtay, Ariel

    2009-03-01

    Selection for higher production rate in cattle inhabiting challenging habitats may be considered disadvantageous because of possible deleterious effects on immunity and reproduction and, consequently, on calf crop percentage. In Israel, free-grazing high productive beef cows experience reduction in nutritional quality of forage during up to 8 months of the year. As milk production by dams dictates calf performance, dam's nutritional needs and rebreeding rates, the aim of the present study was to test how lactating beef cows deal with combined caloric and protein stress both at the productive and self protective levels. For this purpose, we studied the effect of long-term caloric stress on milk characteristics and gene expression of stress and milk components producing proteins. Lactating dams responded to caloric stress by decreased body weight, milk, and milk protein production. To compensate for total energy loses in milk, they produced milk of higher fat concentration and shifted the proportions of its fatty acids towards long and unsaturated ones. This was reflected by increased mRNA transcription of the fatty acid binding protein. Prolonged low-energy diet promoted cell-specific heat shock protein (Hsp) response; whereas significant increase of Hsp90 but unchanged levels of Hsp70 proteins were observed in white blood cells, the expression of Hsp70 in milk somatic cells was markedly attenuated, in parallel with a marked increase of alpha(s1)-casein expression. At the mammary gland level, these results may indicate a decrease in turnover of proteins and a shift to an exclusive expression of milk components producing factors. Similar responses to caloric stress were revealed also in ketotic dairy cows. Ketosis promoted a shift towards long and unsaturated fatty acids and an increased expression of alpha(s1)-casein in milk somatic cells. These findings may reflect an evolutionary-preserved mechanism in lactating cows for coping with caloric restriction. Overall

  11. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric stimulator. (a) Identification. An air or water caloric stimulator is a device that delivers a stream of air...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  12. Caloric Beverage Intake Among Adult Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We compared sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB), alcohol, and other caloric beverage (juice and milk) consumption of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants with that of low-income nonparticipants. Methods. We used 1 day of dietary intake data from the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 4594 adults aged 20 years and older with household income at or below 250% of the federal poverty line. We used bivariate and multivariate methods to compare the probability of consuming and the amount of calories consumed for each beverage type across 3 groups: current SNAP participants, former participants, and nonparticipants. We used instrumental variable methods to control for unobservable differences in participant groups. Results. After controlling for observable characteristics, SNAP participants were no more likely to consume SSBs than were nonparticipants. Instrumental variable estimates showed that current participants consumed fewer calories from SSBs than did similar nonparticipants. We found no differences in alcoholic beverage consumption, which cannot be purchased with SNAP benefits. Conclusions. SNAP participants are not unique in their consumption of SSBs or alcoholic beverages. Purchase restrictions may have little effect on SSB consumption. PMID:25033141

  13. 18 CFR 349.3 - Shortened procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Shortened procedure. 349.3 Section 349.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... thereupon issue a notice setting a schedule for the filing of memoranda. The person electing the use of...

  14. 18 CFR 286.105 - Shortened procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Shortened procedure. 286.105 Section 286.105 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... procedure, the Commission shall thereupon issue a notice setting a schedule for the filing of memoranda....

  15. 18 CFR 286.105 - Shortened procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shortened procedure. 286.105 Section 286.105 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... challenge one or more audit findings, or proposed remedies, or both, in any combination, by the...

  16. 18 CFR 349.3 - Shortened procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shortened procedure. 349.3 Section 349.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... described in § 349.1 notifies the Commission that it seeks to challenge one or more audit findings,...

  17. 18 CFR 158.3 - Shortened procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shortened procedure. 158.3 Section 158.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... notifies the Commission that it seeks to challenge one or more audit findings, or proposed remedies,...

  18. 18 CFR 41.3 - Shortened procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shortened procedure. 41.3 Section 41.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... notifies the Commission that it seeks to challenge one or more audit findings, or proposed remedies,...

  19. Counting calories in Drosophila diet restriction.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung-Jin; Flatt, Thomas; Kulaots, Indrek; Tatar, Marc

    2007-03-01

    The extension of life span by diet restriction in Drosophila has been argued to occur without limiting calories. Here we directly measure the calories assimilated by flies when maintained on full- and restricted-diets. We find that caloric intake is reduced on all diets that extend life span. Flies on low-yeast diet are long-lived and consume about half the calories of flies on high-yeast diets, regardless of the energetic content of the diet itself. Since caloric intake correlates with yeast concentration and thus with the intake of every metabolite in this dietary component, it is premature to conclude for Drosophila that calories do not explain extension of life span.

  20. 9 CFR 319.701 - Mixed fat shortening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 319.701 Mixed fat shortening. Shortening prepared with a mixture of meat fats and vegetable oils may be identified either as “Shortening Prepared with Meat Fats and Vegetable Oils” or “Shortening Prepared with Vegetable Oils and Meat Fats” depending on the predominance of the fat and oils used, or...

  1. 9 CFR 319.701 - Mixed fat shortening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 319.701 Mixed fat shortening. Shortening prepared with a mixture of meat fats and vegetable oils may be identified either as “Shortening Prepared with Meat Fats and Vegetable Oils” or “Shortening Prepared with Vegetable Oils and Meat Fats” depending on the predominance of the fat and oils used, or...

  2. 9 CFR 319.701 - Mixed fat shortening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 319.701 Mixed fat shortening. Shortening prepared with a mixture of meat fats and vegetable oils may be identified either as “Shortening Prepared with Meat Fats and Vegetable Oils” or “Shortening Prepared with Vegetable Oils and Meat Fats” depending on the predominance of the fat and oils used, or...

  3. 9 CFR 319.701 - Mixed fat shortening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 319.701 Mixed fat shortening. Shortening prepared with a mixture of meat fats and vegetable oils may be identified either as “Shortening Prepared with Meat Fats and Vegetable Oils” or “Shortening Prepared with Vegetable Oils and Meat Fats” depending on the predominance of the fat and oils used, or...

  4. 9 CFR 319.701 - Mixed fat shortening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 319.701 Mixed fat shortening. Shortening prepared with a mixture of meat fats and vegetable oils may be identified either as “Shortening Prepared with Meat Fats and Vegetable Oils” or “Shortening Prepared with Vegetable Oils and Meat Fats” depending on the predominance of the fat and oils used, or...

  5. Caloric vestibular stimulation in aphasic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David; Morris, Rachael; Milberg, William; Sakel, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) is commonly used to diagnose brainstem disorder but its therapeutic application is much less established. Based on the finding that CVS increases blood flow to brain structures associated with language and communication, we assessed whether the procedure has potential to relieve symptoms of post-stroke aphasia. Three participants, each presenting with chronic, unilateral lesions to the left hemisphere, were administered daily CVS for four consecutive weeks. Relative to their pre-treatment baseline scores, two of the three participants showed significant improvement on both picture and responsive naming at immediate and 1-week follow-up. One of these participants also showed improved sentence repetition, and another showed improved auditory word discrimination. No adverse reactions were reported. These data provide the first, albeit tentative, evidence that CVS may relieve expressive and receptive symptoms of aphasia. A larger, sham-controlled study is now needed to further assess efficacy. PMID:24391559

  6. Verification of the Calore thermal analysis code.

    SciTech Connect

    Dowding, Kevin J.; Blackwell, Bennie Francis

    2004-07-01

    Calore is the ASC code developed to model steady and transient thermal diffusion with chemistry and dynamic enclosure radiation. An integral part of the software development process is code verification, which addresses the question 'Are we correctly solving the model equations'? This process aids the developers in that it identifies potential software bugs and gives the thermal analyst confidence that a properly prepared input will produce satisfactory output. Grid refinement studies have been performed on problems for which we have analytical solutions. In this talk, the code verification process is overviewed and recent results are presented. Recent verification studies have focused on transient nonlinear heat conduction and verifying algorithms associated with (tied) contact and adaptive mesh refinement. In addition, an approach to measure the coverage of the verification test suite relative to intended code applications is discussed.

  7. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  8. Unix version of CALOR89 for calorimeter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, T.; Job, P.K.; Price, L.E.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1992-05-12

    CALOR89 is a system of coupled Monte Carlo particle transport computer codes which has been successfully employed for the estimation of calorimeter parameters in High Energy Physics. In the past CALOR89 has been running on various IBM machines and on CRAY X-MP at Lawrence Livermore Lab. These machines had non-unix operating systems. In this report we present a UNIX version of CALOR89, which is especially suited for the UNIX work stations. Moreover CALOR89 is also been supplemented with two new program packages which makes it more user friendly. CALPREP is a program for the preparation of the input files for CALOR89 in general geometry and ANALYZ is an analysis package to extract the final results from CALOR89 relevant to calorimeters. This report also provides two script files LCALOR and PCALOR. LCALOR runs CALOR89 sequences of programs and EGS4 for a given configuration sequentially on a single processor and PCALOR concurrently on a multiprocessor unix workstation.

  9. The shortened spinal cord in tetraodontiform fishes.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masato; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Doi, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Harumi

    2015-03-01

    In teleosts, the spinal cord generally extends along the entire vertebral canal. The Tetraodontiformes, in which the spinal cord is greatly reduced in length with a distinct long filum terminale and cauda equina, have been regarded as an aberration. The aims of this study are: 1) to elucidate whether the spinal cord in all tetraodontiform fishes shorten with the filum terminale, and 2) to describe the gross anatomical and histological differences in the spinal cord among all families of the Tetraodontiformes. Representative species from all families of the Tetraodontiformes, and for comparison the carp as a common teleost, were investigated. In the Triacanthodidae, Triacanthidae, and Triodontidae, which are the more ancestral taxa of the Tetraodontiformes, the spinal cord extends through the entire vertebral canal. In the Triacanthidae and Triodontidae, the caudal half or more spinal segments of the spinal cord, however, lack gray matter and consist largely of nerve fibers. In the other tetraodontiform families, the spinal cord is shortened forming a filum terminale with the cauda equina, which is prolonged as far as the last vertebra. The shortened spinal cord is divided into three groups. In the Ostraciidae and Molidae, the spinal cord tapers abruptly at the cranium or first vertebra forming a cord-like filum terminale. In the Monacanthidae, Tetraodontidae, and Diodontidae, it abruptly flattens at the rostral vertebrae forming a flat filum terminale. The spinal cord is relatively longer in the Monacanthidae than that in the other two families. It is suggested by histological features of the flat filum terminale that shortening of the spinal cord in this group progresses in order of the Monacanthidae, Tetraodontidae, and Diodontidae. In the Balistidae and Aracanidae, the cord is relatively long and then gradually decreased in dorso-ventral thickness.

  10. Telomere shortening in leukocyte subpopulations in depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Telomere shortening is a normal age-related process. However, premature shortening of telomeres in leukocytes – as has been reported in depression – may increase the risk for age-related diseases. While previous studies investigated telomere length in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as a whole, this study investigated specific changes in the clonal composition of white blood cells of the adaptive immune system (CD4+ helper and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and CD20+ B lymphocytes). Methods Forty-four females with a history of unipolar depression were investigated and compared to fifty age-matched female controls. Telomere lengths were compared between three groups: 1) individuals with a history of depression but currently no clinically relevant depressive symptoms, 2) individuals with a history of depression with relevant symptoms of depression, and 3) healthy age-matched controls. Telomere length was assessed using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (qFISH). Results Both groups with a history of unipolar depression (with and without current depressive symptoms) showed significantly shorter telomeres in all three lymphocyte subpopulations. The effect was stronger in CD8+ and CD20+ cells than in CD4+ cells. Individuals with a history of depression and with (without) current symptoms exhibited a CD8+ telomere length shortening corresponding to an age differential of 27.9 (25.3) years. Conclusions A history of depression is associated with shortened telomeres in the main effector populations of the adaptive immune system. Shorter telomeres seem to persist in individuals with lifetime depression independently of the severity of depressive symptoms. CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and CD20+ B cells seem to be particularly affected in depression. The total number of depressive episodes did not influence telomere length in the investigated adaptive immune cell populations. PMID:24996455

  11. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy; Idiopathic myocardial fibrosis ... In a case of restrictive cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle is of normal size or slightly enlarged. Most of the time, it also pumps normally. However, it does ...

  12. Studies on flagellar shortening in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Cherniack, J.

    1985-01-01

    Flagellar shortening of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was promoted by sodium chloride, pyrophosphate (sodium, potassium and ammonium salts), EDTA and EGTA, succinate, citrate and oxalate (sodium salts), caffeine and aminophylline. Removal of calcium from the medium potentiated the effects of these agents in inducing shortening. Investigations of the release of phosphorylated compounds to the medium during pyrophosphate-induced flagellar shortening of cells pre-labelled with /sup 32/P, revealed an as yet unidentified /sup 32/P-labelled compound with distinct chromatographic properties. Chromatography and electrophoresis indicates that it is a small, highly polar molecule with a high charge to mass ratio, containing thermo- and acid-labile phosphate linkages. Investigations showed of the release of /sup 35/S-labelled protein to the medium from cells pre-labelled with /sup 35/S-sulfate showed that flagellated cells released two prominent polypeptides which comigrated with ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-flagellar tubulin on SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, while deflagellated cells did not.

  13. Shortening amplitude affects the incomplete force recovery after active shortening in mouse soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Van Noten, Pieter; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2009-12-11

    Compared to isometric contraction, the force producing capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD) after a work producing shortening phase. It has been suggested that FD results from an inhibition of cross-bridge binding. Because the rate constants of the exponential force (re)development are thought to be primarily determined by cross-bridge attachment/detachment rate, we aimed to investigate the components of force redevelopment (REDEV) after 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm shortening, resulting in varying amounts of FD (from about 5% to about 16%), in mouse soleus muscle (n=11). Compared to isometric force development (DEV), the time to reach steady-state during REDEV was about 3 times longer (370 versus 1261ms) increasing with increasing amplitude. Contrary to a single, a double exponential function with one component set equal to the rate constant of DEV (14.3s(-1)), accurately described REDEV (RMS<0.8%). The rate constant of the additional slow component decreased with increasing shortening amplitude and was associated with work delivered during shortening (R(2)=0.75) and FD (R(2)=0.77). We concluded that a work related slow exponential component is induced to the trajectory of incomplete force recovery after shortening, causing FD. These results suggest that after shortening, aside from cross-bridges with normal attachment/detachment rate, cross-bridges with reduced cycling rate are active.

  14. Some strategies for improving caloric responses with ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Scott, James F.; Dkhil, Brahim

    2016-06-01

    Many important breakthroughs and significant engineering developments have been achieved during the past two decades in the field of caloric materials. In this review, we address ferroelectrics emerging as ideal materials which permit both giant elastocaloric and/or electrocaloric responses near room temperature. We summarize recent strategies for improving caloric responses using geometrical optimization, maximizing the number of coexisting phases, combining positive and negative caloric responses, introducing extra degree of freedom like mechanical stress/pressure, and multicaloric effect driven by either single stimulus or multiple stimuli. This review highlights the promising perspective of ferroelectrics for developing next-generation solid-state refrigeration.

  15. Theory of giant-caloric effects in multiferroic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vopson, Melvin M.

    2013-08-01

    A generalized thermodynamic theory of giant-caloric effects in coupled multiferroic solids is introduced. The generalized theory allows analytical derivation of any caloric effect in solids displaying any type of cross coupling. In the particular cases of the non-coupled ferroic materials, the theory reproduces the well-known formulae describing magnetocaloric, electrocaloric or elastocaloric effects. This work facilitates adequate modeling tools and analytical relations capable of predicting caloric effects in complex coupled multiferroic materials, which is very beneficial to future developments in solid-state cooling technologies.

  16. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  17. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  18. Asymmetry dependence of the caloric curve for mononuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoel, C.; Sobotka, L. G.; Charity, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    The asymmetry dependence of the caloric curve, for mononuclear configurations, is studied as a function of neutron-to-proton asymmetry with a model that allows for independent variation of the neutron and proton surface diffusenesses. The evolution of the effective mass with density and excitation is included in a schematic fashion and the entropies are extracted in a local density approximation. The plateau in the caloric curve displays only a slight sensitivity to the asymmetry.

  19. Double rf system for bunch shortening

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho.

    1990-11-01

    It was suggested by Zisman that the combination of the two systems (double rf system) may be more effective to shorten a bunch, compromising between the desirable and the undesirable effects mentioned above. In this paper, we demonstrate that a double rf system is, in fact, quite effective in optimizing the rf performance. The parameters used are explained, and some handy formulae for bunch parameters are derived. We consider an example of bunch shortening by adding a higher-harmonic rf system to the main rf system. The parameters of the main rf system are unchanged. The double rf system, however, can be used for another purpose. Namely, the original bunch length can be obtained with a main rf voltage substantially lower than for a single rf system without necessitating a high-power source for the higher-harmonic cavities. Using a double rf system, the momentum acceptance remains large enough for ample beam lifetime. Moreover, the increase in nonlinearity of the rf waveform increases the synchrotron tune spread, which potentially helps a beam to be stabilized against longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities. We will show some examples of this application. We discuss the choice of the higher-harmonic frequency.

  20. Use of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners in US consumer packaged foods, 2005–9

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shu Wen; Slining, Meghan M.; Popkin, Barry M.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the use of caloric (CS) and non-caloric sweeteners (NCS) in the US food supply is limited. This study utilizes full ingredient list and nutrition facts panel (NFP) data from Gladson Nutrition Database, and nationally representative purchases of consumer packaged foods from Nielsen Homescan in 2005 through 2009 to understand the use of CS (including FJC) and NCS in CPG foods. Of the 85,451 uniquely formulated foods purchased during 2005–2009, 75% contain sweeteners (68% with CS only, 1% with NCS only, 6% with both CS and NCS). CS are in >95% of cakes/cookies/pies, granola/protein/energy bars, ready-to-eat cereals, sweet snacks, and sugar-sweetened beverages. NCS are in >33% of yogurts and sports/energy drinks, 42% of waters (plain or flavored), and most diet sweetened beverages. Across unique products, corn syrup is the most commonly listed sweetener, followed by sorghum, cane sugar, high fructose corn syrup and FJC. Also, 77% of all calories purchased in the US in 2005–2009 contained CS and 3% contained NCS, while 73% of the volume of foods purchased contained CS and 15% contained NCS. Trends during this period suggest a shift towards the purchase of NCS-containing products.Our study poses a challenge toward monitoring sweetener consumption in the US by discussing the need and options available to improve measures of CS and NCS, and additional requirements on NFPs on CPG foods. PMID:23102182

  1. Access conditions affect binge-type shortening consumption in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wojnicki, F.H.E.; Johnson, D.S.; Corwin, R.L.W.

    2009-01-01

    When non-food-deprived rats are given intermittent access to certain substances, consumption of those substances is greater than when more frequent access is provided. The present study examined the effects of three different shortening access conditions on subsequent shortening intake in rats. Each of the three different shortening conditions lasted five weeks and was followed by a five-week period in which shortening access was limited by time (1 hr of availability) on either an Intermittent (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) or Daily schedule of access. In Part 1, limiting the quantity of shortening provided during the 1-hour period of availability attenuated subsequent 1-hr shortening intake in the Intermittent access group, but had no statistically significant effect in the Daily access group. In Part 2, unrestricted availability of shortening (24-hr/day-7days/week) attenuated subsequent 1-hr shortening intake in all groups. In Part 3, shortening non-availability for five weeks enhanced subsequent 1-hr shortening intake in all groups. It was also shown that rats under an Intermittent, but not a Daily, schedule of access consumed as much shortening during a 1 hr period of availability, as was consumed in 24-hr when shortening availability was unrestricted. These results demonstrate that while intermittent access is necessary and sufficient to stimulate binge-type eating in rats, the behavioral history can modulate binge size. PMID:18851983

  2. Proximate composition and caloric content of eight Lake Michigan fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rottiers, Donald V.; Tucker, Robert M.

    1982-01-01

    We measured the proximate composition (percentage lipid, water, fat-free dry material, ash) and caloric content of eight species of Lake Michigan fish: lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), bloater (Coregonus hoyi), alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), deepwater sculpin (Myoxocephalus quadricornis), and slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus). Except for alewives, proximate composition and caloric content did not differ significantly between males and females. And, for coho salmon, there was no significant difference in composition between fish collected in different years. Lipid and caloric content of lake trout increased directly with age. In all species examined, lipids and caloric contents were significantly lower in small, presumably immature, fish than in larger, older fish. Lipid content of lake trout, lake whitefish, and bloaters (range of means, 16-22%) was nearly 3 times higher than that of coho salmon, sculpins, rainbow smelt, and alewives (range of means, 5.2-7.0%). The mean caloric content ranged from 6.9 to 7.1 kcal/g for species high in lipids and from 5.8 to 6.3 kcal/g for species low in lipids. Although the caloric content of all species varied directly with lipid content and inversely with water content, an increase in lipid content did not always coincide with a proportional increase in caloric content when other components of fish composition were essentially unchanged. This observation suggests that the energy content of fish estimated from the proximate composition by using universal conversion factors may not necessarily be accurate.

  3. Analysis of caloric test responses in sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cheng-Ping; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chen, Hsin-Chien; Lee, Jih-Chin; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is characterized by a rapid-onset hearing loss that develops within 3 days. Vertigo may also be present. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether the severity of a loss of caloric function is associated with the initial hearing loss and with hearing recovery. Our study population was made up of 135 patients-67 men and 68 women, aged 25 to 71 years (mean: 50.9)-with sudden sensorineural hearing loss who had undergone bithermal caloric testing. We compared various patient factors according to patients' hearing level and their response to caloric testing. We also analyzed the canal paresis (CP) value in patients with an abnormal caloric response according to three factors: disease severity, vertigo, and hearing recovery, and we evaluated the correlation between the loss of caloric function and hearing outcomes. We found that an abnormal caloric response was significantly associated with a profound hearing loss at presentation, the presence of vertigo, and poor hearing recovery. Among patients with an abnormal caloric response, the CP value was significantly correlated with hearing recovery (r = 0.503, p = 0.001). Poor hearing recovery was seen in 80% of patients with a CP value of ≥40% but in only 25% of patients with a value of <40%; in addition, the degree of hearing recovery was worse in the patients with a CP value of ≥40% (p = 0.002). We conclude that a CP value of ≥40% is a significant prognostic factor for an unfavorable treatment outcome.

  4. Changes of ampulla pressure in the semicircular canal of pigeons by caloric stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yoshiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Satoru

    Still now several hypotheses about the mechanisms of the caloric nystagmus have been in conclusive. In this study we confirmed the convection effect and the volume change effect of the endolymph in horizontal semicircular canal following the caloric stimulation using pigeons ( Columba livia). Although the direction of the caloric nystagmus depended on the head position and the stimulus site of calorization, the caloric nystagmus disappeared after plugging of horizontal semicircular canal. On the other hand, the ampulla pressure increased by cold calorization and decreased by hot calorization and these pressure changes had no relation to the head position. These results show that the main role of the mechanisms of the caloric nystagmus under 1G is the convection effect but the volume change effect may act on the caloric nystagmus not only under 1G but also under microgravity.

  5. Shortened Engineered Human Antibody CH2 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Rui; Wang, Yanping; Feng, Yang; Zhao, Qi; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2011-01-01

    The immunoglobulin (Ig) constant CH2 domain is critical for antibody effector functions. Isolated CH2 domains are promising scaffolds for construction of libraries containing diverse binders that could also confer some effector functions. We have shown previously that an isolated human CH2 domain is relatively unstable to thermally induced unfolding, but its stability can be improved by engineering an additional disulfide bond (Gong, R., Vu, B. K., Feng, Y., Prieto, D. A., Dyba, M. A., Walsh, J. D., Prabakaran, P., Veenstra, T. D., Tarasov, S. G., Ishima, R., and Dimitrov, D. S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 14203–14210). We have hypothesized that the stability of this engineered antibody domain could be further increased by removing unstructured residues. To test our hypothesis, we removed the seven N-terminal residues that are in a random coil as suggested by our analysis of the isolated CH2 crystal structure and NMR data. The resulting shortened engineered CH2 (m01s) was highly soluble, monomeric, and remarkably stable, with a melting temperature (Tm) of 82.6 °C, which is about 10 and 30 °C higher than those of the original stabilized CH2 (m01) and CH2, respectively. m01s and m01 were more resistant to protease digestion than CH2. A newly identified anti-CH2 antibody that recognizes a conformational epitope bound to m01s significantly better (>10-fold higher affinity) than to CH2 and slightly better than to m01. m01s bound to a recombinant soluble human neonatal Fc receptor at pH 6.0 more strongly than CH2. These data suggest that shortening the m01 N terminus significantly increases stability without disrupting its conformation and that our approach for increasing stability and decreasing size by removing unstructured regions may also apply to other proteins. PMID:21669873

  6. Meal timing influences daily caloric intake in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kathryn J.; Baron, Kelly G.; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2016-01-01

    The role that meal pattern plays in weight regulation is a popular topic of scientific and common debate. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between meal timing with caloric intake and body mass index (BMI). We hypothesized that latemeal timing and eating closer to sleep onset time would be associated with greater energy intake and higher BMI. Participants included 59 individuals recruited from the community. Rest/activity patterns were assessed using seven days of wrist actigraphy, and caloric intake was evaluated using seven days of diet logs. Results demonstrated that the timing of meals was associated with overall energy intake but not with BMI. In multivariate analyses controlling for age, gender, sleep duration, and timing; eating more frequently, later timing of the last meal, and a shorter duration between last meal and sleep onset predicted higher total caloric intake. In a mediational model, eating frequency explained the relationship between eating closer to sleep onset and total caloric intake. Results suggest that later relative timing of meals, particularly eating close to sleep, could lead to weight gain due to a greater number of eating occasions and higher total daily caloric intake. These findings have important implications for the development of novel, time-based interventions for weight management. PMID:25439026

  7. Meal timing influences daily caloric intake in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kathryn J; Baron, Kelly G; Zee, Phyllis C

    2014-11-01

    The role that meal pattern plays in weight regulation is a popular topic of scientific and common debate. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between meal timing with caloric intake and body mass index (BMI). We hypothesized that late meal timing and eating closer to sleep onset time would be associated with greater energy intake and higher BMI. Participants included 59 individuals recruited from the community. Rest/activity patterns were assessed using 7 days of wrist actigraphy, and caloric intake was evaluated using 7 days of diet logs. Results demonstrated that the timing of meals was associated with overall energy intake but not with BMI. In multivariate analyses controlling for age, sex, sleep duration, and timing, eating more frequently, later timing of the last meal, and a shorter duration between last meal and sleep onset predicted higher total caloric intake. In a mediational model, eating frequency explained the relationship between eating closer to sleep onset and total caloric intake. Results suggest that later relative timing of meals, particularly eating close to sleep, could lead to weight gain due to a greater number of eating occasions and higher total daily caloric intake. These findings have important implications for the development of novel, time-based interventions for weight management.

  8. Modeling and design aspects of active caloric regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2015-03-01

    A cooling device based on a solid caloric material using, for example, the elastocaloric, magnetocaloric, barocaloric or electrocaloric effect has the potential to replace vapor-compression based systems for a variety of applications. Any caloric device using a solid refrigerant may benefit from using a regenerative cycle to increase the operating temperature span. This presentation shows how all active caloric regenerators can be modeled using similar techniques and how they are related to passive regenerator performance. The advantages and disadvantages of using a regenerative cycle are also discussed. The issue of hysteresis in caloric materials is investigated from a system/thermodynamic standpoint and the effects on cooling power and efficiency are quantified using a numerical model of an active regenerator using model caloric materials with assumed properties. The implementation in a working device will be discussed for elastocaloric and magnetocaloric cooling devices. It is shown that demagnetization effects for magnetocaloric systems and stress concentration effects in elastocaloric system reduce the overall effect in the regenerator and care must be taken in regenerator design for both technologies. Other loss mechanisms outside the regenerator such as heat leaks are also discussed. Finally, experimental results for active magnetic regenerative cooler are given for a range of operating conditions. The most recently published device uses a regenerator consisting of Gd and three alloys of GdY and has demonstrated a COP over 3.

  9. Tetanic force potentiation of mouse fast muscle is shortening speed dependent.

    PubMed

    Gittings, William; Huang, Jian; Vandenboom, Rene

    2012-10-01

    The activity dependent potentiation of peak isometric force associated with phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) is generally restricted to low activation frequencies. The purpose of this study was to determine if muscle shortening speed influenced the stimulus frequency domain over which concentric force potentiation was observed. To this end, mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles (in vitro, 25 °C) were activated at a range of test frequencies (10, 25, 45, 70 or 100 Hz) during shortening ramps at 0.10, 0.30 or 0.50 of the maximal velocity of shortening (V(max)). This procedure was performed before and after a standard conditioning stimulus (CS) that elevated RLC phosphorylation from 0.08 ± 0.01 (rest) to 0.55 ± 0.01 (stimulated) moles phosphate per mol RLC, respectively (n = 9-11) (P < 0.01). When data from all test frequencies were collapsed, the CS potentiated mean concentric force at 0.10, 0.30 and 0.50 V(max) to 1.02 ± 0.03, 1.37 ± 0.03 and 1.59 ± 0.05 of unpotentiated, pre-CS values, respectively (n = 8, P < 0.05). In addition, increasing shortening speed also increased the activation frequency at which concentric force potentiation was maximal, i.e. from 10 Hz at 0.10 V(max) to 10-25 and 25-45 Hz at 0.30 and 0.50 V(max), respectively. These results indicate that both the magnitude of and activation frequency dependence for concentric force potentiation of mouse EDL muscle is shortening speed dependent. Thus, muscle shortening speed may be a critical factor determining the functional utility of the myosin RLC phosphorylation mechanism.

  10. [A caloric vestibular test with increased positive evidence (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kurzeja, A; Strauss, P; Kapell, H

    1979-12-01

    A decrease of the variance of a caloric test would increase the importance of the statement of this test. An important source of variance are the differences concerning the timecourse of the induced heat wave, determined by the different anatomic conditions in the petrous bone, particularly the pneumatisation. A constant temperature gradient is obtained by the irigation in a pessimum position with the head flexed 30 degrees to the front. This temperature gradient evokes immediately a constant maximum vestibular stimulus after having reflected the head 90 degrees to the back. Comparing this new method with the traditional irrigation, one can state an important reduction of variance. The dependence of the nystagumus response on caloric irrigation of the petrous bone demands a X-ray-examination according to the technique of Schüller before starting with the caloric examination. In case of differences between the right and left sides the described test would be necessary in our opinion.

  11. Andrew shortens lifetime of Louisiana Barrier Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    Because the Isles Dernieres, a series of four barrier islands off the coast of Louisiana, have one of the most rapidly eroding shorelines in the world, geologists at the U.S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey have been monitoring erosion activity over the last several years, said Jeff Williams of the USGS in Reston, Va. Hurricane Andrew, which struck the state on August 26, caused severe erosional damage to these islands that has shortened their lifetimes.Before Andrew struck, geologists projected that Raccoon Island would disappear below sea level by the year 2001 and that Whiskey Island would disappear by 2016. Now, due to the severe erosion from Hurricane Andrew, the scientists claim that the islands may disappear before the turn of the century, and the other islands in the Dernieres chain are expected to follow suit within 2 decades. Raccoon, Whiskey, Trinity, and East islands make up the Isles Dernieres, which existed as one island, known as the Isle Derniere, before an 1856 hurricane and subsequent erosion.

  12. On the undetected error probability for shortened Hamming codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujiwara, T.; Kasami, T.; Kitai, A.; Lin, S.

    1985-01-01

    Shortened Hamming codes are widely used for error detection in data communications. In this paper, a method for computing the probability of an undetected error for these codes is presented. This method is then used to evaluate the error-detection performance of the shortened codes obtained from the two distance-four Hamming codes adopted by CCITT X.25 for error control for packet-switched networks. It is shown that shortening a code does affect its error-detection performance.

  13. Characteristics of and corrections for core shortening in unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.; White, William A.

    1997-01-01

    Thinning, bypassing, and compaction of shallow unconsolidated sediments during manual coring or vibracoring operations probably cause more sediment deformation and greater stratigraphic displacement than is commonly reported in the wetland literature. We measured core shortening in open-barrel cores from fluvial wetlands, lagoonal flats, and marshes to document the magnitude and characteristics of shortening where sediments may be stiff and require extra mechanical effort to recover a sufficient length of sample for analysis. Results of those measurements indicate that thinning or non- recovery of discrete sediment intervals can range from 0 to 67 percent and cumulative core shortening can be as much as 30 percent even for cores less than one meter long. Detailed open-barrel measurements also show that core shortening is not uniformly distributed throughout the depth of penetration as is often assumed. Analytical data derived from shortened cores can only be properly interpreted if patterns of shortening are established and incorporated into the analysis. Minor artificial displacement of sediment depths can alter plots of physico-chemical parameters and can significantly influence calculated rates of sedimentation and other depth-dependent statistical relationships. This study (1) demonstrates how plots of interval shortening and cumulative shortening can be used to characterize the distribution of shortening at depth and (2) presents a simple equation for stratigraphic restoration so that core observations and analyses are corrected to their original depths.

  14. Atherosclerotic changes of vessels caused by restriction of movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gvishiani, G. S.; Kobakhidze, N. G.; Mchedlishvili, M. G.; Dekanosidze, T. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of restriction of movement on the development of atheroscelerosis was studied in rabbits. Drastic restriction of movement for 20 and 30 days causes atherosclerotic alterations of the aorta and shifts in ECG which are characteristic of coronary atherosclerosis. At the same time, shortening of the duration of blood coagulation and an increase in the content of catecholamines and beta-lipoproteids occur.

  15. Metabolic effects of intermittent access to caloric or non-caloric sweetened solutions in mice fed a high-caloric diet.

    PubMed

    Soto, Marion; Chaumontet, Catherine; Even, Patrick C; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Tomé, Daniel; Fromentin, Gilles

    2017-03-24

    Human consumption of obesogenic diets and soft drinks, sweetened with different molecules, is increasing worldwide, and increases the risk of metabolic diseases. We hypothesized that the chronic consumption of caloric (sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), maltodextrin) and non-caloric (sucralose) solutions under 2-hour intermittent access, alongside the consumption of a high-fat high-sucrose diet, would result in differential obesity-associated metabolic abnormalities in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice had ad libitum access to an HFHS diet and to water (water control group). In addition, some mice had access, 2h/day, 5days/week (randomly chosen) for 12weeks, to different solutions: i) a sucrose solution (2.1kJ/ml), ii) an HFCS solution (2.1kJ/ml), iii) a maltodextrin solution (2.1kJ/ml) and a sucralose solution (60mM) (n=15/group). Despite no changes in total caloric intake, 2h-intermittent access to the sucrose, HFCS or maltodextrin solutions led to increased body weight and accumulation of lipids in the liver when compared to the group consuming water only. The HFCS and sucrose solutions induced a higher fat mass in various fat depots, glucose intolerance, increased glucose oxidation at the expense of lipid oxidation, and a lower hypothalamic expression of NPY in the fasted state. HFCS also reduced proopiomelanocortin expression in the hypothalamus. 2h-intermittent access to sucralose did not result in significant changes in body composition, but caused a stronger expression of CART in the hypothalamus. Finally, sucrose intake showed a trend to increase the expression of various receptors in the nucleus accumbens, linked to dopamine, opioid and endocannabinoid signaling. In conclusion, 2h-intermittent access to caloric solutions (especially those sweetened with sucrose and HFCS), but not sucralose, resulted in adverse metabolic consequences in high-fat high-sucrose-fed mice.

  16. Can imaginary head tilt shorten postrotatory nystagmus?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianna-Poulin, C. C.; Voelker, C. C.; Erickson, B.; Black, F. O.

    2001-01-01

    In healthy subjects, head tilt upon cessation of a constant-velocity yaw head rotation shortens the duration of postrotatory nystagmus. The presumed mechanism for this effect is that the velocity storage of horizontal semicircular canal inputs is being discharged by otolith organ inputs which signal a constant yaw head position when the head longitudinal axis is no longer earth-vertical. In the present study, normal subjects were rotated head upright in the dark on a vertical-axis rotational chair at 60 degrees/s for 75 s and were required to perform a specific task as soon as the chair stopped. Horizontal position of the right eye was recorded with an infra-red video camera. The average eye velocity (AEV) was measured over a 30-s interval following chair acceleration/deceleration. The ratios (postrotatory AEV/perrotatory AEV) were 1.1 (SD 0.112) when subjects (N=10) kept their head erect, 0.414 (SD 0.083) when subjects tilted their head forward, 1.003 (SD 0.108) when subjects imagined watching a TV show, 1.012 (SD 0.074) when subjects imagined looking at a painting on a wall, and 0.995 (SD 0.074) when subjects imagined floating in a prone position on a lake. Thus, while actual head tilt reduced postrotatory nystagmus, the imagination tasks did not have a statistically significant effect on postrotatory nystagmus. Therefore, velocity storage does not appear to be under the influence of cortical neural signals when subjects imagine that they are floating in a prone orientation.

  17. Charged and neutral particle transport methods and applications: The CALOR code system

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Charlton, L.A.

    1997-04-01

    The CALOR code system, which is a complete radiation transport code system, is described with emphasis on the high-energy (> 20 MeV) nuclear collision models. Codes similar to CALOR are also briefly discussed. A current application using CALOR which deals with the development of the National Spallation Neutron Source is also given.

  18. Restrictive cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Dawson, David

    2009-12-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathies constitute a heterogenous group of heart muscle conditions that all have, in common, the symptoms of heart failure. Diastolic dysfunction with preserved systolic function is often the only echocardiographic abnormality that may be noted, although systolic dysfunction may also be an integral part of some specific pathologies, particularly in the most advanced cases such as amyloid infiltration of the heart. By far, the majority of restrictive cardiomyopathies are secondary to a systemic disorder such as amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, scleroderma, haemochromatosis, eosinophilic heart disease, or as a result of radiation treatment. The much more rare diagnosis of idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy is supported only by the absence of specific pathology on either endomyocardial biopsies or at post-mortem. Restrictive cardiomyopathy is diagnosed based on medical history, physical examination, and tests: such as blood tests, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. With its wide availability, echocardiography is probably the most important investigation to identify the left ventricular dysfunction and should be performed early and by groups that are familiar with the wide variety of aetiologies. Finally, on rare occasions, the differential diagnosis from constrictive pericarditis may be necessary.

  19. Cupula dynamics under caloric stimulation of the semicircular canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrachuk, A. V.; Sirenko, S. P.

    Caloric stimulation of the semicircular canal SC is widely applied in studies of vestibular impairments Barany 1906 suggested that caloric response of SC results from mechanism of endolymph convection due to density changes of endolymph and therefore depends on the action of gravity forces However the Skylab experiments 1983 showed that the caloric reaction of SC can take place even under microgravity The studies of Scherer Clarke 1985 Harada Ariki 1985 Baumgarten et al 1985 considered the thermal expansion of endolymph to be a concurrent mechanism The model of caloric response based on the buoyancy force due to density change in the endolymph induced by thermal stimulation was proposed by Gentine et al 1990 1991 It should be noted that the first qualitative model that took into account the effect of endolymph thermal expansion under local heating to analyze the properties of primary afferents was proposed by Gusev Orlov 1977 However these models failed to answer the question which of the mentioned effects will be dominant under certain conditions The purpose of present study was to account for the expansion and convection of endolymph and to determine under which conditions one mechanism dominates over the other The consideration is based on the following model of SC Kondrachuk Sirenko 1990 an isolated torus filled by a compressible viscous Newton liquid endolymph the torus interior is plugged by an elastic body cupula the cupula surface in contact with endolymph is supposed to be stretched along the

  20. Caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Shizgal, H.M.; Martin, M.F.

    1988-04-01

    The caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient was determined by measuring body composition, by multiple isotope dilution, before and at 2-wk intervals while receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in 86 septic and 57 nonseptic malnourished patients. All patients received a TPN solution containing 25% dextrose and 2.75% crystalline amino acids. The body composition of the nonseptic patients, who received 51.9 +/- 1.5 kcal/kg.day, improved significantly, while that of the septic patients, receiving 46.8 +/- 1.1 kcal/kg.day was only maintained. The relationship between caloric intake and the restoration of a malnourished body cell mass (BCM) was determined for each group by correlating, using multiple linear regression, the mean daily change in the BCM with the caloric intake and the nutritional state, as determined by body composition. According to the resultant regressions, an intake of 35.1 and 50.7 kcal/kg.day was required to maintain the BCM of the septic and nonseptic patients, respectively. To restore a depleted BCM, caloric intakes in excess of this amount are required.

  1. Caloric and entropic temperatures in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Restuccia, L.

    2016-10-01

    We examine the non-equilibrium consequences of two different definitions of temperature in systems out of equilibrium: one is based on the internal energy (caloric temperature), and the other one on the entropy (entropic temperature). We discuss the relation between the values obtained from these two definitions in ideal gases and in two-level systems.

  2. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... vestibular function testing of a patient's body balance system. The vestibular stimulation of the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Air or water caloric stimulator. 874.1800 Section 874.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  3. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... vestibular function testing of a patient's body balance system. The vestibular stimulation of the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Air or water caloric stimulator. 874.1800 Section 874.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  4. Dietary restrictions, bone density, and bone quality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsang-hai; Ables, Gene P

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), protein restriction (PR), and specific amino acid restriction (e.g., methionine restriction (MR)) are different dietary interventions that have been confirmed with regard to their comprehensive benefits to metabolism and health. Based on bone densitometric measurements, weight loss induced by dietary restriction is known to be accompanied by reduced areal bone mineral density, bone mass, and/or bone size, and it is considered harmful to bone health. However, because of technological advancements in bone densitometric instruments (e.g., high-resolution X-ray tomography), dietary restrictions have been found to cause a reduction in bone mass/size rather than volumetric bone mineral density. Furthermore, when considering bone quality, bone health consists of diverse indices that cannot be fully represented by densitometric measurements alone. Indeed, there is evidence that moderate dietary restrictions do not impair intrinsic bone material properties, despite the reduction in whole-bone strength because of a smaller bone size. In the present review, we integrate research evidence from traditional densitometric measurements, metabolic status assays (e.g., energy metabolism, oxidative stresses, and inflammatory responses), and biomaterial analyses to provide revised conclusions regarding the effects of CR, PR, and MR on the skeleton.

  5. Accelerated Telomere Shortening in Acromegaly; IGF-I Induces Telomere Shortening and Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ryusaku; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Odake, Yukiko; Yoshida, Kenichi; Bando, Hironori; Suda, Kentaro; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Michiko; Yamada, Shozo; Ogawa, Wataru; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients with acromegaly exhibit reduced life expectancy and increased prevalence of age-related diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Telomere shortening is reportedly associated with reduced life expectancy and increased prevalence of these age-related diseases. Methods We measured telomere length in patients with acromegaly using quantitative PCR method. The effect of GH and IGF-I on telomere length and cellular senescence was examined in human skin fibroblasts. Results Patients with acromegaly exhibited shorter telomere length than age-, sex-, smoking-, and diabetes-matched control patients with non-functioning pituitary adenoma (0.62 ± 0.23 vs. 0.75 ± 0.35, respectively, P = 0.047). In addition, telomere length in acromegaly was negatively correlated with the disease duration (R2 = 0.210, P = 0.003). In vitro analysis revealed that not GH but IGF-I induced telomere shortening in human skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, IGF-I-treated cells showed increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and expression of p53 and p21 protein. IGF-I-treated cells reached the Hayflick limit earlier than GH- or vehicle-treated cells, indicating that IGF-I induces cellular senescence. Conclusion Shortened telomeres in acromegaly and cellular senescence induced by IGF-I can explain, in part, the underlying mechanisms by which acromegaly exhibits an increased morbidity and mortality in association with the excess secretion of IGF-I. PMID:26448623

  6. The caloric vestibular nystagmus during short lasting microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterveld, W. J.; de Jong, H. A. A.; Kortschot, H. W.

    In human subjects the caloric vestibular test was conducted during parabolic flight. The ear irrigation was performed from 35 secs. till 5 secs. before the onset of microgravity. Nystagmography covered a 10-minutes period, including three parabolic manoeuvres of the aircraft. a. The slow phase velocity (SPV) of the caloric nystagmus increased proportionally with the value of the g-force. Introduction of microgravity induced an exponential decrease of the SPV decay. b. The nystagmus disappeared completely in microgravity, but SPV decay showed a specific time constant. c. The averaged time constant values of the caloric nystagmus SPV decay after sudden onset of microgravity and the averaged time constant of the SPV decay following a sudden stop after sustained rotation during 0-g appeared to be on the same level (10.2 s. and 10.6 s.). d. These two averaged time constant values obtained during shortlasting microgravity proved to be on a lower level than those time constants (15.5 secs.; 15.9 secs.) found in ground-based conditions. e. Because of the similarities in the characteristics of both SPV decay's and their accompanying time constants, a common working mechanism of cupular stimulation is likely. Most probably a fluid movement (or pressure) provokes a cupula deflexion followed by a cupula reflexion, either caused by a sudden stop after a sustained rotation or by a sudden onset of microgravity after g-load calorization. The present results support the Bárány convection theory with regard the endolymph stimulatory properties following the caloric test.

  7. Psychometric Properties of Shortened Versions of the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netemeyer, Richard G.; Williamson, Donald A.; Burton, Scot; Biswas, Dipayan; Jindal, Supriya; Landreth, Stacy; Mills, Gregory; Primeaux, Sonya

    2002-01-01

    Derived shortened versions of the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ) (S. Hollon and P. Kendall, 1980) using samples of 434 and 419 adults. Cross-validation with samples of 163 and 91 adults showed support for the shortened versions. Overall, results suggest that these short forms are useful in measuring cognitions associated with depression.…

  8. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  9. Impact of simulated microgravity and caloric restriction on autonomic nervous system function in adipose tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschmann, Michael; Adams, Frauke; Tank, Jens; Schaller, Karin; Boese, Andrea; Heer, Martina; Klause, Susanne; Luft, Friedrich C.; Jordan, Jens

    2005-08-01

    Long term immobilization and reduced food intake is often associated with development of orthostatic intolerance. Blocking the norepinephrine transporter (NET) can also mimic symptoms of orthostatic intolerance. Therefore, we hypothesized that simulated microgravity (14 days bed rest at head down tilt, BR) can cause changes in postganglionic NET function and adrenoreceptor (AR) sensitivity and these changes can be aggravated by hypocaloric food intake. For testing, two microdialysis probes were inserted into subcutaneous adipose tissue of eight young healthy men at day 1 and 14 of BR and perfused with Ringer's solution and increasing doses of tyramine and isoproterenol in order to simulate NET blockade and stimulate AR, respectively. At day 14 of eucaloric diet and BR, isoproterenol induced lipolysis was greater, whereas at day 14 of hypocaloric diet and BR, tyramine induced lipolysis was greater when compared to day 1. Therefore, the nutritional state affects NET function and AR sensitivity differently during BR.

  10. Weight loss and maintenance outcomes using moderate and severe caloric restriction in an outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Bruce W; Jacobsen, Dennis J; Donnelly, Joseph E

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a formula diet of 520 kilocalorie (kcal, 2177 kilojoules [kJ]) compared to 850 kcal (3558 kJ) produces significantly greater weight loss and improved weight maintenance in a clinical outpatient setting. The investigation was a retrospective analysis of data from 1887 participants who underwent weight loss between December 1994 and January 2003. Participants were between the ages of 18 and 70 and completed a minimum of 12 weeks of a very-low-energy diet (VLED; 520 kcal) or a low-energy diet (LED; 850 kcal). Participants attended weekly meetings, were weighed, and received instruction in behavioral skills. Following active weight loss, participants transitioned to weight maintenance and were prescribed an individual structured meal plan aimed at maintaining body weight. Both levels of energy intake produced significant weight loss over 12 weeks (P < 0.05). Weight loss was 15.2 +/- 4.1% and 14.3 +/- 3.7% of initial body weight for participants in the VLED (n = 1231) and LED (n = 656), respectively. After controlling for baseline body weight, there was no significant difference between diets. Similarly, there was no significant difference in weight regain between VLED and LED after 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks of weight maintenance. VLED did not produce a greater weight loss than the LED. LED provides similar weight loss with a lower incidence of adverse events and diminished need for medical monitoring. We conclude LED is an efficacious, safe, and less burdensome diet compared to VLED.

  11. The human metabolic response to chronic ketosis without caloric restriction: physical and biochemical adaptation.

    PubMed

    Phinney, S D; Bistrian, B R; Wolfe, R R; Blackburn, G L

    1983-08-01

    To study the metabolic effects of ketosis without weight loss, nine lean men were fed a eucaloric balanced diet (EBD) for one week providing 35-50 kcal/kg/d, 1.75 g of protein per kilogram per day and the remaining kilocalories as two-thirds carbohydrate (CHO) and one-third fat. This was followed by four weeks of a eucaloric ketogenic diet (EKD)--isocaloric and isonitrogenous with the EBD but providing less than 20 g CHO daily. Both diets were appropriately supplemented with minerals and vitamins. Weight and whole-body potassium estimated by potassium-40 counting (40K) did not vary significantly during the five-week study. Nitrogen balance (N-Bal) was regained after one week of the EKD. The fasting blood glucose remained lower during the EKD than during the control diet (4.4 mmol/L at EBD, 4.1 mmol/L at EKD-4, P less than 0.01). The fasting whole-body glucose oxidation rate determined by a 13C-glucose primed constant infusion technique fell from 0.71 mg/kg/min during the control diet to 0.50 mg/kg/min (P less than 0.01) during the fourth week of the EKD. The mean serum cholesterol level rose (from 159 to 208 mg/dL) during the EKD, while triglycerides fell from 107 to 79 mg/dL. No disturbance of hepatic or renal function was noted at EKD-4. These findings indicate that the ketotic state induced by the EKD was well tolerated in lean subjects; nitrogen balance was regained after brief adaptation, serum lipids were not pathologically elevated, and blood glucose oxidation at rest was measurably reduced while the subjects remained euglycemic.

  12. Controlled meal frequency without caloric restriction alters peripheral blood mononuclear cell cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intermittent fasting (IF) improves healthy lifespan in animals by a mechanism involving reduced oxidative damage and increased resistance to stress. However, no studies have evaluated the impact of controlled meal frequency on immune responses in human subjects. Objective A study was conducted to establish the effects of controlled diets with different meal frequencies, but similar daily energy intakes, on cytokine production in healthy male and female subjects. Design In a crossover study design with an intervening washout period, healthy normal weight middle-age male and female subjects (n = 15) were maintained for 2 months on controlled on-site one meal per day (OMD) or three meals per day (TMD) isocaloric diets. Serum samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) culture supernatants from subjects were analyzed for the presence of inflammatory markers using a multiplex assay. Results There were no significant differences in the inflammatory markers in the serum of subjects on the OMD or TMD diets. There was an increase in the capacity of PBMCs to produce cytokines in subjects during the first month on the OMD or TMD diets. Lower levels of TNF-α, IL-17, MCP-1 and MIP-1β were produced by PBMCs from subjects on the OMD versus TMD diet. Conclusions PBMCs of subjects on controlled diets exhibit hypersensitivities to cellular stimulation suggesting that stress associated with altered eating behavior might affect cytokine production by immune cells upon stimulation. Moreover, stimulated PBMCs derived from healthy individuals on a reduced meal frequency diet respond with a reduced capability to produce cytokines. PMID:21385360

  13. Lifestyle and nutrition, caloric restriction, mitochondrial health and hormones: Scientific interventions for anti-aging

    PubMed Central

    Vitetta, Luis; Anton, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Aging is a universal process to all life forms. The most current and widely accepted definition for aging in humans is that there is a progressive loss of function and energy production that is accompanied by decreasing fertility and increasing mortality with advancing age. The most obvious and commonly recognised consequence of aging and energy decline is a decrease in skeletal muscle function which affects every aspect of human life from the ability to play games, walk and run to chew, swallow and digest food. There is hence a recognised overall decline of an individuals’ fitness for the environment that they occupy. In Westernised countries this decline is gradual and the signs become mostly noticeable after the 5th decade of life and henceforth, where the individual slowly progresses to death over the next three to four decades. Given that the aging process is slow and gradual, it presents with opportunities and options that may ameliorate and improve the overall functional capacity of the organism. Small changes in function may be more amenable and likely to further slow down and possibly reverse some of the deleterious effects of aging, rather, than when the incremental changes are large. This overall effect may then translate into a significant compression of the deleterious aspects of human aging with a resultant increase in human life expectancy. PMID:18225453

  14. Intermittent fasting dissociates beneficial effects of dietary restriction on glucose metabolism and neuronal resistance to injury from calorie intake.

    PubMed

    Anson, R Michael; Guo, Zhihong; de Cabo, Rafael; Iyun, Titilola; Rios, Michelle; Hagepanos, Adrienne; Ingram, Donald K; Lane, Mark A; Mattson, Mark P

    2003-05-13

    Dietary restriction has been shown to have several health benefits including increased insulin sensitivity, stress resistance, reduced morbidity, and increased life span. The mechanism remains unknown, but the need for a long-term reduction in caloric intake to achieve these benefits has been assumed. We report that when C57BL6 mice are maintained on an intermittent fasting (alternate-day fasting) dietary-restriction regimen their overall food intake is not decreased and their body weight is maintained. Nevertheless, intermittent fasting resulted in beneficial effects that met or exceeded those of caloric restriction including reduced serum glucose and insulin levels and increased resistance of neurons in the brain to excitotoxic stress. Intermittent fasting therefore has beneficial effects on glucose regulation and neuronal resistance to injury in these mice that are independent of caloric intake.

  15. Time-restricted feeding of a high-fat diet reduces diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing obesity may alleviate many medical complications including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. It has been suggested that obesity is contributed by the disruption of the circadian rhythms in addition to increased caloric intake. Restricting feeding to particular times of the day ma...

  16. Ulnar Impaction Syndrome: Ulnar Shortening vs. Arthroscopic Wafer Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Smet, Luc De; Vandenberghe, Lore; Degreef, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of ulnar shortenings was compared with that of arthroscopic wafer resections for ulnar impaction (or abutment) syndrome in patients with a positive ulnar variance. The outcome was measured by DASH score, visual analog scale for pain, and working incapacity. The mean DASH score in the ulnar shortening group was 26; in the wafer group it was 36. The VAS scores were respectively 4.4 and 4.6. The working incapacity was 7?months in the ulnar shortening group and 6.1 months in the wafer group. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. PMID:25032075

  17. Non-caloric sweeteners, sweetness modulators, and sweetener enhancers.

    PubMed

    DuBois, Grant E; Prakash, Indra

    2012-01-01

    For a new sweetness technology to realize strong commercial success, it must be safe, exhibit good taste quality, be sufficiently soluble and stable in food and beverage systems, and be cost effective and patentable. Assessments of the commercial promise of eight synthetic and eight natural non-caloric sweeteners are made relevant to these metrics. High-potency (HP) non-caloric sweeteners, both synthetic and natural, are generally limited in taste quality by (a) low maximal sweetness response, (b) "off" tastes, (c) slow-onset sweet tastes that linger, and (d) sweet tastes that adapt or desensitize the gustatory system. Formulation approaches to address these limitations are discussed. Enhancement of the normal sucrose sensory response by action of a sweetener receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) has been achieved with very significant calorie reduction and with retention of the taste quality of sucrose. Research on PAM discovery over the past decade is summarized.

  18. Phenomenological models of the dynamics of muscle during isotonic shortening.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Sang Hoon; Monroy, Jenna A; Lappin, A Kristopher; Nishikawa, Kiisa C; Pai, Dinesh K

    2013-09-27

    We investigated the effectiveness of simple, Hill-type, phenomenological models of the force-length-velocity relationship for simulating measured length trajectories during muscle shortening, and, if so, what forms of the model are most useful. Using isotonic shortening data from mouse soleus and toad depressor mandibulae muscles, we showed that Hill-type models can indeed simulate the shortening trajectories with sufficiently good accuracy. However, we found that the standard form of the Hill-type muscle model, called the force-scaling model, is not a satisfactory choice. Instead, the results support the use of less frequently used models, the f-max scaling model and force-scaling with parallel spring, to simulate the shortening dynamics of muscle.

  19. The history dependence of force production in mammalian skeletal muscle following stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles.

    PubMed

    Herzog, W; Leonard, T R

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the history dependence of force production during and following stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles in mammalian skeletal muscle. Thirty-three different isometric, stretch, shortening, stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch experiments were preformed in cat soleus (n=8) using previously established methods. Stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles are not commutative with respect to the isometric forces following the length changes. Whereas force depression following shortening is virtually unaffected by previous stretching of the muscle, force enhancement following stretch depends in a dose-dependent manner on the amount of muscle shortening preceding the stretch. The history dependence of isometric force following shortening-stretch cycles can conveniently be modelled using an elastic (compressive and tensile) element that engages at the length of muscle activation. Such an "elastic" mechanism has been proposed by Edman and Tsuchiya (1996) (Edman, K.A. P., Tsuchiya, T., 1996. Strain of passive elements during force enhancement by stretch in frog mucle fibres. Journal of Physiology 490. 1, 191-205) based on experimental observations, and has been implemented theoretically in a rheological model of muscle (Forcinito et al., 1997) (Forcinito, M., Epstein, M., Herzog, W., 1997. Theoretical considerations on myofibril stiffness. Biophysics Journal 72, 1278-1286). The history dependence of isometric force following stretch-shortening cycles appears independent of the stretch preceding the shortening, except perhaps, if stretching occurs at very high speeds (i.e. 6-10 times fibre length per second). The results of this study are hard to reconcile with the two major mechanisms associated with history dependence of force production: sarcomere length non-uniformity (Edman et al., 1993) and stress-induced cross-bridge inhibition (Maréchal and Plaghki, 1979) (Maréchal, G., Plaghki, L., 1979. The deficit of

  20. Biochemical response to chronic shortening in unloaded soleus muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.; Tischler, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    One leg of tail-casted suspended rats was immobilized in a plantar-flexed position to test whether chronic shortening of posterior leg muscles affected the metabolic response to unloading. The immobilized plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles of these animals showed approximately 20 percent loss of muscle mass in contrast to simply a slower growth rate with unloading. Loss of mass of the soleus muscle during suspension was not accentuated by chronic shortening. Although protein degradation in the isolated soleus muscle of the plantar-flexed limb was slightly faster than in the contralateral free limb, this difference was offset by faster synthesis of the myofibrillar protein fraction of the chronically shortened muscle. Total adenine nucleotides were 17 percent lower (P less than 0.005) in the chronically shortened soleus muscle following incubation. Glutamate, glutamine, and alanine metabolism showed little response to chronic shortening. These results suggest that, in the soleus muscle, chronic shortening did not alter significantly the metabolic responses to unloading and reduced activity.

  1. Augmentation of deglutitive thyrohyoid muscle shortening by the Shaker Exercise.

    PubMed

    Mepani, Rachel; Antonik, Stephen; Massey, Benson; Kern, Mark; Logemann, Jerilyn; Pauloski, Barbara; Rademaker, Alfred; Easterling, Caryn; Shaker, Reza

    2009-03-01

    Earlier studies of the effect of 6 weeks of the Shaker Exercise have shown significant increase in UES opening and anterior excursion of larynx and hyoid during swallowing in patients with upper esophageal sphincter (UES) dysfunction, resulting in elimination of aspiration and resumption of oral intake. This effect is attributed to strengthening of the suprahyoid muscles, as evidenced by comparison of electromyographic changes in muscle fatigue before and after completion of the exercise regime. The effect of this exercise on thyrohyoid muscle shortening is unknown. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the effect of the exercise on thyrohyoid muscle shortening. We studied 11 dysphagic patients with UES dysfunction. Six were randomized to traditional swallowing therapy and five to the Shaker Exercise. Videofluoroscopy was used to measure deglutitive thyrohyoid shortening before and after completion of assigned therapy regimen. Maximum thyrohyoid muscle shortening occurred at close temporal proximity to the time of maximal thyroid cartilage excursion. The percent change in thyrohyoid distance from initiation of deglutition to maximal anterior/superior hyoid excursion showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups prior to either therapy (p = 0.54). In contrast, after completion of therapy, the percent change in thyrohyoid distance in the Shaker Exercise group was significantly greater compared to the traditional therapy (p = 0.034). The Shaker Exercise augments the thyrohyoid muscle shortening in addition to strengthening the suprahyoid muscles. The combination of increased thyrohyoid shortening and suprahyoid strengthening contributes to the Shaker Exercise outcome of deglutitive UES opening augmentation.

  2. Frying performance of palm-based solid frying shortening.

    PubMed

    Omar, M N; Nor-Nazuha, M N; Nor-Dalilah, M N; Sahri, M M

    2010-03-15

    In order to evaluate the frying performance of palm-based solid frying shortening against standard olein, the fresh potato chips were fried in both frying media using an open fryer. After frying the chips for 40 h in an open batch fryer, it was found that the frying quality of palm-based solid frying shortening was better than standard palm olein in terms of Free Fatty Acid (FFA) values, Total Polar Content (TPC) and Total Polymeric Material (TPM). Solid shortening gave FFA, TPC and TPM values of 0.7, 15.3 and 2.67%, respectively, whilst standard palm olein gave values for FFA, TPC and TPM of 1.2, 19.6 and 3.10%, respectively. In terms of sensory mean scores, sensory panelists preferred the color of potato chips fried in solid shortening on the first day of frying, while on the third and fifth day of frying there were no significant differences (p < 0.05) in the sensory scores of fried products in both frying mediums. However, on the fifth day of frying, panelists gave higher scores in terms of taste, flavor and crispness for potato chips fried in solid shortening. These findings show that the palm-based solid shortening is better than palm olein when used for deep fat frying in terms of FFA values, total polar content and total polymeric material, especially for starch-based products such as potato chips. The result also shows that, in terms of sensory mean scores, after frying for 40 h, the sensory panelists gave higher scores in terms of taste, flavor and crispiness for potato chips fried in palm-based solid shortening.

  3. The mechanics of mouse skeletal muscle when shortening during relaxation.

    PubMed

    Barclay, C J; Lichtwark, G A

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic properties of relaxing skeletal muscle have not been well characterised but are important for understanding muscle function during terrestrial locomotion, during which a considerable fraction of muscle work output can be produced during relaxation. The purpose of this study was to characterise the force-velocity properties of mouse skeletal muscle during relaxation. Experiments were performed in vitro (21 degrees C) using bundles of fibres from mouse soleus and EDL muscles. Isovelocity shortening was applied to muscles during relaxation following short tetanic contractions. Using data from different contractions with different shortening velocities, curves relating force output to shortening velocity were constructed at intervals during relaxation. The velocity component included contributions from shortening of both series elastic component (SEC) and contractile component (CC) because force output was not constant. Early in relaxation force-velocity relationships were linear but became progressively more curved as relaxation progressed. Force-velocity curves late in relaxation had the same curvature as those for the CC in fully activated muscles but V(max) was reduced to approximately 50% of the value in fully activated muscles. These results were the same for slow- and fast-twitch muscles and for relaxation following maximal tetani and brief, sub-maximal tetani. The measured series elastic compliance was used to partition shortening velocity between SEC and CC. The curvature of the CC force-velocity relationship was constant during relaxation. The SEC accounted for most of the shortening and work output during relaxation and its power output during relaxation exceeded the maximum CC power output. It is proposed that unloading the CC, without any change in its overall length, accelerated cross-bridge detachment when shortening was applied during relaxation.

  4. Tectonic studies and crustal shortening across Easternmost Arunachal Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningthoujam, P. S.; Dubey, C. S.; Lolee, L. K.; Shukla, D. P.; Naorem, S. S.; Singh, S. K.

    2015-11-01

    The Easternmost Arunachal Himalaya has a complex geological and tectonic setting due to triple junction of Indian Plate, Eurasian Plate and Myanmar Platelet. In this region, high degree of crustal shortening is observed, Tethyan Himalaya part is missing and Siwaliks has been eroded completely. Here, we present an updated geological map of the Easternmost Arunachal Himalaya and a balanced palinspastic cross section through the Himalayan thrust-fold belt, along Roing-Hunli-Anini section. The crustal shortening in this area has been accommodated in the present geologic setting by northward thrusting of litho-units consequently developing a duplex below Hunli Village. Balanced palinspastic cross sections reveal that about 16.2 km thick roof over Hunli window has been eroded implying extreme exhumation, erosion and fast un-roofing processes that landscaped a window at Hunli and a klippe at Mayodia. In comparison with other parts of Himalaya, crustal shortening in the Easternmost Arunachal is maximum with a shortening strain of 83.28% which may be related with the bending around the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis. It has been observed that crustal shortening in the Lesser Himalaya Sequence in the area is around 81.46%.

  5. Uniform sarcomere shortening behavior in isolated cardiac muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    We have observed the dynamics of sarcomere shortening and the diffracting action of single, functionally intact, unattached cardiac muscle cells enzymatically isolated from the ventricular tissue of adult rats. Sarcomere length was measured either (a) continuously by a light diffraction method or (b) by direct inspection of the cell's striated image as recorded on videotape or by cinemicroscopy (120--400 frames/s). At physiological levels of added CaCl2 (0.5--2.0 mM), many cells were quiescent (i.e., they did not beat spontaneously) and contracted in response to electrical stimulation (less than or equal to 1.0-ms pulse width). Sarcomere length in the quiescent, unstimulated cells (1.93 +/- 0.10 [SD] micrometers), at peak shortening (1.57 +/- 0.13 micrometers, n = 49), and the maximum velocity of sarcomere shortening and relengthening were comparable to previous observations in intact heart muscle preparations. The dispersion of light diffracted by the cell remained narrow, and individual striations remained distinct and laterally well registered throughout the shortening- relengthening cycle. In contrast, appreciable nonuniformity and internal buckling were seen at sarcomere lengths < 1.8 micrometers when the resting cell, embedded in gelatin, was longitudinally compressed These results indicate (a) that shortening and relengthening is characterized by uniform activation between myofibrils within the cardiac cell and (b) that physiologically significant relengthening forces in living heart muscle originate at the level of the cell rather than in extracellular connections. First-order diffracted light intensity, extremely variable during sarcomere shortening, was always greatest during midrelaxation preceding the onset of a very slow and uniform phase of sarcomere relengthening. PMID:7441197

  6. Can vestibular caloric stimulation be used to treat apotemnophilia?

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S; McGeoch, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Apotemnophilia, or body integrity image disorder (BIID), is characterised by a feeling of mismatch between the internal feeling of how one's body should be and the physical reality of how it actually is. Patients with this condition have an often overwhelming desire for an amputation- of a specific limb at a specific level. Such patients are not psychotic or delusional, however, they do express an inexplicable emotional abhorrence to the limb they wish removed. It is also known that such patients show a left-sided preponderance for their desired amputation. Often they take drastic action to be rid of the offending limb. Given the left-sided bias, emotional rejection and specificity of desired amputation, we suggest that there are clear similarities to be drawn between BIID and somatoparaphrenia. In this rare condition, which follows a right parietal stroke, the patient rejects (usually) his left arm as "alien". We go on to hypothesis that a dysfunction of the right parietal lobe is also the cause of BIID. We suggest that this leads to an uncoupling of the construct of one's body image in the right parietal lobe from how one's body physically is. This hypothesis would be amenable to testing by response to cold-water vestibular caloric stimulation, which is known to temporarily treat somatoparaphrenia. It could also be investigated using functional brain imaging and skin conductance response. If correct our hypothesis not only suggests why BIID arises, but also, in caloric stimulation a therapeutic avenue for this chronic and essentially untreatable condition.

  7. High monetary reward rates and caloric rewards decrease temporal persistence

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Stefan; Murawski, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Temporal persistence refers to an individual's capacity to wait for future rewards, while forgoing possible alternatives. This requires a trade-off between the potential value of delayed rewards and opportunity costs, and is relevant to many real-world decisions, such as dieting. Theoretical models have previously suggested that high monetary reward rates, or positive energy balance, may result in decreased temporal persistence. In our study, 50 fasted participants engaged in a temporal persistence task, incentivised with monetary rewards. In alternating blocks of this task, rewards were delivered at delays drawn randomly from distributions with either a lower or higher maximum reward rate. During some blocks participants received either a caloric drink or water. We used survival analysis to estimate participants' probability of quitting conditional on the delay distribution and the consumed liquid. Participants had a higher probability of quitting in blocks with the higher reward rate. Furthermore, participants who consumed the caloric drink had a higher probability of quitting than those who consumed water. Our results support the predictions from the theoretical models, and importantly, suggest that both higher monetary reward rates and physiologically relevant rewards can decrease temporal persistence, which is a crucial determinant for survival in many species. PMID:28228517

  8. Leucine improves protein nutritional status and regulates hepatic lipid metabolism in calorie-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, João Alfredo B; Nishimura, Luciana Sigueta; de Matos-Neto, Emídio Marques; Donato, Jose; Tirapegui, Julio

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have highlighted the potential of leucine supplementation for the treatment of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and obesity. Caloric restriction is a common approach to improve the health in diabetic and obese subjects. However, very few studies assessed the effects of leucine supplementation in calorie-restricted animals. Rats were subjected to a 30% calorie-restricted diet for 6 weeks to study the effects of leucine supplementation on protein status markers and lipid metabolism. Caloric restriction reduced the body weight. However, increased leucine intake preserved body lean mass and protein mass and improved protein anabolism as indicated by the increased circulating levels of albumin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and the liver expression of albumin and IGF-1 messenger RNA. Leucine supplementation also increased the circulating levels of interleukin-6 and leptin but did not affect the tumour necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 concentrations. Ketone bodies were increased in rats consuming a leucine-rich diet, but we observed no changes in cholesterol or triglycerides concentrations. Caloric restriction reduced the liver expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α and glucose-6-phosphatase, whereas leucine supplementation increased the liver expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA) reductase and sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1. A leucine-rich diet during caloric restriction preserved whole body protein mass and improved markers of protein anabolism. In addition, leucine modulated the hepatic lipid metabolism. These results indicate that increased leucine intake may be useful in preventing excessive protein waste in conditions of large weight loss.

  9. Residual force enhancement following shortening is speed-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Fortuna, Rafael; Power, Geoffrey A.; Mende, Esther; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The steady-state isometric force following active muscle shortening or lengthening is smaller (force depression; FD) or greater (residual force enhancement; RFE) than a purely isometric contraction at the corresponding length. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not explained within the context of the cross-bridge theory and are rarely studied in concert. Previous studies have shown RFE to be speed-independent. In the present study, we investigated if RFE preceded by active shortening is time-dependent by electrically evoking RFE in the human adductor pollicis muscle. The results shown that a slow stretch following FD fully re-established RFE compared to higher speeds of stretch. The mechanism(s) responsible for the recovery of RFE following a preceding shortening contraction (FD) might be associated with the recovery of cross-bridge based force and/or the re-engagement of a passive structural element (titin). Voluntary interaction with one’s environment involves highly coordinated shortening and lengthening muscle contractions. Therefore comprehending these history-dependent muscle properties in the context of movement control is paramount in understanding the behavior of in vivo motor control. PMID:26869508

  10. Stress induced telomere shortening: longer life with less mutations?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations accumulate as a result of DNA damage and imperfect DNA repair machinery. In higher eukaryotes the accumulation and spread of mutations is limited in two primary ways: through p53-mediated programmed cell death and cellular senescence mediated by telomeres. Telomeres shorten at every cell division and cell stops dividing once the shortest telomere reaches a critical length. It has been shown that the rate of telomere attrition is accelerated when cells are exposed to DNA damaging agents. However the implications of this mechanism are not fully understood. Results With the help of in silico model we investigate the effect of genotoxic stress on telomere attrition and apoptosis in a population of non-identical replicating cells. When comparing the populations of cells with constant vs. stress-induced rate of telomere shortening we find that stress induced telomere shortening (SITS) increases longevity while reducing mutation rate. Interestingly, however, the effect takes place only when genotoxic stresses (e.g. reactive oxygen species due to metabolic activity) are distributed non-equally among cells. Conclusions Our results for the first time show how non-equal distribution of metabolic load (and associated genotoxic stresses) combined with stress induced telomere shortening can delay aging and minimize mutations. PMID:24580844

  11. On the Shortcomings of Shortened Tests: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruyen, Peter M.; Emons, Wilco H. M.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2013-01-01

    To efficiently assess multiple psychological constructs and to minimize the burden on respondents, psychologists increasingly use shortened versions of existing tests. However, compared to the longer test, a shorter test version may have a substantial impact on the reliability and the validity of the test scores in psychological research and…

  12. A Load Shortening Curve Library for Longitudinally Stiffened Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    curves. These are compared with similar curves calculated using nonlinear FEA and using design formulas published by the International Association...of parameters values used in load-shortening curve libraries ........................... 7 Table 3: Nonlinear solution strategy...direct assessment with nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) first reported by Chen et al. [9]. A recent study comparing the ultimate strengths of

  13. Device and method for shortening reactor process tubes

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, Charles E.; Alexander, William K.; Lander, Walter E. B.

    1980-01-01

    This disclosure describes a device and method for in situ shortening of nuclear reactor zirconium alloy process tubes which have grown as a result of radiation exposure. An upsetting technique is utilized which involves inductively heating a short band of a process tube with simultaneous application of an axial load sufficient to cause upsetting with an attendant decrease in length of the process tube.

  14. Cellular Consequences of Telomere Shortening in Histologically Normal Breast Tissues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    undergoing reduction mammoplasty surgeries . (A) A normal breast TDLU with normal length telomeres in all cell types present. (B) A normal breast TDLU...to severe telomere shortening is highly prevalent within histologically normal TDLUs obtained from women undergoing reduction mammoplasty surgeries ...specialize in the research and treatment of breast cancer. The trainee has attended weekly journal clubs, Oncology translational research seminars , breast

  15. Sleep Restriction Worsens Mood and Emotion Regulation in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Katherine T.; Desai, Anjali; Field, Julie; Miller, Lauren E.; Rausch, Joseph; Beebe, Dean W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The relationship between inadequate sleep and mood has been well-established in adults and is supported primarily by correlational data in younger populations. Given that adolescents often experience shortened sleep on school nights, we sought to better understand the effect of experimentally induced chronic sleep restriction on…

  16. Long–Term Effects of Energy-Restricted Diets Differing in Glycemic Load on Metabolic Adaptation and Body Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A randomized controlled trial of high glycemic load (HG) and low glycemic load (LG) diets with food provided for 6 months and self-administered for 6 additional months at 30% caloric restriction (CR) was performed in 29 overweight adults (mean+/-SD, age 35+/-5y; BMI 27.5+/-1.5 kg/m2). Total energy e...

  17. Caloric expenditure assessment among older adults: criterion validity of a novel accelerometry device.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Sarah T; Insana, Salvatore P

    2014-11-01

    Criterion validity of a novel accelerometry device that measures caloric expenditure (Fitbit) was evaluated against a self-report estimation of caloric expenditure (Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors) in older adults. Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors and Fitbit estimates of total caloric expenditure per day were significantly correlated (r = .61, p < .05). Bland-Altman plots indicated that 70 percent of participants' data were within 1 standard deviation of the mean difference between measures. These preliminary findings suggest that the Fitbit may be considered a viable instrument for measuring daily caloric expenditure among older adults. However, further work is required to determine the optimal measurement technique for caloric expenditure among older adults.

  18. What impact will shortened training have on urological service delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Payne, S. R.; Shaw, M. B. K.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Modernisation of Medical Careers dictates a shortening of the training required to achieve consultant status. Precisely what type of work these consultants could be expected to accomplish, and be trained to do, is not clear. The objective of this study was to demonstrate a method of stratifying urological workload so as to determine what a urological trainee, undergoing shortened training, might be expected to do as a consultant and to use this stratification to help manpower planning within the specialty. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cohort study of all urological activity undertaken over a 3-year period in a single teaching hospital in the UK was performed. All out-patient, in-patient or day-case activity within the urological department was analysed in the years 2000-2002. Urological activity was stratified according to the absolute numbers of patients presenting for different types of out-patient consultation, the grade of complexity of any surgical intervention undertaken, and the theatre resource consumed by the study population. RESULTS: Utilising prospectively collected data, it was possible to aggregate information about the contributions generalist and sub-specialty activity made to the overall workload of a urological unit. Whilst the majority of out-patient activity, and almost 88% of the surgical workload, could be accomplished by consultants undergoing shortened training, 11.9% of specialised urological activity, consuming nearly 43% of the available theatre resource, was outwith the remit of such a specialist. CONCLUSIONS: Shortened training seems able to satisfy the service delivery needs of the majority of out-patient and day-case urological activity. It will not, however, fulfil the need for subspecialty-based training required to cope with the large minority of patients necessitating complex surgical intervention. Specialist training programmes, promoting advanced operative skills, need to be evolved in parallel to shortened training so

  19. Moderate stem-cell telomere shortening rate postpones cancer onset in a stochastic model.

    PubMed

    Holbek, Simon; Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Juul, Jeppe

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian cells are restricted from proliferating indefinitely. Telomeres at the end of each chromosome are shortened at cell division and when they reach a critical length, the cell will enter permanent cell cycle arrest-a state known as senescence. This mechanism is thought to be tumor suppressing, as it helps prevent precancerous cells from dividing uncontrollably. Stem cells express the enzyme telomerase, which elongates the telomeres, thereby postponing senescence. However, unlike germ cells and most types of cancer cells, stem cells only express telomerase at levels insufficient to fully maintain the length of their telomeres, leading to a slow decline in proliferation potential. It is not yet fully understood how this decline influences the risk of cancer and the longevity of the organism. We here develop a stochastic model to explore the role of telomere dynamics in relation to both senescence and cancer. The model describes the accumulation of cancerous mutations in a multicellular organism and creates a coherent theoretical framework for interpreting the results of several recent experiments on telomerase regulation. We demonstrate that the longest average cancer-free lifespan before cancer onset is obtained when stem cells start with relatively long telomeres that are shortened at a steady rate at cell division. Furthermore, the risk of cancer early in life can be reduced by having a short initial telomere length. Finally, our model suggests that evolution will favor a shorter than optimal average cancer-free lifespan in order to postpone cancer onset until late in life.

  20. Moderate stem-cell telomere shortening rate postpones cancer onset in a stochastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbek, Simon; Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Juul, Jeppe

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian cells are restricted from proliferating indefinitely. Telomeres at the end of each chromosome are shortened at cell division and when they reach a critical length, the cell will enter permanent cell cycle arrest—a state known as senescence. This mechanism is thought to be tumor suppressing, as it helps prevent precancerous cells from dividing uncontrollably. Stem cells express the enzyme telomerase, which elongates the telomeres, thereby postponing senescence. However, unlike germ cells and most types of cancer cells, stem cells only express telomerase at levels insufficient to fully maintain the length of their telomeres, leading to a slow decline in proliferation potential. It is not yet fully understood how this decline influences the risk of cancer and the longevity of the organism. We here develop a stochastic model to explore the role of telomere dynamics in relation to both senescence and cancer. The model describes the accumulation of cancerous mutations in a multicellular organism and creates a coherent theoretical framework for interpreting the results of several recent experiments on telomerase regulation. We demonstrate that the longest average cancer-free lifespan before cancer onset is obtained when stem cells start with relatively long telomeres that are shortened at a steady rate at cell division. Furthermore, the risk of cancer early in life can be reduced by having a short initial telomere length. Finally, our model suggests that evolution will favor a shorter than optimal average cancer-free lifespan in order to postpone cancer onset until late in life.

  1. Comparison of energy output during ramp and staircase shortening in frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Linari, M; Woledge, R C

    1995-01-01

    1. We compared the rates of work and heat production during ramp shortening with those during staircase shortening (sequence of step releases of the same amplitude, separated by regular time intervals). Ramp or staircase shortening was applied to isolated muscle fibres (sarcomere length, 2.2 microns; temperature, approximately 1 degree C) at the plateau of an isometric tetanus. The total amount of shortening was no greater than 6% of the fibre length. 2. During ramp shortening the power output showed a maximum at about 0.8 fibre lengths per second (Lo s-1), which corresponds to 1/3 the maximum shortening velocity (Vo). For the same average shortening velocity during staircase shortening (step size, approximately 0.5% Lo) the power output was 40-60% lower. The rate of heat production for the same average shortening velocity was approximately 45% higher during staircase shortening than during ramp shortening. 3. The relation between rate of total energy output and shortening velocity was well described by a second order regression line in the range of velocities used (0.1-2.3 Lo s-1). For any shortening velocity the rate of total energy output (power plus heat rate) was not statistically different for staircase (step size, approximately 0.5% Lo) and ramp shortening. 4. The mechanical efficiency (the ratio of the power over the total energy rate) during ramp shortening had a maximum value of 0.36 at 1/5 Vo; during staircase shortening, for any given shortening velocity, the mechanical efficiency was reduced compared with ramp shortening: with a staircase step of about 0.5% Lo at 1/5 Vo the efficiency was approximately 0.2. 5. The results indicate that a cross-bridge is able to convert different quantities of energy into work depending on the different shortening protocol used. The fraction of energy dissipated as heat is larger during staircase shortening than during ramp shortening. PMID:8544132

  2. Using mindful eating to treat food restriction: a case study.

    PubMed

    Albers, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This case study describes the application of the principles of mindful eating to the treatment of a case of anorexia nervosa. While many clinicians currently use mindful eating in their treatment of binge eating disorder and bulimia, it also may benefit clients who restrict. The client in this case study is a 19-year-old college student with a BMI of 17.9 and daily restriction of approximately 900-1000 calories who exercises 1 hour daily. Over 15 sessions, she was introduced to the principle of mindful eating. There was an overall decline in restriction, her BMI raised to 19.5, and her caloric intake increased to approximately 1,500-2,000.

  3. Effects of rectilinear acceleration, optokinetic and caloric stimuli in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbaumgarten, R.

    1981-01-01

    The set of experiments comprising the Spacelab 1ES201 package designed to investigate the human vestibular system and equilibratory function in weightlessness are described. The specific objectives of the experiments include: (1) the determination of the threshold of perception of linear oscillatory motion; (2) measurement of physiological and subjective responses to supra threshold, linear and angular motion stimuli; (3) study of the postural adjustments, eye movements, and illusions of attitude and motion evoked by optokinetic stimuli, (i.e., moving visual patterns) in order to assess visual/vestibular interactions; (4) examination of the effect of thermal stimulations of the vestibular apparatus to determine if the eye movements elicited by the 'caloric test' are used by a density gradient in the semicircular canal; and (5) investigation of the pathogenesis of space motion sickness by recording signs and symptoms during the course of vestibular stimulation and, specifically, when the test subject is exposed to sustained, linear oscillatory motion.

  4. Anomalies and synergy in the caloric effects of magnetoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Shashwat; Waghmare, Umesh V.

    2014-12-01

    We determine isothermal entropy changes (Δ S) associated with electrocaloric, magnetocaloric, and the corresponding multicaloric effects in a model type-I multiferroic system using Landau-Devonshire thermodynamic analysis. We show that (a) the magnetocaloric effect exhibits an unexpected anomaly at the ferroelectric transition occurring at a high temperature, even in the absence of magnetic ordering, and (b) the synergy between electro- and magnetocaloric effects leads to a significantly enhanced multicaloric effect (\\mid Δ {{S}MultiCE}\\mid \\gt \\mid Δ {{S}ECE}\\mid +\\mid Δ {{S}MCE}\\mid ) over a wide temperature range when the difference in temperatures of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering (\\mid Δ {{T}C}\\mid =\\mid TCE-TCM\\mid ) is small. This result originate from the coupled thermal fluctuations of magnetic and electric order parameters. While the former is useful in detecting multiferroic materials from the measurements covering higher temperature transition alone, the latter augurs well for caloric applications of multiferroics.

  5. Partial capitate shortening for Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Citlak, A; Akgun, U; Bulut, T; Tahta, M; Dirim Mete, B; Sener, M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience of partial capitate shortening in seven patients with a median 38 months follow-up. Staging was made by the Lichtman classification system and stage II and III-A patients were included in the study. The mean age was 34 years (range 22-52). Patients were assessed for pain, range of motion, grip and pinch strength, and satisfaction was recorded using a scale between 0 and 4. All these parameters showed improvement after surgery. The Lichtman stage, lunate height index and carpal height index were determined radiographically. Magnetic resonance images of the wrist were studied for lunate revascularization at the final follow-up and occurred in all patients. According to our study, partial capitate shortening seems an effective treatment for Lichtman stage II and III-A patients.Level IV case series study.

  6. Lack of telomere shortening during senescence in Paramecium.

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, D; Blackburn, E H

    1994-01-01

    Paramecium tetraurelia cells have a limited clonal life span and die after approximately 200 fissions if they do not undergo the process of autogamy or conjugation. To test the possibility that cellular senescence of this species is caused by telomere shortening, we analyzed the genomic DNA of the macronucleus during the clonal life span of P. tetraurelia. We found that telomeric DNA sequences were not shortened during the interval of decreased fission rate and cellular death, defined as senescence in these cells. However, the mean size of the macronuclear DNA was markedly decreased during the clonal life span. We present a model that expands upon previous proposals that accumulated DNA damage causes cellular senescence in P. tetraurelia. Images PMID:8127914

  7. Pulse shortening via Relativistic Transparency of Nanometer Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Wu, H.-C.; Gautier, D. C.; Jung, D.; Hoerlein, R.; Offermann, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Letzring, S.; Yin, L.; Albright, B.; Fernandez, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2010-11-01

    Intense lasers drive plasma electrons to velocities approaching light-speed. Increase of the electron mass causes optical transparency in otherwise classically over-dense plasma. Simulations indicate relativistic transparency can produce near-single-cycle rise time light pulses. It also lies enables a new mechanism for laser-based ion-acceleration yielding energy increases over earlier approaches. A direct signature of transparency is pulse-shortening thru over-dense plasmas in which relativistic intensity induces transmission. Using nm C foils (LMU) and the high-contrast Trident laser (LANL) we have made auto-correlation measurements showing >2x transmitted pulse duration reduction at intensities corresponding to ˜20-fold increase in electron mass. Spectral measurements agree with pulse shortening thru the target, and 1-D particle-in-cell simulations support the measurements.

  8. Eating habits and caloric intake of physically active young boys, ages 10 to 14 years.

    PubMed

    Thomson, M J; Cunningham, D A; Wearring, G A

    1980-03-01

    Eating habits of 104 male participants (ages 10 to 14 years) in organized ice hockey were compared across age groups and levels of competition. The boys were members of either a highly skilled and intensively active competitive league group (CL) or a less skilled, moderately active house league group (HL). Eating habits were recorded during a school day from a 24 hour recall questionnaire administered by a trained interviewer. The types and amounts of foods eaten were recorded and caloric intake was calculated. The total caloric intakes were not significantly different by age or competitive group. The boys had higher caloric intakes by age (200 kcal day-1) than reported by other studies but the caloric intake by kilogram of body weight was similar. There was a trend towards larger caloric intake by the CL boys (ages 10 and 11 years), however when divided by body weight the differences were not significant suggesting that this trend was due to a greater body weight of the CL boys and not a significantly increased caloric expenditure. The types of foods eaten (fruit, vegetables, dairy, meat, bread or "empty calories") were similar for the two activity groups and across ages 10 to 14 years. The caloric intakes of dairy and meat products of both groups were significantly higher than for the other food groups.

  9. Net caloric cost of a 3-set flywheel ergometer resistance exercise paradigm.

    PubMed

    Caruso, John F; Hernandez, Dan A

    2002-11-01

    Subjects (n = 23) performed three 3 x 8 seated leg press workouts on a flywheel ergometer to note the net caloric cost. This study's purpose was to examine net caloric cost as a function of total work on an inertial resistance exercise device offering more eccentric loading than conventional isotonic weight training equipment. High intraclass correlations for net caloric cost (0.89) and total work (0.94) result from data collected from 3 workouts. Average total work and net caloric cost values reveal a significant (r = 0.62, p < 0.05) correlation yielding the following equation: predicted net caloric cost = 33.2 + 0.006014331 (total work). Current study data also show favorable net caloric cost (1.24 kcal x kg(-1) x d(-1)), exercise efficiency (9.48 kcal x 10(-3) per joule), and estimated mechanical loading (65 W min x kg(-1) LBM x d(-1)) values. The results of the current study serve as baseline knowledge for exercise prescriptions pertaining to net caloric cost, exercise efficiency, and mechanical loading using this device.

  10. Cellular Consequences of Telomere Shortening in Histologically Normal Breast Tissues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    nucleotide polymorphism or a panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms , may provide useful diagnostic information and may identify a subset of people at...Mutat Res. 1995; 338: 25–34. 11. von Zglinicki T, Pilger R, Sitte N. Accumulation of single - strand breaks is the major cause of telomere shortening...Background: Telomeres, nucleoprotein complexes located at the extreme ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, function to mask double strand break DNA damage

  11. Conjectures on some curious connections among social status, calorie restriction, hunger, fatness, and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Kathryn A; Smith, Daniel L; Allison, David B

    2012-01-01

    Many animal and human studies show counterintuitive effects of environmental influences on energy balance and life span. Relatively low social and/or economic status seems to be associated with and produce greater adiposity, and reduced provision (e.g., caloric restriction) of food produces greater longevity. We suggest that a unifying factor may be perceptions of the environment as “energetically insecure” and inhospitable to reproduction, which may in turn provoke adiposity-increasing and longevity-extending mechanisms. We elaborate on two main aspects of resources (or the perceptions thereof) on body weight and longevity. We first discuss the effects of social dominance on body weight regulation in human and animal models. Second, we examine models of the interactions between caloric restriction, body composition, and longevity. Finally, we put forth a relational model of the influences of differing environmental cues on body composition and longevity. PMID:22834696

  12. Conjectures on some curious connections among social status, calorie restriction, hunger, fatness, and longevity.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Kathryn A; Smith, Daniel L; Allison, David B

    2012-08-01

    Many animal and human studies show counterintuitive effects of environmental influences on energy balance and life span. Relatively low social and/or economic status seems to be associated with and produce greater adiposity, and reduced provision (e.g., caloric restriction) of food produces greater longevity. We suggest that a unifying factor may be perceptions of the environment as "energetically insecure" and inhospitable to reproduction, which may in turn provoke adiposity-increasing and longevity-extending mechanisms. We elaborate on two main aspects of resources (or the perceptions thereof) on body weight and longevity. We first discuss the effects of social dominance on body weight regulation in human and animal models. Second, we examine models of the interactions between caloric restriction, body composition, and longevity. Finally, we put forth a relational model of the influences of differing environmental cues on body composition and longevity.

  13. Short-Term Clinical Outcomes of Radial Shortening Osteotomy and Capitates Shortening Osteotomy in Kienböck Disease

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Ahmadreza; Mehdizadeh, Mohsen; Khalkhali, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no consensus on the best surgical treatment in Kienböck disease. We compared the short-term outcomes of radial shortening osteotomy and capitate shortening osteotomy in patients affected with this disease. Methods: In a retrospective study of 21 patients with Lichtman stage IIIA of Kienböck disease, 12 patients with an average follow up of 3.2 ± 0.6 years had radial shortening osteotomy (group I) and 9 patients with an average follow up of 3.1 ± 0.7 years had capitate shortening osteotomy (group II). The two groups were comparable in age, sex, operated side, initial Lichtman stage, and follow-up duration. At the last follow-up the patients were evaluated for pain, wrist range of motion, grip strength, wrist functional status and change in their Lichtman stage. The overall results were evaluated by the Cooney wrist function score and DASH score. Results: All the patients in the two groups had improvement of their wrist pains. According to the Cooney wrist function score group I had 1 excellent, 9 good, and 2 fair scores and group II had 1 excellent, 6 good, and 2 fair scores. Comparisons between the means of pain VAS scores, wrist range of movement, grip strength, DASH score, and Cooney wrist function score in the two groups were not significant. Also, the changes of the Lichtman stage in the two groups were not significant. Conclusions: Both groups had reasonable short-term outcomes. We were unable to recognize a substantial clinical difference between the two surgical treatments in short-term outcomes. PMID:26213706

  14. The effect of shortening history on isometric and dynamic muscle function.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, John; Elmer, Steven J; Martin, James C

    2010-03-03

    Despite numerous reports on isometric force depression, few reports have quantified force depression during active muscle shortening (dynamic force depression). The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of shortening history on isometric force following active shortening, force during isokinetic shortening, and velocity during isotonic shortening. The soleus muscles of four cats were subjected to a series of isokinetic contractions at three shortening velocities and isotonic contractions under three loads. Muscle excursions initiated from three different muscle lengths but terminated at a constant length. Isometric force produced subsequent to active shortening, and force or shortening velocity produced at a specific muscle length during shortening, were compared across all three conditions. Results indicated that shortening history altered isometric force by up to 5%, force during isokinetic shortening up to 30% and shortening velocity during isotonic contractions by up to 63%. Furthermore, there was a load by excursion interaction during isotonic contractions such that excursion had the most influence on shortening velocity when the loads were the greatest. There was not a velocity by excursion interaction during isokinetic contractions. Isokinetic and isotonic power-velocity relationships displayed a downward shift in power as excursions increased. Thus, to discuss force depression based on differences in isometric force subsequent to active shortening may underestimate its importance during dynamic contractions. The presence of dynamic force depression should be realized in sport performance, motor control modeling and when controlling paralyzed limbs through artificial stimulation.

  15. Conjugate heat transfer analysis using the Calore and Fuego codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Nicholas Donald, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    Full coupling of the Calore and Fuego codes has been exercised in this report. This is done to allow solution of general conjugate heat transfer applications that require more than a fluid flow analysis with a very simple conduction region (solved using Fuego alone) or more than a complex conduction/radiation analysis using a simple Newton's law of cooling boundary condition (solved using Calore alone). Code coupling allows for solution of both complex fluid and solid regions, with or without thermal radiation, either participating or non-participating. A coupled physics model is developed to compare to data taken from a horizontal concentric cylinder arrangement using the Penlight heating apparatus located at the thermal test complex (TTC) at Sandia National Laboratories. The experimental set-up requires use of a conjugate heat transfer analysis including conduction, nonparticipating thermal radiation, and internal natural convection. The fluids domain in the model is complex and can be characterized by stagnant fluid regions, laminar circulation, a transition regime, and low-level turbulent regions, all in the same domain. Subsequently, the fluids region requires a refined mesh near the wall so that numerical resolution is achieved. Near the wall, buoyancy exhibits its strongest influence on turbulence (i.e., where turbulence conditions exist). Because low-Reynolds number effects are important in anisotropic natural convective flows of this type, the {ovr {nu}{sup 2}}-f turbulence model in Fuego is selected and compared to results of laminar flow only. Coupled code predictions are compared to temperature measurements made both in the solid regions and a fluid region. Turbulent and laminar flow predictions are nearly identical for both regions. Predicted temperatures in the solid regions compare well to data. The largest discrepancies occur at the bottom of the annulus. Predicted temperatures in the fluid region, for the most part, compare well to data. As before

  16. Relationship of dieting and restrained eating to self-reported caloric intake in female college freshmen.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stephanie P; Katterman, Shawn N; Lowe, Michael R

    2013-04-01

    Evidence indicates that restrained eaters do not eat less than unrestrained eaters in the natural environment. However, no study has examined caloric intake in those who are currently dieting to lose, or avoid gaining, weight. The current study examined caloric intake using 24-hour food recalls among individuals dieting to lose weight, dieting to avoid weight gain, restrained nondieters, and unrestrained nondieters. Participants were 246 female college students participating in a weight gain prevention trial. The predicted significant difference in caloric intake across the four groups was found for beverage but not for food intake. Results reinforce past literature indicating that dieting/restraint status does not reflect hypo-caloric intake in naturalistic settings.

  17. Progress in constraining the asymmetry dependence of the nuclear caloric curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Alan B.; Yennello, Sherry J.

    2016-05-01

    The nuclear equation of state is a basic emergent property of nuclear material. Despite its importance in nuclear physics and astrophysics, aspects of it are still poorly constrained. Our research focuses on answering the question: How does the nuclear caloric curve depend on the neutron-proton asymmetry? We briefly describe our initial observation that increasing neutron-richness leads to lower temperatures. We then discuss the status of our recently executed experiment to independently measure the asymmetry dependence of the caloric curve.

  18. Use of caloric and noncaloric sweeteners in US consumer packaged foods, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shu Wen; Slining, Meghan M; Popkin, Barry M

    2012-11-01

    Our understanding of the use of caloric and noncaloric sweeteners in the US food supply is limited. This study uses full ingredient list and Nutrition Facts label data from Gladson Nutrition Database and nationally representative purchases of consumer packaged foods from Nielsen Homescan in 2005 through 2009 to understand the use of caloric sweeteners (including fruit juice concentrate) and noncaloric sweeteners in consumer packaged foods. Of the 85,451 uniquely formulated foods purchased during 2005 through 2009, 75% contain sweeteners (68% with caloric sweetener only, 1% with noncaloric sweetener only, 6% with both caloric and noncaloric sweeteners). Caloric sweetener are in >95% of cakes/cookies/pies, granola/protein/energy bars, ready-to-eat cereals, sweet snacks, and sugar-sweetened beverages. Noncaloric sweetener are in >33% of yogurts and sport/energy drinks, 42% of waters (plain or flavored), and most dietetic sweetened beverages. Across unique products, corn syrup is the most commonly listed sweetener, followed by sorghum, cane sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, and fruit juice concentrate. Also, 77% of all calories purchased in the United States in 2005-2009 contained caloric sweeteners and 3% contained noncaloric sweeteners, and 73% of the volume of foods purchased contained caloric sweetener and 15% contained noncaloric sweetener. Trends during this period suggest a shift toward the purchase of noncaloric sweetener-containing products. Our study poses a challenge toward monitoring sweetener consumption in the United States by discussing the need and options available to improve measures of caloric sweetener and noncaloric sweetener and additional requirements on Nutrition Facts labels on consumer packaged foods.

  19. Stress and telomere shortening among central Indian conservation refugees

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Sammy; Snodgrass, Jeffrey G.; Maranon, David G.; Upadhyay, Chakrapani; Granger, Douglas A.; Bailey, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Research links psychosocial stress to premature telomere shortening and accelerated human aging; however, this association has only been demonstrated in so-called “WEIRD” societies (Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic), where stress is typically lower and life expectancies longer. By contrast, we examine stress and telomere shortening in a non-Western setting among a highly stressed population with overall lower life expectancies: poor indigenous people—the Sahariya—who were displaced (between 1998 and 2002) from their ancestral homes in a central Indian wildlife sanctuary. In this setting, we examined adult populations in two representative villages, one relocated to accommodate the introduction of Asiatic lions into the sanctuary (n = 24 individuals), and the other newly isolated in the sanctuary buffer zone after their previous neighbors were moved (n = 22). Our research strategy combined physical stress measures via the salivary analytes cortisol and α-amylase with self-assessments of psychosomatic stress, ethnographic observations, and telomere length assessment [telomere–fluorescence in situ hybridization (TEL-FISH) coupled with 3D imaging of buccal cell nuclei], providing high-resolution data amenable to multilevel statistical analysis. Consistent with expectations, we found significant associations between each of our stress measures—the two salivary analytes and the psychosomatic symptom survey—and telomere length, after adjusting for relevant behavioral, health, and demographic traits. As the first study (to our knowledge) to link stress to telomere length in a non-WEIRD population, our research strengthens the case for stress-induced telomere shortening as a pancultural biomarker of compromised health and aging. PMID:25730846

  20. Stress and telomere shortening among central Indian conservation refugees.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Sammy; Snodgrass, Jeffrey G; Maranon, David G; Upadhyay, Chakrapani; Granger, Douglas A; Bailey, Susan M

    2015-03-03

    Research links psychosocial stress to premature telomere shortening and accelerated human aging; however, this association has only been demonstrated in so-called "WEIRD" societies (Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic), where stress is typically lower and life expectancies longer. By contrast, we examine stress and telomere shortening in a non-Western setting among a highly stressed population with overall lower life expectancies: poor indigenous people--the Sahariya--who were displaced (between 1998 and 2002) from their ancestral homes in a central Indian wildlife sanctuary. In this setting, we examined adult populations in two representative villages, one relocated to accommodate the introduction of Asiatic lions into the sanctuary (n = 24 individuals), and the other newly isolated in the sanctuary buffer zone after their previous neighbors were moved (n = 22). Our research strategy combined physical stress measures via the salivary analytes cortisol and α-amylase with self-assessments of psychosomatic stress, ethnographic observations, and telomere length assessment [telomere-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TEL-FISH) coupled with 3D imaging of buccal cell nuclei], providing high-resolution data amenable to multilevel statistical analysis. Consistent with expectations, we found significant associations between each of our stress measures--the two salivary analytes and the psychosomatic symptom survey--and telomere length, after adjusting for relevant behavioral, health, and demographic traits. As the first study (to our knowledge) to link stress to telomere length in a non-WEIRD population, our research strengthens the case for stress-induced telomere shortening as a pancultural biomarker of compromised health and aging.

  1. Shortening Tuberculosis Treatment With Fluoroquinolones: Lost in Translation?

    PubMed

    Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Chaisson, Richard E; Nuermberger, Eric L

    2016-02-15

    The disappointing recent failure of fluoroquinolone-containing regimens to shorten the duration of tuberculosis treatment in costly phase 3 trials has raised serious questions about the reliability of preclinical tuberculosis models, especially mice, and the current paradigm of regimen development. Therefore we re-examined data from murine models and early-stage clinical trials on which the pivotal trials were based, concluding that phase 3 trial results were in line with preceding studies. Finally, we offer suggestions for a more efficient and integrated preclinical and clinical regimen development program where quantitative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models more predictive of curative treatment durations are set forth.

  2. Structural limits on force production and shortening of smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Siegman, Marion J; Davidheiser, Sandra; Mooers, Susan U; Butler, Thomas M

    2013-02-01

    This study determined the factors that limit force production and shortening in two smooth muscles having very different relationships between active and passive force as a function of muscle length. The rat anococcygeus muscle develops active force over the range of lengths 0.2-2.0× the optimum length for force production (Lo). Passive tension due to extension of the resting muscle occurs only at lengths exceeding Lo. In contrast, the rabbit taenia coli develops force in the range of lengths 0.4-1.1 Lo, and passive force which is detectable at 0.56 Lo, increases to ~0.45 maximum active force at Lo, and increases sharply with further extension. The anococcygeus muscle can shorten to 0.2 Lo and the taenia coli to 0.4 Lo. Dynamic stiffness and energy usage at short muscle lengths suggest that the limit of shortening in the taenia coli, in contrast to the anococcygeus muscle, is not due to a failure of cross bridge interaction. Phosphorylation of the regulatory myosin light chains in intact muscles decreased to a small extent at short lengths compared to the decrease in force production. The differences in force production and the extent of shortening in the two muscles was maintained even when, following permeabilization, the myosin light chains were irreversibly phosphorylated with ATPγS, indicating that differences in activation played little, if any role. Ultrastructural studies on resting and activated muscles show that the taenia coli, which is rich in connective tissue (unlike the anococcygeus muscle) undergoes marked cellular twisting and contractile filament misalignment at short lengths with compression of the extracellular matrix. As a result, force is not transmitted in the longitudinal axis of the muscle, but is dissipated against an internal load provided by the compressed extracellular matrix. These observations on two very different normal smooth muscles reveal how differences in the relative contribution of active and passive structural elements

  3. Low replacement doses of thyroxine during food restriction restores type 1 deiodinase activity in rats and promotes body protein loss.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Renata Lopes; de Andrade, Bruno Moulin; de Figueiredo, Alvaro Souto Padron; da Silva, Monique Leandro; Marassi, Michelle Porto; Pereira, Valmara dos Santos; Bouskela, Eliete; Carvalho, Denise P

    2008-07-01

    During food restriction, decreased basal metabolic rate secondary to reduced serum thyroid hormones levels contributes to weight loss resistance. Thyroxine (T(4)) and 3,3',5-tri-iodothyronine (T(3)) administration during caloric restriction produce deleterious side effects; however, the administration of physiological doses of T(4) during food restriction has never been evaluated. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of low replacement doses of T(4) in Wistar rats subjected to 40% food restriction. Food restriction for 30 days led to significantly reduced liver type 1 deiodinase activity, serum TSH, leptin, T(4), T(3), metabolic rate, and body mass. The significant reduction in hepatic deiodinase activity found during food restriction was normalized in a dose-dependent manner by T(4) replacement, showing that decreased type 1 deiodinase (D1) activity is secondary to decreased serum thyroid hormone levels during caloric restriction. The lowest replacement dose of T(4) did not normalize resting metabolic rate, but was able to potentiate the effects of food restriction on carcass fat loss and did not spare body protein. The highest dose of T(4) produced a normalization of daily oxygen consumption and determined a significant reduction in both carcass fat and protein content. Our results show that serum T(4) normalization during food restriction restores serum T(3) and liver D1 activity, while body protein is not spared. Thus, decreased serum T(4) during caloric restriction corresponds to a protective mechanism to avoid body protein loss, highlighting the importance of other strategies to reduce body mass without lean mass loss.

  4. Influence on longevity of blueberry, cinnamon, green and black tea, pomegranate, sesame, curcumin, morin, pycnogenol, quercetin, and taxifolin fed iso-calorically to long-lived, F1 hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Stephen R; Mote, Patricia L; Flegal, James M; Teter, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Phytonutrients reportedly extend the life span of Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mice. We tested extracts of blueberry, pomegranate, green and black tea, cinnamon, sesame, and French maritime pine bark (Pycnogenol and taxifolin), as well as curcumin, morin, and quercetin for their effects on the life span of mice. While many of these phytonutrients reportedly extend the life span of model organisms, we found no significant effect on the life span of male F1 hybrid mice, even though the dosages used reportedly produce defined therapeutic end points in mice. The compounds were fed beginning at 12 months of age. The control and treatment groups were iso-caloric with respect to one another. A 40% calorically restricted and other groups not reported here did experience life span extension. Body weights were un-changed relative to controls for all but two supplemented groups, indicating most supplements did not change energy absorption or utilization. Tea extracts with morin decreased weight, whereas quercetin, taxifolin, and Pycnogenol together increased weight. These changes may be due to altered locomotion or fatty acid biosynthesis. Published reports of murine life span extension using curcumin or tea components may have resulted from induced caloric restriction. Together, our results do not support the idea that isolated phytonutrient anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatories are potential longevity therapeutics, even though consumption of whole fruits and vegetables is associated with enhanced health span and life span.

  5. Caloric compensation for sugar-sweetened beverages in meals: A population-based study in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gombi-Vaca, Maria Fernanda; Sichieri, Rosely; Verly-Jr, Eliseu

    2016-03-01

    Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption can cause positive energy balance, therefore leading to weight gain. A plausible biological mechanism to explain this association is through weak caloric compensation for liquid calories. However, there is an ongoing debate surrounding SSB calorie compensation. The body of evidence comes from a diversity of study designs and highly controlled settings assessing food and beverage intake. Our study aimed to test for caloric compensation of SSB in the free-living setting of daily meals. We analyzed two food records of participants (age 10 years or older) from the 2008-2009 National Dietary Survey (Brazil, N = 34,003). We used multilevel analyses to estimate the within-subject effects of SSB on food intake. Sugar-sweetened beverage calories were not compensated for when comparing daily energy intake over two days for each individual. When comparing meals, we found 42% of caloric compensation for breakfast, no caloric compensation for lunch and zero to 22% of caloric compensation for dinner, differing by household per capita income. In conclusion, SSB consumption contributed to higher energy intake due to weak caloric compensation. Discouraging the intake of SSB especially during lunch and dinner may help reduce excessive energy intake and lead to better weight management.

  6. Postoral Glucose Sensing, Not Caloric Content, Determines Sugar Reward in C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zukerman, Steven; Ackroff, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that because of their energy value, sugars are more rewarding than non-caloric sweeteners. However, intragastric infusion data indicate that sugars differ in their postoral appetite-stimulating effects. We therefore compared the preference for isocaloric 8% sucrose, glucose, and fructose solutions with that of a non-caloric sweetener solution (0.8% sucralose) in C57BL/6J mice. Brief 2-bottle tests indicated that sucralose was isopreferred to sucrose but more preferred than glucose or fructose. Yet, in long-term tests, the mice preferred sucrose and glucose, but not fructose to sucralose. Additional experiments were conducted with a non-caloric 0.1% sucralose + 0.1% saccharin mixture (S + S), which does not have the postoral inhibitory effects of 0.8% sucralose. The S + S was preferred to fructose in brief and long-term choice tests. S + S was also preferred to glucose and sucrose in brief tests, but the sugars were preferred in long-term tests. In progressive ratio tests, non-deprived and food-deprived mice licked more for glucose but not fructose than for S + S. These findings demonstrate that the nutrient-specific postoral actions, not calories per se, determine the avidity for sugar versus non-caloric sweeteners. Furthermore, sweet taste intensity and potential postoral inhibitory actions must be considered in comparing non-caloric and caloric sweeteners. PMID:25715333

  7. Caloric stimulation with near infrared radiation does not induce paradoxical nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Walther, L E; Asenov, D R; Di Martino, E

    2011-04-01

    Near infrared radiation can be used for warm stimulation in caloric irrigation of the equilibrium organ. Aim of this study was to determine whether near infrared radiation offers effective stimulation of the vestibular organ, whether it is well tolerated by the patients and especially whether it is a viable alternative to warm air stimulation in patients with defects of the tympanic membrane and radical mastoid cavities. Patients with perforations of the tympanic membrane (n = 15) and with radical mastoid cavities (n = 13) were tested both with near infrared radiation and warm dry air. A caloric-induced nystagmus could be seen equally effectively and rapidly in all patients. Contrary to stimulation with warm dry air, no paradoxical nystagmus was observed following caloric irrigation with a warm stimulus (near infrared radiation). Results of a questionnaire showed excellent patient acceptance of near infrared stimulation with no arousal effects or unpleasant feeling. In conclusion, near infrared radiation proved to be an alternative method of caloric irrigation to warm dry air in patients with tympanic membrane defects and radical mastoid cavities. Near infrared radiation is pleasant, quick, contact free, sterile and quiet. With this method an effective caloric warm stimulus is available. If near infrared radiation is used for caloric stimulus no evaporative heat loss occurs.

  8. Postoral glucose sensing, not caloric content, determines sugar reward in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Zukerman, Steven; Ackroff, Karen

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that because of their energy value, sugars are more rewarding than non-caloric sweeteners. However, intragastric infusion data indicate that sugars differ in their postoral appetite-stimulating effects. We therefore compared the preference for isocaloric 8% sucrose, glucose, and fructose solutions with that of a non-caloric sweetener solution (0.8% sucralose) in C57BL/6J mice. Brief 2-bottle tests indicated that sucralose was isopreferred to sucrose but more preferred than glucose or fructose. Yet, in long-term tests, the mice preferred sucrose and glucose, but not fructose to sucralose. Additional experiments were conducted with a non-caloric 0.1% sucralose + 0.1% saccharin mixture (S + S), which does not have the postoral inhibitory effects of 0.8% sucralose. The S + S was preferred to fructose in brief and long-term choice tests. S + S was also preferred to glucose and sucrose in brief tests, but the sugars were preferred in long-term tests. In progressive ratio tests, non-deprived and food-deprived mice licked more for glucose but not fructose than for S + S. These findings demonstrate that the nutrient-specific postoral actions, not calories per se, determine the avidity for sugar versus non-caloric sweeteners. Furthermore, sweet taste intensity and potential postoral inhibitory actions must be considered in comparing non-caloric and caloric sweeteners.

  9. Increased caloric intake soon after exercise in cold water.

    PubMed

    White, Lesley J; Dressendorfer, Rudolph H; Holland, Eric; McCoy, Sean C; Ferguson, Michael A

    2005-02-01

    We examined the acute effect of cold-water temperature on post-exercise energy intake (EI) for 1 h. In a randomized, crossover design, 11 men (25.6 +/- 5 y) exercised for 45 min on a submersed cycle ergometer at 60 +/- 2% VO2max in 33 degrees C (neutral) and 20 degrees (cold) water temperatures, and also rested for 45 min (control). Energy expenditure (EE) was determined using indirect calorimetry before, during, and after each condition. Following exercise or rest, subjects had free access to a standard assortment of food items of known caloric value. EE was similar for the cold and neutral water conditions, averaging 505 +/- 22 (+/- standard deviation) and 517 +/- 42 kcal, respectively (P = NS). EI after the cold condition averaged 877 +/- 457 kcal, 44% and 41% higher (P < 0.05) than for the neutral and resting conditions, respectively. Cold-water temperature thus stimulated post-exercise EI. Water temperature warrants consideration in aquatic programs designed for weight loss.

  10. Telomere shortening and metabolic compromise underlie dystrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alex Chia Yu; Ong, Sang-Ging; LaGory, Edward L.; Kraft, Peggy E.; Giaccia, Amato J.; Wu, Joseph C.; Blau, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an incurable X-linked genetic disease that is caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene and affects one in every 3,600 boys. We previously showed that long telomeres protect mice from the lethal cardiac disease seen in humans with the same genetic defect, dystrophin deficiency. By generating the mdx4cv/mTRG2 mouse model with “humanized” telomere lengths, the devastating dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype seen in patients with DMD was recapitulated. Here, we analyze the degenerative sequelae that culminate in heart failure and death in this mouse model. We report progressive telomere shortening in developing mouse cardiomyocytes after postnatal week 1, a time when the cells are no longer dividing. This proliferation-independent telomere shortening is accompanied by an induction of a DNA damage response, evident by p53 activation and increased expression of its target gene p21 in isolated cardiomyocytes. The consequent repression of Pgc1α/β leads to impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, which, in conjunction with the high demands of contraction, leads to increased oxidative stress and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. As a result, cardiomyocyte respiration and ATP output are severely compromised. Importantly, treatment with a mitochondrial-specific antioxidant before the onset of cardiac dysfunction rescues the metabolic defects. These findings provide evidence for a link between short telomere length and metabolic compromise in the etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD and identify a window of opportunity for preventive interventions. PMID:27799523

  11. Stratified crustal shortening under the Longmenshan thrust belt, Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.

    2014-12-01

    Stratified crustal shortening under the Longmenshan thrust belt, Tibetan plateau Xiwei Xu1&2, Baojin Liu3, John H. Shaw2, Guihua Yu11. Key Lab of Active Tectonics & Volcano, Institute of Geology, CEA, Beijing 100029, China 2. Department of Earth & Planetary Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA 3. Geophysical Prospecting Center, CEA, Zhengzhou 450002, China Crustal velocity structure and new seismic reflection profiling across the foothills of the Longmen Shan and Sichuan Basin reveals a distinct pattern of crustal structure under Longmenshan thrust belt: brittle thrust faults with multiple detachments in the upper crust that are localized above, but decoupled from, a steep contact (FL) in the lower crust and upper mantle across which the lower crust thickens abruptly. Then two models are presented: 1) Model showing breakthrough thrusting of the plateau crust over the Sichuan Basin above the basal detachment (FD2); 2) Model showing indentation of a strong structural wedge of the Yangtze Craton into the weak plateau, but no sliding on the contact FL or sliding on the contact FL. This observation provides insights that help us to understand the mechanisms of crustal shortening, thickening, and uplift of the Tibetan Plateau.

  12. Long–Term Effects of High-and Low-Glycemic Load Energy-Restricted Diets on Metabolic Adaptation and the Composition of Weight Loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of high glycemic load (HG) and low glycemic load (LG) diets on resting metabolic rate (RMR) and body composition changes in response to caloric restriction (CR) remains controversial. Objective To examine the effects of two CR diets differing primarily in glycemic load on RMR and the % o...

  13. Simulation studies of circular muscle contraction, longitudinal muscle shortening, and their coordination in esophageal transport.

    PubMed

    Kou, Wenjun; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2015-08-15

    On the basis of a fully coupled active musculomechanical model for esophageal transport, we aimed to find the roles of circular muscle (CM) contraction and longitudinal muscle (LM) shortening in esophageal transport, and the influence of their coordination. Two groups of studies were conducted using a computational model. In the first group, bolus transport with only CM contraction, only LM shortening, or both was simulated. Overall features and detailed information on pressure and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of mucosal and the two muscle layers were analyzed. In the second group, bolus transport with varying delay in CM contraction or LM shortening was simulated. The effect of delay on esophageal transport was studied. For cases showing abnormal transport, pressure and CSA were further analyzed. CM contraction by itself was sufficient to transport bolus, but LM shortening by itself was not. CM contraction decreased the CSA and the radius of the muscle layer locally, but LM shortening increased the CSA. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening led to overlapping of muscle CSA and pressure peaks. Advancing LM shortening adversely influenced bolus transport, whereas lagging LM shortening was irrelevant to bolus transport. In conclusion, CM contraction generates high squeezing pressure, which plays a primary role in esophageal transport. LM shortening increases muscle CSA, which helps to strengthen CM contraction. Advancing LM shortening decreases esophageal distensibility in the bolus region. Lagging LM shortening no longer helps esophageal transport. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening seems to be most effective for esophageal transport.

  14. Simulation studies of circular muscle contraction, longitudinal muscle shortening, and their coordination in esophageal transport

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Wenjun; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of a fully coupled active musculomechanical model for esophageal transport, we aimed to find the roles of circular muscle (CM) contraction and longitudinal muscle (LM) shortening in esophageal transport, and the influence of their coordination. Two groups of studies were conducted using a computational model. In the first group, bolus transport with only CM contraction, only LM shortening, or both was simulated. Overall features and detailed information on pressure and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of mucosal and the two muscle layers were analyzed. In the second group, bolus transport with varying delay in CM contraction or LM shortening was simulated. The effect of delay on esophageal transport was studied. For cases showing abnormal transport, pressure and CSA were further analyzed. CM contraction by itself was sufficient to transport bolus, but LM shortening by itself was not. CM contraction decreased the CSA and the radius of the muscle layer locally, but LM shortening increased the CSA. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening led to overlapping of muscle CSA and pressure peaks. Advancing LM shortening adversely influenced bolus transport, whereas lagging LM shortening was irrelevant to bolus transport. In conclusion, CM contraction generates high squeezing pressure, which plays a primary role in esophageal transport. LM shortening increases muscle CSA, which helps to strengthen CM contraction. Advancing LM shortening decreases esophageal distensibility in the bolus region. Lagging LM shortening no longer helps esophageal transport. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening seems to be most effective for esophageal transport. PMID:26113296

  15. Late Miocene shortening of the Northern Apennines back-arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco; Sani, Federico; Stucchi, Eusebio M.; Moratti, Giovanna; Benvenuti, Marco; Menanno, Giovanni; Tanini, Chiara

    2014-03-01

    The inner Northern Apennines (western Tuscany and Tyrrhenian basin) is characterized by a relatively thin continental crust (˜20-25 km), high heat flow (>100 mW m-2), and the presence of relevant tectonic elision of stratigraphic sequences, a setting known as Serie Ridotta. These features are normally ascribed to an extensional deformation that affected the back-arc area above the subducting Adria plate since the Early-Middle Miocene (˜16 Ma). However, various geophysical studies image the continental crust to be currently affected by W-dipping thrust faults (and associated basement uplifts) that have not been obliterated by this claimed long-lasting extensional process. These observations raise the question whether the thrusts are older or younger than the continental extension. To address this question we have reprocessed and interpreted the deep seismic reflection profile CROP03/c that crosses the onshore hinterland sector, and investigated the structural setting of some of the Late Miocene-Pliocene hinterland basins (Cinigiano-Baccinello, Siena-Radicofani, Tafone, Albegna and Radicondoli basins) that are situated at the front or in-between the basement uplifts. The analysis of field structures and commercial seismic profiles has allowed the recognition that both substratum and basins' infill have been intensely shortened. These findings and the architecture of the basins suggest that the latter developed under a contractional regime, which would have started around 8.5 Ma with the onset of the continental sedimentation. This compressive stress state followed an earlier phase of continental extension that presumably started at ˜16 Ma (with the blocking of the Corsica-Sardinia rotation), and thinned both the continental crust and sedimentary cover producing most of the Serie Ridotta. The main phases of basin shortening are bracketed between 7.5 and 3.5 Ma, and thus overlap with the increase in the exhumation rate of the metamorphic cores at ˜6-4 Ma determined

  16. Palatable Hyper-Caloric Foods Impact on Neuronal Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Jean-Pascal; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F.; Guzmán-Ramos, Kioko; Perez-Cruz, Claudia; Ferreira, Guillaume; Diaz-Cintra, Sofia; Pacheco-López, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Neural plasticity is an intrinsic and essential characteristic of the nervous system that allows animals “self-tuning” to adapt to their environment over their lifetime. Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system is a form of neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory formation, as well as long-lasting, environmentally-induced maladaptive behaviors, such as drug addiction and overeating of palatable hyper-caloric (PHc) food. In western societies, the abundance of PHc foods has caused a dramatic increase in the incidence of overweight/obesity and related disorders. To this regard, it has been suggested that increased adiposity may be caused at least in part by behavioral changes in the affected individuals that are induced by the chronic consumption of PHc foods; some authors have even drawn attention to the similarity that exists between over-indulgent eating and drug addiction. Long-term misuse of certain dietary components has also been linked to chronic neuroimmune maladaptation that may predispose individuals to neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. In this review article, we discuss recent evidence that shows how consumption of PHc food can cause maladaptive neural plasticity that converts short-term ingestive drives into compulsive behaviors. We also discuss the neural mechanisms of how chronic consumption of PHc foods may alter brain function and lead to cognitive impairments, focusing on prenatal, childhood and adolescence as vulnerable neurodevelopmental stages to dietary environmental insults. Finally, we outline a societal agenda for harnessing permissive obesogenic environments. PMID:28261067

  17. Biology of DNA restriction.

    PubMed Central

    Bickle, T A; Krüger, D H

    1993-01-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of DNA restriction and modification systems, the control of the expression of the structural genes for the enzymes, and the importance of DNA restriction in the cellular economy has advanced by leaps and bounds in recent years. This review documents these advances for the three major classes of classical restriction and modification systems, describes the discovery of a new class of restriction systems that specifically cut DNA carrying the modification signature of foreign cells, and deals with the mechanisms developed by phages to avoid the restriction systems of their hosts. PMID:8336674

  18. Genetics of restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sen-Chowdhry, Srijita; Syrris, Petros; McKenna, William J

    2010-04-01

    Restrictive physiology, a severe form of diastolic dysfunction, is characteristically observed in the setting of constrictive pericarditis and myocardial restriction. The latter is commonly due to systemic diseases, some of which are inherited as mendelian traits (eg, hereditary amyloidosis), while others are multifactorial (eg, sarcoidosis). When restrictive physiology occurs as an early and dominant feature of a primary myocardial disorder, it may be termed restrictive cardiomyopathy. In the past decade, clinical and genetic studies have demonstrated that restrictive cardiomyopathy as such is part of the spectrum of sarcomeric disease and frequently coexists with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in affected families.

  19. Caloric and nitrogen balances as predictors of nutritional outcome in patients with burns.

    PubMed

    Mancusi-Ungaro, H R; Van Way, C W; McCool, C

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of energy expenditure with indirect calorimetry allows determination of caloric balance. The present study was done to determine the predictive value of caloric and nitrogen balances for nutritional outcome. Energy expenditure was obtained weekly and interpolated between measurements for daily caloric balance. Nitrogen balance was obtained weekly. Because nitrogen output fluctuated, interpolation of daily values was not possible. Nutritional outcome was defined by whether body weight was lost or maintained and by levels of visceral proteins (albumin, prealbumin, and transferrin). The study group included 12 patients with 7% to 82.5% total body surface area burns. Eleven patients survived their burn injuries, and one died of congestive heart failure at 38 days, after her burn wounds had healed. Nine patients had good nutritional outcomes (group 1) and three had poor nutritional outcomes (group 2) (including the one who died). Nitrogen balance was 1.3 +/- 1.0 gm/day in group 1 and 4.5 +/- 1.7 gm/day in group 2 (mean +/- SEM; p > 0.10). Caloric balance was 515 +/- 130 kcal/day in group 1 and -667 +/- 140 in group 2 (p < 0.001). Caloric balance was significantly different between the two groups, whereas nitrogen balance was not. Caloric intake correlated positively with nitrogen intake (r = 0.92). Nitrogen intake was 16% of total caloric intake. Nitrogen intake from blood products was appreciable and averaged 15% of total nitrogen intake (range, 0% to 47%); 11.3 +/- 1.6 gm/day in group 1 and 14.8 +/- 3 gm/day in group 2 (p > 0.10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Investigation for ultra-shorten coupling length in woodpile structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhifang; Fu, Tingting; Yan, Bin; Liu, Rongjuan

    2017-02-01

    An off-plane directional coupler in woodpile structure is investigated theoretically by finite-difference time-domain method. Our study shows that the coupling length can be adjusted effectively by controlling the refractive index in central region between input and coupling waveguides. And if the distance between rods is more than 1.5a, a coupling length less 2a can be also obtained, where a is the lattice constant. Also, we investigate the effect of the width of rods on the coupling length. The results show that the coupling length can be shortened further by decreasing the width of rods. All results we simulated are very important for the high-density integrated circuit.

  1. [A shortened scale for overall, emotional and social loneliness].

    PubMed

    de Jong Gierveld, J; van Tilburg, T

    2008-02-01

    Loneliness is an indicator of social well-being and pertains to the feeling of missing an intimate relationship (emotional loneliness) or missing a wider social network (social loneliness). The 11-item De Jong Gierveld scale has proved to be a valid and reliable measuring instrument for overall, emotional and social loneliness, although its length has sometimes rendered it difficult to use the scale in large surveys. In this study, we empirically tested a shortened version of the scale on data from two surveys (N=9448). Confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the specification of two latent factors. Congruent validity and the relationship with determinants (partner status, health) proved to be optimal. The 6-item De Jong Gierveld scale is a reliable and valid measuring instrument for overall, emotional and social loneliness, which is suitable for large surveys.

  2. Transcription errors induce proteotoxic stress and shorten cellular lifespan.

    PubMed

    Vermulst, Marc; Denney, Ashley S; Lang, Michael J; Hung, Chao-Wei; Moore, Stephanie; Moseley, M Arthur; Mosely, Arthur M; Thompson, J Will; Thompson, William J; Madden, Victoria; Gauer, Jacob; Wolfe, Katie J; Summers, Daniel W; Schleit, Jennifer; Sutphin, George L; Haroon, Suraiya; Holczbauer, Agnes; Caine, Joanne; Jorgenson, James; Cyr, Douglas; Kaeberlein, Matt; Strathern, Jeffrey N; Duncan, Mara C; Erie, Dorothy A

    2015-08-25

    Transcription errors occur in all living cells; however, it is unknown how these errors affect cellular health. To answer this question, we monitor yeast cells that are genetically engineered to display error-prone transcription. We discover that these cells suffer from a profound loss in proteostasis, which sensitizes them to the expression of genes that are associated with protein-folding diseases in humans; thus, transcription errors represent a new molecular mechanism by which cells can acquire disease phenotypes. We further find that the error rate of transcription increases as cells age, suggesting that transcription errors affect proteostasis particularly in aging cells. Accordingly, transcription errors accelerate the aggregation of a peptide that is implicated in Alzheimer's disease, and shorten the lifespan of cells. These experiments reveal a previously unappreciated role for transcriptional fidelity in cellular health and aging.

  3. Force depression decays during shortening in the medial gastrocnemius of the rat.

    PubMed

    Till, Olaf; Siebert, Tobias; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2014-03-21

    Force depression due to shortening of activated skeletal muscles has previously been described to be long lasting during isometric contractions following the shortening. In the present study, using the medial gastrocnemius of the rat, effects of force depression have been made apparent during shortening by computationally partially compensating for the direct effect of shortening velocity due to the tension-velocity relation. Evidence was found for the decay and complete disappearance of force depression already during continuation of the shortening contraction to short muscle lengths.

  4. Shortened sleep duration does not predict obesity in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Calamaro, Christina J; Park, Sunhee; Mason, Thornton B A; Marcus, Carole L; Weaver, Terri E; Pack, Allan; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2010-12-01

    Obesity continues to be a major public health issue. In adolescents, there are limited studies on the relationship between obesity and sleep duration. We found hypothesized that an average sleep duration of <6 h in adolescents was associated with obesity. Data were from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (ADD Health); a survey of 90,000 youths, aged 12-18 years; surveyed in several waves. The sample population for our study was 13,568. Weighted multiple logistic regression was used to identify the relationship between obesity at Wave II and sleep duration, having adjusted for skipping breakfast ≥ 2/week; race, gender, parental income, TV ≥ 2 h per day, depression, and obesity at Wave I. At Wave I, the mean age was 15.96 ± 0.11 years; mean sleep hours were 7.91 ± 0.04. At Waves I and II, respectively, 10.6 and 11.2% of adolescents were obese. Adjusted analyses suggest that the effect of shortened sleep duration in Wave I was not significantly predictive of obesity in Wave II (P < 0.218). Longitudinally, depression and TV ≥ 2 h per day at Wave I was associated with a higher risk of obesity at Wave II in adjusted analyses. Depressed adolescents were almost twice as likely to be obese (OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.25-2.72); adolescents who watched TV ≥ 2 h per day were 37% more likely to be obese (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.09-1.72). Environmental factors including TV ≥ 2 h per day and depression were significantly associated with obesity; shortened sleep duration was not. Future longitudinal studies in adolescents are needed to determine whether timing of television watching directly influences sleep patterns and, ultimately, obesity.

  5. Cricket antennae shorten when bending (Acheta domesticus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Loudon, Catherine; Bustamante, Jorge; Kellogg, Derek W.

    2014-01-01

    Insect antennae are important mechanosensory and chemosensory organs. Insect appendages, such as antennae, are encased in a cuticular exoskeleton and are thought to bend only between segments or subsegments where the cuticle is thinner, more flexible, or bent into a fold. There is a growing appreciation of the dominating influence of folds in the mechanical behavior of a structure, and the bending of cricket antennae was considered in this context. Antennae will bend or deflect in response to forces, and the resulting bending behavior will affect the sensory input of the antennae. In some cricket antennae, such as in those of Acheta domesticus, there are a large number (>100) of subsegments (flagellomeres) that vary in their length. We evaluated whether these antennae bend only at the joints between flagellomeres, which has always been assumed but not tested. In addition we questioned whether an antenna undergoes a length change as it bends, which would result from some patterns of joint deformation. Measurements using light microscopy and SEM were conducted on both male and female adult crickets (Acheta domesticus) with bending in four different directions: dorsal, ventral, medial, and lateral. Bending occurred only at the joints between flagellomeres, and antennae shortened a comparable amount during bending, regardless of sex or bending direction. The cuticular folds separating antennal flagellomeres are not very deep, and therefore as an antenna bends, the convex side (in tension) does not have a lot of slack cuticle to “unfold” and does not lengthen during bending. Simultaneously on the other side of the antenna, on the concave side in compression, there is an increasing overlap in the folded cuticle of the joints during bending. Antennal shortening during bending would prevent stretching of antennal nerves and may promote hemolymph exchange between the antenna and head. PMID:25018734

  6. Weekly bull exchange shortens postpartum anestrus in suckled beef cows.

    PubMed

    Miller, V; Ungerfeld, R

    2008-05-01

    The duration of anestrus in cattle was usually shortened when cows were exposed to bulls. The objective of the present experiment was to determine if weekly bull exchange accelerated the resumption of cyclicity in postpartum suckled beef cows. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of postpartum, anestrous, suckled beef cows (extensively managed) to weekly exchange of bulls, accelerates the resumption of cyclicity, compared to continuous exposure to the same bulls. Ninety-one multiparous suckled Hereford and Hereford x Angus cows, <60d postpartum, were assigned to two homogeneous groups. Beginning on December 1st (late spring), the control group (C, n=45) remained with one pair of bulls throughout the breeding period (7 weeks), whereas in the "exchanged" (E, n=46) group two pairs of bulls were exchanged weekly. Based on weekly ultrasonographic examinations of all cows, none had a CL at the start of the experiment and for 2 weeks after the start of bull exposure. However, the accumulated frequency of cows with a CL was greater in group E than in group C cows on week 4 (P=0.024), as well as on weeks 5-7 (P<0.001) after the start of bull exposure. Furthermore, in group E versus group C, there was a higher pregnancy rate 30d after the end of bull exposure (26 of 46, 56.2% vs. 16 of 45, 35.6%; P=0.045). In conclusion, weekly exchange of two pairs of bulls shortened postpartum anestrus in suckled multiparous cows, compared to continuous exposure to a single pair of bulls.

  7. Cricket antennae shorten when bending (Acheta domesticus L.).

    PubMed

    Loudon, Catherine; Bustamante, Jorge; Kellogg, Derek W

    2014-01-01

    Insect antennae are important mechanosensory and chemosensory organs. Insect appendages, such as antennae, are encased in a cuticular exoskeleton and are thought to bend only between segments or subsegments where the cuticle is thinner, more flexible, or bent into a fold. There is a growing appreciation of the dominating influence of folds in the mechanical behavior of a structure, and the bending of cricket antennae was considered in this context. Antennae will bend or deflect in response to forces, and the resulting bending behavior will affect the sensory input of the antennae. In some cricket antennae, such as in those of Acheta domesticus, there are a large number (>100) of subsegments (flagellomeres) that vary in their length. We evaluated whether these antennae bend only at the joints between flagellomeres, which has always been assumed but not tested. In addition we questioned whether an antenna undergoes a length change as it bends, which would result from some patterns of joint deformation. Measurements using light microscopy and SEM were conducted on both male and female adult crickets (Acheta domesticus) with bending in four different directions: dorsal, ventral, medial, and lateral. Bending occurred only at the joints between flagellomeres, and antennae shortened a comparable amount during bending, regardless of sex or bending direction. The cuticular folds separating antennal flagellomeres are not very deep, and therefore as an antenna bends, the convex side (in tension) does not have a lot of slack cuticle to "unfold" and does not lengthen during bending. Simultaneously on the other side of the antenna, on the concave side in compression, there is an increasing overlap in the folded cuticle of the joints during bending. Antennal shortening during bending would prevent stretching of antennal nerves and may promote hemolymph exchange between the antenna and head.

  8. Reducing saturated fat with oleogel/shortening blends in a baked product.

    PubMed

    Mert, Behic; Demirkesen, Ilkem

    2016-05-15

    Short dough cookie structure, characterized by its aerated and tender texture, depends on the presence of solid fat during kneading. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential application of Candelilla wax (CDW) containing oleogels for partial replacement of the shortening in cookies. Oleogels were prepared with different amounts of CDW and blended with a commercial bakery shortening. After crystallizing the oleogel/shortening blends by using a pilot scale crystallization unit, the blends were evaluated in a cookie formulations. When the shortening was completely replaced with oleogel softer products were obtained compared to liquid oil, but they were harder than the shortening containing products. On the other hand, partial replacement of shortening with oleogels provided much more acceptable dough and cookie characteristics. Results suggest that gradual replacement of shortening with oleogels may be a suitable approach for reduction of saturated fat in short dough products.

  9. The Lexicocalorimeter: Gauging public health through caloric input and output on social media

    PubMed Central

    Alajajian, Sharon E.; Williams, Jake Ryland; Reagan, Andrew J.; Alajajian, Stephen C.; Frank, Morgan R.; Mitchell, Lewis; Lahne, Jacob; Danforth, Christopher M.; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2017-01-01

    We propose and develop a Lexicocalorimeter: an online, interactive instrument for measuring the “caloric content” of social media and other large-scale texts. We do so by constructing extensive yet improvable tables of food and activity related phrases, and respectively assigning them with sourced estimates of caloric intake and expenditure. We show that for Twitter, our naive measures of “caloric input”, “caloric output”, and the ratio of these measures are all strong correlates with health and well-being measures for the contiguous United States. Our caloric balance measure in many cases outperforms both its constituent quantities; is tunable to specific health and well-being measures such as diabetes rates; has the capability of providing a real-time signal reflecting a population’s health; and has the potential to be used alongside traditional survey data in the development of public policy and collective self-awareness. Because our Lexicocalorimeter is a linear superposition of principled phrase scores, we also show we can move beyond correlations to explore what people talk about in collective detail, and assist in the understanding and explanation of how population-scale conditions vary, a capacity unavailable to black-box type methods. PMID:28187216

  10. The Lexicocalorimeter: Gauging public health through caloric input and output on social media.

    PubMed

    Alajajian, Sharon E; Williams, Jake Ryland; Reagan, Andrew J; Alajajian, Stephen C; Frank, Morgan R; Mitchell, Lewis; Lahne, Jacob; Danforth, Christopher M; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2017-01-01

    We propose and develop a Lexicocalorimeter: an online, interactive instrument for measuring the "caloric content" of social media and other large-scale texts. We do so by constructing extensive yet improvable tables of food and activity related phrases, and respectively assigning them with sourced estimates of caloric intake and expenditure. We show that for Twitter, our naive measures of "caloric input", "caloric output", and the ratio of these measures are all strong correlates with health and well-being measures for the contiguous United States. Our caloric balance measure in many cases outperforms both its constituent quantities; is tunable to specific health and well-being measures such as diabetes rates; has the capability of providing a real-time signal reflecting a population's health; and has the potential to be used alongside traditional survey data in the development of public policy and collective self-awareness. Because our Lexicocalorimeter is a linear superposition of principled phrase scores, we also show we can move beyond correlations to explore what people talk about in collective detail, and assist in the understanding and explanation of how population-scale conditions vary, a capacity unavailable to black-box type methods.

  11. How have agricultural policies influenced caloric consumption in the United States?

    PubMed

    Rickard, Bradley J; Okrent, Abigail M; Alston, Julian M

    2013-03-01

    Many commentators have speculated that agricultural policies have contributed to increased obesity rates in the United States, yet such claims are often made without any analysis of the complex links between real-world farm commodity support programs, prices and consumption of foods, and caloric intake. This article carefully studies the effects of US agricultural policies on prices and quantities of 10 agricultural commodities and nine food categories in the United States over time. Using a detailed multimarket model, we simulate the counterfactual removal of measures of support applied to US agricultural commodities in 1992, 1997, and 2002 and quantify the effects on US food consumption and caloric intake. To parameterize the simulations, we calculate three alternative measures of consumer support (the implicit consumer subsidy from policies that support producers) for the 10 agricultural commodities using information about government expenditures on agricultural commodities from various sources. Our results indicate that-holding all other policies constant-removing US subsidies on grains and oilseeds in the three periods would have caused caloric consumption to decrease minimally whereas removal of all US agricultural policies (including barriers against imports of sugar and dairy products) would have caused total caloric intake to increase. Our results also indicate that the influence of agricultural policies on caloric intake has diminished over time.

  12. A Predictive Model of the Dynamics of Body Weight and Food Intake in Rats Submitted to Caloric Restrictions

    PubMed Central

    Jacquier, Marine; Crauste, Fabien; Soulage, Christophe O.; Soula, Hédi A.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of body weight and food intake can be studied by temporally perturbing food availability. This perturbation can be obtained by modifying the amount of available food over time while keeping the overall food quantity constant. To describe food intake dynamics, we developed a mathematical model that describes body weight, fat mass, fat-free mass, energy expenditure and food intake dynamics in rats. In addition, the model considers regulation of food intake by leptin, ghrelin and glucose. We tested our model on rats experiencing temporally variable food availability. Our model is able to predict body weight and food intake variations by taking into account energy expenditure dynamics based on a memory of the previous food intake. This model allowed us to estimate this memory lag to approximately 8 days. It also explains how important variations in food availability during periods longer than these 8 days can induce body weight gains. PMID:24932616

  13. A predictive model of the dynamics of body weight and food intake in rats submitted to caloric restrictions.

    PubMed

    Jacquier, Marine; Crauste, Fabien; Soulage, Christophe O; Soula, Hédi A

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of body weight and food intake can be studied by temporally perturbing food availability. This perturbation can be obtained by modifying the amount of available food over time while keeping the overall food quantity constant. To describe food intake dynamics, we developed a mathematical model that describes body weight, fat mass, fat-free mass, energy expenditure and food intake dynamics in rats. In addition, the model considers regulation of food intake by leptin, ghrelin and glucose. We tested our model on rats experiencing temporally variable food availability. Our model is able to predict body weight and food intake variations by taking into account energy expenditure dynamics based on a memory of the previous food intake. This model allowed us to estimate this memory lag to approximately 8 days. It also explains how important variations in food availability during periods longer than these 8 days can induce body weight gains.

  14. Magnitude of daily energy deficit predicts frequency but not severity of menstrual disturbances associated with exercise and caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Leidy, Heather J.; Hill, Brenna R.; Lieberman, Jay L.; Legro, Richard S.; Souza, Mary Jane De

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the impact of energy deficiency on menstrual function using controlled feeding and supervised exercise over four menstrual cycles (1 baseline and 3 intervention cycles) in untrained, eumenorrheic women aged 18–30 yr. Subjects were randomized to either an exercising control (EXCON) or one of three exercising energy deficit (ED) groups, i.e., mild (ED1; −8 ± 2%), moderate (ED2; −22 ± 3%), or severe (ED3; −42 ± 3%). Menstrual cycle length and changes in urinary concentrations of estrone-1-glucuronide, pregnanediol glucuronide, and midcycle luteinizing hormone were assessed. Thirty-four subjects completed the study. Weight loss occurred in ED1 (−3.8 ± 0.2 kg), ED2 (−2.8 ± 0.6 kg), and ED3 (−2.6 ± 1.1 kg) but was minimal in EXCON (−0.9 ± 0.7 kg). The overall sum of disturbances (luteal phase defects, anovulation, and oligomenorrhea) was greater in ED2 compared with EXCON and greater in ED3 compared with EXCON AND ED1. The average percent energy deficit was the main predictor of the frequency of menstrual disturbances (f = 10.1, β = −0.48, r2 = 0.23, P = 0.003) even when weight loss was included in the model. The estimates of the magnitude of energy deficiency associated with menstrual disturbances ranged from −22 (ED2) to −42% (ED3), reflecting an energy deficit of −470 to −810 kcal/day, respectively. This is the first study to demonstrate a dose-response relationship between the magnitude of energy deficiency and the frequency of exercise-related menstrual disturbances; however, the severity of menstrual disturbances was not dependent on the magnitude of energy deficiency. PMID:25352438

  15. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined with Caloric Restriction on Circulating Estrogens and IGF-I in Premenopausal Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    KC. Screening for subclinical eating disorders in female athletes : validation of an indirect interview technique. (Presented at the 24th Annual...NI, O’Connor KA, Clark KL, Putukian M. Menstrual irregularities and disordered eating in female athletes : survey vs follow-up cUnical and...McConnell HJ, Clark KC. Screening for subclinical eating disorders in female athletes : validation of an indirect interview technique. (Presented at

  16. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined With Caloric Restriction on Circulating Estrogens and IGF-1 in Premenopausal Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    body composition or body weight changes . (Proceedings of the American College of Sports Medicine meeting, Indianapolis, IN, 2004 Med. Sci...but only produced a trend toward a decrease in body fat percent (-1.2%), and only a small change in body weight (-0.8 kg). Despite the highly...significant changes in body composition and body weight in the exercising group, preliminary results indicate no significant

  17. A controlled trial of reduced meal frequency without caloric restriction in healthy, normal-weight, middle-aged adults123

    PubMed Central

    Stote, Kim S; Baer, David J; Spears, Karen; Paul, David R; Harris, G Keith; Rumpler, William V; Strycula, Pilar; Najjar, Samer S; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ingram, Donald K; Longo, Dan L; Mattson, Mark P

    2009-01-01

    Background Although consumption of 3 meals/d is the most common pattern of eating in industrialized countries, a scientific rationale for this meal frequency with respect to optimal health is lacking. A diet with less meal frequency can improve the health and extend the lifespan of laboratory animals, but its effect on humans has never been tested. Objective A pilot study was conducted to establish the effects of a reduced-meal-frequency diet on health indicators in healthy, normal-weight adults. Design The study was a randomized crossover design with two 8-wk treatment periods. During the treatment periods, subjects consumed all of the calories needed for weight maintenance in either 3 meals/d or 1 meal/d. Results Subjects who completed the study maintained their body weight within 2 kg of their initial weight throughout the 6-mo period. There were no significant effects of meal frequency on heart rate, body temperature, or most of the blood variables measured. However, when consuming 1 meal/d, subjects had a significant increase in hunger; a significant modification of body composition, including reductions in fat mass; significant increases in blood pressure and in total, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol concentrations; and a significant decrease in concentrations of cortisol. Conclusions Normal-weight subjects are able to comply with a 1 meal/d diet. When meal frequency is decreased without a reduction in overall calorie intake, modest changes occur in body composition, some cardiovascular disease risk factors, and hematologic variables. Diurnal variations may affect outcomes. PMID:17413096

  18. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined with Caloric Restriction on Circulating Estrogens and IGF-I in Premenopausal Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    of a novel approach to estimating energy status by measuring metabolic hormones in plasma, insulin, IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and leptin . Recently, dried blood...been properly validated for insulin, IGF-I, IGFBP- 1 and leptin , and it is unclear whether the technique is responsive to physiological changes of...IGFBP-I, Insulin, IGFBP-I, Insulin, (Days 3, 6, 8, 10, 12, IGFBP-1, In Food Frequency Detection Kit i Diet Counseling (LP) T3 , leptin j T3, leptin T3

  19. Effects of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Combined with Caloric Restriction on Circulating Estrogens and IGF-I in Premenopausal Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    in plasma, T3, IGF-I and leptin . Recently, dried blood spot (DBS) sample collection techniques have allowed for endocrine based population studies...partially validated for some hormonal assays, it has not yet been properly validated for T3, IGF-I, and leptin , and it is unclear whether the...6, 8, 10, 12, 14 , 16, 19, 22, & 25): Serum &DBS (FP): IGF-I, IGFBP-1, Insulin, T3, leptin Menses 3-Day Diet Record (FP & LP

  20. An Ultrathin Endoscope with a 2.4-mm Working Channel Shortens the Esophagogastroduodenoscopy Time by Shortening the Suction Time

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Satoshi; Miura, Yoshimasa; Ino, Yuji; Shinozaki, Kenjiro; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Poor suction ability through a narrow working channel prolongs esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). The aim of this study was to evaluate suction with a new ultrathin endoscope (EG-580NW2; Fujifilm Corp.) having a 2.4-mm working channel in clinical practice. Methods: To evaluate in vitro suction, 200 mL water was suctioned and the suction time was measured. The clinical data of 117 patients who underwent EGD were retrospectively reviewed on the basis of recorded video, and the suction time was measured by using a stopwatch. Results: In vitro, the suction time with the EG-580NW2 endoscope was significantly shorter than that with the use of an ultrathin endoscope with a 2.0-mm working channel (EG-580NW; mean ± standard deviation, 22.7±1.1 seconds vs. 34.7±2.2 seconds; p<0.001). We analyzed the total time and the suction time for routine EGD in 117 patients (50 in the EG-580NW2 group and 67 in the EG-580NW group). In the EG-580NW2 group, the total time for EGD was significantly shorter than that in the EG-580NW group (275.3±42.0 seconds vs. 300.6±46.5 seconds, p=0.003). In the EG-580NW2 group, the suction time was significantly shorter than that in the EG-580NW group (19.2±7.6 seconds vs. 38.0±15.9 seconds, p<0.001). Conclusions: An ultrathin endoscope with a 2.4-mm working channel considerably shortens the routine EGD time by shortening the suction time, in comparison with an endoscope with a 2.0-mm working channel. PMID:26668798

  1. Genetic Heterogeneity of HER2 Amplification and Telomere Shortening in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Caria, Paola; Cantara, Silvia; Frau, Daniela Virginia; Pacini, Furio; Vanni, Roberta; Dettori, Tinuccia

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research is dedicated to understanding if sporadic and familial papillary thyroid carcinoma are distinct biological entities. We have previously demonstrated that familial papillary thyroid cancer (fPTC) cells exhibit short relative telomere length (RTL) in both blood and tissues and that these features may be associated with chromosome instability. Here, we investigated the frequency of HER2 (Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2) amplification, and other recently reported genetic alterations in sporadic PTC (sPTC) and fPTC, and assessed correlations with RTL and BRAF mutational status. We analyzed HER2 gene amplification and the integrity of ALK, ETV6, RET, and BRAF genes by fluorescence in situ hybridization in isolated nuclei and paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed sections of 13 fPTC and 18 sPTC patients. We analyzed BRAFV600E mutation and RTL by qRT-PCR. Significant HER2 amplification (p = 0.0076), which was restricted to scattered groups of cells, was found in fPTC samples. HER2 amplification in fPTCs was invariably associated with BRAFV600E mutation. RTL was shorter in fPTCs than sPTCs (p < 0.001). No rearrangements of other tested genes were observed. These findings suggest that the association of HER2 amplification with BRAFV600E mutation and telomere shortening may represent a marker of tumor aggressiveness, and, in refractory thyroid cancer, may warrant exploration as a site for targeted therapy. PMID:27775641

  2. Effect of active pre-shortening on isometric and isotonic performance of single frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Granzier, H L; Pollack, G H

    1989-01-01

    1. We studied the effects of shortening history on isometric force and isotonic velocity in single intact frog fibres. Fibres were isometrically tetanized. When force reached a plateau, shortening was imposed, after which the fibre was held isometric again. Isometric force after shortening could then be compared with controls in which no shortening had taken place. 2. Sarcomere length was measured simultaneously with two independent methods: a laser-diffraction method and a segment-length method that detects the distance between two markers attached to the surface of the fibre, about 800 microns apart. 3. The fibre was mounted between two servomotors. One was used to impose the load clamp while the other cancelled the translation that occurred during this load clamp. Thus, translation of the segment under investigation could be minimized. 4. Initial experiments were performed at the fibre level. We found that active preshortening reduced isometric force considerably, thereby confirming earlier work of others. Force reductions as large as 70% were observed. 5. Under conditions in which there were large effects of shortening at the fibre level, we measured sarcomere length changes in the central region of the fibre. These sarcomeres shortened much less than the fibre's average. In fact, when the load was high, these sarcomeres lengthened while the fibre as a whole shortened. Thus, while the fibre-length signal implied that sarcomeres might have shortened to some intermediate length, in reality some sarcomeres were much longer, others much shorter. 6. Experiments performed at the sarcomere level revealed that isometric force was unaffected by previous sarcomere shortening provided the shortening occurred against either a low load or over a short distance. However, if the work done during shortening was high, force after previous shortening was less than if sarcomeres had remained at the final length throughout contraction. The correlation between the force deficit and

  3. The physics of compensating calorimetry and the new CALOR89 code system

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Brau, J.E.; Bishop, B.L.

    1989-03-01

    Much of the understanding of the physics of calorimetry has come from the use of excellent radiation transport codes. A new understanding of compensating calorimetry was introduced four years ago following detailed studies with a new CALOR system. Now, the CALOR system has again been revised to reflect a better comprehension of high energy nuclear collisions by incorporating a modified high energy fragmentation model from FLUKA87. This revision will allow for the accurate analysis of calorimeters at energies of 100's of GeV. Presented in this paper is a discussion of compensating calorimetry, the new CALOR system, the revisions to HETC, and recently generated calorimeter related data on modes of energy deposition and secondary neutron production (E < 50 MeV) in infinite iron and uranium blocks. 38 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Effects of smoking cessation on weight gain, metabolic rate, caloric consumption, and blood lipids.

    PubMed

    Stamford, B A; Matter, S; Fell, R D; Papanek, P

    1986-04-01

    Thirteen sedentary adult females successfully quit smoking cigarettes for 48 days. Mean daily caloric consumption increased 227 kcal and mean weight gain was 2.2 kg. There were no measurable acute effects of smoke inhalation and no chronic net effects of smoking cessation on resting metabolic rate, as determined by oxygen consumption and respiratory exchange ratio. After 1 yr, subjects who continued to abstain gained an average of 8.2 kg. HDL-cholesterol increased 7 mg/dl in 48 days; however, this effect was lost in those who returned to smoking. Increased caloric consumption accounted for 69% of weight gained immediately following smoking cessation. Factors other than changes in caloric consumption and metabolic rate may be responsible for a significant proportion (31%) of the weight gained in individuals who quit smoking.

  5. Effect of gravity on the caloric stimulation of the inner ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Deserranno, Dimitri; Oas, John G.

    2004-01-01

    Robert Barany won the 1914 Nobel Prize in medicine for his convection hypothesis for caloric stimulation. Microgravity caloric tests aboard the 1983 SpaceLab 1 mission produced nystagmus results that contradicted the basic premise of Barany's convection theory. In this paper, we present a fluid structural analysis of the caloric stimulation of the lateral semicircular canal. Direct numerical simulations indicate that on earth, natural convection is the dominant mechanism for endolymphatic flow. However, in the microgravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, where buoyancy effects are mitigated, an expansive convection becomes the sole mechanism for producing endolymph motion and cupular displacement. Transient 1 g and microgravity case studies are presented to delineate the different dynamic behaviors of the 1 g and microgravity endolymphatic flows. The associated fluid-structural interactions are also analyzed based on the time evolution of cupular displacements.

  6. Effect of gravity on the caloric stimulation of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Deserranno, Dimitri; Oas, John G

    2004-11-01

    Robert Barany won the 1914 Nobel Prize in medicine for his convection hypothesis for caloric stimulation. Microgravity caloric tests aboard the 1983 SpaceLab 1 mission produced nystagmus results that contradicted the basic premise of Barany's convection theory. In this paper, we present a fluid structural analysis of the caloric stimulation of the lateral semicircular canal. Direct numerical simulations indicate that on earth, natural convection is the dominant mechanism for endolymphatic flow. However, in the microgravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, where buoyancy effects are mitigated, an expansive convection becomes the sole mechanism for producing endolymph motion and cupular displacement. Transient 1 g and microgravity case studies are presented to delineate the different dynamic behaviors of the 1 g and microgravity endolymphatic flows. The associated fluid-structural interactions are also analyzed based on the time evolution of cupular displacements.

  7. [The diagnostic value of vertical nystagmus in the simultaneous bilateral calibrated caloric vestibular test (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Toupet, M; Pialoux, P

    1981-01-01

    Vertical nystagmus provoked by simultaneous bilateral caloric stimulation has been known since 1907 (Bàràny). However, if a controlled and calibrated injection os water at 44 degrees C or 30 degrees C for 30 seconds at a flow rate of 250 ml/minute is given in normal subjects, this stimulus is insufficient to provoke a response, whilst in subjects with a central vestibular disorder there appear upward vertical movements with hot stimulation and downward movements with cold stimulation. The degree of this response is proportional to the degree of horizontal nystagmic responses to classical unilateral caloric tests. The authors feel that vertical nystagmic responses to simultaneous bilateral caloric stimulation reflect a loss of control of the vestibular reflex activity of the superior semicircular canals.

  8. Mice that gorged during dietary restriction increased foraging related behaviors and differed in their macronutrient preference when released from restriction

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) can trigger gorging behavior. We examined macronutrient choice and behavior in mice that gorged during restriction compared to restricted non-gorgers and controls. Fifty MF1 male mice were restricted to 75% of ad-libitum food intake (FI), while ten controls were fed ad-lib. Body mass (BM) and FI were measured two and 24-h after food inclusion over 14-days. ‘Gorging’ mice were defined as those which ate over 25% of their daily FI in 2-h. The top 11 gorgers and the lowest 9 gorgers, along with 10 controls, had their behavior analysed during restriction, and were then provided with an unrestricted food choice, consisting of three diets that were high in fat, protein or carbohydrate. During restriction gorgers ate on average 51% of their daily FI in the 2-h following food introduction while the non-gorgers ate only 16%. Gorgers lost significantly more BM than non-gorgers possibly due to an increased physical activity linked to anticipation of daily food provision. Controls and non-gorgers spent most of their time sleeping. After restriction, both gorgers and non-gorgers were hyperphagic until their lost weight was regained. All 3 groups favoured high fat food. Gorgers and non-gorgers had a significantly greater high carbohydrate diet intake than controls, and gorgers also had a significantly greater high protein diet intake than non-gorgers and controls. On unrestricted food, they did not continue to gorge, although they still had a significantly greater 2-h FI than the other groups. Elevated protein intake may play an important role in the recovery of the lost lean tissue of gorgers after restriction. PMID:26157640

  9. Tasting profile affects adoption of caloric beverage reduction in a randomized weight loss intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.; Popkin, B.; Tate, D. F.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective The aim of this study was to examine differences in rates of non‐caloric beverage adoption by participants classified as sweet likers (SLs) or sweet dislikers (measured using a behavioural tasting task). Methods Data are a sub‐study from a 6‐month, three‐group, randomized weight loss trial (CHOICE) (body mass index 36.3 ± 5.8 kg m−2, 84% female, aged 42.2 ± 10.9 years, 53% African‐American) comparing the replacement of caloric beverages with either non‐caloric sweetened beverages (diet) or water (water) compared with a control group. This sub‐study, which included participants within the water (n = 106) and diet (n = 103) groups only, examined whether SLs (n = 33 water; n = 37 diet) varied in their adherence to caloric beverage recommendations compared with sweet dislikers (n = 73 water; n = 76 diet) over the 6‐month study. Results Diet intake and sweet‐liking data collected on 190 (3 months) and 169 participants (6 months) were used for analysis. The interaction between SL status and beverage group (diet vs. water) approached significance (P = 0.06) at 3 months but not 6 months. Caloric beverage intake (% energy) at 3 months was significantly higher in SLs within the water group (9.7 ± 1.4%) compared with SLs in the diet group (5.4 ± 1.0%, P = 0.03). Conclusions Results suggest that SL status may affect the rate in reduction of caloric beverages when water is the recommended substitution. Future studies should explore tailoring beverage recommendations to tasting profile. PMID:28090344

  10. Effect of the stringency of conditions on caloric test results in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Krstulovic, Claudio; Tulsidas Mahtani, Bharti; Atrache Al Attrache, Nabil; Pérez-Garrigues, Herminio

    The caloric test is widely used to assess vestibular function, but the conditions in which it is performed can vary. Caloric nystagmus obtained in 57 healthy subjects were compared: 24 subjects studied in ideal conditions and 33 subjects in non-ideal conditions. A statistically significant decrease in the slow phase velocity of the 4 irrigations performed on the subjects in non-ideal conditions was observed. This must be considered, especially in subjects with suspected bilateral involvement. Stringent conditions reduce the risk of misdiagnosis with bilateral deficit.

  11. Absence of Rotation Perception during Warm Water Caloric Irrigation in Some Seniors with Postural Instability

    PubMed Central

    Chiarovano, Elodie; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; Magnani, Christophe; Lamas, Georges; Curthoys, Ian S.; de Waele, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Falls in seniors are a major public health problem. Falls lead to fear of falling, reduced mobility, and decreased quality of life. Vestibular dysfunction is one of the fall risk factors. The relationship between objective measures of vestibular responses and age has been studied. However, the effects of age on vestibular perception during caloric stimulation have not been studied. Twenty senior subjects were included in the study, and separated in two groups: 10 seniors reporting postural instability (PI) and exhibiting absence of vestibular perception when they tested with caloric stimulation and 10 sex- and age-matched seniors with no such problems (controls). We assessed vestibular perception on a binary rating scale during the warm irrigation of the caloric test. The function of the various vestibular receptors was assessed using video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric tests, and cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials. The Equitest was used to evaluate balance. No horizontal canal dysfunction assessed using both caloric test and vHIT was detected in either group. No significant difference was detected between PI and control groups for the peak SPV of caloric-induced ocular nystagmus or for the HVOR gain. All the controls perceived rotation when the maximal SPV during warm irrigation was equal to or ≥15°/s. None of the subjects in the PI group perceived rotation even while the peak SPV exceeded 15°/s, providing objective evidence of normal peripheral horizontal canal function. All the PI group had abnormal Equitest results, particularly in the two last conditions. These investigations show for the first time that vestibular perception can be absent during a caloric test despite normal horizontal canal function. We call this as dissociation vestibular neglect. Patients with poor vestibular perception may not be aware of postural perturbations and so will not correct for them. Thus, falls in the elderly may result, among other factors, from

  12. Changes of endolymphatic pressure in the semicircular canal of pigeon by caloric stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Watanabe, S.

    1994-08-01

    It gets into difficult to explain the mechanism of caloric nystagmus only by convection theory from results of microgravity experiments. One of the other theories is an occurrence of a relative volume change due to a temperature change. Since the volume change must lead to a pressure change after caloric stimulation, we tried to measure the ampulla pressure of the horizontal semicircular canal in pigeons (Columba livia) using an improved servo micropipette system. The main result was that the ampulla pressure increased by cooling and decreased by heating. The changes of the ampulla pressure depended on the temperature change but were not influenced by the pigeon's head position.

  13. Caloric Intake From Fast Food Among Children and Adolescents in the United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Vikraman, Sundeep; Fryar, Cheryl D; Ogden, Cynthia L

    2015-09-01

    Consumption of fast food has been linked to weight gain in adults (1). Fast food has also been associated with higher caloric intake and poorer diet quality in children and adolescents (2). From 1994 through 2006, caloric intake from fast food increased from 10% to 13% among children aged 2-18 years (3). This report presents the most recent data on the percentage of calories consumed from fast food among U.S. children by sex, age group, race and Hispanic origin, poverty status, and weight status.

  14. Absence of Rotation Perception during Warm Water Caloric Irrigation in Some Seniors with Postural Instability.

    PubMed

    Chiarovano, Elodie; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; Magnani, Christophe; Lamas, Georges; Curthoys, Ian S; de Waele, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Falls in seniors are a major public health problem. Falls lead to fear of falling, reduced mobility, and decreased quality of life. Vestibular dysfunction is one of the fall risk factors. The relationship between objective measures of vestibular responses and age has been studied. However, the effects of age on vestibular perception during caloric stimulation have not been studied. Twenty senior subjects were included in the study, and separated in two groups: 10 seniors reporting postural instability (PI) and exhibiting absence of vestibular perception when they tested with caloric stimulation and 10 sex- and age-matched seniors with no such problems (controls). We assessed vestibular perception on a binary rating scale during the warm irrigation of the caloric test. The function of the various vestibular receptors was assessed using video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric tests, and cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials. The Equitest was used to evaluate balance. No horizontal canal dysfunction assessed using both caloric test and vHIT was detected in either group. No significant difference was detected between PI and control groups for the peak SPV of caloric-induced ocular nystagmus or for the HVOR gain. All the controls perceived rotation when the maximal SPV during warm irrigation was equal to or ≥15°/s. None of the subjects in the PI group perceived rotation even while the peak SPV exceeded 15°/s, providing objective evidence of normal peripheral horizontal canal function. All the PI group had abnormal Equitest results, particularly in the two last conditions. These investigations show for the first time that vestibular perception can be absent during a caloric test despite normal horizontal canal function. We call this as dissociation vestibular neglect. Patients with poor vestibular perception may not be aware of postural perturbations and so will not correct for them. Thus, falls in the elderly may result, among other factors, from

  15. Fuel NOx production during the combustion of low caloric value fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Colaluca, M.A.; Caraway, J.P.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this investigation is to identify and qualify physical mechanisms and parameters that affect the combustion of low caloric value gases (LCVG) and the formation of NOx pollutants produced form fuel bound nitrogen. Average physical properties of a low caloric value gas were determined from the products of several industrial coal gasifiers. A computer model was developed, utilizing the PHOENICS computational fluid dynamics software to model the combustion of LCVG. The model incorporates a 3-dimensional physical design and is based on typical industrial combustors. Feed stock to the gasifier can be wood, feed stock manure, cotton gin trash, coal, lignite and numerous forms of organic industrial wastes.

  16. Space travel shortens diapause in gypsy moth eggs.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D K; Morgan, N O; Webb, R E; Bell, R A

    1991-02-01

    Field-collected and laboratory-reared gypsy moth eggs were exposed to microgravity, cosmic radiation, sub-freezing temperatures, unusual vibrations, and other extraterrestrial phenomena while they were sealed for 6 days, in January, in a Get-Away-Special (GAS) canister in the open bay of a NASA earth-orbiting spacecraft, the Columbia. Insects were not exposed to light after preparation for and during space flight. Under field conditions, out-of-doors, the eggs should have hatched in April, after 3-4 months of chilling temperatures and should not have hatched after the 6 days of chilling to -11 degrees C during flight in the Columbia spacecraft. However by April 1, more than 4000 larvae had hatched from eggs that had travelled in space, as opposed to approximately 350 from a similar number of control, earthbound eggs. These results indicate that the period of a circannual rhythm in field- and lab-reared insects had been shortened, presumably as result of exposure to microgravity, other factors associated with space flight, and/or conditions of outer space. These results suggest that it may be possible to develop methods for rearing the gypsy moth year round, without the necessity of three months chilling interspersed in the development process. This, in turn, would facilitate production of large numbers of insects for sterile male release or for use as a rearing medium for parasites, predators and pathogens of the gypsy moth.

  17. Chemical Sharpening, Shortening, and Unzipping of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Yunlong; Chen, Zhongfang; Connell, John W.; Fay, Catharine C.; Park, Cheol; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), the one-dimensional member of the boron nitride nanostructure family, are generally accepted to be highly inert to oxidative treatments and can only be covalently modifi ed by highly reactive species. Conversely, it is discovered that the BNNTs can be chemically dispersed and their morphology modifi ed by a relatively mild method: simply sonicating the nanotubes in aqueous ammonia solution. The dispersed nanotubes are significantly corroded, with end-caps removed, tips sharpened, and walls thinned. The sonication treatment in aqueous ammonia solution also removes amorphous BN impurities and shortened BNNTs, resembling various oxidative treatments of carbon nanotubes. Importantly, the majority of BNNTs are at least partially longitudinally cut, or "unzipped". Entangled and freestanding BN nanoribbons (BNNRs), resulting from the unzipping, are found to be approximately 5-20 nm in width and up to a few hundred nanometers in length. This is the fi rst chemical method to obtain BNNRs from BNNT unzipping. This method is not derived from known carbon nanotube unzipping strategies, but is unique to BNNTs because the use of aqueous ammonia solutions specifi cally targets the B-N bond network. This study may pave the way for convenient processing of BNNTs, previously thought to be highly inert, toward controlling their dispersion, purity, lengths, and electronic properties.

  18. Impact of elasticity on lithospheric shortening and strain localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquet, Yoann; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Duretz, Thibault

    2015-04-01

    The initiation of subduction is not well understood and also the mechanisms of localization in a compressive domain are incompletely understood. In order to better understand what controls strain localization during compression, we perform two dimensional numerical simulations with a finite element code using the MILAMIN solver with the Triangle mesh generator. Our model configuration consists of a lithosphere composed of an upper crust, a lower crust and a mantle with each layer having its own non-Newtonian rheology. We add a thermal perturbation (+100°C) to the right bottom side of the model. The model is then shortened with a fixed strain rate (5*10-15s-1) and we vary both the bottom temperature and the shear modulus. The latter allows variations between two extreme rheological models: visco-elasto-plastic and visco-plastic. The results show that (1) the lithosphere is subjected to buckling, (2) localization caused by shear heating can occur in one of the folds during ongoing buckling, and (3) a lower basal temperature favors higher stresses so that localization is facilitated. The visco-elasto-plastic model shows faster and more intense localization than the visco-plastic model. Moreover, as soon as strain localization initiates, strain rates suddenly increase by several orders of magnitude (>2) during a short period of time (

  19. Ectoparasitism shortens the breeding season in a colonial bird

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Charles R.; Brown, Mary Bomberger

    2015-01-01

    When blood-feeding parasites increase seasonally, their deleterious effects may prevent some host species, especially those living in large groups where parasites are numerous, from reproducing later in the summer. Yet the role of parasites in regulating the length of a host's breeding season—and thus the host's opportunity for multiple brooding—has not been systematically investigated. The highly colonial cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota), a temperate-latitude migratory songbird in the western Great Plains, USA, typically has a relatively short (eight to nine week) breeding season, with birds rarely nesting late in the summer. Colonies at which ectoparasitic swallow bugs (Oeciacus vicarius) were experimentally removed by fumigation were over 45 times more likely to have birds undertake a second round of nesting than were colonies exposed to parasites. Late nesting approximately doubled the length of the breeding season, with some birds raising two broods. Over a 27 year period the percentage of birds engaging in late nesting each year increased at a colony site where parasites were removed annually. This trend could not be explained by changes in group size, climate or nesting phenology during the study. The results suggest that ectoparasitism shortens the cliff swallow's breeding season and probably prevents many individuals from multiple brooding. When this constraint is removed, selection may rapidly favour late nesting. PMID:26064606

  20. The different muscle-energetics during shortening and stretch.

    PubMed

    Jarosch, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The helical shape of the thin filaments causes their passive counterclockwise rotation during muscle stretch that increases tensile stress and torque at first by unwinding and then by winding up the four anchoring Z-filaments. This means storage of energy in the series elastic Z-filaments and a considerable decrease of the liberated energy of heat and work to (h-w(ap)), where h is the heat energy and w(ap) the stretch energy induced from outside by an apparatus. The steep thin filament helix with an inclination angle of 70° promotes the passive rotation during stretch, but impedes the smooth sliding of shortening by increased friction and production of frictional heat. The frictional heat may be produced by the contact with the myosin cross-bridges: (1) when they passively snap on drilling thin filaments from cleft to cleft over a distance 2 × 2.7 nm = 5.4 nm between the globular actin monomers in one groove, causing stepwise motion; or (2) when they passively cycle from one helical groove to the next (distance 36 nm). The latter causes more heat and may take place on rotating thin filaments without an effective forward drilling ("idle rotation"), e.g., when they produce "unexplained heat" at the beginning of an isometric tetanus. In an Appendix to this paper the different states of muscle are defined. The function of its most important components is described and rotation model and power-stroke model of muscular contraction is compared.

  1. Does the speed of shortening affect steady-state force depression in cat soleus muscle?

    PubMed

    Leonard, T R; Herzog, W

    2005-11-01

    It has been stated repeatedly for the past 50 years that the steady-state force depression following shortening of an activated muscle depends on the speed of shortening. However, these statements were based on results from experiments in which muscles were shortened at different speeds but identical activation levels. Therefore, the force during shortening was changed in accordance with the force-velocity relationship of muscles: that is, increasing speeds of shortening were associated with decreasing forces, and vice versa. Consequently, it is not possible at present to distinguish whether force depression is caused by the changes in speed, as frequently stated, or the associated changes in force, or both. The purpose of this study was to test if force depression depends on the speed of shortening. We hypothesized that force depression was dependent on the force but not the speed of contraction. Our prediction is that the amount of force depression after shortening contractions at different speeds could be similar if the force during contraction was controlled at a similar level. Cat soleus muscles (n=7) were shortened by 9 or 12 mm at speeds of 3, 9, and 27 mm/s, first with a constant activation during shortening (30Hz), then with activation levels that were reduced (<30Hz) for the slow speeds (3 and 9 mm/s) to approximate the shortening forces of the fast speed contractions (27 mm/s). If done properly, force depression could be precisely matched at the three different speeds, indicating that force depression was related to the force during the shortening contraction but not to the speed. However, in order to match force depression, the forces during shortening had to be systematically greater for the slow compared to the fast speeds of shortening, suggesting that force depression also depends on the level of activation, as force depression at constant activation levels can only be matched if the force during shortening, evaluated by the mechanical work, is

  2. Prenatal Caloric Intake and the Development of Academic Achievement among U.S. Children from Ages 5 to 14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Eric J.; Beaver, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relation between maternal caloric intake during pregnancy and growth in child academic achievement while controlling for important confounding influences. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the current study examined the effects of reduced prenatal caloric intake on growth in scores on the…

  3. Measuring Restriction Sizes Using Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews a new concept in magnetic resonance as applied to cellular and biological systems. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging can be used to infer information about restriction sizes of samples being measured. The measurements rely on the apparent diffusion coefficient changing with diffusion times as measurements move from restricted to free diffusion regimes. Pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) measurements are limited in the ability to shorten diffusion times and thus are limited in restriction sizes which can be probed. Oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) measurements could provide shorter diffusion times so smaller restriction sizes could be probed. PMID:25114548

  4. Differential effects of fasting vs food restriction on liver thyroid hormone metabolism in male rats.

    PubMed

    de Vries, E M; van Beeren, H C; Ackermans, M T; Kalsbeek, A; Fliers, E; Boelen, A

    2015-01-01

    A variety of illnesses that leads to profound changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) are axis collectively known as the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). NTIS is characterized by decreased tri-iodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) and inappropriately low TSH serum concentrations, as well as altered hepatic thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism. Spontaneous caloric restriction often occurs during illness and may contribute to NTIS, but it is currently unknown to what extent. The role of diminished food intake is often studied using experimental fasting models, but partial food restriction might be a more physiologically relevant model. In this comparative study, we characterized hepatic TH metabolism in two models for caloric restriction: 36 h of complete fasting and 21 days of 50% food restriction. Both fasting and food restriction decreased serum T4 concentration, while after 36-h fasting serum T3 also decreased. Fasting decreased hepatic T3 but not T4 concentrations, while food restriction decreased both hepatic T3 and T4 concentrations. Fasting and food restriction both induced an upregulation of liver D3 expression and activity, D1 was not affected. A differential effect was seen in Mct10 mRNA expression, which was upregulated in the fasted rats but not in food-restricted rats. Other metabolic pathways of TH, such as sulfation and UDP-glucuronidation, were also differentially affected. The changes in hepatic TH concentrations were reflected by the expression of T3-responsive genes Fas and Spot14 only in the 36-h fasted rats. In conclusion, limited food intake induced marked changes in hepatic TH metabolism, which are likely to contribute to the changes observed during NTIS.

  5. Dispersible shortened boron nitride nanotubes with improved molecule-loading capacity.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Chunyi; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2011-09-05

    The oxidation process of boron nitride nanotubes was thoroughly investigated, and a slow oxidation characteristic was clearly revealed. Subsequently, the controllable oxidation process was utilized to break the sturdy structure of the boron nitride nanotubes to fabricate shortened nanotubes. The shortened boron nitride nanotubes were found to possess good solubility in water and many organic solvents. Further experiments demonstrated remarkably improved molecule-loading capacity of the shortened boron nitride nanotubes. These dispersible shortened boron nitride nanotubes might have the potential to be developed as effective delivery systems for various molecules, which may find applications in bio-related fields.

  6. Circular smooth muscle contributes to esophageal shortening during peristalsis

    PubMed Central

    Vegesna, Anil K; Chuang, Keng-Yu; Besetty, Ramashesai; Phillips, Steven J; Braverman, Alan S; Barbe, Mary F; Ruggieri, Michael R; Miller, Larry S

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the angle between the circular smooth muscle (CSM) and longitudinal smooth muscle (LSM) fibers in the distal esophagus. METHODS: In order to identify possible mechanisms for greater shortening in the distal compared to proximal esophagus during peristalsis, the angles between the LSM and CSM layers were measured in 9 cadavers. The outer longitudinal layer of the muscularis propria was exposed after stripping the outer serosa. The inner circular layer of the muscularis propria was then revealed after dissection of the esophageal mucosa and the underlying muscularis mucosa. Photographs of each specimen were taken with half of the open esophagus folded back showing both the outer longitudinal and inner circular muscle layers. Angles were measured every one cm for 10 cm proximal to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) by two independent investigators. Two human esophagi were obtained from organ transplant donors and the angles between the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers were measured using micro-computed tomography (micro CT) and Image J software. RESULTS: All data are presented as mean ± SE. The CSM to LSM angle at the SCJ and 1 cm proximal to SCJ on the autopsy specimens was 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 74.9 ± 3.09 degrees, P = 0.32. The CSM to LSM angle at SCJ were statistically significantly lower than at 2, 3, 4 and 5 cm proximal to the SCJ, 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 82.58 ± 1.34 degrees, 84.04 ± 1.64 degrees, 84.87 ± 1.04 degrees and 83.72 ± 1.42 degrees, P = 0.013, P = 0.008, P = 0.004, P = 0.009 respectively. The CSM to LSM angle at SCJ was also statistically significantly lower than the angles at 6, 7 and 8 cm proximal to the SCJ, 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 80.18 ± 2.09 degrees, 81.81 ± 1.75 degrees and 80.96 ± 2.04 degrees, P = 0.05, P = 0.02, P = 0.03 respectively. The CSM to LSM angle at 1 cm proximal to SCJ was statistically significantly lower than at 3, 4 and 5 cm proximal to the SCJ, 74.94 ± 3.09 degrees vs 84.04 ± 1

  7. GPS computer navigators to shorten EMS response and transport times.

    PubMed

    Ota, F S; Muramatsu, R S; Yoshida, B H; Yamamoto, L G

    2001-05-01

    GPS (global positioning satellite system to determine one's position on earth) units have become inexpensive and compact. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a GPS enhanced computer street map navigator to improve the ability of EMS drivers in an urban setting to locate their destination and shorten response times. For part I, residential addresses in the city were randomly selected from a telephone directory. Two driver/navigator teams were assigned to drive to the address adhering to speed limits. One team used a standard street map, whereas the other team used a GPS computer navigator. The travel time and distance of the runs were compared. For part II, the computer GPS navigator was placed on an ambulance to supplement their normal methods of navigation to find the address requesting EMS. After the run was completed, EMS providers were interviewed to determine their opinion of whether the GPS navigator was helpful. For part I the results showed that in the 29 initial test runs, comparing the GPS team versus the standard map team, the mean distances traveled were 8.7 versus 9.0 kilometers (not significant) and the mean travel times were 13.5 versus 14.6 minutes (P=.02), respectively. The GPS team arrived faster in 72% runs. For part II the results showed that most EMS providers surveyed noted that the GPS computer navigator enhanced their ability to find the destination and all EMS providers acknowledged that it would enhance their ability to find a destination in an area in which they were unfamiliar. These results suggest that a portable GPS computer navigator system is helpful and can enhance the ability of prehospital care providers to locate their destination. Because these units are accurate and inexpensive, GPS computer navigators may be a valuable tool in reducing pre-hospital transport times.

  8. Shortened night sleep impairs facial responsiveness to emotional stimuli.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Johanna F A; Popp, Roland; Haas, Jessica; Zulley, Jürgen; Geisler, Peter; Alpers, Georg W; Osterheider, Michael; Eisenbarth, Hedwig

    2013-04-01

    Sleep deprivation deteriorates mood, impairs the recognition of facial expressions, and affects the ability to regulate emotions. The present study investigated the effect of partial sleep deprivation on facial responses to emotional stimuli. Thirty-three healthy undergraduates were tested twice: after a night with (i) 8h and (ii) 4h sleep. Self-reported sleepiness and sustained attention (Psychomotor Vigilance Task) were assessed. Emotional reactivity was measured with facial Electromyogram (EMG) while participants were asked to respond with either compatible or incompatible facial muscles to emotional stimuli in order to study whether partial sleep deprivation caused slower reactions mainly in response to incompatible stimuli (due to an additional effort to suppress the compatible reaction caused by decreased inhibitory control) or in response to both compatible and incompatible stimuli. Self-reported sleepiness and reaction times in a sustained attention task significantly increased after one night of partial sleep deprivation. Facial reactions to emotional stimuli were decelerated. No significant interaction between sleep restriction and compatibility of the muscle to the picture valence could be observed. Hence, volitional facial reactions in response to emotional stimuli were slower after one night of reduced sleep, but affective inhibitory control was not significantly impaired. However, slowed facial responding to emotional stimuli may affect social interaction after sleep restriction.

  9. Vestibular reactions to long-term caloric stimulation of the rabbit labyrinth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorgiladze, G. I.

    1978-01-01

    Long-term, periodically repeated caloric stimulation of the labyrinth receptors of the internal ear was studied on eight rabbits with immobilzed heads. Warm (20 C) water was used as a stimulus in a dose of 40 ml per min injected into the auditory meatus.

  10. Cardiac Frequency and Caloric Cost of Aerobic Dancing in Young Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Deborah J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study of cardiac frequency during aerobic dancing indicated that it can sustain an elevated cardiac frequency in most cases. The caloric cost of aerobic dancing is approximately 50 percent greater than an equal duration of barre and center-floor exercise by elite ballet dancers. (JD)

  11. Effects of caloric deprivation and satiety on sensitivity of the gustatory system

    PubMed Central

    Zverev, Yuriy P

    2004-01-01

    Background Sensitivity of the gustatory system could be modulated by a number of short-term and long-term factors such as body mass, gender, age, local and systemic diseases and pathological processes, excessive alcohol drinking, drug dependence, smoking, composition of oral fluid, state of oral hygiene, consumption of some foods among many others. A few studies have demonstrated the effects of hunger and caloric satiety on sensitivity of the gustatory system in obese humans and animals. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of short-term caloric deprivation and satiety on recognition taste thresholds of healthy, non-smoking, non-drinking, non-obese young male subjects. The two-alternative forced-choice technique was used to measure taste threshold. Results Recognition thresholds for sucrose and salt were significantly lower during fasting state than after a meal (t = 2.23, P < 0.05, and t = 2.86, P < 0.02, respectively) while the values of recognition thresholds for bitter substances in fasting state and after caloric loading did not differ significantly. Conclusions Short-term caloric deprivation in our study model was associated with increased taste sensitivity to sweet and salty substances compared to satiated state while taste sensitivity to bitter substances was not affected by the conditions of measurements. Selective modulation of sensitivity of the gustatory system might reflect the different biological importance of salty, sweet and bitter qualities of taste. PMID:15028115

  12. Effect of solids, caloric content on dual-phase gastric emptying

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Maegdenbergh, V.; Urbain, J.L.; Siegel, J.A.; Mortelmans, L.; De Roo, M. Temple Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA )

    1990-03-01

    The dual-phase gastric emptying technique is routinely employed to determine the differential emptying of solids and liquids in a wide spectrum of gastrointestinal diseases. Composition, acidity, volume, caloric density, physical form and viscosity of the test means have been shown to be important determinants for the quantitative evaluation of gastric emptying. In this study, the authors have evaluated the effect of increasing the caloric content of the solid portion of a physiologic test mean on both solid and liquid emptying kinetics in health male volunteers. They observed that increasing solid caloric content delayed emptying of both solids and liquids. For the solid phase, the delay was accounted for by a longer lag phase and decrease in emptying rate; for liquids a longer emptying rate was also obtained. They conclude that modification of the caloric content of the solid portion of a meal not only affects the emptying of the solid phase but also alters the emptying of the liquid component of the meal.

  13. Resource availability hypothesis: Perceived financial and caloric status affect individuals' height preferences for potential partners.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingzhou; Lou, Liandi; Lu, Jingyi; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhong, Jun; Tan, Xuyun; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Yongfang

    2016-10-01

    Height is an important concern in human mate choices. Prior research indicates that people who live in areas with abundant resources differ from those who live in areas with scarce resources regarding height preferences. Based on a health-maximizing principle, we propose a resource availability account for such differences. Compared with women's height preferences, men's height preferences are hypothesized to be more dependent on either financial or caloric resource availability. Specifically, taller females would be more preferred by males who are poor in resources than those who are rich in resources. Results from three studies supported these hypotheses. In Study 1, men from remote areas of China who had lower family income preferred taller women more than those from eastern China who had higher family income. In Study 2, men who were financially dissatisfied preferred taller women more than those who were financially satisfied. In Study 3, men with low caloric status preferred taller women more than men with high caloric status. In addition, women's height preferences in Studies 1, 2 and 3 were less determined by resource availability. These findings suggest that height preferences are changeable, depending on financial or caloric status.

  14. 3D analysis of human locomotion before and after caloric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kubo, T; Kumakura, H; Hirokawa, Y; Yamamoto, K; Imai, T; Hirasaki, E

    1997-03-01

    Human locomotion was analysed in the sagittal and coronal planes using a position detector system composed of 2 infrared video cameras and a data processor. Normal healthy volunteers with 8 marker points on the body were asked to walk in place (WIP) and on a treadmill (WOT). Vertical and medial/lateral (M/L) translational movements were measured. Head angular movements in the sagittal (pitch) and coronal (roll) planes were also analysed. Pitch movements counteracted the vertical head movements. Head movement was remarkably attenuated in the vertical axis compared with that of the trunk. However, head M/L movement showed no difference with that of the lower part of the body. Ice water caloric stimulation was introduced to cause acute unilateral vestibular deficit. The stride length and step cycle became small after caloric stimulation in WOT, but not in WIP. The characteristic change in locomotive pattern was a large lateral sway of the hip joint occurring to the side away from calorization (right) during one foot standing (right foot) (t-test, p = 0.057). Measurement of M/L sway amplitude showed an increase only at the hip joint. As the changes in head and neck movements were not significant after caloric stimulation, it appears that the vestibulo-spinal reflex contributes little to maintaining the dynamic balance of the upper body. The importance of the hip joint for locomotion (hip strategy) was confirmed from the present data.

  15. Shortening-induced torque depression in old men: implications for age-related power loss.

    PubMed

    Power, Geoffrey A; Makrakos, Demetri P; Stevens, Daniel E; Herzog, Walter; Rice, Charles L; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2014-09-01

    Following active muscle shortening, the steady-state isometric torque at the final muscle length is lower than the steady-state torque obtained for a purely isometric contraction at that same final muscle length. This well-documented property of skeletal muscle is termed shortening-induced torque depression (TD). Despite many investigations into the mechanisms of weakness and power loss in old age, the influence of muscle shortening on the history dependence of isometric torque production remains to be elucidated. Thus, it is unclear whether older adults are disadvantaged for torque and power production following a dynamic shortening contraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate shortening-induced TD in older adults, and to determine whether shortening-induced TD is related to power loss. Maximal voluntary isometric dorsiflexion contractions (MVC; 10s) in 8 young (25.5±3.7years) and 9 old (76.1±5.4years) men were performed on a HUMAC NORM dynamometer as a reference, and then again following an active shortening of 40° joint excursion (40°PF-0°PF) at angular velocities of 15°/s and 120°/s. Work and instantaneous power were derived during shortening. Shortening-induced TD was calculated and expressed as a percentage by determining the mean torque value over 1s during the isometric steady state of the MVC following shortening, divided by the mean torque value for the same 1s time period during the isometric reference MVC. To assess muscle activation, electromyography (root mean square; EMGRMS) of the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) was calculated at identical time points used in assessing shortening-induced TD, and voluntary activation (VA) was assessed using the interpolated twitch technique. Old were 18% weaker than young for MVC, and ~40% less powerful for 15°/s and 120°/s of shortening. Old produced 37% and 21% less work for 15°/s and 120°/s than young, respectively. Furthermore, old experienced 60% and 70% greater shortening-induced TD

  16. The Shortened Raven Standard Progressive Matrices: Item Response Theory-Based Psychometric Analyses and Normative Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Elst, Wim; Ouwehand, Carolijn; van Rijn, Peter; Lee, Nikki; Van Boxtel, Martin; Jolles, Jelle

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a shortened version of the Raven Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) under an item response theory framework (the one- and two-parameter logistic models). The shortened Raven SPM was administered to N = 453 cognitively healthy adults aged between 24 and 83 years. The…

  17. Assisting High School Students with Career Indecision Using a Shortened Form of the Career Construction Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfuss, Mark C.; Sickinger, Pamela H.

    2015-01-01

    A shortened form of the Career Construction Interview (CCI) was used to help high school students struggling with the career decision making process. The shortened instrument is described, as well as, its use with eleventh grade high school students who had low levels of career concern and career curiosity. Students who completed the exercise…

  18. Accumulating evidence for increased velocity of airway smooth muscle shortening in asthmatic airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Ijpma, Gijs; Matusovsky, Oleg; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    It remains unclear whether airway smooth muscle (ASM) mechanics is altered in asthma. While efforts have originally focussed on contractile force, some evidence points to an increased velocity of shortening. A greater rate of airway renarrowing after a deep inspiration has been reported in asthmatics compared to controls, which could result from a shortening velocity increase. In addition, we have recently shown in rats that increased shortening velocity correlates with increased muscle shortening, without increasing muscle force. Nonetheless, establishing whether or not asthmatic ASM shortens faster than that of normal subjects remains problematic. Endobronchial biopsies provide excellent tissue samples because the patients are well characterized, but the size of the samples allows only cell level experiments. Whole human lungs from transplant programs suffer primarily from poor patient characterization, leading to high variability. ASM from several animal models of asthma has shown increased shortening velocity, but it is unclear whether this is representative of human asthma. Several candidates have been suggested as responsible for increased shortening velocity in asthma, such as alterations in contractile protein expression or changes in the contractile apparatus structure. There is no doubt that more remains to be learned about the role of shortening velocity in asthma.

  19. Effects of stretch and shortening on gene expression in intact myocardium.

    PubMed

    Haggart, Charles R; Ames, Elizabeth G; Lee, Jae K; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-15

    Multiple cues have been suggested as the mechanical stimulus for the heart's hypertrophic response. Our work has previously suggested that the amount of cyclic shortening in cardiomyocytes controls myocyte shape and the amount of stretch controls myocyte size. To identify gene expression changes that occur in response to these mechanical perturbations, we used microarray analysis of papillary muscles cultured for 12 h at physiological or reduced levels of cyclic shortening and physiological or reduced mean stretch. Overall, genes related to extracellular matrix (ECM) were surprisingly prominent in our analysis. Connective tissue growth factor was among a small group of genes regulated by the amount of cyclic shortening regardless of the level of mean stretch, and many more ECM genes were regulated by shortening with reduced amounts of stretch. When we compared our results to gene expression data from an in vivo model of pressure overload (PO), which also decreases myocyte shortening, we found the genes that were commonly regulated in PO and our decreased shortening groups were most significantly enriched for ontology terms related to the ECM, followed by genes associated with mechanosensing and the cytoskeleton. The list of genes regulated in PO and our decreased shortening groups also includes genes known to change early in hypertrophy, such as myosin heavy chain 7, brain natriuretic peptide, and myosin binding protein C. We conclude that in intact myocardium, the amount of cyclic shortening may be an important regulator not only of myocyte genes classically associated with hypertrophy but also of ECM genes.

  20. Effect of feeding a high-fat diet independently of caloric intake on reproductive function in diet-induced obese female rats

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mona A.; Abogresha, Noha M.; Tamany, Dalia A.; Lotfy, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Globally, the prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing, predisposing females to health hazards including compromised reproductive capacity. Our objective was to investigate the effect of ad libitum, isocalorically and hypocalorically restricted high-fat diet (HFD) feeding on reproductive function in diet-induced obese female rats. Material and methods Twenty female albino Sprague Dawley rats were used; 5 rats were kept on a standard pellet animal diet to serve as a control group (A) and 15 rats were fed a HFD for 9 weeks to induce obesity. The HFD fed animals were equally divided into three groups: an ad libitum HFD group (B), an isocalorically restricted HFD group (C), and a hypocalorically restricted HFD group (D). Estrous cyclicity, hormonal levels, ovarian histopathology and caspase-3 immunoreactivity were evaluated. Results The HFD-fed rats in groups B, C and D had significant irregularity in estrous cyclicity Vs group A (p = 0.001, 0.003 and 0.034 respectively). Groups C and D had significant reduction in serum progesterone level (p = 0.006 and 0.018 Vs A). Isocaloric restriction of HFD feeding significantly increased serum LH. Groups B and C had a significant increase in caspase-3 expression in the ovary (p < 0.001). Conclusions Ad libitum HFD interfered with the normal estrous cycle and enhanced apoptosis of luteal cells in obese female rats. The HFD restriction interfered with the normal estrous cycle and caused functional insufficiency of the corpus luteum in obese female rats. These results suggest that HFD feeding determinately affects female reproductive function independently of caloric intake. PMID:27478474

  1. Shortening treatment time in robotic radiosurgery using a novel node reduction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Water, Steven van de; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The fraction duration of robotic radiosurgery treatments can be reduced by generating more time-efficient treatment plans with a reduced number of node positions, beams, and monitor units (MUs). Node positions are preprogramed locations where the robot can position the focal spot of the x-ray beam. As the time needed for the robot to travel between node positions takes up a large part of the treatment time, the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a node reduction technique in order to reduce the treatment time per fraction for robotic radiosurgery. Methods: Node reduction was integrated into the inverse planning algorithm, developed in-house for the robotic radiosurgery modality. It involved repeated inverse optimization, each iteration excluding low-contribution node positions from the planning and resampling new candidate beams from the remaining node positions. Node reduction was performed until the exclusion of a single node position caused a constraint violation, after which the shortest treatment plan was selected retrospectively. Treatment plans were generated with and without node reduction for two lung cases of different complexity, one oropharyngeal case and one prostate case. Plan quality was assessed using the number of node positions, beams and MUs, and the estimated treatment time per fraction. All treatment plans had to fulfill all clinical dose constraints. Extra constraints were added to maintain the low-dose conformality and restrict skin doses during node reduction. Results: Node reduction resulted in 12 residual node positions, on average (reduction by 77%), at the cost of an increase in the number of beams and total MUs of 28% and 9%, respectively. Overall fraction durations (excluding patient setup) were shortened by 25% (range of 18%-40%), on average. Dose distributions changed only little and dose in low-dose regions was effectively restricted by the additional constraints. Conclusions: The fraction duration of robotic

  2. Chronic food restriction in young rats results in depression- and anxiety-like behaviors with decreased expression of serotonin reuptake transporter.

    PubMed

    Jahng, Jeong Won; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Bom-Taeck; Kang, Dong-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2007-05-30

    Evidence of semi-starvation is commonly found in patients with eating disorders. This study was conducted to examine the adverse effects of chronic caloric restriction in young rats, since there have been increasing incidence of eating disorders especially among young populations. Food restriction group was supplied daily with 50% of chow consumed by its ad libitum fed control group from postnatal day 28. After 5 weeks of food restriction, brain contents of serotonin (5-hydroxy-tryptamine; 5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindol acetic acid were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and mRNA expression of 5-HT reuptake transporter (5-HTT) by in situ hybridization. Plasma corticosterone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Behavioral assessments were performed with Porsolt swim test for depressive behavior and with elevated plus maze test for anxiety. Five weeks of food restriction markedly increased plasma level of corticosterone, and significantly decreased 5-HT turnover rates in the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. 5-HTT mRNA expression decreased in the raphe nucleus of food restricted rats compared with free fed controls. Immobility time during the swim test increased in the food restricted group, compared to the control group. Food restricted rats spent more time in the closed arms, less time in the open arms, of elevated plus maze compared with control rats. These results suggest that chronic caloric restriction in young rats may lead to the development of depressive and/or anxiety disorders, likely, in relation with dysfunction of brain 5-HT system.

  3. MTOR signaling and ubiquitin-proteosome gene expression in the preservation of fat free mass following high protein, calorie restricted weight loss

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Caloric restriction is one of the most efficient ways to promote weight loss and is known to activate protective metabolic pathways. Frequently reported with weight loss is the undesirable consequence of fat free (lean muscle) mass loss. Weight loss diets with increased dietary protein intake are popular and may provide additional benefits through preservation of fat free mass compared to a standard protein, high carbohydrate diet. However, the precise mechanism by which a high protein diet may mitigate dietary weight loss induced reductions in fat free mass has not been fully elucidated. Maintenance of fat free mass is dependent upon nutrient stimulation of protein synthesis via the mTOR complex, although during caloric restriction a decrease (atrophy) in skeletal muscle may be driven by a homeostatic shift favouring protein catabolism. This review evaluates the relationship between the macronutrient composition of calorie restricted diets and weight loss using metabolic indicators. Specifically we evaluate the effect of increased dietary protein intake and caloric restricted diets on gene expression in skeletal muscle, particularly focusing on biosynthesis, degradation and the expression of genes in the ubiquitin-proteosome (UPP) and mTOR signaling pathways, including MuRF-1, MAFbx/atrogin-1, mTORC1, and S6K1. PMID:22974011

  4. Perioperative Fluid Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Bleier, Joshua I.S.; Aarons, Cary B.

    2013-01-01

    Perioperative fluid management of the colorectal surgical patient has evolved significantly over the last five decades. Older notions espousing aggressive hydration have been shown to be associated with increased complications. Newer data regarding fluid restriction has shown an association with improved outcomes. Management of perioperative fluid administration can be considered in three primary phases: In the preoperative phase, data suggests that avoidance of preoperative bowel preparation and avoidance of undue preoperative dehydration can improve outcomes. Although the type of intraoperative fluid given does not have a significant effect on outcome, data do suggest that a restrictive fluid regimen results in improved outcomes. Finally, in the postoperative phase of fluid management, a fluid-restrictive regimen, coupled with early enteral feeding also seems to result in improved outcomes. PMID:24436675

  5. The low-methionine content of vegan diets may make methionine restriction feasible as a life extension strategy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies confirm that dietary methionine restriction increases both mean and maximal lifespan in rats and mice, achieving "aging retardant" effects very similar to those of caloric restriction, including a suppression of mitochondrial superoxide generation. Although voluntary caloric restriction is never likely to gain much popularity as a pro-longevity strategy for humans, it may be more feasible to achieve moderate methionine restriction, in light of the fact that vegan diets tend to be relatively low in this amino acid. Plant proteins - especially those derived from legumes or nuts - tend to be lower in methionine than animal proteins. Furthermore, the total protein content of vegan diets, as a function of calorie content, tends to be lower than that of omnivore diets, and plant protein has somewhat lower bioavailability than animal protein. Whole-food vegan diets that moderate bean and soy intake, while including ample amounts of fruit and wine or beer, can be quite low in methionine, while supplying abundant nutrition for health (assuming concurrent B12 supplementation). Furthermore, low-fat vegan diets, coupled with exercise training, can be expected to promote longevity by decreasing systemic levels of insulin and free IGF-I; the latter effect would be amplified by methionine restriction - though it is not clear whether IGF-I down-regulation is the sole basis for the impact of low-methionine diets on longevity in rodents.

  6. Utilization of zero-trans non-interesterified and interesterified shortenings in cookie production.

    PubMed

    Dinç, Saliha; Javidipour, Issa; Ozbas, Ozen Özboy; Tekin, Aziz

    2014-02-01

    The effects of zero-trans chemically interesterified (in-es) and non-interesterified (non-in-es) cottonseed (CO), hazelnut (HO) and olive oil (OO) and their blends (25, 50 and 75%) with palm oil (PO) were studied in the production of cookies. All the experimental shortenings had zero-trans fatty acids (TFA) while the shortening contained 14.20% TFA. Incorporation of CO in PO considerably increased the linoleic acid content whereas the raising of HO and OO ratio in the blend increased the oleic acid content. Zero-TFA and lower saturated /unsaturated fatty acid ratio (SFA/UFA) of some of the experimental shortenings indicated an important in nutritional properties of cookies produced from these experimental shortenings. Cookies with in-es shortenings showed significantly higher (p < 0.05) spread ratios and L Hunter color than their non-in-es shortenings added counterparts. It can be concluded that chemical interesterification is a promising method to produce cookie shortenings with zero-TFA.

  7. Effects of muscle fibre shortening on the characteristics of surface motor unit potentials.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Place, Nicolas

    2014-02-01

    Traditionally, studies dealing with muscle shortening have concentrated on assessing its impact on conduction velocity, and to this end, electrodes have been located between the end-plate and tendon regions. Possible morphologic changes in surface motor unit potentials (MUPs) as a result of muscle shortening have not, as yet, been evaluated or characterized. Using a convolutional MUP model, we investigated the effects of muscle shortening on the shape, amplitude, and duration characteristics of MUPs for different electrode positions relative to the fibre-tendon junction and for different depths of the MU in the muscle (MU-to-electrode distance). It was found that the effects of muscle shortening on MUP morphology depended not only on whether the electrodes were between the end-plate and the tendon junction or beyond the tendon junction, but also on the specific distance to this junction. When the electrodes lie between the end-plate and tendon junction, it was found that (1) the muscle shortening effect is not important for superficial MUs, (2) the sensitivity of MUP amplitude to muscle shortening increases with MU-to-electrode distance, and (3) the amplitude of the MUP negative phase is not affected by muscle shortening. This study provides a basis for the interpretation of the changes in MUP characteristics in experiments where both physiological and geometrical aspects of the muscle are varied.

  8. Multiple causes of fatigue during shortening contractions in rat slow twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hortemo, Kristin Halvorsen; Munkvik, Morten; Lunde, Per Kristian; Sejersted, Ole M

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue in muscles that shorten might have other causes than fatigue during isometric contractions, since both cross-bridge cycling and energy demand are different in the two exercise modes. While isometric contractions are extensively studied, the causes of fatigue in shortening contractions are poorly mapped. Here, we investigate fatigue mechanisms during shortening contractions in slow twitch skeletal muscle in near physiological conditions. Fatigue was induced in rat soleus muscles with maintained blood supply by in situ shortening contractions at 37°C. Muscles were stimulated repeatedly (1 s on/off at 30 Hz) for 15 min against a constant load, allowing the muscle to shorten and perform work. Fatigue and subsequent recovery was examined at 20 s, 100 s and 15 min exercise. The effects of prior exercise were investigated in a second exercise bout. Fatigue developed in three distinct phases. During the first 20 s the regulatory protein Myosin Light Chain-2 (slow isoform, MLC-2s) was rapidly dephosphorylated in parallel with reduced rate of force development and reduced shortening. In the second phase there was degradation of high-energy phosphates and accumulation of lactate, and these changes were related to slowing of muscle relengthening and relaxation, culminating at 100 s exercise. Slowing of relaxation was also associated with increased leak of calcium from the SR. During the third phase of exercise there was restoration of high-energy phosphates and elimination of lactate, and the slowing of relaxation disappeared, whereas dephosphorylation of MLC-2s and reduced shortening prevailed. Prior exercise improved relaxation parameters in a subsequent exercise bout, and we propose that this effect is a result of less accumulation of lactate due to more rapid onset of oxidative metabolism. The correlation between dephosphorylation of MLC-2s and reduced shortening was confirmed in various experimental settings, and we suggest MLC-2s as an important regulator of

  9. Self-Shortening Dynamics Measured along a Femtosecond Laser Filament in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Odhner, J. H.; Levis, R. J.; Romanov, D. A.

    2010-09-17

    The filamentation-induced temporal shortening of a 40 femtosecond pulse propagating in air is traced using impulsive vibrational Raman scattering and measurement of the power spectrum as a function of position along the propagation axis. The N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O vibrational Raman responses reveal self-shortening of pulse features to 14 fs during the first filamentation cycle and to at least 9 fs in the second cycle. Spectral measurements further demonstrate that the coherent bandwidth generated in the region from 470 to 330 nm during the self-shortening process forms the {approx}9 fs pulse.

  10. Mechanism‐Based Modeling of Gastric Emptying Rate and Gallbladder Emptying in Response to Caloric Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sonne, DP; Hansen, M; Bagger, JI; Lund, A; Rehfeld, JF; Alskär, O; Karlsson, MO; Vilsbøll, T; Knop, FK; Bergstrand, M

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids released postprandially modify the rate and extent of absorption of lipophilic compounds. The present study aimed to predict gastric emptying (GE) rate and gallbladder emptying (GBE) patterns in response to caloric intake. A mechanism‐based model for GE, cholecystokinin plasma concentrations, and GBE was developed on data from 33 patients with type 2 diabetes and 33 matched nondiabetic individuals who were administered various test drinks. A feedback action of the caloric content entering the proximal small intestine was identified for the rate of GE. The cholecystokinin concentrations were not predictive of GBE, and an alternative model linking the nutrients amount in the upper intestine to GBE was preferred. Relative to fats, the potency on GBE was 68% for proteins and 2.3% for carbohydrates. The model predictions were robust across a broad range of nutritional content and may potentially be used to predict postprandial changes in drug absorption. PMID:28028939

  11. Non-caloric artificial sweeteners and the microbiome: findings and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2015-01-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are common food supplements consumed by millions worldwide as means of combating weight gain and diabetes, by retaining sweet taste without increasing caloric intake. While they are considered safe, there is increasing controversy regarding their potential ability to promote metabolic derangements in some humans. We recently demonstrated that NAS consumption could induce glucose intolerance in mice and distinct human subsets, by functionally altering the gut microbiome. In this commentary, we discuss these findings in the context of previous and recent works demonstrating the effects of NAS on host health and the microbiome, and the challenges and open questions that need to be addressed in understanding the effects of NAS consumption on human health. PMID:25831243

  12. Parental attachment insecurity predicts child and adult high-caloric food consumption.

    PubMed

    Faber, Aida; Dubé, Laurette

    2015-05-01

    Eating habits are established early and are difficult to change once formed. This study investigated the role of caregiver-child attachment quality and its associations with high-caloric food consumption in a sample of middle socio-economic status children and adults, respectively. Survey data were collected from an online questionnaire administered separately to 213 (143 girls) children and 216 parents (adult sample; 180 women). Two studies showed that an insecure parental attachment, whether actual (Study 1; children) or recalled (Study 2; adults), significantly and positively predicted high-caloric food consumption in both samples. The present findings highlight the importance of parental attachment and its association with unhealthy eating patterns in children and adults.

  13. Influence of meal weight and caloric content on gastric emptying of meals in man

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.G.; Christian, P.E.; Brown, J.A.; Brophy, C.; Datz, F.; Taylor, A.; Alazraki, N.

    1984-06-01

    This study was designed to assess the relative influence of meal weight and caloric content on gastric emptying of liquid and solid meals in man. A dual radioisotopic method which permits noninvasive and simultaneous measurement of liquid- and solid-phase emptying by external gamma camera techniques was employed. Nine healthy volunteer subjects ingested 50-, 300-, and 900-g lettuce and water meals adjusted to either 68, 208, or 633 kcal with added salad oil. The following observations were made: (1) absolute emptying rates (grams of solid food emptied from the stomach per minute) increased directly and significantly with meal weight; (2) increasing meal total caloric content significantly slowed solid food gastric emptying but did not overcome the enhancing effect of meal weight; and (3) liquid emptying rates were uninfluenced by meal total kcal amount.

  14. (Magneto)caloric refrigeration: is there light at the end of the tunnel?

    PubMed

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K; Cui, Jun; Johnson, Duane D

    2016-08-13

    Caloric cooling and heat pumping rely on reversible thermal effects triggered in solids by magnetic, electric or stress fields. In the recent past, there have been several successful demonstrations of using first-order phase transition materials in laboratory cooling devices based on both the giant magnetocaloric and elastocaloric effects. All such materials exhibit non-equilibrium behaviours when driven through phase transformations by corresponding fields. Common wisdom is that non-equilibrium states should be avoided; yet, as we show using a model material exhibiting a giant magnetocaloric effect, non-equilibrium phase-separated states offer a unique opportunity to achieve uncommonly large caloric effects by very small perturbations of the driving field(s).This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'.

  15. Non-caloric artificial sweeteners and the microbiome: findings and challenges.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2015-01-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are common food supplements consumed by millions worldwide as means of combating weight gain and diabetes, by retaining sweet taste without increasing caloric intake. While they are considered safe, there is increasing controversy regarding their potential ability to promote metabolic derangements in some humans. We recently demonstrated that NAS consumption could induce glucose intolerance in mice and distinct human subsets, by functionally altering the gut microbiome. In this commentary, we discuss these findings in the context of previous and recent works demonstrating the effects of NAS on host health and the microbiome, and the challenges and open questions that need to be addressed in understanding the effects of NAS consumption on human health.

  16. (Magneto)caloric refrigeration: Is there light at the end of the tunnel?

    SciTech Connect

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Cui, Jun; Johnson, Duane D.

    2016-07-11

    Here, caloric cooling and heat pumping rely on reversible thermal effects triggered in solids by magnetic, electric or stress fields. In the recent past, there have been several successful demonstrations of using first-order phase transition materials in laboratory cooling devices based on both the giant magnetocaloric and elastocaloric effects. All such materials exhibit non-equilibrium behaviours when driven through phase transformations by corresponding fields. Common wisdom is that non-equilibrium states should be avoided; yet, as we show using a model material exhibiting a giant magnetocaloric effect, non-equilibrium phase-separated states offer a unique opportunity to achieve uncommonly large caloric effects by very small perturbations of the driving field(s).

  17. (Magneto)caloric refrigeration: Is there light at the end of the tunnel?

    DOE PAGES

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Cui, Jun; Johnson, Duane D.

    2016-07-11

    Here, caloric cooling and heat pumping rely on reversible thermal effects triggered in solids by magnetic, electric or stress fields. In the recent past, there have been several successful demonstrations of using first-order phase transition materials in laboratory cooling devices based on both the giant magnetocaloric and elastocaloric effects. All such materials exhibit non-equilibrium behaviours when driven through phase transformations by corresponding fields. Common wisdom is that non-equilibrium states should be avoided; yet, as we show using a model material exhibiting a giant magnetocaloric effect, non-equilibrium phase-separated states offer a unique opportunity to achieve uncommonly large caloric effects by verymore » small perturbations of the driving field(s).« less

  18. Restricting Grammatical Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Theories of natural language syntax often characterize grammatical knowledge as a form of abstract computation. This paper argues that such a characterization is correct, and that fundamental properties of grammar can and should be understood in terms of restrictions on the complexity of possible grammatical computation, when defined in terms of…

  19. Calorie restriction and stroke

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Stroke, a major cause of disability and mortality in the elderly, occurs when a cerebral blood vessel is occluded or ruptured, resulting in ischemic damage and death of brain cells. The injury mechanism involves metabolic and oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis and inflammatory processes, including activation of glial cells and infiltration of leukocytes. In animal models, dietary energy restriction, by daily calorie reduction (CR) or intermittent fasting (IF), extends lifespan and decreases the development of age-related diseases. Dietary energy restriction may also benefit neurons, as suggested by experimental evidence showing that CR and IF protect neurons against degeneration in animal models. Recent findings by our group and others suggest the possibility that dietary energy restriction may protect against stroke induced brain injury, in part by inducing the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF); protein chaperones, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78); antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases (SOD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1), uncoupling proteins and anti-inflammatory cytokines. This article discusses the protective mechanisms activated by dietary energy restriction in ischemic stroke. PMID:21910904

  20. A Snack-based Ration Containing Caffeine Increases Caloric Intake and Improves Cognitive Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Natick, MA 01760·5007 Figure 1 2 3 4 1 Study Schedule Dietary Intake LIST OF FIGURES Reaction time and minor lapses measured by PVT... dietary intakes during military exercises. In: Marriot 8M, ed . Not Eating Enough. Washington , DC: National Academy Press; 1995:121-49. Banderet LE...RATION CONTAINING CAFFEINE INCREASES CALORIC INTAKE AND IMPROVES COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE Approved for Public Release; Distribution Is Unlimited United

  1. The minimal caloric test asymmetric response in vertigo-free migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Eliana Teixeira; Maranhão Filho, Péricles; Vincent, Maurice Borges; Luiz, Ronir Raggio

    2016-02-01

    Vertigo symptoms and subclinical vestibular dysfunctions may occur in migraine. The Minimal Caloric Test (MCT), an easy-to-perform, convenient and yet informative procedure was used to test the vestibular function in 30 vertigo-free migraine patients outside attacks and 30 paired controls. Although not statistically significant, a right-to-left nystagmus duration asymmetry greater than 25% was present in both groups. This difference was greater in the patients group, suggesting the presence of subclinical vestibular imbalance in migraine.

  2. Caloric content of Chukchi Sea benthic invertebrates: Modeling spatial and environmental variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilt, Lisa M.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Miller, Thomas J.; Cooper, Lee W.

    2014-04-01

    The Chukchi Sea shelf off the northern coast of Alaska is rich with infauna and epibenthic macroinvertebrates used by foraging Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and other benthic-feeding consumers. Recent seasonal sea-ice retreat on the Chukchi Sea shelf has resulted in walrus hauling out in late summer on beaches of the Chukchi Sea in Russia and Alaska rather than on sea ice. Additional energetic costs may be imposed upon walruses traveling from these haul-outs to more productive foraging areas. Here, we provide an energetic assessment of prey items that could be relevant to the foraging energetics of walruses in haul-out locations. Caloric values for 171 potential walrus prey items (comprising 11 classes of benthic fauna) were obtained over 15 southeastern Chukchi Sea stations in 2010. There were statistically significant relationships between caloric content and increasing latitude (R=0.661) and bottom temperature (R=-0.560). Linear modeling indicated that taxon and latitude were the most important explanatory variables for caloric content in the study area, whereas a second model with taxon dependencies removed returned significant coefficients for the explanatory variables of latitude, depth, bottom water temperature, and sediment total organic carbon and nitrogen. K-means cluster analysis identified 6 clusters based mainly upon environmental variables such as bottom temperature, bottom salinity, and other water-column and sediment parameters that explained 86% of the variation in the data. The finding that caloric content varies strongly with latitude, which is a proxy for both water-mass type and associated water-mass productivity in the study area, may have implications for Pacific walrus, whose historical foraging patterns well offshore on sea ice have been disrupted by sea-ice decline.

  3. Perovskite-like fluorides and oxyfluorides: Phase transitions and caloric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flerov, I. N.; Gorev, M. V.; Tressaud, A.; Laptash, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of the effect that chemical and hydrostatic pressures have on the thermodynamic properties of perovskite-like fluorine-oxygen compounds A 2 A' MeO x F6 - x has revealed that materials under-going order-disorder transitions and having significant external-pressure compliance have the highest caloric efficiency. Some of the fluorides and oxyfluorides under study can be considered promising solid coolants.

  4. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients. PMID:27746761

  5. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests.

    PubMed

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  6. Normal physical activity obliterates the deleterious effects of a high-caloric intake.

    PubMed

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Pedersen, Maria; Solomon, Thomas P J; Knudsen, Sine Haugaard; Hansen, Louise Seier; Karstoft, Kristian; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Pedersen, Karin Kaereby; Thomsen, Carsten; Holst, Jens Juul; Pedersen, Bente K

    2014-02-01

    A high-caloric intake combined with a sedentary lifestyle is an important player in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study was undertaken to examine if the level of physical activity has impact on the metabolic effects of a high-caloric (+2,000 kcal/day) intake. Therefore, healthy individuals on a high-caloric intake were randomized to either 10,000 or 1,500 steps/day for 14 days. Step number, total energy expenditure, dietary records, neuropsychological tests, maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max), whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) with stable isotopes were performed before and after the intervention. Both study groups gained the same amount of body weight. However, the inactive group accumulated significantly more visceral fat compared with the active group. Following the 2-wk period, the inactive group also experienced a poorer glycemic control, increased endogenous glucose production, decreased hepatic insulin extraction, increased baseline plasma levels of total cholesterol and LDL, and a decreased cognitive function with regard to capacity of attention. In conclusion, we find evidence to support that habitual physical activity may prevent pathophysiological symptoms associated with diet-induced obesity.

  7. Subjective Visual Vertical during Caloric Stimulation in Healthy Subjects: Implications to Research and Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Funabashi, Martha; Flores, Aline I.; Vicentino, Amanda; Barros, Camila G. C.; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M.; Leite, João P.; Santos-Pontelli, Taiza E. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The subjective visual vertical (SVV) is a perception often impaired in patients with neurologic disorders and is considered a sensitive tool to detect otolithic dysfunctions. However, it remains unclear whether the semicircular canals (SCCs) are also involved in the visual vertical perception. Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of horizontal SCCs on SVV by caloric stimulation in healthy subjects. Methods. SVV was performed before and during the ice-cold caloric stimulation (4°C, right ear) in 30 healthy subjects. Results. The mean SVV tilts before and during the caloric stimulation were 0.31° ± 0.39 and −0.28° ± 0.40, respectively. There was no significant difference between the mean SVV tilts before and during stimulation (p = 0.113). Conclusion. These results suggest that horizontal SCCs do not influence SVV. Therefore, investigations and rehabilitation approaches for SVV misperceptions should be focused on otolithic and cognitive strategies. PMID:26161271

  8. Fluid-structural dynamics of ground-based and microgravity caloric tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Oas, J. G.; Deserranno, Dimitri

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity caloric tests aboard the 1983 SpaceLab1 mission produced nystagmus results with an intensity comparable to those elicited during post- and pre- flight tests, thus contradicting the basic premise of Barany's convection hypothesis for caloric stimulation. In this work, we present a dynamic fluid structural analysis of the caloric stimulation of the lateral semicircular canal based on two simultaneous driving forces for the endolymphatic flow: natural convection driven by the temperature-dependent density variation in the bulk fluid and expansive convection caused by direct volumetric displacement of the endolymph during the thermal irrigation. Direct numerical simulations indicate that on earth, the natural convection mechanism is dominant. But in the microgravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, where buoyancy effects are mitigated, expansive convection becomes the sole mechanism for producing cupular displacement. A series of transient 1 g and microgravity case studies are presented to delineate the differences between the dynamics of the 1 g and microgravity endolymphatic flows. The impact of these different flow dynamics on the endolymph-cupula fluid-structural interactions is also analyzed based on the time evolutions of cupular displacement and velocity and the transcupular pressure differences.

  9. CALOR2012 XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Akchurin, Nural .

    2015-05-04

    The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, or the CALOR series, have always been where the calorimeter experts come together to review the state of calorimetry and bring forth new ideas every two years. The fteenth conference, CALOR2012, in Santa Fe was no exception. Although they were built roughly a decade ago, we are now witnessing the exceptional power of the LHC calorimeters and the crucial role they have been playing in the discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs-like boson. As we ruminate on the coming generation of experiments at the next (linear) collider and on the upgrades at the LHC, we are heartened by the substantial advances we made in calorimetry in the last decade. These advances will certainly help uncover new physics in the years to come, not only at colliders but also in astroparticle experiments that take advantage of natural elements such as air, water, and ice. The proceedings were published by the IOP in Journal of Physics, Vol 404 2011. The conference web site is calor2012.ttu.edu.

  10. Heavy metal content in sediments along the Calore river: relationships with physical-chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, G; Papa, S; Sagnella, E; Fioretto, A

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, trace metals contents (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) and physico-chemical parameters (nitrogen, organic and inorganic carbon, pH and particle size) in sediments samples along the Calore river were analyzed in two seasons. Sediment samples were collected in ten sites upstream and downstream of the city of Benevento and its industrial area, the confluence of Sabato and Tammaro tributaries, and the confluence of Calore and Volturno rivers. The highest contents of trace metals were found, generally, in the sites immediately downstream of industrial area and of Benevento city. The sites on the Tammaro and Sabato also showed relatively high contents of Ni and, only for Sabato sites, of Cr, and Fe. With the exception of Cd, the heavy metal contents were highest in the last site of Calore river, which therefore is a source of pollution to the Volturno river. Besides the sites downstream of Benevento city showed the higher pH values and also the highest contents of fine particles size and organic matter. Positive correlations among trace metals, organic substance, particle size sediments were found. The data obtained in this study were analyzed with reference to Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines and indicated moderate-to-high pollution by some trace metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu).

  11. Economic management of vertigo/dizziness disease in a county hospital: video-head-impulse test vs. caloric irrigation.

    PubMed

    Rambold, Holger A

    2015-10-01

    The video-head-impulse test (vHIT) is an important test for examining unilateral vestibular hypofunction. Alternatively, one can test for vestibular hypofunction with the caloric irrigation test. Various studies have shown that both tests may not always identify vestibular hypofunction; instead, the results of the tests might be contradictory. This retrospective study reproduces those finding in a much larger group of patients at a county hospital. 1063 patients were examined with the vHIT and bithermal caloric irrigation on the same day and analyzed with respect to side differences. Of those patients 13.3% had pathological vHIT and a caloric irrigation test, 4.6% a pathological vHIT only and 24.1% a pathologic caloric test only. As both tests might be necessary, we calculated the optimal sequence of the two examinations based on savings in time for the different disease groups. Especially in vestibular failure using the vHIT first and only applying the caloric irrigation in case of an unremarkable vHIT saves time and optimizes the diagnostic work up. In contrast, in Menière's disease and vestibular migraine testing caloric irrigation first might be more efficient.

  12. Saccharin and aspartame, compared with sucrose, induce greater weight gain in adult Wistar rats, at similar total caloric intake levels.

    PubMed

    Feijó, Fernanda de Matos; Ballard, Cíntia Reis; Foletto, Kelly Carraro; Batista, Bruna Aparecida Melo; Neves, Alice Magagnin; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques; Bertoluci, Marcello Casaccia

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the use of nonnutritive sweeteners (NNSs) can lead to weight gain, but evidence regarding their real effect in body weight and satiety is still inconclusive. Using a rat model, the present study compares the effect of saccharin and aspartame to sucrose in body weight gain and in caloric intake. Twenty-nine male Wistar rats received plain yogurt sweetened with 20% sucrose, 0.3% sodium saccharin or 0.4% aspartame, in addition to chow and water ad libitum, while physical activity was restrained. Measurements of cumulative body weight gain, total caloric intake, caloric intake of chow and caloric intake of sweetened yogurt were performed weekly for 12 weeks. Results showed that addition of either saccharin or aspartame to yogurt resulted in increased weight gain compared to addition of sucrose, however total caloric intake was similar among groups. In conclusion, greater weight gain was promoted by the use of saccharin or aspartame, compared with sucrose, and this weight gain was unrelated to caloric intake. We speculate that a decrease in energy expenditure or increase in fluid retention might be involved.

  13. Telomere shortening in diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscles of aged mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Lund, Troy C; Grange, Robert W; Lowe, Dawn A

    2007-09-01

    The progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is, in part, due to satellite cell senescence driven by high replicative pressure as these muscle stem cells repeatedly divide and fuse to damaged muscle fibers. We hypothesize that telomere shortening in satellite cells underlies their senescence. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the diaphragm and a leg muscle from dystrophic mice of various ages for telomere dynamics. We found 30% telomere shortening in tibialis anterior muscles from 600-day-old mdx mice relative to age-matched wildtype mice. We also found a more severe shortening of telomere length in diaphragm muscles of old mdx mice. In those muscles, telomeres were shortened by approximately 15% and 40% in 100- and 600-day-old mdx mice, respectively. These findings indicate that satellite cells undergo telomere erosion, which may contribute to the inability of these cells to perpetually repair DMD muscle.

  14. Partitioning of crustal shortening during continental collision: 2-D thermomechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie; Gerya, Taras

    2017-01-01

    Partitioning of crustal shortening between the colliding continental plates is highly variable in nature. Physical controls of such variability remain largely enigmatic and require quantitative understanding. In this study, we employ 2-D thermomechanical numerical modeling to investigate the influence of the rheological properties of the continental crust on the dynamics and distribution of crustal shortening during continental collision. Three major physical parameters, (i) the mechanical strength of the upper crust, (ii) the Moho temperature, and (iii) the convergence rate, are investigated, and their influences on crustal shortening partitioning between the lower and upper plates are systematically documented. Numerical modeling results suggest that a strong upper crust of the lower plate, high Moho temperature, and slow convergence rate favor migration of crustal shortening from the lower to the upper plate. Our numerical modeling results compare well with natural observations from the Alpine orogenic system where variable partitioning of crustal deformation between the plates is documented.

  15. Femoral shortening in correction of congenital knee flexion deformity with popliteal webbing.

    PubMed

    Saleh, M; Gibson, M F; Sharrard, W J

    1989-01-01

    Severe knee flexion deformity with popliteal webbing or pterygium is considered to be uncorrectable. The soft tissues and, in particular, the main nerves and vessels are short relative to the bone. Femoral shortening was used in correction of such a deformity in a child with arthrogryposis. The operative procedure is described. Femoral shortening should be considered as an aid to correction of any severe knee flexion deformity.

  16. Shortening and Thickening of Metropolitan Los Angeles Measured and Inferred Using Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, D.; Heflin, M.; Donnellan, A.; Webb, F.; Dong, D.; Hurst, K.; Jefferson, D.; Lyzenga, G.; Watkins, M.; Zumberge, J.

    1999-01-01

    Geodetic measurements using the Global Positioning System and other techniques show north-south shortening near Los Angeles to be fastest across the northern part of the metropolitan area, where an ESE-striking, 5- to 40-km-wide belt lying to the south of San Gabriel Mountains and to the north of downtown and West Los Angeles is shortening at 5 mm/yr.

  17. Attempts to Shorten the Time of Lactic Fermentation by Ultrasonic Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Ohdaira, Etsuzo

    2002-05-01

    In recent years, applications of ultrasound to food processing have been of interest. Fermentation is a typical example of food processing which has been used, since ancient times, on milk and is utilized for processing various dairy products, e.g., yoghurt. In this study, ultrasonic irradiation to shorten the time of fermentation in yoghurt production is attempted. It is proven that shortening the fermentation time is possible by employing ultrasonic irradiation.

  18. Effects of fiber type on force depression after active shortening in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Joumaa, V; Power, G A; Hisey, B; Caicedo, A; Stutz, J; Herzog, W

    2015-07-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate force depression in Type I and Type II muscle fibers. Experiments were performed using skinned fibers from rabbit soleus and psoas muscles. Force depression was quantified after active fiber shortening from an average sarcomere length (SL) of 3.2µ m to an average SL of 2.6 µm at an absolute speed of 0.115f iber length/s and at a relative speed corresponding to 17% of the unloaded shortening velocity (V0) in each type of fibers. Force decay and mechanical work during shortening were also compared between fiber types. After mechanical testing, each fiber was subjected to myosin heavy chain (MHC) analysis in order to confirm its type (Type I expressing MHC I, and Type II expressing MHC IId). Type II fibers showed greater steady-state force depression after active shortening at a speed of 0.115 fiber length/s than Type I fibers (14.5±1.5% versus 7.8±1.7%). Moreover, at this absolute shortening speed, Type I fibers showed a significantly greater rate of force decay during shortening and produced less mechanical work than Type II fibers. When active shortening was performed at the same relative speed (17% V0), the difference in force depression between fiber types was abolished. These results suggest that no intrinsic differences were at the origin of the disparate force depressions observed in Type I and Type II fibers when actively shortened at the same absolute speed, but rather their distinct force-velocity relationships.

  19. Caloric Beverages Were Major Sources of Energy among Children and Adults in Mexico, 1999–2012123

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Dalia; Piernas, Carmen; Barquera, Simon; Rivera, Juan A.; Popkin, Barry M.

    2014-01-01

    Mexico, with 1 of the highest obesity prevalences in the world, instituted a 10% excise tax for any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) starting on 1 January 2014. Understanding the recent patterns and trends in beverage intake and sales in Mexico provides both background and baseline data for the importance of SSBs and other beverages in the Mexican diet. We analyzed a single 24-h dietary recall from 2 nationally representative surveys: the Mexican Nutrition Survey 1999 (n = 6049) and the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012 (n = 10,343). To describe trends and patterns in beverages, we calculated the volume and energy intake per capita and per consumer and the proportion of consumers of each beverage group in each survey. A commercial sales dataset was used to describe beverage sales trends from 1999 to 2012. From 1999 to 2012, total daily energy from beverages increased among children aged 5–11 y (+45.3 kcal), females aged 12–19 y (+57.3 kcal), and adult females aged 20–49 y (+96.4 kcal) (P < 0.05). Over the same period, intake of beverages with added sugars increased, specifically flavored milk, agua fresca (fruit water made in stalls or at home, usually with added sugars), and fruit drinks among children aged 5–11 y and females aged 12–19 y and caloric coffee/tea, soda, and agua fresca among adult females aged 20–49 y. In 2012, beverages represented 17.5% (325 kcal) and 19.0% (382 kcal) of the total daily energy intake per capita in children aged 1–19 y and adults aged ≥20 y, respectively. In 2012, flavored milk beverages, caloric soda, and high-fat milk were the top 3 major contributors to total daily energy intake per capita in all children aged 1–19 y. Caloric soda, caloric coffee/tea, and agua fresca were the top 3 major energy contributors in adults aged ≥20 y. From 1999 to 2012, sales of soda, fruit-flavored drinks, and flavored waters increased. In conclusion, consumption of several beverages with added sugars increased among

  20. Caloric beverages were major sources of energy among children and adults in Mexico, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Stern, Dalia; Piernas, Carmen; Barquera, Simon; Rivera, Juan A; Popkin, Barry M

    2014-06-01

    Mexico, with 1 of the highest obesity prevalences in the world, instituted a 10% excise tax for any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) starting on 1 January 2014. Understanding the recent patterns and trends in beverage intake and sales in Mexico provides both background and baseline data for the importance of SSBs and other beverages in the Mexican diet. We analyzed a single 24-h dietary recall from 2 nationally representative surveys: the Mexican Nutrition Survey 1999 (n = 6049) and the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012 (n = 10,343). To describe trends and patterns in beverages, we calculated the volume and energy intake per capita and per consumer and the proportion of consumers of each beverage group in each survey. A commercial sales dataset was used to describe beverage sales trends from 1999 to 2012. From 1999 to 2012, total daily energy from beverages increased among children aged 5-11 y (+45.3 kcal), females aged 12-19 y (+57.3 kcal), and adult females aged 20-49 y (+96.4 kcal) (P < 0.05). Over the same period, intake of beverages with added sugars increased, specifically flavored milk, agua fresca (fruit water made in stalls or at home, usually with added sugars), and fruit drinks among children aged 5-11 y and females aged 12-19 y and caloric coffee/tea, soda, and agua fresca among adult females aged 20-49 y. In 2012, beverages represented 17.5% (325 kcal) and 19.0% (382 kcal) of the total daily energy intake per capita in children aged 1-19 y and adults aged ≥20 y, respectively. In 2012, flavored milk beverages, caloric soda, and high-fat milk were the top 3 major contributors to total daily energy intake per capita in all children aged 1-19 y. Caloric soda, caloric coffee/tea, and agua fresca were the top 3 major energy contributors in adults aged ≥20 y. From 1999 to 2012, sales of soda, fruit-flavored drinks, and flavored waters increased. In conclusion, consumption of several beverages with added sugars increased among children and adult

  1. Frequencies of restriction sites.

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, M S

    1983-01-01

    Restriction sites or other sequence patterns are usually assumed to occur according to a Poisson distribution with mean equal to the reciprocal of the probability of the given site or pattern. For situations where non-overlapping occurrences of patterns, such as restriction sites, are the objects of interest, this note shows that the Poisson assumption is frequently misleading. Both the case of base composition (independent bases) and of dinucleotide frequencies (Markov chains) are treated. Moreover, a new technique is presented which allows treatment of collections of patterns, where the departure from the Poisson assumption is even more striking. This later case includes double digests, and an example of a five enzyme digest is included. PMID:6324109

  2. Co-contraction modifies the stretch reflex elicited in muscles shortened by a joint perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gwyn N.; MacKinnon, Colum D.; Trumbower, Randy; Perreault, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles acting about a joint influences joint stiffness and stability. Although several studies have shown that reflexes in the muscle lengthened by a joint perturbation are modulated during co-contraction, little attention has been given to reflex regulation in the antagonist (shortened) muscle. The goal of the present study was to determine whether co-contraction gives rise to altered reflex regulation across the joint by examining reflexes in the muscle shortened by a joint perturbation. Reflexes were recorded from electromyographic activity in elbow flexors and extensors while positional perturbations to the elbow joint were applied. Perturbations were delivered during isolated activation of the flexor or extensor muscles as well as during flexor and extensor co-contraction. Across the group, the shortening reflex in the elbow extensor switched from suppression during isolated extensor muscle activation to facilitation during co-contraction. The shortening reflex in the elbow flexor remained suppressive during co-contraction but was significantly smaller compared to the response obtained during isolated elbow flexor activation. This response in the shortened muscle was graded by the level of activation in the lengthened muscle. The lengthening reflex did not change during co-contraction. These results support the idea that reflexes are regulated across multiple muscles around a joint. We speculate that the facilitatory response in the shortened muscle arises through a fast-conducting oligosynaptic pathway involving Ib interneurons. PMID:20878148

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Radial Shortening Osteotomy and Vascularized Bone Graft in Kienböck's Disease.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Mohammad; Moshgelani, Mohammad Ali; Nouraei, Mohammad Hadi; Dehghani, Shaghayegh; Gholshahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two surgery methods including radial shortening and radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft for treatment of stage II or IIIa of Kienböck's disease. It is a randomized, controlled clinical trial, which was carried out in 2011-2013. Twenty-four patients were assigned equally to radial shortening group (A) or radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft group (B). The outcome was assessed by Mayo Wrist score before and 9 months after surgery. The mean Mayo Wrist score (SD) was 27.1 (15.4) and 32.5 (18.3) before surgery and 74.6 (5.4) and 85.8 (5.1) after surgery for groups A and B, respectively. The mean score increased in both groups, and it was higher in group B significantly. Radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft is a valuable method which can be more effective than radial shortening alone, in early stages of Kienböck's disease. This trial is registered with IRCT201404127841N5.

  4. Co-contraction modifies the stretch reflex elicited in muscles shortened by a joint perturbation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gwyn N; MacKinnon, Colum D; Trumbower, Randy; Perreault, Eric J

    2010-11-01

    Simultaneous contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles acting about a joint influences joint stiffness and stability. Although several studies have shown that reflexes in the muscle lengthened by a joint perturbation are modulated during co-contraction, little attention has been given to reflex regulation in the antagonist (shortened) muscle. The goal of the present study was to determine whether co-contraction gives rise to altered reflex regulation across the joint by examining reflexes in the muscle shortened by a joint perturbation. Reflexes were recorded from electromyographic activity in elbow flexors and extensors while positional perturbations to the elbow joint were applied. Perturbations were delivered during isolated activation of the flexor or extensor muscles as well as during flexor and extensor co-contraction. Across the group, the shortening reflex in the elbow extensor switched from suppression during isolated extensor muscle activation to facilitation during co-contraction. The shortening reflex in the elbow flexor remained suppressive during co-contraction but was significantly smaller compared to the response obtained during isolated elbow flexor activation. This response in the shortened muscle was graded by the level of activation in the lengthened muscle. The lengthening reflex did not change during co-contraction. These results support the idea that reflexes are regulated across multiple muscles around a joint. We speculate that the facilitatory response in the shortened muscle arises through a fast-conducting oligosynaptic pathway involving Ib interneurons.

  5. Positive or Negative Ulnar Variance after Ulnar Shortening for Ulnar Impaction Syndrome: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Soo-Min; Kim, Kyung-Cheon

    2012-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare simple radiographic findings and clinical results according to residual ulnar variance following ulnar shortening for ulnar impaction syndrome. Methods Forty-five cases of ulnar impaction syndrome, which were treated with ulnar shortening from 2005 to 2008, were studied retrospectively. Group I included 13 cases with positive residual variance after ulnar shortening and group II included 32 cases with negative variance after shortening. The presence of a lunate cystic lesion both preoperatively and at final follow-up and assessments of wrist function based on the modified Mayo wrist score, the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) score, as well as the Chun and Palmer score were evaluated. Results A cystic lesion of the lunate was present in 4 cases preoperatively and the size decreased in 2 cases at final follow-up in group I, and in 10 and 5 cases, respectively, in group II. No statistical difference was observed between the groups. The modified Mayo wrist score, DASH score, as well as the Chun and Palmer score improved significantly in both groups. No significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the proportion of positive cystic lesions at final follow-up or the functional scores. Conclusions After ulnar shortening, the degree of radiological change in the cystic lunate lesions and clinical improvement did not differ significantly between the groups with unintended residual positive and negative variance after shortening. PMID:22949953

  6. Clinical Outcomes of Radial Shortening Osteotomy and Vascularized Bone Graft in Kienböck's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Mohammad; Nouraei, Mohammad Hadi; Dehghani, Shaghayegh; Gholshahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two surgery methods including radial shortening and radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft for treatment of stage II or IIIa of Kienböck's disease. It is a randomized, controlled clinical trial, which was carried out in 2011–2013. Twenty-four patients were assigned equally to radial shortening group (A) or radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft group (B). The outcome was assessed by Mayo Wrist score before and 9 months after surgery. The mean Mayo Wrist score (SD) was 27.1 (15.4) and 32.5 (18.3) before surgery and 74.6 (5.4) and 85.8 (5.1) after surgery for groups A and B, respectively. The mean score increased in both groups, and it was higher in group B significantly. Radial shortening combined with vascularized bone graft is a valuable method which can be more effective than radial shortening alone, in early stages of Kienböck's disease. This trial is registered with IRCT201404127841N5. PMID:27382615

  7. Constraints on the use of lifespan-shortening Wolbachia to control dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Schraiber, Joshua G; Kaczmarczyk, Angela N; Kwok, Ricky; Park, Miran; Silverstein, Rachel; Rutaganira, Florentine U; Aggarwal, Taruna; Schwemmer, Michael A; Hom, Carole L; Grosberg, Richard K; Schreiber, Sebastian J

    2012-03-21

    Dengue fever, a viral disease spread by the mosquito Aedes aegypti, affects 50-100 million people a year in many tropical countries. Because the virus must incubate within mosquito hosts for two weeks before being able to transmit the infection, shortening the lifespan of mosquitoes may curtail dengue transmission. We developed a continuous time reaction-diffusion model of the spatial spread of Wolbachia through a population of A. aegypti. This model incorporates the lifespan-shortening effects of Wolbachia on infected A. aegypti and the fitness advantage to infected females due to cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). We found that local establishment of the Wolbachia infection can occur if the fitness advantage due to CI exceeds the fitness reduction due to lifespan-shortening effects, in accordance with earlier results concerning fecundity reduction. However, spatial spread is possible only if the fitness advantage due to CI is twice as great as the fitness reduction due to lifespan shortening effects. Moreover, lifespan-shortening and fecundity-reduction can have different effects on the speed of wave-retreat. Using data from the literature, we estimated all demographic parameters for infected and uninfected mosquitoes and computed the velocities of spread of infection. Our most optimistic estimates suggest that the spatial spread of lifespan-shortening Wolbachia may be so slow that efficient spatial spread would require a prohibitively large number of point releases. However, as these estimates of demographic parameters may not accurately reflect natural conditions, further research is necessary to corroborate these predictions.

  8. License restrictions at Barnwell

    SciTech Connect

    Autry, V.R.

    1991-12-31

    The State of South Carolina was delegated the authority by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to regulate the receipt, possession, use and disposal of radioactive material as an Agreement State. Since 1970, the state has been the principal regulatory authority for the Barnwell Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility operated by Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. The radioactive material license issued authorizing the receipt and disposal of low-level waste contains numerous restrictions to ensure environmental protection and compliance with shallow land disposal performance criteria. Low-level waste has evolved from minimally contaminated items to complex waste streams containing high concentrations of radionuclides and processing chemicals which necessitated these restrictions. Additionally, some waste with their specific radionuclides and concentration levels, many classified as low-level radioactive waste, are not appropriate for shallow land disposal unless additional precautions are taken. This paper will represent a number of these restrictions, the rationale for them, and how they are being dealt with at the Barnwell disposal facility.

  9. Telomeres shorten more slowly in slow-aging wild animals than in fast-aging ones.

    PubMed

    Dantzer, Ben; Fletcher, Quinn E

    2015-11-01

    Research on the physiological causes of senescence aim to identify common physiological mechanisms that explain age-related declines in fitness across taxonomic groups. Telomeres are repetitive nucleotide sequences found on the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Past research indicates that telomere attrition is strongly correlated with inter-specific rates of aging, though these studies cannot distinguish whether telomere attrition is a cause or consequence of the aging process. We extend previous research on this topic by incorporating recent studies to test the hypothesis that telomeres shorten more slowly with age in slow-aging animal