Science.gov

Sample records for calorimeter trigger initial

  1. The Zeus calorimeter first level trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    The design of the Zeus Detector Calorimeter Level Trigger is presented. The Zeus detector is being built for operation at HERA, a new storage ring that will provide collisions between 820 GeV protons and 30 GeV electrons in 1990. The calorimeter is made of depleted uranium plates and plastic scintillator read out by wavelength shifter bars into 12,864 photomultiplier tubes. These signals are combined into 974 trigger towers with separate electromagnetic and hadronic sums. The calorimeter first level trigger is pipelined with a decision provided 5 {mu}sec after each beam crossing, occurring every 96 nsec. The trigger determines the total energy, the total transverse energy, the missing energy, and the energy and number of isolated electrons and muons. It also provides information on the number and energy of clusters. The trigger rate needs to be held to 1 kHz against a rate of proton-beam gas interactions of approximately 500 kHz. The summed trigger tower pulseheights are digitized by flash ADC`s. The digital values are linearized, stored and used for sums and pattern tests.

  2. Level-2 Calorimeter Trigger Upgrade at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, G.U.; /Purdue U.

    2007-04-01

    The CDF Run II Level-2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on an algorithm used in Run I. This system insured good performance at low luminosity obtained during the Tevatron Run II. However, as the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitations of the current system due to the algorithm start to become clear. In this paper, we will present an upgrade of the Level-2 calorimeter trigger system at CDF. The upgrade is based on the Pulsar board, a general purpose VME board developed at CDF and used for upgrading both the Level-2 tracking and the Level-2 global decision crate. This paper will describe the design, hardware and software implementation, as well as the advantages of this approach over the existing system.

  3. The ZEUS calorimeter first level trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Foudas, C.; Dawson, J.; Krakauer, D.; Talaga, R.; Ali, I.; Behrens, B.; Fordham, C.; Goussiou, A.; Jaworski, M.; Lackey, J.

    1994-12-31

    The authors present results on the efficiency and performance of the ZEUS detector Calorimeter First Level Trigger (CFLT) using data taken during the 1993 HERA physics run. The CFLT is designed to process events in a digital pipeline applying pattern recognition algorithms and fast digital summation techniques in order to collect interesting physics events and reduce background from beam gas interactions. The total FLT efficiency was 98% for neutral current events and 85% for charged current events above Q{sup 2} of 10 GeV{sup 2}. The introduction of the isolated electron trigger increases the CFLT beam gas rejection by a factor of two.

  4. The new UA1 calorimeter trigger processor

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, S.A.; Campbell, D.; Cawthraw, M.; Coughlan, J.; Flynn, P.; Galagadera, S.; Grayer, G.; Halsall, R.; Shah, T.P.; Stephens, R.

    1989-02-01

    The UA1 First Level Trigger Processor (TP) is a fast digital machine with a highly parallel pipelined architecture of fast TTL combinational and programmable logic controlled by programmable microsequencers. The TP uses 100,000 IC's housed in 18 crates each containing 21 fastbus sized modules. It is hardwired with a very high level of interconnection. The energy deposited in the upgraded calorimeter is digitised into 1700 bytes of input data every beam crossing. The Processor selects in 1.5 microseconds events for further processing. The new electron trigger has improved hadron jet rejection, achieved by requiring low energy deposition around the electro-magnetic cluster. A missing transverse energy trigger and a total energy trigger have also been implemented.

  5. Hierarchical Trigger of the ALICE Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Hans; Awes, Terry C

    2010-05-01

    The trigger of the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeters is implemented in 2 hierarchically connected layers of electronics. In the lower layer, level-0 algorithms search shower energy above threshold in locally confined Trigger Region Units (TRU). The top layer is implemented as a single, global trigger unit that receives the trigger data from all TRUs as input to the level-1 algorithm. This architecture was first developed for the PHOS high p{sub T} photon trigger before it was adopted by EMCal also for the jet trigger. TRU units digitize up to 112 analogue input signals from the Front End Electronics (FEE) and concentrate their digital stream in a single FPGA. A charge and time summing algorithm is combined with a peakfinder that suppresses spurious noise and is precise to single LHC bunches. With a peak-to-peak noise level of 150 MeV the linear dynamic range above threshold spans from MIP energies at 215 up to 50 GeV. Local level-0 decisions take less than 600 ns after LHC collisions, upon which all TRUs transfer their level-0 trigger data to the upstream global trigger module which searches within the remaining level-1 latency for high p{sub T} gamma showers (PHOS) and/or for Jet cone areas (EMCaL).

  6. Hierarchical trigger of the ALICE calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Hans; Awes, Terry C.; Novitzky, Norbert; Kral, Jiri; Rak, Jan; Schambach, Jo; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Daicui

    2010-05-01

    The trigger of the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeters is implemented in 2 hierarchically connected layers of electronics. In the lower layer, level-0 algorithms search shower energy above threshold in locally confined Trigger Region Units (TRU). The top layer is implemented as a single, global trigger unit that receives the trigger data from all TRUs as input to the level-1 algorithm. This architecture was first developed for the PHOS high pT photon trigger before it was adopted by EMCal also for the jet trigger. TRU units digitize up to 112 analogue input signals from the Front End Electronics (FEE) and concentrate their digital stream in a single FPGA. A charge and time summing algorithm is combined with a peakfinder that suppresses spurious noise and is precise to single LHC bunches. With a peak-to-peak noise level of 150 MeV the linear dynamic range above threshold spans from MIP energies at 215 up to 50 GeV. Local level-0 decisions take less than 600 ns after LHC collisions, upon which all TRUs transfer their level-0 trigger data to the upstream global trigger module which searches within the remaining level-1 latency for high pT gamma showers (PHOS) and/or for Jet cone areas (EMCaL).

  7. The upgrade of the ATLAS first-level calorimeter trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shimpei

    2016-07-01

    The first-level calorimeter trigger (L1Calo) had operated successfully through the first data taking phase of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Towards forthcoming LHC runs, a series of upgrades is planned for L1Calo to face new challenges posed by the upcoming increases of the beam energy and the luminosity. This paper reviews the ATLAS L1Calo trigger upgrade project that introduces new architectures for the liquid-argon calorimeter trigger readout and the L1Calo trigger processing system.

  8. Test beam operation of the CMS calorimeter trigger synchronization boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, A.; Almeida, N.; da Silva, J.; Silva, P.; Varela, J.

    2008-05-01

    The CMS experiment uses information from its electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters and muon detectors to decide whether to read out the whole detector. For such a task to be successful, all trigger primitives pushed through the trigger decision tree must be flawlessly aligned in time for operation at 40 MHz. Both calorimeters in CMS use the Synchronization Link Board for this purpose. In this article we report on the test results of this board using the bunched beams available in the H4 electron beam line at CERN.

  9. Run 2 upgrades to the CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, B.; Berryhill, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Mishra, K.; Rivera, R.; Uplegger, L.; Apanasevich, L.; Zhang, J.; Marrouche, J.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Tapper, A.; Foudas, C.; Beaudette, F.; Cadamuro, L.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Romanteau, T.; Sauvan, J. B.; Strebler, T.; Zabi, A.; Barbieri, R.; Cali, I. A.; Innocenti, G. M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Roland, C.; Wyslouch, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Northup, M.; Tran, B.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Forbes, R.; Gorski, T.; Klabbers, P.; Levine, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Ruggles, T.; Smith, N.; Smith, W.; Svetek, A.; Tikalsky, J.; Vicente, M.

    2016-01-01

    The CMS Level-1 calorimeter trigger is being upgraded in two stages to maintain performance as the LHC increases pile-up and instantaneous luminosity in its second run. In the first stage, improved algorithms including event-by-event pile-up corrections are used. New algorithms for heavy ion running have also been developed. In the second stage, higher granularity inputs and a time-multiplexed approach allow for improved position and energy resolution. Data processing in both stages of the upgrade is performed with new, Xilinx Virtex-7 based AMC cards.

  10. Operation of the enhanced ATLAS First Level Calorimeter Trigger at the start of Run-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, Marek

    2016-02-01

    In 2015 the LHC is already operating with a higher centre-of-mass energy and proton beam luminosity. To keep high trigger efficiency with the increased event rate ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger electronics have been re-designed or newly introduced (Pre-Processors, Merging Modules and Topological Processors). Additionally, to achieve the best possible resolution for the reconstructed physics objects, complex calibration and monitoring systems are employed. Hit rates and energy spectra down to channel level, based on reconstructed events, are supervised with the calorimeter trigger hardware. In this paper the performance of the upgraded Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger at the beginning of LHC Run-2 is described.

  11. Missing Transverse Momentum Trigger Performance Studies for the ATLAS Calorimeter Trigger Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamas, Brianna; Parrish, Elliot; Lisi, Luc; Dudley, Christopher; Majewski, Stephanie

    2016-03-01

    The ATLAS Experiment is one of two general purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. In anticipation of discovering new physics, the detector will undergo numerous hardware upgrades including improvements to the Liquid Argon Calorimeter trigger electronics. For the upgrade, one component of the Level-1 trigger system will be the global feature extractor, gFEX, which will house three field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). Specifically, in order to improve the missing transverse energy (ETmiss)trigger, an adapted topological clustering algorithm is being investigated for implementation on the FPGAs for reconstruction of proton-proton interactions in the ATLAS detector. Using simulated data, this study analyzes the performance of the adapted algorithm in software.

  12. The Calorimeter Trigger Processor Card: the next generation of high speed algorithmic data processing at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetek, A.; Blake, M.; Cepeda Hermida, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Fobes, R.; Gomber, B.; Gorski, T.; Guo, Z.; Klabbers, P.; Levine, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Ruggles, T.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Tikalsky, J.; Vicente, M.; Woods, N.

    2016-02-01

    The CMS Level-1 upgraded calorimeter trigger requires a powerful, flexible and compact processing card. The Calorimeter Trigger Processor Card (CTP7) uses the Virtex-7 FPGA as its primary data processor and is the first FPGA based processing card in CMS to employ the ZYNQ System-on-Chip (SoC) running embedded Linux to provide TCP/IP communication and board support functions. The CTP7 was built from the ground up to support AXI infrastructure to provide flexible and modular designs with minimal time from project conception to final implementation.

  13. Triggering on electrons, jets and tau leptons with the CMS upgraded calorimeter trigger for the LHC RUN II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabi, A.; Beaudette, F.; Cadamuro, L.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Romanteau, T.; Sauvan, J. B.; Strebler, T.; Marrouche, J.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Tapper, A.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.

    2016-02-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment has implemented a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 105. During Run II, the LHC will increase its centre-of-mass energy up to 13 TeV and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2 × 1034 cm-2 s-1. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition (DAQ) system has been upgraded. A novel concept for the L1 calorimeter trigger is introduced: the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT) . In this design, nine main processors receive each all of the calorimeter data from an entire event provided by 18 preprocessors. This design is not different from that of the CMS DAQ and HLT systems. The advantage of the TMT architecture is that a global view and full granularity of the calorimeters can be exploited by sophisticated algorithms. The goal is to maintain the current thresholds for calorimeter objects and improve the performance for their selection. The performance of these algorithms will be demonstrated, both in terms of efficiency and rate reduction. The callenging aspects of the pile-up mitigation and firmware design will be presented.

  14. Phase-I trigger readout electronics upgrade of the ATLAS liquid-argon calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Tatsuya

    2016-09-01

    This article gives an overview of the Phase-I Upgrade of the ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Trigger Readout. The design of custom developed hardware for fast real-time data processing and transfer are presented. Performance results from the prototype boards operated in the demonstrator system, first measurements of noise behavior and responses on the test pulses to the demonstrator system are shown.

  15. Design and Implementation of the New D0 Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Abolins, M.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Anderson, J.; Bagby, L.; Ban, J.; Barberis, E.; Beale, S.; Benitez, J.; Biehl, J.; /Columbia U. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Delhi U. /Fermilab /Florida State U. /Indiana U. /Michigan State U. /Northeastern U. /Rice U. /Southern Methodist U. /University Coll., Dublin

    2007-09-01

    Increasing luminosity at the Fermilab Tevatron collider has led the D0 collaboration to make improvements to its detector beyond those already in place for Run IIa, which began in March 2001. One of the cornerstones of this Run IIb upgrade is a completely redesigned level-1 calorimeter trigger system. The new system employs novel architecture and algorithms to retain high efficiency for interesting events while substantially increasing rejection of background. We describe the design and implementation of the new level-1 calorimeter trigger hardware and discuss its performance during Run IIb data taking. In addition to strengthening the physics capabilities of D0, this trigger system will provide valuable insight into the operation of analogous devices to be used at LHC experiments.

  16. A flexible demonstrator system for the ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Brawn, I.; Carney, R.; Connors, A.

    1996-12-31

    The proposed level-1 calorimeter trigger system for ATLAS relies upon several key technologies which we have been testing in a demonstrator programme. We describe here the final phase of this programme, which concentrates on crucial aspects of high-speed data transmission inherent in the trigger architecture while operating with signals from prototype ATLAS calorimeters. The 36-channel trigger demonstrator system has been designed to provide a flexible infrastructure for the study of alternative techniques of communication between the calorimeters and the trigger processor, including both analogue links and high-speed digital optical and electrical links operating at up to 1.6 Gbaud. Data fan-out at 160 Mbit/s between trigger processor modules using serializing Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) driving transmission-line backplanes is also evaluated. A programmable timing system re-synchronizes all channels before pipeline processing by ASICs executing an electromagnetic cluster-finding algorithm. Some preliminary results are presented from the operation of this demonstrator system installed in the ATLAS test-beam at CERN.

  17. A bit-serial first-level calorimeter trigger for LHC detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bohm, C.; Zhao, X.; Appelquist, G.; Engstroem, M.; Hellman, S.; Holmgren, S.O.; Johansson, E.; Yamdagni, N.

    1994-12-31

    A first-level calorimeter trigger design, implemented as a farm of local bit-serial systolic arrays, is presented. The massive bit-serial operation can achieve higher processing throughput and more compact designs than conventional bit-parallel data representation. The construction is based on high speed optical fiber data transmissions, Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) and multi-chip modules (MCMs) packaging technologies.

  18. Precision closed bomb calorimeter for testing flame and gas producing initiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, D. R., Jr.; Taylor, A. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A calorimeter has been developed under this study to help meet the needs of accurate performance monitoring of electrically or mechanically actuated flame and gas producing devices, such as squib-type initiators. A ten cubic centimeter closed bomb (closed volume) calorimeter was designed to provide a standard pressure trace and to measure a nominal 50 calorie output, using the basic components of a Parr Model 1411 calorimeter. Two prototype bombs were fabricated, pressure tested to 2600 psi, and extensively evaluated.

  19. Trigger-less readout system with pulse pile-up recovery for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavatsyuk, M.; Tambave, G.; Hevinga, M.; Lemmens, P. J. J.; Schakel, P.; Schreuder, F.; Speelman, R.; Löhner, H.; Panda Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    A simple, efficient, and robust on-line data-processing scheme was developed for the digital front-end electronics of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the PANDA spectrometer at FAIR, Darmstadt. The implementation of the processing algorithm in FPGA enables the construction of an almost dead-time free data acquisition system. The prototype of a complete trigger-less readout chain has been developed and evaluated. The precision of time synchronisation commands has been verified. A pile-up recovery algorithm was developed and evaluated over a large dynamic range of signal amplitudes.

  20. First operation of the level-0 trigger of the NA62 liquid krypton calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbanera, M.; Bizzarri, M.; Bonaiuto, V.; Checcucci, B.; Cipollone, P.; De Simone, N.; Fantechi, R.; Federici, L.; Fucci, A.; Lupi, M.; Paoluzzi, G.; Papi, A.; Salamon, A.; Salina, G.; Santoni, C.; Sargeni, F.; Venditti, S.

    2015-03-01

    The NA62 experiment at CERN Super Proton Synchrotron aims at studying ultra-rare decays of charged kaons for precise tests of the Standard Model. The complete experimental setup is being commissioned for the first physics data taking in the autumn of 2014. This paper presents the final design and implementation of the Level-0 trigger system of the LKr calorimeter, acting as hermetic photon veto of the experiment in the 1-8.5 mrad region. The first on-field performance tests are presented.

  1. Development and testing of an upgrade to the CMS level-1 calorimeter trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baber, M.; Blake, M.; Brooke, J.; Cepeda Hermida, M.; Dasu, S.; Durkin, T.; Fayer, S.; Friis, E. K.; Gorski, T.; Hall, G.; Harder, K.; Iles, G.; Ives, S.; Jones, J.; Klabbers, P. R.; Levine, A. G.; Lucas, C.; Lucas, R.; Newbold, D.; Marrouche, J.; Paramesvaran, S.; Perry, T. M.; Rose, A.; Sankey, D.; Smith, W.; Tapper, A.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.

    2014-01-01

    When the LHC resumes operation in 2015, the higher centre-of-mass energy and high-luminosity conditions will require significantly more sophisticated algorithms to select interesting physics events within the readout bandwidth limitations. The planned upgrade to the CMS calorimeter trigger will achieve this goal by implementing a flexible system based on the μTCA standard, with modules based on Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGAs and up to 144 optical links running at speeds of 10 Gbps. The upgrade will improve the energy and position resolution of physics objects, enable much improved isolation criteria to be applied to electron and tau objects and facilitate pile-up subtraction to mitigate the effect of the increased number of interactions occurring in each bunch crossing. The design of the upgraded system is summarised with particular emphasis placed on the results of prototype testing and the experience gained which is of general application to the design of such systems.

  2. Initial measurements with an actively cooled calorimeter in a large pool fire

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Kent, L.A.; Wix, S.D.

    1993-11-01

    The initial measurements with a 1 m {times} 1 m water cooled vertical flat plate calorimeter located 0.8 m above and inside a 6 m {times} 6 m JP-4 pool fire are described. Heat fluxes in ten vertical 0. 1 m high {times} 1 m wide zones were measured by means of water calorimetry in quasi-steady-state. The calorimeter face also included an array of intrinsic thermocouples to measure surface temperatures, and an array of Schmidt-Boelter radiometers for a second, more responsive, method of heat flux measurement. Other experimental measurement devices within the pool fire included velocity probes, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), and thermocouples. Water calorimetry indicated heat fluxes of about 65 to 70 kW/m{sup 2} with a gradual decrease with increasing height above the pool. Intrinsic thermocouple measurements recorded typical calorimeter surface temperatures of about 500{degrees}C, with spatial variations of {plus_minus}150{degrees}C. Gas velocities across the calorimeter face averaged 3.4 m/s with a predominant upward component, but with an off-vertical skew. Temperatures of 800 to 1100{degrees}C were measured with the DFTS. The observed decrease in heat flux with increasing vertical height is consistent with analytical fire models derived for constant temperature surfaces. Results from several diagnostics also indicated trends and provided additional insight into events that occurred during the fire. Some events are correlated, and possible explanations are discussed.

  3. A low-latency, low-overhead encoder for data transmission in the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter trigger upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Le; Li, Xiaoting; Gong, Datao; Chen, Jinghong; Deng, Binwei; Fan, Qingjun; Feng, Yulang; Guo, Di; He, Huiqin; Hou, Suen; Huang, Guangming; Liu, Chonghan; Liu, Tiankuan; Sun, Xiangming; Tang, Yuxuan; Teng, Ping-Kun; Vosooghi, Bozorgmehr; Xiang, Annie C.; Ye, Jingbo; You, Yang; Zuo, Zhiheng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present the design and test results of an encoder integrated circuit for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter trigger upgrade. The encoder implements a low-latency and low-overhead line code called LOCic. The encoder operates at 320 MHz with a latency of no greater than 21 ns. The overhead of the encoder is 14.3%. The encoder is an important block of the transmitter ASIC LOCx2, which is prototyped with a commercial 0.25 μm Silicon-on-Sapphire CMOS technology and packaged in a 100-pin QFN package.

  4. LOCx2, a low-latency, low-overhead, 2 × 5.12-Gbps transmitter ASIC for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter trigger upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Li, X.; Gong, D.; Chen, J.; Guo, D.; He, H.; Hou, S.; Huang, G.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Sun, X.; Teng, P.; Vosooghi, B.; Xiang, A. C.; Ye, J.; You, Y.; Zuo, Z.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present the design and test results of LOCx2, a transmitter ASIC for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter trigger upgrade. LOCx2 consists of two channels and each channel encodes ADC data with an overhead of 14.3% and transmits serial data at 5.12 Gbps with a latency of less than 27.2 ns. LOCx2 is fabricated with a commercial 0.25-μm Silicon-on-Sapphire CMOS technology and is packaged in a 100-pin QFN package. The power consumption of LOCx2 is about 843 mW.

  5. Debris-flow initiation experiments using diverse hydrologic triggers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Controlled debris-flow initiation experiments focused on three hydrologic conditions that can trigger slope failure: localized ground-water inflow; prolonged moderate-intensity rainfall; and high-intensity rainfall. Detailed monitoring of slope hydrology and deformation provided exceptionally complete data on conditions preceding and accompanying slope failure and debris-flow mobilization. Ground-water inflow and high-intensity sprinkling led to abrupt, complete failure whereas moderate-intensity sprinkling led to retrogressive, block-by-block failure. Failure during ground-water inflow and during moderate-intensity sprinkling occurred with a rising water table and positive pore pressures. Failure during high-intensity sprinkling occurred without widespread positive pore pressures. In all three cases, pore pressures in most locations increased dramatically (within 2-3 seconds) during failure. In some places, pressures in unsaturated materials rapidly 'flashed' from zero to elevated positive values. Transiently elevated pore pressures and partially liquefied soil enhanced debris-flow mobilization.

  6. The digital data acquisition chain and the cosmic ray trigger system for the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Benvenuti, A.; Piemontese, L.; Calcaterra, A.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Burrows, P.N.; Cartwright, S.L.; Gonzales, S.; Lath, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Williams, D.C.; Yamartino, J.M.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Castro, A.; Galvagni, S.; Loreti, M.; Pescara, L.; Wyss, J.; Alpat, B.; Bilei, G.M.; Checcucci, B.; Dell'Orso, R.; Pauluzzi, M.; Servoli, L.; Carpinelli, M.; Castaldi, R.; Cazzola, U.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G.; Messn

    1989-08-01

    The entire data-acquisition chain, from the custom-made front-end electronics to the Fastbus readout and data-reduction module, for the digital readout of the SLD limited streamer tube Warm Iron Calorimeter and Muon Identifier is described. Also described is a Fastbus Cosmic Logic Unit being developed to achieve the capability of reading cosmic ray events, also during the inter-crossing time, for apparatus monitoring and calibration purposes. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  7. MAC calorimeters and applications

    SciTech Connect

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-03-01

    The MAC detector at PEP features a large solid-angle electromagnetic/hadronic calorimeter system, augmented by magnetic charged-particle tracking, muon analysis and scintillator triggering. Its implementation in the context of electron-positron annihilation physics is described, with emphasis on the utilization of calorimetry.

  8. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    ALICE is the general purpose experiment at the LHC dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a late addition to the ALICE suite of detectors with first modules installed in ALICE this year. The EMCal is designed to trigger on high energy gamma-rays and jets, and to enhance the capabilities of ALICE for these measurements. The EMCal is a Pb/scintillator sampling shish-kebab type calorimeter. The EMCal construction, readout, and performance in beam tests at the CERN SPS and PS are described.

  9. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is the general purpose experiment at the LHC dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a late addition to the ALICE suite of detectors with first modules installed in ALICE this year. The EMCal is designed to trigger on high energy gamma-rays and jets, and to enhance the capabilities of ALICE for these measurements. The EMCal is a Pb/scintillator sampling shish-kebab type calorimeter. The EMCal construction, readout, and performance in beam tests at the CERN SPS and PS are described.

  10. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gadrat, S.

    2010-06-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the only LHC experiment at CERN fully dedicated to the study of the quark and gluon plasma. Driven by the RHIC results on jet quenching, the ALICE collaboration has proposed to extend the capabilities of the ALICE detector for the study of high momentum photons and jets by adding a large acceptance calorimeter. This EMCal (ElectroMagnetic Calorimeter) is designed to provide an unbiased fast high-p{sub T} trigger and to measure the neutral energy of jets and photons up to 200 GeV. Four over ten supermodules of the calorimeter have been installed and commissioned at CERN in 2009 which represents 40% of the full acceptance.

  11. Calorimeter-Based Triggers at the ATLAS Detector for Searches for Supersymmetry in Zero-Lepton Final States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Alexander

    Electrospinning is now recognized as an efficient technique to produce polymer fibers with diameters ranging from tens of nanometers to tens of microns from polymer solutions or melts using an applied electric field. A conventional electrospinning setup can only produce randomized fibrous mats. Researchers have developed modified electrospinning setups so as to collect macroscopically aligned fibers and have shown that aligned fibers are also oriented at the molecular level. However, the mechanism of molecular orientation is still under investigation. This dissertation is focused on understanding the driving forces for molecular orientation in electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fibers. PVDF was chosen for this study because a large beta phase content can be formed by electrospinning and this beta phase of PVDF is very sensitive to an electric field. A customized collector is first developed here consisting of an Al foil covered cardboard with a rectangular air gap in the center. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that fibers in the gap are macroscopically aligned and those off the gap are randomly oriented. Polarized Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra demonstrate that fibers in the gap are aligned at the molecular level with the polymer backbones oriented along the fiber axis. However, quantitative analysis of molecular orientation from polarized FTIR data is only reasonable when the effect of fibrous mat thickness is also considered. Single fiber selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns not only confirm polarized FTIR results but also indicate that the molecular orientation is initially formed after the polymer jet is emitted from the Taylor cone and elongated by the whipping process while travelling towards the collector, and is then enhanced by the air gap. To further determine the mechanism of molecular orientation in the two steps (initial fiber formation followed by deposition on the gap), the effects of applied voltage

  12. Photon Calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1989-01-01

    A photon calorimeter (20, 40) is provided that comprises a laminar substrate (10, 22, 42) that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating (28, 48, 52), that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions (30, 50, 54) are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly.

  13. Photon calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1988-04-22

    A photon calorimeter is provided that comprises a laminar substrate that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating, that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions, are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly. 4 figs.

  14. Bomb calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, D.H.; Bell, F.H.

    1981-02-03

    A bomb calorimeter is presented in which a cartridge type specimen holder is provided in a fitted bomb casing so that a separate pressure seal is no longer required and the ease of making repeated tests is enhanced. The overall efficiency is also improved because of the central location of the specimen holder.

  15. The initial stage processes of rocket-and-wire triggered lightning as observed by VHF interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Biagi, C. J.; Rakov, V. A.; Hill, J. D.; Stapleton, M. V.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Morimoto, T.; Ushio, T.; Kawasaki, Z.-I.; Akita, M.

    2012-05-01

    We examine VHF interferometric images, channel-base currents, and broadband electric field waveforms of the initial stage (IS) in two rocket-and-wire triggered lightning flashes. Two types of negative leaders, termed "long-duration" and "short-duration" leaders, were imaged by the VHF interferometers during the IS of the two flashes. There were three leaders that had relatively long durations of more than a few milliseconds. These three leaders were not accompanied by a significant change of channel-base current during their early stages of development, indicating that they corresponded to intracloud (IC) discharges that were not connected to the grounded triggered-lightning channel. Two of these three leaders eventually connected to the triggered-lightning channel and initiated initial continuous current (ICC) pulses. The third long-duration leader apparently developed from the vicinity of an isolated negative charge region toward an upper-level positive charge region and toward a branch of the grounded channel; it served to bridge the positive charge region and the triggered-lightning channel, resulting in the opposite polarity portion of the bipolar ICC. The short-duration negative leaders had durations of some hundreds of microseconds. These negative leaders apparently recoiled along the conductive channels created by branches of the upward positive leader (UPL); they initiated ICC pulses when the grounded channel was sufficiently conductive. It follows that ICC pulses can be initiated either by recoil leaders or via interception of separate in-cloud leaders by a grounded current-carrying channel.

  16. Isothermal Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Pressure-feedback signal indicates rate of heating. Improved isothermal calorimeter measures rate of heating in object under test. Called "isothermal" because chamber holding object and its environment maintained at or near constant temperature to minimize spurious tranfers of heat introducing errors into measurements. When item under test generates heat, rate of boiling and pressure in inner chamber increase. Servo-valve opens wider to maintain preset differential pressure. Valve-control voltage used as measure of rate of heating.

  17. Retinoic acid triggers meiosis initiation via stra8-dependent pathway in Southern catfish, Silurus meridionalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Feng, Ruijuan; Ma, He; Dong, Ranran; Liu, Zhilong; Jiang, Wentao; Tao, Wenjing; Wang, Deshou

    2016-06-01

    Existing studies demonstrated that retinoic acid (RA) regulates meiotic initiation via stra8-independent pathway in teleosts which lack stra8 in their genomes. However, stra8 was recently identified from several fish species including Southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis). To explore the existence of stra8-dependent pathway in RA mediated meiotic initiation in fishes, in the present study, the genes encoding RA synthase aldh1a2 and catabolic enzyme cyp26a1 and cyp26b1 were cloned from the Southern catfish. By immunohistochemistry, Aldh1a2 signal was observed in gonads of both sexes during the meiotic initiation period. By real-time PCR, differentially expressed gene was observed for cyp26a1, but not for cyp26b1, in gonads during the meiotic initiation. Administration of exogenous RA or inhibition of endogenous RA degradation by either KET (RA catabolic enzyme inhibitor) or cyp26a1 knockdown using CRISPR/Cas9 induced advanced meiotic initiation in the ovaries as demonstrated by increased Stra8/stra8 expression and appearance of oocytes. In contrast, treatment with RA synthase inhibitor DEAB resulted in delayed meiotic initiation and Stra8/stra8 expression in the ovaries, which was rescued by exogenous RA administration. These results indicated that (1) RA triggers the onset of meiosis via stra8-dependent pathway in stra8 existing teleosts, as it does in tetrapods; (2) exogenous RA can rescue the endogenous RA deficiency; (3) Cyp26a1, instead of Cyp26b1, is the key catabolic enzyme involved in meiosis initiation in teleosts. Taken together, RA might trigger meiotic initiation via stra8-dependent and -independent pathway in different teleosts.

  18. INITIATORS AND TRIGGERING CONDITIONS FOR ADAPTIVE AUTOMATION IN ADVANCED SMALL MODULAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Katya L Le Blanc; Johanna h Oxstrand

    2014-04-01

    It is anticipated that Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMRs) will employ high degrees of automation. High levels of automation can enhance system performance, but often at the cost of reduced human performance. Automation can lead to human out-of the loop issues, unbalanced workload, complacency, and other problems if it is not designed properly. Researchers have proposed adaptive automation (defined as dynamic or flexible allocation of functions) as a way to get the benefits of higher levels of automation without the human performance costs. Adaptive automation has the potential to balance operator workload and enhance operator situation awareness by allocating functions to the operators in a way that is sensitive to overall workload and capabilities at the time of operation. However, there still a number of questions regarding how to effectively design adaptive automation to achieve that potential. One of those questions is related to how to initiate (or trigger) a shift in automation in order to provide maximal sensitivity to operator needs without introducing undesirable consequences (such as unpredictable mode changes). Several triggering mechanisms for shifts in adaptive automation have been proposed including: operator initiated, critical events, performance-based, physiological measurement, model-based, and hybrid methods. As part of a larger project to develop design guidance for human-automation collaboration in AdvSMRs, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have investigated the effectiveness and applicability of each of these triggering mechanisms in the context of AdvSMR. Researchers reviewed the empirical literature on adaptive automation and assessed each triggering mechanism based on the human-system performance consequences of employing that mechanism. Researchers also assessed the practicality and feasibility of using the mechanism in the context of an AdvSMR control room. Results indicate that there are tradeoffs associated with each

  19. Landslides triggered by the Gorkha earthquake in the Langtang valley, volumes and initiation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    The Gorkha earthquake (Nepal, 2015, M w 7.9) triggered many landslides. The most catastrophic mass movement was a debris avalanche that buried several villages in the Langtang valley. In this study, questions are raised about its volume and initiation. I investigate the possibility of high-resolution digital surface models computed from tri-stereo SPOT6/7 images to resolve this issue. This high-resolution dataset enables me to derive an inventory of 160 landslides triggered by this earthquake. I analyze the source of errors and estimate the uncertainties in the landslide volumes. The vegetation prevents to correctly estimate the volumes of landslides that occured in vegetated areas. However, I evaluate the volume and thickness of 73 landslides developing in vegetated-free areas, showing a power law between their surface areas and volumes with exponent of 1.20. Accumulations and depletion volumes are also well constrained for larger landslides, and I find that the main debris avalanches accumulated 6.95 × 106 m3 of deposits in the valley with thicknesses reaching 60 m, and 9.66 × 106 m3 in the glaciated part above 5000 m asl. The large amount of sediments is explained by an initiation of the debris avalanche due to serac falls and snow avalanches from five separate places between 6800 and 7200 m asl over 3 km length.

  20. Ground-level observation of a terrestrial gamma ray flash initiated by a triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, B. M.; Uman, M. A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Jordan, D. M.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Caicedo, J. A.; Carvalho, F. L.; Wilkes, R. A.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Gamerota, W. R.; Pilkey, J. T.; Ngin, T. K.; Moore, R. C.; Rassoul, H. K.; Cummer, S. A.; Grove, J. E.; Nag, A.; Betten, D. P.; Bozarth, A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on a terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) that occurred on 15 August 2014 coincident with an altitude-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) in North Central Florida. The TGF was observed by a ground-level network of gamma ray, close electric field, distant magnetic field, Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), optical, and radar measurements. Simultaneous gamma ray and LMA data indicate that the upward positive leader of the triggered lightning flash induced relativistic runaway electron avalanches when the leader tip was at about 3.5 km altitude, resulting in the observed TGF. Channel luminosity and electric field data show that there was an initial continuous current (ICC) pulse in the lightning channel to ground during the time of the TGF. Modeling of the observed ICC pulse electric fields measured at close range (100-200 m) indicates that the ICC pulse current had both a slow and fast component (full widths at half maximum of 235 μs and 59 μs) and that the fast component was more or less coincident with the TGF, suggesting a physical association between the relativistic runaway electron avalanches and the ICC pulse observed at ground. Our ICC pulse model reproduces moderately well the measured close electric fields at the ICLRT as well as three independent magnetic field measurements made about 250 km away. Radar and LMA data suggest that there was negative charge near the region in which the TGF was initiated.

  1. Muon g-2 Calorimeter Prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Polly, Chris; /Fermilab

    2010-05-03

    The proposed design is a tungsten-scintillating fiber calorimeter with 35 segments, each read out by a separate PMT. Tungsten, which is significantly denser than lead, produces compact showers. This is necessary, in order to improve shower separation in analysis and to fully contain the showers within a calorimeter that satisfies the strict space constraints of the experiment. A single calorimeter segment (4 x 6 x 15 cm{sup 3}) has been constructed in order establish the feasibility of the new design and study its properties. Initial tests of the detector segment at the Paul Scherrer Institute were conducted with a low energy < 400 MeV/c electron beam. A higher-energy test with electrons up to a few GeV/c was performed at the Test Beam Facility under the experimental number T-967. All data from that test have been analyzed and published, and the tungsten-scintillating fiber calorimeter still appears to be a viable candidate. For this test beam run, a larger calorimeter (15 x 15 x 11 cm{sup 3}) has been constructed and an emphasis will be placed on understanding shower leakage and the ability to separate pileup events with a more granular readout. The experimenters will measure the energy resolution, linearity, and shower size of the calorimeter segment. This will provide important information for finalizing decisions on the angle of the fibers relative to the incoming electrons and the optimal granularity of the readout.

  2. Operation and performance of the CDF calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauletta, Giovanni; CDF Collaboration

    2009-04-01

    All electromagnetic and hadronic components of the The CDF run II calorimeter system are scintillator - based sampling calorimeters employing both older (Run I) and newer fiber - based techniques for light extraction. The system has now been operating successfully for several years and is presently taking data at high luminosity thanks to its design characteristics and the upgrade of its frontend daq and trigger electronics. The composition and operation of the calorimeter system is described with due consideration for calibration and maintenance techniques required for the preservation of data quality and stability and its performance will be summarized with reference to design expectations.

  3. Plate tectonics on the Earth triggered by plume-induced subduction initiation.

    PubMed

    Gerya, T V; Stern, R J; Baes, M; Sobolev, S V; Whattam, S A

    2015-11-12

    Scientific theories of how subduction and plate tectonics began on Earth--and what the tectonic structure of Earth was before this--remain enigmatic and contentious. Understanding viable scenarios for the onset of subduction and plate tectonics is hampered by the fact that subduction initiation processes must have been markedly different before the onset of global plate tectonics because most present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are both consequences of plate tectonics. However, plume-induced subduction initiation could have started the first subduction zone without the help of plate tectonics. Here, we test this mechanism using high-resolution three-dimensional numerical thermomechanical modelling. We demonstrate that three key physical factors combine to trigger self-sustained subduction: (1) a strong, negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere; (2) focused magmatic weakening and thinning of lithosphere above the plume; and (3) lubrication of the slab interface by hydrated crust. We also show that plume-induced subduction could only have been feasible in the hotter early Earth for old oceanic plates. In contrast, younger plates favoured episodic lithospheric drips rather than self-sustained subduction and global plate tectonics. PMID:26560300

  4. Plate tectonics on the Earth triggered by plume-induced subduction initiation.

    PubMed

    Gerya, T V; Stern, R J; Baes, M; Sobolev, S V; Whattam, S A

    2015-11-12

    Scientific theories of how subduction and plate tectonics began on Earth--and what the tectonic structure of Earth was before this--remain enigmatic and contentious. Understanding viable scenarios for the onset of subduction and plate tectonics is hampered by the fact that subduction initiation processes must have been markedly different before the onset of global plate tectonics because most present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are both consequences of plate tectonics. However, plume-induced subduction initiation could have started the first subduction zone without the help of plate tectonics. Here, we test this mechanism using high-resolution three-dimensional numerical thermomechanical modelling. We demonstrate that three key physical factors combine to trigger self-sustained subduction: (1) a strong, negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere; (2) focused magmatic weakening and thinning of lithosphere above the plume; and (3) lubrication of the slab interface by hydrated crust. We also show that plume-induced subduction could only have been feasible in the hotter early Earth for old oceanic plates. In contrast, younger plates favoured episodic lithospheric drips rather than self-sustained subduction and global plate tectonics.

  5. The scintillating optical fiber calorimeter (SOFCAL) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christl, Mark J.; Fountain, W. F.; Parnell, Thomas A.; Roberts, F. E.; Benson, C.; Berry, Fred A.; Gregory, J. C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-10-01

    A hybrid detector system is being developed for measuring the cosmic ray elemental composition and energy spectra above approximately GeV/nucleon. This system employs both a conventional 'passive' emulsion chamber and an 'active' ionization calorimeter incorporating scintillating fibers. Emulsion chambers have a proton energy threshold approximately greater than 5 TeV for detectable dark spots in the x-ray films which are used as a visual 'trigger.' The central element of this hybrid system is a calorimeter which has 10 x-y hodoscopic layers of 0.5 mm scintillating fibers interspersed with 4 mm lead plates. The fibers sample the hadronic and electromagnetic showers (cascades) initiated by interactions in the overlying emulsion chamber. The cascades are recorded by two image-intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras which view the ends of the fibers to present orthogonal views. These showers are located and traced with microscopes in the emulsion chamber to provide an energy calibration through standard emulsion chamber methods, and an independent confirmation of the primary particle's charge (which is also measured with a Cerenkov counter above the emulsion chamber). The hybrid system will be used this fall for a balloon-borne measurement of the cosmic ray proton and helium spectra from approximately 400 GeV/n to approximately 10 TeV/n. An 8-hour test flight was performed in September 1995. Details of the detector system and sample results from the test flight are presented.

  6. The Geometric Characteristics and Initiation Mechanisms of the Earthquake- Triggered Daguangbao Landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. J.; Tsao, C. C.; Yang, C. M.; Wu, W. J.; Lee, C. T.; Lin, M. L.; Zhang, W. F.; Pei, X. J.; Wang, G. H.; Huang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, catastrophic landslides are getting considerable attentions not only from natural hazard but also from geo-material science. In the past century, the Daguangbao (DGB) landslide which triggered by the Wenchuan earthquake is one of the largest earthquake- triggered landslides. Our main goal is to characterize the geometry of DGB landslide to better determine the initiation mechanisms. Based on the remote sensing images analysis and field investigation, we proposed an atypical wedge model of DGB landslide compose of a folded strata and a zigzag stepping-out joint system, which outcropped at the south and north of the landslide site, respectively. The intersection line of wedge is curved, counterclockwise rotated and daylighted, which fit the pre- and post- position of the mining tent with 1.9 km displacements. The volume of sliding mass was evaluated to 10.51×108 m3 by the atypical wedge model. The identified slip zone of DGB landslide consists of the breccia and gouge layers in the dolomite strata. The rotary-shear tests were performed with the intact dolomite rocks near the slip zone and the gouges in the slip zone to determine the strength of slip surface. The peak and the steady-state friction coefficient of the tested dry dolomite discontinuities, wet gouges are 0.52~0.96, 0.73~0.86 and 0.1~0.57, 0.16~0.63, respectively. Although the result of static wedge stability analysis shows that the slope is quite stable (F.S. = 4), but the result of pseudo-static wedge stability analysis with seismic coefficient will trigger the gigantic wedge by the Wenchuan earthquake. Moreover, the friction coefficient of the tested gouges after long slip displacements as shear velocity exceeds 1.3 m/s will lower than 0.25 (=tan(14°); the intersection line plunged 14°). Therefore, the gigantic wedge can be accelerated by the inertial force and keep moving rapidly with long run-out. According to the calculations of simple one dimensional particle motion model, DGB landslide

  7. Non-infectious environmental antigens as a trigger for the initiation of an autoimmune skin disease.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ye; Culton, Donna A; Jeong, Joseph S; Trupiano, Nicole; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Diaz, Luis A

    2016-09-01

    Pemphigus represents a group of organ specific autoimmune blistering disorders of the skin mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies with well-defined antigenic targets. While most of these diseases are sporadic, endemic forms of disease do exist. The endemic form of pemphigus foliaceus (also known as fogo selvagem, FS) exhibits epidemiological features that suggest exposure to hematophagous insect bites are a possible precipitating factor of this autoimmune disease, and provides a unique opportunity to study how environmental factors contribute to autoimmune disease development. FS patients and healthy individuals from endemic regions show an autoreactive IgM response that starts in early childhood and becomes restricted to IgG4 autoantibodies in FS patients. In searching for triggering environmental antigens, we have found that IgG4 and IgE autoantibodies from FS patients cross-react with a salivary antigen from sand flies. The presence of these cross-reactive antibodies and antibody genetic analysis confirming that these antibodies evolve from the same naïve B cells provides compelling evidence that this non-infectious environmental antigen could be the initial target of the autoantibody response in FS. Consequently, FS serves as an ideal model to study the impact of environmental antigens in the development of autoimmune disease.

  8. The CLAS Forward Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    M. Amarian; Geram Asryan; Kevin Beard; Will Brooks; Volker Burkert; Tom Carstens; Alan Coleman; Raphael Demirchyan; Yuri Efremenko; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Herb Funsten; Vladimir Gavrilov; Kevin L. Giovanetti; R.M. Marshall; Berhard Mecking; R.C. Minehart; H. Mkrtchan; Mavrik Ohandjanyan; Youri Sharabian; L.C. Smith; Stepan Stepanyan; W.A. Stephens; T.Y. Tung; Carl Zorn

    2001-05-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab utilizes six iron-free superconducting coils to provide an approximately toroidal magnetic field. The six sectors are instrumented individually to form six independent spectrometers. The forward region (8deg < (theta) < 45deg) of each sector is equipped with a lead-scintillator electromagnetic sampling calorimeter (EC), 16 radiation lengths thick, using a novel triangular geometry with stereo readout. With its good energy and position resolution, the EC is used to provide the primary electron trigger for CLAS. It is also used to reject pions, reconstruct pi-0 and eta decays and detect neutrons, This paper treats the design, construction and performance of the calorimeter.

  9. MARK II end cap calorimeter electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jared, R.C.; Haggerty, J.S.; Herrup, D.A.; Kirsten, F.A.; Lee, K.L.; Olson, S.R.; Wood, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An end cap calorimeter system has been added to the MARK II detector in preparation for its use at the SLAC Linear Collider. The calorimeter uses 8744 rectangular proportional counter tubes. This paper describes the design features of the data acquisition electronics that has been installed on the calorimeter. The design and use of computer-based test stands for the amplification and signal-shaping components is also covered. A portion of the complete system has been tested in a beam at SLAC. In these initial tests, using only the calibration provided by the test stands, a resolution of 18%/..sqrt..E was achieved.

  10. Commissioning and Initial LHC Run-2 operation of the ATLAS minimum bias trigger scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MBTS) are sub-detectors in ATLAS delivering the primary trigger for selecting events from low luminosity proton-proton, lead-lead and lead-proton collisions with the smallest possible bias. The MBTS have undergone a complete replacement before LHC Run-2 and several improvements have been implemented in the layout. Since 2014 the MBTS have been commissioned with cosmic rays and first LHC Run-2 beam splash events. We summarise the outcome of the commissioning.

  11. Effect of initial conditions and of intra-event rainfall intensity variability on shallow landslide triggering return period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, David Johnny; Cancelliere, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Assessment of shallow landslide hazard is important for appropriate planning of mitigation measures. Generally, return period of slope instability is assumed as a quantitative metric to map landslide triggering hazard on a catchment. The most commonly applied approach to estimate such return period consists in coupling a physically-based landslide triggering model (hydrological and slope stability) with rainfall intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves. Among the drawbacks of such an approach, the following assumptions may be mentioned: (1) prefixed initial conditions, with no regard to their probability of occurrence, and (2) constant intensity-hyetographs. In our work we propose the use of a Monte Carlo simulation approach in order to investigate the effects of the two above mentioned assumptions. The approach is based on coupling a physically based hydrological and slope stability model with a stochastic rainfall time series generator. By this methodology a long series of synthetic rainfall data can be generated and given as input to a landslide triggering physically based model, in order to compute the return period of landslide triggering as the mean inter-arrival time of a factor of safety less than one. In particular, we couple the Neyman-Scott rectangular pulses model for hourly rainfall generation and the TRIGRS v.2 unsaturated model for the computation of transient response to individual rainfall events. Initial conditions are computed by a water table recession model that links initial conditions at a given event to the final response at the preceding event, thus taking into account variable inter-arrival time between storms. One-thousand years of synthetic hourly rainfall are generated to estimate return periods up to 100 years. Applications are first carried out to map landslide triggering hazard in the Loco catchment, located in highly landslide-prone area of the Peloritani Mountains, Sicily, Italy. Then a set of additional simulations are performed

  12. Lightning initiation mechanism based on the development of relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation: Numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, L. P. Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2011-05-15

    The mechanism of lightning initiation due to electric field enhancement by the polarization of a conducting channel produced by relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation has been simulated numerically. It is shown that the fields at which the start of a lightning leader is possible even in the absence of precipitations are locally realized for realistic thundercloud configurations and charges. The computational results agree with the in-situ observations of penetrating radiation enhancement in thunderclouds.

  13. Performance of CDF calorimeter simulation for Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect

    C. Currat

    2002-09-19

    The upgraded CDF II detector has collected first data during the initial operation of the Tevatron accelerator in Run II. The simulation of the CDF electromagnetic and hadronic central and upgraded plug (forward) calorimeter is based on the Gflash calorimeter parameterization package used within the GEANT based detector simulation of the Run II CDF detector. We present the results of tuning the central and plug calorimeter response to test beam data.

  14. Correlated Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and Radar Observations of the Initial Stages of Florida Triggered Lightning Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. D.; Pilkey, J.; Uman, M, A.; Jordan, D. M.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Rison, W.; Blakeslee, R.

    2012-01-01

    We characterize the geometrical and electrical characteristics of the initial stages of nine Florida triggered lightning discharges using a Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), a C-band SMART radar, and measured channel-base currents. We determine initial channel and subsequent branch lengths, average initial channel and branch propagation speeds, and channel-base current at the time of each branch initiation. The channel-base current is found to not change significantly when branching occurs, an unexpected result. The initial stage of Florida triggered lightning typically transitions from vertical to horizontal propagation at altitudes of 3-6 km, near the typical 0 C level of 4-5 km and several kilometers below the expected center of the negative cloud-charge region at 7-8 km. The data presented potentially provide information on thunderstorm electrical and hydrometeor structure and discharge propagation physics. LMA source locations were obtained from VHF sources of positive impulsive currents as small as 10 A, in contrast to expectations found in the literature.

  15. A heat flow calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Reaction mechanism for nickel-cadmium cell is not known well enough to allow calculation of heat effects. Calorimeter can measure heat absorbed or evolved in cell, by determining amount of external heat that must be supplied to calorimeter to maintain constant flow isothermal heat sink.

  16. Initial experience and clinical comparison of two image guidance methods for SBRT treatment: 4DCT versus respiratory-triggered imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Brian; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Zhao, Hui; Huang, Y Jessica; Sarkar, Vikren; Szegedi, Martin; Kokeny, Kristine E; Anker, Christopher J; Shrieve, Dennis C; Salter, Bill J

    2011-01-31

    For Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) treatment of lung and liver, we quantified the differences between two image guidance methods: 4DCT and ExacTrac respiratory-triggered imaging. Five different patients with five liver lesions and one lung lesion for a total of 19 SBRT delivered fractions were studied. For the 4DCT method, a manual registration process was used between the 4DCT image sets from initial simulation and treatment day to determine the required daily image-guided corrections. We also used the ExacTrac respiratory-triggered imaging capability to verify the target positioning, and calculated the differences in image guidance shifts between these two methods. The mean (standard deviation) of the observed differences in image-guided shifts between 4DCT and ExacTrac respiratory-triggered image guidance was left/right (L/R) = 0.4 (2.0) mm, anterior/posterior (A/P) = 1.4 (1.7) mm, superior/inferior (S/I) = 2.2 (2.0) mm, with no difference larger than 5.0 mm in any given direction for any individual case. The largest error occurred in the S/I direction, with a mean of 2.2 mm for the six lesions. This seems reasonable, because respiratory motion and the resulting imaging uncertainties are most pronounced in this S/I direction. Image guidance shifts derived from ExacTrac triggered imaging at two extreme breathing phases (i.e., full exhale vs. full inhale), agreed well (less than 2.0 mm) with each other. In summary, two very promising image guidance methods of 4DCT and ExacTrac respiratory-triggered imaging were presented and the image guidance shifts were comparable for the patients evaluated in this study.

  17. The ZEUS uranium calorimeter: Main characteristics and first operating experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, R.

    The uranium scintillator calorimeter of the ZEUS experiment in the HERA (German acronym for hadron electron storage ring) in Hamburg, Germany, is described. It covers 99.8% of the solid angle, has an energy resolution 35%/square root of E for single hadrons and jets, and 17.5%/square root of E for electrons. e/h is 1 within 2% in the energy range of 2 to 100 GeV. Test beams results show that an intercalibration at the 1% level is achievable using uranium radioactivity. The calorimeter was commissioned in Apr. 1992. The main characteristics of the calorimeter construction, readout, and trigger are reviewed. The experience from the first data taking period, including results on noise, stability of calibration, background from HERA accelerator, and performance of the calorimeter trigger is discussed.

  18. Hadron calorimeter with reradiating fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kostritskii, A.V.; Baliev, L.O.; Buzultskov, A.F.

    1995-03-01

    A hadron calorimeter in which scintillators are aligned in parallel with the particle beam and the light is output from the scintillators via optical fibers doped with a reradiating is described. The active element has been tested and the calorimeter`s operation simulated. The structure of a calorimeter unit is illustrated.

  19. What are the required conditions to trigger the obduction/subduction initiation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamato, Philippe; Duretz, Thibault; Agard, Philippe; Soret, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    The initial stages allowing for the birth of obduction and/or subduction zones still remain enigmatic and highly debated. Although there is no doubt that initiation occurs on a preexisting lithospheric-scale thermal or mechanical discontinuity (e.g., ridge, supra-subduction zone or transform fault), no consensus has yet been reached on this subject. However, more and more data allowing to address this issue are available (coming from field analyses, metamorphic petrology and geochronology). In particular, metamorphic soles located at the base of ophiolitic nappes, which formed during the very first stages of initiation, yield increasingly precise P-T-t constraints. By confronting such data to thermo-mechanical models, it should be possible to identify which initial configuration allows for metamorphic sole formation and for the emplacement (or not) of an ophiolitic nappe of realistic dimensions. In this study we designed thermo-mechanical models encompassing three initial model configurations, for which P-T-t data from the Semail ophiolite of Oman are then used for the validation of model outputs. The first configuration encompasses an oceanic ridge type initial thermal perturbation (error function). The second configuration mimics the thermal perturbation caused by the arrival of a mantle plume at the base of the lithosphere (gaussian function). The third initial condition corresponds to a case where the obduction/subduction initiates along a transform fault delimitating lithospheres of contrasting thermal ages (step function). Our results show that obduction never initiates in ridge type models, excepted for particular conditions that are not compatible with the Oman case. They also indicate that the initial thermal anomaly has to be sharp but not necessary of large amplitude and that the strength of the lithosphere has to be high enough to ensure the establishment of thin and long ophiolitic nappe without buckling. Our results also highlight the key role of

  20. The PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kistenev, E.; White, S.; Belikov, S.; Kochetkov, V.

    1993-12-31

    The main features of the Phenix EM calorimeter are presented. This a Pb/scintillator calorimeter with ``shish-kebab`` fiber readout, designed for low energy electron and photon measurements. Prototype calorimeters have been built with longitudinal segmentation, {approximately} 100 psec time of flight resolution and 8% energy resolution at 1GeV/c. The laser based monitoring system which has been incorporated into large scale prototypes is described. The dependence of light yield on fiber choice and scintillator surface preparation has been studied.

  1. Calorimeter Control Program

    1998-11-03

    The Calorimeter Control Software provides PID (Proportional, Integral, and Derivative) Control for up to twelve Mound Calorimeters and five Calorimeter Waterbaths. The software accepts a Voltage input, compares it to a user defined setpoint, calculates a new voltage output designed to bring the input closer to the setpoint using a PID control algorithm, then sets the analog voltage output to the calculated value. The software is designed to interface with HP 3852A Data Acquisition Unitmore » via an HP-1B PC board. All field inputs are wired into Digital Input cards and field outputs are wired from Analog Output cards.« less

  2. CDF calorimeter and its upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Seiya, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The CDF calorimeter systems are briefly reviewed with an emphasis on the calibration and the performance of the central electromagnetic calorimeter. Several physics analyses where the calorimetry plays an important role are discussed. The present gas calorimeter will be upgraded in accord with the collider upgrade. The new system is a scintillator-based calorimeter with optical fiber readout. A status of the CDF calorimeter upgrade project is also described.

  3. Overview of the Lhcb Calorimeter Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machefert, Frédéric

    2005-02-01

    The goal of the LHCb calorimeter electronics is twofold. It provides a fast response for the first level trigger on the nature and characteristics of the particles produced in the B meson decay and gives precision measurements for the offline analysis. Stringent constraints are imposed on the electronics whose noise and pile-up effect must remain low, in spite of the high data sample rate and of its location (just above the detector), in a high radiation level area.

  4. The kinematics and initiation mechanisms of the earthquake-triggered Daguangbao landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Che-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Yun; Tsao, Chia-Che; Wu, Wen-Jie; Dong, Jia-Jyun; Lee, Chyi-Tyi; Lin, Ming-Lang; Zhang, Wei-Fong; Pei, Xiang-Jun; Wang, Gong-Hui; Huang, Run-Qiu

    2015-04-01

    The Daguangbao (DGB) landslide is one of the largest earthquake-triggered landslides induced by the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in the world over the past century. Based on remote sensing images, topography analysis and field investigation, this landslide was speculated a gigantic atypical wedge failure with the folded bedding plane and a zigzag stepping-out joint system, which outcropped at the south and north, respectively. With the inferred failure surfaces, the volume of the DGB landslide is about 1,051 Mm3. The frequently adopted Rigid Wedge Method (RWM), which assumed zero shear stress on the sliding surface along the vectors perpendicular to the intersection line when evaluating the wedge stability, could not be valid for this super large DGB wedge. Under an assumption that the shear strength is fully mobilized on the sliding surface along the vectors perpendicular to the intersection line, this study proposed to use a Maximum Shear Stress Method (MSSM) to calculate the factor of safety (FOS) of the DGB wedge. Based on the assumptions of the two methods, the FOS of the RWM and MSSM are the upper and lower bounds for the wedge stability analysis. Based on the rotary shear tests, the averaged friction coefficients of the representative materials of the two sliding surfaces are 0.79 (bedding parallel fault gauges) and 0.71 (dolomite joints). Without external force, the FOSs of the DGB landslide are 4.14 and 2.51 by the RWM and MSSM, respectively. Restate, the wedge is stable before the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. However, DGB landslide can be triggered at 35.7 sec based on the ground acceleration records of strong motion station MZQP during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake and the pseudo-static stability analysis incorporated into MSSM (Acceleration: EW=0.272g, NS=0.152g, Vertical=0.244g). Moreover, using the friction coefficient of the representative materials under large shear displacement under shear velocity of 1.3 m/s (0.16 for bedding parallel fault gouges and 0

  5. CMS electromagnetic calorimeter readout

    SciTech Connect

    Denes, P.; Wixted, R.

    1997-12-31

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter will consist of 109,008 crystals of Lead Tungstate (PbWO{sub 4}) arranged in a barrel (92880 crystals) and 2 endcaps (8064 crystals each). The crystals will be 25 radiation lengths long and cut in tapered shapes to make a hermetic calorimeter. The scintillation light from the crystals is captured by a photodetector, amplified and digitized. The properties of PbWO4, which is a new crystal still very much under development.

  6. Was Himalayan normal faulting triggered by initiation of the Ramgarh-Munsiari Thrust?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Delores M.; Pearson, Ofori N.

    2013-01-01

    The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust is a major orogen-scale fault that extends for more than 1,500 km along strike in the Himalayan fold-thrust belt. The fault can be traced along the Himalayan arc from Himachal Pradesh, India, in the west to eastern Bhutan. The fault is located within the Lesser Himalayan tectonostratigraphic zone, and it translated Paleoproterozoic Lesser Himalayan rocks more than 100 km toward the foreland. The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust is always located in the proximal footwall of the Main Central thrust. Northern exposures (toward the hinterland) of the thrust sheet occur in the footwall of the Main Central thrust at the base of the high Himalaya, and southern exposures (toward the foreland) occur between the Main Boundary thrust and Greater Himalayan klippen. Although the metamorphic grade of rocks within the Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust sheet is not significantly different from that of Greater Himalayan rock in the hanging wall of the overlying Main Central thrust sheet, the tectonostratigraphic origin of the two different thrust sheets is markedly different. The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust became active in early Miocene time and acted as the roof thrust for a duplex system within Lesser Himalayan rocks. The process of slip transfer from the Main Central thrust to the Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust in early Miocene time and subsequent development of the Lesser Himalayan duplex may have played a role in triggering normal faulting along the South Tibetan Detachment system.

  7. Formation of metastable structures by phase separation triggered by initial composition gradients in thin films.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Prabhat K; Binder, Kurt; Puri, Sanjay

    2012-08-14

    Phase separation kinetics of a binary (A,B) mixture contained in a thin film of thickness D induced by a quench from the one-phase region into the miscibility gap is studied by simulations using a Cahn-Hilliard-Cook model. The initial randomly mixed state (50% A, 50% B) contains a concentration gradient perpendicular to the film, while the surfaces of the film are "neutral" (no preference for either A or B). In thermal equilibrium, a pattern of large A-rich and B-rich domains must result, separated by domain walls oriented perpendicularly to the external surfaces of the thin film. However, it is shown that for many choices of D and the strength of the initial gradient Ψ(g), instead a very long-lived metastable layered structure forms, with two domains separated by a single interface parallel to the external walls. The transient time evolution that leads to this structure is interpreted in terms of a competition between domain growth in the bulk and surface-directed spinodal decomposition caused by the gradient during the initial stages. A surprising and potentially useful finding is that a moderate concentration gradient perpendicular to the film does not favor the layered structure but facilitates the approach toward the true equilibrium with just two domain walls perpendicular to the film. This mechanism may have useful applications in producing layered materials. PMID:22897299

  8. Globular Cluster Formation Triggered by the Initial Starburst in Galaxy Formation.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi; Trentham; Ikeuchi

    1999-11-20

    We propose and investigate a new formation mechanism for globular clusters in which they form within molecular clouds that are formed in the shocked regions created by galactic winds driven by successive supernova explosions shortly after the initial burst of massive star formation in the galactic centers. The globular clusters have a radial distribution that is more extended than that of the stars because the clusters form as pressure-confined condensations in a shell that is moving outward radially at high velocity. In addition, the model is consistent with existing observations of other global properties of globular clusters, as far as comparisons can be made.

  9. Magnetically Coupled Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Calorimeters that utilize the temperature sensitivity of magnetism have been under development for over 20 years. They have targeted a variety of different applications that require very high resolution spectroscopy. I will describe the properties of this sensor technology that distinguish it from other low temperature detectors and emphasize the types of application to which they appear best suited. I will review what has been learned so far about the best materials, geometries, and read-out amplifiers and our understanding of the measured performance and theoretical limits. I will introduce some of the applications where magnetic calorimeters are being used and also where they are in development for future experiments. So far, most magnetic calorimeter research has concentrated on the use of paramagnets to provide temperature sensitivity; recent studies have also focused on magnetically coupled calorimeters that utilize the diamagnetic response of superconductors. I will present some of the highlights of this research, and contrast the properties of the two magnetically coupled calorimeter types.

  10. Dynamic Remodeling of the Magnetosome Membrane Is Triggered by the Initiation of Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Elias; Subramanian, Poorna; Li, Zhuo; Jensen, Grant J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of membrane-bound organelles that direct the biomineralization of magnetic nanoparticles. These magnetosome compartments are a model for studying the biogenesis and subcellular organization of bacterial organelles. Previous studies have suggested that discrete gene products build and assemble magnetosomes in a stepwise fashion. Here, using an inducible system, we show that the stages of magnetosome formation are highly dynamic and interconnected. During de novo formation, magnetosomes first organize into discontinuous chain fragments that are subsequently connected by the bacterial actin-like protein MamK. We also find that magnetosome membranes are not uniform in size and can grow in a biomineralization-dependent manner. In the absence of biomineralization, magnetosome membranes stall at a diameter of ~50 nm. Those that have initiated biomineralization then expand to significantly larger sizes and accommodate mature magnetic particles. We speculate that such a biomineralization-dependent checkpoint for membrane growth establishes the appropriate conditions within the magnetosome to ensure successful nucleation and growth of magnetic particles. PMID:26884433

  11. PP1 initiates the dephosphorylation of MASTL, triggering mitotic exit and bistability in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Samuel; Fey, Dirk; McCloy, Rachael A.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.; Payne, Richard J.; Daly, Roger J.; James, David E.; Caldon, C. Elizabeth; Watkins, D. Neil; Croucher, David R.; Burgess, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entry into mitosis is driven by the phosphorylation of thousands of substrates, under the master control of Cdk1. During entry into mitosis, Cdk1, in collaboration with MASTL kinase, represses the activity of the major mitotic protein phosphatases, PP1 and PP2A, thereby ensuring mitotic substrates remain phosphorylated. For cells to complete and exit mitosis, these phosphorylation events must be removed, and hence, phosphatase activity must be reactivated. This reactivation of phosphatase activity presumably requires the inhibition of MASTL; however, it is not currently understood what deactivates MASTL and how this is achieved. In this study, we identified that PP1 is associated with, and capable of partially dephosphorylating and deactivating, MASTL during mitotic exit. Using mathematical modelling, we were able to confirm that deactivation of MASTL is essential for mitotic exit. Furthermore, small decreases in Cdk1 activity during metaphase are sufficient to initiate the reactivation of PP1, which in turn partially deactivates MASTL to release inhibition of PP2A and, hence, create a feedback loop. This feedback loop drives complete deactivation of MASTL, ensuring a strong switch-like activation of phosphatase activity during mitotic exit. PMID:26872783

  12. Automated calorimeter testing system

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenburg, W.W.; James, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Automated Calorimeter Testing System (ACTS) is a portable measurement device that provides an independent measurement of all critical parameters of a calorimeter system. The ACTS was developed to improve productivity and performance of Mound-produced calorimeters. With ACTS, an individual with minimal understanding of calorimetry operation can perform a consistent set of diagnostic measurements on the system. The operator can identify components whose performance has deteriorated by a simple visual comparison of the current data plots with previous measurements made when the system was performing properly. Thus, downtime and out of control'' situations can be reduced. Should a system malfunction occur, a flowchart of troubleshooting procedures has been developed to facilitate quick identification of the malfunctioning component. If diagnosis is beyond the capability of the operator, the ACTS provides a consistent set of test data for review by a knowledgeable expert. The first field test was conducted at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site in early 1990. 6 figs.

  13. The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, M.

    2008-06-01

    The CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider has placed great emphasis on precise calorimetry. The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) contains 75000 scintillating lead tungstate crystals that are read out using sophisticated electronics; this paper describes these technologies and how they were implemented in the calorimeter. The results of pre-calibration measurements for the detector modules are detailed. Installation of the ECAL into the underground cavern has commenced and the commissioning process and its status are discussed. The experiment is scheduled to start in 2008 and prospects for the first year of operation and running are given.

  14. SLD liquid argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, E.; SLD Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    The liquid argon calorimeter (LAC) of the SLD detector is a parallel plate -- liquid argon sampling calorimeter, used to measure particle energies in Z{sup 0} decays at the Stanford Linear Collider. The LAC module design is based on a unique projective tower structure, in which lead plates and segmented lead tiles serve both as absorbers and electrodes. The LAC front end electronics incorporates several novel features, including extensive multiplexing and optical fiber readout, which take advantage of the low SLC beam crossing frequency. The operational performance of the LAC during the recently completed SLD physics run (which recorded over 10,000 Z{sup 0} events) is discussed.

  15. SLD liquid argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, E.

    1992-10-01

    The liquid argon calorimeter (LAC) of the SLD detector is a parallel plate -- liquid argon sampling calorimeter, used to measure particle energies in Z[sup 0] decays at the Stanford Linear Collider. The LAC module design is based on a unique projective tower structure, in which lead plates and segmented lead tiles serve both as absorbers and electrodes. The LAC front end electronics incorporates several novel features, including extensive multiplexing and optical fiber readout, which take advantage of the low SLC beam crossing frequency. The operational performance of the LAC during the recently completed SLD physics run (which recorded over 10,000 Z[sup 0] events) is discussed.

  16. The electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC. A Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Beddo, M.E.; Bielick, E.; Dawson, J.W.; The STAR EMC Collaboration

    1993-09-22

    This report discusses the following on the electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC: conceptual design; the physics of electromagnetic calorimetry in STAR; trigger capability; integration into STAR; and cost, schedule, manpower, and funding.

  17. Nose-cone calorimeter: PHENIX forward upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvala, Ondrej

    2009-07-01

    PHENIX is a high rate experiment efficient at measuring rare processes, but has limited acceptance in azimuth and pseudorapidity ( η). The Nose Cone Calorimeter (NCC), a W-Si sampling calorimeter in the region of 0.9< η<3, is one of the upgrades which will significantly increase coverage in both azimuth and pseudorapidity. The NCC will expand PHENIX’s precision measurements of electromagnetic probes in η, reconstruct jets, perform a wide scope of correlation measurements, and enhance triggering capabilities. The detector will significantly contribute to measurements of γ-jet correlations, quarkonia production, and low- x nuclear structure functions. This report discusses details of the detector design and its performance concerning a sample of the physics topics which will benefit from the NCC. In view of recent funding difficulties, outlook of the activities is discussed.

  18. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Kim, K. C.; Seo, E. S.; Sina, R.; Wang, J. Z.; Wu, J.; Case, G.; Ellison, S. B.; Gould, R.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) experiment is designed to measure the composition and energy spectra of Z = 1 to 28 cosmic rays over the energy range of approximately 10 GeV - 100 TeV. ATIC is comprised of an eight-layer, 18 radiation length deep Bismuth Germanate (BGO) calorimeter, downstream of a 0.75 nuclear interaction length graphite target and an approximately 1 sq m finely segmented silicon charge detector. Interleaved with the graphite layers are three scintillator strip hodoscopes for pre-triggering and tracking. ATIC flew for the first time on a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) launched from McMurdo, Antarctica in January 2001. During its 16-day flight ATIC collected more than 30 million science events, along with housekeeping, calibration, and rate data. This presentation will describe the ATIC data processing, including calibration and efficiency corrections, and show results from analysis of this dataset. The next launch is planned for December 2002.

  19. Performance of the DELPHI small angle tile calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Alvsvaag, S.J.; Maeland, O.A.; Klovning, A.

    1996-06-01

    The DELPHI STIC detector is a lead-scintillator sampling calorimeter with wave length shifting optical fibers used for light collection. The main goal of the calorimeter at LEP100 is to measure the luminosity with an accuracy better than 0.1%. The detector has been in operation since the 1994 LEP run. Presented here is the performance measured during the 1994--1995 LEP runs, with the emphasis on the achieved energy and space resolution, the long-term stability and the efficiency of the detector. The new bunchtrains mode of LEP requires a rather sophisticated trigger and timing scheme which is also presented. To control the trigger efficiency and stability of the calorimeter channels, a LED-based monitoring system has been developed.

  20. Cumulative Coulomb Stress Triggering as an Explanation for the Canterbury (New Zealand) Aftershock Sequence: Initial Conditions Are Everything?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark; Harte, David; Williams, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Using 2 years of aftershock data and three fault-plane solutions for each of the initial M7.1 Darfield earthquake and the larger (M >6) aftershocks, we conduct a detailed examination of Coulomb stress transfer in the Canterbury 2010-2011 earthquake sequence. Moment tensor solutions exist for 283 of the events with M ≥ 3.6, while 713 other events of M ≥ 3.6 have only hypocentre and magnitude information available. We look at various methods for deciding between the two possible mechanisms for the 283 events with moment tensor solutions, including conformation to observed surface faulting, and maximum ΔCFF transfer from the Darfield main shock. For the remaining events, imputation methods for the mechanism including nearest-neighbour, kernel smoothing, and optimal plane methods are considered. Fault length, width, and depth are arrived at via a suite of scaling relations. A large (50-70 %) proportion of the faults considered were calculated to have initial loading in excess of the final stress drop. The majority of faults that accumulated positive ΔCFF during the sequence were `encouraged' by the main shock failure, but, on the other hand, of the faults that failed during the sequence, more than 50 % of faults appeared to have accumulated a negative ΔCFF from all preceding failures during the sequence. These results were qualitatively insensitive to any of the factors considered. We conclude that there is much unknown about how Coulomb stress triggering works in practice.

  1. Initial design and results from an ion current collection diagnostic for the triggered plasma opening switch experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Seidel, David Bruce; Gilmore, Mark; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.

    2005-06-01

    Study of the triggered plasma opening switch (TPOS) characteristics is in progress via an ion current collection diagnostic (ICCD), in addition to offline apparatus. This initial ion current collection diagnostic has been designed, fabricated, and tested on the TPOS in order to explore the opening profile of the main switch. The initial ion current collection device utilizes five collectors which are positioned perpendicularly to the main switch stage in order to collect radially traveling ions. It has been shown through analytical prowess that this specific geometry can be treated as a planar case of the Child-Langmuir law with only a 6% deviation from the cylindrical case. Additionally, magnetostatic simulations with self consistent space charge emitting surfaces of the main switch using the Trak code are under way. It is hoped that the simulations will provide evidence in support of both the analytical derivations and experimental data. Finally, an improved design of the ICCD (containing 12 collectors in the axial direction) is presently being implemented.

  2. Gas calorimeter workshop: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Gas calorimeters combining functions of energy measurement and fine tracking have become more and more popular in the past few years. They help identify muons, gammas, electrons, and hadrons within dense tracks from transverse and longitudinal shower development. Fine segmentation capability using pads and strips on the cathodes have made gas-sampling calorimeters very attractive for colliding-beam detectors where a large multiplicity of particles are detected in a projected geometry. Linearity, energy resolution, shower position resolution, multishower resolution, and calibration questions were discussed in detail at the workshop. Ease of energy calibration by monitoring radioactive sources, good gain uniformity, and gain stability obtained were among the topics of the speakers. There was a discussion session on the operation mode of wire chambers. Gas calorimeters have been used successfully at CERN, Cornell, Fermilab, and SLAC for experiments. Some of the results from those large-scale devices were reported. Future usage of gas-sampling calorimeters for colliding-beam experiments at Fermilab and CERN were discussed. Wire chambers using extruded conductive plastic tubes have made construction easy of pads and strips which can conveniently read out induced signals from the cathode. The results of extensive studies on such devices were discussed. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the 17 papers presented. (WHK)

  3. An Inexpensive Solution Calorimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanagh, Emma; Mindel, Sam; Robertson, Giles; Hughes, D. E. Peter

    2008-01-01

    We describe the construction of a simple solution calorimeter, using a miniature bead thermistor as a temperature-sensing element. This has a response time of a few seconds and made it possible to carry out a thermometric reaction in under a minute, which led to minimal heat losses. Small temperature changes of 1 K associated with enthalpies of…

  4. Heavy Photon Search Commissioning Run and Performance of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumila-Vance, Holly; Heavy Photon Search Collaboration Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment at Jefferson Lab will search for a possible new heavy vector boson that couples weakly to electric charge and can decay to e+e- pairs. HPS utilizes an Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECal) for fast triggering and complementary energy information in the reconstruction of the e+e- invariant mass. The ECal is composed of 442 PbWO4 crystals readout through large area avalanche photo-diodes and digitized using flash ADCs. The initial testing and calibration of the ECal began in the fall of 2014 using a light monitoring system, cosmic muons, and 2 GeV beam electrons. Proper performance of the ECal is crucial for optimizing the trigger selection for potential Heavy Photon events and eliminating background from accidentals. This talk covers the design, calibration, and performance of the HPS ECal during the commissioning run.

  5. Aspirin Triggered-Lipoxin A4 Reduces the Adhesion of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils to Endothelial Cells Initiated by Preeclamptic Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Villa, AM; Norling, LV; Serhan, CN; Cordero, D; Rojas, M; Cadavid, A

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia is a disorder of pregnancy, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation. Here, we evaluated the role of aspirin triggered-lipoxin A4 (ATL, 15-epi-LXA4) on the modulation of the adhesion of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to endothelial cells initiated by preeclamptic plasma. Materials and methods Plasma from preeclamptic, normotensive pregnant, and non-pregnant women were analysed for factors involved in regulating angiogenesis, inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Plasma from preeclamptic women was added to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and the adhesion of PMN (incubated with or without ATL) to cells was evaluated. Results Preeclampsia was associated with some augmented anti-angiogenic, oxidative and pro-inflammatory markers, as well as increasing human PMN-endothelial cell adhesion. This cell adhesion was reduced when human PMN were incubated with ATL prior to addition to endothelial monolayers. Discussions and Conclusions Our results are the starting point for further research on the efficacy and rational use of aspirin in preeclampsia. PMID:22974760

  6. The CDF level 2 calorimetric trigger upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, A.; Canepa, A.; Casarsa, M.; Convery, M.; Cortiana, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Donati, S.; Flanagan, G.; Frisch, H.; Fukun, T.; Krop, D.; /Chicago U., EFI /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2009-01-01

    CDF II upgraded the calorimeter trigger to cope with the higher detector occupancy due to the increased Tevatron instantaneous luminosity ({approx} 2.8 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}). While the original system was implemented in custom hardware and provided to the L2 trigger a limited-quality jet clustering performed using a reduced resolution measurement of the transverse energy in the calorimeter trigger towers, the upgraded system provides offline-quality jet reconstruction of the full resolution calorimeter data. This allows to keep better under control the dependence of the trigger rates on the instantaneous luminosity and to improve the efficiency and purity of the trigger selections. The upgraded calorimeter trigger uses the general purpose VME board Pulsar, developed at CDF II and already widely used to upgrade the L2 tracking and L2 decision systems. A battery of Pulsars is used to merge and send the calorimeter data to the L2 CPUs, where software-implemented algorithms perform offline-like clustering. In this paper we review the design and the performance of the upgraded system.

  7. Precision timing calorimeter for high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Peña, Cristián; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Ronzhin, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    Scintillator based calorimeter technology is studied with the aim to achieve particle detection with a time resolution on the order of a few 10 ps for photons and electrons at energies of a few GeV and above. We present results from a prototype of a 1.4×1.4×11.4 cm3 sampling calorimeter cell consisting of tungsten absorber plates and Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal scintillator plates. The LYSO plates are read out with wave lengths shifting fibers which are optically coupled to fast photo detectors on both ends of the fibers. The measurements with electrons were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) and the CERN SPS H2 test beam. In addition to the baseline setup plastic scintillation counter and a MCP-PMT were used as trigger and as a reference for a time of flight measurement (TOF). We also present measurements with a fast laser to further characterize the response of the prototype and the photo sensors. All data were recorded using a DRS4 fast sampling digitizer. These measurements are part of an R&D program whose aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a large scale electromagnetic calorimeter with a time resolution on the order of 10 ps, to be used in high energy physics experiments.

  8. Secondary Emission Calorimeter (SEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. J.; Northrop, Richard; Frisch, Henry; Elagin, Andrey; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Ramberg, Erik; Spiropulu, Maria; Apresyan, Artur; Xie, Si

    2014-06-25

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) the experimenters of University of Chicago and California Institute of Technology, who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2014-2015 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The TSW is intended primarily for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations. The experimenters propose using large-area micro-channel plates assembled without the usual bialkali photocathodes as the active element in sampling calorimeters, Modules without photocathodes can be economically assembled in a glove box and then pumped and sealed using the process to construct photomultipliers, This electromagnetic calorimeter is based on W and Pb absorber plates sandwiched with detectors. Measurements can be made with bare plates and absorber inside the vacuum vessel.

  9. Radionuclide calorimeter system

    DOEpatents

    Donohoue, Thomas P.; Oertel, Christopher P.; Tyree, William H.; Valdez, Joe L.

    1991-11-26

    A circuit for measuring temperature differentials in a calorimeter is disclosed. The temperature differential between the reference element and sample element containing a radioactive material is measured via a wheatstone bridge arrangement of thermistors. The bridge is driven with an alternating current on a pulsed basis to maintain the thermal floor of the calorimeter at a low reference value. A lock-in amplifier connected to the bridge phase locks a signal from the bridge to the input pulsed AC signal to provide a DC voltage. The DC voltage is sampled over time and provided to a digital computer. The digital computer, using curve fitting algorithms, will derive a function for the sample data. From the function, an equilibrium value for the temperature may be calculated.

  10. Radionuclide calorimeter system

    SciTech Connect

    Donohoue, T.P.; Oertel, C.P.; Tyree, W.H.; Valdez, J.L.

    1991-11-26

    A circuit for measuring temperature differentials in a calorimeter is disclosed. The temperature differential between the reference element and sample element containing a radioactive material is measured via a Wheatstone bridge arrangement of thermistors. The bridge is driven with an alternating current on a pulsed basis to maintain the thermal floor of the calorimeter at a low reference value. A lock-in amplifier connected to the bridge phase locks a signal from the bridge to the input pulsed AC signal to provide a DC voltage. The DC voltage is sampled over time and provided to a digital computer. The digital computer, using curve fitting algorithms, will derive a function for the sample data. From the function, an equilibrium value for the temperature may be calculated. 7 figures.

  11. Absorbed dose water calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Domen, S.R.

    1982-01-26

    An absorbed dose water calorimeter that takes advantage of the low thermal diffusivity of water and the water-imperviousness of polyethylene film. An ultra-small bead thermistor is sandwiched between two thin polyethylene films stretched between insulative supports in a water bath. The polyethylene films insulate the thermistor and its leads, the leads being run out from between the films in insulated sleeving and then to junctions to form a wheatstone bridge circuit. Convection barriers may be provided to reduce the effects of convection from the point of measurement. Controlled heating of different levels in the water bath is accomplished by electrical heater circuits provided for controlling temperature drift and providing adiabatic operation of the calorimeter. The absorbed dose is determined from the known specific heat of water and the measured temperature change.

  12. Performance of the VENUS lead-glass calorimeter at TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumiyoshi, T.; Hayashi, K.; Ogawa, K.; Takasaki, F.; Haba, J.; Kamitani, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Osabe, H.; Sugimoto, S.; Yamashita, T.; Sakano, M.; Yoshida, H.; Shino, K.

    1988-09-01

    The initial performance of the VENUS barrel electromagnetic calorimeter at TRISTAN is described. The calorimeter is composed of 5160 lead-glass counters in a semi-tower arrangement. An energy resolution of 3.8% was obtained for 26 GeV Bhabha events. The neutral pions in the hadronic events were reconstructed with a mass resolution of σ = 16 MeV. The gain of the lead-glass counters was stable within 2% during a four months operation at TRISTAN.

  13. Modeling Complex Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a software suite that models complex calorimeters in the time and frequency domain. These models can reproduce all measurements that we currently do in a lab setting, like IV curves, impedance measurements, noise measurements, and pulse generation. Since all these measurements are modeled from one set of parameters, we can fully describe a detector and characterize its behavior. This leads to a model than can be used effectively for engineering and design of detectors for particular applications.

  14. Upgraded readout electronics for the ATLAS LAr calorimeter at the phase I of LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stärz, S.; Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2013-08-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters produce a total of 182,486 signals which are digitized and processed by the front-end and back-end electronics at every triggered event. In addition, the front-end electronics is summing analog signals to provide coarsely grained energy sums, called trigger towers, to the first-level trigger system, which is optimized for nominal LHC luminosities. However, the pile-up noise expected during the high luminosity phases of LHC will be increased by factors of 3-7. An improved spatial granularity of the trigger primitives is therefore proposed in order to improve the identification performance for trigger signatures, like electrons or photons, at high background rejection rates. The general concept of the upgraded LAr calorimeter readout together with the various electronics components to be developed for such a complex system is presented. The R&D activities and architectural studies undertaken by the ATLAS LAr Calorimeter group are described.

  15. DSWA calorimeter bomb experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, B

    1998-10-01

    Two experiments were performed in which 25 grams of TNT were detonated inside an expended detonation calorimeter bomb. The bomb had a contained volume of approximately 5.28 liters. In the first experiment, the bomb was charged with 3 atmospheres of nitrogen. In the second, it was charged with 2.58 atmospheres (23.1 psi gage) of oxygen. In each experiment pressure was monitored over a period of approximately 1200 microseconds after the pulse to the CDU. Monitoring was performed via two 10,000 psi 102AO3 PCB high frequency pressure transducers mounted symmetrically in the lid of the calorimeter bomb. Conditioners used were PCB 482As. The signals from the transducers were recorded in digital format on a multi channel Tektronix scope. The sampling frequency was 10 Mhz (10 samples per microsecond). After a period of cooling following detonation, gas samples were taken and were subsequently submitted for analysis using gas mass spectrometry. Due to a late request for post shot measurement, it was only possible to make a rough estimate of the weight of debris (carbon) remaining in the calorimeter bomb following the second experiment.

  16. Nose-Cone Calorimeter: upgrade of PHENIX detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvala, Ondrej

    2008-10-01

    PHENIX experiment at RHIC is efficient at measuring processes involving rare probes, but has limited acceptance in azimuth and pseudorapidity (η). The Nose Cone Calorimeter (NCC), a W-Si sampling calorimeter in the region of 0.9,<η<,, is one of the upgrades which will dramatically increase coverage in azimuth and pseudorapidity. The NCC will expand PHENIX's precision measurements of electromagnetic probes in η, reconstruct jets, and enhance triggering capabilities. It will significantly contribute to measurements of γ-jets, quarkonia, and low-x nuclear structure functions. Details of the detector design, performance, and a sample of the physics topics which will benefit from the NCC, will be discussed.

  17. Development of COTS ADC SEE Test System for the ATLAS LArCalorimeter Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xue -Ye; Chen, Hu -Cheng; Chen, Kai; Mead, Joseph; Liu, Shu -Bin; An, Qi

    2014-12-01

    Radiation-tolerant, high speed, high density and low power commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are planned to be used in the upgrade to the Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter front end (FE) trigger readout electronics. Total ionization dose (TID) and single event effect (SEE) are two important radiation effects which need to be characterized on COTS ADCs. In our initial TID test, Texas Instruments (TI) ADS5272 was identified to be the top performer after screening a total 17 COTS ADCs from different manufacturers with dynamic range and sampling rate meeting the requirements of the FE electronics. Another interesting feature of ADS5272 is its 6.5 clock cycles latency, which is the shortest among the 17 candidates. Based on the TID performance, we have designed a SEE evaluation system for ADS5272, which allows us to further assess its radiation tolerance. In this paper, we present a detailed design of ADS5272 SEE evaluation system and show the effectiveness of this system while evaluating ADS5272 SEE characteristics in multiple irradiation tests. According to TID and SEE test results, ADS5272 was chosen to be implemented in the full-size LAr Trigger Digitizer Board (LTDB) demonstrator, which will be installed on ATLAS calorimeter during the 2014 Long Shutdown 1 (LS1).

  18. Development of COTS ADC SEE Test System for the ATLAS LArCalorimeter Upgrade

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Xue -Ye; Chen, Hu -Cheng; Chen, Kai; Mead, Joseph; Liu, Shu -Bin; An, Qi

    2014-12-01

    Radiation-tolerant, high speed, high density and low power commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are planned to be used in the upgrade to the Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter front end (FE) trigger readout electronics. Total ionization dose (TID) and single event effect (SEE) are two important radiation effects which need to be characterized on COTS ADCs. In our initial TID test, Texas Instruments (TI) ADS5272 was identified to be the top performer after screening a total 17 COTS ADCs from different manufacturers with dynamic range and sampling rate meeting the requirements of the FE electronics. Another interesting feature of ADS5272more » is its 6.5 clock cycles latency, which is the shortest among the 17 candidates. Based on the TID performance, we have designed a SEE evaluation system for ADS5272, which allows us to further assess its radiation tolerance. In this paper, we present a detailed design of ADS5272 SEE evaluation system and show the effectiveness of this system while evaluating ADS5272 SEE characteristics in multiple irradiation tests. According to TID and SEE test results, ADS5272 was chosen to be implemented in the full-size LAr Trigger Digitizer Board (LTDB) demonstrator, which will be installed on ATLAS calorimeter during the 2014 Long Shutdown 1 (LS1).« less

  19. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA grant NAGW-4577, "Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)". This grant covered a joint project between LSU and the University of Maryland for a Concept Study of a new type of fully active calorimeter to be used to measure the energy spectra of very high energy cosmic rays, particularly Hydrogen and Helium, to beyond 1014 eV. This very high energy region has been studied with emulsion chamber techniques, but never investigated with electronic calorimeters. Technology had advanced to the point that a fully active calorimeter based upon Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillating crystals appeared feasible for balloon flight (and eventually space) experiments.

  20. Thermal effects on the STAR electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Fornek, T.; Guarino, V.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.

    1994-07-19

    The STAR detector for the RHIC colliding beam accelerator is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This detector will consist of a number of subsystems. These include a silicon vertex detector (SVT) for charged particle tracks near the interaction region, a time projection chamber (TPC) for charged particle tracking, an array of plastic scintillation counters (CTB) in a layer around the TPC for triggering on charged particles, a conventional solenoidal magnet, and some additional small triggering detectors along the beam-line. An electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) is an upgrade to the ``baseline`` detector configuration above. The conventional magnet and numerous electronic channels for the SVT and TPC subsystems will generate a considerable amount of heat during the operation of STAR. However, it is possible that a chiller for the magnet cooling water will not be available during some of the early STAR runs. As a result, the average magnet temperature may vary considerably between winter and summer. This note summarizes calculations and measurements performed to evaluate the effects of an elevated magnet temperature on the performance of the electromagnetic calorimeter.

  1. End Calorimeter Warm Tube Heater

    SciTech Connect

    Primdahl, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-08-06

    The Tevatron accelerator beam tube must pass through the End Calorimeter cryostats of the D-Zero Collider Detector. Furthermore, the End Calorimeter cryostats must be allowed to roll back forty inches without interruption of the vacuum system; hence, the Tev tube must slide through the End Calorimeter cryostat as it is rolled back. The Tev pass through the End Calorimeter can actually be thought of as a cluster of concentric tubes: Tev tube, warm (vacuum vessel) tube, IS layers of superinsulation, cold tube (argon vessel), and Inner Hadronic center support tube. M. Foley generated an ANSYS model to study the heat load. to the cryostat. during collider physics studies; that is, without operation of the heater. A sketch of the model is included in the appendix. The vacuum space and superinsulation was modeled as a thermal solid, with conductivity derived from tests performed at Fermilab. An additional estimate was done. by this author, using data supplied by NR-2. a superinsulation manufacturer. The ANSYS result and hand calculation are in close agreement. The ANSYS model was modified. by this author. to incorporate the effect of the heater. Whereas the earlier model studied steady state operation only. the revised model considers the heater-off steady state mode as the initial condition. then performs a transient analysis with a final load step for time tending towards infinity. Results show the thermal gradient as a function of time and applied voltage. It should be noted that M. Foley's model was generated for one half the warm tube. implying the tube to be symmetric. In reality. the downstream connection (relative to the collision point) attachment to the vacuum shell is via several convolutions of a 0.020-inch wall bellows; hence. a nearly adiabatic boundary condition. Accordingly. the results reported in the table reflect extrapolation of the curves to the downstream end of the tube. Using results from the ANSYS analysis, that is, tube temperature and

  2. A FOrward CALorimeter Upgrade For PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, Richard S.

    2011-06-01

    Over the past few years, the PHENIX detector has undergone several upgrades in the forward region (1<|{eta}|<4), initially covered only by the muon arms. The focus of these upgrades is toward a better understanding of the Color-Glass Condensate and the interplay between the different components of the proton's spin valence/sea quark and gluon contributions. This paper highlights the newly proposed forward calorimeter detector, FOCAL. FOCAL is a tungsten-silicon sampling calorimeter with high position and energy resolution, covering a pseudorapidity of 1.6<{eta}<2.5. This future detector aims to constrain the current view of gluon saturation at small x in the Color-Glass Condensate framework, through isolation of direct photons at high-p{sub T} over a broad range of pseudorapidity.

  3. Design and status of the Mu2e electromagnetic calorimeter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Atanov, N.; Baranov, V.; Budagov, J.; Carosi, R.; Cervelli, F.; Colao, F.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Dane, E.; Davydov, Yu. I.; et al

    2015-10-02

    Here, the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab aims at measuring the neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron and reach a single event sensitivity of 2.5×10–17 after three years of data taking. The monoenergetic electron produced in the final state, is detected by a high precision tracker and a crystal calorimeter, all embedded in a large superconducting solenoid (SD) surrounded by a cosmic ray veto system. The calorimeter is complementary to the tracker, allowing an independent trigger and powerful particle identification, while seeding the track reconstruction and contributing to remove background tracks mimicking the signal. In order to matchmore » these requirements, the calorimeter should have an energy resolution of O(5)% and a time resolution better than 500 ps at 100 MeV. The baseline solution is a calorimeter composed of two disks of BaF2 crystals read by UV extended, solar blind, Avalanche Photodiode (APDs), which are under development from a JPL, Caltech, RMD consortium. In this paper, the calorimeter design, the R&D; studies carried out so far and the status of engineering are described. A backup alternative setup consisting of a pure CsI crystal matrix read by UV extended Hamamatsu MPPC's is also presented.« less

  4. The ATLAS tile calorimeter performance at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, R.

    2011-07-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal), the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, is a key detector component to detect hadrons, jets and taus and to measure the missing transverse energy. Due to the very good muon signal to noise ratio it assists the spectrometer in the identification and reconstruction of muons. TileCal is built of steel and scintillating tiles coupled to optical fibers and read out by photomultipliers. The calorimeter is equipped with systems that allow to monitor and to calibrate each stage of the read out system exploiting different signal sources: laser light, charge injection and a radioactive source. The performance of the calorimeter has been measured and monitored using calibration data, random triggered data, cosmic muons and more importantly LHC collision events. The results presented here assess the absolute energy scale calibration precision, the energy and timing uniformity and the synchronization precision. The ensemble of the results demonstrates a very good understanding of the performance of the Tile Calorimeter that is proved to be well within the design expectations. (authors)

  5. Design and status of the Mu2e electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Atanov, N.; Baranov, V.; Budagov, J.; Carosi, R.; Cervelli, F.; Colao, F.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Dane, E.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Di Falco, S.; Donati, S.; Donghia, R.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.; Giovannella, S.; Glagolev, V.; Grancagnolo, F.; Happacher, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, Stefano; Miyashita, T.; Morescalchi, L.; Murat, P.; Pasciuto, D.; Pezzullo, G.; Porter, F.; Saputi, A.; Sarra, I.; Soleti, S. R.; Spinella, F.; Tassielli, G.; Tereshchenko, V.; Usubov, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.

    2015-10-02

    Here, the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab aims at measuring the neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron and reach a single event sensitivity of 2.5×10–17 after three years of data taking. The monoenergetic electron produced in the final state, is detected by a high precision tracker and a crystal calorimeter, all embedded in a large superconducting solenoid (SD) surrounded by a cosmic ray veto system. The calorimeter is complementary to the tracker, allowing an independent trigger and powerful particle identification, while seeding the track reconstruction and contributing to remove background tracks mimicking the signal. In order to match these requirements, the calorimeter should have an energy resolution of O(5)% and a time resolution better than 500 ps at 100 MeV. The baseline solution is a calorimeter composed of two disks of BaF2 crystals read by UV extended, solar blind, Avalanche Photodiode (APDs), which are under development from a JPL, Caltech, RMD consortium. In this paper, the calorimeter design, the R&D; studies carried out so far and the status of engineering are described. A backup alternative setup consisting of a pure CsI crystal matrix read by UV extended Hamamatsu MPPC's is also presented.

  6. Design and status of the Mu2e electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanov, N.; Baranov, V.; Budagov, J.; Carosi, R.; Cervelli, F.; Colao, F.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Dané, E.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Di Falco, S.; Donati, S.; Donghia, R.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.; Giovannella, S.; Glagolev, V.; Grancagnolo, F.; Happacher, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Miyashita, T.; Morescalchi, L.; Murat, P.; Pasciuto, D.; Pezzullo, G.; Porter, F.; Saputi, A.; Sarra, I.; Soleti, S. R.; Spinella, F.; Tassielli, G.; Tereshchenko, V.; Usubov, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.

    2016-07-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab aims at measuring the neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron and reach a single event sensitivity of 2.5 ×10-17 after three years of data taking. The monoenergetic electron produced in the final state, is detected by a high precision tracker and a crystal calorimeter, all embedded in a large superconducting solenoid (SD) surrounded by a cosmic ray veto system. The calorimeter is complementary to the tracker, allowing an independent trigger and powerful particle identification, while seeding the track reconstruction and contributing to remove background tracks mimicking the signal. In order to match these requirements, the calorimeter should have an energy resolution of O(5)% and a time resolution better than 500 ps at 100 MeV. The baseline solution is a calorimeter composed of two disks of BaF2 crystals read by UV extended, solar blind, Avalanche Photodiode (APDs), which are under development from a JPL, Caltech, RMD consortium. In this paper, the calorimeter design, the R&D studies carried out so far and the status of engineering are described. A backup alternative setup consisting of a pure CsI crystal matrix read by UV extended Hamamatsu MPPC's is also presented.

  7. Towards a compensatable Muon Collider calorimeter with manageable backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-04-01

    Muon Collider detectors pose very challenging problems in detector technology due to extremely large backgrounds present in the detector volume as a result of muon decays. Current designs of a 750 GeV/c per beam Muon Collider envisage 4.28 x 10{sup 5} muon decays per meter in the beam pipe close to the interaction region. The decay electrons after intense shielding still manage to produce large backgrounds in the detector volume of low energy photons, neutrons and higher energy Bethe Heitler muons. There are 170/184/6.8/177 TeVs energy entering the detector volume per crossing due to EM particles/Muons/Mesons/Baryons respectively. We investigate the capabilities of an iron calorimeter with pixelated readout where each pixel gives a yes/no answer as to whether a charged particle passed through it or not, to solve this problem. Each pixel is individually triggered by a 'travelling gate trigger' with a gate of 2 ns where the beginning of the gate is the time of arrival of a light signal from the interaction region to the pixel. We show that such a calorimeter is compensatable and propose two schemes to compensate the digital output in software to improve the resolution of the calorimeter. We show that such a calorimeter is capable of digitizing physics signals from the interaction region and as a result, the backgrounds from the muon decays are much reduced and under control.

  8. Motivational Modulation of Self-Initiated and Externally Triggered Movement Speed Induced by Threat of Shock: Experimental Evidence for Paradoxical Kinesis in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Louise M.; Griffin, Harry J.; Angeli, Aikaterini; Torkamani, Mariam; Georgiev, Dejan; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Background Paradoxical kinesis has been observed in bradykinetic people with Parkinson’s disease. Paradoxical kinesis occurs in situations where an individual is strongly motivated or influenced by relevant external cues. Our aim was to induce paradoxical kinesis in the laboratory. We tested whether the motivation of avoiding a mild electric shock was sufficient to induce paradoxical kinesis in externally-triggered and self-initiated conditions in people with Parkinson’s disease tested on medication and in age-matched controls. Methods Participants completed a shock avoidance behavioural paradigm in which half of the trials could result in a mild electric shock if the participant did not move fast enough. Half of the trials of each type were self-initiated and half were externally-triggered. The criterion for avoiding shock was a maximum movement time, adjusted according to each participant’s performance on previous trials using a staircase tracking procedure. Results On trials with threat of shock, both patients with Parkinson’s disease and controls had faster movement times compared to no potential shock trials, in both self-initiated and externally-triggered conditions. The magnitude of improvement of movement time from no potential shock to potential shock trials was positively correlated with anxiety ratings. Conclusions When motivated to avoid mild electric shock, patients with Parkinson’s disease, similar to healthy controls, showed significant speeding of movement execution. This was observed in both self-initiated and externally-triggered versions of the task. Nevertheless, in the ET condition the improvement of reaction times induced by motivation to avoid shocks was greater for the PD patients than controls, highlighting the value of external cues for movement initiation in PD patients. The magnitude of improvement from the no potential shock to the potential shock trials was associated with the threat-induced anxiety. This demonstration of

  9. Installation and operation of recording calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Kersey, A.F.

    1984-04-01

    The Cutler-Hammer recording calorimeter is illustrated in this paper. This calorimeter measures the total calorific value of combustible gas, and continuously samples, indicates, and records BTU per cubic foot. The paper emphasizes the importance of calorimeter accuracy. It is suggested that the calorimeter manufacturer be consulted for advice and assistance in developing a sound service program for trouble shooting and for service.

  10. An absorbed dose calorimeter for IMRT dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duane, S.; Aldehaybes, M.; Bailey, M.; Lee, N. D.; Thomas, C. G.; Palmans, H.

    2012-10-01

    A new calorimeter for dosimetry in small and complex fields has been built. The device is intended for the direct determination of absorbed dose to water in moderately small fields and in composite fields such as IMRT treatments, and as a transfer instrument calibrated against existing absorbed dose standards in conventional reference conditions. The geometry, materials and mode of operation have been chosen to minimize detector perturbations when used in a water phantom, to give a reasonably isotropic response and to minimize the effects of heat transfer when the calorimeter is used in non-reference conditions in a water phantom. The size of the core is meant to meet the needs of measurement in IMRT treatments and is comparable to the size of the air cavity in a type NE2611 ionization chamber. The calorimeter may also be used for small field dosimetry. Initial measurements in reference conditions and in an IMRT head and neck plan, collapsed to gantry angle zero, have been made to estimate the thermal characteristics of the device, and to assess its performance in use. The standard deviation (estimated repeatability) of the reference absorbed dose measurements was 0.02 Gy (0.6%).

  11. The CDF miniplug calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Lami, Stefano

    2002-06-28

    Two MiniPlug calorimeters, designed to measure the energy and lateral position of particles in the (forward) pseudorapidity region of 3.6 < |{nu}| < 5.2 of the CDF detector, have been recently installed as part of the Run II CDF upgrade at the Tevatron {bar p}p collider. They consist of lead/liquid scintillator read out by wavelength shifting fibers arranged in a pixel-type towerless geometry suitable for ''calorimetric tracking''. The design concept, the prototype performance and the final design of the MiniPlugs are here described. A recent cosmic ray test resulted in a light yield of approximately 100 pe/MIP, which exceeds our design requirements.

  12. The LHCb Trigger System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, E.; LHCb Collaboration

    2007-08-01

    The LHCb detector has been conceived to study with high precision CP violation and rare decays of b-flavoured hadrons produced at the LHC. The LHCb trigger is of crucial importance in selecting the collisions of interest for b-physics studies. The trigger is based on a two-level system. The first level, Level-0, is implemented in hardware and uses information from the calorimeter, muon and pile-up systems to select events containing particles with relatively large transverse momentum, typically above 1-2 GeV. The Level-0 trigger accepts events at a rate of 1 MHz. All the detector information is then read out and fed into the High Level Trigger. This software trigger runs in the event-filter farm composed of about 1800 CPU nodes. Events are selected at a rate of 2 kHz and sent for mass storage and subsequent offline reconstruction and analysis. The current status and expected performance of the trigger system are described.

  13. Containerless high temperature calorimeter apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A calorimeter apparatus for measuring high temperature thermophysical properties of materials is disclosed which includes a containerless heating apparatus in which the specimen is suspended and heated by electron bombardment.

  14. The VENUS barrel electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, K.; Hayashi, K.; Iwai, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Teramoto, Y.; Uehara, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Kusomoto, H.; Yoshida, H.

    1986-02-01

    The VENUS barrel electromagnetic calorimeter for the TRISTAN electron-positron colliding experiment now under construction is described. It is composed of 5160 lead glass counters pointing to interaction point. It covers polar angles of 37°-143° and whole azimuthal angles. The energy resolution of this calorimeter is measured to be typically σ/E = 0.7% + 5.2%/√E.

  15. Experimental evidence for seismically initiated gas bubble nucleation and growth in groundwater as a mechanism for coseismic borehole water level rise and remotely triggered seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.; Cooper, Clay A.

    2014-09-01

    Changes in borehole water levels and remotely triggered seismicity occur in response to near and distant earthquakes at locations around the globe, but the mechanisms for these phenomena are not well understood. Experiments were conducted to show that seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater can trigger a sustained increase in pore fluid pressure consistent in magnitude with observed coseismic borehole water level rise, constituting a physically plausible mechanism for remote triggering of secondary earthquakes through the reduction of effective stress in critically loaded geologic faults. A portion of the CO2 degassing from the Earth's crust dissolves in groundwater where seismic Rayleigh and P waves cause dilational strain, which can reduce pore fluid pressure to or below the bubble pressure, triggering CO2 gas bubble growth in the saturated zone, indicated by a spontaneous buildup of pore fluid pressure. Excess pore fluid pressure was measured in response to the application of 0.1-1.0 MPa, 0.01-0.30 Hz confining stress oscillations to a Berea sandstone core flooded with initially subsaturated aqueous CO2, under conditions representative of a confined aquifer. Confining stress oscillations equivalent to the dynamic stress of the 28 June 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers, California, earthquake Rayleigh wave as it traveled through the Long Valley caldera, and Parkfield, California, increased the pore fluid pressure in the Berea core by an average of 36 ± 15 cm and 23 ± 15 cm of equivalent freshwater head, respectively, in agreement with 41.8 cm and 34 cm rises recorded in wells at those locations.

  16. SCA controller for the ATLAS calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gingrich, D.M.; Hewlett, J.C.; Holm, L.

    1997-12-31

    The front-end readout of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter will store data locally in analog pipeline memories at the LHC beam crossing frequency of 40 MHz. Switched capacitor array chips meeting the ATLAS readout requirements will be used. These new chips axe capable of simultaneous read and write operations, and allow random access to storage locations. To utilize these essential design features requires a substantial amount of fast control and address bookkeeping logic. We have designed a controller capable of operating the pipelines as analog random access memories and that satisfies the ATLAS readout requirements. The pipeline controller manages the data of 144 time samples and can operate at a mean trigger rate of about 75 kHz, when reading out five time samples per event. We are currently prototyping an integrated version of the controller implemented in a FPGA from Xilinx.

  17. Progress status for the Mu2e calorimeter system

    SciTech Connect

    Pezzullo, Gianantonio; Budagov, J.; Carosi, R.; Cervelli, F.; Cheng, C.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Davydov, Yu.; Echenard, B.; Giovannella, S.; Glagolev, V.; Happacher, F.; Hitlin, D.; Luca, A.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Murat, P.; Ongmonkolkul, P.; Porter, F.; Saputi, A.; Sarra, I.; Spinella, F.; Stomaci, V.; Tassielli, G.

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at FNAL aims to measure the charged-lepton flavor violating neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron. The conversion results in a monochromatic electron with an energy slightly below the muon rest mass (104.97 MeV). The calorimeter should confirm that the candidates reconstructed by the extremely precise tracker system are indeed conversion electrons while performing a powerful $\\mu/e$ particle identification. Moreover, it should also provide a high level trigger for the experiment independently from the tracker system. The calorimeter should also be able to keep functionality in an environment where the background delivers a dose of ~ 10 krad/year in the hottest area and to work in the presence of 1 T axial magnetic field. These requirements translate in the design of a calorimeter with large acceptance, good energy resolution O(5%) and a reasonable position (time) resolution of ~<1 cm (<0.5ns). The baseline version of the calorimeter is composed by two disks of inner (outer) radius of 351 (660) mm filled by 1860 hexagonal $BaF_2$ crystals of 20 cm length. Each crystal is readout by two large area APD's. In this study, we summarize the experimental tests done so far as well as the simulation studies in the Mu2e environment.

  18. Progress status for the Mu2e calorimeter system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pezzullo, Gianantonio; Budagov, J.; Carosi, R.; Cervelli, F.; Cheng, C.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Davydov, Yu.; Echenard, B.; Giovannella, S.; et al

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at FNAL aims to measure the charged-lepton flavor violating neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron. The conversion results in a monochromatic electron with an energy slightly below the muon rest mass (104.97 MeV). The calorimeter should confirm that the candidates reconstructed by the extremely precise tracker system are indeed conversion electrons while performing a powerfulmore » $$\\mu/e$$ particle identification. Moreover, it should also provide a high level trigger for the experiment independently from the tracker system. The calorimeter should also be able to keep functionality in an environment where the background delivers a dose of ~ 10 krad/year in the hottest area and to work in the presence of 1 T axial magnetic field. These requirements translate in the design of a calorimeter with large acceptance, good energy resolution O(5%) and a reasonable position (time) resolution of ~<1 cm (<0.5ns). The baseline version of the calorimeter is composed by two disks of inner (outer) radius of 351 (660) mm filled by 1860 hexagonal $BaF_2$ crystals of 20 cm length. Each crystal is readout by two large area APD's. In this study, we summarize the experimental tests done so far as well as the simulation studies in the Mu2e environment.« less

  19. Operational experience with the CMS hadronic calorimeter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetkin, Taylan; CMS Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) of CMS was commissioned before and during the initial proton collisions in Large Hadron Collider. Various phases of HCAL commissioning were used to gain operational experience and prepare the detector for physics. In this note we briefly summarize the activities and outcomes from the the commissioning studies.

  20. Thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Richard E.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters are modeled using a lumped heat transfer analysis in which heat is released in a pressure vessel/bomb immersed in a stirred water bath that is surrounded by a static air space bounded by an insulated (static) jacket, a constant/controlled temperature jacket (isoperibol), or a changing temperature (adiabatic) jacket. The temperature history of the water bath for each of these boundary conditions (methods) is well described by the two-term solution for the calorimeter response to a heat impulse (combustion), allowing the heat transfer coefficients and thermal capacities of the bomb and water bath to be determined parametrically. The validated heat transfer model provides an expression for direct calculation of the heat released in an arbitrary process inside a bomb calorimeter using the temperature history of the water bath for each of the boundary conditions (methods). This result makes possible the direct calculation of the heat of combustion of a sample in an isoperibol calorimeter from the recorded temperature history without the need for semi-empirical temperature corrections to account for non-adiabatic behavior. Another useful result is that the maximum temperature rise of the water bath in the static jacket method is proportional to the total heat generated, and the empirical proportionality constant, which is determined by calibration, accounts for all of the heat losses and thermal lags of the calorimeter.

  1. Thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    The thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters are modeled using a lumped heat transfer analysis in which heat is released in a pressure vessel/bomb immersed in a stirred water bath that is surrounded by a static air space bounded by an insulated (static) jacket, a constant/controlled temperature jacket (isoperibol), or a changing temperature (adiabatic) jacket. The temperature history of the water bath for each of these boundary conditions (methods) is well described by the two-term solution for the calorimeter response to a heat impulse (combustion), allowing the heat transfer coefficients and thermal capacities of the bomb and water bath to be determined parametrically. The validated heat transfer model provides an expression for direct calculation of the heat released in an arbitrary process inside a bomb calorimeter using the temperature history of the water bath for each of the boundary conditions (methods). This result makes possible the direct calculation of the heat of combustion of a sample in an isoperibol calorimeter from the recorded temperature history without the need for semi-empirical temperature corrections to account for non-adiabatic behavior. Another useful result is that the maximum temperature rise of the water bath in the static jacket method is proportional to the total heat generated, and the empirical proportionality constant, which is determined by calibration, accounts for all of the heat losses and thermal lags of the calorimeter.

  2. Thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    The thermal dynamics of bomb calorimeters are modeled using a lumped heat transfer analysis in which heat is released in a pressure vessel/bomb immersed in a stirred water bath that is surrounded by a static air space bounded by an insulated (static) jacket, a constant/controlled temperature jacket (isoperibol), or a changing temperature (adiabatic) jacket. The temperature history of the water bath for each of these boundary conditions (methods) is well described by the two-term solution for the calorimeter response to a heat impulse (combustion), allowing the heat transfer coefficients and thermal capacities of the bomb and water bath to be determined parametrically. The validated heat transfer model provides an expression for direct calculation of the heat released in an arbitrary process inside a bomb calorimeter using the temperature history of the water bath for each of the boundary conditions (methods). This result makes possible the direct calculation of the heat of combustion of a sample in an isoperibol calorimeter from the recorded temperature history without the need for semi-empirical temperature corrections to account for non-adiabatic behavior. Another useful result is that the maximum temperature rise of the water bath in the static jacket method is proportional to the total heat generated, and the empirical proportionality constant, which is determined by calibration, accounts for all of the heat losses and thermal lags of the calorimeter. PMID:26724069

  3. Design, performance, and calibration of the CMS hadron-outer calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.; Adam, N.; Adams, M.; Akchurin, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E.; Anderson, E. W.; Antchev, G.; Arcidy, M.; Ayan, S.; Aydin, S.; Aziz, T.; Baarmand, M.; Babich, K.; Baden, D.; Bakirci, M. N.; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bard, R.; Barnes, V.; Bawa, H.; Baiatian, G.; Bencze, G.; Beri, S.; Berntzon, L.; Bhandari, V.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bodek, A.; Bose, S.; Bose, T.; Budd, H.; Burchesky, K.; Camporesi, T.; Cankoçak, K.; Carrell, K.; Cerci, S.; Chendvankar, S.; Chung, Y.; Clarida, W.; Cremaldi, L.; Cushman, P.; Damgov, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Debbins, P.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Demianov, A.; de Visser, T.; Deshpande, P. V.; Diaz, J.; Dimitrov, L.; Dugad, S.; Dumanoglu, I.; Duru, F.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Elias, J.; Elvira, D.; Emeliantchik, I.; Eno, S.; Ershov, A.; Erturk, S.; Esen, S.; Eskut, E.; Fenyvesi, A.; Fisher, W.; Freeman, J.; Ganguli, S. N.; Gaultney, V.; Gamsizkan, H.; Gavrilov, V.; Genchev, V.; Gleyzer, S.; Golutvin, I.; Goncharov, P.; Grassi, T.; Green, D.; Gribushin, A.; Grinev, B.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Murat Güler, A.; Gülmez, E.; Gümüş, K.; Haelen, T.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Halyo, V.; Hashemi, M.; Hauptman, J.; Hazen, E.; Heering, A.; Heister, A.; Hunt, A.; Ilyina, N.; Ingram, D.; Isiksal, E.; Jarvis, C.; Jeong, C.; Johnson, K.; Jones, J.; Kaftanov, V.; Kalagin, V.; Kalinin, A.; Kalmani, S.; Karmgard, D.; Kaur, M.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Kellogg, R.; Khmelnikov, A.; Kim, H.; Kisselevich, I.; Kodolova, O.; Kohli, J.; Kolossov, V.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Y.; Kosarev, I.; Kramer, L.; Krinitsyn, A.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krokhotin, A.; Kryshkin, V.; Kuleshov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Laasanen, A.; Ladygin, V.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Laszlo, A.; Lawlor, C.; Lazic, D.; Lee, S. W.; Levchuk, L.; Linn, S.; Litvintsev, D.; Lobolo, L.; Los, S.; Lubinsky, V.; Lukanin, V.; Ma, Y.; Machado, E.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mans, J.; Marlow, D.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Merlo, J. P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mescheryakov, G.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M.; Moeller, A.; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M.; Moissenz, P.; Mondal, N.; Mossolov, V.; Nagaraj, P.; Narasimham, V. S.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Onengut, G.; Ozkan, C.; Ozkurt, H.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Ozok, F.; Paktinat, S.; Pal, A.; Patil, M.; Penzo, A.; Petrushanko, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Pikalov, V.; Piperov, S.; Podrasky, V.; Polatoz, A.; Pompos, A.; Popescu, S.; Posch, C.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Qian, W.; Ralich, R. M.; Reddy, L.; Reidy, J.; Rogalev, E.; Roh, Y.; Rohlf, J.; Ronzhin, A.; Ruchti, R.; Ryazanov, A.; Safronov, G.; Sanders, D. A.; Sanzeni, C.; Sarycheva, L.; Satyanarayana, B.; Schmidt, I.; Sekmen, S.; Semenov, S.; Senchishin, V.; Sergeyev, S.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Singh, B.; Singh, J. B.; Sirunyan, A.; Skuja, A.; Sharma, S.; Sherwood, B.; Shumeiko, N.; Smirnov, V.; Sogut, K.; Sonmez, N.; Sorokin, P.; Spezziga, M.; Stefanovich, R.; Stolin, V.; Sudhakar, K.; Sulak, L.; Suzuki, I.; Talov, V.; Teplov, K.; Thomas, R.; Tonwar, S.; Topakli, H.; Tully, C.; Turchanovich, L.; Ulyanov, A.; Vanini, A.; Vankov, I.; Vardanyan, I.; Varela, F.; Vergili, M.; Verma, P.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vidal, R.; Vishnevskiy, A.; Vlassov, E.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Volobouev, I.; Volkov, A.; Volodko, A.; Wang, L.; Werner, J.; Wetstein, M.; Winn, D.; Wigmans, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, S. X.; Yazgan, E.; Yetkin, T.; Zalan, P.; Zarubin, A.; Zeyrek, M.

    2008-10-01

    The Outer Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL HO) of the CMS detector is designed to measure the energy that is not contained by the barrel (HCAL HB) and electromagnetic (ECAL EB) calorimeters. Due to space limitation the barrel calorimeters do not contain completely the hadronic shower and an outer calorimeter (HO) was designed, constructed and inserted in the muon system of CMS to measure the energy leakage. Testing and calibration of the HO was carried out in a 300 GeV/c test beam that improved the linearity and resolution. HO will provide a net improvement in missing E T measurements at LHC energies. Information from HO will also be used for the muon trigger in CMS.

  4. Detection of gamma quanta due to {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} decays by a modular electromagnetic calorimeter with a neutral trigger under a 40-GeV {pi}{sup -} beam

    SciTech Connect

    Barkov, B.P.; Katinov, Y.V.; Lisin, V.I.

    1994-11-01

    We have previously generated a YAC contig of the SMA region on chromosome 5q13 and initiated construction of a corresponding cosmid contig from these YAC clones and a chromosome 5 cosmid library. In order to screen for candidate genes from this area, a cosmid containing CATT1, a microsatellite marker, in linkage disequilibrium with SMA was used to screen a fetal brain library. The largest cDNA clone (2.2 Kb) isolated from this library, GA1, was mapped back to the original cosmid and then characterized. Screening of a spinal cord library with the GA1 cDNA identified a 700 bp clone. Hybridization to a zoo blot revealed cross-species conservation in pig, sheep, goat and horse. Sequencing of GA1 identified 2221 bp with no long open reading frame or poly A tail. Analysis of this sequence with `grail` showed a small potential coding region of 75 bp coding for 25 amino acids. A database search for homologous sequence using `blast` did not show any significant matches. Furthermore, no introns were identified in genomic subclones when compared to the cDNA sequence by using PCR and various combinations of GA1 sequence-derived primers. Experiments with RT-PCR on DNase-treated total mRNA from adult brain, fibroblasts and liver identified the anticipated GA1 product from fibroblast mRNA only. RACE extension of the cDNA clone revealed that we were dealing with the full-length transcript. Subsequent fine mapping with various combinations of GA1 PCR primers to PAC clones in this region identified 1 copy of a novel 300 bp sequence that has undergone a microduplication yielding several copies of this sequence in a 300 Kb segment of the SMA critical region. PCR-based mutational analysis has not revealed any alteration peculiar to SMA chromosomes. A search for polymorphisms with the GA1 sequence to use in SMA linkage analysis was also conducted.

  5. Study of response nonuniformity for the LHCb calorimeter module and the prototype of the CBM calorimeter module

    SciTech Connect

    Korolko, I. E.; Prokudin, M. S.

    2009-02-15

    A spatial nonuniformity of the response to high-energy muons is studied in the modules of the LHCb electromagnetic calorimeter and the prototype of the calorimeter module with lead plates and scintillator tiles 0.5 mm thick. The nonuniformity of the response of the inner LHCb modules to 50-GeV electrons is also measured. Software is developed for a thorough simulation of light collection in scintillator plates of a shashlik calorimeter. A model is elaborated to describe light transmission from the initial scintillation to the wavelength-shifting fiber with a subsequent reradiation and propagation of light over the fiber to the photodetector. The results of the simulation are in good agreement with data.

  6. High-temperature battery calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.D.; Hart, R.H.; Chen, D.M.; Gibbard, H.F.

    1982-04-01

    A battery calorimeter was built for the measurement of thermal energy generation of high-temperature lithium--aluminum/iron sulfide battery cells, which are under development for electric vehicle propulsion and other energy storage applications. The calorimeter was designed with a temperature range of 400 /sup 0/--500 /sup 0/C, a detection limit of 1 mW, and an upper limit of heat flow of 50 W. The results of measurements on 200-Ah LiAl/FeS cells were in excellent agreement with the predictions of thermodynamic calculations based on precise measurements of the total cell polarization and the temperature coefficient of the emf. Details of the construction and operation principles of this calorimeter are given.

  7. Precision Timing Calorimeter for High Energy Physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present studies on the performance and characterization of the time resolution of LYSO-based calorimeters. Results for an LYSO sampling calorimeter and an LYSO-tungsten Shashlik calorimeter are presented. We also demonstrate that a time resolution of 30 ps is achievable for the LYSO sampling calorimeter. Timing calorimetry is described as a tool for mitigating the effects due to the large number of simultaneous interactions in the high luminosity environment foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Initiating protease with modular domains interacts with β-glucan recognition protein to trigger innate immune response in insects.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Garcia, Brandon L; Kanost, Michael R

    2015-11-10

    The autoactivation of an initiating serine protease upon binding of pattern recognition proteins to pathogen surfaces is a crucial step in eliciting insect immune responses such as the activation of Toll and prophenoloxidase pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for autoactivation of the initiating protease remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the molecular basis for the autoactivation of hemolymph protease 14 (HP14), an initiating protease in hemolymph of Manduca sexta, upon the binding of β-1,3-glucan by its recognition protein, βGRP2. Biochemical analysis using HP14 zymogen (proHP14), βGRP2, and the recombinant proteins as truncated forms showed that the amino-terminal modular low-density lipoprotein receptor class A (LA) domains within HP14 are required for proHP14 autoactivation that is stimulated by its interaction with βGRP2. Consistent with this result, recombinant LA domains inhibit the activation of proHP14 and prophenoloxidase, likely by competing with the interaction between βGRP2 and LA domains within proHP14. Using surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrated that immobilized LA domains directly interact with βGRP2 in a calcium-dependent manner and that high-affinity interaction requires the C-terminal glucanase-like domain of βGRP2. Importantly, the affinity of LA domains for βGRP2 increases nearly 100-fold in the presence of β-1,3-glucan. Taken together, these results present the first experimental evidence to our knowledge that LA domains of an insect modular protease and glucanase-like domains of a βGRP mediate their interaction, and that this binding is essential for the protease autoactivation. Thus, our study provides important insight into the molecular basis underlying the initiation of protease cascade in insect immune responses. PMID:26504233

  9. Initiating protease with modular domains interacts with β-glucan recognition protein to trigger innate immune response in insects

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Garcia, Brandon L.; Kanost, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The autoactivation of an initiating serine protease upon binding of pattern recognition proteins to pathogen surfaces is a crucial step in eliciting insect immune responses such as the activation of Toll and prophenoloxidase pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for autoactivation of the initiating protease remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the molecular basis for the autoactivation of hemolymph protease 14 (HP14), an initiating protease in hemolymph of Manduca sexta, upon the binding of β-1,3-glucan by its recognition protein, βGRP2. Biochemical analysis using HP14 zymogen (proHP14), βGRP2, and the recombinant proteins as truncated forms showed that the amino-terminal modular low-density lipoprotein receptor class A (LA) domains within HP14 are required for proHP14 autoactivation that is stimulated by its interaction with βGRP2. Consistent with this result, recombinant LA domains inhibit the activation of proHP14 and prophenoloxidase, likely by competing with the interaction between βGRP2 and LA domains within proHP14. Using surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrated that immobilized LA domains directly interact with βGRP2 in a calcium-dependent manner and that high-affinity interaction requires the C-terminal glucanase-like domain of βGRP2. Importantly, the affinity of LA domains for βGRP2 increases nearly 100-fold in the presence of β-1,3-glucan. Taken together, these results present the first experimental evidence to our knowledge that LA domains of an insect modular protease and glucanase-like domains of a βGRP mediate their interaction, and that this binding is essential for the protease autoactivation. Thus, our study provides important insight into the molecular basis underlying the initiation of protease cascade in insect immune responses. PMID:26504233

  10. EPCR-dependent PAR2 activation by the blood coagulation initiation complex regulates LPS-triggered interferon responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai Po H; Kerschen, Edward J; Hernandez, Irene; Basu, Sreemanti; Zogg, Mark; Botros, Fady; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J; Griffin, John H; Ruf, Wolfram; Weiler, Hartmut

    2015-04-30

    Infection and inflammation are invariably associated with activation of the blood coagulation mechanism, secondary to the inflammation-induced expression of the coagulation initiator tissue factor (TF) on innate immune cells. By investigating the role of cell-surface receptors for coagulation factors in mouse endotoxemia, we found that the protein C receptor (ProcR; EPCR) was required for the normal in vivo and in vitro induction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-regulated gene expression. In cultured bone marrow-derived myeloid cells and in monocytic RAW264.7 cells, the LPS-induced expression of functionally active TF, assembly of the ternary TF-VIIa-Xa initiation complex of blood coagulation, and the EPCR-dependent activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) by the ternary TF-VIIa-Xa complex were required for the normal LPS induction of messenger RNAs encoding the TLR3/4 signaling adaptor protein Pellino-1 and the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8. In response to in vivo challenge with LPS, mice lacking EPCR or PAR2 failed to fully initiate an interferon-regulated gene expression program that included the Irf8 target genes Lif, Iigp1, Gbp2, Gbp3, and Gbp6. The inflammation-induced expression of TF and crosstalk with EPCR, PAR2, and TLR4 therefore appear necessary for the normal evolution of interferon-regulated host responses.

  11. D-Zero Calorimeter Multiplan

    SciTech Connect

    Wintercorn, S.J.; /Fermilab

    1987-06-15

    This short report explains the parameters, and their basis, of the D-Zero calorimeter multiplan spread sheet Macintosh Multiplan worksheets have been found to be a valuable asset to the D-Zero design effort. The spread sheet contains parameters (constants) and results that come from the parameters. The full effect of changes in D-Zero calorimeter parameters can be calculated quite easily with Multiplan. When a change in a parameter is made, any results that pertain to that parameter automatically change also. This report will explain how some of the unobvious results were obtained.

  12. A linear Fick's law calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Seymour S.; Bryant, Pat D.; Woodside, William F.

    1982-10-01

    A small animal calorimeter is described that is based on the direct application of Fick's law. Heat flow is channeled through a circular disk of magnesium and the temperature difference between the inside and outside surface of the disk is detected by means of solid-state temperature transducers. The device is calibrated using a light-weight electrical resistive source and is shown to be linear in its response and to have an e-folding time of 4.8 min. A rat was introduced into the calorimeter and its heat energy expenditure rate was observed in both the sedated and unsedated states.

  13. Calorimeters for pulsed lasers: calibration.

    PubMed

    Thacher, P D

    1976-07-01

    A calibration technique is developed and tested in which a calorimeter used for single-shot laser pulse energy measurements is calibrated with reference to a cw power standard using a chopped cw laser beam. A pulsed laser is required only to obtain the relative time response of the calorimeter to a pulse. With precautions as to beam alignment and wavelength, the principal error of the technique is that of the cw standard. Calibration of two thermopiles with cone receivers showed -2.5% and -3.5% agreement with previous calibrations made by the National Bureau of Standards. PMID:20165270

  14. The OPAL silicon-tungsten calorimeter front end electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.E.; Charalambous, A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Anderson, K. )

    1994-08-01

    A pair of small angle silicon-tungsten (Si-W) calorimeters has been built to measure the luminosity to a precision better than 0.1% in the OPAL experiment at the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN near Geneva. Each calorimeter contains 19 layers of tungsten (W) plates and silicon (Si) detectors, corresponding to a total of 22 radiation lengths, sampled by about 1 m[sup 2] of detectors divided into 304 x64 independently read out channels. A complete electronics system has been developed, from the preamplifier up to the VME read out and control interface. It includes a fast trigger based on analogue sums. This paper describes how a large number of channels have been implemented in a dense environment, thanks to the use of ASIC's directly bonded on the detector.

  15. The readout driver (ROD) for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2001-04-01

    The Readout Driver (ROD) for the Liquid Argon calorimeter of the ATLAS detector is described. Each ROD module receives triggered data from 256 calorimeter cells via two fiber-optics 1.28 Gbit/s links with a 100 kHz event rate (25 kbit/event). Its principal function is to determine the precise energy and timing of the signal from discrete samples of the waveform, taken each period of the LHC clock (25 ns). In addition, it checks, histograms, and formats the digital data stream. A demonstrator system, consisting of a motherboard and several daughter-board processing units (PUs) was constructed and is currently used for tests in the lab. The design of this prototype board is presented here. The board offers maximum modularity and allows the development and testing of different PU designs based on today's leading integer and floating point DSPs.

  16. LHCb calorimeters high voltage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilitsky, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Perret, P.; Schopper, A.; Soldatov, M.; Yakimchuk, V.

    2007-02-01

    The calorimeter system in LHCb aims to identify electrons, photons and hadrons. All calorimeters are equipped with Hamamatsu photo tubes as devices for light to signal conversion. Eight thousand R7899-20 tubes are used for electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters and two hundred 64 channels multi-anode R7600-00-M64 for Scintillator-Pad/Preshower detectors. The calorimeter high voltage (HV) system is based on a Cockroft Walton (CW) voltage converter and a control board connected to the Experiment Control System (ECS) by serial bus. The base of each photomultiplier tube (PMT) is built with a high voltage converter and constructed on an individual printed circuit board, using compact surface mount components. The base is attached directly to the PMT. There are no HV cables in the system. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used on the control board as an interface between the ECS and the 200 control channels. The FPGA includes also additional functionalities allowing automated monitoring and ramp up of the high voltage values. This paper describes the HV system architecture, some technical details of the electronics implementation and summarizes the system performance. This safe and low power consumption HV electronic system for the photomultiplier tubes can be used for various biomedical apparatus too.

  17. The CMS central hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.; E892 Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    The CMS central hadron calorimeter is a copper absorber/ scintillator sampling structure. We describe design choices that led us to this concept, details of the mechanical and optical structure, and test beam results. We discuss calibration techniques, and finally the anticipated construction schedule.

  18. ELECTRONICS FOR CALORIMETERS AT LHC.

    SciTech Connect

    RADEKA,V.

    2001-09-11

    Some principal design features of front-end electronics for calorimeters in experiments at the LHC will be highlighted. Some concerns arising in the transition from the research and development and design phase to the construction will be discussed. Future challenges will be indicated.

  19. COE1 Calorimeter Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Santi, Peter Angelo

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this manual is to describe the operations of the COE1 calorimeter which is used to measure the thermal power generated by the radioactive decay of plutonium-bearing materials for the purposes of assaying the amount of plutonium within the material.

  20. Barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Shebalin, V. E. Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Ignatov, F. V.; Erofeev, A. L.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Shwartz, B. A.; Talyshev, A. A.; Titov, V. M.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2015-12-15

    The structure of the barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector is presented in this work. The procedure of energy calibration of the calorimeter and the method of photon energy restoration are described. The distinctive feature of this barrel calorimeter is its combined structure; it is composed of two coaxial subsystems: a liquid xenon calorimeter and a crystalline CsI calorimeter. The calorimeter spatial resolution of the photon conversion point is about 2 mm, which corresponds to an angular resolution of ∼6 mrad. The energy resolution of the calorimeter is about 8% for photons with energy of 200 MeV and 4% for photons with energy of 1 GeV.

  1. Seismically Initiated Carbon Dioxide Gas Bubble Growth in Groundwater: A Mechanism for Co-seismic Borehole Water Level Rise and Remotely Triggered Secondary Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.

    Visualization experiments, core-scale laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations were conducted to examine the transient effect of dilational seismic wave propagation on pore fluid pressure in aquifers hosting groundwater that is near saturation with respect to dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. Groundwater can become charged with dissolved CO2 through contact with gas-phase CO2 in the Earth's crust derived from magma degasing, metamorphism, and biogenic processes. The propagation of dilational seismic waves (e.g., Rayleigh and p-waves) causes oscillation of the mean normal confining stress and pore fluid pressure. When the amplitude of the pore fluid pressure oscillation is large enough to drive the pore fluid pressure below the bubble pressure, an aqueous-to-gas-phase transition can occur in the pore space, which causes a buildup of pore fluid pressure and reduces the inter-granular effective stress under confined conditions. In visualization experiments conducted in a Hele-Shaw cell representing a smooth-walled, vertically oriented fracture, millisecond-scale pressure perturbations triggered bubble nucleation and growth lasting tens of seconds, with resulting pore fluid overpressure proportional to the magnitude of the pressure perturbation. In a Berea sandstone core flooded with initially under-saturated aqueous CO2 under conditions representative of a confined aquifer, rapid reductions in confining stress triggered transient pore pressure rise up to 0.7 MPa (100 psi) overpressure on a timescale of ~10 hours. The rate of pore pressure buildup in the first 100 seconds was proportional to the saturation with respect to dissolved CO 2 at the pore pressure minimum. Sinusoidal confining stress oscillations on a Berea sandstone core produced excess pore fluid pressure after the oscillations were terminated. Confining stress oscillations in the 0.1-0.4 MPa (15-60 psi) amplitude range and 0.05-0.30 Hz frequency band increased the pore fluid pressure by 13-60 cm

  2. Electronic trigger for the ASP experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.J.

    1985-11-01

    The Anomalous Single Photon (ASP) electronic trigger is described. The experiments is based on an electromagnetic calorimeter composed of arrays of lead glass blocks, read out with photo-multiplier tubes, surrounding the interaction point at the PEP storage ring. The primary requirement of the trigger system is to be sensitive to low energy (approx. =0.5 GeV and above) photons whilst discriminating against high backgrounds at PEP. Analogue summing of the PMT signals and a sequence of programmable digital look-up tables produces a ''dead-timeless'' trigger for the beam collision rate of 408 kHz. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Jet Reconstruction and Calibration in the ATLAS Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen Roca, Sigrid

    2006-10-27

    Many physics studies in ATLAS require precise reconstruction and calibration of particle jet kinematics. Among these are the reconstruction of the top quark mass, the search for the Higgs boson, and possible supersymmetric particles. The ATLAS calorimeter system has been designed to meet these requirements across a wide acceptance in pseudorapidity (|{eta}|<5). Different calorimeter technologies are applied in different rapidity regions to optimize the performance with respect to coverage, containment, highest possible spatial granularity, and the best possible energy resolution, in the difficult and changing experimental conditions characteristic for each of these regions.In this talk we briefly illustrate the ATLAS calorimeter features most relevant for the jet measurement. The general approach to calorimeter jet calibration is two-fold. First, the jet signal shape is used to correct for detector effects such as non-compensation and energy losses in inactive materials. This followed by corrections for biases introduced by the jet clustering algorithms and effects from the collision physics environment. We intend to discuss this calibration procedure and the different strategies available to implement it, in the context of the evaluation of the jet reconstruction performance for various available jet clustering algorithms, including a fixed cone and the Kt algorithm. A focus in this discussion is on the expected initial run condition at ATLAS start-up.

  4. Dynamic triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  5. Signal reconstruction performance with the ATLAS Hadronic Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimek, Pawel; ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Group

    2012-12-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS. It is a key detector for the reconstruction of hadrons, jets, taus and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a sampling calorimeter with steel as absorber and scintillators as active medium. The scintillators are read-out by wavelength shifting fibers coupled to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analogue signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The read out system is designed to reconstruct the data in real time fulfilling the tight constraints imposed by the ATLAS first level trigger rate (100 kHz). The signal amplitude for each channel and their phase are measured using Optimal Filtering techniques both at online and offline level. We present the performance of these techniques on the data collected in the proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energy equal to 7 TeV. We will address the performance for the measurement on high pile-up environment and on various physics and calibration signals.

  6. Electromagnetic Calorimeter studies for the GEp(5) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayerbe Gayoso, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    The GEp(5) experiment, part of the SBS collaboration, will be the fourth measurement of the GEp /GMp ratio using the proton recoil polarization technique. The current data suggests that the GEp /GMp ratio obtained with this technique, might cross zero near Q2 ~ 10 GeV2 , now reachable with the CEBAF upgrade to 12 GeV energy beam. This measurement technique requires a precise measurement of the energy and angles of the scattered electron in coincidence with the recoil proton. The electron's measured energy and crude position will be used in the trigger, while the offline position measurement will be used in kinematic cuts to separate the elastic process from the background. A lead-glass calorimeter, which was used in the previous experiments, is not optimal for the planned experiment due to the rapid radiation damage in the experiment's running conditions. A sampling calorimeter, made of lead and plastic scintillators, is under consideration. Results from a test beam and Monte Carlo simulations of this kind of calorimeter will be presented. Supported from a NSF grant, PHY-1066374.

  7. The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, M.

    2009-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider has placed great emphasis on precise calorimetry for electrons and photons. The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) contains about 75 000 scintillating lead tungstate crystals that are read out using sophisticated electronics. This paper will describe the ECAL and the experimental factors that influenced the choice of the technologies used in the detector design. The barrel ECAL has been installed into the experiment and installation of the endcaps will commence in early 2008. The pre-calibration and commissioning of these detectors will be described and the current status of the ECAL reviewed. The prospects for the initial operation period in 2008, when beams are first collided in the LHC, will be discussed.

  8. Containerless high-temperature calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B.; Robinson, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Samples are heated by electron bombardment in high-temperature calorimeter that operates from 1,000 to 3,600 C yet consumes less that 100 watts at temperatures less than 2,500 C. Contamination of samples is kept to minimum by suspending them from wire in vacuum chamber. Various sample slopes such as wires, dishs, spheres, rods, or irregular bodies can be accommodated and only about 100 nq of samples are needed for accurate measurements.

  9. An elevated temperature titration calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Zanonato, P.L.; Choppin, G.R. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-06-01

    A variable-temperature (313 K to 353 K) titration calorimeter of high sensitivity has been constructed. The purpose of the calorimeter is to study temperature effects on the enthalpies of complex formation and of other reactions of metal cations such as hydrolysis and precipitation. Operation of the calorimetric system, including that final calculation of the heat released during titration, is automatic via computer control. Calibration tests of the calorimeter using 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol gave -(46.0 {plus minus} 0.3) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} and -(46.2 {plus minus} 0.2) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} for the enthalpy of protonation, at 318 K and at 343 K, respectively. For titrations of 2-bis(2-hydroxyethyl) amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol, enthalpy of protonation values of -(28.4 {plus minus} 0.3) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} and -(29.3 {plus minus} 0.2) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} were obtained at 318 K and at 343 K, respectively. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Rugged calorimeter with a fast rise time

    SciTech Connect

    McMurtry, W.M.; Dolce, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    An intrinsic 1-mil-thick gold foil calorimeter has been developed which rises to 95% of the energy deposited in less than 2 microseconds. This calorimeter is very rugged, and can withstand rough handling without damage. The time constant is long, in the millisecond range, because of its unique construction. Use of this calorimeter has produced 100% data recovery, and agreement with true deposition to less than 10%.

  11. Secondary Emission Calorimeter Sensor Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, David R.; Onel, Yasar

    2012-12-01

    In a Secondary Emission electron(SEe) detector module, Secondary Emission electrons (SEe) are generated from an SE surface/cathode, when charged hadronic or electromagnetic particles, particularly shower particles, penetrate an SE sampling module placed between absorber materials (Fe, Cu, Pb, W etc) in calorimeters. The SE cathode is a thin (10-50 nm thick) film (simple metal-oxides, or other higher yield materials) on the surface of a metal plate, which serves as the entrance “window” to a compact vacuum vessel (metal or metal-ceramic); this SE film cathode is analogous to a photocathode, and the SEe are similar to p.e., which are then amplified by dynodes, also is in a PMT. SE sensor modules can make use of electrochemically etched/machined or laser-cut metal mesh dynode sheets, as large as ~30 cm square, to amplify the Secondary Emission Electrons (SEe), much like those that compact metal mesh or mesh dynode PMT's use to amplify p.e.'s. The construction requirements easier than a PMT, since the entire final assembly can be done in air; there are no critical controlled thin film depositions, cesiation or other oxygen-excluded processes or other required vacuum activation, and consequently bake-out can be a refractory temperatures; the module is sealed by normal vacuum techniques (welding or brazing or other high temperature joinings), with a simple final heated vacuum pump-out and tip-off. The modules envisioned are compact, high gain, high speed, exceptionally radiation damage resistant, rugged, and cost effective, and can be fabricated in arbitrary tileable shapes. The SE sensor module anodes can be segmented transversely to sizes appropriate to reconstruct electromagnetic cores with high precision. The GEANT4 and existing calorimeter data estimated calorimeter response performance is between 35-50 Secondary Emission electrons per GeV, in a 1 cm thick Cu absorber calorimeter, with a gain per SEe > 105 per SEe, and an e/pi<1.2. The calorimeter pulse width is

  12. Upgraded Readout Electronics for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters at the High Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andeen, Timothy R.; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS liquid-argon calorimeters produce a total of 182,486 signals which are digitized and processed by the front-end and back-end electronics at every triggered event. In addition, the front-end electronics sum analog signals to provide coarsely grained energy sums, called trigger towers, to the first-level trigger system, which is optimized for nominal LHC luminosities. However, the pile-up background expected during the high luminosity phases of the LHC will be increased by factors of 3 to 7. An improved spatial granularity of the trigger primitives is therefore proposed in order to improve the identification performance for trigger signatures, like electrons or photons, at high background rejection rates. For the first upgrade phase in 2018, new Liquid Argon Trigger Digitizer Boards are being designed to receive higher granularity signals, digitize them on detector and send them via fast optical links to a new, off-detector digital processing system. The digital processing system applies digital filtering and identifies significant energy depositions. The refined trigger primitives are then transmitted to the first level trigger system to extract improved trigger signatures. The general concept of the upgraded liquid-argon calorimeter readout together with the various electronics components to be developed for such a complex system is presented. The research activities and architectural studies undertaken by the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group are described, particularly details of the on-going design of mixed-signal front-end electronics, of radiation tolerant optical-links, and of the high-speed off-detector digital processing system.

  13. Dynamic range and response speed of heat-flux differential calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal'Perin, L. N.

    2011-08-01

    A technique for the linearization of calorimeter cell (CC) thermal feedback in differential calorimeters was investigated. The technique was shown to ensure the linearity of the tract of rapid compensation measurements of thermokinetics ( W in( t)) in a dynamic range of heat-fluxes limited in principle only by the linearity of the CCs themselves, while their original identity is not required. The technique was employed in prototype models of updated DAK calorimeters, in which W in( t)max reached 0.5 W while the duration of the transition process associated with the insertion of the test specimen was reduced by a factor of 2.3. This was shown to reduce calorimeter inertia, extend the possibilities of thermokinetic measurements, and record earlier stages of the initial thermokinetics.

  14. The Development of a 3D Imaging Calorimeter of DAMPE for Cosmic Ray Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Hu, Yiming; Feng, Changqing; Liu, Shubin; Wang, Chi; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wei, Yifeng; Huang, Guangshun

    2016-07-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) experiment began its on-orbit operations on December 17, 2015. The BGO Electromagnetic Calorimeter (BGO ECAL) of the DAMPE is a total absorption calorimeter that allows for a precise three-dimensional imaging of the shower shape. It provides a good energy resolution (<1%@200GeV) and high electron/hadron discrimination (>10^5). The calorimeter also provides a trigger capability to DAMPE. The BGO ECAL light collection system and electronics are designed to measure electromagnetic particles over a wide energy range, from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. An Engineering qualified model was built and tested using high energy electron and proton beams with energy ranging from 1 GeV to 250GeV. Some pre results will be introduced in this talk.

  15. Measurement and simulation of neutron detection efficiency in lead-scintillating fiber calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anelli, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Branchini, P.; Curceanu, C.; De Zorzi, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Micco, B.; Ferrari, A.; Fiore, S.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Happacher, F.; Iliescu, M.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Nguyen, F.; Passeri, A.; Prokofiev, A.; Sciascia, B.; Sirghi, F.

    2009-12-01

    The overall detection efficiency to neutrons of a small prototype of the KLOE lead-scintillating fiber calorimeter has been measured at the neutron beam facility of The Svedberg Laboratory, TSL, Uppsala, in the kinetic energy range [5-175] MeV. The measurement of the neutron detection efficiency of a NE110 scintillator provided a reference calibration. At the lowest trigger threshold, the overall calorimeter efficiency ranges from 30% to 50%. This value largely exceeds the estimated 8-15% expected if the response were proportional only to the scintillator equivalent thickness. A detailed simulation of the calorimeter and of the TSL beam line has been performed with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. First data-MC comparisons are encouraging and allow to disentangle a neutron halo component in the beam.

  16. The NA62 trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivda, M.; NA62 Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The main aim of the NA62 experiment (NA62 Technical Design Report, [1]) is to study ultra-rare Kaon decays. In order to select rare events over the overwhelming background, central systems with high-performance, high bandwidth, flexibility and configurability are necessary, that minimize dead time while maximizing data collection reliability. The NA62 experiment consists of 12 sub-detector systems and several trigger and control systems, for a total channel count of less than 100,000. The GigaTracKer (GTK) has the largest number of channels (54,000), and the Liquid Krypton (LKr) calorimeter shares with it the largest raw data rate (19 GB/s). The NA62 trigger system works with 3 trigger levels. The first trigger level is based on a hardware central trigger unit, so-called L0 Trigger Processor (L0TP), and Local Trigger Units (LTU), which are all located in the experimental cavern. Other two trigger levels are based on software, and done with a computer farm located on surface. The L0TP receives information from triggering sub-detectors asynchronously via Ethernet; it processes the information, and then transmits a final trigger decision synchronously to each sub-detector through the Trigger and Timing Control (TTC) system. The interface between L0TP and the TTC system, which is used for trigger and clock distribution, is provided by the Local Trigger Unit board (LTU). The LTU can work in two modes: global and stand-alone. In the global mode, the LTU provides an interface between L0TP and TTC system. In the stand-alone mode, the LTU can fully emulate L0TP and so provides an independent way for each sub-detector for testing or calibration purposes. In addition to the emulation functionality, a further functionality is implemented that allows to synchronize the clock of the LTU with the L0TP and the TTC system. For testing and debugging purposes, a Snap Shot Memory (SSM) interface is implemented, that can work

  17. Status of the CDF II Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, Mark

    2006-10-27

    The status of the CDF calorimeters was reported at the CALOR2002 conference, about a year after Run II started at the Tevatron Collider. I will review upgrades to the system since that conference, as well as the operation and performance of the calorimeters.

  18. 5.8 X-ray Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures, can form the basis of a very high performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-the-art calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous band-passes, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated x-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. In this chapter I briefly review the detection scheme, the state-of-the-art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  19. Active radiometric calorimeter for absolute calibration of radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, K.E.; DeWerd, L.A.; Rudman, D.A.; Schima, S.A.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes the design and initial noise floor measurements of a radiometric calorimeter designed to measure therapeutic medical radioactive sources. The instrument demonstrates a noise floor of approximately 2 nW. This low noise floor is achieved by using high temperature superconducting (HTS) transition edge sensor (TES) thermometers in a temperature-control feedback loop. This feedback loop will be used to provide absolute source calibrations based upon the electrical substitution method. Other unique features of the calorimeter are (a) its ability to change sources for calibration without disrupting the vacuum of the instrument, and (b) the ability to measure the emitted power of a source in addition to the total contained source power.

  20. High-temperature containerless calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, M. B.; Lacy, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    A high-temperature (greater than 1500 K) containerless calorimeter is described and its usefulness demonstrated. The calorimeter uses the technique of omnidirectional electron bombardment of pendant drops to achieve an isothermal test environment. The small heat input into the sample (i.e., 15-50 W) can be controlled and measured. The apparatus can be used to determine the total hemispherical emissivity, specific heat, heat of fusion, surface tension, and equilibrium melting temperature of small molten drops in the temperature range of 1500 to 3500 K. The total hemispherical emissivity and specific heat of pure niobium and two alloys of niobium-germanium have been measured in the temperature range of 1700 to 2400 K. As reported in the literature, the total hemispherical emissivity varied as a function of temperature. However, specific heat values for both the pure metal and alloys seem to be independent of temperature. Specific heat for the liquid alloy phase was also measured and compared to the solid phase.

  1. Lessons from (triggered) tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    I test a “clock-advance” model that implies triggered tremor is ambient tremor that occurs at a sped-up rate as a result of loading from passing seismic waves. This proposed model predicts that triggering probability is proportional to the product of the ambient tremor rate and a function describing the efficacy of the triggering wave to initiate a tremor event. Using data mostly from Cascadia, I have compared qualitatively a suite of teleseismic waves that did and did not trigger tremor with ambient tremor rates. Many of the observations are consistent with the model if the efficacy of the triggering wave depends on wave amplitude. One triggered tremor observation clearly violates the clock-advance model. The model prediction that larger triggering waves result in larger triggered tremor signals also appears inconsistent with the measurements. I conclude that the tremor source process is a more complex system than that described by the clock-advance model predictions tested. Results of this and previous studies also demonstrate that (1) conditions suitable for tremor generation exist in many tectonic environments, but, within each, only occur at particular spots whose locations change with time; (2) any fluid flow must be restricted to less than a meter; (3) the degree to which delayed failure and secondary triggering occurs is likely insignificant; and 4) both shear and dilatational deformations may trigger tremor. Triggered and ambient tremor rates correlate more strongly with stress than stressing rate, suggesting tremor sources result from time-dependent weakening processes rather than simple Coulomb failure.

  2. ATLAS LAr calorimeter performance and LHC Run-2 commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spettel, Fabian

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS detector was built to study proton-proton collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center of mass energy of up to 14 TeV. The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry as well as the hadronic calorimetry in the endcap and forward regions. They have shown excellent performance during the first LHC data taking campaign, from 2010 to 2012, so-called Run 1, at a peak luminosity of 8 ×1033cm-2s-1. During the next run, peak luminosities of 1.5 ×1034cm-2s-1 and even higher are expected at a 25 ns bunch spacing. Such a high collision rate may have an impact on the quality of the energy reconstruction which is attempted to be maintained at a high level using a calibration procedure described in this contribution. It also poses major challenges to the first level of the trigger system which is constrained to a maximal rate of 100 kHz. For Run-3, scheduled to start in 2019, instantaneous luminosity as high as 3 ×1034cm-2s-1 are foreseen imposing an upgrade of the LAr trigger system to maintain its performance. A demonstrator containing prototypes of the upgraded trigger electronic architecture has been installed on one of the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter readout front end crates to test it during the Run-2 campaign. The new architecture and its benefits for data taking will be discussed below as well as the results from first beam splash events.

  3. The Soudan 2 honeycomb calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, C.

    1990-12-01

    Soudan 2 is an 1100-ton honeycomb tracking calorimeter which is being constructed to search for nucleon decay. The detector consists of finely segmented iron instrumented with long drift tubes, and records three spatial coordinates and dE/dx for every gas crossing. Excellent event reconstruction capability, particle identification and muon sign and direction determination give superior rejection of the neutrino background to nucleon decay in many modes. The first 620 tons of Soudan 2 are now in steady operation, with completion planned for 1992. Detector performance has been studied using cosmic ray tracks and a charged test beam calibration. Results on detector performance and detector response are described in this paper. 2 refs. , 11 figs.

  4. Correlation analysis between the channel current and luminosity of initial continuous and continuing current processes in an artificially triggered lightning flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Enwei; Lu, Weitao; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Baoyou; Zheng, Dong; Zhang, Yijun

    2013-07-01

    Using simultaneous high-speed camera records and channel-base current records in an artificially triggered negative lightning event, the correlation between the channel-base current and the integrated luminosity (IL) of the air-ionized part of the lightning channel is analyzed during the periods of the initial continuous current (ICC) process and eight continuing current (CC) processes. Depending on the current's changing trend (ascending or descending) and the luminosity property of the pixels used to calculate the IL from the high-speed camera records (including saturated pixels or not), the ICC and eight CC processes are divided into the saturated ascending stage (Stage-A), the saturated descending stage (Stage-B), the unsaturated ascending stage (Stage-C) and the unsaturated descending stage (Stage-D), including the descending tail stage (Stage-T, in which the channel-base current falls to zero). The analysis shows the following: (1) the IL is linearly correlated with the logarithmic value of the current in both Stage-A and Stage-B of two long CC processes, the ICC process and the CC process after the 7th return stroke, although the regression parameters (intercept and slope) in Stage-B are higher than those in Stage-A. This rule can also be found in most pulses of the long CC processes, where the IL in the descending stage is higher than that in the ascending stage at the same current value, regardless of which threshold index or height range used to calculate the IL are selected and regardless of whether the IL includes saturated pixels or not. (2) In the unsaturated stage of long CC processes, the channel current shows a significant linear correlation with the square root of the IL, and the fit of this relationship is much better than that in the saturated stage. Additionally, in each Stage-T of the eight CC processes following return strokes, the square root of the IL is significantly and linearly correlated with the current, and the regression slope is

  5. Trigger finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Redness in your cut or hand Swelling or warmth in your cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  6. CMS hadron calorimeter front-end upgrade for SLHC phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, Juliana; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    We present an upgrade plan for the CMS HCAL detector. The HCAL upgrade is required for the increased luminosity (3 * 10E34) of SLHC Phase I which is targeted for 2014. A key aspect of the HCAL upgrade is to add longitudinal segmentation to improve background rejection, energy resolution, and electron isolation at the L1 trigger. The increased segmentation is achieved by replacing the hybrid photodiodes (HPDs) with silicon PMTs (SIPMs). We plan to instrument each fiber of the calorimeter with an SIPM (103,000 total). We will then electrically sum outputs from selected SIPMs to form the longitudinal readout segments. In addition to having more longitudinal information, the upgrade plans include a new custom ADC with matched sensitivity and timing information. The increased data volume requires higher speed transmitters and the additional power dissipation for the readout electronics requires better thermal design, since much of the on-detector infrastructure (front-end electronics crates, cooling pipes, optical fiber plant, etc.) will remain the same. We will report on the preliminary designs for these upgraded systems, along with performance requirements and initial design studies.

  7. CDF End Plug calorimeter Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; de Barbaro, P.; Mishina, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the status of the CDF End Plug Upgrade Project. In this project, the CDF calorimeters in the end plug and the forward regions will be replaced by a single scintillator based calorimeter. After an extensive R&D effort on the tile/fiber calorimetry, we have now advanced to a construction phase. We review the results of the R&D leading to the final design of the calorimeters and the development of tooling devised for this project. The quality control program of the production of the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters is described. A shower maximum detector for the measurement of the shower centroid and the shower profile of electrons, {gamma} and {pi}{sup 0} has been designed. Its performance requirements, R&D results and mechanical design are discussed.

  8. The CMS central hadron calorimeter: Update

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.

    1998-06-01

    The CMS central hadron calorimeter is a brass absorber/ scintillator sampling structure. We describe details of the mechanical and optical structure. We also discuss calibration techniques, and finally the anticipated construction schedule.

  9. Accelerator Test of an Imaging Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark J.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Binns, R. W.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Howell, L. W.; Gregory, J. C.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Kippen, R. M.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) utilizes a thin sampling calorimeter concept for direct measurements of high-energy cosmic rays. The ICA design uses arrays of small scintillating fibers to measure the energy and trajectory of the produced cascades. A test instrument has been developed to study the performance of this concept at accelerator energies and for comparison with simulations. Two test exposures have been completed using a CERN test beam. Some results from the accelerator tests are presented.

  10. Calorimeter Data Acquisition and Reporting Software

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, Jean R.; Levi, Gerald

    1998-08-27

    The calorimeter Data Acquisition and Reporting Program performs the calculations necessary to calculate the calorimetric sample results in grams and provide a printable report for up to twelve Mound Calorimeters. To determine a standard''s wattage or sample gram fill, the reporting program retrieves the output voltage from the power supply at the calorimeter and a temperature resistant resistor via a voltmeter and digital input card in a Hewlett Packard Data Acquisition Unit (DAQ). From the retrieved voltage data, the reporting program can calculate a standard''s wattage output and sample gram fill. The reporting program also determines equilibrium (stability) by performing a stability algorithm bassed on user defined slope an/or sigma values for the previous forty values. Once the stability is determined, the reporting program will notify the user that the calorimeter has reached equilibrium. The Calorimeter Data Acquisition and Reporting Program operates continuously as described to monitor for calorimeter equilibrium and to generate a printable report with sample results.

  11. CALDAR. Calorimeter Data Acquisition and Reporting Software

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, J.R.; Levi, G.

    1998-07-20

    The calorimeter Data Acquisition and Reporting Program performs the calculations necessary to calculate the calorimetric sample results in grams and provide a printable report for up to twelve Mound Calorimeters. To determine a standard`s wattage or sample gram fill, the reporting program retrieves the output voltage from the power supply at the calorimeter and a temperature resistant resistor via a voltmeter and digital input card in a Hewlett Packard Data Acquisition Unit (DAQ). From the retrieved voltage data, the reporting program can calculate a standard`s wattage output and sample gram fill. The reporting program also determines equilibrium (stability) by performing a stability algorithm bassed on user defined slope an/or sigma values for the previous forty values. Once the stability is determined, the reporting program will notify the user that the calorimeter has reached equilibrium. The Calorimeter Data Acquisition and Reporting Program operates continuously as described to monitor for calorimeter equilibrium and to generate a printable report with sample results.

  12. Transportable high sensitivity small sample radiometric calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, J.R.; Biddle, R.S.; Cordova, B.S.; Sampson, T.E.; Dye, H.R.; McDow, J.G.

    1998-12-31

    A new small-sample, high-sensitivity transportable radiometric calorimeter, which can be operated in different modes, contains an electrical calibration method, and can be used to develop secondary standards, will be described in this presentation. The data taken from preliminary tests will be presented to indicate the precision and accuracy of the instrument. The calorimeter and temperature-controlled bath, at present, require only a 30-in. by 20-in. tabletop area. The calorimeter is operated from a laptop computer system using unique measurement module capable of monitoring all necessary calorimeter signals. The calorimeter can be operated in the normal calorimeter equilibration mode, as a comparison instrument, using twin chambers and an external electrical calibration method. The sample chamber is 0.75 in (1.9 cm) in diameter by 2.5 in. (6.35 cm) long. This size will accommodate most {sup 238}Pu heat standards manufactured in the past. The power range runs from 0.001 W to <20 W. The high end is only limited by sample size.

  13. Calorimeter Data Acquisition and Reporting Software

    1998-08-27

    The calorimeter Data Acquisition and Reporting Program performs the calculations necessary to calculate the calorimetric sample results in grams and provide a printable report for up to twelve Mound Calorimeters. To determine a standard''s wattage or sample gram fill, the reporting program retrieves the output voltage from the power supply at the calorimeter and a temperature resistant resistor via a voltmeter and digital input card in a Hewlett Packard Data Acquisition Unit (DAQ). From themore » retrieved voltage data, the reporting program can calculate a standard''s wattage output and sample gram fill. The reporting program also determines equilibrium (stability) by performing a stability algorithm bassed on user defined slope an/or sigma values for the previous forty values. Once the stability is determined, the reporting program will notify the user that the calorimeter has reached equilibrium. The Calorimeter Data Acquisition and Reporting Program operates continuously as described to monitor for calorimeter equilibrium and to generate a printable report with sample results.« less

  14. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heelan, Louise; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. It is also useful for identification and reconstruction of muons due to good signal to noise ratio. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5000 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, timing, noise and associated stabilities. The results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter has performed well within the design requirements and it has given essential contribution to reconstructed objects and physics results. In addition, the data quality procedures used during the LHC data-taking are described and the outcome of the detector consolidation in the maintenance period is also presented.

  15. Triggering Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  16. The NA62 Liquid Krypton calorimeter readout architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccucci, A.; Fantechi, R.; Farthouat, P.; Ryjov, V.; De Simone, N.; Venditti, S.

    2016-01-01

    The NA62 experiment [1] at the CERN SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) accelerator studies the ultra-rare decays of charged kaons. The high-resolution Liquid Krypton (LKr) electromagnetic calorimeter of the former NA48 experiment [2] is a key component of the experiment photon-veto system. The new LKr readout system comprises 14,000 14-bit ADC acquisition channels, 432× 1 Gbit Ethernet data request and readout links routed by 28× 10 Gbit network switches to the experiment computer farm, and timing, trigger and control (TTC) distribution system. This paper presents the architecture of the LKr readout and TTC systems, the overall performance and the first successfully collected experiment physics data.

  17. The CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeter Upgrade During Phase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülmez, E.

    2014-06-01

    The CMS Hadron Forward Calorimeter is being upgraded during phase 1. The upgrade includes the replacement of the current PMTs with the 4-anode ones and the readout electronics. Stray muons hitting the PMT windows produce Cherenkov light causing erroneous signals. These signals are detrimental to the triggering and physic results, since such signals mimic very high energy events. The new 4-anode PMTs are selected because of their thin windows to reduce the Cherenkov light production. Additional anodes also provide information to eliminate such signals. These new PMTs have been tested extensively to understand their characteristics and to develop the algorithms to eliminate the unwanted signals. Eventually, the current read out will be replaced with two-channel readout electronics for each PMT. The overall expected improvement on the physics results will also be discussed.

  18. Relative Gain Monitoring of the GlueX Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Anassontzis, Efstratios G.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Voulgaris, G.; Kappos, E.; Beattie, T.; Krueger, S.; Lolos, G. J.; Papandreou, Z.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Frye, John M.; Leckey, John P.; Shepherd, Matt; Bogart, T.; Smith, Elton S.

    2014-02-01

    The relative gain of the photodetectors for the GlueX Barrel and Forward calorimeters will be monitored using modular LED driver systems. The BCAL system consists of a global controller that feeds power, bias voltage and trigger signals to 96 local controllers situated at the ends of the 48 BCAL modules, which drive 40 LEDs associated with the 40 light guides at the end of each module. The FCAL system consists also of a global controller, a local controller for each acrylic quadrant covering the face of the FCAL, and ten 4-LED pulser boards per local controller connected in a star configuration along the edges of the acrylic panes. The respective systems are currently being installed on the detectors and their tested performance is presented herein.

  19. Master plate production for the tile calorimeter extended barrel modules.

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.J.; Hill, N.; Petereit, E.; Price, L.E.; Proudfoot, J.; Wood, K.

    1999-03-10

    Approximately 41,000 master plates (Fig. 1) are required for the Extended Barrel Hadronic Calorimeter for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Early in the R&D program associated with the detector, it was recognized that the fabrication of these steel laminations was a significant issue, both in terms of the cost to produce these high precision formed plates, as well as the length of time required to produce all plates for the calorimeter. Two approaches were given serious consideration: laser cutting and die stamping. The Argonne group was a strong supporter of the latter approach and in late 1995 initiated an R&D program to demonstrate the feasibility and cost effectiveness of die stamping these plates by constructing a die and stamping approximately 2000 plates for use in construction of three full size prototype modules. This was extremely successful and die stamping was selected by the group for production of these plates. When the prototype die was constructed it was matched to the calorimeter envelope at that time. This subsequently changed. However with some minor adjustments in the design envelope and a small compromise in terms of instrumented volume, it became possible to use this same die for the production of all master plates for the Tile Calorimeter. Following an extensive series of discussions and an evaluation of the performance of the stamping presses available to our collaborators in Europe, it was decided to ship the US die to CERN for use in stamping master plates for the barrel section of the calorimeter. This was done under the supervision of CERN and JINR, Dubna, and carried out at the TATRA truck plant at Koprivinice, Czech Republic. It was a great success. Approximately 41,000 plates were stamped and fully met specification. Moreover, the production time was significantly reduced by avoiding the need of constructing and then qualifying a second die for use in Europe. This also precluded small geometrical differences between the barrel and

  20. Tritium calorimeter setup and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, David E.

    2002-12-17

    The LBNL tritium calorimeter is a stable instrument capable of measuring tritium with a sensitivity of 25 Ci. Measurement times range from 8-hr to 7-days depending on the thermal conductivity and mass of the material being measured. The instrument allows accurate tritium measurements without requiring that the sample be opened and subsampled, thus reducing personnel exposure and radioactive waste generation. The sensitivity limit is primarily due to response shifts caused by temperature fluctuation in the water bath. The fluctuations are most likely a combination of insufficient insulation from ambient air and precision limitations in the temperature controller. The sensitivity could probably be reduced to below 5 Ci if the following improvements were made: (1) Extend the external insulation to cover the entire bath and increase the top insulation. (2) Improve the seal between the air space above the bath and the outside air to reduce evaporation. This will limit the response drift as the water level drops. (3) Install an improved temperature controller, preferably with a built in chiller, capable of temperature control to {+-}0.001 C.

  1. The calibration and monitoring system for the PHENIX lead-scintillator electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    David, G.; Kistenev, E.; Stoll, S.

    1997-11-01

    A system for calibrating the PHENIX lead-scintillator electromagnetic calorimeter modules with cosmic rays and monitoring the stability during operation is described. The system is based on a UV laser which delivers light to each module through a network of optical fibers and splutters and is monitored at various points with silicon and vacuum photodiodes. Results are given from a prototype system which used a nitrogen laser to set the initial phototube gains and to establish the energy calibration of calorimeter modules and monitor their stability. A description of the final system to be used in PHENIX based on a high power YAG laser, is also given.

  2. The calibration and monitoring system for the PHENIX lead-scintillator electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    David, G.; Kistenev, E.; Stoll, S.; White, S.; Woody, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Chernichenkov, S.; Denisov, A.; Gilitzky, Y.; Kochetkov, V.; Melnikov, Y.; Onuchin, V.; Semenov, A.; Shelikhov, V.; Soldatov, A.

    1998-11-09

    A system for calibrating the PHENIX lead-scintillator electromagnetic calorimeter modules with cosmic rays and monitoring the stability during operation is described. The system is based on a UV laser which delivers light to each module through a network of optical fibers and splitters and is monitored at various points with silicon and vacuum photodiodes. Results are given from a prototype system which used a nitrogen laser to set the initial phototube gains and to establish the energy calibration of calorimeter modules and monitor their stability. A description of the final system to be used in PHENIX, based on a high power YAG laser, is also given.

  3. The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeters for the magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Carlini, Roger D.; Tadevosyan, Vardan H.; Arrington, John Robert; Asaturyan, Arshak Razmik; Christy, Michael Eric; Dutta, Dipangkar; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard C.; Gaskell, David J.; Horn, Tanja; Jones, Mark K.; Keppel, Cynthia; Mack, David J.; Malace, Simona P.; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Seely, Charles Jason; Tvaskis, Vladas; Wood, Stephen A.; Zhamkochyan, Simon

    2013-08-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeters of the various magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab are presented. For the existing HMS and SOS spectrometers design considerations, relevant construction information, and comparisons of simulated and experimental results are included. The energy resolution of the HMS and SOS calorimeters is better than $\\sigma/E \\sim 6%/\\sqrt E $, and pion/electron ($\\pi/e$) separation of about 100:1 has been achieved in energy range 1 -- 5 GeV. Good agreement has been observed between the experimental and simulated energy resolutions, but simulations systematically exceed experimentally determined $\\pi^-$ suppression factors by close to a factor of two. For the SHMS spectrometer presently under construction details on the design and accompanying GEANT4 simulation efforts are given. The anticipated performance of the new calorimeter is predicted over the full momentum range of the SHMS. Good electron/hadron separation is anticipated by combining the energy deposited in an initial (preshower) calorimeter layer with the total energy deposited in the calorimeter.

  4. High temperature calorimeter performance variable study

    SciTech Connect

    Troyer, R.

    1986-04-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory with funding supplied by the Department of Energy sponsored the evaluation of a water calorimeter for thermal transmission testing of refractory fiber insulation using a ruggedness test. The specimens tested were low density refractory fiber flexible blanket insulation. The factors evaluated included (1) emissivity of copper plate; (2) calorimeter to guard balance; (3) calorimeter to room temperature balance; (4) calorimeter water flow rate; (5) perimeter insulation; (6) type of hot side thermocouple and (7) type of cold side thermocouple. A ruggedness test is a statistical method of evaluating step changes making multiple changes each test. Five of the seven factors were found to be significant at a minimum of one temperature. One plate versus three plates, two inch thick specimen versus three inch thick specimen and a release agent were three factors that were tested independently of the ruggedness test. The specimens were also tested in a guarded hot plate for comparison purposes. Recommendations are given to improve the design and operation of the calorimeter.

  5. Description of an ionization calorimeter complemented with proportional counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babayan, K. P.; Boyadzhyan, N. G.; Vasiltsov, V. V.; Grigorov, N. L.; Sobinyakov, V. A.; Shestoperov, V. Y.

    1975-01-01

    An ionization calorimeter is described with a system of proportional counters which are used to determine the charge of the particles incident to the calorimeter and to estimate the number of the secondary charged particles.

  6. Calorimeter operations in RunII at DØ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    The operation and performance of the DØ calorimeter is presented. Calorimeter operation will be overviewed with specific focus on calibration techniques hardware monitoring and stability, and overall data quality strategies

  7. Steady-state differential calorimeter measures gamma heating in reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, D.; Talboy, J. H.

    1968-01-01

    Steady-state differential calorimeter, which displays good accuracy and reproducibility of results, is used to measure gamma heating in a reactor environment. The calorimeter has a long life expectancy since it is virtually unharmed by the reactor environment.

  8. Performance of the ATLAS trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadei, Diego

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS trigger has been used very successfully to collect collision data during 2009-2011 LHC running at centre of mass energies between 900 GeV and 7 TeV. The three-level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. The first level uses custom electronics to reject most background events, in less than 2.5 μs, using information from the calorimeter and muon detectors. The upper two trigger levels are software-based triggers. The trigger system selects events by identifying signatures of muon, electron, photon, tau lepton, jet, and B meson candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. We give an overview of the performance of these trigger selections based on extensive online running during the 2011 LHC run and discuss issues encountered during 2011 operations. We describe how the trigger has evolved with increasing LHC luminosity coping with pile-up conditions close to LHC design luminosity.

  9. Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.

    1965-01-01

    A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  10. Temperature Effects in the ATIC BGO Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isbert, J.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K.; Chang, J.; Christl, M. J.; Fazely, A.; Ganel, O.; Gunasigha, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment contains a segmented calorimeter composed of 320 individual BGO crystals (18 radiation lengths deep) to determine the particle energy. Like all inorganic scintillation crystals the light output of BGO depends not only on the energy deposited by particles but also on the temperature of the crystal. ATIC had successful flights in 2000/2001 and 2002/2003 from McMurdo, Antarctica. The temperature of balloon instruments varies during their flights at altitude due to sun angle variations and differences in albedo from the ground and is monitored and recorded. In order to determine the temperature sensitivity of the ATIC calorimeter it was temperature cycled in the thermal vacuum chamber at the CSBF in Palestine, TX. The temperature dependence is derived from the pulse height response to cosmic ray muons at various temperatures.

  11. Electromagnetic calorimeter for the Heavy Photon Search Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, Emma

    2014-11-01

    The Heavy Photon Search Experiment (HPS) seeks to detect a hypothesised hidden sector boson, the A', predicted to be produced in dark matter decay or annihilation. Theories suggest that the A' couples weakly to electric charge through kinetic mixing, allowing it, as a result, to decay to Standard Matter (SM) lepton pair, which may explain the electron and positron excess recently observed in cosmic rays. Measuring the lepton pair decay of the A' could lead to indirect detection of dark matter. The HPS experiment is a fixed target experiment that will utilize the electron beam produced at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). The detector set-up includes a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) and an Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECal). The ECal will provide the trigger and detect e+e- pairs and its construction and testing forms the focus of this thesis. The ECal consists of 442 PbWO4- tapered crystals with a length 16cm and a 1.6x1.6cm2 cross-section, stacked into a rectangular array and are coupled to Large Area APDs and corresponding pre-amplifiers. Supplementary to the ECal is a Light Monitoring System (LMS) consisting of bi-coloured LEDs that will monitor changes in APD gain and crystal transparency due to radiation damage. Before construction of the ECal each of the components were required to be individually tested to determine a number of different characteristics. Irradiation tests were performed on PbWO4 ECal crystals and, as a comparison, one grown by a different manufacturer to determine their radiation hardness. A technique for annealing the radiation damage by optical bleaching, which involves injecting light of various wavelengths into the crystal, was tested using the blue LED from the LMS as a potential candidate. The light yield dependence on temperature was also measured for one of the PbWO4 crystal types. Each APD was individually tested to determine if they functioned correctly and

  12. The aleph pictorial electromagnetic calorimeter - A high granularity gaseous calorimeter operated in a high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videau, Henri

    1984-09-01

    We outline briefly the general structure of the Aleph detector, to place in context conceptually and physically the electromagnetic calorimeter. The calorimeter is then described, emphasizing the read-out mechanical and electronic structure, which allows adequate granularity; three layers of towers 3×3 cm 2, approximately 210 000 pieces of analog information. We discuss the basic properties of such apparatus with the results of tests performed on a prototype. We emphasize the peculiarities of operating such a wire gas calorimeter in a strong magnetic field parallel to the wires.

  13. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2016-07-12

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal’s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  14. Radiation damage effects on calorimeter compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A. ); Handler, T. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    An important consideration in the design of a detector that is to be used at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is the response of the calorimeter to electromagnetic and hadronic particles and the equality of those responses for different types of particles at equal incident energies, i.e. compensation. However, as the simulations that are reported show, the compensation characteristics of a calorimeter can be seriously compromised over a relatively short period of time due to the large radiation levels that are expected in the SSC environment. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  15. A Pb-SciFi imaging calorimeter for high energy cosmic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Torii, S.; Tateyama, N.; Tamura, T.; Yoshida, K.; Yamagami, T.; Murakami, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Yuda, T.; Nishimura, J.

    1998-11-09

    The BETS (balloon-borne electron telescope with scintillating fiber) detector has been developed for high-altitude balloon flights to observe high-energy cosmic-electrons. The detector consists of an imaging calorimeter and a trigger system for particle identification and energy measurement. The calorimeter is composed of scintillating fibers and leads of a total thickness of {approx}8 r.l. Two sets of an image-intensifier and CCD camera system are adopted for read-out of 10,080 scintillating fibers. The accelerator tests were carried out to study performance of the detector by the CERN-SPS electron and proton beams. It is demonstrated in the flight data that a reliable identification of the electron component has been successfully achieved up to 100 GeV, and the energy spectrum has been measured.

  16. Preliminary on-orbit results of trigger system for DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Chang, Jin; Guo, Jian hua; Dong, TieKuang; Liu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), Chinese first high energy cosmic ray explorer in space, has been successfully launched at Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, with the mission of searching dark matter particle. Large energy range for electron/gamma, good energy resolution, and excellent PID ability, make DAMPE to be the most promising detector so far to find the signal of dark matter. DAMPE consists of four sub-detectors: Plastic Scintillation detector, Silicon-Tungsten tracker, BGO calorimeter and Neutron detector. The hit signals generated by the BGO calorimeter and the trigger board (in DAQ) constitute the trigger system of DAMPE, which will generate trigger signals for the four sub-detectors to start data acquisition. The trigger system reduces the trigger rates on orbit from about 1kHz to 70~100Hz, that releases the stress of DAQ transmitting data to ground. In this paper, we will introduce the trigger system of DAMPE, and present some preliminary on-orbit results e.g. trigger efficiency, together with the beam test results at CERN and the simulation results as comparison.

  17. The New APD Based Readout for the Crystal Barrel Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, M.; Honisch, Ch; Steinacher, M.; CBELSA/TAPS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The CBELSA/TAPS experiment at ELSA measures double polarization observables in meson photoproduction off protons and neutrons. To be able to measure purely neutral reactions off polarized neutrons with high efficiency, the main calorimeter has to be integrated into the first level trigger. This requires to exchange the existing PIN photo diode by a new avalanche photo diode (APD) readout. The newly developed readout electronics will provide an energy resolution compatible to the previous set-up and a fast trigger signal down to 10 MeV energy deposit per crystal. After the successful final tests with a 3x3 CsI crystal matrix in Bonn at ELSA and in Mainz at MAMI all front-end electronics were produced in fall 2013. Automated test routines for the front-end electronics were developed and the characterization measurements of all APDs were successfully accomplished in Bonn. The project is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SFB/TR16) and Schweizerischer Nationalfonds.

  18. Grout Analysis for EC and CC Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Engstrom, L.L.; /Fermilab

    1987-01-06

    The EC and CC calorimeters roll on Two parallel hardened steel ways which reside on the top of the D0 platform's center beam. The ways will be grouted to the center beam once their correct elevation has been established. The purpose of this report is to evaluate and compare three different epoxy grouts and their properties for this application.

  19. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

  20. Coordinated movements of eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF1, eIF1A, and eIF5 trigger phosphate release from eIF2 in response to start codon recognition by the ribosomal preinitiation complex.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Jagpreet S; Saini, Adesh K; Muñoz, Antonio M; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Lorsch, Jon R

    2013-02-22

    Accurate recognition of the start codon in an mRNA by the eukaryotic translation preinitiation complex (PIC) is essential for proper gene expression. The process is mediated by eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs) in conjunction with the 40 S ribosomal subunit and (initiator) tRNA(i). Here, we provide evidence that the C-terminal tail (CTT) of eIF1A, which we previously implicated in start codon recognition, moves closer to the N-terminal domain of eIF5 when the PIC encounters an AUG codon. Importantly, this movement is coupled to dissociation of eIF1 from the PIC, a critical event in start codon recognition, and is dependent on the scanning enhancer elements in the eIF1A CTT. The data further indicate that eIF1 dissociation must be accompanied by the movement of the eIF1A CTT toward eIF5 in order to trigger release of phosphate from eIF2, which converts the latter to its GDP-bound state. Our results also suggest that release of eIF1 from the PIC and movement of the CTT of eIF1A are triggered by the same event, most likely accommodation of tRNA(i) in the P site of the 40 S subunit driven by base pairing between the start codon in the mRNA and the anticodon in tRNA(i). Finally, we show that the C-terminal domain of eIF5 is responsible for the factor's activity in antagonizing eIF1 binding to the PIC. Together, our data provide a more complete picture of the chain of molecular events that is triggered when the scanning PIC encounters an AUG start codon in the mRNA.

  1. π0 Reconstruction using the Muon Piston Calorimeter Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Dhruv; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Muon-Piston Calorimeter Extension (MPC-EX) is a new detector in the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider that was installed for the recent Run 15 of the experiment. In polarized p+p and polarized p+A collisions, an important measurement is the yield and momentum distribution of direct photons. Unaffected by the strong force, direct photons traverse the dense medium in the collision zone mostly unchanged, thereby providing information about the initial stages of the collision. However, there is a huge background of photons from other sources, primarily π0 which decay into two photons. The opening angle between the decay photons becomes smaller with higher energies of the original π0. For energies greater than ~20 GeV, the Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) cannot distinguish the two decay photons from a single photon, as their showers merge. The MPC-EX, an 8-layer tungsten and silicon sensor sandwich in front of the MPC, can measure and image the shower development, and help distinguish between direct photons and π0 decay photons up to higher energies than the MPC alone. We will describe the MPC-EX detector and its readout, and present the calibration procedures applied to the data in order to obtain the π0 spectrum. This project was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  2. Monte Carlo Simulation of Massive Absorbers for Cryogenic Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, D.; Asai, M.; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Silva, E.do Couto e; Kelsey, M.; Leman, S.W.; McArthy, K.; Resch, R.; Wright, D.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; /MIT

    2012-06-12

    There is a growing interest in cryogenic calorimeters with macroscopic absorbers for applications such as dark matter direct detection and rare event search experiments. The physics of energy transport in calorimeters with absorber masses exceeding several grams is made complex by the anisotropic nature of the absorber crystals as well as the changing mean free paths as phonons decay to progressively lower energies. We present a Monte Carlo model capable of simulating anisotropic phonon transport in cryogenic crystals. We have initiated the validation process and discuss the level of agreement between our simulation and experimental results reported in the literature, focusing on heat pulse propagation in germanium. The simulation framework is implemented using Geant4, a toolkit originally developed for high-energy physics Monte Carlo simulations. Geant4 has also been used for nuclear and accelerator physics, and applications in medical and space sciences. We believe that our current work may open up new avenues for applications in material science and condensed matter physics.

  3. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strizenec, P.

    2014-09-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid Argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudorapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a parallel plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 88.5 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, around 27 fb-1 of data have been collected at a unprecedented center of mass energies between 7 TeV and 8 TeV. During all these stages, the calorimeter and its electronics have been operating with performances very close to the specification ones. After 2019, the instantaneous luminosity will reach 2-3 × 1034 cm-2s-1, well above the luminosity for which the calorimeter was designed. In order to preserve its triggering capabilities, the detector will be upgraded with a new fully digital trigger system with a refined granularity. In 2023, the instantaneous luminosity will ultimately reach 5-7 × 1034 cm-2s-1, requiring a complete replacement of the readout electronics. Moreover, with an increased particle flux, several phenomena (liquid argon boiling, space charge effects...) will affect the performance of the forward calorimeter (FCal). A replacement with a new FCal with smaller LAr gaps or a new calorimeter module are considered. The performance of these new

  4. Search for Very Short Bursts with the AGILE Mini-Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Marisaldi, M.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Galli, M.; Argan, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Longo, F.; Moretti, E.; Boffelli, F.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Bulgarelli, A.; Di Cocco, G.; Gianotti, F.; Caraveo, P.; Chen, A.; Fornari, F.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.

    2009-05-25

    In this paper the results of the first months of burst search on very short time scales with the Mini-Calorimeter (MCAL) on-board the AGILE mission are presented. MCAL is equipped with a flexible on-board trigger logic for autonomous GRB detection. In addition to standard trigger time windows, MCAL has been equipped with trigger capabilities on 16 ms, 1 ms and sub-millisecond time windows. Since June 2008 burst search on these short time scales has been enabled, resulting in an average rate of 4 triggers/orbit, compliant with telemetry budget. An on-ground rejection strategy is applied, allowing more sophisticated selection criteria than those allowed by the on-board trigger logic. Triggers due to instrumental effects or geophysical phenomena can be spotted due to their photon-by-photon pattern; what remains after this cleaning is an almost unexplored territory and could shed light on the origin of very short bursts. The trigger criteria, as well as the on-ground rejection strategy and the properties of the selected events will be described and discussed.

  5. Firearm trigger assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  6. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  7. FPGA-based 10-Gbit Ethernet Data Acquisition Interface for the Upgraded Electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohs, J. Philipp; Atlas Liquid Argon calorimeter Group

    2014-06-01

    A stepwise upgrade of the LHC is foreseen starting now until the year 2023 to increase the instantaneous luminosity up to five times of its design value. It implies a challenge for the ATLAS experiment coping with the expected event pile-up, especially for the Level-1 calorimeter trigger system. In order to keep the trigger rates within the limited bandwidth new algorithms have to be applied which in turn requires an upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeter trigger readout electronics. Towards this upgrade, the ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeter group develops a high-speed data acquisition interface in ATCA standard using commercial hardware instead of complex and expensive in-house developments where possible. This paper gives an overview of the general concepts of the DAQ interface, the engaged technologies and the current status of the development efforts for an FPGA based fast data link with a standard 10 Gbps Ethernet protocol which may also be useful for DAQ systems of other high energy physics experiments.

  8. Bromelain inhibits COX-2 expression by blocking the activation of MAPK regulated NF-kappa B against skin tumor-initiation triggering mitochondrial death pathway.

    PubMed

    Bhui, Kulpreet; Prasad, Sahdeo; George, Jasmine; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2009-09-18

    Chemoprevention impels the pursuit for either single targeted or cocktail of multi-targeted agents. Bromelain, potential agent in this regard, is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and fruits of pineapple (Ananas cosmosus), endowed with anti-inflammatory, anti-invasive and anti-metastatic properties. Herein, we report the anti tumor-initiating effects of bromelain in 2-stage mouse skin tumorigenesis model. Pre-treatment of bromelain resulted in reduction in cumulative number of tumors (CNT) and average number of tumors per mouse. Preventive effect was also comprehended in terms of reduction in tumor volume up to a tune of approximately 65%. Components of the cell signaling pathways, connecting proteins involved in cell death were targeted. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in Bcl-2. A marked inhibition in cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression and inactivation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) was recorded, as phosphorylation and consequent degradation of I kappa B alpha was blocked by bromelain. Also, bromelain treatment curtailed extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt activity. The basis of anti tumor-initiating activity of bromelain was revealed by its time dependent reduction in DNA nick formation and increase in percentage prevention. Thus, modulation of inappropriate cell signaling cascades driven by bromelain is a coherent approach in achieving chemoprevention.

  9. Sum and buffer amplifier for lead-glass barrel calorimeter in the TOPAZ detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ujiie, N.; Ikeda, M.; Inaba, S.

    1988-02-01

    Analog sum and buffer amplifiers have been developed to provide a fast trigger signal from the lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeter in the TOPAZ detector for TRISTAN e/sup +/e/sup -/ collider experiments at KEK. The total kick-back noise from the 4300 channel gate signals of the LeCroy FASTBUS ADC 1885N has been suppressed to less than 40 mV (equivalent to a 0.4 GeV electron signal). The performances of the analog sum and buffer amplifiers that have been developed are described.

  10. Measurement and simulation of the neutron detection efficiency with a Pb-scintillating fiber calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anelli, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Branchini, P.; Curceanu, C.; DeZorzi, G.; Domenico, Adi; Di Micco, B.; Ferrari, A.; Fiore, S.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Happacher, F.; Iliescu, M.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Ngugen, F.; Paseri, A.; Prokfiev, A.; Sala, P.; Sciascia, B.; Sirghi, F.

    2009-04-01

    We have measured the overall detection efficiency of a small prototype of the KLOE PB-scintilation fiber calorimeter to neutrons with kinetic energy range [5,175] MeV. The measurement has been done in a dedicated test beam in the neutron beam facility of the Svedberg Laboratory, TSL Uppsala. The measurements of the neutron detection efficiency of a NE110 scintillator provided a reference calibration. At the lowest trigger threshold, the overall calorimeter efficiency ranges from 28% to 33%. This value largely exceeds the estimated ~8% expected if the response were proporetional only to the scintillator equivalent thickness. A detailed simulation of the calorimeter and of the TSL beam line has been performed with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The simulated response of the detector to neutrons is presented together with the first data to Monte Carlo comparison. The results show an overall neutron efficiency of about 35%. The reasons for such an efficiency enhancement, in comparison with the typical scintillator-based neutron counters, are explained, opening the road to a novel neutron detector.

  11. Effect of dead material in a calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1995-10-01

    The existence of dead material in any practical calorimeter system is simply a fact of life. The task for the designer, then, is to understand the impact on the Physics in question, and strive to minimize it. The aim of this note is to use the ``Hanging File`` test data, which has fined grained individual readout of about 100 depth segments, to explore impact of dead material on the mean and r.m.s. of the hadronic distribution. The amount and location of the dead material is varied. It important to remember that the Hanging File data was calibrated, EM to HCAL compartment, so as to minimize the electron to pion energy dependence. In practical terms e/pie was made = 1.0 at an incident energy of about 100 GeV. Note that the PB(EM) + FE(HCAL) calorimeter was not a compensating device.

  12. Performance of the HPC calorimeter in DELPHI

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, A.; Crawley, H.B.; Edsall, D.M. |

    1995-08-01

    The performance of the High-density Projection Chamber (HPC), the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter of the DELPHI experiment, is described. The detector adopts the time projection technique in order to obtain exceptionally fine spatial granularity in the three coordinates ({approximately}2{times}20 mrad{sup 2} in {theta}{times}{phi} with nine samplings along the shower axes), using a limited number of readout channels (18,432). Among the various topics concerning the HPC construction and operation, major emphasis is given to the aspects related to the calibration in energy of the calorimeter, based mainly on the analysis of the detector response to {sup 83m}Kr decays, and to the treatment of aging in the readout proportional counters.

  13. Can a Pb/SCIFI calorimeter survive the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D.W.; Hughes, S.A.; Reimer, P.E.; Tayloe, R.L. ); Johnson, K.F. ); Majewski, S.; Zorn, C.; Zorn, M. )

    1990-01-01

    A scintillating fiber based electromagnetic calorimeter module built from radiation-hard materials has been tested in a beam capable of delivering both low and high currents of monoenergetic electrons. Energy resolution and light output measurements were made following high-dose exposures. The procedure was repeated until the resolution of the detector decreased from an initial value of 6.9%{radical}E to 14.0%{radical}E and the pulse height dropped by a factor of 11. After four weeks, the detector was retested. Partial recovery was observed in the light output which returned to approximately 52% of its original value. The resolution recovered to a value of 8.8%{radical}E. The tests are described. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Can a PB / SCIFI Calorimeter Survive the SSC?

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Hertzog; S. A. Hughes; P. E. Reimer; R. L. Tayloe; K. F. Johnson; S. Majewski; C. Zorn; M. Zorn

    1990-03-01

    A scintillating fiber based electromagnetic calorimeter module built from radiation-hard materials has been tested in a beam capable of delivering both low and high currents of monoenergetic electrons. Energy resolution and light output measurements were made following high-dose exposures. The procedure was repeated until the resolution of the detector decreased from an initial value of 6.9%/sqrt E to 14.0%/sqrt E and the pulse height dropped by a factor of 11. After four weeks, the detector was retested. Partial recovery was observed in the light output which returned to approximately 52% of its original value. The resolution recovered to a value of 8.8%/sqrt E. The tests are described.

  15. Development and implementation of optimal filtering in a Virtex FPGA for the upgrade of the ATLAS LAr calorimeter readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stärz, S.

    2012-12-01

    In the context of upgraded read-out systems for the Liquid-Argon Calorimeters of the ATLAS detector, modified front-end, back-end and trigger electronics are foreseen for operation in the high-luminosity phase of the LHC. Accuracy and efficiency of the energy measurement and reliability of pile-up suppression are substantial when processing the detector raw-data in real-time. Several digital filter algorithms are investigated for their performance to extract energies from incoming detector signals and for the needs of the future trigger system. The implementation of fast, resource economizing, parameter driven filter algorithms in a modern Virtex FPGA is presented.

  16. A no-load RF calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The described device can be used to measure the output of any dc powered RF source. No dummy load is required for the measurements. The device is, therefore, called the 'no-load calorimeter' (NLC). The NLC measures the power actually fed to the antenna or another useful load. It is believed that the NLC can compete successfully with directional coupler type systems in measuring the output of high-power RF sources.

  17. Performance testing of a large volume calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bracken, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Calorimetry is used as a nondestructive assay technique for determining the power output of heat-producing nuclear materials. Calorimetric assay of plutonium-bearing and tritium items routinely obtains the highest precision and accuracy of all nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques, and the power calibration can be traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology through certified electrical standards. Because the heat-measurement result is completely independent of material and matrix type, it can be reliably used on any material form or item matrix. The calorimetry measurement is combined with isotopic composition information to determine the correct plutonium content of an item. When an item is unsuitable for neutron or gamma-ray NDA, calorimetric assay is used. Currently, the largest calorimeter capable of measuring plutonium-bearing or tritium items is 36 cm in diameter and 61 cm long. Fabrication of a high-sensitivity large volume calorimeter (LVC) capable of measuring tritium and plutonium-bearing items in 208-1 (55-gal) shipping or storage containers has provided a reliable NDA method to measure many difficult to measure forms of plutonium and tritium more accurately. This large calo rimeter can also be used to make secondary working standards from process material for the calibration of faster NDA assay techniques. The footprint of the calorimeter is 104 cm wide by 157 cm deep and 196 cm high in the closed position. The space for a standard electronics rack is also necessary for the operation of the calo rimeter. The maximum item size that can be measured in the LVC is 62 cm in diameter and 100 cm long. The extensive use of heat-flow calorimeters for safeguards-related measurements at DOE facilities makes it important to extend the capability of calorimetric assay of plutonium and tritium items to larger container sizes. Measurement times, precision, measurement threshold, and position sensitivity of the instrument will be discussed.

  18. Troubleshooting guide for Mound calorimeter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Breakall, K.L.; Duff, M.F.; Rodenburg, W.W.

    1988-06-29

    This report is to be used as a tool for troubleshooting Mound calorimeter systems. It describes in simple language the equilibration, prediction, and servo-control modes of operation. A problem-cause-action table provides suggestions and, in some cases, directs personnel to one of six troubleshooting flow charts included in the report. Using the flow charts, laboratory personnel should be able to rcognize and troubleshoot most problems that occur. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of HERD calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Chen, G. M.; Dong, Y. W.; Lu, J. G.; Quan, Z.; Wang, L.; Wang, Z. G.; Wu, B. B.; Zhang, S. N.

    2014-07-01

    The High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's Space Station is planned for operation starting around 2020 for about 10 years. It is designed as a next generation space facility focused on indirect dark matter search, precise cosmic ray spectrum and composition measurements up to the knee energy, and high energy gamma-ray monitoring and survey. The calorimeter plays an essential role in the main scientific objectives of HERD. A 3-D cubic calorimeter filled with high granularity crystals as active material is a very promising choice for the calorimeter. HERD is mainly composed of a 3-D calorimeter (CALO) surrounded by silicon trackers (TK) from all five sides except the bottom. CALO is made of 9261 cubes of LYSO crystals, corresponding to about 55 radiation lengths and 3 nuclear interaction lengths, respectively. Here the simulation results of the performance of CALO with GEANT4 and FLUKA are presented: 1) the total absorption CALO and its absorption depth for precise energy measurements (energy resolution: 1% for electrons and gammarays beyond 100 GeV, 20% for protons from 100 GeV to 1 PeV); 2) its granularity for particle identification (electron/proton separation power better than 10-5); 3) the homogenous geometry for detecting particles arriving from every unblocked direction for large effective geometrical factor (<3 m2sr for electron and diffuse gammarays, >2 m2sr for cosmic ray nuclei); 4) expected observational results such as gamma-ray line spectrum from dark matter annihilation and spectrum measurement of various cosmic ray chemical components.

  20. Level-3 Calorimetric Resolution available for the Level-1 and Level-2 CDF Triggers

    SciTech Connect

    Canepa, Anadi; Casarsa, M.; Cavaliere, V.; Cortiana, Giorgio; Donati, S.; Flanagan, G.; Greco, V.; Giannetti, P.; Frisch, H.; Krop, D.; Liu, T.; /Fermilab /INFN, Pisa

    2008-06-01

    As the Tevatron luminosity increases sophisticated selections are required to be efficient in selecting rare events among a very huge background. To cope with this problem, CDF has pushed the offline calorimeter algorithm reconstruction resolution up to Level 2 and, when possible, even up to Level 1, increasing efficiency and, at the same time, keeping under control the rates. The CDF Run II Level 2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on a simple algorithm that was used in Run I. This system has worked well for Run II at low luminosity. As the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitation due to this simple algorithm starts to become clear: some of the most important jet and MET (Missing ET) related triggers have large growth terms in cross section at higher luminosity. In this paper, we present an upgrade of the Level 2 Calorimeter system which makes the calorimeter trigger tower information available directly to a CPU allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be implemented in software. Both Level 2 jets and MET can be made nearly equivalent to offline quality, thus significantly improving the performance and flexibility of the jet and MET related triggers. However in order to fully take advantage of the new L2 triggering capabilities having at Level 1 the same L2 MET resolution is necessary. The new Level-1 MET resolution is calculated by dedicated hardware. This paper describes the design, the hardware and software implementation and the performance of the upgraded calorimeter trigger system both at Level 2 and Level 1.

  1. Fast Shower Simulation in the ATLAS Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Barberio, E.; Boudreau, J.; Butler, B.; Cheung, S.L.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Di Simone, A.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Gallas, M.V.; Glazov, A.; Marshall, Z.; Mueller, J.; Placakyte, R.; Rimoldi, A.; Savard, P.; Tsulaia, V.; Waugh, A.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    The time to simulate pp collisions in the ATLAS detector is largely dominated by the showering of electromagnetic particles in the heavy parts of the detector, especially the electromagnetic barrel and endcap calorimeters. Two procedures have been developed to accelerate the processing time of electromagnetic particles in these regions: (1) a fast shower parameterisation and (2) a frozen shower library. Both work by generating the response of the calorimeter to electrons and positrons with Geant 4, and then reintroduce the response into the simulation at runtime. In the fast shower parameterisation technique, a parameterization is tuned to single electrons and used later by simulation. In the frozen shower technique, actual showers from low-energy particles are used in the simulation. Full Geant 4 simulation is used to develop showers down to {approx} 1 GeV, at which point the shower is terminated by substituting a frozen shower. Judicious use of both techniques over the entire electromagnetic portion of the ATLAS calorimeter produces an important improvement of CPU time. We discuss the algorithms and their performance in this paper.

  2. Design considerations for a scintillating plate calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Job, P. K.; Price, L. E.; Proudfoot, J.; Handler, T.; Gabriel, T. A.

    1992-06-01

    Results of the simulation studies for the design of a scintillating plate calorimeter for an SSC detector are presented. These simulation studies have been carried out with the CALOR89 code. The results show that both lead and uranium can yield good compensation in practical sampling geometries. However, the significant delayed energy release in the uranium systems can lead to a serious pile up problem at high rates. In the energy range under consideration, an iron-scintillator system is not compensating at any absorber to scintillator ratio. An inhomogeneous calorimeter with 4γ of lead-scintillator in a compensating configuration followed by 4γ of iron-scintillator with moderate sampling is found to perform as well as a homogeneous lead-scintillator compensating calorimeter. In such inhomogeneous systems the hadronic signal from different segments are weighted by a scheme based on minimum ionizing d E/d X. We show that, in a properly optimised three segment, compensation and good hadronic resolution can be achieved by appropriately weighting the signal from the segments.

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on triggering and data acquisition for experiments at the Supercollider

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, R.

    1989-04-01

    This meeting covered the following subjects: triggering requirements for SSC physics; CDF level 3 trigger; D0 trigger design; AMY trigger systems; Zeus calorimeter first level trigger; data acquisition for the Zeus Central Tracking Detector; trigger and data acquisition aspects for SSC tracking; data acquisition systems for the SSC; validating triggers in CDF level 3; optical data transmission at SSC; time measurement system at SSC; SSC/BCD data acquisition system; microprocessors and other processors for triggering and filtering at the SSC; data acquisition, event building, and on-line processing; LAA real-time benchmarks; object-oriented system building at SSC; and software and project management. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Heat flow calorimeter. [measures output of Ni-Cd batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.; Johnston, W. V. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Heat flow calorimeter devices are used to measure heat liberated from or absorbed by an object. This device is capable of measuring the thermal output of sealed nickel-cadmium batteries or cells during charge-discharge cycles. An elongated metal heat conducting rod is coupled between the calorimeter vessel and a heat sink, thus providing the only heat exchange path from the calorimeter vessel itself.

  5. Test beam performance of CDF plug upgrade EM calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; CDF Upgrade Group

    1998-01-01

    CDF Plug Upgrade(tile-fiber) EM Calorimeter performed resolution of 15%/{radical}E{circle_plus}0.7% with non-linearity less than 1% in a energy range of 5-180 GeV at Fermilab Test Beam. Transverse uniformity of inside-tower-response of the EM Calorimeter was 2.2% with 56 GeV positron, which was reduced to 1.0% with response map correction. We observed 300 photo electron/GeV in the EM Calorimeter. Ratios of EM Calorimeter response to positron beam to that to {sup 137}Cs Source was stable within 1% in the period of 8 months.

  6. Performance of the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Callegari, G.; Piemontese, L.; De Sangro, R.; Peruzzi, I., Piccolo, M.; Busza, W.; Friedman, J.; Johnson, A.; Kendall, H.; Kistiakowsky, V.

    1986-03-01

    A prototype hadron calorimeter, of similar design to the Warm Iron Calorimeter (WIC) planned for the SLD experiment, has been built and its performance has been studied in a test beam. The WIC is an iron sampling calorimeter whose active elements are plastic streamer tubes similar to those used for the Mont-Blanc proton decay experiment. The construction and operation of the tubes will be briefly described together with their use in an iron calorimeter - muon tracker. Efficiency, resolution and linearity have been measured in a hadron/muon beam up to 11 GeV. The measured values correspond to the SLD design goals.

  7. Performance of the CDF Calorimeter Simulation in Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Pedro A. Movilla

    2006-10-27

    The CDF experiment is successfully collecting data from pp(bar sign) collisions at the Tevatron in Run II. As the data samples are getting larger, systematic uncertainties due to the measurement of the jet energy scale assessed using the calorimeter simulation have become increasingly important. In many years of operation, the collaboration has gained experience with GFLASH, a fast parametrization of electromagnetic and hadronic showers used for the calorimeter simulation. We present the performance of the calorimeter simulation and report on recent improvements based on a refined in situ tuning technique. The central calorimeter response is reproduced with a precision of 1-2%.

  8. Performance of the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Callegari, G.; Piemontese, L.; DeSangro, R.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Busza, W.; Friedman, J.; Johnson, A.; Kendall, H.; Kistiakowsky, V.

    1986-02-01

    A prototype hadron calorimeter, of similar design to the Warm Iron Calorimeter (WIC) planned for the SLD experiment, has been built and its performance has been studied in a test beam. The WIC is an iron sampling calorimeter whose active elements are plastic streamer tubes similar to those used for the Mont-Blanc proton decay experiment. The construction and operation of the tubes will be briefly described together with their use in an iron calorimeter - muon tracker. Efficiency, resolution and linearity have been measured in a hadron/muon beam up to 11 GeV. The measured values correspond to the SLD design goals.

  9. Compensatable muon collider calorimeter with manageable backgrounds

    DOEpatents

    Raja, Rajendran

    2015-02-17

    A method and system for reducing background noise in a particle collider, comprises identifying an interaction point among a plurality of particles within a particle collider associated with a detector element, defining a trigger start time for each of the pixels as the time taken for light to travel from the interaction point to the pixel and a trigger stop time as a selected time after the trigger start time, and collecting only detections that occur between the start trigger time and the stop trigger time in order to thereafter compensate the result from the particle collider to reduce unwanted background detection.

  10. Front-end Electronics for the ALICE Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, K.; Awes, Terry C; Enokizono, Akitomo; Silvermyr, David O; Zhang, Chun; Young, Glenn R; The, ALICE

    2010-05-01

    The ALICE calorimeters PHOS and EMCal are based on Avalanche Photo-Diode (APD) photosensors with Charge Sensitive Preamplifiers (CSP) for readout of the scintillating elements. The amplified signals are read out via 32-channel shaper/digitizer front-end electronics (FEE) with 14-bit effective dynamic range. The electronics is based on second order shapers with dual gain for each channel, getting digitized by ALTRO chips. Each APD channel is equipped with an individual 10-bit APD gain adjustment and 2 x 2 channel clusters generate a 100 ns shaped analog sums output (Fast OR) for the associated Trigger Region Units (TRU). The Fast OR signals are generated by first order shapers with a dynamic range of 12-bit given by the ADC in the TRU cards. Board controller firmware in the FPGA provides local monitoring and configuration of all parameters via the ALICE DCS system. The signal to noise ratio for MIP at 215 MeV is {approx}7 per channel with a noise level of 30 MeV at room temperature for a dynamic range of 80 GeV for PHOS, and the fast-OR RMS noise level is about 75 MeV for a dynamic range of 250 GeV for EMCal.

  11. [Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  12. The CMS central hadron calorimeter DAQ system upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbeck, A.; Hirschauer, J.

    2015-05-01

    The CMS central hadron calorimeters will undergo a complete replacement of their data acquisition system electronics. The replacement is phased, with portions of the replacement starting in 2014 and continuing through LHC Long Shutdown 2 in 2018. The existing VME electronics will be replaced with a μTCA-based system. New on-detector QIE electronics cards will transmit data at 4.8 GHz to the new μHTR cards residing in μTCA crates in the CMS electronics cavern. The μTCA crates are controlled by the AMC13, which accepts system clock and trigger throttling control from the CMS global DAQ system. The AMC13 distributes the clock to the μHTR and reads out data buffers from the μHTR into the CMS data acquisition system. The AMC 13 also provides the clock for in-crate GLIBs which in turn distribute the clock to the on-detector front end electronics. We report on the design, development status, and schedule of the DAQ system upgrades.

  13. Monolithic electronics for the WA98 leadglass calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Young, G.R.; Awes, T.C.; Alley, C.L.

    1995-04-01

    A set of electronics have been constructed, installed and operated for the 10,800 element leadglass photon calorimeter that is part of CERN experiment WA98 studying photon production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions of 160.A GeV{sup 208}Pb with targets of Ni, Nb and Pb. Two custom monolithic CMOS circuits were developed for this project. One chip includes 8 channels each of integrator, dual gain amplifier, fast amplifier, and CFD, as well as calibration circuits for amplitude and timing, threshold DACs, and current-mode trigger sum and discriminator. The second includes 16 channels of analog memory, 8 channels of TAC, a 24-channel Wilkinson 10 bit ADC, and buffers. The system is implemented as 72 144-channel circuit boards. Custom interface boards were also developed. A set of 26 model TMS320C40 digital signal processors is used to collect, zero-suppress and format the output data. Experience with data-taking using the {sup 208}Pb beam will be reported.

  14. The performance of the DELPHI hadron calorimeter at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Ajinenko, I.; Beloous, K.; Chudoba, J. |

    1996-06-01

    The DELPHI Hadron Calorimeter was conceived more than ten years ago, as an instrument to measure the energy of hadrons and hadronic jets from e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at the CERN collider LEP. In addition it was expected to provide a certain degree of discrimination between pions and muons. The detector is a rather simple and relatively inexpensive device consisting of around 20,000 limited streamer plastic tubes, with inductive pad read-out, embedded in the iron yoke of the 1.2 T DELPHI magnet. Its depth is at minimum 6.6 nuclear interaction lengths. The electronics necessary for the pad readout was designed to have an adequate performance for a reasonable cost. This detector has proved over six years of operation to have an entirely satisfactory performance and great reliability; for example less than 1% of the streamer tubes have failed and electronic problems remain at the per mil level. During the past two years an improvement program has been under way. It has been found possible to use the streamer tubes as strips, hence giving better granularity and particle tracking, by reading out the cathode of individual tubes. The constraints on this were considerable because of the inaccessibility of the detectors in the magnet yoke. However, a cheap and feasible solution has been found. The cathode readout leads to an improved energy resolution, better {mu} identification, a better {pi}/{mu} separation and to possibilities of neutral particle separation. The simultaneous anode read-out of several planes of the endcaps of the detector will provide a fast trigger in the forward/backward direction which is an important improvement for LEP200. On the barrel the system will provide a cosmic trigger which is very useful for calibration as counting rates at LEP200 will be very low.

  15. Readout Electronics for BGO Calorimeter of DAMPE: Status during the First Half-year after Launching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Siyuan; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Deliang; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    The DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientic satellite which was successfully launched into a 500 Km sun-synchronous orbit, on December 17th, 2015, from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center of China. The major scientific objective of DAMPE mission is indirect searching for dark matter by observing high energy primary cosmic rays, especially positrons/electrons and gamma rays with an energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. The BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) calorimeter, which is a critical sub-detector of DAMPE payload, was developed for measuring the energy of cosmic particles, distinguishing positrons/electrons and gamma rays from hadron background, and providing trigger information. It is composed of 308 BGO crystal logs, with the size of 2.5cm*2.5cm*60cm for each log to form a total absorption electromagnetic calorimeter. All the BGO logs are stacked in 14 layers, with each layer consisting of 22 BGO crystal logs and each log is viewed by two Hamamatsu R5610A PMTs (photomultiplier tubes), from both sides respectively. Each PMT incorporates a three dynode pick off to achieve a large dynamic range, which results in 616 PMTs and 1848 signal channels. The main function of readout electronics system, which consists of 16 FEE(Front End Electronics) modules, is to precisely measure the charge of PMT signals and providing "hit" signals. The hit signals are sent to the trigger module of PDPU (Payload Data Process Unit) to generate triggers for the payload. The calibration of the BGO calorimeter is composed of pedestal testing and electronic linear scale, which are executed frequently in the space after launching. The data of the testing is transmitted to ground station in the form of scientific data. The monitor status consists of temperature, current and status words of the FEE, which are measured and recorded every 16 seconds and packed in the engineering data, then transmitted to ground station. The status of the BGO calorimeter can be evaluated by the calibration

  16. Remote hydraulic ocean instrument trigger: DIRECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, M.

    1993-05-01

    A robust, reliable, inexpensive, easily operated, remote acting, deep ocean triggering system called DIRECTS (depth-indexed remote-equipment-commanding trigger system) is designed to initiate and power the operation of generic instrumentation at specific depths in the sea. The triggers, hydraulically actuated, are accurate within a few meters of depth and provide important post-retrieval confirmation of depth at the time of operation. The majority of research and commercial endeavors in the sea depend on the ability to accuratesly initiate subsea activities at specifically determined depths. Chemical, physical, and biological oceanographic sampling, commercial fishing, and offshore petroleum resource assessment are among operations requiring depth-accurate triggering capabilities.

  17. Summary talk on fiber tower calorimeter for the scintillation calorimeter subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.P.; Walker, J.K.; Johnson, C.; Wahl, H.; Gabriel, T.

    1989-01-01

    We present here a new calorimeter design based on small scintillator tiles, lead absorber and wavelength shifting fiber readout. We have addressed all the major issues in SSC calorimetry and have developed a design with many advantageous features. It has been well demonstrated that the best resolution is obtained for a 'compensated' calorimeter. It is also well known how such compensation may be achieved by a suitable choice of active and passive materials and their relative thickness. One such choice is that of lead and scintillator for which the best thickness ratio is 4:1. This selection has been used in the development of the so-called spaghetti calorimeter (SPACAL) discussed at this workshop. The relative merits of this and many other designs have been the subject of much discussion at SSC workshops from which a number of critical issues have emerged for each design. In the present paper, we have addressed the issues raised in the SPACAL design and proposed an alternative, improved design. The SPACAL represents a significant step forward in calorimeter design, but there are always areas which can be improved in any design when it is subjected to detailed study. Specifically we have considered the areas of energy resolution, channeling, projective towers/calibration, longitudinal segmentation, and radiation sensitivity. We will now discuss each of these areas in turn. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  18. T-1018 UCLA Spacordion Tungsten Powder Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Trentalange, Stephen; Tsai, Oleg; Igo, George; Huang, Huan; Pan, Yu Xi; Dunkelberger, Jay; Xu, Wen Qin; Soha, Aria; Heppelmann, Steven; Gagliardi, Carl; /Texas A-M

    2011-11-16

    The present experiments at the BNL-RHIC facility are evolving towards physics goals which require the detection of medium energy electromagnetic particles (photons, electrons, neutral pions, eta mesons, etc.), especially at forward angles. New detectors will place increasing demands on energy resolution, hadron rejection and two-photon resolution and will require large area, high performance electromagnetic calorimeters in a variety of geometries. In the immediate future, either RHIC or JLAB will propose a facility upgrade (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with physics goals such as electron-heavy ion collisions (or p-A collisions) with a wide range of calorimeter requirements. An R and D program based at Brookhaven National Laboratory has awarded the group funding of approximately $110,000 to develop new types of calorimeters for EIC experiments. The UCLA group is developing a method to manufacture very flexible and cost-effective, yet high quality calorimeters based on scintillating fibers and tungsten powder. The design and features of the calorimeter can be briefly stated as follows: an arbitrarily large number of small diameter fibers (< 0.5 mm) are assembled as a matrix and held rigidly in place by a set of precision screens inside an empty container. The container is then back-filled with tungsten powder, compacted on a vibrating table and infused with epoxy under vacuum. The container is then removed. The resulting sub-modules are extremely uniform and achieve roughly the density of pure Lead. The sub-modules are stacked together to achieve a final detector of the desired shape. There is no dead space between sub-modules and the fibers can be in an accordion geometry bent to prevent 'channeling' of the particles due to accidental alignment of their track with the module axis. This technology has the advantage of being modular and inexpensive to the point where the construction work may be divided among groups the size of typical university physics departments

  19. Measurement and simulation of the neutron response and detection efficiency of a Pb-scintillating fiber calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anelli, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Branchini, P.; Curceanu, C.; De Zorzi, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Micco, B.; Ferrari, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Happacher, F.; Iliescu, M.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Nguyen, F.; Passeri, A.; Prokofiev, A.; Sala, P.; Sciascia, B.; Sirghi, F.

    2007-10-01

    The overall detection efficiency to neutrons of a small prototype of the KLOE Pb-scintillating fiber calorimeter has been measured at the neutron beam facility of The Svedberg Laboratory, TSL, Uppsala, in the kinetic energy range 5-175 MeV. The measurement of the neutron detection efficiency of a NE110 scintillator provided a reference calibration. At the lowest trigger threshold, the overall calorimeter efficiency ranges from 40% to 50%. This value largely exceeds the estimated 8-16% expected if the response were proportional only to the scintillator equivalent thickness. A detailed simulation of the calorimeter and of the TSL beamline has been performed with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The simulated response of the detector to neutrons is presented, as well as a first data-Monte Carlo comparison. The results show an overall neutron efficiency of about 50%, when no trigger threshold is applied. The reasons of such an efficiency enhancement, in comparison with the typical scintillator-based neutron counters, are explained, opening the road to a novel neutron detector.

  20. Calorimeter measurements of low wattage items

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, T.L.; Camp, K.L.; Hildner, S.S.; Sedlacek, W.A.

    1993-08-01

    The transition of DOE facilities from production to decontamination and decommissioning has led to more measurements of waste, scrap, and other less attractive materials. The difficulty that these materials pose for segmented gamma scanning and neutron counting has increased the use of calorimetric assay for very low wattage items (< 250 millwatts). We have measured well characterized {sup 238}Pu oxide ranging in wattage from 25 to 500 milliwatts in the calorimeters at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility and report the error and the precision of the measurements.

  1. Monitoring LSO/LYSO Crystal Based Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Liyuan; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Precision light monitoring is important for keeping excellent energy resolution promised by LSO/LYSO crystals in severe radiation environment. In this paper, we report an investigation on the wavelength choice for monitoring LYSO crystal based calorimeters. Gamma-ray induced absorption and light output loss were measured for 20 cm long crystals from five different vendors. Monitoring sensitivity and divergence between crystals from different vendors were investigated. The pros and cons of two monitoring approaches using emission and excitation light and their practical implementation for a LYSO/W Shashlik test beam matrix are discussed.

  2. Calorimeter probe studies of PDX and PLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, D. M.; Budny, R.; Satake, T.; Cohen, S. A.

    1982-12-01

    Using a combined electrostatic-calorimeter probe, a comprehensive survey of energy flux in the edge plasmas of low field ohmic and beam-heated PDX and PLT discharges has been made. Ions are shown to carry the majority of the power to floating probes. The intercepted energy is found to increase nearly linearly with applied heating power. The scrape-off distances, ranging from 0.5 cm for a 4 null diverted discharge to 2.5 cm for inside dee diverted discharge, are independent of heating power. Direct evidence is presented for the prompt loss to the walls and limiters in PDX of energetic beam ions.

  3. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter: Construction, Integration, Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksa, Martin

    2006-10-27

    The ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The liquid argon sampling technique, with an accordion geometry was chosen for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (EMB) and adapted to the end cap (EMEC). The hadronic end cap calorimeter (HEC) uses a copper-liquid argon sampling technique with flat plate geometry and is subdivided in depth in two wheels per end-cap. Finally, the forward calorimeter (FCAL) is composed of three modules employing cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps.The construction of the full calorimeter system is complete since mid-2004. Production modules constructed in the home institutes were integrated into wheels at CERN in 2003-2004, and inserted into the three cryostats. They passed their first complete cold test before the lowering into the ATLAS cavern. Results of quality checks (e.g. electrical, mechanical, ...) performed on all the 190304 read-out channels after cool down will be reported. End 2004 the ATLAS barrel electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter was installed in the ATLAS cavern and since summer 2005 the front-end electronics are being connected and tested. Results of this first commissioning phase will be shown to demonstrate the high standards of quality control for our detectors.

  4. Charge Detector for the Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongin; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Cosmic Ray Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS) Mission is planned to consist of a transition radiation detector (TRD) and a thin ionization calorimeter. In order to measure the charge of the primary cosmic ray, it is necessary for the calorimeter to have its own charge detector. Silicon detectors are chosen for the charge detector because of their excellent resolution, small size and nearly square shape. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to find the probability of misidentifying protons as alpha particles due to backscattered radiation from the calorimeter. Simulations were also used to investigate identifying primary cosmic rays that fragmented in the TRD before reaching the calorimeter. For this study algorithms have been developed for determining a direction of the core shower in the calorimeter. These algorithms are used to find the approximate location of the primary particle in the silicon detectors. Results show the probability to misidentify the charge depends upon the energy and direction of the primary particles.

  5. Mechanical construction and installation of the ATLAS tile calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Adragna, P.; Alexa, C.; Alves, R.; Amaral, P.; Ananiev, A.; Anderson, K.; Andresen, X.; Antonaki, A.; Batusov, V.; Bednar, P.; Behrens, A.; Bergeaas, E.; Biscarat, C.; Blanch, O.; Blanchot, G.; Blocki, J.; Bohm, C.; Boldea, V.; Bosi, F.; Bosman, M.; Bromberg, C.; Brunel, B.; Budagov, J.; Calderón, D.; Calvet, D.; Cardeira, C.; Carli, T.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castillo, M. V.; Costello, J.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Clement, C.; Cobal, M.; Cogswell, F.; Constantinescu, S.; Costanzo, D.; Da Silva, P.; David, M.; Davidek, T.; Dawson, J.; De, K.; Del Prete, T.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dotti, A.; Downing, R.; Drake, G.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Farbin, A.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feng, E.; Fenyuk, A.; Ferdi, C.; Ferreira, B. C.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, J.; Flaminio, V.; Flix, J.; Francavilla, P.; Fullana, E.; Garde, V.; Gayde, J. C.; Gellerstedt, K.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gildemeister, O.; Gilewsky, V.; Giokaris, N.; Gollub, N.; Gomes, A.; Gonzalez, V.; Gouveia, J.; Grenier, P.; Gris, P.; Grudzinski, J.; Guarino, V.; Guicheney, C.; Gupta, A.; Hakobyan, H.; Haney, M.; Hellman, S.; Henriques, A.; Higon, E.; Hill, N.; Holmgren, S.; Hruska, I.; Hurwitz, M.; Huston, J.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jon-And, K.; Junk, T.; Karyukhin, A.; Khubua, J.; Klereborn, J.; Kopikov, S.; Korolkov, I.; Krivkova, P.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kurochkin, Y.; Kuzhir, P.; Lapin, V.; Lasseur, C.; LeCompte, T.; Lefevre, R.; Leitner, R.; Li, J.; Lyablin, M.; Lim, H.; Lokajicek, M.; Lomakin, Y.; Lourtie, P.; Lovas, L.; Lupi, A.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Maliukov, S.; Manousakis, A.; Marques, C.; Marroquim, F.; Martin, F.; Mazzoni, E.; Mergelkuhl, D.; Merritt, F.; Miagkov, A.; Miller, R.; Minashvili, I.; Miralles, L.; Montarou, G.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Nikitine, I.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nyman, T.; Onofre, A.; Oreglia, M.; Palan, B.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Pereira, A.; Pilcher, J.; Pina, J.; Pinhão, J.; Pod, E.; Podlyski, F.; Portell, X.; Poveda, J.; Pribyl, L.; Price, L. E.; Proudfoot, J.; Ramalho, M.; Ramstedt, M.; Raposeiro, L.; Reis, J.; Richards, R.; Roda, C.; Romanov, V.; Rose-Dulcina, L.; Rosnet, P.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Rumiantsau, V.; Russakovich, N.; da Costa, J. Sa; Salto, O.; Salvachua, B.; Sanchis, E.; Sanders, H.; Santoni, C.; Santos, J.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Says, L.-P.; Schlager, G.; Schlereth, J.; Seixas, J. M.; Selldèn, B.; Shalanda, N.; Shchelchkov, A.; Shevtsov, P.; Shochet, M.; Silva, J.; Simaitis, V.; Simonyan, M.; Sissakian, A.; Sjoelin, J.; Skrzecz, F.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Sorokina, J.; Sosebee, M.; Spano, F.; Speckmeyer, P.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Starovoitov, P.; Suk, M.; Sykora, I.; Tang, F.; Tas, P.; Teuscher, R.; Tokar, S.; Topilin, N.; Torres, J.; Underwood, D.; Usai, G.; Utkin, V.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls, J. A.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Ventura, F.; Vichou, I.; Vivarelli, I.; Volpi, M.; White, A.; Wood, K.; Zaitsev, A.; Zenin, A.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zilka, B.

    2013-11-01

    This paper summarises the mechanical construction and installation of the Tile Calorimeter for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in CERN, Switzerland. The Tile Calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter using scintillator as the sensitive detector and steel as the absorber and covers the central region of the ATLAS experiment up to pseudorapidities ±1.7. The mechanical construction of the Tile Calorimeter occurred over a period of about 10 years beginning in 1995 with the completion of the Technical Design Report and ending in 2006 with the installation of the final module in the ATLAS cavern. During this period approximately 2600 metric tons of steel were transformed into a laminated structure to form the absorber of the sampling calorimeter. Following instrumentation and testing, which is described elsewhere, the modules were installed in the ATLAS cavern with a remarkable accuracy for a structure of this size and weight.

  6. Closed Gap Slug Calorimeter for Plasma Stream Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Gorbunov, Sergey; Terrazas-Salinas, Imelda; Jones, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Slug calorimeters are used in sheer and stagnation mode to characterize heat flux levels for high enthalpy streams. The traditional design features a gap between slug and holder, which can be of concern in these convective heat flux environments. The challenge is to develop a calorimeter that closes the gap to gas flow, but largely maintains thermal insulation of the slug. The work presented herein introduces two new slug calorimeter designs featuring a closed gap. This is done using either aerogel as a filler or press fitting the slug with a disk. The designs were verified and compared to the baseline calorimeter design under radiative heat flux. Building on this, the calorimeters were exposed to convective heat flux in the arc-jet facilities. Results from the new designs and conclusions on the impact of the gap in convective heat flux will be shown.

  7. Hadron shower decomposition in the highly granular CALICE analogue hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigen, G.; Price, T.; Watson, N. K.; Marshall, J. S.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Bonnevaux, A.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J. C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Steen, A.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Markin, O.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Ilyin, A.; Mironov, D.; Mizuk, R.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cizel, J.-B.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Magniette, F.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Musat, G.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Ruan, M.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; de la Taille, Ch.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-06-01

    The spatial development of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter is studied using test beam data collected at CERN and FNAL for single positive pions and protons with initial momenta in the range of 10-80 GeV/c. Both longitudinal and radial development of hadron showers are parametrised with two-component functions. The parametrisation is fit to test beam data and simulations using the QGSP_BERT and FTFP_BERT physics lists from GEANT4 version 9.6. The parameters extracted from data and simulated samples are compared for the two types of hadrons. The response to pions and the ratio of the non-electromagnetic to the electromagnetic calorimeter response, h/e, are estimated using the extrapolation and decomposition of the longitudinal profiles.

  8. PERFORMANCE OF A LIQUID XENON CALORIMETER CRYOGENIC SYSTEM FOR THE MEG EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Haruyama, T.; Kasami, K.; Hisamitsu, Y.; Iwamoto, T.; Mihara, S.; Mori, T.; Nishiguchi, H.; Otani, W.; Sawada, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; Nishitani, T.

    2008-03-16

    The {mu}-particle rare decay physics experiment, the MU-E-GAMMA (MEG) experiment, will soon be operational at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Zurich. To achieve the extremely high sensitivity required to detect gamma rays, 800 L of liquid xenon is used as the medium in the calorimeter, viewed by 830 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) immersed in it. The required liquid xenon purity is of the order of ppb of water, and is obtained by using a cryogenic centrifugal pump and cold molecular sieves. The heat load of the calorimeter at 165 K is to be approximately 120 W, which is removed by a pulse-tube cryocooler developed at KEK and built by Iwatani Industrial Gas Corp., with a cooling power of about 200 W at 165 K. The cryogenic system is also equipped with a 1000-L dewar. This paper describes the results of an initial performance test of each cryogenic component.

  9. The calibration and monitoring system for the PHENIX lead-scintillator electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    David, G.; Kistenev, E.; Stoll, S.; White, S.; Woody, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Chernichenkov, S.; Denisov, A.; Gilitzky, Y.; Kochetkov, V.; Melnikov, Y.; Onuchin, V.; Semenov, A.; Shelikhov, V.; Soldatov, A.

    1998-11-01

    A system for calibrating the PHENIX lead-scintillator electromagnetic calorimeter modules with cosmic rays and monitoring the stability during operation is described. The system is based on a UV laser which delivers light to each module through a network of optical fibers and splitters and is monitored at various points with silicon and vacuum photodiodes. Results are given from a prototype system which used a nitrogen laser to set the initial phototube gains and to establish the energy calibration of calorimeter modules and monitor their stability. A description of the final system to be used in PHENIX, based on a high power YAG laser, is also given. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Triggering Reform at Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    An intriguing experiment is afoot in some of the nation's struggling public schools. New "Parent Trigger" laws passed in California and on the agenda in New York, Ohio, Colorado, and Chicago, allow parents of chronically failing schools to unseat the schools' leadership and staff. But the initiative has pitfalls. It's easy to mobilize parents to…

  11. Research and development for a free-running readout system for the ATLAS LAr Calorimeters at the high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hils, Maximilian

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters were designed and built to measure electromagnetic and hadronic energy in proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to 1034 cm-2 s-1. The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) programme is now developed for up to 5-7 times the design luminosity, with the goal of accumulating an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1. In the HL-LHC phase, the increased radiation levels and an improved ATLAS trigger system require a replacement of the Front-end (FE) and Back-end (BE) electronics of the LAr Calorimeters. Results from research and development of individual components and their radiation qualification as well as the overall system design will be presented.

  12. Identifying asthma triggers.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Justin C; Ferguson, Berrylin J

    2014-02-01

    Asthma has many triggers including rhinosinusitis; allergy; irritants; medications (aspirin in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease); and obesity. Paradoxic vocal fold dysfunction mimics asthma and may be present along with asthma. This article reviews each of these triggers, outlining methods of recognizing the trigger and then its management. In many patients more than one trigger may be present. Full appreciation of the complexity of these relationships and targeted therapy to the trigger is needed to best care for the patient with asthma.

  13. Methods for automatic trigger threshold adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Benjamin J; Partridge, Michael E

    2014-03-18

    Methods are presented for adjusting trigger threshold values to compensate for drift in the quiescent level of a signal monitored for initiating a data recording event, thereby avoiding false triggering conditions. Initial threshold values are periodically adjusted by re-measuring the quiescent signal level, and adjusting the threshold values by an offset computation based upon the measured quiescent signal level drift. Re-computation of the trigger threshold values can be implemented on time based or counter based criteria. Additionally, a qualification width counter can be utilized to implement a requirement that a trigger threshold criterion be met a given number of times prior to initiating a data recording event, further reducing the possibility of a false triggering situation.

  14. Cell Type-Specific Gene Expression Analyses by RNA Sequencing Reveal Local High Nitrate-Triggered Lateral Root Initiation in Shoot-Borne Roots of Maize by Modulating Auxin-Related Cell Cycle Regulation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng; Eggert, Kai; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Li, Chunjian; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Plants have evolved a unique plasticity of their root system architecture to flexibly exploit heterogeneously distributed mineral elements from soil. Local high concentrations of nitrate trigger lateral root initiation in adult shoot-borne roots of maize (Zea mays) by increasing the frequency of early divisions of phloem pole pericycle cells. Gene expression profiling revealed that, within 12 h of local high nitrate induction, cell cycle activators (cyclin-dependent kinases and cyclin B) were up-regulated, whereas repressors (Kip-related proteins) were down-regulated in the pericycle of shoot-borne roots. In parallel, a ubiquitin protein ligase S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein1-cullin-F-box protein(S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein 2B)-related proteasome pathway participated in cell cycle control. The division of pericycle cells was preceded by increased levels of free indole-3-acetic acid in the stele, resulting in DR5-red fluorescent protein-marked auxin response maxima at the phloem poles. Moreover, laser-capture microdissection-based gene expression analyses indicated that, at the same time, a significant local high nitrate induction of the monocot-specific PIN-FORMED9 gene in phloem pole cells modulated auxin efflux to pericycle cells. Time-dependent gene expression analysis further indicated that local high nitrate availability resulted in PIN-FORMED9-mediated auxin efflux and subsequent cell cycle activation, which culminated in the initiation of lateral root primordia. This study provides unique insights into how adult maize roots translate information on heterogeneous nutrient availability into targeted root developmental responses.

  15. Cell Type-Specific Gene Expression Analyses by RNA Sequencing Reveal Local High Nitrate-Triggered Lateral Root Initiation in Shoot-Borne Roots of Maize by Modulating Auxin-Related Cell Cycle Regulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Peng; Eggert, Kai; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Li, Chunjian; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved a unique plasticity of their root system architecture to flexibly exploit heterogeneously distributed mineral elements from soil. Local high concentrations of nitrate trigger lateral root initiation in adult shoot-borne roots of maize (Zea mays) by increasing the frequency of early divisions of phloem pole pericycle cells. Gene expression profiling revealed that, within 12 h of local high nitrate induction, cell cycle activators (cyclin-dependent kinases and cyclin B) were up-regulated, whereas repressors (Kip-related proteins) were down-regulated in the pericycle of shoot-borne roots. In parallel, a ubiquitin protein ligase S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein1-cullin-F-box proteinS-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein 2B-related proteasome pathway participated in cell cycle control. The division of pericycle cells was preceded by increased levels of free indole-3-acetic acid in the stele, resulting in DR5-red fluorescent protein-marked auxin response maxima at the phloem poles. Moreover, laser-capture microdissection-based gene expression analyses indicated that, at the same time, a significant local high nitrate induction of the monocot-specific PIN-FORMED9 gene in phloem pole cells modulated auxin efflux to pericycle cells. Time-dependent gene expression analysis further indicated that local high nitrate availability resulted in PIN-FORMED9-mediated auxin efflux and subsequent cell cycle activation, which culminated in the initiation of lateral root primordia. This study provides unique insights into how adult maize roots translate information on heterogeneous nutrient availability into targeted root developmental responses. PMID:26198256

  16. Implementation of linear bias corrections for calorimeters at Mound

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    In the past, Mound has generally made relative bias corrections as part of the calibration of individual calorimeters. The correction made was the same over the entire operating range of the calorimeter, regardless of the magnitude of the range. Recently, an investigation was performed to check the relevancy of using linear bias corrections to calibrate the calorimeters. The bias is obtained by measuring calibrated plutonium and/or electrical heat standards over the operating range of the calorimeter. The bias correction is then calculated using a simple least squares fit (y = mx + b) of the bias in milliwatts over the operating range of the calorimeter in watts. The equation used is B{sub i} = B{sub 0} + (B{sub w} * W{sub m}), where B{sub i} is the bias at any given power in milliwatts, B{sub 0} is the intercept (absolute bias in milliwatts), B{sub w} is the slope (relative bias in milliwatts per watt), and W{sub m} is the measured power in watts. The results of the study showed a decrease in the random error of bias corrected data for most of the calorimeters which are operated over a large wattage range (greater than an order of magnitude). The linear technique for bias correction has been fully implemented at Mound and has been included in the Technical Manual, ``A Measurement Control Program for Radiometric Calorimeters at Mound`` (MD-21900).

  17. Method and system for improved resolution of a compensated calorimeter detector

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved method and system for a depleted uranium calorimeter detector used in high energy physics experiments. In a depleted uranium calorimeter detector, the energy of a particle entering the calorimeter detector is determined and the output response of the calorimeter detector is compensated so that the ratio of the integrated response of the calorimeter detector from a lepton to the integrated response of the calorimeter detector from a hadron of the same energy as the lepton is approximately equal to 1. In the present invention, the energy of a particle entering the calorimeter detector is determined as a function of time and the hadron content of the response of the calorimeter detector is inferred based upon the time structure of the energy pulse measured by the calorimeter detector. The energy measurement can be corrected based on the inference of the hadron content whereby the resolution of the calorimeter can be improved.

  18. The automatic gain-matching in the PIBETA CsI calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frlež, E.; Bychkov, M.; Počanić, D.

    2008-08-01

    Segmented electromagnetic calorimeters are used to determine both the total energy and direction (momentum components) of charged particles and photons. A trade-off is involved in selecting the degree of segmentation of the calorimeter as the spatial and energy resolutions are affected differently. Increased number of individual detectors reduces accidental particle pile-up per detector but introduces complications related to ADC pedestals and pedestal variations, exacerbates the effects of electronic noise and ground loops, and requires summing and discrimination of multiple analog signals. Moreover, electromagnetic showers initiated by individual ionizing particles spread over several detectors. This complicates the precise gain-matching of the detector elements which requires an iterative procedure. The PIBETA calorimeter is a 240-module pure CsI non-magnetic detector optimized for detection of photons and electrons in the energy range 5-100 MeV. We present the computer-controlled, automatic, in situ gain-matching procedure that we developed and used routinely in several rare pion and muon decay experiments with the PIBETA detector.

  19. Data Analysis for the Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark J.

    1997-01-01

    The scintillating optical fiber calorimeter is a hybrid instrument with both active and passive components for measuring the proton and helium cosmic ray spectra from 0.2 to IO TeV kinetic energy. A thin emulsion/x-ray film chamber is situated between a cerenkov counter and an imaging calorimeter. Scintillating optical fibers sample the electromagnetic showers that develop in the calorimeter and identify the trajectory of cosmic rays that interact in SOFCAL. The emulsion/x-ray film data provide an in flight calibration for SOFCAL. The data reduction techniques used will be discussed and interim results of the analysis from a 20 hour balloon flight will be presented.

  20. Complex Calorimeter with AC- and Relaxation-Mode Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ema, Kenji; Uematsu, Takashi; Sugata, Atsushi; Yao, Haruhiko

    1993-04-01

    A complex calorimeter has been developed. This calorimeter, which can be operated both in the ac mode and the relaxation mode using the same sample cell and the same apparatus settings, uses only a small amount (30-50 mg) of sample. An application to measurements in the vicinity of the antiferroelectric phase transitions in the liquid crystal MHPOBC(4-(1-methylheptyloxycarbonyl)-phenyl 4'-octyloxybiphenyl-4-carboxylate) is demonstrated. It is shown that the present calorimeter, when operated in the relaxation mode, enables detection of the latent heat with a resolution of 0.002 J/g.

  1. Rectangular waveguide calorimeter for single intense microwave pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Ballard, W.P.; Roose, L.D.

    1986-09-01

    A new calorimeter for single intense microwave pulses has been designed and tested. The device was constructed in WR284 rectangular waveguide and was operated at frequencies from 2.5 to 4.3 GHz with a tunable instantaneous bandwidth of approximately 500 MHz. The calorimeter used a single thermistor to measure the energy deposited on a carbon absorber having a microwave power absorbance of 90%. The calorimeter was tested at power levels from 100 to 1000 MW for pulse lengths of 12--6 ns, respectively. The sensitivity of the device was 200--300 mV/J.

  2. Radiation damage in the SDC hadronic endcap calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1992-12-01

    Detectors for the SSC face a radiation field which is very dependent on angle. For example, the SDC barrel'' calorimeter can function well for 100 year operation of the SSC running at desip luminosity, while the small angle forward calorimeter'' faces Grad of radiation in the same period. The SDC endcap'' calorimeter is in an intermediate location. One wishes to examine whether it might be possible to use conventional scintillator technology with periodic refurbishment in the endcap- The angular range covered by the endcap spans the region, 1.4 < [eta] < 3.0. In this note, only the hadronic (HAD) compartment is considered. The electromagnetic (EM) compartment is considered elsewhere.

  3. Radiation damage in the SDC hadronic endcap calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1992-12-01

    Detectors for the SSC face a radiation field which is very dependent on angle. For example, the SDC ``barrel`` calorimeter can function well for 100 year operation of the SSC running at desip luminosity, while the small angle ``forward calorimeter`` faces Grad of radiation in the same period. The SDC ``endcap`` calorimeter is in an intermediate location. One wishes to examine whether it might be possible to use conventional scintillator technology with periodic refurbishment in the endcap- The angular range covered by the endcap spans the region, 1.4 < {eta} < 3.0. In this note, only the hadronic (HAD) compartment is considered. The electromagnetic (EM) compartment is considered elsewhere.

  4. New tools for the simulation and design of calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Womersley, W.J.

    1989-07-10

    Two new approaches to the simulation and design of large hermetic calorimeters are presented. Firstly, the Shower Library scheme used in the fast generation of showers in the Monte Carlo of the calorimeter for the D-Zero experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron is described. Secondly, a tool for the design future calorimeters is described, which can be integrated with a computer aided design system to give engineering designers an immediate idea of the relative physics capabilities of different geometries. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Calorimeter Simulation with Hadrons in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Piperov, Stefan; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    CMS is using Geant4 to simulate the detector setup for the forthcoming data from the LHC. Validation of physics processes inside Geant4 is a major concern in view of getting a proper description of jets and missing energy for signal and background events. This is done by carrying out an extensive studies with test beam using the prototypes or real detector modules of the CMS calorimeter. These data are matched with Geant4 predictions using the same framework that is used for the entire CMS detector. Tuning of the Geant4 models is carried out and steps to be used in reproducing detector signals are defined in view of measurements of energy response, energy resolution, transverse and longitudinal shower profiles for a variety of hadron beams over a broad energy spectrum between 2 to 300 GeV/c. The tuned Monte Carlo predictions match many of these measurements within systematic uncertainties.

  6. TFTR neutral beam calorimeter fabrication and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, E.D.; Brown, G.M.; Dudek, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR Neutral Beam Calorimeter were designed by Lawrence Livemore Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, but while the production units were being fabricated by the Plasma Physics Laboratory, several design changes were made. The major alterations included a detailed examination of the braze joints and cooling tubes along with techniques for inspecting the joints, and changing the temperature measurement instrumentation from thermistors to thermocouples. In addition, the water pipes were changed from custom bent pieces to assemblies of off the shelf street elbows and metal bellows, the motor control wiring was reworked to interface with the various TFTR control systems, and a second set of guide rollers was added to the retraction mechanism in order to provide smoother operation. Also, separate blow-out lines for each vee were added in order to increase the reliability of sufficiently purging the cooling systems and provide the capability of draining a single vee should it develop a leak.

  7. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.; Guzik, T. Gregory

    2001-01-01

    During grant NAG5-5064, Louisiana State University (LSU) led the ATIC team in the development, construction, testing, accelerator validation, pre-deployment integration and flight operations of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment. This involved interfacing among the ATIC collaborators (UMD, NRL/MSFC, SU, MSU, WI, SNU) to develop a new balloon payload based upon a fully active calorimeter, a carbon target, a scintillator strip hodoscope and a pixilated silicon solid state detector for a detailed investigation of the very high energy cosmic rays to energies beyond 10(exp 14) eV/nucleus. It is in this very high energy region that theory predicts changes in composition and energy spectra related to the Supernova Remnant Acceleration model for cosmic rays below the "knee" in the all-particle spectrum. This report provides a documentation list, details the anticipated ATIC science return, describes the particle detection principles on which the experiment is based, summarizes the simulation results for the system, describes the validation work at the CERN SPS accelerator and details the balloon flight configuration. The ATIC experiment had a very successful LDB flight from McMurdo, Antarctica in 12/00 - 1/01. The instrument performed well for the entire 15 days. Preliminary data analysis shows acceptable charge resolution and an all-particle power law energy deposition distribution not inconsistent with previous measurements. Detailed analysis is underway and will result in new data on the cosmic ray charge and energy spectra in the GeV - TeV energy range. ATIC is currently being refurbished in anticipation of another LDB flight in the 2002-03 period.

  8. TECHNICAL DESIGN REPORT FOR A NOSECONE CALORIMETER (NCC) FOR THE PHENIX EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    PHENIX EXPERIMENT; OBRIEN,E.; BOOSE, S.; CHIU, M.; JOHNSON, B.M.; KISTENEV, E.P.; LYNCH, D.; NOUICER, R.; PAK, R.; PISANI, R.; STOLL, S.P.; SUKHANOV, A.; WOODY, C.L.; LI, Z.; RADEKA, V.; RESCIA, S.

    2007-08-01

    A remarkable result has emerged from the first several years of data taking at RHIC--the high temperature and density phase of QCD matter created in heavy ion collisions at RHIC is best described as a near perfect fluid--the strongly interacting Quark-Gluon-Plasma (sQGP). This state is characterized by a small viscosity to entropy ratio, and a high density of color charges which induces huge energy losses of partons transversing the medium. The task for the future is to understand the characteristics of the sQGP, and perhaps more importantly--to gain some insight into how and why such a medium is created. The PHENIX detector has been one of the primary experimental tools at RHIC; in particular the electromagnetic calorimeter has been a critical component of many of the measurements leading to this discovery. The coverage of the present PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter is rather limited, covering half the azimuth and -0.35< {eta} <0.35 Further progress requires larger coverage of electromagnetic calorimetry, both to increase the rate for low cross section phenomena, and to cover a broader range of pseudorapidity to study the rapidity dependence of the medium. A pair of Nosecone Calorimeters (NCC) has been designed covering both positive and negative rapidity regions 1< |{eta}| <3 of the PHENIX detector. The NCC will make it possible to perform tomographic studies of the jet energy dependence of energy loss and medium response, by using direct photons as trigger particles over a large rapidity range. The technique of correlating trigger hadrons with low momentum hadrons has been powerfully exploited at RHIC to study the evolution of back to back jets [1, 2] and hence the response of the medium. The NCC will make it possible to do such studies using direct photons as the trigger particles. The direct photon in such ''photon-jet'' events tags the transverse momentum of outgoing parton which then fragments into lower energy particles. Together with the Forward Silicon

  9. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  10. A fine grained electromagnetic lead-liquid scintillator calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, L.; Bonesini, M.; Cavalli, D.; Costa, G.; Fischer, J.; Fluri, L.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Mandelli, L.; Martin, M.; Mazzanti, M.; Mermod, R.; Pensotti-Rancoita, S.; Perrin, D.; Rosselet, L.; Rutschmann, J.; Tamborini, M.; Vuilleumier, J. M.; Werlen, M.

    1983-02-01

    A new technique using liquid scintillator contained in teflon tubes to build a low cost high spatial resolution electromagnetic sampling calorimeter is described. Test results and comparison with a Monte Carlo simulation are presented.

  11. CALOR89 calorimeter simulations, benchmarking, and design calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, T. ); Panakkal, J.K.; Proudfoot, J. ); Cremaldi, L.; Moore, B.; Reidy, J.J. ); Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Fu, P.; Gabriel, T.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Results on CALOR89 benchmarking and design calculations utilizing the CALOR89 programs are presented. The benchmarking is done with respect to the ZEUS and DO calorimeters. The design calculations were done for a variety of absorbers (depleted uranium, lead, and iron) of various thickness for a given scintillator thickness and for a fixed absorber thickness using various thickness for the scintillator. These studies indicate that a compensating calorimeter can be built using lead as the absorber, whereas a purely iron calorimeter would be non-compensating. A depleted uranium calorimeter would possibly be unsuitable if used in a large configuration and a high luminosity machine because of the delayed energy release from capture gammas. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  12. The liquid krypton calorimeter of NA48: First operation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, F.

    1998-02-01

    The first technical run of the complete NA48 experimental apparatus took place in 1996. The first operation results of the full size liquid Krypton electromagnetic calorimeter as energy resolution and π 0 mass resolution are presented in this paper.

  13. An empirical profile of VLF triggered emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. D.; Spasojevic, M.; Inan, U. S.

    2015-08-01

    The Siple Transmitter Experiment operated from 1973 to 1988 and generated a wealth of observations of nonlinear wave-particle interactions including extensive recordings of triggered emissions generated by VLF signals injected into the magnetosphere from the transmitter at Siple Station, Antarctica. Due to their complex appearance and immensely varied behavior, triggered emissions remain poorly described and understood. This work provides a comprehensive statistical description of observed triggered emissions and establishes statistical bounds on triggered emission type (fallers, risers, and positive and negative hooks) and behavior (frequency changes between 1 kHz and 2.5 kHz with initial sweep rates between -2.5 kHz/s and 2.5 kHz/s, with risers undergoing a median frequency change of 556 Hz and fallers a median frequency change of -198 Hz). The statistical study also reveals an apparent dependence of the triggered emission behavior on the transmitted signal itself. Long tones and rising ramps generate more risers and positive hooks, while short tones and falling ramps produce more fallers and negative hooks. Triggered emissions also appear to favorably initiate with sweep rates similar to that of the triggering element, with the 1 kHz/s rising ramps triggering initial risers with a median sweep rate of 1.03 kHz/s and -1 kHz/s triggering initial fallers with a median sweep rate of -0.73 kHz/s. These results improve observations of wave modification resulting from wave-particle interactions in the radiation belts and can be used to validate numerical simulations of triggered emissions.

  14. Building and testing a high school calorimeter at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesot, L.; Crane, R.; Engelen, M. A. G.; van Haren, A. M. A.; van Kleef, R. H. B.; Leenders, O. R.; Timmermans, C.

    2016-11-01

    We have designed, built and tested a crystal calorimeter in the context of CERN’s first beam line for schools competition. The results of the tests at CERN show that the light output of our calorimeter depends on the energy deposited by particles (electrons and muons) hitting the crystals. Our design can be reproduced by high schools around the world, as we have avoided the use of toxic chemicals.

  15. A 1152 channel timing system for an electromagnetic calorimeter readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.; Bonvin, E.; Booth, P. S. L.; Carroll, L. J.; Cass, A. J.; Cavalli, D.; Cecchet, G.; Costa, G.; Donnat, M.; Dorsaz, P. A.; Edwards, D. N.; Fischer, J. R.; Fluri, L.; Frame, D.; Gianotti, F.; Jack, S.; Jackson, J. N.; Kelly, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Lucock, R.; Lynch, J. G.; Mandelli, L.; Martin, M.; Mathys, L.; Maxwell, A.; Mazzanti, M.; Myerscough, J. J.; Negus, P. J.; Pensotti-Rancoita, S.; Perini, L.; Perrin, D.; Range, W. H.; Rosselet, L.; Rutschmann, J.; Snow, S. W.; Tamborini, M.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Wells, J.; Werlen, M.

    1988-01-01

    A 1152 channel timing system used with a large electromagnetic calorimeter is described. Analysis of the timing information from the vertical and horizontal elements of the calorimeter yielded values for the position coordinates of the showers. This information was used to resolve ambiguities in the pattern recognition arising from multiple showers. A resolution of better than 0.25 ns for all channels was achieved. The calibration methods employed to maintain this resolution over several years are discussed.

  16. Performance and operation of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CMS Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The operation and general performance of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter using cosmic-ray muons are described. These muons were recorded after the closure of the CMS detector in late 2008. The calorimeter is made of lead tungstate crystals and the overall status of the 75 848 channels corresponding to the barrel and endcap detectors is reported. The stability of crucial operational parameters, such as high voltage, temperature and electronic noise, is summarised and the performance of the light monitoring system is presented.

  17. The BaBar Electromagnetic Calorimeter: Status and Performance Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Johannes M.; /SLAC

    2006-01-20

    The electromagnetic calorimeter at the BABAR detector, part of the asymmetric B Factory at SLAC, measures photons in the energy range from 20 MeV to 8 GeV with high resolution. The current status of the calorimeter, now in its seventh year of operation, is being presented, as well as details on improvements made to the analysis code during the last years.

  18. A cryogenic dose calorimeter for pulsed radiographic machines

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, S.; Mueller, K.; Kauppila, T.

    1995-05-05

    Calorimetry is the most direct, absolute technique for absorbed dose measurements. To improve the measurement accuracy for use with quantitative radiography, a calorimeter has been developed for LANL`s pulsed radiographic machines which produce bremsstrahlung radiation fields of 50--200 Rad per pulse at 1 meter from the source. This paper describes the theory of operation, the calorimeter design, and presents results from the PHERMEX accelerator. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  19. A cryogenic dose calorimeter for pulsed radiographic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, S.A.; Kauppila, T.; Mueller, K.H.

    1994-10-01

    Calorimetry is the most direct, absolute technique for absorbed dose measurements. To improve the measurement accuracy for use with quantitative radiography, a calorimeter has been developed for LANL`s pulsed radiographic machines which produce Bremsstrahlung radiation fields of 50-200 Rad per pulse at 1 meter from the source. This paper describes the theory of operation, the calorimeter design, and presents results from the PHERMEX accelerator.

  20. Current Status and Performance of the BESIII Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldbauer, Florian; BESIII Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The BESIII experiment is located at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII) in China. Its electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) consists of 6240 CsI(TI) crystals, each read out by two Photodiodes (PD) at the end of the crystal. Changes in the response of the calorimeter due to radiation damage in the crystals or changes in the photo detector output are monitored with a light pulser system.

  1. Neural triggering system operating on high resolution calorimetry information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Anjos, A.; Torres, R. C.; Seixas, J. M.; Ferreira, B. C.; Xavier, T. C.

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents an electron/jet discriminator system for operating at the Second Level Trigger of ATLAS. The system processes calorimetry data and organizes the regions of interest in the calorimeter in the form of concentric ring sums of energy deposition, so that both signal compaction and high performance can be achieved. The ring information is fed into a feed forward neural discriminator. This implementation resulted on a 97% electron detection efficiency for a false alarm of 3%. The full discrimination chain could still be executed in less than 500 μs.

  2. Energy Calibration of the Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter Chamber (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M. C.; Fountain, W. F.; Parnell, T.; Roberts, F. E.; Gregory, J. C.; Johnson, J.; Takahashi, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter (SOFCAL) detector is designed to make direct measures of the primary cosmic ray spectrum from -200 GeV/amu - 20 TeV/amu. The primary particles are resolved into groups according to their charge (p, He, CNO, Medium Z, Heavy Z) using both active and passive components integrated into the detector. The principal part of SOFCAL is a thin ionization calorimeter that measures the electromagnetic cascades that result from these energetic particles interacting in the detector. The calorimeter is divided into two sections: a thin passive emulsion/x-ray film calorimeter, and a fiber calorimeter that uses crossing layers of small scintillating optical fibers to sample the energy deposition of the cascades. The energy determination is made by fitting the fiber data to transition curves generated by Monte Carlo simulations. The fiber data must first be calibrated using the electron counts from the emulsion plates in the calorimeter for a small number of events. The technique and results of this calibration will be presented together with samples of the data from a balloon flight.

  3. An Imaging Calorimeter for Access-Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.; Adams, James H.; Binns, R. W.; Christl, M. J.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Howell, L. W.; Gregory, J. C.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A mission concept study to define the "Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS)" was sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The ACCESS instrument complement contains a transition radiation detector and an ionization calorimeter to measure tile spectrum of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei up to approximately 10(exp 15) eV to search for the limit of S/N shock wave acceleration, or evidence for other explanations of the spectra. Several calorimeter configurations have been studied, including the "baseline" totally active bismuth germanate instrument and sampling calorimeters utilizing various detectors. The Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) concept comprises a carbon target and a calorimeter using a high atomic number absorber sampled approximately each radiation length (rl) by thin scintillating fiber (SCIFI) detectors. The main features and options of the ICA instrument configuration are described in this paper. Since direct calibration is not possible over most of the energy range, the best approach must be decided from simulations of calorimeter performance extrapolated from CERN calibrations at 0.375 TeV. This paper presents results from the ICA simulations study.

  4. L1 track finding for a time multiplexed trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieri, D.; Brooke, J.; Grimes, M.; Newbold, D.; Harder, K.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Tomalin, I.; Vichoudis, P.; Reid, I.; Iles, G.; Hall, G.; James, T.; Pesaresi, M.; Rose, A.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.

    2016-07-01

    At the HL-LHC, proton bunches will cross each other every 25 ns, producing an average of 140 pp-collisions per bunch crossing. To operate in such an environment, the CMS experiment will need a L1 hardware trigger able to identify interesting events within a latency of 12.5 μs. The future L1 trigger will make use also of data coming from the silicon tracker to control the trigger rate. The architecture that will be used in future to process tracker data is still under discussion. One interesting proposal makes use of the Time Multiplexed Trigger concept, already implemented in the CMS calorimeter trigger for the Phase I trigger upgrade. The proposed track finding algorithm is based on the Hough Transform method. The algorithm has been tested using simulated pp-collision data. Results show a very good tracking efficiency. The algorithm will be demonstrated in hardware in the coming months using the MP7, which is a μTCA board with a powerful FPGA capable of handling data rates approaching 1 Tb/s.

  5. Testing and Calibration of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter for the Heavy Photon Search Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhart, Mathieu; HPS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment at Jefferson Laboratory will search for hypothetical massive vector boson, called ``heavy photon.'' The experiment is expected to run in Hall B in the fall of 2014. In this first phase of the measurements, it will search for a heavy photon in the mass range of 20 to 200 MeV/c2. In this mass range the heavy photon will decay into e+e- pair. An electromagnetic calorimeter (Ecal) will be used to identify electrons and for triggering the readout. The Ecal is made of 442 lead-tungstate (PbWO4) crystals with avalanche photodiode (APD) readout. I will present results from the calibration of cosmic ray testing.

  6. The DELPHI Hadron Calorimeter module characteristics in the saturated proportional mode of its detector operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatova, N. A.; Gotra, Yu. N.; Kadyrov, R. B.; Pozdnyakov, V. N.; Ryzhov, V. N.; Sadovsky, A. B.; Spassov, Tz.; Timofeev, V. G.; Tsyganov, E. N.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Vodopianov, A. S.; Zimin, N. I.; Zinchenko, A. I.

    1989-07-01

    A preamplifier allowing an increase in the sensitivity of the already produced DELPHI Hadron Calorimeter front-end electronics up to 0.1 pC is described. The presented preamplifier permits a considerable reduction of the gas gain and transition to the saturated avalanche mode region. The HC barrel module characteristics in the proportional mode of its detector operation are explored. The possibility of selecting muon tracks in the HC and using them for detector triggering has been investigated. It is shown that the transition to the proportional mode does not worsen the main characteristics of the HC and the reliability of its detectors will be considerably increased. The investigation has been performed at the Laboratory of High Energies, JINR.

  7. Triggered creep as a possible mechanism for delayed dynamic triggering of tremor and earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelly, D.R.; Peng, Z.; Hill, D.P.; Aiken, C.

    2011-01-01

    The passage of radiating seismic waves generates transient stresses in the Earth's crust that can trigger slip on faults far away from the original earthquake source. The triggered fault slip is detectable in the form of earthquakes and seismic tremor. However, the significance of these triggered events remains controversial, in part because they often occur with some delay, long after the triggering stress has passed. Here we scrutinize the location and timing of tremor on the San Andreas fault between 2001 and 2010 in relation to distant earthquakes. We observe tremor on the San Andreas fault that is initiated by passing seismic waves, yet migrates along the fault at a much slower velocity than the radiating seismic waves. We suggest that the migrating tremor records triggered slow slip of the San Andreas fault as a propagating creep event. We find that the triggered tremor and fault creep can be initiated by distant earthquakes as small as magnitude 5.4 and can persist for several days after the seismic waves have passed. Our observations of prolonged tremor activity provide a clear example of the delayed dynamic triggering of seismic events. Fault creep has been shown to trigger earthquakes, and we therefore suggest that the dynamic triggering of prolonged fault creep could provide a mechanism for the delayed triggering of earthquakes. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  8. GEANT SIMULATIONS OF PRESHOWER CALORIMETER FOR CLAS12 UPGRADE OF THE FORWARD ELECTROMAGNETIC CALORIMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlow, K.; Stepanyan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility uses the CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to study the structure of the nucleon. An upgrade from a 6 GeV beam to a 12GeV beam is currently planned. With the beam energy upgrade, more high-energy pions will be created from the interaction of the beam and the target. Above 6GeV, the angle between the two-decay photons of high-energy pions becomes too small for the current electromagnetic calorimeter (EC) of CLAS to differentiate between two photon clusters and single photon events. Thus, a preshower calorimeter will be added in front of the EC to enable fi ner granularity and ensure better cluster separation for all CLAS experiments at higher energies. In order to optimize cost without compromising the calorimeter’s performance, three versions of the preshower, varying in number of scintillator and lead layers, were compared by their resolution and effi ciency. Using GSIM, a GEANT detector simulation program for CLAS, the passage of neutral pions and single photons through CLAS and the new preshower calorimeter (CLAS12 EC) was studied. The resolution of the CLAS12 EC was calculated from the Gaussian fi t of the sampling fraction, the energy CLAS12 EC detected over the Monte Carlo simulated energy. The single photon detection effi ciency was determined from the energy and position of the photon hits. The fractional energy resolution measured was ΔE/E = 0.0972 in the fi ve-module version, 0.111 in the four-module version, and 0.149 in the three-module version. Both the fi ve- and four-module versions had 99% single photon detection effi ciency above 0.5GeV while the 3 module version had 99% effi ciency above 1.5GeV. Based on these results, the suggested preshower confi guration is the four-module version containing twelve layers of scintillator and fi fteen layers of lead. This version provides a reasonable balance of resolution, effi ciency, and

  9. sPHENIX Hadronic Calorimeter Scintillator Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Reuben; Sphenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    A new form of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) was discovered with the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). PHENIX is an experiment at RHIC that helped with this discovery, but plans are being made to replace it with a new spectrometer with different capabilities. The sPHENIX detector will consist of a superconducting solenoid magnet, hadronic and electromagnetic calorimetry and charged particle tracking. sPHENIX will enable a rich jet physics program that will address fundamental questions about of the nature of the QGP. The new detector will provide full azimuthal coverage and +/- 1.1 in pseudorapidity. The Hadronic Calorimeter is a major subsystem in this detector. It is made of alternating layers of scintillating tiles and steel plates. In the current prototype the tiles are covered with a reflective coating and contain wavelength shifting fibers. As the second round of prototypes are developed for an upcoming beam test, special care is being taken to provide uniform light collection efficiency across the detector. Studies are being conducted to ensure this by careful alignment of the silicon photomultipliers to the fibers and varying coatings on the tiles. The effects of the coating will be presented along with the current status and ongoing plans.

  10. Source calibrations and SDC calorimeter requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1992-10-01

    Several studies of the problem of calibration of the SDC calorimeter exist. In this note the attempt is made to give a connected account of the requirements on the source calibration from the point of view of the desired, and acceptable, constant term induced in the EM resolution. It is assumed that a ``local`` calibration resulting from exposing each tower to a beam of electrons is not feasible. It is further assumed that an ``in situ`` calibration is either not yet performed, or is unavailable due to tracking alignment problems or high luminosity operation rendering tracking inoperative. Therefore, the assumptions used are rather conservative. In this scenario, each scintillator plate of each tower is exposed to a moving radioactive source. That reading is used to ``mask`` an optical ``cookie`` in a grey code chosen so as to make the response uniform. The source is assumed to be the sole calibration of the tower. Therefore, the phrase ``global`` calibration of towers by movable radioactive sources is adopted.

  11. Source calibrations and SDC calorimeter requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1992-10-01

    Several studies of the problem of calibration of the SDC calorimeter exist. In this note the attempt is made to give a connected account of the requirements on the source calibration from the point of view of the desired, and acceptable, constant term induced in the EM resolution. It is assumed that a local'' calibration resulting from exposing each tower to a beam of electrons is not feasible. It is further assumed that an in situ'' calibration is either not yet performed, or is unavailable due to tracking alignment problems or high luminosity operation rendering tracking inoperative. Therefore, the assumptions used are rather conservative. In this scenario, each scintillator plate of each tower is exposed to a moving radioactive source. That reading is used to mask'' an optical cookie'' in a grey code chosen so as to make the response uniform. The source is assumed to be the sole calibration of the tower. Therefore, the phrase global'' calibration of towers by movable radioactive sources is adopted.

  12. A time-multiplexed track-trigger for the CMS HL-LHC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, G.

    2016-07-01

    A new CMS Tracker is under development for operation at the High Luminosity LHC from 2025. It includes an outer tracker based on special modules of two different types which will construct track stubs using spatially coincident clusters in two closely spaced sensor layers, to reject low transverse momentum track hits and reduce the data volume before data transmission to the Level-1 trigger. The tracker data will be used to reconstruct track segments in dedicated processors before onward transmission to other trigger processors which will combine tracker information with data originating from the calorimeter and muon detectors, to make the final L1 trigger decision. The architecture for processing the tracker data outside the detector is under study, using several alternative approaches. One attractive possibility is to exploit a Time Multiplexed design similar to the one which is currently being implemented in the CMS calorimeter trigger as part of the Phase I trigger upgrade. The novel Time Multiplexed Trigger concept is explained, the potential benefits for processing future tracker data are described and a feasible design based on currently existing hardware is outlined.

  13. Performance and upgrade of the CMS electron and photon trigger for Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; CMS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online trigger selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 105. The first level (L1) trigger is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the high-level trigger combines fine-grain information from all sub-detectors. In the near future the LHC will increase its centre of mass energy to 13 TeV and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2 × 1034 cm-2s-1. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics program under this challenging environment, the CMS trigger and data acquisition system must be consolidated. In particular the calorimeter L1 trigger hardware and architecture will be changed. The aim is to maintain the current thresholds and improve performance. This programme will be achieved using the μTCA architecture with fast optical links and latest generation FPGAs. Sophisticated object reconstruction algorithms, as well as online pile-up corrections, are being developed that will make use of these new hardware capabilities. For electron and photon reconstruction and identification, the first version of the new algorithms has been tested against the current algorithms. It shows a reduction of the trigger rate by a factor of two for isolated objects, an improved energy resolution of about 30%, and a position resolution reduced by more than four.

  14. High Resolution, Non-Dispersive X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers on EBITs and Orbiting Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is the primary tool for performing atomic physics with Electron beam ion trap (EBITs). X-ray instruments have generally fallen into two general categories, 1) dispersive instruments with very high spectral resolving powers but limited spectral range, limited count rates, and require an entrance slit, generally, for EBITs, defined by the electron beam itself, and 2) non-dispersive solid-state detectors with much lower spectral resolving powers but that have a broad dynamic range, high count rate ability and do not require a slit. Both of these approaches have compromises that limit the type and efficiency of measurements that can be performed. In 1984 NASA initiated a program to produce a non-dispersive instrument with high spectral resolving power for x-ray astrophysics based on the cryogenic x-ray calorimeter. This program produced the XRS non-dispersive spectrometers on the Astro-E, Astro-E2 (Suzaku) orbiting observatories, the SXS instrument on the Astro-H observatory, and the planned XMS instrument on the International X-ray Observatory. Complimenting these spaceflight programs, a permanent high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer, the XRS/EBIT, was installed on the LLNL EBIT in 2000. This unique instrument was upgraded to a spectral resolving power of 1000 at 6 keV in 2003 and replaced by a nearly autonomous production-class spectrometer, the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), in 2007. The ECS spectrometer has a simultaneous bandpass from 0.07 to over 100 keV with a spectral resolving power of 1300 at 6 keV with unit quantum efficiency, and 1900 at 60 keV with a quantum efficiency of 30%. X-ray calorimeters are event based, single photon spectrometers with event time tagging to better than 10 us. We are currently developing a follow-on instrument based on a newer generation of x-ray calorimeters with a spectral resolving power of 3000 at 6 keV, and improved timing and measurement cadence. The unique capabilities of the x

  15. Myofascial trigger points.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Elizabeth Demers; Lavelle, William; Smith, Howard S

    2007-03-01

    Painful conditions of the musculoskeletal system, including myofascial pain syndrome, constitute some of the most important chronic problems encountered in a clinical practice. A myofascial trigger points is a hyperirritable spot, usually within a taut band of skeletal muscle, which is painful on compression and can give rise to characteristic referred pain, motor dysfunction, and autonomic phenomena. Trigger points may be relieved through noninvasive measures, such as spray and stretch, transcutaneous electrical stimulation, physical therapy, and massage. Invasive treatments for myofascial trigger points include injections with local anesthetics, corticosteroids, or botulism toxin or dry needling. The etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of myofascial trigger points are addressed in this article.

  16. CALORIC: A readout chip for high granularity calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, L.; Bonnard, J.; Manen, S.; Gay, P.; Soumpholphakdy, X.

    2011-07-01

    A very-front-end electronics has been developed to fulfil requirements for the next generation of electromagnetic calorimeters. The compactness of this kind of detector and its large number of channels (up to several millions) impose a drastic limitation of the power consumption and a high level of integration. The electronic channel proposed is first of all composed of a low-noise Charge Sensitive Amplifier (CSA) able to amplify the charge delivered by a silicon diode up to 10 pC. Next, a two-gain shaping, based on a Gated Integration (G.I.), is implemented to cover the 15 bits dynamic range required: a high gain shaper processes signals from 4 fC (charge corresponding to the MIP) up to 1 pC, and a low gain filter handles charges up to 10 pC. The G.I. performs also the analog memorization of the signal until it is digitalized. Hence, the analog-to-digital conversion is carried out through a low-power 12-bit cyclic ADC. If the signal overloads the high-gain channel dynamic range, a comparator selects the low-gain channel instead. Moreover, an auto-trigger channel has been implemented in order to select and store a valid event over the noise. The timing sequence of the channel is managed by a digital IP. It controls the G.I. switches, generates all needed clocks, drives the ADC and delivers the final result over 12 bits. The whole readout channel is power controlled, which permits to reduce the consumption according to the duty cycle of the beam collider. Simulations have been performed with Spectre simulator on the prototype chip designed with the 0.35 {mu}m CMOS technology from Austriamicrosystems. Results show a non-linearity better than 0.1% for the high-gain channel, and a non-linearity limited to 1% for the low-gain channel. The Equivalent Noise Charge referred to the input of the channel is evaluated to 0.4 fC complying with the MIP/10 limit. With the timing sequence of the International Linear Collider, which presents a duty cycle of 1%, the power

  17. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an "inline" calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an "offline" calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a "cold test" on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the "inline" calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device's power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the "offline" calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the "cold tests," and the experiments show good agreement. PMID:26724055

  18. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an "inline" calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an "offline" calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a "cold test" on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the "inline" calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device's power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the "offline" calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the "cold tests," and the experiments show good agreement.

  19. Simulations of a thin sampling calorimeter with GEANT/FLUKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongin; Watts, John; Howell, Leonard

    2001-09-01

    The Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS) will investigate the origin, composition and acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays by measuring the elemental composition of the cosmic rays up to 10 15 eV. These measurements will be made with a thin ionization calorimeter and a transition radiation detector. This paper reports studies of a thin sampling calorimeter concept for the ACCESS thin ionization calorimeter. For the past year, a Monte Carlo simulation study of a thin sampling calorimeter (TSC) design has been conducted to predict the detector performance and to design the system for achieving the ACCESS scientific objectives. Simulation results show that the detector energy resolution function resembles a Gaussian distribution and the energy resolution of TSC is about 40%. In addition, simulations of the detector's response to an assumed broken power law cosmic ray spectrum in the region where the 'knee' of the cosmic ray spectrum is believed to occur have been conducted and clearly show that a thin sampling calorimeter can provide sufficiently accurate estimates of the spectral parameters to meet the science requirements of ACCESS.

  20. Simulations of a Thin Sampling Calorimeter with GEANT/FLUKA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongin; Watts, John; Howell, Leonard; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS) will investigate the origin, composition and acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays by measuring the elemental composition of the cosmic rays up to 10(exp 15) eV. These measurements will be made with a thin ionization calorimeter and a transition radiation detector. This paper reports studies of a thin sampling calorimeter concept for the ACCESS thin ionization calorimeter. For the past year, a Monte Carlo simulation study of a Thin Sampling Calorimeter (TSC) design has been conducted to predict the detector performance and to design the system for achieving the ACCESS scientific objectives. Simulation results show that the detector energy resolution function resembles a Gaussian distribution and the energy resolution of TSC is about 40%. In addition, simulations of the detector's response to an assumed broken power law cosmic ray spectra in the region where the 'knee' of the cosmic ray spectrum occurs have been conducted and clearly show that a thin sampling calorimeter can provide sufficiently accurate estimates of the spectral parameters to meet the science requirements of ACCESS. n

  1. The E864 lead-scintillating fiber hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T. A.; Barish, K.; Bennett, S. J.; Cormier, T. M.; Cernej, R.; Chikanian, A.; Coe, S. D.; Davies, R.; Dee, P. R.; Diebold, G. E.; Fachini, P.; Finch, E.; George, N. K.; Greene, S. V.; Haridas, P.; Hill, J. C.; Hirsch, A.; Huang, H. Z.; Hoversten, R. A.; Kim, B.; Kumar, B. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Libby, B.; Maguire, C. F.; Majka, R. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murgatroyd, J. T.; Nagle, J. L.; Petridis, A. N.; Pless, I. A.; Pope, J. K.; Pruneau, C. A.; Riso, J.; Rabin, M. S. Z.; Reid, J. D.; Rotondo, F. S.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sandweiss, J.; Scharenberg, R.; Sheen, J.; Tincknell, M.; Rimai, A.; Van Buren, G.; Wilson, W. K.; Wohn, F. K.; Zhao, K.

    1998-02-01

    A large hadronic lead scintillating fiber calorimeter has been built and integrated into the AGS experiment E864 [C. Pruneau et al., E864 Collaboration, Proc. 6th Internal. Conf. on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, 1996, Frascati, Italy; F. Rotondo et al., E864 Collaboration, Proc. Quark Matter'96, Heidelberg, Germany, 20 May 1996] spectrometer to provide an independent measurement of the mass of particles produced in heavy ion collisions. The "spaghetti-type" calorimeter design and construction techniques are described in detail. Results from a prototype and the full implementation of the calorimeter are reported. The hadronic energy resolution of the calorimeter is found to be 6E/E = 0.035(± 0.005) + 0.344(± 0.008)/trE/GeV, in very good agreement with a FLUKA calculation. The hadronic time resolution is measured to be better than 400 ps. The combined calorimeter energy and time signals provide for a mass determination with good resolution. The mass resolution scales as δm/m = 0.026 + 0.347/√E(GeV) for velocities v/c < 0.98.

  2. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-15

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an “inline” calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an “offline” calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a “cold test” on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the “inline” calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device’s power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the “offline” calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the “cold tests,” and the experiments show good agreement.

  3. Characterization of Novel Calorimeters in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehr, Brian D.; Parma, Edward J.; Peters, Curtis D.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, S. Michael

    2016-02-01

    A series of pulsed irradiation experiments have been performed in the central cavity of Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) to characterize the responses of a set of elemental calorimeter materials including Si, Zr, Sn, Ta, W, and Bi. Of particular interest was the perturbing effect of the calorimeter itself on the ambient radiation field - a potential concern in dosimetry applications. By placing the calorimeter package into a neutron-thermalizing lead/polyethylene (LP) bucket and irradiating both with and without a cadmium wrapper, it was demonstrated that prompt capture gammas generated inside the calorimeters can be a significant contributor to the measured dose in the active disc region. An MCNP model of the experimental setup was shown to replicate measured dose responses to within 10%. The internal (n,γ) contribution was found to constitute as much as 50% of the response inside the LP bucket and up to 20% inside the nominal (unmodified) cavity environment, with Ta and W exhibiting the largest enhancement due to their sizable (n,γ) cross sections. Capture reactions in non-disc components of the calorimeter were estimated to be responsible for up to a few percent of the measured response. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy.

  4. Triggering on B-jets at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Amerio, Silvia; Casarsa, Massimo; Cortiana, Giorgio; Donini, Julien; Lucchesi, Donatella; Pagan Griso, Simone; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a trigger algorithm able to select online events enriched of b-jets. This feature is of central interest in order to extend the physics reach for standard model and minimal super symmetric model Higgs decaying into a pair of b-quarks. The algorithm fully exploits the recently upgraded CDFII tracking system and Level 2 CALorimeter cluster finder. These upgrades are necessary to cope with Tevatron increasing luminosity and provide new and refined trigger primitives that are the key elements of our algorithm together with the already existing silicon vertex trigger. A b-hadron can travel some millimeters before decaying and the trigger algorithm exploits this characteristic by searching for tracks displaced with respect to the primary vertex and matched to energetic jets of particles. We discuss the study and the optimization of the algorithm, its technical implementation as well as its performance. The new trigger provides an efficient selection for Higgs decaying into a pair of b-quarks and runs up to high luminosity with an acceptable occupancy of the available bandwidth.

  5. eXtremely Fast Tracker trigger upgrade at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Azzurri, P.; Cochran, E.; Cox, C.; Cox, D.; Dittmann, J.; Donati, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Fedorko, I.; /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Purdue U.

    2009-01-01

    The CDF II eXtremely Fast Tracker (XFT) is a trigger processor which reconstructs charged particle tracks in the transverse plane of the central tracking chamber. The XFT tracks are also extrapolated to the electromagnetic calorimeter and muon chambers to generate trigger electron and muon candidates. The XFT is crucial for the entire CDF II physics program: it detects high P{sub t} lepton from W/Z and heavy flavors decay and, in conjunction with the level 2 processor, it identifies secondary vertices from beauty decay. The XFT has thus been crucial for the recent measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation and {Sigma}{sub b}. The increase of the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity demanded an upgrade of the system to cope with the higher occupancy of the chamber. In the upgraded XFT, three-dimensional tracking reduces the level of fake tracks and measures the longitudinal track parameters, which strongly reinforce the trigger selection. This allows to maintain the trigger perfectly efficient at the record luminosities 2-3 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and to maintain intact the CDF II high luminosity physics program, which includes the Higgs search. In this paper we review the architecture, the used technology, the performance and the impact of the upgraded XFT on the entire CDF II trigger strategy.

  6. AMY trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yoshihide

    1989-04-01

    A trigger system of the AMY detector at TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described briefly. The system uses simple track segment and shower cluster counting scheme to classify events to be triggered. It has been operating successfully since 1987.

  7. The central trigger control system of the CMS experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taurok, A.; Arnold, B.; Bergauer, H.; Eichberger, M.; Erö, J.; Hartl, Ch; Jeitler, M.; Kastner, K.; Mikulec, I.; Neuherz, B.; Padrta, M.; Sakulin, H.; Strauss, J.; Wulz, C.-E.; Varela, J.; Smith, W. H.

    2011-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider will deliver up to 32 million physics collisions per second. This rate is far too high to be processed by present-day computer farms, let alone stored on disk by the experiments for offline analysis. A fast selection of interesting events must therefore be made. In the CMS experiment, this is implemented in two stages: the Level-1 Trigger of the CMS experiment uses custom-made, fast electronics, while the experiment's high-level trigger is implemented in computer farms. The Level-1 Global Trigger electronics has to receive signals from the subdetector systems that enter the trigger (mostly from muon detectors and calorimeters), synchronize them, determine if a pre-set trigger condition is fulfilled, check if the various subsystems are ready to accept triggers based on information from the Trigger Throttling System and on calculations of possible dead-times, and finally distribute the trigger decision (``Level-1 Accept'') together with timing signals to the subdetectors over the so-called ``Trigger, Timing and Control'' distribution tree of the experiment. These functions are fulfilled by several specialized, custom-made VME modules, most of which are housed in one crate. The overall control is exerted by the central ``Trigger Control System'', which is described in this paper. It consists of one main module and several ancillary boards for input and output functions.

  8. Optimization of pyrolysis properties using TGA and cone calorimeter test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Won-Hee; Yoon, Kyung-Beom

    2013-04-01

    The present paper describes an optimization work to obtain the properties related to a pyrolysis process in the solid material such as density, specific heat, conductivity of virgin and char, heat of pyrolysis and kinetic parameters used for deciding pyrolysis rate. A repulsive particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to obtain the pyrolysis-related properties. In the previous study all properties obtained only using a cone calorimeter but in this paper both the cone calorimeter and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) are used for precisely optimizing the pyrolysis properties. In the TGA test a very small mass is heated up and conduction and heat capacity in the specimen is negligible so kinetic parameters can first be optimized. Other pyrolysis-related properties such as virgin/char specific heat and conductivity and char density are also optimized in the cone calorimeter test with the already decided parameters in the TGA test.

  9. A compact light readout system for longitudinally segmented shashlik calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra, A.; Brizzolari, C.; Cecchini, S.; Cindolo, F.; Jollet, C.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Mandrioli, G.; Mauri, N.; Meregaglia, A.; Paoloni, A.; Pasqualini, L.; Patrizii, L.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Prest, M.; Sirri, G.; Terranova, F.; Vallazza, E.; Votano, L.

    2016-09-01

    The longitudinal segmentation of shashlik calorimeters is challenged by dead zones and non-uniformities introduced by the light collection and readout system. This limitation can be overcome by direct fiber-photosensor coupling, avoiding routing and bundling of the wavelength shifter fibers and embedding ultra-compact photosensors (SiPMs) in the bulk of the calorimeter. We present the first experimental test of this readout scheme performed at the CERN PS-T9 beamline in 2015 with negative particles in the 1-5 GeV energy range. In this paper, we demonstrate that the scheme does not compromise the energy resolution and linearity compared with standard light collection and readout systems. In addition, we study the performance of the calorimeter for partially contained charged hadrons to assess the e / π separation capability and the response of the photosensors to direct ionization.

  10. The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeter for the SELEX experiment

    SciTech Connect

    M. Y. Balatz et al.

    2004-07-19

    A large-acceptance, highly segmented electromagnetic lead glass calorimeter for Experiment E781 (SELEX) at Fermi National Acceleration Laboratory was designed and built. This detector has been used to reconstruct photons and electrons with energies ranging from few GeV up to 500 GeV in the collisions of the 650 GeV {Sigma}{sup -} hyperons and {pi}{sup -} mesons with the target nucleons. The design, calibration and performance of the calorimeter are described. Energy resolution and position resolution are assessed using both calibration electron beams and {pi}{sup 0} mesons reconstructed in 650 GeV hadron-hadron interactions. The performance of the calorimeter in selecting resonant states that involve photons is demonstrated.

  11. Test results of the solid state stand alone development calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Renz, D.P.; Breakall, K.L.; Fultz, R.L.; Wetzel, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    Radiometric heat flow calorimeters have been used to determine the heat output of radioactive materials for over 40 years. EG and G Mound Applied Technologies has developed a stand alone developmental calorimeter which utilizes solid state sensor technology. The sample size was increased to 8 in. high by 4 in. diameter in the system under test from 3 in. high by 5/8 in. diameter in the previous prototype. The calorimeter system uses an air bath for environmental stability which further reduces weight and assay time. Tests in the developmental system have produced excellent servo control results over the 0.5 to 5 watt range, with one sigma precision errors ranging from 1.3% at 0.5 watts to 0.1% at 4 watts. The average run time of these samples was approximately 90 minutes with no preconditioning used.

  12. Effect of dead materials on calorimeter response and Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmaratna, W.G.D.; D0 Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    The D0 calorimeter system, cylindrical central calorimeter and two end calorimeters, is constructed with minimal cracks and dead regions in order to provide essentially hermetic coverage over the full solid angle. The effect of the existing few construction features which could perturb the uniformity of the calorimeter is studied in detail with beam tests. The results with the correction algorithms are presented. A comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation is made.

  13. Effect of dead materials on calorimeter response and Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmaratna, W.G.D. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    The D0 calorimeter system, cylindrical central calorimeter and two end calorimeters, is constructed with minimal cracks and dead regions in order to provide essentially hermetic coverage over the full solid angle. The effect of the existing few construction features which could perturb the uniformity of the calorimeter is studied in detail with beam tests. The results with the correction algorithms are presented. A comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation is made.

  14. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Cameron Russell

    2015-03-11

    Many nuclear safeguards applications could benefit from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy achievable with metallic magnetic calorimeters. This dissertation covers the development of a system for these applications based on gamma-ray detectors developed at the University of Heidelberg. It demonstrates new calorimeters of this type, which achieved an energy resolution of 45.5 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV, roughly ten times better than current state of the art high purity germanium detectors. This is the best energy resolution achieved with a gamma-ray metallic magnetic calorimeter at this energy to date. In addition to demonstrating a new benchmark in energy resolution, an experimental system for measuring samples with metallic magnetic calorimeters was constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system achieved an energy resolution of 91.3 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV under optimal conditions. Using this system it was possible to characterize the linearity of the response, the count-rate limitations, and the energy resolution as a function of temperature of the new calorimeter. With this characterization it was determined that it would be feasible to measure 242Pu in a mixed isotope plutonium sample. A measurement of a mixed isotope plutonium sample was performed over the course of 12 days with a single two-pixel metallic magnetic calorimeter. The relative concentration of 242Pu in comparison to other plutonium isotopes was determined by direct measurement to less than half a percent accuracy. This is comparable with the accuracy of the best-case scenario using traditional indirect methods. The ability to directly measure the relative concentration of 242Pu in a sample could enable more accurate accounting and detection of indications of undeclared activities in nuclear safeguards, a better constraint on source material in forensic samples containing plutonium, and improvements in verification in a future plutonium

  15. A TRD Trigger for the tevatron collider experiment at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Utes, M.; Johnson, M.; Martin, M.

    1991-11-01

    A VME-based module for use as an input to the D0 Detector Level 1.5 Trigger is described. Its main function will be the confirmation of electron candidates flagged by the First Level Calorimeter Trigger using digitized data from the Transition Radiation Detector. Features of the board include the use of fast FIFOs to store incoming track coordinates, dual ported SRAM lookup tables for addressing integrated charge data and forming scalars, multiplier/accumulators for speed of calculation, and a single synchronous finite state machine to control all board operations. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  16. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the future PANDA Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Rainer

    2006-10-27

    Experiments with a cooled antiproton beam at the future accelerator facility FAIR at GSI, Darmstadt, will be performed with the 4{pi} detector PANDA comprising a high resolution, compact and fast homogeneous electromagnetic calorimeter to detect photons between 10MeV and 10GeV energy inside a superconducting solenoid (2T). The target calorimeter comprises more than 20,000 PbWO4 crystals of significantly enhanced quality read-out with large area avalanche photodiodes at an operating temperature of -25 degree sign C. The paper describes the quality of PWO-II and illustrates the future performance based on response measurements with high-energy photons.

  17. Signal Reconstruction and Performance of the ATLAS Hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, Atlas

    2014-03-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment is the hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. Latest results on calibration, signal reconstruction and performance of the TileCal detector using pp collision data are presented. The studies of the TileCal response to single isolated charged particles and the noise description with increasing pile-up are presented. In addition, TileCal upgrade plans are discussed. on behalf of the ATLAS Collaboration.

  18. Improvements in a calorimeter for high-power CW lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, G. E.; Simpson, P. A.; Smith, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A technique for improving the measurement certainty with the BB series (Smith et al., 1972) of electrically calibrated calorimeters used in high-energy lasers is described. The technique is based on monitoring the energy which is backscattered from the meter and monitoring the overspill radiation impinging on the calorimeter at the entrance aperture. The design and performance of a second generation BB meter is discussed and compared to that of the original device in terms of number of electrical calibrations, the residual standard deviation of electrical calibration, the calibration constant for laser energy, the correcting factor for systematics, inaccuracy, imprecision, and uncertainty.

  19. Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS Simulations with GEANT/FLUKA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, John; Lee, Jeongin

    2000-01-01

    Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) is a candidate of the calorimeter for the NASA's ACCESS program to be flown on the International Space Station. The ICA studies the origin and acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays by measuring the elemental composition of the cosmic rays in the energy up to 10(exp 16) eV. For the past year, Monte Carlo simulation study for the ICA has been conducted using GEANT/FLUKA to predict the detector performance and to design the system for match the scientific objectives. Simulation results will be shown for the detector response and the energy resolution for various configurations.

  20. The Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter Instrument Performance (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M. J.; Benson, C. M.; Berry, F. A.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Johnson, J. S.; Munroe, R. B.; Parnell, T. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    SOFCAL is a balloon-borne instrument designed to measure the P-He cosmic ray spectra from about 200 GeV/amu - 20 TeV/amu. SOFCAL uses a thin lead and scintillating-fiber ionization calorimeter to measure the cascades produced by cosmic rays interacting in the hybrid detector system. Above the fiber calorimeter is an emulsion chamber that provides the interaction target, primary particle identification and in-flight energy calibration for the scintillating fiber data. The energy measurement technique and its calibration are described, and the present results from the analysis of a 1 day balloon flight will be presented.

  1. Precision two-compartment bomb calorimeter for combustion in fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenski, H.; Böhler, D.

    1980-02-01

    An isothermally jacketed liquid calorimeter permitting thermochemical studies on spontaneous combustion in fluorine has been built and tested. The fluorine storage tank was located outside the calorimeter vessel, thus lowering the heat capacity of the system and its thermal inertia. Particular attention was paid to the method and rate of liquid circulation since it largely determines the experimental accuracy. The system can be calibrated electrically. The possible experimental errors are discussed, and their analysis shows that calibration is feasible with an accuracy of ≳99.98%. A series of measurements involving a temperature rise of about 0.9 K showed a standard deviation of 0.02%.

  2. Calorimeter probes for measuring high thermal flux. [in arc jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    Expendable, slug-type calorimeter probes were developed for measuring high heat-flux levels of 10-30 kW/sq cm in electric-arc jet facilities. The probes were constructed with thin tungsten caps mounted on Teflon bodies. The temperature of the back surface of the tungsten cap is measured, and its time rate of change gives the steady-state absorbed heat flux as the calorimeter probe heats to destruction when inserted into the arc jet. Design, construction, test, and performance data are presented.

  3. A purity monitor for the KEDR liquid krypton calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, P. N.; Kotov, K. Yu.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Snopkov, R. G.; Rogozin, A. I.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a purity monitor for the KEDR liquid krypton calorimeter. A new method is suggested based on the usage of a short pulse of a gas discharge as a source of ultraviolet radiation for the photoproduction of electrons in a drift cell of the monitor. This paper describes the design of the monitor, the results of experiments with gaseous and liquid krypton, as well as the experience of using the developed device in the process of krypton purification for the KEDR liquid krypton calorimeter.

  4. Performance of the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter pre-prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.S.; Busza, W.; Friedman, J.; Kendall, H.; Kistiakowsky, V.; Lyons, T.; Osborne, L.S.; Rosenson, L.; Verdier, R.; Carumbalis, D.

    1985-10-01

    The performance of a pre-prototype of the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter (WIC) build with proportional tube cathode pad readout has been studied. The calorimeter was found to have an average resolution of 36.7 +- 0.2% for muons at 2.0, 5.0 and 10.5 GeV and 81 +- 2%/..sqrt..E for pion showers at 5.0 and 10.5 GeV. The mean energy found for the pion showers was consistent with a linear dependence on energy within these standard deviations. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so- called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all ’interesting” decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. Methods studied include cascading, ensembling and blending techniques. Furthermore, novel boosting techniques have been implemented that will help reduce systematic uncertainties in Run 2 measurements. We demonstrate that the reoptimized topological trigger is expected to significantly improve on the Run 1 performance for a wide range of b-hadron decays.

  6. Common Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... your bedding on the hottest water setting. Outdoor Air Pollution Outdoor air pollution can trigger an asthma attack. This pollution can ... your newspaper to plan your activities for when air pollution levels will be low. Cockroach Allergen Cockroaches and ...

  7. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... smell given off by paint or gas, and air pollution. If you notice that an irritant triggers your ... or other tobacco products around you. If outdoor air pollution is a problem, running the air conditioner or ...

  8. ELECTRONIC TRIGGER CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.A.G.

    1958-01-01

    An electronic trigger circuit is described of the type where an output pulse is obtained only after an input voltage has cqualed or exceeded a selected reference voltage. In general, the invention comprises a source of direct current reference voltage in series with an impedance and a diode rectifying element. An input pulse of preselected amplitude causes the diode to conduct and develop a signal across the impedance. The signal is delivered to an amplifier where an output pulse is produced and part of the output is fed back in a positive manner to the diode so that the amplifier produces a steep wave front trigger pulsc at the output. The trigger point of the described circuit is not subject to variation due to the aging, etc., of multi-electrode tabes, since the diode circuit essentially determines the trigger point.

  9. The magnitude distribution of dynamically triggered earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Stephen

    Large dynamic strains carried by seismic waves are known to trigger seismicity far from their source region. It is unknown, however, whether surface waves trigger only small earthquakes, or whether they can also trigger large, societally significant earthquakes. To address this question, we use a mixing model approach in which total seismicity is decomposed into 2 broad subclasses: "triggered" events initiated or advanced by far-field dynamic strains, and "untriggered" spontaneous events consisting of everything else. The b-value of a mixed data set, b MIX, is decomposed into a weighted sum of b-values of its constituent components, bT and bU. For populations of earthquakes subjected to dynamic strain, the fraction of earthquakes that are likely triggered, f T, is estimated via inter-event time ratios and used to invert for bT. The confidence bounds on b T are estimated by multiple inversions of bootstrap resamplings of bMIX and fT. For Californian seismicity, data are consistent with a single-parameter Gutenberg-Richter hypothesis governing the magnitudes of both triggered and untriggered earthquakes. Triggered earthquakes therefore seem just as likely to be societally significant as any other population of earthquakes.

  10. Onboard calibration circuit for the DAMPE BGO calorimeter front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, De-Liang; Feng, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Jun-Bin; Wang, Qi; Ma, Si-Yuan; Shen, Zhong-Tao; Jiang, Di; Gao, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yun-Long; Guo, Jian-Hua; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-05-01

    DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientific satellite which is mainly aimed at indirectly searching for dark matter in space. One critical sub-detector of the DAMPE payload is the BGO (bismuth germanium oxide) calorimeter, which contains 1848 PMT (photomultiplier tube) dynodes and 16 FEE (Front-End Electronics) boards. VA160 and VATA160, two 32-channel low power ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), are adopted as the key components on the FEEs to perform charge measurement for the PMT signals. In order to monitor the parameter drift which may be caused by temperature variation, aging, or other environmental factors, an onboard calibration circuit is designed for the VA160 and VATA160 ASICs. It is mainly composed of a 12-bit DAC (Digital to Analog Converter), an operational amplifier and an analog switch. Test results showed that a dynamic range of 0–30 pC with a precision of 5 fC (Root Meam Square, RMS) was achieved, which covers the VA160’s input range. It can be used to compensate for the temperature drift and test the trigger function of the FEEs. The calibration circuit has been implemented for the front-end electronics of the BGO Calorimeter and verified by all the environmental tests for both Qualification Model and Flight Model of DAMPE. The DAMPE satellite was launched at the end of 2015 and the calibration circuit will operate periodically in space. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA04040202-4), and National Basic Research Program (973 Program) of China (2010CB833002) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11273070)

  11. Design and expected performance of a fast scintillator hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Ghosh, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    A typical pulse from the 807 calorimeter is shown. This was generated by 4 GeV electrons but the pulses from hadrons and at different energies are not significantly different. The width and shape of this pulse comes from the convolution of a number of sources: (a) The time spread of energy deposition by a shower including time of flight of slow protons and neutrons, (b) scintillator phosphor rise and decay times, (c) shifter rise and decay times, (d) phototube response, (e) time delays in the light collection from different parts of the calorimeter and time dispersion in transmission. The objective of the first phase of this study was to isolate these spearate contributions, estimate how they could be speeded up and find what costs are involved. In the second phase we constructed an extremely crude calorimeter whose pulses should have the same characteristic as in a real device. With this we have observed signals whose mean width was 7 nsec and whose width at 10% of maximum height was 15 nsec. Clipping could reduce these widths to 6 and 12 nsec respectively. We conclude that gate times of less than 20 nsec would be appropriate for such a calorimeter.

  12. Balloon test project: Cosmic Ray Antimatter Calorimeter (CRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, J. C.; Dhenain, G.; Goret, P.; Jorand, J.; Masse, P.; Mestreau, P.; Petrou, N.; Robin, A.

    1984-01-01

    Cosmic ray observations from balloon flights are discussed. The cosmic ray antimatter calorimeter (CRAC) experiment attempts to measure the flux of antimatter in the 200-600 Mev/m energy range and the isotopes of light elements between 600 and 1,000 Mev/m.

  13. Resolution Performance of HERA-B Lead-Glass Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada, Anthony; Brash, Edward; Thomas, Jordan; Ayerbe-Gayoso, Carlos; Burton, Matthew; Perdisat, Charles; Jones, Mark; Punjabi, Vina; Hast, Carsten; Szalata, Zenon

    2013-10-01

    In preparation of upcoming 12 GeV experiments at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility it is necessary to upgrade existing systems or install new detectors. As part of this effort, an array of lead-glass sampling calorimeters is need for use in the GEP-5 experiment. A sampling calorimeter can be used to determine the energy and spatial position of a high energy particle that enters it while simultaneously stopping the particle. To determine the appropriate construction to meet the needs of upcoming experiments, it was necessary to take an existing model and confirm its energy and position resolution. This model could then be confirmed as an option for the final construction, or used as a starting point to design a better detector. For our test we obtained ten lead-glass calorimeters used in HERA-B and tested them in End Station A at SLAC. I will report on our findings for the HERA-B lead-glass sampling calorimeters. I will cover the results of both the energy and position resolutions as well as the methods used to determine these quantities.

  14. Design, performance, and calibration of CMS forward calorimeter wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, S.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B.; Adams, M.; Akchurin, N.; Akgun, U.; Anderson, E. W.; Antchev, G.; Arcidy, M.; Ayan, S.; Aydin, S.; Baarmand, M.; Babich, K.; Baden, D.; Bakirci, M. N.; Banerjee, Sud.; Banerjee, Sun.; Bard, R.; Barnes, V.; Bawa, H.; Baiatian, G.; Bencze, G.; Beri, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Burchesky, K.; Camporesi, T.; Cankoçak, K.; Carrell, K.; Cerci, S.; Chendvankar, S.; Chung, Y.; Cremaldi, L.; Cushman, P.; Damgov, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Demianov, A.; de Visser, T.; Dimitrov, L.; Dindar, K.; Dugad, S.; Dumanoglu, I.; Duru, F.; Elias, J.; Elvira, D.; Emeliantchik, I.; Eno, S.; Eskut, E.; Fenyvesi, A.; Fisher, W.; Freeman, J.; Gamsizkan, H.; Gavrilov, V.; Genchev, V.; Gershtein, Y.; Golutvin, I.; Goncharov, P.; Grassi, T.; Green, D.; Gribushin, A.; Grinev, B.; Gülmez, E.; Gümüş, K.; Haelen, T.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hashemi, M.; Hauptman, J.; Hazen, E.; Heering, A.; Ilyina, N.; Isiksal, E.; Jarvis, C.; Johnson, K.; Kaftanov, V.; Kalagin, V.; Kalinin, A.; Karmgard, D.; Kalmani, S.; Katta, S.; Kaur, M.; Kaya, M.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Kellogg, R.; Khmelnikov, A.; Kim, H.; Kisselevich, I.; Kodolova, O.; Kohli, J.; Kolossov, V.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Y.; Kosarev, I.; Koylu, S.; Kramer, L.; Krinitsyn, A.; Krokhotin, A.; Kryshkin, V.; Kuleshov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kurt, P.; Kuzucu-Polatoz, A.; Laasanen, A.; Ladygin, V.; Laszlo, A.; Lawlor, C.; Lazic, D.; Levchuk, L.; Linn, S.; Litvintsev, D.; Litov, L.; Los, S.; Lubinsky, V.; Lukanin, V.; Ma, Y.; Machado, E.; Mans, J.; Markowitz, P.; Massolov, V.; Martinez, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Merlo, J. P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mescheryakov, G.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M.; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M.; Moissenz, P.; Mondal, N.; Nagaraj, P.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Onengut, G.; Ozdes-Koca, N.; Ozkan, C.; Ozkurt, H.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Paktinat, S.; Pal, A.; Patil, M.; Penzo, A.; Petrushanko, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Pikalov, V.; Piperov, S.; Podrasky, V.; Pompos, A.; Posch, C.; Qiang, W.; Reddy, L.; Reidy, J.; Ruchti, R.; Rogalev, E.; Rohlf, J.; Ronzhin, A.; Ryazanov, A.; Safronov, G.; Sanders, D. A.; Sanzeni, C.; Sarycheva, L.; Satyanarayana, B.; Schmidt, I.; Sekmen, S.; Semenov, S.; Senchishin, V.; Sergeyev, S.; Serin-Zeyrek, M.; Sever, R.; Singh, J.; Sirunyan, A.; Skuja, A.; Sharma, S.; Sherwood, B.; Shumeiko, N.; Smirnov, V.; Sogut, K.; Sorokin, P.; Spezziga, M.; Stefanovich, R.; Stolin, V.; Sulak, L.; Suzuki, I.; Talov, V.; Teplov, K.; Thomas, R.; Topakli, H.; Tully, C.; Turchanovich, L.; Ulyanov, A.; Vankov, I.; Vardanyan, I.; Varela, F.; Vergili, M.; Verma, P.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vidal, R.; Vishnevskiy, A.; Vlassov, E.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Volkov, A.; Volodko, A.; Wang, L.; Wetstein, M.; Winn, D.; Wigmans, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, S. X.; Yazgan, E.; Yershov, A.; Yetkin, T.; Zalan, P.; Zarubin, A.; Zeyrek, M.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the test beam results and calibration methods using high energy electrons, pions and muons with the CMS forward calorimeter (HF). The HF calorimeter covers a large pseudorapidity region (3≤|η|≤5), and is essential for a large number of physics channels with missing transverse energy. It is also expected to play a prominent role in the measurement of forward tagging jets in weak boson fusion channels in Higgs production. The HF calorimeter is based on steel absorber with embedded fused-silica-core optical fibers where Cherenkov radiation forms the basis of signal generation. Thus, the detector is essentially sensitive only to the electromagnetic shower core and is highly non-compensating (e/h≈5). This feature is also manifest in narrow and relatively short showers compared to similar calorimeters based on ionization. The choice of fused-silica optical fibers as active material is dictated by its exceptional radiation hardness. The electromagnetic energy resolution is dominated by photoelectron statistics and can be expressed in the customary form as a/sqrt{E}oplus{b}. The stochastic term a is 198% and the constant term b is 9%. The hadronic energy resolution is largely determined by the fluctuations in the neutral pion production in showers, and when it is expressed as in the electromagnetic case, a = 280% and b = 11%.

  15. Noise in a Calorimeter Readout System Using Periodic Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Innes, Walter R.; /SLAC

    2009-02-26

    Fourier transform analysis of the calorimeter noise problem gives quantitative results on (a) the time-height correlation, (b) the effect of background on optimal shaping and on the ENC, (c) sampling frequency requirements, and (d) the relation between sampling frequency and the required quantization error.

  16. Temperature and humidity control in indirect calorimeter chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-chamber, indirect calorimeter has been a part of the Environmental Laboratory at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) for over 25 yr. Corrosion of the animal chambers and unreliable temperature control forced either major repairs or complete replacement. There is a strong demand for...

  17. Development of standard operating procedures for differential scanning calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callanan, Jane E.; Sullivan, Sandra A.

    1986-10-01

    This paper describes an assessment of the behavior of a differential scanning calorimeter and the development of satisfactory calibration, operation, and data reduction procedures, which depend on performance characteristics of the individual instrument. Factors that contribute to thermal lag are identified; suggestions for evaluating and compensating for it are given.

  18. Predicting asthma control: the role of psychological triggers.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Thomas; Bobb, Carol; Griffiths, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Asthma triggers have been linked to adverse health outcomes in asthma, but little is known about their association with asthma control. Because trigger avoidance is an integral part of successful asthma management, psychological triggers in particular may be associated with suboptimal asthma control, given the difficulty of controlling them. We examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of perceived asthma triggers with self-report of asthma control impairment, symptoms, and spirometric lung function (forced expiratory volume in the 1st second, [FEV1]) in 179 adult primary care asthma patients. Perceived asthma triggers explained up to 42.5% of the variance in asthma control and symptoms, but not in FEV1 alone. Allergic triggers explained up to 12.1% of the asthma control and symptom variance, three nonallergic trigger types, air pollution/irritants, physical activity, and infection, explained up to 26.2% over and above allergic triggers, and psychological triggers up to 9.5% over and above all other triggers. Psychological triggers alone explained up to 33.9% of the variance and were the only trigger class that was consistently significant in all final multiple regression models predicting control and symptoms. Psychological triggers also predicted lower asthma control 3-6 months later, although controlling for initial asthma control eliminated this association. In free reports of individually relevant triggers, only psychological triggers were associated with suboptimal asthma control. Trigger factors are important predictors of self-reported asthma control and symptoms but not actual lung function. Particular attention should be directed to psychological triggers as indicators of patients' perceptions of suboptimal asthma control.

  19. Development of a scintillating optical fiber ionization calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A design study of a scintillation fiber (SF) calorimeter for a cosmic ray observation is made. An evaluation of various fibers and design configuration was made. The proposed design has a dimension of 1 m (W) x 1 m (L) x 16 cm (H) contains 1000 fibers at each of 40 x- or 40 y-layers interleaved with 1mm thick leadplates. Two or four CCD Particle Track Imaging Systems are connected to a bundle of SF edges at x- and y-ends. The overall weight of a calorimeter is 1,200 kg including read-out systems and supporting boards. The designed calorimeter can measure cosmic ray nuclei and gamma-rays with position, angles and energy information suitable for detailed spectrum analysis. The system is particularly beneficial at very high energies where the flux is extremely low and it requires a very long exposure over many years in space. Emulsion chambers have an advantage for cosmic ray measurements if the exposure is limited to several months in space. In fact, the most important energy region for the current cosmic ray studies is at around 1,000 TeV where a drastic change of elemental composition is indicated by various indirect observations. A detector whose size is in the order of 1 m(sup 2) requires several years of exposure in space accumulate sufficient statistics near 1,000 TeV. Emulsions will be strongly contaminated by background radiation for such a long duration flight, while SF calorimeter is totally immune from this concern. This is particularly important for long-duration experiments. The SF calorimeter also allows time-tagging of individual events, extending the experimental capability in various ways.

  20. The sROD module for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase-II Upgrade Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Castillo, V.; Ferrer, A.; Fiorini, L.; Hernández, Y.; Higón, E.; Mellado, B.; March, L.; Moreno, P.; Reed, R.; Solans, C.; Valero, A.; Valls, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The main upgrade of the LHC to increase the instantaneous luminosity is scheduled for 2022. The High Luminosity LHC, also called upgrade Phase-II, will imply a complete redesign of the read-out electronics in TileCal. In the new read-out architecture, the front-end electronics aims to transmit full digitized information to the back-end system in the counting rooms. Thus, the back-end system will also provide digital calibrated information with enhanced precision and granularity to the first level trigger to improve the trigger efficiencies. The demonstrator project is envisaged to qualify this new proposed architecture. A reduced part of the detector, 1/256 of the total, will be equipped with the new electronics during 2014 to evaluate the proposed architecture in real conditions. The upgraded Read-Out Driver (sROD) will be the core element of the back-end electronics in Phase-II. The sROD module is designed on a double mid-size AMC format and will operate under an AdvancedTCA framework. The module includes two Xilinx Series 7 Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for data receiving and processing, as well as the implementation of embedded systems. Related to optical connectors, the sROD uses 4 QSFPs to receive and transmit data from the front-end electronics and 1 Avago MiniPOD to send preprocessed data to the first level trigger system. An SFP module maintains the compatibility with the existing hardware. A complete description of the sROD module for the demonstrator including the main functionalities, circuit design and the control software and firmware will be presented.

  1. Trigger mechanism for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.R.

    1989-02-28

    A trigger mechanism is described for a blower-vacuum apparatus having a trigger mounted within a handle and a small engine comprising: a throttle; a ''L'' shaped lever having first and second legs mounted for rotation about an intermediate pivot within the handle when the trigger is depressed, interconnecting the trigger and the throttle, the second leg having first teeth defined therein, the lever further having idle, full throttle and stop positions; a normally raised latch means adapted to be rotated and axially depressed, the latch means having second teeth situated on a cam to engage the first teeth for holding the lever in an intermediate position between the idle and full throttle positions when the latch means is rotated. The latch means further are cam teeth into potential engagement with the lever teeth when the trigger is depressed, lever is biased to the stop position; and idle adjusting means means for intercepting the second leg for preventing the second leg from reaching the stop position when the latch means is raised.

  2. Cygnus Trigger System

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two radiographic sources (Cygnus 1, Cygnus 2) each with a dose rating of 4 rads at 1 m, and a 1-mm diameter spot size. The electrical specifications are: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This facility is located in an underground environment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for subcritical tests, which are single-shot, high-value events. In such an application there is an emphasis on reliability and reproducibility. A robust, low-jitter trigger system is a key element for meeting these goals. The trigger system was developed with both commercial and project-specific equipment. In addition to the traditional functions of a trigger system there are novel features added to protect the investment of a high-value shot. Details of the trigger system, including elements designed specifically for a subcritical test application, will be presented. The individual electronic components have their nominal throughput, and when assembled have a system throughput with a measured range of jitter. The shot-to-shot jitter will be assessed both individually and in combination. Trigger reliability and reproducibility results will be presented for a substantial number of shots executed at the NTS.

  3. AMPLITUDE DISCRIMINATOR HAVING SEPARATE TRIGGERING AND RECOVERY CONTROLS UTILIZING AUTOMATIC TRIGGERING

    DOEpatents

    Chase, R.L.

    1962-01-23

    A transistorized amplitude discriminator circuit is described in which the initial triggering sensitivity and the recovery threshold are separately adjustable in a convenient manner. The discriminator is provided with two independent bias components, one of which is for circuit hysteresis (recovery) and one of which is for trigger threshold level. A switching circuit is provided to remove the second bias component upon activation of the trigger so that the recovery threshold is always at the point where the trailing edge of the input signal pulse goes through zero or other desired value. (AEC)

  4. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  5. Video Event Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.; Lichter, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    Video event trigger (VET) processes video image data to generate trigger signal when image shows significant change like motion or appearance, disappearance, change in color, change in brightness, or dilation of object. System aids in efficient utilization of image-data-storage and image-data-processing equipment in applications in which many video frames show no changes and are wasteful to record and analyze all frames when only relatively few frames show changes of interest. Applications include video recording of automobile crash tests, automated video monitoring of entrances, exits, parking lots, and secure areas.

  6. Gamma-telescopes Fermi/LAT and GAMMA-400 Trigger Systems Event Recognizing Methods Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Murchenko, A. E.; Chasovikov, E. N.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Kheymits, M. D.

    Usually instruments for high-energy γ-quanta registration consists of converter (where γ-quanta produced pairs) and calorimeter for particles energy measurements surrounded by anticoincidence shield used to events identification (whether incident particle was charged or neutral). The influence of pair formation by γ-quanta in shield and the backsplash (moved in the opposite direction particles created due high energy γ-rays interact with calorimeter) should be taken into account. It leads to decrease both effective area and registration efficiency at E>10 GeV. In the presented article the event recognizing methods used in Fermi/LAT trigger system is considered in comparison with the ones applied in counting and triggers signals formation system of gamma-telescope GAMMA-400. The GAMMA-400 (Gamma Astronomical Multifunctional Modular Apparatus) will be the new high-apogee space γ-observatory. The GAMMA-400 consist of converter-tracker based on silicon-strip coordinate detectors interleaved with tungsten foils, imaging calorimeter make of 2 layers of double (x, y) silicon strip coordinate detectors interleaved with planes of CsI(Tl) crystals and the electromagnetic calorimeter CC2 consists only of CsI(Tl) crystals. Several plastics detections systems used as anticoincidence shield, for particles energy and moving direction estimations. The main differences of GAMMA-400 constructions from Fermi/LAT one are using the time-of-flight system with base of 50 cm and double layer structure of plastic detectors provides more effective particles direction definition and backsplash rejection. Also two calorimeters in GAMMA-400 composed the total absorbtion spectrometer with total thickness ∼ 25 X0 or ∼1.2 λ0 for vertical incident particles registration and 54 X0 or 2.5 λ0 for laterally incident ones (where λ0 is nuclear interaction length). It provides energy resolution 1-2% for 10 GeV-3.0×103 GeV events while the Fermi/LAT energy resolution does not reach such a

  7. The Liquid Argon Calorimeter system for the SLC Large Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.M.; Fox, J.D.; Smith, S.R.

    1988-09-01

    In this paper the physical packaging and the logical organization of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) electronics system for the Stanford Linear Collider Large Detector (SLD) at SLAC are described. This system processes signals from approximately 44,000 calorimeter towers and is unusual in that most electronic functions are packaged within the detector itself as opposed to an external electronics support rack. The signal path from the towers in the liquid argon through the vacuum to the outside of the detector is explained. The organization of the control logic, analog electronics, power regulation, analog-to-digital conversion circuits, and fiber optic drivers mounted directly on the detector are described. Redundancy considerations for the electronics and cooling issues are discussed. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  8. CMS HF calorimeter PMTs and Xi(c)+ lifetime measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, Ugur; /Iowa U.

    2003-12-01

    This thesis consists of two parts: In the first part we describe the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) selection and testing processes for the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter of the CMS, a Large Hadron Collier (LHC) experiment at CERN. We report the evaluation process of the candidate PMTs from three different manufacturers, the complete tests performed on the 2300 Hamamatsu PMTs which will be used in the HF calorimeter, and the details of the PMT Test Station that is in University of Iowa CMS Laboratories. In the second part we report the {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} lifetime measurement from SELEX, the charm hadro-production experiment at Fermilab. Based upon 301 {+-} 31 events from three di.erent decay channels, by using the binned maximum likelihood technique, we observe the lifetime of {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} as 427 {+-} 31 {+-} 13 fs.

  9. Charge Detector Study for a Thin Sampling Calorimeter for ACCESS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongin; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Advanced Cosmic ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS) is a NASA's new mission concept that is now being studied. The scientific objective is to measure cosmic ray elemental energy spectra in the energy range from I TeV up to 1000 TeV. ACCESS will carry two instruments and measure the energy and charge of incoming particles. One of these will be a calorimeter with a charge detector. The charge detector will see not only signals from the incident cosmic rays but also signals from radiation backscattered from the calorimeter. In that case, bias information on particle identification is unavoidable. This study shows how much the charge detector will be affected by backscatter and how it can be designed with a minimized effect.

  10. Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS Simulations with GEANT/FLUKA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongin; Watts, John; Howell, Leonard; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) is a candidate of the calorimeter for the NASA's ACCESS program. The ICA studies the origin and acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays by measuring the elemental composition of the cosmic rays in the energy up to 10(exp 16) eV. For the past year, Monte Carlo simulation study for the ICA has been conducted to predict the detector performance and to design the system for match the scientific objectives. Simulation results show that the detector response resembles a Gaussian distribution and the energy resolution with ICA can be achieved about 40%. In addition, simulations of the detector's response to an assumed bent power law spectra in the region where the knee occurs have been conducted and clearly show that this detector can provide sufficiently accurate estimates of the spectral parameters that are a science goal of ACCESS.

  11. Thermal detection of X-rays. [cryogenic calorimeters for astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Edwards, B.; Juda, M.; Plucinsky, P.; Zhang, J.; Kelley, R.; Holt, S.; Madejski, G.; Moseley, S.; Szymkowiak, A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of calorimeters is described in terms of their proposed application to sounding-rocket investigations of cosmic X-ray sources. The fundamental theory of the energy resolution of the devices is given, and general discussions are presented regarding the limitations associated with the materials used and available thermometer types. Also given are data describing electrical nonlinearity as a function of temperature, thermistor sensitivity, and heat capacity, as well as data regarding the excess noise that aids in the conduction process. Cryogenic calorimeters based on doped semiconductor thermistors are found to be limited, although thermal detectors have important applications to high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy. Electrical nonlinearity and the excess noise are found to be important for obtaining optimum heat capacity in the thermistor.

  12. A Study on Thermal Design of the BGO Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dengyi; Hu, Yiming; Wu, Jian; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Yunlong; Chang, Jin

    The BGO Electromagnetic Calorimeter (BGO ECAL) is one of the most important payload of the Chinese DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), which can precisely measure the incident energy of cosmic ray. However, thermal control of the BGO ECAL plays a key role on its running in the space. In this paper, the thermal design of the BGO ECAL and the thermal FEM modal created by hyper-mesh & NASTRAN FEM software will be introduced. Then the temperature distribution of the BGO calorimeter with the given on orbit conditions is performed. In the end, we depicts the thermal test which has been carried out in February. By the comparisons between the experiment results and the analyses results, the methodology in this paper was proved to be effective.

  13. ANL four-meter calorimeter design and operation manual

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.B.; Lewis, R.N.; Youngdahl, G.A.; Jung, E.A.; Roche, C.T.

    1980-02-01

    The four-meter fuel rod calorimetric system measures the thermal power produced by radioactive decay of fuel rods containing Pu. The Pu mass is related to the measured power through the weighted average of the product of the isotopic decay energies and the decay constants of the Pu isotopes present. U content has no effect since the thermal power produced by the U nuclides is insignificant when compared to Pu. Radiations from Pu are alpha particles and low-energy photons. This calorimeter will measure samples producing power up to 1.5 watts at a rate of one sample every 120 min. The instrument consists of a data-acquisition module made up of a microprocessor, with an 8K-byte nonvolatile memory, a control cabinet and the calorimeter chamber. (FS)

  14. Effects of operating environment on performance of radiometric calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, R. L., II

    An experimental program was conducted to assess the effects of changes in operating environment on calorimeter performance. An environmental chamber was used to permit bath temperature stability, room temperature stability, room humidity, and the humidity to which the calorimeter's sample chamber is exposed to be varied independently of one another. The resulting effects on the mean and standard deviation of the error for standard measurements were studied. The results of analysis indicated that the interaction of bath and room temperature stability has a significant effect on error standard deviation, while the humidity to which the sample chamber is exposed most significantly affects mean error. This information can be used as part of a measurement assurance program by checking the product of bath and room temperature stability for significant changes with each sample measurement, and by checking for major shifts in humidity to which the sample chamber is exposed.

  15. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  16. Disambiguating Syntactic Triggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakas, William Gregory; Fodor, Janet Dean

    2012-01-01

    We present data from an artificial language domain that suggest new contributions to the theory of syntactic triggers. Whether a learning algorithm is capable of matching the achievements of child learners depends in part on how much parametric ambiguity there is in the input. For practical reasons this cannot be established for the domain of all…

  17. Triggered plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C W

    1988-02-23

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  18. The large-scale anisotropy with the PAMELA calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelin, A.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G.; Bazilevskaya, G.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A.; Koldashov, S.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krut'kov, S.; Kvashnin, A.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S.; Sarkar, R.; Simon, M.; Scotti, V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G.; Voronov, S.; Yurkin, Y.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-10-01

    The large-scale anisotropy (or the so-called star-diurnal wave) has been studied using the calorimeter of the space-born experiment PAMELA. The cosmic ray anisotropy has been obtained for the Southern and Northern hemispheres simultaneously in the equatorial coordinate system for the time period 2006-2014. The dipole amplitude and phase have been measured for energies 1-20 TeV n-1.

  19. Some studies of data using the STAR endcap electromagnetic calorimeter.

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics

    2009-02-24

    A series of studies was performed using data from the STAR detector at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's RHIC accelerator from collisions of protons at {radical}s = 200 GeV. Many of these involved the shower maximum detector (SMD) of the STAR endcap electromagnetic calorimeter (EEMC). Detailed studies of photon candidates from {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay, and of {gamma} + Jet inclusive data and simulated events were performed.

  20. After-burning of nitropenta products in a calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H

    1999-06-18

    Explored here are the ''after-burning'' effects for explosions of Nitropenta (NP) charges in air. Detonation of the charge transforms the solid explosive ( C HNO 5 8412 , also known as PETN) into gaseous products that are rich in carbon and CO, which subsequently act as a fuel. When these hot ({approximately}3500 K) gases mix with air, rapid combustion (after-burning) takes place. The dynamics of this exothermic process was studied in ''pressure calorimeter'' experiments performed at EMI.

  1. Cryogenic Technology Development For The MEG Liquid Xenon Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Haruyama, Tomiyoshi

    2008-02-21

    Cryogenic key technologies have been developed for the muon rare decay experiment (MEG) at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. These technologies are the high power pulse tube cryocooler for precise temperature and pressure control of liquid xenon in the calorimeter, a purification system with a cryogenic liquid pump and a cryogenic dewar with 1000 L storage capacity. The paper describes the general concepts and the first test results of each technology. All the results imply a promising performance for the coming MEG experiment.

  2. Calibration and Characterization of the Small Sample Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Santi, Peter A.; Perry, Katherine A.

    2012-08-13

    An early component of the Joint Fuel Cycle Study (JFCS) between the United States and the Republic of Korea is a test of gram scale electrochemical recycling of spent fuel which is to be performed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Included in this test is the development of Nondestructive Assay (NDA) technologies that would be applicable for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards of the electrochemical recycling process. Of upmost importance to safeguarding the fuel cycle associated with the electrochemical recycling process is the ability to safeguard the U/TRU ingots that will be produced in the process. For the gram scale test, the ingots that will be produced will have an expected thermal power of approximately 130 mW. To ascertain how well the calorimetric assay NDA technique can perform in assaying these ingots, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has characterized and calibrated a small solid-state calorimeter called the Small Sample Calorimeter (SSC3) to perform these measurements at LANL. To calibrate and characterize the SSC3, a series of measurements were performed using certified {sup 238}Pu heat standards whose power output is traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) electrical standards. The results of these measurements helped establish both the calibration of the calorimeter as well as the expected performance of the calorimeter in terms of its accuracy and precision as a function of thermal power of the item that is being measured. In this report, we will describe the measurements that were performed and provide a discussion of the results of these measurements.

  3. On timing properties of LYSO-based calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Duarte, J.; Pena, C.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Trevor, J.; Xie, S.

    2015-04-23

    We present test beam studies and results on the timing performance and characterization of the time resolution of Lutetium–Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO)-based calorimeters. We also demonstrate that a time resolution of 30 ps is achievable for a particular design. Additionally, we discuss precision timing calorimetry as a tool for the mitigation of physics object performance degradation effects due to the large number of simultaneous interactions in the high luminosity environment foreseen at the Large Hadron Collider.

  4. An electromagnetic calorimeter for the JLab real compton scattering experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D J; Wojtsekhowski, B; Annand, J.R. M.; Chang, T -H; Chudakov, E; Danagoulian, A; Degtyarenko, P; Egiyan, K; Gilman, R; Gorbenko, V; Hines, J; Hovhannisyan, E; Hyde-Wright, C E; de Jager, C W; Ketikyan, A; Mamyan, V H; Michaels, R; Natham, A M; Nelyubin, V; Rachek, I; Roedelbrom, M; Petrosyan, A; Pomatsalyuk, R; Popov, V; Segal, J; Shestakov, Y; Templon, J; Voskanyan, H

    2011-07-01

    A lead–glass hodoscope calorimeter that was constructed for use in the Jefferson Lab Real Compton Scattering experiment is described. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6%/View the MathML source. Features of both the detector design and its performance in the high luminosity environment during the experiment are presented.

  5. Micro-fabricated DC comparison calorimeter for RF power measurement.

    PubMed

    Neji, Bilel; Xu, Jing; Titus, Albert H; Meltzer, Joel

    2014-10-27

    Diode detection and bolometric detection have been widely used to measure radio frequency (RF) power. However, flow calorimeters, in particular micro-fabricated flow calorimeters, have been mostly unexplored as power meters. This paper presents the design, micro-fabrication and characterization of a flow calorimeter. This novel device is capable of measuring power from 100 μW to 200 mW. It has a 50-Ohm load that is heated by the RF source, and the heat is transferred to fluid in a microchannel. The temperature change in the fluid is measured by a thermistor that is connected in one leg of a Wheatstone bridge. The output voltage change of the bridge corresponds to the RF power applied to the load. The microfabricated device measures 25.4 mm × 50.8 mm, excluding the power supplies, microcontroller and fluid pump. Experiments demonstrate that the micro-fabricated sensor has a sensitivity up to 22 × 10⁻³ V/W. The typical resolution of this micro-calorimeter is on the order of 50 μW, and the best resolution is around 10 μW. The effective efficiency is 99.9% from 0−1 GHz and more than 97.5% at frequencies up to 4 GHz. The measured reflection coefficient of the 50-Ohm load and coplanar wave guide is less than −25 dB from 0−2 GHz and less than −16 dB at 2−4 GHz.

  6. Development of an air flow thermal balance calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An air flow calorimeter, based on the idea of balancing an unknown rate of heat evolution with a known rate of heat evolution, was developed. Under restricted conditions, the prototype system is capable of measuring thermal wattages from 10 milliwatts to 1 watt, with an error no greater than 1 percent. Data were obtained which reveal system weaknesses and point to modifications which would effect significant improvements.

  7. Development of Radhard VLSI electronics for SSC calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J.W.; Nodulman, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    A new program of development of integrated electronics for liquid argon calorimeters in the SSC detector environment is being started at Argonne National Laboratory. Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Vanderbilt University together with an industrial participants are expected to collaborate in this work. Interaction rates, segmentation, and the radiation environment dictate that front-end electronics of SSC calorimeters must be implemented in the form of highly integrated, radhard, analog, low noise, VLSI custom monolithic devices. Important considerations are power dissipation, choice of functions integrated on the front-end chips, and cabling requirements. An extensive level of expertise in radhard electronics exists within the industrial community, and a primary objective of this work is to bring that expertise to bear on the problems of SSC detector design. Radiation hardness measurements and requirements as well as calorimeter design will be primarily the responsibility of Argonne scientists and our Brookhaven and Vanderbilt colleagues. Radhard VLSI design and fabrication will be primarily the industrial participant's responsibility. The rapid-cycling synchrotron at Argonne will be used for radiation damage studies involving response to neutrons and charged particles, while damage from gammas will be investigated at Brookhaven. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. The backward end-cap for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozza, L.; Maas, F. E.; Noll, O.; Rodriguez Pineiro, D.; Valente, R.

    2015-02-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new FAIR facility will cover a broad experimental programme in hadron structure and spectroscopy. As a multipurpose detector, the PANDA spectrometer needs to ensure almost 4π coverage of the scattering solid angle, full and accurate multiple-particle event reconstruction and very good particle identification capabilities. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will be a key item for many of these aspects. Particle energies ranging from some MeVs to several GeVs have to be measured with a relative resolution of 1% ⊕ 2%/√E/GeV . It will be a homogeneous calorimeter made of PbWO4 crystals and will be operated at -25°C, in order to improve the scintillation light yield. With the exception of the very forward section, the light will be detected by large area avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The current pulses from the APDs will be integrated, amplified and shaped by ASIC chips which were developed for this purpose. The whole calorimeter has been designed in three sections: a forward end-cap, a central barrel and a backward end-cap (BWEC). In this contribution, a status report on the development of the BWEC is presented.

  9. The Design of a Calorimeter to Measure Concentrated Solar Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, Elizabeth Anne Bennett

    A water-cooled, cavity calorimeter was designed to accurately measure concentrated solar thermal power produced by the University of Minnesota's solar simulator. The cavity is comprised of copper tubing bent into spiral and helical coils for the base and cylindrical walls, respectively. Insulation surrounds the cavity to reduce heat transfer to the ambient, and a water- cooled aperture cover is positioned at the open end of the cavity. The calorimeter measures the heat gain of water flowing through the system as radiant energy is passed through the aperture. Chilled water flows through the tubing, and the energy incident on the cavity surface is conducted through the wall and convected to the flowing water. The energy increase in the water can be observed by an increase in fluid temperature. A Monte Carlo ray tracing method is used to predict the incident flux distribution and corresponding power on the surfaces of the cavity. These values are used to estimate the thermal losses of the system, and it is found that they account for less that 1% of the total power passed through the aperture. The overall uncertainty of the calorimeter is found by summing the measured uncertainty and the estimated heat loss and is found to be +/-2.5% for 9.2 kW of power output and +/-3.4% for 3 kW.

  10. Applying fast calorimetry on a spent nuclear fuel calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Liljenfeldt, Henrik

    2015-04-15

    Recently at Los Alamos National Laboratory, sophisticated prediction algorithms have been considered for the use of calorimetry for treaty verification. These algorithms aim to predict the equilibrium temperature based on early data and therefore be able to shorten the measurement time while maintaining good accuracy. The algorithms have been implemented in MATLAB and applied on existing equilibrium measurements from a spent nuclear fuel calorimeter located at the Swedish nuclear fuel interim storage facility. The results show significant improvements in measurement time in the order of 15 to 50 compared to equilibrium measurements, but cannot predict the heat accurately in less time than the currently used temperature increase method can. This Is both due to uncertainties in the calibration of the method as well as identified design features of the calorimeter that limits the usefulness of equilibrium type measurements. The conclusions of these findings are discussed, and suggestions of both improvements of the current calorimeter as well as what to keep in mind in a new design are given.

  11. Quality Factor for the Hadronic Calorimeter in High Luminosity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seixas, J. M.; ATLAS Tile Calorimeter System

    2015-05-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS experiment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and has about 10,000 eletronic channels. An Optimal Filter (OF) has been used to estimate the energy sampled by the calorimeter and applies a Quality Factor (QF) for signal acceptance. An approach using Matched Filter (MF) has also been pursued. In order to cope with the luminosity rising foreseen for LHC operation upgrade, different algorithms have been developed. Currently, the OF measurement for signal acceptance is implemented through a chi-square test. At a low luminosity scenario, such QF measurement has been used as a way to describe how the acquired signal is compatible to the pulse shape pattern. However, at high-luminosity conditions, due to pile up, this QF acceptance is no longer possible when OF is employed, and the QF becomes a measurement to indicate whether the reconstructed signal suffers or not from pile up. Methods are being developed in order to recover the superimposed information, and the QF may be used again as signal acceptance criterion. In this work, a new QF measurement is introduced. It is based on divergence statistics, which measures the similarity of probability density functions.

  12. An automated flow calorimeter for heat capacity and enthalpy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandarusi, J. A.; Yesavage, V. F.

    1988-11-01

    An automated flow calorimeter has been developed for the measurement of heat capacity and latent enthalpies of fluids at elevated temperatures (300 700 K) and pressure (<30M Pa) with a design accuracy of 0.1%. The method of measurement is the traditional electrical power input flow calorimeter, utilizing a precision metering pump, which eliminates the need for flow-rate monitoring. The calorimeter cell uses a unique concentric coil design with passive metal radiation shields and active guard heaters to minimize heat leakage, eliminate the traditional constant-temperature bath, and facilitate easy component replacement. An additional feature of the instrument is a complete automation system, greatly simplifying operation of the apparatus. A novel multitasking software scheme allows a single microcomputer simultaneously to control all system temperatures, provide continuous monitoring and updates on system status, and log data. Preliminary results for liquid water mean heat capacities show the equipment to be performing satisfactorily, with data accuracies of better than ±0.3%. Minor equipment modifications and better thermometry are required to reduce systemic errors and to achieve the designed operational range.

  13. An automated flow calorimeter for heat capacity and enthalpy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sandarusi, J.A.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1988-11-01

    An automated flow calorimeter has been developed for the measurement of heat capacity and latent enthalpies of fluids at elevated temperatures (300-700 K) and pressure (< 30 MPa) with a design accuracy of 0.1%. The method of measurement is the traditional electrical power input flow calorimeter, utilizing a precision metering pump, which eliminates the need for flow-rate monitoring. The calorimeter cell uses a unique concentric coil design with passive metal radiation shields and active guard heaters to minimize heat leakage, eliminate the traditional constant-temperature bath, and facilitate easy component replacement. An additional feature of the instrument is a complete automation system, greatly simplifying operation of the apparatus. A novel multitasking software scheme allows a single microcomputer simultaneously to control all system temperatures, provide continuous monitoring and updates on system status, and log data. Preliminary results for liquid water mean heat capacities show the equipment to be performing satisfactorily, with data accuracies of better than /plus minus/0.3%. Minor equipment modifications and better thermometry are required to reduce systemic errors and to achieve the designed operational range.

  14. A photon calorimeter using lead tungstate crystals for the CEBAF HAll A Compton polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    D. Neyret; T. Pussieux; T. Auger; M. Baylac; E. Burtin; C. Cavata; R. Chipaux; S. Escoffier; N. Falletto; J. Jardillier; S. Kerhoas; D. Lhuillier; F. Marie; C. Veyssiere; J. Ahrens; R. Beck; M. Lang

    2000-05-01

    A new Compton polarimeter is built on the CEBAF Hall A electron beam line. Performances of 10% resolution and 1% calibration are required for the photon calorimeter of this polarimeter. This calorimeter is built with lead tungstate scintillators coming from the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter R&D. Beam tests of this detector have been made using the tagged photon beam line at MAMI, Mainz, and a resolution of 1.76%+2.75%/v+0.41%/E has been measured.

  15. Determination of shower central position in laterally segmented lead-fluoride electromagnetic calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazouz, M.; Ghedira, L.; Voutier, E.

    2016-07-01

    The spatial resolution of laterally segmented electromagnetic calorimeters, built of lead fluoride material, is studied on the basis of Monte-Carlo simulations. Parametrization of the relative resolution on the shower position is proposed and optimized in terms of the energy of incoming particles and the elementary size of the calorimeter blocks. A new fit algorithm method is proposed that improves spatial resolution at high energies (> 5 GeV), and provides guidance for the design optimization of electromagnetic calorimeters.

  16. SUITABILITY OF A NEW CALORIMETER FOR EXOTIC MESON SEARCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, C.; Ostrovidov, A.; Eugenio, P.

    2007-01-01

    Exotic mesons, particles that have quantum numbers that are inaccessible to conventional quark-model mesons, are predicted by quantum chromodynamics (QCD), but past experiments seeking to identify exotic candidates have produced controversial results. The HyCLAS experiment (E04005) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) proposes the use of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B to study the photoproduction of exotic mesons. However, the base detector package at CLAS is not ideal for observing and measuring neutral particles, particularly at forward angles. The Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) experiment at TJNAF has commissioned a new calorimeter for detecting small-angle photons, but studies must be performed to determine its suitability for a meson spectroscopy experiment. The ηπ system has been under especial scrutiny in the community as a source for potential exotics, so the new calorimeter’s ability at reconstructing these resonances must be evaluated. To achieve this, the invariant mass of showers in the calorimeter are reconstructed. Also, two electroproduction reaction channels analogous to photoproduction channels of interest to HyCLAS are examined in DVCS data. It is found that, while not ideal, the new calorimeter will allow access to additional reaction channels, and its inclusion in HyCLAS is warranted. Results in basic shower reconstruction show that the calorimeter has good effi ciency in resolving π° decays, but its η reconstruction is not as strong. When examining ep → epπ°η, preliminary reconstruction of the ηπ° system shows faint signals in the a0(980) region. In the ep → e n π+ η channel, preliminary reconstruction of the ηπ+ system gave good signals in the a0(980) and a2(1320) regions, but statistics were poor. While more analyses are necessary to improve statistics and remove background, these preliminary results support the claim

  17. Upgrade fo the CMS Hadron Outer Calorimeter with SIPMs

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jacob; Freeman, James; Los, Sergey; Whitmore, Juliana; /Fermilab

    2011-09-14

    The CMS Hadron Outer Calorimeter (HO) is undergoing an upgrade to replace the existing photodetectors (HPDs) with SIPMs. The chosen device is the Hamamatsu 3 x 3mm 50 {mu}m pitch MPPC. The system has been developed to be a 'drop-in' replacement of the HPDs. A complete control system of bias voltage generation, leakage current monitoring, temperature monitoring, and temperature control using solid state Peltier coolers has been developed and tested. 108 channels of the system have been installed into CMS and operated for more than 2 years. The complete system of about 2200 channels is in production and will be installed in the next LHC long shutdown scheduled for 2013. The CMS central calorimeter consists of a detector inside the solenoidal magnet, HB, and a component outside the magnet, the Outer Hadron Calorimeter, HO [1]. The HO is installed inside the magnet flux return yoke and provides for typically 3{lambda} of additional absorber to the calorimetric measurement. The outer calorimeter is composed of one or more layers of scintillator with wavelength shifting fiber readout into photodetectors. Figure 1 (a) shows the schematic layout of the calorimeters in CMS and shows the location of the HO scintillator layers. The front end electronics are placed inside the CMS detector, close to the scintillators. Figure 1(b) shows a photograph of the scintillators. Note the four wavelength shifting fibers per tile. The tile size creates a projective tower with the HB. Currently the photodetector used is the HPD but for performance and operational reasons it is desired to upgrade these with SIPMs. The CMS HCAL group has developed a drop-in replacement for the HPD using SIPMs. SIPMs are very suitable for this application because of several factors: The radiation levels are modest with a lifetime expected fluence of less than 5*10{sup 11} neutrons (E > 100 KeV) per cm{sup 2}. The energy flux into HO is small, the rate of larger energy depositions is low, and the required

  18. Tail reconnection triggering substorm onset.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulos, Vassilis; McFadden, James P; Larson, Davin; Carlson, Charles W; Mende, Stephen B; Frey, Harald; Phan, Tai; Sibeck, David G; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Auster, Uli; Donovan, Eric; Mann, Ian R; Rae, I Jonathan; Russell, Christopher T; Runov, Andrei; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Kepko, Larry

    2008-08-15

    Magnetospheric substorms explosively release solar wind energy previously stored in Earth's magnetotail, encompassing the entire magnetosphere and producing spectacular auroral displays. It has been unclear whether a substorm is triggered by a disruption of the electrical current flowing across the near-Earth magnetotail, at approximately 10 R(E) (R(E): Earth radius, or 6374 kilometers), or by the process of magnetic reconnection typically seen farther out in the magnetotail, at approximately 20 to 30 R(E). We report on simultaneous measurements in the magnetotail at multiple distances, at the time of substorm onset. Reconnection was observed at 20 R(E), at least 1.5 minutes before auroral intensification, at least 2 minutes before substorm expansion, and about 3 minutes before near-Earth current disruption. These results demonstrate that substorms are likely initiated by tail reconnection. PMID:18653845

  19. Magnetic calorimeter with a SQUID for detecting weak radiations and recording the ultralow energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, Aleksander I; Zherikhina, L N; Kuleshova, G V; Tskhovrebov, A M; Izmailov, G N

    2006-12-31

    The scheme of a magnetic calorimeter for recording extremely low energy releases is developed. The calorimeter is activated by the method of adiabatic demagnetisation and its response to the energy release is measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The estimate of the ultimate sensitivity of the calorimeter with the SQUID demonstrates the possibilities of its application for detecting ultralow radiation intensity, recording single X-ray quanta in the proportional regime and other events with ultralow energy releases. The scheme of the calorimeter with the SQUID on matter waves in superfluid {sup 4}He is proposed. (radiation detectors)

  20. Forward hadron calorimeter for measurements of projectile spectators in heavy-ion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Golubeva, M. B. Guber, F. F. Ivashkin, A. P. Kurepin, A. B. Marin, V. N. Sadovsky, A. S. Petukhov, O. A.

    2012-06-15

    The construction and performance of a modular hadron calorimeter for NA61 experiment at CERN are described. The calorimeter consists of individual lead/scintillator sandwich modules with the sampling satisfying the compensating condition. The light from the individual scintillator tiles is captured and transported with the WLS-fibers embedded in the scintillator grooves. The light readout is done by avalanche micro-pixel photodiodes. The construction ensures a fine transverse granulation of the calorimeter and a longitudinal segmentation of each module in 10 independent sections. The results of beam tests of the calorimeter prototype are presented.

  1. Performance and calibration of the D0 uranium liquid-argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Guida, J.; D0 Collaboration

    1995-01-01

    The performance of the D{phi} uranium liquid-argon calorimeter is discussed, as well as the electromagnetic energy calibration. Results from test beam studies and collider data are incorporated to estimate the energy scale. The {phi} symmetry of the events is used to improve the understanding of the electromagnetic part of the calorimeter, and the EM energy scale is determined from Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} events. The calorimeter`s response to other resonances is also investigated.

  2. A calorimeter for measuring the neutral beam power reaching the plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Edmonds, P.H.; Hahs, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    A calorimeter has been designed to measure the neutral beam power reaching the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) plasma. The high-heat-flux surface of this calorimeter is made of an array of graphite tiles. The calorimeter, which will be located in the adapter section between the ATF vacuum vessel and the beam line, is retractable so that it can be moved away from the plasma without opening the vacuum vessel during normal ATF operation. Two rows of thermocouples mounted perpendicular to each other allow determination of the beam profile. This paper presents the details of the design and fabrication of the calorimeter. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Optically triggered infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Ramiro, Íñigo; Martí, Antonio; Antolín, Elisa; López, Esther; Datas, Alejandro; Luque, Antonio; Ripalda, José M; González, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate a new class of semiconductor device: the optically triggered infrared photodetector (OTIP). This photodetector is based on a new physical principle that allows the detection of infrared light to be switched ON and OFF by means of an external light. Our experimental device, fabricated using InAs/AlGaAs quantum-dot technology, demonstrates normal incidence infrared detection in the 2-6 μm range. The detection is optically triggered by a 590 nm light-emitting diode. Furthermore, the detection gain is achieved in our device without an increase of the noise level. The novel characteristics of OTIPs open up new possibilities for third generation infrared imaging systems ( Rogalski, A.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 105 (9), 091101). PMID:25490236

  4. Optically triggered infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Ramiro, Íñigo; Martí, Antonio; Antolín, Elisa; López, Esther; Datas, Alejandro; Luque, Antonio; Ripalda, José M; González, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate a new class of semiconductor device: the optically triggered infrared photodetector (OTIP). This photodetector is based on a new physical principle that allows the detection of infrared light to be switched ON and OFF by means of an external light. Our experimental device, fabricated using InAs/AlGaAs quantum-dot technology, demonstrates normal incidence infrared detection in the 2-6 μm range. The detection is optically triggered by a 590 nm light-emitting diode. Furthermore, the detection gain is achieved in our device without an increase of the noise level. The novel characteristics of OTIPs open up new possibilities for third generation infrared imaging systems ( Rogalski, A.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 105 (9), 091101).

  5. (Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders). [State Univ. of New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  6. Neural networks for triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B. ); Campbell, M. ); Bedeschi, F. ); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. ); Nesti, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Calorimeter Preamplifier Hybrid Circuit Test Jig

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.; /Fermilab

    1999-04-19

    There are two ways in which the testing may be initiated, remotely or locally. If the remote operation is desired, an external TTL level signal must be provided to the test jig with the remotellocal switch on the side of the test jig switched to remote. A logic high will initiate the test. A logic low will terminate the test. In the event that an external signal is connected to the test jig while local operation occurs, the local control takes precedence over remote control. Once a DVT has been locked in the ZIF socket and the DIP switches are selected, the Push-to-Test button may be depressed. Momentarily depressing the button will initiate a test with a minimum 400 ms duration. At the same time a PBCLOCK and PBLATCH pulses will be initiated and the power rails +12V, +8V, and -6V will be ramped to full voltage. The time at which the power rails reach the full voltage is about 13 ms and it is synchronized with bypass capacitors placed on COMP input of U20 and U22 and on the output of U23 voltage regulators. The voltage rails are supplied to a {+-}10% window comparator. A red LED indicates the rail is below or above 10% of the design value. A green LED indicates the rail is within acceptable limits. For DDT with a 5 pF and 10 pF feed back capacitor, the +12V and +8V rails are current-regulated to 19rnA and 22 rnA respectively and the -6V rail is short-circuit protected within the regulator. For DUT with a 22 pF feed back capacitor the current regulation is the same as above except that the +8V rail is current regulated to 43 rnA. The power rails are supplied to the DUT via a 10 {Omega} resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is sensed by a differential amplifier AD620 and amplified by a gain of 10. An external BNC connection is provided from this point to allow for current measurements by the vendor. The current value for each rail is calculated by measuring the voltage value at this point and divided by (10*10{Omega}). The next stage inverts and amplifies

  8. Dopamine triggers heterosynaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masago; Otaka, Mami; Huang, Yanhua H; Neumann, Peter A; Winters, Bradley D; Grace, Anthony A; Schlüter, Oliver M; Dong, Yan

    2013-04-17

    As a classic neuromodulator, dopamine has long been thought to modulate, rather than trigger, synaptic plasticity. In contrast, our present results demonstrate that within the parallel projections of dopaminergic and GABAergic terminals from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens core (NAcCo), action-potential-activated release of dopamine heterosynaptically triggers LTD at GABAergic synapses, which is likely mediated by activating presynaptically located dopamine D1 class receptors and expressed by inhibiting presynaptic release of GABA. Moreover, this dopamine-mediated heterosynaptic LTD is abolished after withdrawal from cocaine exposure. These results suggest that action-potential-dependent dopamine release triggers very different cellular consequences from those induced by volume release or pharmacological manipulation. Activation of the ventral tegmental area to NAcCo projections is essential for emotional and motivational responses. This dopamine-mediated LTD allows a flexible output of NAcCo neurons, whereas disruption of this LTD may contribute to the rigid emotional and motivational state observed in addicts during cocaine withdrawal.

  9. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  10. Performance and upgrade plans of the LHCb trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligorov, V. V.; LHCb Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The trigger of the LHCb experiment consists of two stages: an initial hardware trigger, and a high-level trigger implemented in a farm of parallel-processing CPUs. It reduces the event rate from an input of 15 MHz to an output rate of around 4 kHz. In order to maximize efficiencies and minimize biases, the trigger is designed around inclusive selection algorithms, culminating in a novel boosted decision tree which enables the efficient selection of beauty hadron decays based on a robust partial reconstruction of their decay products. In order to improve performance, the LHCb upgrade aims to significantly increase the rate at which the detector will be read out, and hence shift more of the workload onto the high-level trigger. It is demonstrated that the current high-level trigger architecture will be able to meet this challenge, and the expected efficiencies in several key channels are discussed in context of the LHCb upgrade.

  11. Design and performance of the upgrade of the CMS L1 muon trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortignon, P.

    2016-07-01

    After the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) LHC will run at a center of mass energy of 13 TeV, providing CMS with proton collisions at an expected luminosity which is almost double the LHC design value of 1034cm-2s-1, and almost three times the peak luminosity reached during Run1 of 7.7 ·1033cm-2s-1. The higher luminosity and center of mass energy of the LHC will raise the Level 1 (L1) muon trigger rate by almost a factor six for a given muon transverse momentum pT threshold. It is therefore necessary to increase the muon (pT) threshold to keep the trigger rate below 100 kHz, the maximum sustainable rate for the CMS detectors. An increase of the L1 trigger thresholds implies a lowering of the efficiency in detecting signals from new physics. The CMS muon trigger is upgraded using custom designed AMC boards, with more powerful FPGAs and larger memories. The upgraded CMS muon trigger system implements pattern recognition and MVA (Boosted Decision Tree) regression techniques in the trigger boards for muon pT assignment, drastically reducing the trigger rate and improving the trigger efficiency. The upgraded system design exploits the redundancy of the CMS muon detectors at a very early stage merging different muon detector information already at L1. The pileup subtracted information from the upgraded calorimeter trigger allows to require isolated muons already in the L1 algorithms. The upgrade trigger is also designed to include inputs from GEM, the phase 2 muon detector upgrade in the very high pseudorapidity region.

  12. Triggering filamentation using turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eeltink, D.; Berti, N.; Marchiando, N.; Hermelin, S.; Gateau, J.; Brunetti, M.; Wolf, J. P.; Kasparian, J.

    2016-09-01

    We study the triggering of single filaments due to turbulence in the beam path for a laser of power below the filamenting threshold. Turbulence can act as a switch between the beam not filamenting and producing single filaments. This positive effect of turbulence on the filament probability, combined with our observation of off-axis filaments, suggests the underlying mechanism is modulation instability caused by transverse perturbations. We hereby experimentally explore the interaction of modulation instability and turbulence, commonly associated with multiple filaments, in the single-filament regime.

  13. Response of the D0 calorimeter to cosmic ray muons

    SciTech Connect

    Kotcher, J.

    1992-10-01

    The D0 Detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is a large multipurpose detector facility designed for the study of proton-antiproton collision products at the center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV. It consists of an inner tracking volume, hermetic uranium/liquid argon sampling calorimetry, and an outer 47{pi} muon detector. In preparation for our first collider run, the collaboration organized a Cosmic Ray Commissioning Run, which took place from February--May of 1991. This thesis is a detailed study of the response of the central calorimeter to cosmic ray muons as extracted from data collected during this run. We have compared the shapes of the experimentally-obtained pulse height spectra to the Landau prediction for the ionization loss in a continuous thin absorber in the four electromagnetic and four hadronic layers of the calorimeter, and find good agreement after experimental effects are folded in. We have also determined an absolute energy calibration using two independent methods: one which measures the response of the electronics to a known amount of charge injected at the preamplifiers, and one which uses a carry-over of the calibration from a beam test of central calorimeter modules. Both absolute energy conversion factors agree with one another, within their errors. The calibration determined from the test beam carryover, relevant for use with collider physics data, has an error of 2.3%. We believe that, with further study, a final error of {approx}1% will be achieved. The theory-to-experiment comparison of the peaks (or most probable values) of the muon spectra was used to determine the layer-to-layer consistency of the muon signal. We find that the mean response in the 3 fine hadronic layers is (12 {plus_minus} 2%) higher than that in the 4 electromagnetic layers. These same comparisons have been used to verify the absolute energy conversion factors. The conversion factors work well for the electromagnetic sections.

  14. Subnanosecond trigger system for ETA

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, E.G.; Lauer, E.J.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers D.; Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-05-30

    A high-voltage trigger system capable of triggering 30, 250 kV spark gaps; each with less than +- 1 ns jitter has been constructed. In addition to low jitter rates, the trigger system must be capable of delivering the high voltage pulses to the spark gaps either simultaneously or sequentially as determined by other system requirements. The trigger system consists of several stages of pulse amplification culminating in 160 kV pulses having 30 ns risetime. The trigger system is described and test data provided.

  15. The CMS hadron calorimeter detector control system upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, M. O.; Behrens, U.; Campbell, A.; Martens, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. A.; Saxena, P.

    2015-04-01

    The detector control system of the CMS hadron calorimeter provides the 40.0788 MHz LHC clock to the front end electronics and supplies synchronization signals and I2C communication. Pedestals and diagnostic bits are controlled, and temperatures and voltages are read out. SIPM temperatures are actively stabilized by temperature readback and generation of correction voltages to drive the Peltier regulation system. Overall control and interfacing to databases and experimental DAQ software is provided by the software CCM Server. We report on design and development status, and implementation schedule of this system.

  16. Performance of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, G.; Ellison, S.; Gould, R.; Granger, D.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Price, B.; Stewart, M.; Wefel, J. P.; Adams, J. H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATIC instrument is a balloon-borne experiment capable of measuring cosmic ray elemental spectra from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from H to Fe with a fully active Bismuth Germanate calorimeter. Several Long Duration Balloon flights from McMurdo station, Antarctica are scheduled. The detector was tested with high energy electron, proton, and pion beams at CERN. We present results for 150 and 375 GeV protons, and 150 GeV pions and comparison with a GEANT Monte Carlo.

  17. A Gas-Filled Calorimeter for High Intensity Beam Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Robert; Ankenbrandt, Harles; Flanagan, Gene; Hauptman, John; Kahn, Steven; Lee, Sehwook; Notani, Masahiro

    We describe a novel gas-Cherenkov calorimeter, which detects Cherenkov light showers emitted in an array of thin metal tubes or channels filled with gas. The materials are not vulnerable to radiation damage, and the detector is inherently fast and able to operate in high rate environments. Future accelerators such as the ILC and a muon collider will need fast, radiation-tolerant detectors for monitoring beams and beam halos, and detectors are needed that can operate in the presence of high particle rates. Such detectors will also be useful for high rate environments at upgraded facilities such as RHIC, CEBAF II, and at Fermilab's Project X.

  18. Silicon photomultiplier characterization for the GlueX barrel calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    F. Barbosa, J.E. McKisson, J. McKisson, Y. Qiang, E. Smith, C. Zorn

    2012-12-01

    GlueX is a new detector being constructed at Jefferson Laboratory to study gluonic excitations and confinement via the detection of exotic meson states. The hermetic detector includes a barrel calorimeter where the photodetectors must operate in a high magnetic field exceeding 0.5 T. After extensive tests with a variety of sensors, the chosen photodetector will be a custom silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) array manufactured by Hamamatsu Corporation. This paper will focus on the characterization of the first 80 production samples of these SiPMs, including dark rate, photodetection efficiency (PDE), crosstalk, response uniformity and radiation tolerance.

  19. Evaluating Small Scintillating Cells for Digital Hadron Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    This thesis discusses the use of scintillator cells with digital electronics as a basis for a digital hadron calorimeter. The detection of a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), analysis of crosstalk, and determination of light yield for the array of scintillating cells are described. The cells were found to have a light yield (in terms of single photoelectrons per MIP) of 7 to 13. Crosstalk due to transfer of light between adjacent cells or photomultiplier tube channels can reach 45%. Rejection versus efficiency studies show that single-channel thresholds can be set that reject noise while accepting MIP signals.

  20. Determination of the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jia-Hua; Wang, Zhe; Lebanowski, Logan; Lin, Guey-Lin; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-08-01

    A physically motivated function was developed to accurately determine the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter and to overcome biases present in many commonly used methods. The function is the convolution of a detector resolution function with the sum of a delta function, which represents the complete absorption of energy, and a tail function, which describes the partial absorption of energy and depends on the detector materials and structures. Its performance was tested with the simulation of three typical cases. The accuracy of the extracted peak value, resolution, and peak area was improved by an order of magnitude on average, relative to the Crystal Ball function.

  1. Analysis of diagnostic calorimeter data by the transfer function technique.

    PubMed

    Delogu, R S; Poggi, C; Pimazzoni, A; Rossi, G; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the analysis procedure applied to the thermal measurements on the rear side of a carbon fibre composite calorimeter with the purpose of reconstructing the energy flux due to an ion beam colliding on the front side. The method is based on the transfer function technique and allows a fast analysis by means of the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Its efficacy has been tested both on simulated and measured temperature profiles: in all cases, the energy flux features are well reproduced and beamlets are well resolved. Limits and restrictions of the method are also discussed, providing strategies to handle issues related to signal noise and digital processing. PMID:26932104

  2. The KTeV Pure CsI Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    KTeV is currently building a state-of-the-art pure CsI electromagnetic calorimeter with a sophisticated digital readout. The CsI array is expected to have better than 1% resolution over a dynamic range of 2--64 GeV. The design of the CsI array is driven by the difficult physics goal of attempting to measure the CP violation parameter Re({epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}) to 1 part in 10000 in a high-rate neutral beam environment. The physics requirements and their impact on the final design will be discussed.

  3. Light nuclear charge measurement with Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basara, Laurent; Choutko, Vitaly; Li, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a high energy particle detector installed and operating on board of the International Space Station (ISS) since May 2011. So far more than 70 billion cosmic ray events have been recorded by AMS. In the present paper the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) detector of AMS is used to measure cosmic ray nuclear charge magnitudes up to Z=10. The obtained charge magnitude resolution is about 0.1 and 0.3 charge unit for Helium and Carbon, respectively. These measurements are important for an accurate determination of the interaction probabilities of various nuclei with the AMS materials. The ECAL charge calibration and measurement procedures are presented.

  4. Simulation of Energy Response of the ATIC Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batkov, K. E.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Case, G.; Christl, M.; Chang, J.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Granger, D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon borne experiment designed to measure the cosmic ray composition for elements from hydrogen to iron and their energy spectra from approx.50 GeV to near 100 TeV. It consists of a Si-matrix detector to determine the charge of a CR particle, a scintillator hodoscope for tracking, carbon interaction targets and a fully active BGO calorimeter. ATIC had its first flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 28/12/2000 to 13/01/2001. The ATIC flight collected approximately 25 million events. For reconstruction of primary spectra from spectra of energy deposits measured in the experiment, correlations between kinetic energy of a primary particle E(sub kin) and energy deposit in the calorimeter E(sub d) should be known. For this purpose, simulations of energy response of the calorimeter on energy spectra of different nuclei were done. The simulations were performed by GEANT-3.21 code with QGSM generator for nucleus - nucleus interactions. The incident flux was taken as isotropic in the ATIC aperture. Primary spectra power-law by momentum were used as inputs according to standard models of cosmic ray acceleration. These spectra become power-law by kinetic energy at E(sub kin) higher than approx.20Mc(sup 2), where M is primary nucleus mass. It should be noted that energy deposit spectra measured by ATIC illustrate similar behavior. Distributions of ratio E(sub kin)/E(sub d) are presented for different energy deposits and for a set of primaries. For power-law regions of energy spectra at E(sub d)> or equal to 20Mc(sup 2) the obtained mean value of E(sub kin)/E(sub d) increases from approx.2.4 for protons to approx.3.1 for iron, while rms/ decreases from 50% for protons to about 15% for iron. These values were obtained for the spectral index gamma=1.6

  5. The BABAR Electromagnetic Calorimeter in its Third Year of Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Eschrich, Ivo G.

    2003-09-18

    The BABAR experiment at the SLAC B-Factory has recorded more than 80 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity since 1999. Its electromagnetic calorimeter which consists of 6580 CsI(Tl) crystals has to detect both photons below 20 MeV as well as electrons in the 0.5-9 GeV range with a few percent resolution. Status and performance of the readout electronics including reliability issues and operational experience after the first three years of operation are presented.

  6. Operational performance of a large liquid argon photon calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, C.; Biel, J.; Droege, T.; Jonckheere, A.; Koehler, P.; Berg, D.; Chandlee, C.; Cihangir, S.; Ferbel, T.; Huston, J.; Jensen, T.; LeBritton, J.; Lobkowicz, F.; McLaughlin, M.; Ohshima, T.; Slattery, P.; Thompson, P.; Bromberg, C.; Cooper, S. R. W.; Collick, B.; Heppelmann, S.; Makdisi, Y.; Marshak, M.; Peterson, E.; Povlis, J.; Ruddick, K.; Brown, B.; Garelick, D.; Glass, G.; Glaubman, M.; Han, S. R.; Pothier, E.

    1983-11-01

    We describe the performance of a large (0.9 × 1.4 m2) liquid argon photon calorimeter in high energy experiments at Fermilab. Resolutions for π0 and electron showers, obtained under data-taking conditions, are compared with electron-beam calibration results. Exceptional spatial and time resolutions have been achieved for isolated showers (σx,y <0.7 mm and σt ∼6 ns). Electron data up to energies of 80 GeV and π0 data up to 180 GeV are presented.

  7. The Babar Electromagnetic Calorimeter in its Third Year of Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschrich, Ivo Gough

    2002-01-01

    The BABAR experiment at the SLAC B-Factory has recorded more than 80 fb-1 of integrated luminosity since 1999. Its electromagnetic calorimeter which consists of 6580 CsI(Tl) crystals has to detect both photons below 20 MeV as well as electrons in the 0.5-9 GeV range with a few percent resolution. Status and performance of the readout electronics including reliability issues and operational experience after the first three years of operation are presented.

  8. Soudan 2 detector as a time-projection calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, W.W.M.; Alner, J.; Ambats, I.; Ayres, D.; Barr, G.D.; Barrett, L.; Brooks, C.B.; Cobb, J.H.; Cockerill, D.; Courant, H.

    1986-01-01

    The Soudan 2 Nucleon Decay Detector uses Hytrel plastic tubes to cause ionization electrons to drift up to 50 cm prior to gas multiplication and collection. The drift tubes are embedded in a matrix of thin steel sheets. Readout is accomplished by flash digitizers in a system with distributed intelligence. This design is usable as a general-purpose calorimeter in which 3 spatial coordinates and pulse height are measured at all points where ionization occurs. Several 4.3 ton modules of this detector have now been studied in detail. We will present information about the detector performance and its dependence on manufacturing tolerances.

  9. Description of a Sensitive Seebeck Calorimeter Used for Cold Fusion Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Edmund

    A sensitive and stable Seebeck calorimeter is described and used to determine the heat of formation of PdD. This determination can be used to show that such calorimeters are sufficiently accurate to measure the LENR effect and give support to the claims.

  10. Calorimeter measures high nuclear heating rates and their gradients across a reactor test hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burwell, D.; Coombe, J. R.; Mc Bride, J.

    1970-01-01

    Pedestal-type calorimeter measures gamma-ray heating rates from 0.5 to 7.0 watts per gram of aluminum. Nuclear heating rate is a function of cylinder temperature change, measured by four chromel-alumel thermocouples attached to the calorimeter, and known thermoconductivity of the tested material.

  11. Twin solution calorimeter determines heats of formation of alloys at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darby, J. B., Jr.; Kleb, R.; Kleppa, O. J.

    1968-01-01

    Calvert-type, twin liquid metal solution calorimeter determines the heats of formation of transition metal alloys at high temperatures. The twin differential calorimeter measures the small heat effects generated over extended periods of time, has maximum operating temperature of 1073 degrees K and an automatic data recording system.

  12. Flow Type Bio-Chemical Calorimeter with Micro Differential Thermopile Sensor.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masataka; Nakabeppu, Osamu

    2015-04-01

    Bio-chemical calorimeters with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) thermopile sensor have been studied for monitoring detailed processes of the biochemical reactions of a minute sample with a high temporal resolution. The bio-calorimeters are generally divided into a batch-type and a flow-type. We developed a highly sensitive batch-type calorimeter which can detect a 100 nW level thermal reaction. However it shows a long settling time of 2 hours because of the heat capacity of a whole calorimeter. Thus, the flow-type calorimeters in passive and active mode have been studied for measuring the thermal reactions in an early stage after starting an analysis. The flow-type calorimeter consists of the MEMS differential thermopile sensor, a pair of micro channel reactor in a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) sheet in a three-fold thermostat chamber. The calorimeter in the passive mode was tested with dilution reactions of ethanol to water and NaCl aqueous solution to water. It was shown that the calorimeter detects exo- and endothermic reaction over 250 nW at solution flow rate of 0.05 ~ 1 µl/min with a settling time of about 4 minutes. In the active mode, a response test was conducted by using heat removal by water flow from the reactor channel. The active calorimetry enhances the response time about three to four times faster. PMID:26353514

  13. Test and evaluation of an Argonne National Laboratory bulk assay calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenburg, W.W.; Fellers, C.L.; Lemming, J.F.

    1981-06-30

    The Argonne National Laboratory bulk assay calorimeter (BAC) was subjected to a series of tests, using plutonium-238 heat standards, to evaluate the performance of the calorimeter over its operating range. The results of these tests provide baseline information of the instrument performance under laboratory conditions.

  14. Flow Type Bio-Chemical Calorimeter with Micro Differential Thermopile Sensor.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masataka; Nakabeppu, Osamu

    2015-04-01

    Bio-chemical calorimeters with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) thermopile sensor have been studied for monitoring detailed processes of the biochemical reactions of a minute sample with a high temporal resolution. The bio-calorimeters are generally divided into a batch-type and a flow-type. We developed a highly sensitive batch-type calorimeter which can detect a 100 nW level thermal reaction. However it shows a long settling time of 2 hours because of the heat capacity of a whole calorimeter. Thus, the flow-type calorimeters in passive and active mode have been studied for measuring the thermal reactions in an early stage after starting an analysis. The flow-type calorimeter consists of the MEMS differential thermopile sensor, a pair of micro channel reactor in a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) sheet in a three-fold thermostat chamber. The calorimeter in the passive mode was tested with dilution reactions of ethanol to water and NaCl aqueous solution to water. It was shown that the calorimeter detects exo- and endothermic reaction over 250 nW at solution flow rate of 0.05 ~ 1 µl/min with a settling time of about 4 minutes. In the active mode, a response test was conducted by using heat removal by water flow from the reactor channel. The active calorimetry enhances the response time about three to four times faster.

  15. A completely automated flow, heat-capacity, calorimeter for use at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.S.Z. ); Sandarusi, J. )

    1990-11-01

    An automated, flow calorimeter has been constructed to measure the isobaric heat capacities of concentrated, aqueous electrolyte solutions using a differential calorimetry technique. The calorimeter is capable of operation to 700 K and 40 MPa with a measurement accuracy of 0.03% relative to the heat capacity of the pure reference fluid (water). A novel design encloses the calorimeter within a double set of separately controlled, copper, adiabatic shields that minimize calorimeter heat losses and precisely control the temperature of the inlet fluids. A multistage preheat train, used to efficiently heat the flowing fluid, includes a counter-current heat exchanger for the inlet and outlet fluid streams in tandem with two calorimeter preheaters. Complete system automation is accomplished with a distributed control scheme using multiple processors, allowing the major control tasks of calorimeter operation and control, data logging and display, and pump control to be performed simultaneously. A sophisticated pumping strategy for the two separate syringe pumps allows continuous fluid delivery. This automation system enables the calorimeter to operate unattended except for the reloading of sample fluids. In addition, automation has allowed the development and implementation of an improved heat loss calibration method that provides calorimeter calibration with absolute accuracy comparable to the overall measurement precision, even for very concentrated solutions.

  16. Trigger point therapy.

    PubMed

    Janssens, L A

    1992-03-01

    Trigger points (TP) are objectively demonstrable foci in muscles. They are painful on compression and trigger pain in a referred area. This area may be the only locus of complaint in humans. In dogs we cannot prove the existence of referred zones of pain. Therefore, we can only diagnose a TP-induced claudication if we cannot find bone, joint, or neurologic abnormalities, and we do find TP that disappear after treatment together with the original lameness. Several methods have been developed to demonstrate TP existence objectively. These are pressure algometry, pressure threshold measurements, magnetic resonance thermography, and histology. In humans, 71% of the TP described are acupuncture points. TP treatment consists of TP stimulation with non-invasive or invasive methods such as dry needling or injections. In the dog, ten TP are described in two categories of clinical patients. First, those with one or few TP reacting favorably on treatment (+/- 80% success in +/- 2-3 weeks). Second, those with many TPs reacting badly on treatment. Most probably the latter group are fibromyalgia patients.

  17. Earthquake triggering by transient and static deformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Beeler, N.M.; Blanpied, M.L.; Bodin, P.

    1998-01-01

    at the initiation of failure, whereas static loads that are applied sufficiently late raise it. Rate-and-state friction predictions differ markedly from those based on Coulomb failure stress changes (??CFS) in which ??t equals the amplitude of the static stress change divided by the background stressing rate. The ??CFS model assumes a stress failure threshold, while the rate-and-state equations require a slip failure threshold. The complete rale-and-state equations predict larger ??t than the ??CFS model does for static stress steps at small t0, and smaller ??t than the ??CFS model for stress steps at large t0. The ??CFS model predicts nonzero ??t only for transient loads that raise the stress to failure stress levels during the transient. In contrast, the rate-and-state model predicts nonzero ??t for smaller loads, and triggered failure may occur well after the transient is finished. We consider heuristically the effects of triggering on a population of faults, as these effects might be evident in seismicity data. Triggering is manifest as an initial increase in seismicity rate that may be followed by a quiescence or by a return to the background rate. Available seismicity data are insufficient to discriminate whether triggered earthquakes are "new" or clock advanced. However, if triggering indeed results from advancing the failure time of inevitable earthquakes, then our modeling suggests that a quiescence always follows transient triggering and that the duration of increased seismicity also cannot exceed the duration of a triggering transient load. Quiescence follows static triggering only if the population of available faults is finite.

  18. Calibration of a calorimeter for measuring the performance of thermal control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, John; Siebes, Georg

    1993-01-01

    The calibration to evaluate the heat leak in terms of the deviation from a perfect calorimeter is described. A thermal vacuum test was carried out to characterize the performance of the calorimeter. The calorimeter was equipped with a heater to control the sample disc temperature and with specific instrumentation to measure the heat leak. The radiation sink temperature of the black cavity target was varied from -192 to +31C, while the heater power was varied from 0 to 311 milliwatts. A steady state thermal model was developed to correlate the results. The calorimeter performance was characterized in terms of the heat leak as a percentage of the ideal heat flow of the calorimeter disc. Large deviations from ideal performance occur at low sink temperatures. The effect of the use of the heater is discussed. The effects of transient conditions during low Earth orbit are discussed. It is concluded that heat leak calibrations are necessary for a wide range of conditions.

  19. Addendum 3 to CSAR 80-027, Use of calorimeter 109B for fissile material measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, T.

    1994-12-05

    This modification to the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) calorimeter system involves removing current calorimeter No. 3 from the water bath and replacing it with a calorimeter that can accommodate larger diameter items (an oversize can). The inside diameters of both the sample and the reference cells will be increased to 5.835 inches at the top opening and to 5.22 inches at the bottom, the 8 inch high measurement zone. This Addendum 3 to Criticality Safety Analysis Report 80-027 examines criticality safety during the use of the modified calorimeter (Calorimeter 109B) with enlarged cell tube diameters to assure that an adequate margin of subcriticality is maintained for all normal and contingency conditions.

  20. The modular nuclear absorber of the ATLAS hadron calorimeter (The experience controlled assembly of the surface and in the pit).

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.; Batusov, V.; Budagov, J.; Leitener, R.; Lyablin, M.; Miralles, L.; Nessi, M.; Russakovich, N.; Sissakian, A.; Topilin, N.; Khubua, J.; Henriques, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Hadron Calorimeter of the ATLAS spectrometric complex is a principal part of the whole setup. This paper describes the developed concept and methods for the controlled construction of a steel nuclear calorimeter absorber which provides calorimeter assembly on the surface and in the underground experimental hall meeting the required design tolerances.

  1. Photoconductive semiconductor switches: Laser Q-switch trigger and switch-trigger laser integration

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; Hamil, R.A.; Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report provides a summary of the Pulser In a Chip 9000-Discretionary LDRD. The program began in January of 1997 and concluded in September of 1997. The over-arching goal of this LDRD is to study whether laser diode triggered photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) can be used to activate electro-optic devices such as Q-switches and Pockels cells and to study possible laser diode/switch integration. The PCSS switches we used were high gain GaAs switches because they can be triggered with small amounts of laser light. The specific goals of the LDRD were to demonstrate: (1) that small laser diode arrays that are potential candidates for laser-switch integration will indeed trigger the PCSS switch, and (2) that high gain GaAs switches can be used to trigger optical Q-switches in lasers such as the lasers to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and the laser used for direct optical initiation (DOI) of explosives. The technology developed with this LDRD is now the prime candidate for triggering the Q switch in the multiple lasers in the laser trigger system of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and may be utilized in other accelerators. As part of the LDRD we developed a commercial supplier. To study laser/switch integration we tested triggering the high gain GaAs switches with: edge emitting laser diodes, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), and transverse junction stripe (TJS) lasers. The first two types of lasers (edge emitting and VCSELs) did activate the PCSS but are harder to integrate with the PCSS for a compact package. The US lasers, while easier to integrate with the switch, did not trigger the PCSS at the US laser power levels we used. The PCSS was used to activate the Q-switch of the compact laser to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source.

  2. Shower development of particles with momenta from 15 GeV to 150 GeV in the CALICE scintillator-tungsten hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefdeville, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Eigen, G.; Marshall, J. S.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Alipour Tehrani, N.; Apostolakis, J.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Münnich, A.; Poss, S.; Ribon, A.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Giraud, J.; Grondin, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Brianne, E.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Tran, H. L.; Vargas-Trevino, A.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schröder, S.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Onel, Y.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Wing, M.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M. S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouëné, J.; Thiebault, A.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cizel, J.-B.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Nanni, J.; Pavy, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Shpak, K.; Tran, T. H.; Videau, H.; Yu, D.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Chen, S.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Kozakai, C.; Nakanishi, H.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present a study of showers initiated by electrons, pions, kaons, and protons with momenta from 15 GeV to 150 GeV in the highly granular CALICE scintillator-tungsten analogue hadronic calorimeter. The data were recorded at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron in 2011. The analysis includes measurements of the calorimeter response to each particle type as well as measurements of the energy resolution and studies of the longitudinal and radial shower development for selected particles. The results are compared to Geant4 simulations (version 9.6.p02). In the study of the energy resolution we include previously published data with beam momenta from 1 GeV to 10 GeV recorded at the CERN Proton Synchrotron in 2010.

  3. The Status Of GLAST CsI Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Chekhtman, A.

    2006-10-27

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) CsI calorimeter, which consists of 16 flight modules and 2 spare modules, was assembled in 2004-2005 by an international team from the USA, France and Sweden. Each module contains 96 CsI crystals supported by a carbon fiber composite structure and read out from both ends with silicon PIN photodiodes. Signals from the array of photodiodes are processed by custom analog ASICs and commercial ADCs. After assembly, each module underwent a full environmental test program including electromagnetic interference and compatibility, vibration, and thermal-vacuum test to flight-acceptance levels. The functional performance of each module was verified before and after each test, and calibration with cosmic muons and charge injection was performed throughout the test sequence. All 18 modules showed stable functioning over the few months of the assembly and test program. None of the 1728 crystals experienced mechanical or optical degradation. Integration of the calorimeter modules with the other detector and electronics subsystems into the complete Large Area Telescope began at SLAC in April 2005 and was completed in December 2005. The environmental testing of full LAT instrument is planned for summer 2006. Simultaneously the beam test of calibration unit made of spare modules is planned to be done at PS and SPS beam lines at CERN.

  4. Development of a semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Venkata Krishnan, R; Jogeswararao, G; Parthasarathy, R; Premalatha, S; Prabhakar Rao, J; Gunasekaran, G; Ananthasivan, K

    2014-12-01

    A semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter has been indigenously developed. The measurement system comprises modules for sensitive temperature measurement probe, signal processing, data collection, and joule calibration. The sensitivity of the temperature measurement module was enhanced by using a sensitive thermistor coupled with a lock-in amplifier based signal processor. A microcontroller coordinates the operation and control of these modules. The latter in turn is controlled through personal computer (PC) based custom made software developed with LabView. An innovative summing amplifier concept was used to cancel out the base resistance of the thermistor. The latter was placed in the dewar. The temperature calibration was carried out with a standard platinum resistance (PT100) sensor coupled with an 8½ digit multimeter. The water equivalent of this calorimeter was determined by using electrical calibration with the joule calibrator. The experimentally measured values of the quantum of heat were validated by measuring heats of dissolution of pure KCl (for endotherm) and tris (hydroxyl methyl) amino-methane (for exotherm). The uncertainity in the measurements was found to be within ±3%. PMID:25554316

  5. Unix version of CALOR89 for calorimeter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, T.; Job, P.K.; Price, L.E.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1992-05-12

    CALOR89 is a system of coupled Monte Carlo particle transport computer codes which has been successfully employed for the estimation of calorimeter parameters in High Energy Physics. In the past CALOR89 has been running on various IBM machines and on CRAY X-MP at Lawrence Livermore Lab. These machines had non-unix operating systems. In this report we present a UNIX version of CALOR89, which is especially suited for the UNIX work stations. Moreover CALOR89 is also been supplemented with two new program packages which makes it more user friendly. CALPREP is a program for the preparation of the input files for CALOR89 in general geometry and ANALYZ is an analysis package to extract the final results from CALOR89 relevant to calorimeters. This report also provides two script files LCALOR and PCALOR. LCALOR runs CALOR89 sequences of programs and EGS4 for a given configuration sequentially on a single processor and PCALOR concurrently on a multiprocessor unix workstation.

  6. New calorimeters for space experiments: physics requirements and technological challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchesi, Pier Simone

    2015-07-01

    Direct measurements of charged cosmic radiation with instruments in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), or flying on balloons above the atmosphere, require the identification of the incident particle, the measurement of its energy and possibly the determination of its sign-of-charge. The latter information can be provided by a magnetic spectrometer together with a measurement of momentum. However, magnetic deflection in space experiments is at present limited to values of the Maximum Detectable Rigidity (MDR) hardly exceeding a few TV. Advanced calorimetric techniques are, at present, the only way to measure charged and neutral radiation at higher energies in the multi-TeV range. Despite their mass limitation, calorimeters may achieve a large geometric factor and provide an adequate proton background rejection factor, taking advantage of a fine granularity and imaging capabilities. In this lecture, after a brief introduction on electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry, an innovative approach to the design of a space-borne, large acceptance, homogeneous calorimeter for the detection of high energy cosmic rays will be described.

  7. Cosmic Ray Study with the Nose Cone Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langin, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The Nose Cone Calorimeter (NCC) is a proposed upgrade detector for the PHENIX experiment at Brookhaven National Lab. The NCC will be useful for a variety of measurements in polarized p+p, d+A, and A+A collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The NCC is a tungsten-silicon sampling calorimeter, made up of 3 mm tungsten plates sandwiched by 1.5x1.5 cm^2 silicon pads. The NCC would add a new capability to measure the χC meson and electrons from W-boson decays in PHENIX, as well as adding acceptance for the 0̂ and γ-jet and many other measurements. Since it uses tungsten plates which have a very small Moliere radius of 0.9 cm, the NCC is capable of distinguishing photons down to very small separations, which is essential for the high densities in the heavy ion collisions and for decay photons from very high energy 0̂'s. The performance of the most recent NCC prototype was tested using cosmic rays, which deposit close to the lowest energies the NCC needs to measure. We find that the dynamic range of the NCC is within design specifications. Additionally, different methods to reconstruct the energy from the measured signal pulses were studied which will help in optimizing the pulse shaping for the next prototype.

  8. Photosensor test station for the Mu2e electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzullo, G.; Mu2e Calorimeter Group

    2015-03-01

    The Mu2e experiment searches for coherent, neutrinoless conversion of muons into electrons in the field of a nucleus. The Mu2e measurement will have a sensitivity of fews parts in 10^{-17} , with an improvement of a factor of 10^3{-}10^4 with respect to the existing limits. The Mu2e apparatus takes advantage of the high intensity muon beam which hits muon stopping targets, and uses a detector composed of a low-mass straw tubes tracker and an electromagnetic calorimeter. The calorimeter is made of 1860 hexagonal crystals read out by two large area photosensors, for a total of 3720 channels. Two options of photosensors are currently under study: large-area Avalanche Photo Diodes (APDs) and Silicon Photo Multipliers (SiPMs). A photosensor test station has been developed in Pisa, in collaboration with the LNF Mu2e group, in order to validate the photosensors performance. In particular the following characteristics are carefully studied: gain vs. bias voltage, gain vs. temperature, gain vs. light source position and dark current characterization.

  9. Imaging pion showers with the CALICE analogue hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Feege, N.

    2011-07-01

    The CALICE collaboration investigates different technology options for highly granular calorimeters for detectors at a future electron-positron collider. One of the devices constructed and tested by the collaboration is a 1 m{sup 3} prototype for an imaging scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter for hadrons with analogue readout (AHCAL). The light from 7608 small scintillator cells is detected with silicon photomultipliers. The AHCAL has been successfully operated during electron and hadron test-beam measurements at DESY, CERN, and Fermilab since 2005. The collected data allow for evaluating the novel technologies employed. In addition, these data provide a valuable basis for validating pion cascade simulations. This paper presents the current status of comparisons between the AHCAL data and predictions from different Monte Carlo models implemented in GEANT4. The comparisons cover the total visible energy, longitudinal and radial shower profiles, and the shower substructure. Furthermore, this paper discusses a software compensation algorithm for improving the energy resolution of the AHCAL for single pions. (authors)

  10. Construction and operation of a drift-collection calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Ambats, I.; Ayres, D.S.; Dawson, J.W.; Hoftiezer, J.H.; Mann, W.A.; May, E.N.; Pearson, N.M.; Price, L.E.; Sivaprasad, K.; Solomey, N.

    1984-01-01

    Large areas planar drift chambers with long drift distance (up to 50 cm) have been developed for possible use in the new Soudan 2 nucleon decay detector. Design goals included fine sampling to determine the topology of complex events with several low-energy tracks. The large scale of the experiment (> 1000 metric tons) required large area inexpensive chambers, which also had good position resolution and multi-track separation. The chambers were to be installed between thin sheets of steel to form a finegrained detector. A second goal was the sampling of dE/dx with each position measurement, in order to determine the direction and particle identity of each track. In this paper we report on the construction and operation of a prototype dectector consisting of 50 chambers, separated by 3 mm-thick steel plates. Readout of drift time and pulse height from anode wires and an orthogonal grid of bussed cathode pads utilized 6-bit flash ADC's. This application of the drift-collection calorimeter technique to a nucleon decay detector follows the investigation by a number of groups of calorimeters for high energy detectors based on long drifting.

  11. Development of a semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Venkata Krishnan, R.; Jogeswararao, G.; Parthasarathy, R.; Premalatha, S.; Prabhakar Rao, J.; Gunasekaran, G.; Ananthasivan, K.

    2014-12-15

    A semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter has been indigenously developed. The measurement system comprises modules for sensitive temperature measurement probe, signal processing, data collection, and joule calibration. The sensitivity of the temperature measurement module was enhanced by using a sensitive thermistor coupled with a lock-in amplifier based signal processor. A microcontroller coordinates the operation and control of these modules. The latter in turn is controlled through personal computer (PC) based custom made software developed with LabView. An innovative summing amplifier concept was used to cancel out the base resistance of the thermistor. The latter was placed in the dewar. The temperature calibration was carried out with a standard platinum resistance (PT100) sensor coupled with an 8½ digit multimeter. The water equivalent of this calorimeter was determined by using electrical calibration with the joule calibrator. The experimentally measured values of the quantum of heat were validated by measuring heats of dissolution of pure KCl (for endotherm) and tris (hydroxyl methyl) amino-methane (for exotherm). The uncertainity in the measurements was found to be within ±3%.

  12. Performance And Operation of the BaBar Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, A.M.; /Texas U.

    2011-11-23

    The performance and operation of the CsI(Tl) crystal calorimeter of the BABAR detector during the last years of operation is discussed. The BABAR detector is located at the PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). PEP-II is an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -}-collider operating mainly at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. This corresponds to the mass of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, which decays exclusively into B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} and B{sup +}B{sup -} pairs. One main physics goal of the BABAR experiment was the measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in the decay of neutral B-mesons. Other goals of the experiment include precision measurements of the decays of bottom mesons to charm and {tau} leptons, as well as searches for rare decays utilizing the high luminosity delivered by the PEP-II accelerator. The BABAR detector (Fig 1) consists of 6 subdetectors. Starting from the interaction point and moving radially outwards there is a Silicon Vertex Detector, Drift Chamber, DRC (Cherenkov detector), an Electromagnetic Calorimeter, and an Instrumented Flux Return.

  13. Cryogenic Tests of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, J.; Fabre, C.; Passardi, G.; Chalifour, M.

    2006-04-27

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter consists of the barrel and two end-cap detectors housed in three independent cryostats filled with a total volume of 78 m3 of liquid argon. During cool-down the temperature differences in the composite structure of the detectors must be kept within strict limits to avoid excessive mechanical stresses and relative displacements. During normal operation the formation of gas bubbles, which are detrimental to the functioning of the detector, must be prevented and temperature gradients of less than 0.7 K across the argon bath are mandatory due to the temperature dependence of the energy measurements. Between April 2004 and May 2005 the barrel (120 t) and one end-cap (219 t) underwent qualification tests at the operating temperature of 87.3 K using a dedicated test facility at ground level. These tests provided a validation of the cooling methods to be adopted in the final underground configuration. In total 6.9 GJ and 15.7 GJ were extracted from the calorimeters and a temperature uniformity of the argon bath of less than 0.4 K was achieved.

  14. Construction and operation of a drift-collection calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Ambats, I.; Ayres, D.S.; Dawson, J.W.; Hoftiezer, J.H.; Mann, W.A.; May, E.N.; Pearson, N.M.; Price, L.E.; Sivaprasad, K.

    1985-02-01

    Large area planar drift chambers with long drift distances (up to 50 cm) have been developed for possible use in the new Soudan 2 nucleon decay detector. Design goals included fine sampling to determine the topology of complex events with several low-energy tracks. The large scale of the experiment (greater than 1000 metric tons) required large area, inexpensive chambers, which also had good position resolution and multi-track separation. The chambers were to be installed between thin sheets of steel to form a finegrained detector. A second goal was the sampling of dE/dx with each position measurement, in order to determine the direction and particle identity of each track. In this paper we report on the construction and operation of a prototype detector consisting of 50 chambers, separated by 3 mm-thick steel plates. Readout of drift time and pulse height from anode wires and an orthogonal grid of bussed cathode pads utilized 6-bit flash ADC's. This application of the drift-collection calorimeter technique to a nucleon decay detector/sup 1/ follows the investigation by a number of groups/sup 2 -4/ of calorimeters for high energy detectors based on long drifting.

  15. Floating data acquisition system for microwave calorimeter measurements on MTX

    SciTech Connect

    Sewall, N.R.; Meassick, S. )

    1989-09-13

    A microwave calorimeter has been designed for making 140-GHz absorption measurements on the MTX. Measurement of the intensity and spatial distribution of the FEL-generated microwave beam on the inner wall will indicate the absorption characteristics of the plasma when heated with a 140 GHz FEL pulse. The calorimeter works by monitoring changes of temperature in silicon carbide tiles located on the inner wall of the tokamak. Thermistors are used to measure the temperature of each tile. The tiles are located inside the tokamak about 1 cm outside of the limiter radius at machine potential. The success of this measurement depends on our ability to float the data acquisition system near machine potential and isolate it from the rest of the vault ground system. Our data acquisition system has 48 channels of thermistor signal conditioning, a multiplexer and digitizer section, a serial data formatter, and a fiber-optic transmitter to send the data out. Additionally, we bring timing signals to the interface through optical fibers to tell it when to begin measurement, while maintaining isolation. The receiver is an HP 200 series computer with a serial data interface; the computer provides storage and local display for the shot temperature profile. Additionally, the computer provides temporary storage of the data until it can be passed to a shared resource management system for archiving. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  16. LED Monitoring System of the Phenix Muon Piston Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motschwiller, Steven

    2010-11-01

    The Muon Piston Calorimeter in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC has a monitoring system consisting of LEDs and PIN diodes to calibrate out the time dependent changes to the detector. The LEDs track the temperature and radiation-damage changes to the response of the MPC, while the absolute calibration can be done using 0̂ decays. To execute this, LEDs flash light through the PbWO4 crystal to the Avalanche Photo Diodes The MPC is made up of 416 independent electromagnetic calorimeter towers. By using the LEDs we can correct for changes in the gains of each tower in the MPC, on a run by run basis. Because the LED value only gives a relative measurement of the gain over time, this method of calibration can only be used in conjunction with absolute calibrations provided by 0̂ decays or by minimum ionizing peaks . This work will be used to make a final measurement on Transverse energy at √sNN = 200 GV in Au+Au collisions.

  17. Development of a semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Krishnan, R.; Jogeswararao, G.; Parthasarathy, R.; Premalatha, S.; Prabhakar Rao, J.; Gunasekaran, G.; Ananthasivan, K.

    2014-12-01

    A semi-adiabatic isoperibol solution calorimeter has been indigenously developed. The measurement system comprises modules for sensitive temperature measurement probe, signal processing, data collection, and joule calibration. The sensitivity of the temperature measurement module was enhanced by using a sensitive thermistor coupled with a lock-in amplifier based signal processor. A microcontroller coordinates the operation and control of these modules. The latter in turn is controlled through personal computer (PC) based custom made software developed with LabView. An innovative summing amplifier concept was used to cancel out the base resistance of the thermistor. The latter was placed in the dewar. The temperature calibration was carried out with a standard platinum resistance (PT100) sensor coupled with an 8½ digit multimeter. The water equivalent of this calorimeter was determined by using electrical calibration with the joule calibrator. The experimentally measured values of the quantum of heat were validated by measuring heats of dissolution of pure KCl (for endotherm) and tris (hydroxyl methyl) amino-methane (for exotherm). The uncertainity in the measurements was found to be within ±3%.

  18. Latent myofascial trigger points.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2011-10-01

    A latent myofascial trigger point (MTP) is defined as a focus of hyperirritability in a muscle taut band that is clinically associated with local twitch response and tenderness and/or referred pain upon manual examination. Current evidence suggests that the temporal profile of the spontaneous electrical activity at an MTP is similar to focal muscle fiber contraction and/or muscle cramp potentials, which contribute significantly to the induction of local tenderness and pain and motor dysfunctions. This review highlights the potential mechanisms underlying the sensory-motor dysfunctions associated with latent MTPs and discusses the contribution of central sensitization associated with latent MTPs and the MTP network to the spatial propagation of pain and motor dysfunctions. Treating latent MTPs in patients with musculoskeletal pain may not only decrease pain sensitivity and improve motor functions, but also prevent latent MTPs from transforming into active MTPs, and hence, prevent the development of myofascial pain syndrome.

  19. Gravity triggered neutrino condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2010-11-01

    In this work we use the Schwinger-Dyson equations to study the possibility that an enhanced gravitational attraction triggers the formation of a right-handed neutrino condensate, inducing dynamical symmetry breaking and generating a Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrino at a scale appropriate for the seesaw mechanism. The composite field formed by the condensate phase could drive an early epoch of inflation. We find that to the lowest order, the theory does not allow dynamical symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, thanks to the large number of matter fields in the model, the suppression by additional powers in G of higher order terms can be compensated, boosting them up to their lowest order counterparts. This way chiral symmetry can be broken dynamically and the infrared mass generated turns out to be in the expected range for a successful seesaw scenario.

  20. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  1. The CMS high level trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running on the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. Here we will present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simpler single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We will discuss the optimisation of the triggers and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  2. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  3. Construction and commissioning of a technological prototype of a high-granularity semi-digital hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baulieu, G.; Bedjidian, M.; Belkadhi, K.; Berenguer, J.; Boudry, V.; Calabria, P.; Callier, S.; Calvo Almillo, E.; Cap, S.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Cornat, R.; Cortina Gil, E.; de Callatay, B.; Davin, F.; de la Taille, C.; Dellanegra, R.; Delaunay, D.; Doizon, F.; Dulucq, F.; Eynard, A.; Fouz, M.-C.; Gastaldi, F.; Germani, L.; Grenier, G.; Haddad, Y.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J.-C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Manai, K.; Mannai, S.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Prast, J.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Ruan, M.; Schirra, F.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Tytgat, M.; Vander Donckt, M.; Vouters, G.; Zaganidis, N.

    2015-10-01

    A large prototype of 1.3 m3 was designed and built as a demonstrator of the semi-digital hadronic calorimeter (SDHCAL) concept proposed for the future ILC experiments. The prototype is a sampling hadronic calorimeter of 48 units. Each unit is built of an active layer made of 1 m2 Glass Resistive Plate Chamber (GRPC) detector placed inside a cassette whose walls are made of stainless steel. The cassette contains also the electronics used to read out the GRPC detector. The lateral granularity of the active layer is provided by the electronics pick-up pads of 1 cm2 each. The cassettes are inserted into a self-supporting mechanical structure built also of stainless steel plates which, with the cassettes walls, play the role of the absorber. The prototype was designed to be very compact and important efforts were made to minimize the number of services cables to optimize the efficiency of the Particle Flow Algorithm techniques to be used in the future ILC experiments. The different components of the SDHCAL prototype were studied individually and strict criteria were applied for the final selection of these components. Basic calibration procedures were performed after the prototype assembling. The prototype is the first of a series of new-generation detectors equipped with a power-pulsing mode intended to reduce the power consumption of this highly granular detector. A dedicated acquisition system was developed to deal with the output of more than 440000 electronics channels in both trigger and triggerless modes. After its completion in 2011, the prototype was commissioned using cosmic rays and particles beams at CERN.

  4. An analysis of calibration curve models for solid-state heat-flow calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Hypes, P. A.; Bracken, D. S.; McCabe, G.

    2001-01-01

    Various calibration curve models for solid-state calorimeters are compared to determine which model best fits the calibration data. The calibration data are discussed. The criteria used to select the best model are explained. A conclusion regarding the best model for the calibration curve is presented. These results can also be used to evaluate the random and systematic error of a calorimetric measurement. A linear/quadratic model has been used for decades to fit the calibration curves for wheatstone bridge calorimeters. Excellent results have been obtained using this calibration curve model. The Multical software package uses this model for the calibration curve. The choice of this model is supported by 40 years [1] of calorimeter data. There is good empirical support for the linear/quadratic model. Calorimeter response is strongly linear. Calorimeter sensitivity is slightly lower at higher powers; the negative coefficient of the x{sup 2} term accounts for this. The solid-state calorimeter is operated using the Multical [2] software package. An investigation was undertaken to determine if the linear/quadratic model is the best model for the new sensor technology used in the solid-state calorimeter.

  5. Room-temperature calorimeter for x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T. Kato, M.; Saito, N.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2015-09-15

    We have developed a room-temperature calorimeter for absolute radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. This room-temperature calorimeter is an electrical substitution device based on the equivalence of electrical and radiant heating. Consequently, the measured radiant powers are traceable to electrical standards, i.e., the International System Units (SI). We demonstrated the performance of the room-temperature calorimeter by electrical power measurements (offline tests). In the offline tests, the room-temperature calorimeter was proven to be able to measure external powers up to at least 6.9 mW, which exceeds the upper limit (∼4 mW) of a cryogenic radiometer (the primary standard detector in Japan). In addition, measurement uncertainties of the room-temperature calorimeter were evaluated to be less than 1.0%, which is adequate for the radiant power measurements of x-ray free-electron lasers. An indirect comparison with the cryogenic radiometer was performed using a synchrotron radiation source to confirm the validity of the absolute radiant powers measured with the room-temperature calorimeter. The absolute radiant powers measured by the calorimeter agreed with those measured by the cryogenic radiometer within 0.6%, which is less than the relative standard uncertainty of the comparison (1.0%)

  6. Study on Radiation Condition in DAMPE Orbit by Analyzing the Engineering Data of BGO Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Changqing; Liu, Shubin; Zhang, Yunlong; Ma, Siyuan

    2016-07-01

    The DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientific satellite which was successfully launched into a 500 Km sun-synchronous orbit, on December 17th, 2015, from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center of China. The major scientific objectives of the DAMPE mission are primary cosmic ray, gamma ray astronomy and dark matter particles, by observing high energy primary cosmic rays, especially positrons/electrons and gamma rays with an energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. The BGO calorimeter is a critical sub-detector of DAMPE payload, for measuring the energy of cosmic particles, distinguishing positrons/electrons and gamma rays from hadron background, and providing trigger information. It utilizes 308 BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) crystal logs with the size of 2.5cm*2.5cm*60cm for each log, to form a total absorption electromagnetic calorimeter. All the BGO logs are stacked in 14 layers, with each layer consisting of 22 BGO crystal logs and each log is viewed by two Hamamatsu R5610A PMTs (photomultiplier tubes), from both sides respectively. In order to achieve a large dynamic range, each PMT base incorporates a three dynode (2, 5, 8) pick off, which results in 616 PMTs and 1848 signal channels. The readout electronics system, which consists of 16 FEE (Front End Electronics) modules, was developed. Its main functions are based on the Flash-based FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) chip and low power, 32-channel VA160 and VATA160 ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits) for precisely measuring the charge of PMT signals and providing "hit" signals as well. The hit signals are sent to the trigger module of PDPU (Payload Data Process Unit) and the hit rates of each layer is real-timely recorded by counters and packed into the engineering data, which directly reflect the flux of particles which fly into or pass through the detectors. In order to mitigate the SEU (Single Event Upset) effect in radioactive space environment, certain protecting methods, such as TMR

  7. Central Calorimeter configuration: A study report to the SDC Technical Board

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, T.B.W.; Wicklund, A.B.

    1991-04-11

    The single most important determinant of the overall Central Calorimeter (CC) shape is the criterion for depth of hadron shower containment. This criterion and its rapidity dependence is discussed in a companion document to this report titled ``Depth Requirements in SSC Calorimeters`` by a D. Green et al., SDC-91-00016. The conclusion reached there is that the calorimeter should be 10 {lambda} thick at {eta} = 0 and increase smoothly to 12 {lambda} at {eta} = 3. We adopt this criterion in this report and discuss the mechanical properties and design details of a CC that meets this condition.

  8. The ATIC Experiment: Performance of the Scintillator Hodoscopes and the BGO Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isbert, Joachim; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H.; Ampe, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment had its first flight from Mcmurdo, Antarctica 28/12/2000 to 13/01/2001, local time, recording over 360 hours of data. The design goal of ATIC was to measure the Cosmic Ray composition and energy spectra from approximately 50 GeV to near 100 TeV utilizing a Si-matrix detector, a scintillator hodoscope, carbon targets and a calorimeter consisting of a stack of BGO scintillator crystals. The design, the operations and in-flight performance of the scintillator hodoscope and the BGO calorimeter are described.

  9. The ATIC Experiment : Performance of the Scintillator Hodoscope and the BGO Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isbert, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment had its first flight from McMurdo, Antarctica, 28/12/00 to 13/01/01, recording over 360 hours of data. The design goal for ATIC was to measure the Cosmic Ray composition and energy spectra from approximately 50 GeV to near 100 TeV utilizing a Si-matrix detector, a scintillator hodoscope, carbon targets and a calorimeter consisting of a stack of BGO scintillator crystals. The design, operation, and in-flight performance of the scintillator hodoscope and the BGO calorimeter are described.

  10. Evaluation of a bulk calorimeter and heat balance for determination of supersonic combustor efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclinton, C. R.; Anderson, G. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented from the shakedown and evaluation test of a bulk calorimeter. The calorimeter is designed to quench the combustion at the exit of a direct-connect, hydrogen fueled, scramjet combustor model, and to provide the measurements necessary to perform an analysis of combustion efficiency. Results indicate that the calorimeter quenches reaction, that reasonable response times are obtained, and that the calculated combustion efficiency is repeatable within + or -3 percent and varies in a regular way with combustor model parameters such as injected fuel equivalence ratio.

  11. Design of experiments for measuring heat-transfer coefficients with a lumped-parameter calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to determine optimum experimental conditions for using a lumped-parameter calorimeter to measure heat-transfer coefficients and heating rates. A mathematical model of the transient temperature response of the calorimeter was used with the measured temperature response to predict the heat-transfer coefficient and the rate of heating. A sensitivity analysis was used to determine the optimum transient experiment for simultaneously measuring the heat addition during heating and the convective heat-transfer coefficient during heating and cooling of a lumped-parameter calorimeter. Optimum experiments were also designed for measuring the convective heat-transfer coefficient during both heating and cooling and cooling only.

  12. The design and performance of the electromagnetic calorimeters in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Vardan Tadevosyan, Hamlet Mkrtchyan, Arshak Asaturyan, Arthur Mkrtchyan, Simon Zhamkochyan

    2012-12-01

    The design and performance of the electromagnetic calorimeters in the magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab are presented. For the existing HMS and SOS spectrometers, construction information and comparisons of simulated and experimental results are presented. The design and simulated performance for a new calorimeter to be used in the new SHMS spectrometer is also presented. We have developed and constructed electromagnetic calorimeters from TF-1 type lead-glass blocks for the HMS and SOS magnetic spectrometers at JLab Hall C. The HMS/SOS calorimeters are of identical design and construction except for their total size. Blocks of dimension 10 cm × 10 cm × 70 cm are arranged in four planes and stacked 13 and 11 blocks high in the HMS and SOS respectively. The energy resolution of these calorimeters is better than 6%/√E, and pion/electron (π/e) separation of about 100:1 has been achieved in energy range 1–5 GeV. Good agreement has been observed between the experimental and GEANT4 simulated energy resolutions. The HMS/SOS calorimeters have been used nearly in all Hall C experiments, providing good energy resolution and a high pion suppression factor. No significant deterioration in their performance has been observed in the course of use since 1994. For the SHMS spectrometer, presently under construction, details on the calorimeter design and accompanying GEANT4 simulation efforts are given. A Preshower+Shower design was selected as the most cost-effective among several design choices. The preshower will consist of a layer of 28 modules with TF-1 type lead glass radiators, stacked in two columns. The shower part will consist of 224 modules with F-101 type lead glass radiators, stacked in a “fly's eye” configuration of 14 columns and 16 rows. The active area of 120 × 130 cm(2) will encompass the beam envelope at the calorimeter. The anticipated performance of the new calorimeter is simulated over the full momentum range of the SHMS, predicting

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of a Multichannel 3D Thermopile for Chip Calorimeter Applications

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Tho Phuoc; Zhang, Yilei; Yehuda, Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Thermal sensors based on thermopiles are some of the most robust and popular temperature sensing technologies across industries and research disciplines. A chip calorimeter with a 3D thermopile layout with a large sensing area and multichannel capacity has been developed, which is highly desired for many applications requiring large reaction chambers or high throughputs, such as biofilm research, drug screening, etc. The performance of the device, including temperature sensitivity and heat power sensitivity, was evaluated. The capability to split the chip calorimeter to multiple channels was also demonstrated, which makes the chip calorimeter very flexible and powerful in many applications. PMID:25654716

  14. Operation of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters at sLHC luminosities: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Atlas Liquid Argon Hilum Group

    2010-05-01

    The expected increase of luminosity at sLHC by a factor of ten with respect to LHC luminosities has serious consequences for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters in the end-cap (EMEC, HEC) and in the forward region (FCAL). Small modules of each type of calorimeter have been built and exposed to a high intensity (up to 10 12 pps) proton beam of 60 GeV at IHEP/Protvino. The correlation between beam intensity and the read-out signal has been studied. Also, the dependence of the HV currents as well as calorimeter module temperature on the beam intensity has been measured.

  15. Performance of the BGO endcap calorimeter with phototriode readout for the CMD-2 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, D.N.; Akhmetshin, R.R.; Beschastnov, P.M.; Fedorenko, V.E.; Pyata, E.E.; Smakhtin, V.P.; Yudin, Yu.V.; Shlegel, V.N.; Vasiliev, Ya.V.

    1995-08-01

    The endcap calorimeter of the CMD-2 detector for the VEPP-2M collider is described. The calorimeter contains 680 BGO crystals read out by vacuum phototriodes. Charge sensitive preamplifiers are placed directly on the phototriodes for the best noise performance. The calorimeter was installed during the last year. Calibration by cosmic rays showed the energy equivalent of the electronic noise to be about 0.9 MeV during operation in a 1 T magnetic field which corresponds to the design value.

  16. Installation, commissioning and operation of the tile hadron calorimeter of ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenschein, Ulla

    2007-03-01

    Within the ATLAS experiment at the pp-collider LHC at CERN, the Tile Hadron Calorimeter is the first subdetector to be assembled, commissioned and operated. The calorimeter has successfully been deployed in the ATLAS cavern. The installation of the services and the routing of connections is in progress. The final certification of the front-end electronics has started, using both a temporary and the final back-end. Cosmic muons are used to test the performance and alignment of the whole calorimeter. In parallel, the integration with other ATLAS systems has started.

  17. Correlated observations of three triggered lightning flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idone, V. P.; Orville, R. E.; Hubert, P.; Barret, L.; Eybert-Berard, A.

    1984-01-01

    Three triggered lightning flashes, initiated during the Thunderstorm Research International Program (1981) at Langmuir Laboratory, New Mexico, are examined on the basis of three-dimensional return stroke propagation speeds and peak currents. Nonlinear relationships result between return stroke propagation speed and stroke peak current for 56 strokes, and between return stroke propagation speed and dart leader propagation speed for 32 strokes. Calculated linear correlation coefficients include dart leader propagation speed and ensuing return stroke peak current (32 strokes; r = 0.84); and stroke peak current and interstroke interval (69 strokes; r = 0.57). Earlier natural lightning data do not concur with the weak positive correlation between dart leader propagation speed and interstroke interval. Therefore, application of triggered lightning results to natural lightning phenomena must be made with certain caveats. Mean values are included for the three-dimensional return stroke propagation speed and for the three-dimensional dart leader propagation speed.

  18. Calibration of BGO Calorimeter of the DAMPE in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explore (DAMPE) is a satellite based experiment which launched on December 2015 and aims at indirect searching for dark matter by measuring the spectra of high energy e±, γ from 5GeV up to 10TeV originating from deep space. The 3D imaging BGO calorimeter of DAMPE was designed to precisely measurement the primary energy of the electromagnetic particle and provides a highly efficient rejection of the hadronic background by reconstruct the longitudinal and lateral profiles of showers. To achieve the expected accuracy on the energy measurement, each signal channel has to be calibrated. The energy equalization is performed using the signal that Minimum Ionizing Particles (MIP) leave in each BGO bar, the MIPs measurement method with orbit data and, data quality, time stability using MIPs data will be presented, too.

  19. Hadron shower decomposition in a highly granular calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadeeva, Marina; CALICE Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The spatial development of showers induced by positive hadrons with momenta 10-80 GeV in the highly granular CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadronic calorimeter is analysed. The parametrisation of both longitudinal and radial shower profiles with the two- component functions are fit to the test beam data and simulations using the physics lists QGSP_BERT and FTFP_BERT from GEANT4 version 9.6 patch 01. The shower parameters, describing the longitudinal tail and radial halo, are in good agreement between data and simulations and are similar for pions and protons. For the longitudinal development, the most significant difference between data and simulations is in the relative containment of the separated components. For the radial development, the core slope parameter is underestimated by simulations. The physics list FTFP_BERT gives a very good description of proton showers in the studied energy range and gives better predictions of the pion shower development than QGSP_BERT.

  20. Web system to support analysis of the Tile Calorimeter commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidantchik, C.; Faria, A.; Grael, F. F.; Ferreira, F. G.; Galvão, K. K.; Dotti, A.; Solans, C.; Price, L.

    2008-07-01

    This article describes the set of computer systems that support the data analysis and quality control during the Tile Calorimeter commissioning phase. The Tile Commissioning Web System (TCWS) encapsulates the steps to retrieve information, execute programs, access the outcomes, register statements and verify the equipment status. TCWS integrates different applications, each one presenting a particular view of the commissioning process. The TileComm Analysis stores plots and analysis results, provides equipment-oriented visualization, collects information regarding the equipment performance, and outlines its status in each test. The Timeline application provides the equipment status history in a chronological way. The Web Interface for Shifters supports monitoring tasks by managing test parameters, graphical views of the detector's performance, and information status of all equipment that was used in each test. The DCS Web System provides a standard way to verify the behaviour of power sources and the cooling system.

  1. The magnetized steel and scintillator calorimeters of the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, : D.G.

    2008-05-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment uses an accelerator-produced neutrino beam to perform precision measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the 'atmospheric neutrino' sector associated with muon neutrino disappearance. This long-baseline experiment measures neutrino interactions in Fermilab's NuMI neutrino beam with a near detector at Fermilab and again 735 km downstream with a far detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. The two detectors are magnetized steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. They are designed to be as similar as possible in order to ensure that differences in detector response have minimal impact on the comparisons of event rates, energy spectra and topologies that are essential to MINOS measurements of oscillation parameters. The design, construction, calibration and performance of the far and near detectors are described in this paper.

  2. The Electron Calorimeter (ECAL) Long Duration Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Binns, W. R.; Chang, J.; Cherry, M. L.; Christl, M.; Dowkontt, P.; Ellison, B.; Isbert, J. B.; Israel, M. H.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Panov, A.; Sokolskaya, N.; Stewart, M.; Watts, J.; Wefel, P.; Zatsepin, V.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the cosmic ray electron energy spectrum in the energy region 50 GeV to greater than 1 TeV may reveal structure caused by the annihilation of exotic dark matter particles and/or individual cosmic ray sources. Here we describe a new long duration balloon (LDB) experiment, ECAL, optimized to directly measure cosmic ray electrons up to several TeV. ECAL includes a double layer silicon matrix, a scintillating optical fiber track imager, a neutron detector and a fully active calorimeter to identify more than 90% of the incident electrons with an energy resolution of about 1.7% while misidentifying only 1 in 200,000 protons and 0.8% of secondary gamma rays as electrons. Two ECAL flights in Antarctica are planned for a total exposure of 50 days with the first flight anticipate for December 2009.

  3. Finite element analysis of the SDC barrel and endcap calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.; Hill, N.; Nasiakta, J.

    1992-03-11

    In designing the SCD barrel and endcap calorimeters, the inter-module connecting forces must be known in order to determine the required size and number of connecting links between modules, and in order to understand how individual modules will be affected by these forces when assembled to form a full barrel and endcap. The connecting forces were found by analyzing three-dimensional Finite Element Models of both the barrel and endcap. This paper is divided into two parts, the first part will describe in detail the results of the barrel analysis and the second part will describe the results obtained from the endcap analysis. A similar approach was used in constructing the models for both analysis.

  4. A high precision calorimeter for the SOX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, L.; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Caminata, A.; Cereseto, R.; Di Noto, L.; Farinon, S.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Schönert, S.; Testera, G.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    The SOX (Short distance neutrino Oscillations with BoreXino) experiment is being built to discover or reject eV-scale sterile neutrinos by observing short baseline oscillations of active-to-sterile neutrinos [1]. For this purpose, a 100 kCi 144Ce-144Pr antineutrino generator (CeSOX) will be placed under the BOREXINO detector at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Thanks to its large size and very low background, BOREXINO is an ideal detector to discover or reject eV-scale sterile neutrinos. To reach the maximal sensitivity, we aim at determining the neutrino flux emitted by the antineutrino generator with a < 1 % accuracy. With this goal, TU München and INFN Genova are developing a vacuum calorimeter, which is designed to measure the source-generated heat with high accuracy.

  5. Fusion energy calorimeter for the tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Imel, G.R.

    1981-04-01

    One and two-dimensional neutronic analyses treating the transport and scattering of neutrons and the production and transport of gamma rays in the TFTR demonstrate that the fusion energy production in a D-T pulse in the TFTR can be determined with an uncertainty of +- 15% or less, simply by integrating the measured profile of temperature increase along the central radial axis of a large hydrocarbon moderator that fills the bay between adjacent toroidal-field coils, just outside the vacuum vessel. Limitations in thermopile temperature measurements dictate a minimum fusion-neutron fluence at the vacuum vessel of the order of 10/sup 12/ n/cm/sup 2/ per pulse (a source strength of 10/sup 18/ n/pulse in TFTR), in order that this simple calorimeter can provide useful accuracy.

  6. Design of Refractory Metal Life Test Heat Pipe and Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Reid, R. S.; Bragg-Sitton, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Heat pipe life tests have seldom been conducted on a systematic basis. Typically, one or more heat pipes are built and tested for an extended period at a single temperature with simple condenser loading. Results are often reported describing the wall material, working fluid, test temperature, test duration, and occasionally the nature of any failure. Important information such as design details, processing procedures, material assay, power throughput, and radial power density are usually not mentioned. We propose to develop methods to generate carefully controlled data that conclusively establish heat pipe operating life with material-fluid combinations capable of extended operation. The test approach detailed in this Technical Publication will use 16 Mo-44.5%Re alloy/sodium heat pipe units that have an approximate12-in length and 5/8-in diameter. Two specific test series have been identified: (1) Long-term corrosion rates based on ASTM-G-68-80 (G-series) and (2) corrosion trends in a cross-correlation sequence at various temperatures and mass fluences based on a Fisher multifactor design (F-series). Evaluation of the heat pipe hardware will be performed in test chambers purged with an inert purified gas (helium or helium/argon mixture) at low pressure (10-100 torr) to provide thermal coupling between the heat pipe condenser and calorimeter. The final pressure will be selected to minimize the potential for voltage breakdown between the heat pipe and radio frequency (RF) induction coil (RF heating is currently the planned method of powering the heat pipes). The proposed calorimeter is constructed from a copper alloy and relies on a laminar flow water-coolant channel design to absorb and transport energy

  7. Triggering requirements for SSC physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1989-04-01

    Some aspects of triggering requirements for high P{sub T} physics processes at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are described. A very wide range of trigger types will be required to enable detection of the large number of potential physics signatures possible at the SSC. Although in many cases trigger rates are not now well understood, it is possible to conclude that the ability to trigger on transverse energy, number and energy of jets, number and energy of leptons (electrons and muons), missing energy and combinations of these will be required. An SSC trigger system must be both highly flexible and redundant to ensure reliable detection of many new physics processes at the SSC.

  8. The Laser calibration of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter during the LHC run 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Alexa, C.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Anderson, K. J.; Arabidze, G.; Araque, J. P.; Artamonov, A.; Asquith, L.; Astalos, R.; Backus Mayes, J.; Bartos, P.; Batkova, L.; Bertolucci, F.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Blanco Castro, A.; Blazek, T.; Bohm, C.; Boumediene, D.; Boveia, A.; Brown, H.; Busato, E.; Calkins, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Carli, T.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castro, N. F.; Cavasinni, V.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Chadelas, R.; Chakraborty, D.; Chekanov, S.; Chen, X.; Chikovani, L.; Choudalakis, G.; Cinca, D.; Ciubancan, M.; Clement, C.; Cole, S.; Constantinescu, S.; Costin, T.; Crouau, M.; Crozatier, C.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Darmora, S.; Davidek, T.; Del Prete, T.; Dita, S.; Djobava, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dotti, A.; Dubreuil, E.; Dunford, M.; Eriksson, D.; Errede, S.; Errede, D.; Faltova, J.; Farbin, A.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Feng, E. J.; Ferrer, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Francavilla, P.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Galhardo, B.; Gellerstedt, K.; Ghodbane, N.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giokaris, N.; Glonti, G. L.; Gomes, A.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Grenier, P.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Guicheney, C.; Hakobyan, H.; Hard, A. S.; Harkusha, S.; Heelan, L.; Helsens, C.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Hernandez, C. M.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hurwitz, M.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jennens, D.; Johansson, K. E.; Jon-And, K.; Jorge, P. M.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kapliy, A.; Karpov, S. N.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Khandanyan, H.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H.; Klimek, P.; Korolkov, I.; Kruse, A.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Lafarguette, P.; Lambert, D.; LeCompte, T.; Leitner, R.; Leone, S.; Liao, H.; Lie, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Lundberg, O.; Magalhaes Martins, P. J.; Maio, A.; Makouski, M.; Maneira, J.; Filho, L. Manhaes de Andrade; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Martin, B.; Mchedlidze, G.; Meehan, S.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meoni, E.; Merritt, F. S.; Meyer, C.; Miller, D. W.; Milstead, D. A.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mir, L. M.; Molander, S.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Mosidze, M.; Myagkov, A. G.; Nemecek, S.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nilsson, P.; Nodulman, L.; Nordkvist, B.; Ohm, C. C.; Olariu, A.; Oleiro Seabra, L. F.; Onofre, A.; Oreglia, M. J.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Pedro, R.; Martins, F. M. Pedro; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pina, J.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Podlyski, F.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Poveda, J.; Pravahan, R.; Pribyl, L.; Price, L. E.; Proudfoot, J.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Rossetti, V.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Santoni, C.; Santos, H.; Saraiva, J. G.; Says, L. P.; Schwartzman, A.; Scuri, F.; Shimizu, S.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Solans, C. A.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Spalla, M.; Stanek, R. W.; Starchenko, E. A.; Starovoitov, P.; Stavina, P.; Stoicea, G.; Succurro, A.; Suhr, C.; Sumida, T.; Sykora, I.; Tas, P.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tokár, S.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tudorache, V.; Tudorache, A.; Tuggle, J. M.; Tylmad, M.; Usai, G.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Vazeille, F.; Veloso, F.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Viret, S.; Volpi, M.; Wang, C.; Weng, Z.; White, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Yanush, S.; Yoshida, R.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, Y.; Zinonos, Z.; Zutshi, V.; Ženiš, T.; van Woerden, M. C.

    2016-10-01

    This article describes the Laser calibration system of the ATLAS hadronic Tile Calorimeter that has been used during the run 1 of the LHC . First, the stability of the system associated readout electronics is studied. It is found to be stable with variations smaller than 0.6 %. Then, the method developed to compute the calibration constants, to correct for the variations of the gain of the calorimeter photomultipliers, is described. These constants were determined with a statistical uncertainty of 0.3 % and a systematic uncertainty of 0.2 % for the central part of the calorimeter and 0.5 % for the end-caps. Finally, the detection and correction of timing mis-configuration of the Tile Calorimeter using the Laser system are also presented.

  9. Specific features of thermocouple calorimeter application for measurements of pulsed X-ray emission from plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, V. V.; Fasakhov, I. K.

    2012-01-15

    It is shown that the accuracy of time-integrated measurements of pulsed X-ray emission from hot plasma with calibrated thermocouple calorimeters is mainly determined by two factors. The first and the most important factor is heating of the filter by the absorbed X-rays; as a result, the calorimeter measures the thermal radiation of the filter, which causes appreciable distortion of the temporal profile and amplitude of the recorded signal. The second factor is the dependence of the effective depth of X-ray absorption in the dielectric that covers the entrance window of the calorimeter on the energy of X-ray photons, i.e., on the recorded radiation spectrum. The results of model calculations of the calorimeter signal are compared with the experimental data.

  10. Modification of an oxygen bomb calorimeter to measure enthalpies of reaction of liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Carling, R W

    1978-10-01

    Modification of a commercially available oxygen bomb calorimeter is described. This modification permits direct determination of the enthalpies of reaction of liquid metals that have melting points below about 310 K. PMID:18698983

  11. Investigation of the avalanche photodiodes for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter operated at high gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiters, K.; Diemoz, M.; Godinovic, N.; Ingram, Q.; Longo, E.; Montecchi, M.; Musienko, Y.; Nicol, S.; Patel, B.; Renker, D.; Reucroft, S.; Rusack, R.; Sakhelashvili, T.; Singovski, A.; Soric, I.; Swain, J.; Vikas, P.

    2001-04-01

    Avalanche Photodiodes (APD) with improved characteristics were developed by Hamamatsu Photonics for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the CMS experiment. This report presents measurements of the latest generation of APDs, which are capable to operate at high gains (˜2000).

  12. The Liquid Xenon Scintillation Calorimeter of the MEG Experiment:. Operation of a Large Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorelli, Giovanni

    2005-02-01

    The MEG experiment at PSI will search for the μ → eγ decay well below the present experimental limit (BR < 1.2 × 10-11). The detection of the 52.8 MeV photon in the experiment will be done by an innovative liquid Xenon calorimeter in which only the information provided by the scintillation light is used for the photon energy and position reconstruction. The major issues concerning this calorimeter, such as transparency to scintillation light and PMT behaviour at low temperature, will be reviewed. The calorimeter has been extensively tested with various particles: α-sources, cosmic ray muons and electrons. Recently a test with high energy photons from π0 decays has been carried out at PSI: the calorimeter response to photons in an energy range very close to the final experimental conditions will be presented.

  13. Experimental results and experience with the KfK-tritium-calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kapulla, H.; Heine, R.

    1995-10-01

    For the tritium assay at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) which started operation in Nov.94 an isothermal shield calorimeter was built. The calibration of the calorimeter was performed with an electrically heated simulator covering the range between 1 mW and about 2 W. After the calibration tritium activities in four Amersham uranium getter containers were determined. The excellent reproducibility and high precision of the measurements with the KfK-calorimeter was shown. The tritium activity inventories could be determined with relative standard deviations from the average value of the order of 0.01% to 0.1% depending on the activity level. These results demonstrate the suitability of the KfK-calorimeter as a nondestructive method for a careful assay of tritium. 3 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Simultaneous operation of a liquid argon detector as bubble chamber and calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berset, J. C.; Burns, M.; Harigel, G.; Lindsay, J.; Linser, G.; Schenk, F.

    1982-12-01

    The first successful operation of a new detector, filled with liquid argon is described. It can be used simultaneously as bubble chamber and calorimeter, and may find interesting applications at high-energy accelerators.

  15. The analog processing system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter for SLD at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.M.; Nelson, D.; Freytag, D.R.

    1986-09-01

    The analog processing system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter for the SLD project at SLAC is described. Amplification, storage of the analog information, and multiplexing is realized on specially developed hybrids, which will be mounted directly on the detector. This leads to a substantial reduction of the cable plant. Test results for the amplifier and for the sampling and multiplexing hybrid (CDU hybrid) are presented. The latter hybird contains a custom monolithic device, the Calorimeter Data Unit (CDU).

  16. Hadronic Shower Validation Experience for the ATLAS End-Cap Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryunin, A. E.; Salihagić, D.

    2007-03-01

    Validation of GEANT4 hadronic physics models is carried out by comparing experimental data from beam tests of modules of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters with GEANT4 based simulations. Two physics lists (LHEP and QGSP) for the simulation of hadronic showers are evaluated. Calorimeter performance parameters like the energy resolution and response for charged pions and shapes of showers are studied. Comparison with GEANT3 predictions is done as well.

  17. GEANT4 physics evaluation with testbeam data of the ATLAS hadronic end-cap calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryunin, A. E.; Oberlack, H.; Salihagić, D.; Schacht, P.; Strizenec, P.

    2009-04-01

    The validation of GEANT4 physics models is done by comparing experimental data from beam tests of modules of the ATLAS hadronic end-cap calorimeter with GEANT4 based simulations. Various physics lists for the simulation of hadronic showers are evaluated. We present results of studies of the calorimeter performance parameters (like energy resolution and shower shapes) as well as results of investigations of the influence of the Birks' law and of cuts on the time of development of hadronic showers.

  18. Hadronic Shower Validation Experience for the ATLAS End-Cap Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryunin, A. E.; Salihagic, D.

    2007-03-19

    Validation of GEANT4 hadronic physics models is carried out by comparing experimental data from beam tests of modules of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters with GEANT4 based simulations. Two physics lists (LHEP and QGSP) for the simulation of hadronic showers are evaluated. Calorimeter performance parameters like the energy resolution and response for charged pions and shapes of showers are studied. Comparison with GEANT3 predictions is done as well.

  19. Development of calorimeters using thin chambers operating in a high gain mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, G.; Cohen, J.; Czyrkowski, H.; Fink, P.; Horwitz, N.; Kalo, J.; Lupu, N.; Majewski, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Mir, R.; Nowak, R.; Revel, D.; Walczak, R.; Walker, J.

    1986-12-01

    A new type of thin multiwire proportional chamber detector operating in a high gain mode has been developed. Its characteristics have been optimized for calorimetric use. Two setups consisting of ten such detectors (electromagnetic calorimeter) interlaced with lead plates of 6 mm thickness and with iron plates of 8 cm thickness (hadron calorimeter) were tested. The characteristics of these detectors operating in calorimetric environments have been investigated and compared with theoretical expectations.

  20. Test and evaluation of an Argonne National Laboratory small sample calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenburg, W.W.

    1981-04-30

    This report provides details of an evaluation made at Mound Facility of the performance of the modified Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) small sample calorimeter (SSC). The goals of this evaluation were to: (1) Determine whether the problems associated with the previous calorimeter were solved. (2) Provide assurance that the procedures and operating characteristics remain valid for the modified instrument. (3) Calibrate the instrument using plutonium-fueled heat standards. (4) Provide recommendations for the operation of this instrument.

  1. Development of the front end electronics for the ZEUS high resolution calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Sippach, W.; Caldwell, A.; Cunitz, H.; Kotz, U.; Moeschen, J.

    1989-02-01

    The development and design of the pipelined data acquisition system for the high resolution ZEUS calorimeter is described. Details of the front end analog card and its performance are given. A description of the custom pipeline and buffer multiplexer chips is given, along with test results for the pipeline chip. In addition, some results are presented for a CCD test system built to evaluate the pipeline principles using the ZEUS calorimeter prototype at the CERN PS.

  2. WE-G-17A-06: A Water Calorimeter for Use in MRI Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    De Prez, L; De Pooter, J; Jansen, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: At VSL, Dutch Metrology Institute, a new water calorimeter was developed with the purpose to replace the existing primary standard for absorbed dose to water in the Netherlands. The new water calorimeter is designed to be operable in medium- to high energy photon beams, electrons, protons as well as MRI integrated linear accelerators. VSL has operated a water calorimeter since 2001. This calorimeter formed the basis for the NCS-18 dosimetry protocol, which is commonly applied by medical physicists in the Netherlands and Belgium. Methods: The unit Gray is the unit of interest for measurement of the absorbed dose to water. Water calorimetry involves the measurement of a small temperature rise (0.24 mK/Gy) with an uncertainty of less than 1 μK/Gy at a temperature of 4 °C. Using extensive multi-physics simulations the new calorimeter's thermal performance was simulated before it was constructed at the end of 2013. With the advent of radiotherapy treatment units incorporating MR imaging the performance of the thermistor temperature sensors were characterized in a 1.5 T magnetic field. Results: A change of thermistor resistance was observed of less than 0.004% as a Result of the magneto-resistance effect in a 1.5 T magnetic field. Although a magneto-resistance effect was detectable, the effect on the temperature response in the water calorimeter was found to be negligible. Conclusion: With the realization of the new calorimeter operable in MRI linacs and designed for use in a variety of beam modalities, VSL is ready for accurate dosimetry in new advanced radiotherapy modalities. Due to the small form factor the calorimeter can be used on location in the actual therapy beam inside a 68 cm linac bore. This work was supported by EMRP grant HLT06. The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union.

  3. A measurement of E/{pi} for a fast lead liquid argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Makowiecki, D.; Gordon, H.A.; Ma, H.; Murtagh, M.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rescia, S.; Abrams, G.S.; Groom, D.E.; Kirsten, F.; Levi, M.; Siegrist, J.; Amako, K.; Inaba, O.; Kondo, T.; Baden, A.R.; Fong, D.; Hadley, N.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A.; Bowen, T.; Forden, G.; Jenkins, E.; Johns, K.; Rutherfoord, J.; Shupe, M.; Burnett, T.; Cook, V.; Davisson, R.; Mockett, P.; Rothberg, J.; Williams, R.W.; Cremaldi, L.; Reidy, J.; Summers, D.; DiGiacomo, N.; Draper, P.; Ferbel, T.; Lobkowicz, F.; Faust, J.; Hauptman, J.; Pang, M.; Gabriel, T.A.; Hagopian, V.; Womersley, J.; Handler, T.; Hitlin, D.; Mulholland, G.T.; Watanabe, Y.; Weerts, H.

    1990-12-31

    The NA34 (HELIOS) calorimeter has measured e/{pi} {congruent} 1.1 in a uranium/liquid argon calorimeter with a shaping time of 135 nsec. Lead may be a viable alternative, but e/{pi} must first be measured at fast shaping times in lead. We re preparing to measure e/{pi} at momenta ranging from 0.5 to 20 GeV/c and with shaping times of 50, 100 and 150 nsec.

  4. Seismology: dynamic triggering of earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2005-10-01

    After an earthquake, numerous smaller shocks are triggered over distances comparable to the dimensions of the mainshock fault rupture, although they are rare at larger distances. Here we analyse the scaling of dynamic deformations (the stresses and strains associated with seismic waves) with distance from, and magnitude of, their triggering earthquake, and show that they can cause further earthquakes at any distance if their amplitude exceeds several microstrain, regardless of their frequency content. These triggering requirements are remarkably similar to those measured in the laboratory for inducing dynamic elastic nonlinear behaviour, which suggests that the underlying physics is similar.

  5. Pulsed thyristor trigger control circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A trigger control circuit is provided for producing firing pulses for the thyristor of a thyristor control system such as a power factor controller. The control circuit overcomes thyristor triggering problems involved with the current lag associated with controlling inductive loads and utilizes a phase difference signal, already present in the power factor controller, in deriving a signal for inhibiting generation of a firing pulse until no load current is flowing from the preceding half cycle and thereby ensuring that the thyristor is triggered on during each half cycle.

  6. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Odom, Susan A.; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  7. Test beam results on the Proton Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Scomparin, E.; Stocco, D.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.

    2006-10-27

    The proton Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZP) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator protons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Since all the spectator protons have the same energy, the calorimeter's response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. The ZP is a spaghetti calorimeter, which collects and measures the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a brass absorber. The details of its construction will be shown. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter and its energy resolution have been studied as a function of the beam energy. Also, the signal uniformity and a comparison between the transverse profile of the hadronic and electromagnetic shower are presented. Moreover, the differences between the calorimeter's responses to protons and pions of the same energy have been investigated, exploiting the proton contamination in the positive pion beams.

  8. Comissioning and calibration of the Zero Degree Calorimeters for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMarco, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicald, C.; Cortese, P.; DeFalco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Ferretti, A.; Floris, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Luparello, G.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Stocco, D.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.; ALICE Collaboration

    2009-04-01

    The Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDCs) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator nucleons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Since all the spectator nucleons have the same energy, the calorimeter reponse is proportional to their umber providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. Two sets of ZDCs are located at opposite sides with respect to the interaction point (I), 116 m away from it Each set consists of a neutron (ZN) calorimeter, placed between the two beam pipes, an a proton (ZP) calorimeter, posioned externally to the outgoing beam pipe. The ZDCs spaghetti calorimeters, which detect the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particle in silica optical fibers embedded in a dense absorber. In summer 2007 the ZN and ZP calorimeters have been placed on a movable platform and then installed in the LHC tunnel. The results of the commissioning studies and in particular the solutions adopted to control the stability of the PMTs response will be shown: light injection with a larser diode and cosmic rays. The foreseen calibration with e.m. dissociation event in Pb-Pb collisions will also be disussed. Finally the it meaurements carried out during the commissining in the LHC tunnel will be presentend.

  9. Monte Carlo Simulation Study of a Differential Calorimeter Measuring the Nuclear Heating in Material Testing Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amharrak, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Carette, M.; Brun, J.; De Vita, C.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.-F.; Guimbal, P.

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are crucial for the study of nuclear materials and fuels under irradiation. The reference measurements of this nuclear heating are especially performed by a differential calorimeter including a graphite sample material. Then these measurements are used for other materials, other geometries, or other experimental conditions in order to predict the nuclear heating and thermal conditions induced in the irradiation devices. This paper will present new simulations with MCNP Monte-Carlo transport code to determine the gamma heating profile inside the calorimeter. The whole complex geometry of the sensor has been considered. We use as an input source in the model, the photon spectra calculated in various positions of CARMEN-1 irradiation program in OSIRIS reactor. After a description of the differential calorimeter device, the MCNP modeling used for the calculations of radial profile of nuclear heating inside the calorimeter elements will be introduced. The obtained results of different simulations will be detailed and discussed in this paper. The charged particle equilibrium inside the calorimeter elements will be studied. Then we will focus on parametric studies of the various components of the calorimeter. The influence of source type will be also took into account. Moreover the influence of the material used for the sample will be described.

  10. Evaluation of the Argonne National Laboratory servo-controlled calorimeter system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    The control system of a replacement mode, twin-bridge, water-bath calorimeter originally built by Mound EG&G Applied Technologies was modified by Argonne National Laboratory. The calorimeter was upgraded with a PC-based computer control and data acquisition system. The system was redesigned to operate in a servo-control mode, and a preheater was constructed to allow pre-equilibration of samples. The instrument was sent to the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory for testing and evaluation of its performance in the field using heat source standards and plutonium process materials. The important parameters for calorimeter operation necessary to satisfy the nuclear materials control and accountability requirements of the Plutonium Facility were evaluated over a period of several months. These parameters include calorimeter stability, measurement precision and accuracy, and average measurement time. The observed measurement precision and accuracy were found to be acceptable for most accountability measurements, although they were slightly larger than the values for calorimeters in routine use at the Plutonium Facility. Average measurement times were significantly shorter than measurement times for identical items in the Plutonium Facility calorimeters. Unexplained shifts in the baseline measurements were observed on numerous occasions. These shifts could lead to substantial measurement errors if they are not very carefully monitored by the operating facility. Detailed results of the experimental evaluation are presented in this report.

  11. Bulk-assay calorimeter: Part 1. System design and operation. Part 2. Calibration and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.B.; Roche, C.T.; Harkness, A.L.; Winslow, G.H.; Youngdahl, G.A.; Lewis, R.N.; Jung, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Bulk-Assay Calorimeter is designed to measure the thermal power emitted by plutonium-containing samples. The sample power range of the instrument is 1.4 to 22.4 W. The instrument package consists of the calorimeter measurement chamber, the control circuit power bin, and the data acquisition system. Two sample preheating chambers and five calorimeter canisters for containing the samples are included. A set of 32 test points which monitor voltages at points within the calorimeter and its control circuitry are accessed by the data acquisition system. The use of the test points is described. System start-up and checkout are described. Sample assay and preheater operation procedures are given. The data acquisition system and data analysis software are described. The calorimeter was calibrated at 23 points with heat sources from 1.4 to 22.4 watts. The combined measurement error varied with sample power from 1.4% to 0.1% over the range of calibration measurements. Circuit diagrams for the calorimeter and schematics for the data acquisition system are included. (LEW)

  12. Fire tests and analyses of a rail cask-sized calorimeter.

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Lopez, Carlos; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Greiner, Miles

    2010-10-01

    Three large open pool fire experiments involving a calorimeter the size of a spent fuel rail cask were conducted at Sandia National Laboratories Lurance Canyon Burn Site. These experiments were performed to study the heat transfer between a very large fire and a large cask-like object. In all of the tests, the calorimeter was located at the center of a 7.93-meter diameter fuel pan, elevated 1 meter above the fuel pool. The relative pool size and positioning of the calorimeter conformed to the required positioning of a package undergoing certification fire testing. Approximately 2000 gallons of JP-8 aviation fuel were used in each test. The first two tests had relatively light winds and lasted 40 minutes, while the third had stronger winds and consumed the fuel in 25 minutes. Wind speed and direction, calorimeter temperature, fire envelop temperature, vertical gas plume speed, and radiant heat flux near the calorimeter were measured at several locations in all tests. Fuel regression rate data was also acquired. The experimental setup and certain fire characteristics that were observed during the test are described in this paper. Results from three-dimensional fire simulations performed with the Cask Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) fire code are also presented. Comparisons of the thermal response of the calorimeter as measured in each test to the results obtained from the CAFE simulations are presented and discussed.

  13. Inflammation: a trigger for acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sager, Hendrik B; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall and a major cause of death worldwide. One of atherosclerosis' most dreadful complications are acute coronary syndromes that comprise ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. We now understand that inflammation substantially contributes to the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atherosclerosis. In this review, we will focus on the role of inflammatory leukocytes, which are the cellular protagonists of vascular inflammation, in triggering disease progression and, ultimately, the destabilization that causes acute coronary syndromes. PMID:27273431

  14. Upgrade of the ATLAS Level-1 Trigger with event topology information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simioni, E.; Artz, S.; Bauβ, B.; Büscher, V.; Jakobi, K.; Kaluza, A.; Kahra, C.; Palka, M.; Reiβ, A.; Schäffer, J.; Schäfer, U.; Schulte, A.; Simon, M.; Tapprogge, S.; Vogel, A.; Zinser, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2015 will collide proton beams with increased luminosity from 1034 up to 3 × 1034cm-2s-1. ATLAS is an LHC experiment designed to measure decay properties of high energetic particles produced in the protons collisions. The higher luminosity places stringent operational and physical requirements on the ATLAS Trigger in order to reduce the 40MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of 1kHz while at the same time, selecting those events with valuable physics meaning. The Level-1 Trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS Trigger, with an output rate of 100kHz and decision latency of less than 2.5µs. It is composed of the Calorimeter Trigger (L1Calo), the Muon Trigger (L1Muon) and the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). By 2015, there will be a new electronics element in the chain: the Topological Processor System (L1Topo system). The L1Topo system consist of a single AdvancedTCA shelf equipped with three L1Topo processor blades. It will make it possible to use detailed information from L1Calo and L1Muon processed in individual state-of-the-art FPGA processors. This allows the determination of angles between jets and/or leptons and calculates kinematic variables based on lists of selected/sorted objects. The system is designed to receive and process up to 6Tb/s of real time data. The paper reports the relevant upgrades of the Level-1 trigger with focus on the topological processor design and commissioning.

  15. Landslide triggering modeling in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari Manesh, Ahoura; Mignan, Arnaud; Giardini, Domenico

    2016-04-01

    Switzerland is prone to hazard interactions due to its mountainous landscape. Historical earthquakes are known to have triggered aftershocks, landslides, rock falls and avalanches, as well as lake tsunamis. Here we present a simple cellular automaton to simulate landslide footprints triggered by both rain and earthquakes. The method is based on the Sandpile model, which dynamics is controlled by the ground slope. Rain levels are approximated by ground water saturation and earthquake-landslide triggering is evaluated using the concept of Newmark displacement. That concept is then modified to estimate stable slopes during shaking at which locations the landslide stops. The cellular automaton is first tested in a virtual region where a parameter sensitivity analysis is made. Then it is tested in a region of Switzerland, where historic landslides triggered by earthquakes are known to have occurred.

  16. Stimuli triggering violence in psychoses.

    PubMed

    Pontius, A A

    1981-01-01

    Various behavioral and neurophysiological models are suggested to objectify and quantify the defense of insanity and to assess dangerousness in someone who is being considered for release from custody. Two cases are presented that show a pattern of specific relationships between traumatic experiences in youth and a later trigger stimulus that releases homicidal action. Until a refined classification system and neurophysiological understanding of sudden aggression can be achieved, forensic psychiatrists should be aware of the psychotic trigger reaction within a clinical psychiatric model.

  17. WE-A-17A-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Development of a Calorimeter for the Measurement of the Power Emitted From LDR Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, M; Palmer, B; DeWerd, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Model-based dose calculation algorithms for brachytherapy sources are designed to compute dose per particle or dose per unit energy leaving the encapsulation of a brachytherapy source. As such, the power leaving the encapsulation of a source, called emitted power (EP), would be a natural source strength metric for these new algorithms. However, no instrument is currently capable of an absolute measurement of EP. A calorimeter operating with a liquid helium thermal sink was designed and constructed to measure the EP of low-dose rate (LDR) I-125 and Pd-103 brachytherapy sources. Methods: Calorimeter design was optimized through thermal and Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. Thermal modeling showed that specific thermal conditions would be necessary for accurate calorimeter measurements. These conditions were experimentally verified. The EP of two LDR I-125 source models was measured. An air-kermastrength (AKS)-to-EP conversion coefficient was determined through MC simulations and applied to well-type ionization chamber measurements of AKS to enable comparison with EP measurements. Results: MCdetermined EP per unit AKS conversion coefficients were source model dependent and are on the order of 0.1 μW/U. The signal-to-noise ratio was a function of source strength, and was 294 for a 0.5 μW source. Measurements were repeatable to within 3.6% for a 0.5 μW source. Initial EP measurements were made with two I-125 source models, a 5.7 U Oncura 6711 and a 2.9 U Best Medical 2301. Model 2301 results agreed with the MC-converted AKS value to within the measurement uncertainty of 4.3% at k=1. The Model 6711 results were systematically high and are under investigation. Conclusion: A calorimeter was designed to provide an absolute measurement of the EP for LDR brachytherapy sources and preliminary EP measurements have been made. This new calorimeter design shows promise of providing a more fundamentally useful source strength standard.

  18. Performance evaluation of a commercially available heat flow calorimeter and applicability assessment for safeguarding special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bracken, D.S.; Biddle, R.; Rudy, C.

    1998-12-31

    The performance characteristics of a commercially available heat-flow calorimeter will be presented. The heat-flow sensors within the calorimeter are based on thermopile technology with a vendor-quoted sensitivity of 150 {micro}V/mW. The calorimeter is a full-twin design to compensate for ambient temperature fluctuations. The efficacy of temperature fluctuation compensations will also be detailed. Finally, an assessment of design applicability to special nuclear materials control and accountability and safeguarding will be presented.

  19. Demonstration of Time Domain Multiplexed Readout for Magnetically Coupled Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porst, J.-P.; Adams, J. S.; Balvin, M.; Bandler, S.; Beyer, J.; Busch, S. E.; Drung, D.; Seidel, G. M.; Smith, S. J.; Stevenson, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically coupled calorimeters (MCC) have extremely high potential for x-ray applications due to the inherent high energy resolution capability and being non-dissipative. Although very high energy-resolution has been demonstrated, until now there has been no demonstration of multiplexed read-out. We report on the first realization of a time domain multiplexed (TDM) read-out. While this has many similarities with TDM of transition-edge-sensors (TES), for MGGs the energy resolution is limited by the SQUID read-out noise and requires the well established scheme to be altered in order to minimize degradation due to noise aliasing effects. In cur approach, each pixel is read out by a single first stage SQUID (SQ1) that is operated in open loop. The outputs of the SQ1 s are low-pass filtered with an array of low cross-talk inductors, then fed into a single-stage SQUID TD multiplexer. The multiplexer is addressed from room temperature and read out through a single amplifier channel. We present results achieved with a new detector platform. Noise performance is presented and compared to expectations. We have demonstrated multiplexed X-ray spectroscopy at 5.9keV with delta_FWHM=10eV. In an optimized setup, we show it is possible to multiplex 32 detectors without significantly degrading the Intrinsic detector resolution.

  20. Temporal Gain Correction for X-ray Calorimeter Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. S.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Fujimoto, R.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; McCammon, D.; Mitsuda, K.; Sawada, M.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Takei, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Tsujimoto, M.; Watanabe, T.; Yamada, S.

    2016-07-01

    Calorimetric X-ray detectors are very sensitive to their environment. The boundary conditions can have a profound effect on the gain including heat sink temperature, the local radiation temperature, bias, and the temperature of the readout electronics. Any variation in the boundary conditions can cause temporal variations in the gain of the detector and compromise both the energy scale and the resolving power of the spectrometer. Most production X-ray calorimeter spectrometers, both on the ground and in space, have some means of tracking the gain as a function of time, often using a calibration spectral line. For small gain changes, a linear stretch correction is often sufficient. However, the detectors are intrinsically non-linear and often the event analysis, i.e., shaping, optimal filters etc., add additional non-linearity. Thus for large gain variations or when the best possible precision is required, a linear stretch correction is not sufficient. Here, we discuss a new correction technique based on non-linear interpolation of the energy-scale functions. Using Astro-H/SXS calibration data, we demonstrate that the correction can recover the X-ray energy to better than 1 part in 104 over the entire spectral band to above 12 keV even for large-scale gain variations. This method will be used to correct any temporal drift of the on-orbit per-pixel gain using on-board calibration sources for the SXS instrument on the Astro-H observatory.