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Sample records for calvert bluff formation

  1. The origin and distribution of HAPs elements in relation to maceral composition of the A1 lignite bed (Paleocene, Calvert Bluff Formation, Wilcox Group), Calvert mine area, east-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, S.S.; Warwick, P.D.; Ruppert, L.F.; Pontolillo, J.

    1997-01-01

    The origin and distribution of twelve potentially Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs; As, Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb Sb, Se, and U) identified in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments were examined in relation to the maceral composition of the A1 bed (Paleocene, Calvert Bluff Formation, Wilcox Group) of the Calvert mine in east-central Texas. The 3.2 m-thick A1 bed was divided into nine incremental channel samples (7 lignite samples and 2 shaley coal samples) on the basis of megascopic characteristics. Results indicate that As, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Sb, and U are strongly correlated with ash yield and are enriched in the shaley coal samples. We infer that these elements are associated with inorganic constituents in the coal bed and may be derived from a penecontemporaneous stream channel located several kilometers southeast of the mining block. Of the HAPs elements studied, Mn and Hg are the most poorly correlated to ash yield. We infer an organic association for Mn; Hg may be associated with pyrite. The rest of the trace elements (Be, Co, and Se) are weakly correlated with ash yield. Further analytical work is necessary to determine the mode of occurrence for these elements. Overall, concentrations of the HAPs elements are generally similar to or less than those reported in previous studies of lignites of the Wilcox Group, east-central region, Texas. Petrographic analysis indicates the following ranges in composition for the seven lignite samples: liptinites (5-8%), huminites (88-95%), and inertinites (trace amounts to 7%). Samples from the middle portion of the A1 bed contain abundant crypto-eugelinite compared to the rest of the samples; this relationship suggests that the degradation of plant material was an important process during the development of the peat mire. With the exception of Hg and Mn, relatively low levels of the HAPs elements studied are found in the samples containing abundant crypto-eugelinite. We infer that the peat-forming environment for this portion

  2. Slope evolution at the Calvert Cliffs, Maryland -- measuring the change from eroding bluffs to stable slopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, Martha; Larsen, Curtis E.; McRae, Michele

    2002-01-01

    Despite a long history of geomorphic studies, it is difficult to ascertain the time required for slopes to change from near vertical exposures to relatively stable slopes due to inadequate age control. Actively eroding coastal bluffs along the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay provide a key for understanding the centennial-scale development of stable slopes from eroding bluff faces. The Calvert Cliffs are composed of sandy silts, silty sands, and clayey silts of Miocene-age. Active wave erosion at the bluff toes encourages rapid sloughing from bluff faces and maintains slope angles of 70-80 degrees and relatively constant bluff-retreat rates. Naturally stabilized slopes are preserved as a fossil bluff line inland from a prograding cuspate foreland at Cove Point. The foreland is migrating southward at a rate of ca. 1.5 m/yr. As it moves south, it progressively protects bluffs from wave action as new beaches are deposited at their toes. Wave erosion is reinitiated at the northern end of the complex as the landform passes. An incremental record of slope change is preserved along the fossil bluff line. 14C dating of swales between beach ridges shows the complex to span 1700 years of progressive migration history. We hypothesized that slopes would change from steep, eroding faces to low-angle slopes covered with vegetation and sought to document the rate of change. Our team measured slope angles at intervals along the fossil bluff line and dated profiles by interpolating 14C ages of adjacent beach ridges. There was no progressive decrease in slope with age. All slopes along the fossil bluff line were 30-40 degrees with a mean of 35 degrees. Constancy in slope angle suggests that steep, actively eroding bluffs were quickly changed to stable slopes by landslides and slumping once they were protected. Given the accuracy of our age control, we conclude that the time required to attain a stable slope under natural processes is less than one century. This indicates that

  3. Coal geology of the Paleocene-Eocene Calvert Bluff Formation (Wilcox Group) and the Eocene Manning Formation (Jackson Group) in east-central Texas; field trip guidebook for the Society for Organic Petrology, Twelfth Annual Meeting, The Woodlands, Texas, August 30, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, Peter D.; Crowley, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Jackson and Wilcox Groups of eastern Texas (fig. 1) are the major lignite producing intervals in the Gulf Region. Within these groups, the major lignite-producing formations are the Paleocene-Eocene Calvert Bluff Formation (Wilcox) and the Eocene Manning Formation (Jackson). According to the Keystone Coal Industry Manual (Maclean Hunter Publishing Company, 1994), the Gulf Coast basin produces about 57 million short tons of lignite annually. The state of Texas ranks number 6 in coal production in the United States. Most of the lignite is used for electric power generation in mine-mouth power plant facilities. In recent years, particular interest has been given to lignite quality and the distribution and concentration of about a dozen trace elements that have been identified as potential hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. As pointed out by Oman and Finkelman (1994), Gulf Coast lignite deposits have elevated concentrations of many of the HAPs elements (Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Se, U) on a as-received gm/mmBtu basis when compared to other United States coal deposits used for fuel in thermo-electric power plants. Although regulations have not yet been established for acceptable emissions of the HAPs elements during coal burning, considerable research effort has been given to the characterization of these elements in coal feed stocks. The general purpose of the present field trip and of the accompanying collection of papers is to investigate how various aspects of east Texas lignite geology might collectively influence the quality of the lignite fuel. We hope that this collection of papers will help future researchers understand the complex, multifaceted interrelations of coal geology, petrology, palynology and coal quality, and that this introduction to the geology of the lignite deposits of east Texas might serve as a stimulus for new ideas to be applied to other coal basins in the U.S. and abroad.

  4. Frequency of effective wave activity and the recession of coastal bluffs: Calvert Cliffs, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcock, P.R.; Miller, D.S.; Shea, R.H.; Kerkin, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    The Calvert Cliffs, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA, erode by direct wave undercutting or by freeze/thaw erosion accompanied by wave removal of slope debris. Directly undercut slopes recede more rapidly, with long-term rates exceeding 1.0 m/yr; freeze/thaw slopes recede at rates approaching 0.5 m/yr. The frequency of wave height and water level at the shoreline is estimated for eleven sites based on a 37-year wind record, estimates of storm surge, offshore wave geometry, nearshore wave transformation, and breaking wave type. Locations experiencing the largest slope recession are not uniformly those with the largest cumulative wave energy; the resistance to erosion of the slope toe must also be accounted for. An index of relative wave strength is defined as the ratio of wave pressure T and the cohesive strength S of the slope material. For the Calvert Cliffs, a minimum relative wave strength for initiating erosion of intact material is 0.05 < T/S < 0.1. A cumulative duration of ???50 hours per year for T/S ??? 0.1 distinguishes undercut and nonundercut slopes and recession rates greater or lesser than 0.5 m/yr. The relative wave strength index may be used to identify sites at risk of increased erosion. At one site with a small historical erosion rate, the loss of a protective beach and associated decrease in toe elevation caused a positive shift in the frequency of large T/S. Direct wave undercutting and increased slope recession may be anticipated at this site, as indicated by the development of an undercut notch during the course of the study.

  5. Wind Erosion and Dune Formation on High Frozen Bluffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, W. M.; Marsh, B. D.

    1984-01-01

    Frost penetration increases upslope on barren, windswept bluffs in cold environments. Along the south shore of Lake Superior, near the brow of 100 m high bluffs it typically exceeds 5 m. Frost increases the shear strength of damp sand to a level comparable to that of concrete, making winter slopes highly stable despite undercutting by waves and ground-water sapping along the footslope. Sublimation of interparticle ice in the slope face increases with wind speed and lower vapor pressures. The cold and dry winter winds of Lake Superior ablate these slopes through loss of binding ice. Wind erosion rates, based on measurements of sand accumulation on the forest floor downwind of the brow, show most airborne sand falls out within several meters of the brow, forming a berm 1 to 3 m high after many years. The spatial pattern of sand deposition, however, varies considerably over distances of several hundred meters along the top bluffs in response to frost conditions and the build-up of gravel lag on the slope face, sand exposure from mass movements, and local aerodynamics of the crest slope. The formation of perched sand dunes in the Great Lakes region is clearly related to wind erosion of sand from high bluffs in winter. Broadly similar processes may operate on Mars.

  6. Wind erosion and dune formation on high frozen bluffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, W. M.; Marsh, B. D.

    1984-04-01

    Frost penetration increases upslope on barren, windswept bluffs in cold environments. Along the south shore of Lake Superior, near the brow of 100 m high bluffs it typically exceeds 5 m. Frost increases the shear strength of damp sand to a level comparable to that of concrete, making winter slopes highly stable despite undercutting by waves and ground-water sapping along the footslope. Sublimation of interparticle ice in the slope face increases with wind speed and lower vapor pressures. The cold and dry winter winds of Lake Superior ablate these slopes through loss of binding ice. Wind erosion rates, based on measurements of sand accumulation on the forest floor downwind of the brow, show most airborne sand falls out within several meters of the brow, forming a berm 1 to 3 m high after many years. The spatial pattern of sand deposition, however, varies considerably over distances of several hundred meters along the top bluffs in response to frost conditions and the build-up of gravel lag on the slope face, sand exposure from mass movements, and local aerodynamics of the crest slope. The formation of perched sand dunes in the Great Lakes region is clearly related to wind erosion of sand from high bluffs in winter. Broadly similar processes may operate on Mars.

  7. Stratigraphy and Facies of Cretaceous Schrader Bluff and Prince Creek Formations in Colville River Bluffs, North Slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Romeo M.; Myers, Mark D.; Houseknecht, David W.; Stricker, Gary D.; Brizzolara, Donald W.; Ryherd, Timothy J.; Takahashi, Kenneth I.

    2007-01-01

    Stratigraphic and sedimentologic studies of facies of the Upper Cretaceous rocks along the Colville River Bluffs in the west-central North Slope of Alaska identified barrier shoreface deposits consisting of vertically stacked, coarsening-upward parasequences in the Schrader Bluff Formation. This vertical stack of parasequence deposits represents progradational sequences that were affected by shoaling and deepening cycles caused by fluctuations of sea level. Further, the vertical stack may have served to stabilize accumulation of voluminous coal deposits in the Prince Creek Formation, which formed braided, high-sinuosity meandering, anastomosed, and low-sinuosity meandering fluvial channels and related flood plain deposits. The erosional contact at the top of the uppermost coarsening-upward sequence, however, suggests a significant drop of base level (relative sea level) that permitted a semiregional subaerial unconformity to develop at the contact between the Schrader Bluff and Prince Creek Formations. This drop of relative sea level may have been followed by a relative sea-level rise to accommodate coal deposition directly above the unconformity. This rise was followed by a second drop of relative sea level, with formation of incised valley topography as much as 75 ft deep and an equivalent surface of a major marine erosion or mass wasting, or both, either of which can be traced from the Colville River Bluffs basinward to the subsurface in the west-central North Slope. The Prince Creek fluvial deposits represent late Campanian to late Maastrichtian depositional environments that were affected by these base level changes influenced by tectonism, basin subsidence, and sea-level fluctuations.

  8. The physical conditions and age indicated by the flora of the Alum Bluff formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Edward Wilber

    1917-01-01

    The present paper has for its purpose the description of a small flora collected from the Alum Bluff formation, representing a horizon hitherto unrepresented paleobotanically in southeastern North America, and the discussion of the bearing of this flora on the physical conditions of deposition and the probable age of the deposits.

  9. Pumice in the interglacial Whidbey Formation at Blowers Bluff, central Whidbey Island, WA, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dethier, D.P.; Dragovich, J.D.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Fleck, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    A new 40Ar/39Ar age of 128??9 ka and chemical analyses of pumice layers from interglacial alluvium at Blowers Bluff, Whidbey Island, WA, show that the deposits are part of the Whidbey Formation, a widespread, mainly subsurface unit. Glass chemistry of the dated dacitic pumice does not match any analyzed northern Cascade source, but upper Pleistocene dacites from Glacier Peak and early Pleistocene silicic rocks from the Kulshan caldera are chemically similar. The chemistry of pumiceous dacite in younger units, including the latest Pleistocene Partridge Gravel, is similar to that of the dated material. The deep troughs of the modern northern Puget lowland must have been filled during deposition of the Whidbey Formation, allowing volcanic-rich sediment to reach what is now Whidbey Island. Topographic analysis of LIDAR images demonstrates that extensive erosion occurred during latest Pleistocene ice retreat. The Partridge Gravel likely records subglacial fluvial erosion along an ice tunnel and ice-marginal deposition into adjacent marine waters. Pumice in the Partridge Gravel probably was reworked from stratigraphically and topographically lower deposits, including those at Blowers Bluff. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  10. Bluff formation and long-term recession rates, southwestern Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, C.W. II )

    1992-01-01

    Where eroding cohesive sediments are present, Lake Michigan bluffs range up to 140 ft. in height and expose multiple stratigraphic units. According to the model presented here, bluffs form as a wave cut terrace erodes inland from a point near the original shoreline. The erosion plane is nearly horizontal, in contrast with the eastward dip of the glacial units inherited from underlying bedrock. Therefore, terraces eroding inland (west) produce progressively higher bluffs and expose successively older units at the toe and beneath the lake. This process repeated several times as lake levels sequentially dropped to their modern stage. The initial modern shoreline, and hence the width of the wave cut terrace, was determined from 4 offshore seismic profiles. It is picked as an inflection point in the slope of the lake bed, occurring offshore of dipping reflectors intersecting the lake bottom. The calculated average recession rate over the 2,500 year duration of the modern stage is 5 ft/yr in contrast to average rates of 2 ft/yr measured over the last century. Thus rates decrease through time as the terrace widens and wave energy is damped. By correlating bluff height to amount of recession of modern bluffs, a third rate of 12 ft/yr of the first 800 years of a recession is calculated for relict bluffs formed at the Nipissing II level. The 3 rates define a steeply decaying exponential curve in early stages of bluff retreat, flattening into a nearly linear function after 1,000 years.

  11. Sentinel Hill Core Test 1: Facies Descriptions and Stratigraphic Reinterpretations of the Prince Creek and Schrader Bluff Formations, North Slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Romeo M.; Stricker, Gary D.; Decker, Paul L.; Myers, Mark D.

    2007-01-01

    The Sentinel Hill Core Test 1 well penetrated an intertonguing sequence of (1) the marine Schrader Bluff Formation in the depth intervals 950?1,180 ft and 690?751 ft, which consists of shoreface and offshore deposits that accumulated along a storm-dominated, barred shoreline; and (2) the nonmarine Prince Creek Formation in the depth intervals 751?950 ft and surface to 690 ft, which consists of fluvial channel, crevasse splay, backswamp, and ash fall deposits. The strata range in age from early Campanian to early Maastrichtian. An erosional contact at a depth of 690 ft at the base of the upper unit of the Prince Creek Formation is interpreted as a major regional sequence boundary, and the overlying conglomeratic fluvial channel deposits are interpreted to have accumulated in a paleovalley. In its more proximal reaches along the Colville River, channels of this paleovalley cut down 75 ft into the lowermost Prince Creek Formation and the uppermost Schrader Bluff Formation. Farther offshore, the equivalent surface to the aforementioned paleovalley appears to be a subtle discontinuity between middle and lower Schrader Bluff Formation shelfal marine strata. Still farther offshore, the equivalent paleovalley surface is interpreted as a marine mass-wasting surface that locally cuts through the lowermost Schrader Bluff Formation and into the underlying Seabee Formation.

  12. Bluff evolution along coastal drumlins: Boston Harbor Islands, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Himmelstoss, E.A.; FitzGerald, D.M.; Rosen, P.S.; Allen, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    A series of partially drowned drumlins forms the backbone of the inner islands within Boston Harbor. The shoreline of these rounded glacial deposits is composed of actively retreating bluffs formed by continual wave attack. Comparisons of bluffs reveal variability in their height and lateral extent, as well as in the dominant mechanism causing their retreat. Two processes are responsible for bluff erosion and yield distinct bluff morphologies: (1) wave attack undercuts the bluff and causes episodic slumping, yielding planar bluff slopes, and (2) subaerial processes such as rainfall create irregular slopes characterized by rills and gullies. We propose a model of drumlin bluff evolution that is based on processes of erosion and physical characteristics such as bluff height, slope morphology, and the orientation of the bluff with respect to the long axis of the drumlin and its topographic crest. The four phases of drumlin bluff evolution consist of (1) initial formation of bluff, with retreat dominated by wave notching and slumping processes; (2) rill and gully development as bluff heights exceed 10 m and slumped sediment at bluff base inhibits wave attack; (3) return of wave notching and slumping as bluff heights decrease; and (4) final development of boulder retreat lag as last remnants of drumlin are eroded by wave action. These phases capture the important physical processes of drumlin evolution in Boston Harbor and could apply to other eroding coastal drumlin deposits.

  13. 6. SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT AT CALVERT STREET, SHOWING LEON HERMANT ALLEGORICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT AT CALVERT STREET, SHOWING LEON HERMANT ALLEGORICAL RELIEF OF TRANSPORTATION BY AUTOMOBILE - Calvert Street Bridge, Spanning Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 76 FR 39908 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... COMMISSION Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2.... DPR-53 and DPR-69, for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 (CCNPP), respectively... (ISFSI), currently held by Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC as owner and licensed...

  15. 75 FR 66802 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... COMMISSION Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2... Regulatory Commission (the Commission) has granted the request of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC... Operating License Nos. DPR-53 and DPR-69 for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and...

  16. Hemiacodon engardae, a new species of omomyid primate from the earliest Uintan Turtle Bluff Member of the Bridger Formation, southwestern Wyoming, USA.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Paul C; Dunn, Rachel H

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we describe a new species of Hemiacodon known only from University of Colorado Museum Loc. 92189 (Donna's Locality) in the Turtle Bluff Member of the Bridger Formation, Green River Basin, southwestern Wyoming. Donna's locality has yielded a diverse mostly small-bodied mammalian assemblage of Bridgerian and first appearance Uintan mammalian taxa, as well as range-through taxa. Together with H. engardae sp. nov., the faunal assemblage from Donna's Locality and more recently discovered localities in the same stratigraphic interval provides the first conclusive paleontological evidence of an earliest Uintan age (Ui1A biochron) for the Turtle Bluff Member of the Bridger Formation. The new species is represented by a sample of 11 specimens consisting of well-preserved upper and lower premolars and lower molars. H. engardae is distinct from H. gracilis on the basis of overall larger size as well as a combination of features of the premolars and molars related to a greater development of shearing crests. This suggests that H. engardae may have incorporated more foliage into its diet than the Bridgerian species, H. gracilis. PMID:19625072

  17. 77 FR 47121 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... Consideration (73 FR 17148; March 31, 2008), states that ``Plant emergencies are extraordinary circumstances... COMMISSION Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC (the licensee) is the holder of...

  18. 33 CFR 165.505 - Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland. 165.505 Section 165.505 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.505 Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant,...

  19. 33 CFR 165.505 - Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland. 165.505 Section 165.505 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.505 Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant,...

  20. 33 CFR 165.505 - Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland. 165.505 Section 165.505 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.505 Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant,...

  1. 33 CFR 165.505 - Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland. 165.505 Section 165.505 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.505 Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant,...

  2. 33 CFR 165.505 - Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland. 165.505 Section 165.505 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.505 Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant,...

  3. Historic bluff retreat and stabilization at Flag Harbor, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Inga; Larsen, Curtis E.; McRae, Michele

    2002-01-01

    Studies of bluff erosion and slope stability along the western shore of Chesapeake Bay suggest relative evolution from steep, eroding coastal bluffs to stable slopes at angles of repose ca. 35 degrees over decades. Because of the dating methods in those studies, it was impossible to precisely define rates of change. The present study provides historic age control. A pair of small harbor structures were constructed in the early 1950's at Chesapeake Beach, MD to maintain a dredged channel to a small marina occupying a ravine in the Calvert Cliffs. Prior to construction, this section of shoreline was comprised of eroding steep bluffs cut into Miocene-age sediments. Downdrift erosion is now apparent south of the structures as is updrift deposition behind the northern jetty. Since construction the updrift sand body has prograded northward and progressively deposited protective beaches along the toes of the bluffs. Former eroding bluffs nearest the harbor are now stable, vegetated slopes at angles near 35 degrees. Slope angles widen to the north and to the northern limit of the sand body. Beyond this are eroding bluffs standing at angles of 70-80 degrees. The relative time required for eroding bluffs to reach stability is estimated by interpolating the distance and time for the sand body to prograde northward since harbor construction. We measured slope angles at intervals northward from the updrift structure for a distance of 2000 feet. A least squares regression of slope angle vs distance showed progressive decrease in angle from north to south. Actively eroding 70-80 degree bluffs gave way to vegetated, but slumping slopes, and finally to stable 35-degree slopes at the harbor. A relationship between time and distance along the shore allowed us to estimate a stabilization time for this location of 35-40 years. The shortness of this time scale allows us to suggest that attempts to artificially stabilize eroding bluffs along this coast is not a simple task of protecting

  4. A model of tephra dispersal from an early Palaeogene shallow submarine Surtseyan-style eruption(s), the Red Bluff Tuff Formation, Chatham Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrentino, Leonor; Stilwell, Jeffrey D.; Mays, Chris

    2014-03-01

    The Red Bluff Tuff Formation, an early Palaeogene volcano-sedimentary shallow marine succession from the Chatham Islands (New Zealand), provides a unique framework, in eastern 'Zealandia', to explore tephra dispersal processes associated with ancient small phreatomagmatic explosions (i.e. Surtseyan-style eruptions). Detailed sedimentological mapping, logging and sampling integrated with the results of extensive laboratory analyses (i.e. grain-size, componentry and applied palaeontological methods) elucidated the complex mechanisms of transport and deposition of nine identified resedimented fossiliferous volcaniclastic facies. These facies record the subaqueous reworking and deposition of tephra from the erosion and degradation of a proximal, entirely submerged ancient Surtseyan volcanic edifice (Cone II). South of this volcanic cone, the lowermost distal facies provides significant evidence of deposition as water-supported volcanic- or storm-driven mass flows (e.g. turbidity currents and mud/debris flows) of volcaniclastic and bioclastic debris, whereas the uppermost distal facies exhibit features of tractional sedimentary processes caused by shallow subaqueous currents. Further north, within the proximity of the volcanic edifice, the uppermost facies are represented by an abundant, diverse, large, and well preserved in situ fauna of shallow marine sessile invertebrates (e.g. corals and sponges) that reflect the protracted biotic stabiliszation and rebound following pulsed volcanic events. Over a period of time, these stable and wave-eroded volcanic platforms were inhabited by a flourishing and diversifying marine community of benthic and sessile pioneers (corals, bryozoans, molluscs, brachiopods, barnacles, sponges, foraminifera, etc.). This succession exhibits a vertical progression of sedimentary structures (i.e. density, cohesive and mass flows, and cross-bedding) and our interpretations indicate a shallowing upwards succession. This study reports for the first

  5. 77 FR 10784 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Notice of Withdrawal of Application for Amendment to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... COMMISSION Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Notice of Withdrawal of Application for Amendment to... of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC, the licensee, to withdraw its application dated October... the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, respectively, located in Calvert County,...

  6. A Bluff-Bidding Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meister, J. Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Consider an auction in which one potential buyer wishes to participate, but the other potential buyer would rather the bidding not start. However, once bidding starts, the reluctant firm participates (submits "bluff bids") simply to make the eventual winner pay more. This incentive exists when the marginal effect of the winning bid is to increase…

  7. Calvert Cliffs RELAP5/MOD3/SCDAP plant deck

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, C.E.; Determan, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    This report documents the development of a RELAP5/MOD3/SCDAP input deck for the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant. Through the addition of SCDAP inputs, NPA interactive capabilities, and significant nodalization enhancements the range of applicability; of this input deck has been greatly increased.

  8. Gosses Bluff impact structure, Australia.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, D. J.; Barlow, B. C.; Brown, A. R.; Glikson, A. Y.; Manwaring, E. A.; Moss, F. J.; Sedmik, E. C. E.; Van Son, J.; Brett, R.; Young, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive study has been carried out of the Gosses Bluff structure in Central Australia, which is a typical cryptoexplosion structure. The study included detailed geologic mapping, and seismic reflection and refraction, gravity, aeromagnetic, and ground magnetic surveys. It is concluded that the structure is an eroded crater formed by a single nearly instantaneous shock event, and that the event can be explained only by impact.

  9. Red Bluff, Marion County, Mississippi: a Citronelle braided-stream deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.L.; Meylan, M.A.

    1983-09-01

    Red Bluff is an erosional escarpment located on the western margin of the Pearl River flood plain in northwestern Marion County, Mississippi. The sand grains are composed primarily of quartz, with small amounts of heavy minerals and feldspar. The gravel is composed of varying percentages of chert, flint, jasper, rip-up clasts, quartz, and tripoli, including a small fraction of silicified Paleozoic fossils. Grain-size analysis of the sediment and investigation of the sedimentary structures suggest a braided-fluvial environment of deposition. The most conspicuous sedimentary structures at Red Bluff are graded bedding, low-angle to medium-angle cross-bedding, and well-developed paleochannels. A statistical comparison (discriminant analysis) of the seven most abundant heavy minerals of Red Bluff, with the same suite of heavy minerals found at the type section of the Citronelle Formation (Pliocene-Pleistocene), and outcrops of a known Miocene coarse clastic unit indicates a correlation of Red Bluff to the Citronelle Formation. These heavy minerals are kyanite, staurolite, rutile, tourmaline, zircon, black opaques (primarily ilmenite and magnetite), and white opaques (primarily leucoxene). The suite of heavy minerals present at Red Bluff belongs to the east Gulf province. This metamorphic assemblage of heavy minerals implies the source area of the sediments at Red Bluff to be the southern Appalachians. The silicified pebble-size Devonian-Mississippian fossils were derived most likely from formations flanking the southern Appalachians in northern Alabama.

  10. Conversations with Rep. Ken Calvert. Interview by Frank Sietzen Jr.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Ken

    2005-07-01

    Rep. Calvert, chair of the House aeronautics and space subcommittee of the Science Committee, answers questions related to priorities for space in the current congressional session: the Vision for Space Exploration, development of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and other heavy-lift launch vehicles, entrepreneurial alliances in the space transportation industry, the U.S. aerospace industry, space tourism, entrepreneurs and NASA, U.S. aeronautics research, a service mission to the Hubble Space Telescope, and priority military space programs.

  11. Conversations with Rep. Ken Calvert. Interview by Frank Sietzen Jr.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Ken

    2005-07-01

    Rep. Calvert, chair of the House aeronautics and space subcommittee of the Science Committee, answers questions related to priorities for space in the current congressional session: the Vision for Space Exploration, development of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and other heavy-lift launch vehicles, entrepreneurial alliances in the space transportation industry, the U.S. aerospace industry, space tourism, entrepreneurs and NASA, U.S. aeronautics research, a service mission to the Hubble Space Telescope, and priority military space programs. PMID:16044613

  12. 78 FR 23563 - LWD, Inc. Superfund Site; Calvert City, Marshall County, Kentucky; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... Agencies addressing past costs concerning the LWD, Inc., Superfund Site located in Calvert City, Marshall... settlement if comments received disclose facts or considerations which indicate that the settlement...

  13. Particle size and X-ray analysis of Feldspar, Calvert, Ball, and Jordan soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Pipette analysis and X-ray diffraction techniques were employed to characterize the particle size distribution and clay mineral content of the feldspar, calvert, ball, and jordan soils. In general, the ball, calvert, and jordan soils were primarily clay size particles composed of kaolinite and illite whereas the feldspar soil was primarily silt-size particles composed of quartz and feldspar minerals.

  14. 77 FR 34093 - License Renewal for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC's

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... COMMISSION License Renewal for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC's AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant site near Lusby, Maryland. The NRC has prepared an Environmental Assessment... dated September 17, 2010, Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC (CCNPP) submitted an application...

  15. Assessing landslide potential on coastal bluffs near Mukilteo, Washington—Geologic site characterization for hydrologic monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Smith, Joel B.; Benjamin Stark,; York Lewis,; Abigail Michel,; Baum, Rex L.

    2016-07-01

    During the summer 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey collected geologic and geotechnical data for two sites on coastal bluffs along the eastern shore of Puget Sound, Washington. The U.S. Geological Survey also installed hydrologic instrumentation at the sites and collected specimens for laboratory testing. The two sites are located on City of Mukilteo open-space land and are about 0.6 kilometers apart. The bluffs at each site are approximately 42 meters high, and rise steeply from the shoreline with 32–35° slopes. The more northerly of the two sites occupies an active landslide and is mostly unvegetated. The other site is forested, and although stable during the preparation of this report, shows evidence of historical and potential landslide activity. The slopes of the bluffs at both sites are mantled by a thin, nonuniform colluvium underlain by clay-rich glacial deposits and tills of the Whidbey Formation or Double Bluff Drift. Till consisting of sand, gravel, and cobbles caps the bluffs and rests on finer grained glacial deposits of sand, silt, and clay. These types of different glacial deposits are dense, vertically fractured, and generally have low permeability, but field observations indicate that locally the deposits are sufficiently permeable to allow lateral flow of water along fractures and subhorizontal boundaries between deposits of different texture. Laboratory tests indicate that many of the deposits are highly plastic, with low hydraulic conductivity, and moderate shear strength. Steep slopes combined with the strength and hydraulic characteristics of the deposits leave the bluffs prone to slope instability, particularly during the wet season when infiltrating rainfall changes moisture content, pore-water pressure, and effective stress within the hillslope. The instrumentation was designed to primarily observe rainfall variability and hydrologic changes in the subsurface that can affect stability of the bluffs, and also to compare the hydrologic

  16. Assessing landslide potential on coastal bluffs near Mukilteo, Washington—Geologic site characterization for hydrologic monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Smith, Joel B.; Benjamin Stark; York Lewis; Abigail Michel; Baum, Rex L.

    2016-01-01

    During the summer 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey collected geologic and geotechnical data for two sites on coastal bluffs along the eastern shore of Puget Sound, Washington. The U.S. Geological Survey also installed hydrologic instrumentation at the sites and collected specimens for laboratory testing. The two sites are located on City of Mukilteo open-space land and are about 0.6 kilometers apart. The bluffs at each site are approximately 42 meters high, and rise steeply from the shoreline with 32–35° slopes. The more northerly of the two sites occupies an active landslide and is mostly unvegetated. The other site is forested, and although stable during the preparation of this report, shows evidence of historical and potential landslide activity. The slopes of the bluffs at both sites are mantled by a thin, nonuniform colluvium underlain by clay-rich glacial deposits and tills of the Whidbey Formation or Double Bluff Drift. Till consisting of sand, gravel, and cobbles caps the bluffs and rests on finer grained glacial deposits of sand, silt, and clay. These types of different glacial deposits are dense, vertically fractured, and generally have low permeability, but field observations indicate that locally the deposits are sufficiently permeable to allow lateral flow of water along fractures and subhorizontal boundaries between deposits of different texture. Laboratory tests indicate that many of the deposits are highly plastic, with low hydraulic conductivity, and moderate shear strength. Steep slopes combined with the strength and hydraulic characteristics of the deposits leave the bluffs prone to slope instability, particularly during the wet season when infiltrating rainfall changes moisture content, pore-water pressure, and effective stress within the hillslope. The instrumentation was designed to primarily observe rainfall variability and hydrologic changes in the subsurface that can affect stability of the bluffs, and also to compare the hydrologic

  17. Control of Flow Over a Bluff Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Jeon, Woo-Pyung; Kim, Jinsung

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we present control methods for flow over a bluff body such as a circular cylinder, a 2D bluff body with a blunt trailing edge, and a sphere. We introduce recent major achievements in bluff-body flow controls such as 3D forcing, active feedback control, control based on local and global instability, and control with a synthetic jet. We then classify the controls as boundary-layer controls and direct-wake modifications and discuss important features associated with these controls. Finally, we discuss some other issues such as Reynolds-number dependence, the lowest possible drag by control, and control efficiency.

  18. Aerodynamics of two-dimensional slotted bluff bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, F.; Higuchi, H.

    1988-04-30

    Aerodynamic characteristics of two-dimensional, slotted bluff bodies were experimentally investigated. Flow visualizations, base pressure measurements, mean velocity vector measurements, and drag force measurements were conducted to analyze effects of spacing ratio (i.e., porosity), curvature, and vent. Low porosity model configurations produced stable near-wake patterns with enhanced vortex sheddings of overall wake formations. Model curvature reduced drag forces and weakened the vortex sheddings. Stabilizing effect of curvature on the near-wake patterns was also found. A vent combined with large model curvature was found to control drag force effectively, as well as suppressing vortex sheddings. 10 refs., 52 figs., 1 tab.

  19. 78 FR 41397 - Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on June 28, 2013, Moss Bluff Hub, LLC (Moss Bluff) filed a revised Statement of Operating Conditions (SOC) pursuant to sections 284.123 and 284.224 of the Commission's regulations, (18 CFR 284.123 and 284.224). Moss...

  20. 77 FR 70431 - Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on November 15, 2012, Moss Bluff Hub, LLC, (Moss Bluff) filed to revise its Statement of Operating Conditions (SOC)...

  1. The Hydrogen Economy as a Technological Bluff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburg, Willem H.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen economy is a technological bluff in its implied assurance that, despite the accelerating pace at which we are depleting the remaining half of our fossil fuels, our energy future is secure. Elementary thermodynamic considerations are developed to show that a hydrogen economy is about as feasible as a perpetual motion machine. Hydrogen…

  2. Interactions of bluff-body obstacles with turbulent airflows affecting evaporative fluxes from porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Or, Dani

    2015-11-01

    Bluff-body obstacles interacting with turbulent airflows are common in many natural and engineering applications (from desert pavement and shrubs over natural surfaces to cylindrical elements in compact heat exchangers). Even with obstacles of simple geometry, their interactions within turbulent airflows result in a complex and unsteady flow field that affects surface drag partitioning and transport of scalars from adjacent evaporating surfaces. Observations of spatio-temporal thermal patterns on evaporating porous surfaces adjacent to bluff-body obstacles depict well-defined and persistent zonation of evaporation rates that were used to construct a simple mechanistic model for surface-turbulence interactions. Results from evaporative drying of sand surfaces with isolated cylindrical elements (bluff bodies) subjected to constant turbulent airflows were in good agreement with model predictions for localized exchange rates. Experimental and theoretical results show persistent enhancement of evaporative fluxes from bluff-rough surfaces relative to smooth flat surfaces under similar conditions. The enhancement is attributed to formation of vortices that induce a thinner boundary layer over part of the interacting surface footprint. For a practical range of air velocities (0.5-4.0 m/s), low-aspect ratio cylindrical bluff elements placed on evaporating sand surfaces enhanced evaporative mass losses (relative to a flat surface) by up to 300% for high density of elements and high wind velocity, similar to observations reported in the literature. Concepts from drag partitioning were used to generalize the model and upscale predictions to evaporation from surfaces with multiple obstacles for potential applications to natural bluff-rough surfaces.

  3. 78 FR 4467 - UniStar Nuclear Energy, Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Power Plant, Unit 3...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION UniStar Nuclear Energy, Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Power Plant, Unit 3, Exemption 1.0 Background UniStar Nuclear Energy (UNE), on behalf of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Project, LLC...

  4. 77 FR 1748 - Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; Calvert Cliffs 3 Nuclear Project, LLC, and UniStar Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... Meetings/Hearings, 66 FR 31,719 (June 12, 2001) [hereinafter Meeting Security Guidelines]. All individuals... COMMISSION Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; Calvert Cliffs 3 Nuclear Project, LLC, and UniStar Nuclear... Calvert Cliffs 3 Nuclear Project, L.L.C., and UniStar Nuclear Operating Services, L.L.C. (Applicants)...

  5. Geology and paleoecology of the Cottonwood Creek delta in the Eocene Tipton Tongue of the Green River Formation and a mammalian fauna from the Eocene Cathedral Bluffs Tongue of the Wasatch Formation, Southeast Washakie Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Roehler, H.W.; Hanley, J.H.; Honey, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Nonmarine mollusks are used to interpret paleoenvironments and patterns of sedimentation of a fan delta on the east margin of Eocene Lake Gosiute. The delta is composed of a lens of quartzose sandstone intertongued with oil shale. Delta morphology is illustrated by cross sections and paleogeographic maps. A fossil fauna representing five mammalian orders is described and used to establish the age of parts of the Wasatch and Green River formations. There are three chapters in this bulletin.

  6. 78 FR 21930 - Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on March 29, 2013, Moss Bluff Hub, LLC filed to revise its Statement of Operating Conditions to modify Sections 3.4.4,...

  7. 76 FR 10581 - Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on February 11, 2011, Moss Bluff Hub, LLC filed to revise its Statement of General Terms and Standard Operating Conditions...

  8. Bluff Body Flow Control Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Flint

    2005-11-01

    In this study, the use of single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators for the control of bluff body flow separation is investigated. In particular, surface mounted plasma actuators are used to reduce both drag and unsteady vortex shedding from circular cylinders in cross-flow. It is demonstrated that the plasma-induced surface blowing gives rise to a local Coanda effect that promotes the maintenance of flow attachment. Large reductions in vortex shedding and drag are demonstrated for Reynolds numbers ˜ 10^410^5. Both steady and unsteady plasma-induced surface blowing is explored. Results are presented from experiments involving both two and four surface mounted actuators.

  9. Overview from bluff east of facility. Note buildings #35 (left). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview from bluff east of facility. Note buildings #35 (left). #33 (center), and #31 A (right) VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  10. 15. GENERAL VEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING BLUFF, COAST GUARD'S HOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. GENERAL VEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING BLUFF, COAST GUARD'S HOUSE, WARDEN'S HOUSE AND RUBBLE IN FOREGROUND - Alcatraz, Cell House, Alcatraz Island, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  11. Anatomy of extremely thin marine sequences landward of a passive-margin hinge zone: Neogene Calvert Cliffs succession, Maryland, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect

    Kidwell, S.M.

    1997-03-01

    Detailed examination of Neogene strata in cliffs 25--35 m high along the western shore of Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, reveals the complexity of the surviving record of siliciclastic sequences {approximately}150 km inland of the structural hinge zone of the Atlantic passive margin. Previous study of the lower to middle Miocene Calvert (Plum Point Member) and Choptank Formations documented a series of third-order sequences 7--10 m thick in which lowstand deposits are entirely lacking, transgressive tracts comprise a mosaic of condensed bioclastic facies, and regressive (highstand) tracts are present but partially truncated by the next sequence boundary; smaller-scale (fourth-order) cyclic units could not be resolved. Together, these sequences constitute the transgressive and early highstand tracts of a larger (second-order Miocene) composite sequence. The present paper documents stratigraphic relations higher in the Calvert Cliffs succession, including the upper Miocene St. Marys Formation, which represents late highstand marine deposits of the Miocene second-order sequence, and younger Neogene fluvial and tidal-inlet deposits representing incised-valley deposits of the succeeding second-order cycle. The St. Marys Formation consists of a series of tabular units 2--5 m thick, each with an exclusively transgressive array of facies and bounded by stranding surfaces of abrupt shallowing. These units, which are opposite to the flooding-surface-bounded regressive facies arrays of model parasequences, are best characterized as shaved sequences in which only the transgressive tract survives, and are stacked into larger transgressive, highstand, and forced-regression sets.

  12. 78 FR 33121 - Staff Requirements-SECY-12-0168-Calvert Cliffs 3 Nuclear Project, LLC & UniStar Nuclear Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Staff Requirements--SECY-12-0168--Calvert Cliffs 3 Nuclear Project, LLC & UniStar Nuclear.... On March 11, 2013, in SRM-12-0168, ``Calvert Cliffs 3 Nuclear Project, LLC & UniStar...

  13. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  14. Inside interrogation: the lie, the bluff, and false confessions.

    PubMed

    Perillo, Jennifer T; Kassin, Saul M

    2011-08-01

    Using a less deceptive variant of the false evidence ploy, interrogators often use the bluff tactic, whereby they pretend to have evidence to be tested without further claiming that it necessarily implicates the suspect. Three experiments were conducted to assess the impact of the bluff on confession rates. Using the Kassin and Kiechel (Psychol Sci 7:125-128, 1996) computer crash paradigm, Experiment 1 indicated that bluffing increases false confessions comparable to the effect produced by the presentation of false evidence. Experiment 2 replicated the bluff effect and provided self-reports indicating that innocent participants saw the bluff as a promise of future exoneration which, paradoxically, made it easier to confess. Using a variant of the Russano et al. (Psychol Sci 16:481-486, 2005) cheating paradigm, Experiment 3 replicated the bluff effect on innocent suspects once again, though a ceiling effect was obtained in the guilty condition. Results suggest that the phenomenology of innocence can lead innocents to confess even in response to relatively benign interrogation tactics. PMID:20734122

  15. 75 FR 65230 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Pine Bluff, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ...) entitled Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Pine Bluff, AR in the Federal Register (75 FR... Bluff, AR AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: Drawbridge operations for the Rob...

  16. Transient platoon aerodynamics and bluff body flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuei, Lun

    There are two components of this experimental work: transient vehicle platoon aerodynamics and bluff-body flows. The transient aerodynamic effects in a four-vehicle platoon during passing maneuvers and in-line oscillations are investigated. A vehicle model is moved longitudinally parallel to a four-car platoon to simulate passing maneuvers. The drag and side forces experienced by each platoon member are measured using strain gauge balances. The resulting data are presented as dimensionless coefficients. It is shown that each car in the platoon experiences a repulsive side force when the passing vehicle is in the neighborhood of its rear half. The side force reverses its direction and becomes an attractive force when the passing vehicle moves to the neighborhood of its front half. The drag force experienced by each platoon member is increased when the passing vehicle is in its proximity. The effects of the lateral spacing and relative velocity between the platoon and the passing vehicle, as well as the shape of the passing vehicle, are also investigated. Similar trends are observed in simulations of both a vehicle passing a platoon and a platoon overtaking a vehicle. During the in-line oscillation experiments, one of the four platoon members is forced to undergo longitudinal periodic motions. The drag force experienced by each platoon member is determined simultaneously during the oscillations. The effects of the location of the oscillating vehicle, the shape of the vehicles and the displacement and velocity amplitudes of the oscillation are examined. The results from the transient conditions are compared to those from the steady tests in the same setup. In the case of a four-car platoon, the drag variations experienced by the vehicles adjacent to the oscillating vehicle are discussed using a cavity model. It is found that when the oscillating car moves forward and approaches its upstream neighbor, itself and its downstream neighbor experiences an increased drag

  17. Environmental radionuclide concentrations in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant: 1978-1980

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, R.I.; Magette, T.E.; Zobel, S.G.

    1982-12-01

    The Power Plant Siting Program conducts radiological analyses of environmental samples collected in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant to determine radioecological impact. The assessment, initiated in 1975, focuses on the ecology of the Chesapeake Bay because aqueous releases represent the greatest radioecological impact pathway. Collections of sediment, finfish, shellfish, miscellaneous invertebrates, algae, and waterfowl were analyzed by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy to determine gamma-emitting radionuclide concentrations. Analysis results and interpretation of studies conducted during 1978-1980 are presented.

  18. Gas Turbine Engine Staged Fuel Injection Using Adjacent Bluff Body and Swirler Fuel Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A fuel injection array for a gas turbine engine includes a plurality of bluff body injectors and a plurality of swirler injectors. A control operates the plurality of bluff body injectors and swirler injectors such that bluff body injectors are utilized without all of the swirler injectors at least at low power operation. The swirler injectors are utilized at higher power operation.

  19. Monitoring stream bluff erosion using repeat terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitzel, G.; Gran, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technology provides high-resolution topographic data that can be used to detect geomorphic change in fluvial environments. In this study, we utilize successive terrestrial laser scans to investigate the relationship between peak flow rates and stream bluff erosion in the Amity Creek watershed in Duluth, Minnesota. We also combine TLS scan results with bluff inventories from airborne lidar to estimate the volume of sediment erosion from bluffs in the watershed, which is an important source of fine sediment contributing to the creek's turbidity impairment. We selected nine study bluffs to conduct terrestrial laser scans on after all significant flood events over a two-year time period. The study employs a Faro Focus 3D phase-shift laser to collect data. Post-processing of the TLS-point cloud data sets involves: (1) removal of vegetation and objects other than the erosional surface of interest; (2) decimation of the point cloud in PC Tools and extraction of zmin values to produce a data set manageable in GIS; (3) creation of a bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) for each set of scans using ArcMap; and (4) utilization of Geomorphic Change Detection (GCD) software to generate DEMs of Difference (DODs) from subsequent terrestrial laser scans. Preliminary results from three flooding events indicate significant erosional activity at all field sites. Slumps were observed at two bluffs following spring melt and freeze/thaw cycling. Two major precipitation events in late spring and early summer provided a unique opportunity to observe the impact of extreme high flow events on bluff erosion throughout the watershed using TLS technology. 4.75 inches of intermittent rain over a six-day period in late May 2012 (May 23-28) resulted in slumping at many bluffs and one major failure. The ≥100-year flood that occurred on June 19-20 (7.25 inches), 2012 was powerful enough to induce considerable channel change. Slumps occurred at six study sites

  20. 76 FR 81994 - UniStar Nuclear Energy; Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION UniStar Nuclear Energy; Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3; Exemption 1.0 Background: UniStar Nuclear Energy (UNE) submitted to the U.S. Nuclear...

  1. Thermal Modeling of NUHOMS HSM-15 and HSM-1 Storage Modules at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station ISFSI

    SciTech Connect

    Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-10-01

    As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE), visual inspections and temperature measurements were performed on two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Detailed thermal models models were developed to obtain realistic temperature predictions for actual storage systems, in contrast to conservative and bounding design basis calculations.

  2. 3. IRONWOOD BLUFFS BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, ITAWAMBA CO. One mile W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. IRONWOOD BLUFFS BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, ITAWAMBA CO. One mile W of Ms. 25 on dirt road 2.5 mi. N of Bull Mtn. Cr. View from S side of E approach. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. September 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  3. 4. IRONWOOD BLUFFS BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, ITAWAMBA CO. One mile W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. IRONWOOD BLUFFS BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, ITAWAMBA CO. One mile W of Ms. 25 on dirt road 2.5 mi. N of Bull Mtn. Cr. View from N, wide angle. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. September 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  4. 1. IRONWOOD BLUFFS BRIDGE Tombigbee R. MISSISSIPPI, ITAWAMBA CO. One ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. IRONWOOD BLUFFS BRIDGE Tombigbee R. MISSISSIPPI, ITAWAMBA CO. One mile W of Ms. 25 on dirt road 2.5 mi. N of Bull Mtn. Cr. Detail of upper panel point, showing components of members. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. September 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  5. 5. IRONWOOD BLUFFS BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, ITAWAMBA CO. One mile W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. IRONWOOD BLUFFS BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, ITAWAMBA CO. One mile W of Ms. 25 on dirt road 2.5 mi. N of Bull Mtn. Cr. View of underside from NE shore, showing lower panel point, lateral bracing. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. September 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  6. 2. IRONWOOD BLUFFS BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, ITAWAMBA CO. One mile W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. IRONWOOD BLUFFS BRIDGE MISSISSIPPI, ITAWAMBA CO. One mile W of Ms. 25 on dirt road 2.5 mi. N of Bull Mtn. Cr. Oblique view of N truss from E end. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. September 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  7. Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from bluff south of Grand Coulee Dam; this segment of the panorama shows the terminus of the concrete-lined feeder canal and entrance to Banks Lake at the head of the Grand Coulee. Note the earthen embankment at the easternmost section of Banks Lake, looking northwest. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  8. Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of facility. Note Buildings #35. #33 and #31A in lower left of photograph. VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  9. Description of the larva of Argia chelata Calvert, 1902 (Odonata: Coenagrionidae).

    PubMed

    Novelo-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo

    2013-12-06

    The larva of Argia chelata is described and figured. It falls into the group of Argia larvae with a moderately prominent ligula and two palpal seta, but it differs from its closest relatives by having labial palp with 2 setae plus one basal setella; the length of the ligula is 30% of its maximum width; basal tergites (1-5) lacking long, fine setae, mainly on midline; S8-10 mostly dark brown; paraprocts with spiniform setae on basal 0.25 and 0.55 of dorsal and ventral borders, respectively. Larvae were found in 2nd to 4th order shallow streams in cloud forest, crawling among debris, fine sand and mud where the water flow is slow or still, close to the shoreline. The larva is compared with A. lacrimans (Hagen), A. pima Garrison, and A. tonto Calvert, species apparently closely related. 

  10. Laboratory measurements of upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    An effort to investigate the potential of remote sensing for monitoring nonpoint source pollution was conducted. Spectral reflectance characteristics for four types of soil sediments were measured for mixture concentrations between 4 and 173 ppm. For measurements at a spectral resolution of 32 mm, the spectral reflectances of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments were distinctly different over the wavelength range from 400 to 980 nm at each concentration tested. At high concentrations, spectral differences between the various sediments could be detected by measurements with a spectral resolution of 160 nm. At a low concentration, only small differences were observed between the various sediments when measurements were made with 160 nm spectral resolution. Radiance levels generally varied in a nonlinear manner with sediment concentration; linearity occurred in special cases, depending on sediment type, concentration range, and wavelength.

  11. Measurements of aerodynamic forces on unsteadily moving bluff parachute canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockrell, D. J.; Harwood, R. J.; Shen, C. Q.

    1987-06-01

    Equations which describe the unsteady motion of bluff bodies through fluids contain certain components, termed added mass coefficients, which can only be determined by experiment. From the solutions to such equations the ways in which the shapes of parachute canopies influence the frequency of their oscillatory motion in pitch and their corresponding damping rates are required. Although a full-scale parachute canopy descends through air, oscillating in pitch as it does, experiments necessary to determine these added mass coefficients have been performed under water, using for this purpose a large ship tank from the towing carriage of which the model parachute canopies were suspended. These experiments showed that the added mass coefficients for bluff parachute canopies differed appreciably from their corresponding potential flow values. The latter were obtained from the analysis of inviscid, fluid flow around regular shapes which were representative of those parachute canopies. The significance for the prediction of the parachute's dynamic behavior in pitch is outlined.

  12. Morphologic characteristics of upland bluffs east and west of Crowley's Ridge in the New Madrid area

    SciTech Connect

    Church, A.; Mayer, L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Although presumed to be purely erosional in origin, the development of the bluffs bounding the Mississippi River may be ultimately influenced by tectonic processes. Quantitative morphologic characterization of the bluffs may provide insights to their erosional history and possible tectonic impacts on their evolution. Characterization consists of digitizing topographic planforms of the bluffs, valley floor morphology, and calculation of such parameters as sinuosity (S), valley floor/valley height ratios (Vf) and stream gradient indices for streams cutting the bluffs. Bluff planforms vary in sinuosity from nearly straight, S = 1.3, to highly sinuous, S = 8.2. Sinuosity appears to primarily reflect the size of the streams that dissect the bluffs. On the west side of the river, sinuosities are systematically higher than on the east side, reflecting the consequences of larger streams which effectively embay the bluffs. Interestingly, the lowest sinuosities in the area studied are geographically juxtaposed to the highest ones, both found on the east side of the river. The low sinuosities are due to the near coincidence of the drainage divide with the bluffs themselves resulting in east flowing drainage away from the bluffs. Vf ratios show a geographic pattern similar to that of sinuosity.

  13. Characterizing Morphology and Erosional Trends of Permafrost Bluffs, Barter Island, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, A.; Erikson, L. H.; Jones, B.; Richmond, B. M.

    2010-12-01

    Recession of coastal permafrost bluffs along portions of the North Slope of Alaska are highly variable, and recent studies have found increased retreat rates since the early 2000s along the western Beaufort Sea coastline, yet the mechanisms and processes driving the increased retreat rates remain poorly understood. The Native village of Kaktovik and adjacent U.S. Air Force radar site are situated on Barter Island and bound by an eroding coastal bluff where attempts to control bluff erosion with shore protection structures were undertaken more than a decade ago. In an effort to gain insight into the physical controls driving or limiting bluff recession in this region, a suite of field data was collected in August 2010 to characterize the beaches, bluffs, and nearshore setting. Data collected at 13 transect locations along the 3 km section of coastal bluffs include general bluff morphology and stratigraphy, detailed surveys of bluff edge and bluff face morphology, sediment grain size of the fronting beach, water/ice content and sediment grain size of the massive ice within the bluffs, and nearshore bathymetry. The bluffs here range in height from a few meters to more than ten meters and consist of a very complex sequence of material ranging from dense marine clay at the base, sands and gravel thought to be of fluvial origin, massive units of sand of unknown origin, massive ice which has recently been interpreted as buried glacial ice, wedge ice, thermokarst cave ice, aeolian silts and sands, and peat. At one site, thermistor arrays were installed to evaluate temperature gradients in response to solar radiation and heat flux transfers through characteristic bluff material. Aerial lidar DEMs obtained in 2009 (USGS) revealed a rise in bluff elevation across the central portion of the island where field observations of bluff stratigraphy showed multi-layered stratification. At the lower elevation outer flanks the exposed bluff face consisted of homogenous layers of sandy

  14. 78 FR 39310 - Niobrara Confluence and Ponca Bluffs Conservation Areas, NE and SD; Draft Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ..., NE and SD; Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Land Protection Plan; Extension of the Public... Bluffs Conservation Areas Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Land Protection Plan until September... Ponca Bluff Conservation Areas. We are extending the public comment period until September 30, 2013....

  15. 33 CFR 207.170 - Federal Dam, Oklawaha River, Moss Bluff, Fla.; pool level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal Dam, Oklawaha River, Moss Bluff, Fla.; pool level. 207.170 Section 207.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS..., Moss Bluff, Fla.; pool level. (a) The level of the pool shall normally be maintained at elevation...

  16. 75 FR 33799 - Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing June 8, 2010. Take notice that on June 1, 2010, Moss Bluff Hub, LLC submitted a baseline filing of its Statement of General...

  17. 76 FR 53426 - Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Moss Bluff Hub, LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing Take notice that on August 17, 2011, Moss Bluff Hub, LLC submitted a revised Statement of Operating Conditions, that governs...

  18. 33 CFR 207.170 - Federal Dam, Oklawaha River, Moss Bluff, Fla.; pool level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Federal Dam, Oklawaha River, Moss Bluff, Fla.; pool level. 207.170 Section 207.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS..., Moss Bluff, Fla.; pool level. (a) The level of the pool shall normally be maintained at elevation...

  19. 33 CFR 207.170 - Federal Dam, Oklawaha River, Moss Bluff, Fla.; pool level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal Dam, Oklawaha River, Moss Bluff, Fla.; pool level. 207.170 Section 207.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS..., Moss Bluff, Fla.; pool level. (a) The level of the pool shall normally be maintained at elevation...

  20. Secondary sulfate minerals from Alum Cave Bluff: Microscopy and microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    Microcrystals of secondary sulfate minerals from Alum Cave Bluff, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, were examined by scanning electron microscopy and identified by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) in the SEM. Among the samples the author discovered three new rare-earth sulfates: coskrenite-(Ce), levinsonite-(Y), and zugshunstite-(Ce). Other minerals illustrated in this report include sulfur, tschermigite, gypsum, epsomite, melanterite, halotrichite, apjohnite, jarosite, slavikite, magnesiocopiapite, and diadochite. Additional specimens whose identification is more tentative include pickeringite, aluminite, basaluminite, and botryogen. Alum Cave is a ``Dana locality`` for apjohnite and potash alum, and is the first documented North American occurrence of slavikite.

  1. Coastal erosion: Processes, timing and magnitudes at the bluff toe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, C.H.; Guy, D.E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Five Lake Erie bluffs (one interlaminated clay and silt, three clay-rich diamicts and one shale) were surveyed at about 2-week intervals and after wind storms for up to 5 years. Erosion of the bluff toes along this low-energy coast occurred during northeast wind storms, which produced surges of up to 1 m and surf-zone waves of up to 1.2 m. Wave impact and/or uprush caused quarrying, which removed most of the toe material, and abrasion. There were from 1 to 23 erosion events/sites, with maximum magnitudes of erosion ranging from 12 to 55 cm/event. Timing and magnitude were linked to erodibility, maximum water level, storm surge, storm duration and beach width. A threshold maximum water level and a threshold surge were necessary for erosion. At these thresholds, the beach was submerged and wave energy was directly expended on the toe. Erosion did not take place when there was shorefast ice or when debris slopes shielded the toe from waves. The originally cohesive toe materials are easily eroded when they weather to an essentially noncohesive state. Wave erosion is the crucial erosion process; removal of material from the toe prevents the development of a stable slope. ?? 1988.

  2. Hydrodynamic Mass of Bluff Bodies with a Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgabaili, Mohamed; Desabrais, Kenneth; Johari, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    Hydrodynamic mass of an object may be used to compute the contribution of unsteady drag resulting from potential flow. Even though the hydrodynamic mass of certain bluff bodies such as cylinder and sphere have been available from analytical considerations for a long time, there are no analytical solutions for a general bluff body with a cavity such as a cup facing the flow or a round parachute canopy. There is, however, an analytical solution for spherical shells of various concavities. The translational hydrodynamic mass of cups having various depth and thickness as well as round parachute canopies during inflation was computed using a finite element solver. The kinetic energy of the potential flow around the body was used to extract the hydrodynamic mass. Results indicate that the hydrodynamic mass of a cup can be decomposed into two components, the hydrodynamic mass of a cylinder whose axis is aligned with the flow and the mass of fluid within the cup cavity. Similarly, the hydrodynamic mass of a parachute canopy during various stages of inflation may be written as the hydrodynamic mass of a disk having the same area as the projected area of the canopy plus the mass of fluid enclosed by the canopy. Sponsored by the US Army Natick RDEC.

  3. A mathematical simulation to synchronization of a bluff structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. G.; Suaris, W.; Goodman, R. H.

    2010-04-01

    When the periodic vortex-shedding frequency of a bluff structure “locks-in” with one of the natural frequencies of the structure, the state is termed synchronization. When this lock-in or detuning state persists over a considerable period of time, fatigue stresses become predominant which then may lead to structural damage and even failure. Vortex-excited oscillations of bluff structures are one of the important problems in wind engineering, and wake oscillator models, especially the Van der Pol or Rayleigh type, have been studied profoundly over the last 20 odd years. The approach of most researchers is to couple one form of the Rayleigh oscillator with the conventional equation of motion of a single degree of freedom system. It is emphasized though that, depending on the form of the Rayleigh equation chosen, convergence to the solution may not be guaranteed, and the problem becomes ill-defined. The proposed semi-empirical model is of the coupled Rayleigh wake-oscillator type with the equation of motion containing a series term for the forcing function. The paper highlights the mathematical suitability of the proposed form for the aerodynamic response of an isolated structure.

  4. Blowoff dynamics of bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Kostka, Stanislav; Renfro, Michael W.; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2010-04-15

    This article concerns the flame dynamics of a bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flame as it approaches lean blowoff. Time resolved chemiluminescence imaging along with simultaneous particle image velocimetry and OH planar laser-induced fluorescence were utilized in an axisymmetric bluff body stabilized, propane-air flame to determine the sequence of events leading to blowoff and provide a quantitative analysis of the experimental results. It was found that as lean blowoff is approached by reduction of equivalence ratio, flame speed decreases and the flame shape progressively changes from a conical to a columnar shape. For a stably burning conical flame away from blowoff, the flame front envelopes the shear layer vortices. Near blowoff, the columnar flame front and shear layer vortices overlap to induce high local stretch rates that exceed the extinction stretch rates instantaneously and in the mean, resulting in local flame extinction along the shear layers. Following shear layer extinction, fresh reactants can pass through the shear layers to react within the recirculation zone with all other parts of the flame extinguished. This flame kernel within the recirculation zone may survive for a few milliseconds and can reignite the shear layers such that the entire flame is reestablished for a short period. This extinction and reignition event can happen several times before final blowoff which occurs when the flame kernel fails to reignite the shear layers and ultimately leads to total flame extinguishment. (author)

  5. Piezoelectric energy harvesting from transverse galloping of bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelkefi, A.; Hajj, M. R.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of harvesting energy from transverse galloping oscillations of a bluff body with different cross-section geometries is investigated. The energy is harvested by attaching a piezoelectric transducer to the transverse degree of freedom of the body. The power levels that can be generated from these vibrations and the variations of these levels with the load resistance, cross-section geometry, and freestream velocity are determined. A representative model that accounts for the transverse displacement of the bluff body and harvested voltage is presented. The quasi-steady approximation is used to model the aerodynamic loads. A linear analysis is performed to determine the effects of the electrical load resistance and the cross-section geometry on the onset of galloping, which is due to a Hopf bifurcation. The normal form of this bifurcation is derived to determine the type (supercritical or subcritical) of the instability and to characterize the effects of the linear and nonlinear parameters on the level of harvested power near the bifurcation. The results show that the electrical load resistance and the cross-section geometry affect the onset speed of galloping. The results also show that the maximum levels of harvested power are accompanied with minimum transverse displacement amplitudes for all considered (square, D, and triangular) cross-section geometries, which points to the need for performing a coupled analysis of the system.

  6. The larvae of Epigomphus jannyae Belle, 1993 and E. tumefactus Calvert, 1903 (Insecta: Odonata: Gomphidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Alonso; Delgado, Débora

    2016-01-01

    The taxonomic knowledge about immature stages of the insect order Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) is rather limited in tropical America. Here, the larvae of Epigomphus jannyae Belle, 1993 and E. tumefactus Calvert, 1903 are described, figured, and compared with other described congeners. E. jannyae larva is characterized by 3rd antennomere 1.6 times longer than its widest part; ligula very poorly developed, with ten short, truncate teeth on middle; apical lobe of labial palp rounded and smooth. Lateral margins on abdominal segments (S5–9) serrated, lateral spines on S6–9 small and divergent; male epiproct with a pair of dorsal tubercles at basal 0.66; tips of cerci and paraprocts strongly divergent. The larva of E. tumefactus is characterized by 3rd antennomere 2.3 times longer than its widest part, ligula with 6–7 truncate teeth, apical lobe of labial palp acute and finely serrate. Lateral margins of S6–9 serrate, lateral spines on S7–9; male epiproct with a pair of dorsal tubercles at basal 0.50. Differences with other species were found in 3rd antennomere, lateral spines of S7–9, and the caudal appendages. Epigomphus larvae inhabit small, shallow creeks (1st order streams) where they live in fine benthic sediments. When mature, the larva leaves the water in shady places, climbing small rocks at the water’s edge and metamorphosing horizontally on flat rocks. These new descriptions bring the total number of Epigomphus species with known larval stages to eight; only 28% of the species in this genus are known as larva. PMID:27635319

  7. The larvae of Epigomphus jannyae Belle, 1993 and E. tumefactus Calvert, 1903 (Insecta: Odonata: Gomphidae).

    PubMed

    Novelo-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Ramírez, Alonso; Delgado, Débora

    2016-01-01

    The taxonomic knowledge about immature stages of the insect order Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) is rather limited in tropical America. Here, the larvae of Epigomphus jannyae Belle, 1993 and E. tumefactus Calvert, 1903 are described, figured, and compared with other described congeners. E. jannyae larva is characterized by 3rd antennomere 1.6 times longer than its widest part; ligula very poorly developed, with ten short, truncate teeth on middle; apical lobe of labial palp rounded and smooth. Lateral margins on abdominal segments (S5-9) serrated, lateral spines on S6-9 small and divergent; male epiproct with a pair of dorsal tubercles at basal 0.66; tips of cerci and paraprocts strongly divergent. The larva of E. tumefactus is characterized by 3rd antennomere 2.3 times longer than its widest part, ligula with 6-7 truncate teeth, apical lobe of labial palp acute and finely serrate. Lateral margins of S6-9 serrate, lateral spines on S7-9; male epiproct with a pair of dorsal tubercles at basal 0.50. Differences with other species were found in 3rd antennomere, lateral spines of S7-9, and the caudal appendages. Epigomphus larvae inhabit small, shallow creeks (1st order streams) where they live in fine benthic sediments. When mature, the larva leaves the water in shady places, climbing small rocks at the water's edge and metamorphosing horizontally on flat rocks. These new descriptions bring the total number of Epigomphus species with known larval stages to eight; only 28% of the species in this genus are known as larva. PMID:27635319

  8. The larvae of Epigomphus jannyae Belle, 1993 and E. tumefactus Calvert, 1903 (Insecta: Odonata: Gomphidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Alonso; Delgado, Débora

    2016-01-01

    The taxonomic knowledge about immature stages of the insect order Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) is rather limited in tropical America. Here, the larvae of Epigomphus jannyae Belle, 1993 and E. tumefactus Calvert, 1903 are described, figured, and compared with other described congeners. E. jannyae larva is characterized by 3rd antennomere 1.6 times longer than its widest part; ligula very poorly developed, with ten short, truncate teeth on middle; apical lobe of labial palp rounded and smooth. Lateral margins on abdominal segments (S5–9) serrated, lateral spines on S6–9 small and divergent; male epiproct with a pair of dorsal tubercles at basal 0.66; tips of cerci and paraprocts strongly divergent. The larva of E. tumefactus is characterized by 3rd antennomere 2.3 times longer than its widest part, ligula with 6–7 truncate teeth, apical lobe of labial palp acute and finely serrate. Lateral margins of S6–9 serrate, lateral spines on S7–9; male epiproct with a pair of dorsal tubercles at basal 0.50. Differences with other species were found in 3rd antennomere, lateral spines of S7–9, and the caudal appendages. Epigomphus larvae inhabit small, shallow creeks (1st order streams) where they live in fine benthic sediments. When mature, the larva leaves the water in shady places, climbing small rocks at the water’s edge and metamorphosing horizontally on flat rocks. These new descriptions bring the total number of Epigomphus species with known larval stages to eight; only 28% of the species in this genus are known as larva.

  9. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Final phase 1, Environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  10. Combustion heat release effects on asymmetric vortex shedding from bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Caleb Nathaniel

    2011-07-01

    reduced the temperature of the recirculating gases further, resulting in large (i.e., near-unity) products-to-reactants density ratios in the near-wake. When the fuel was introduced upstream of the bluff body, the BVK heat release dynamics significantly decreased in amplitude. In this case the fuel was, in all likelihood, fully evaporated and well-mixed with the air prior to burning, resulting in greater amounts of fuel entrainment and subsequent heat release in the near-wake than in the close-coupled fuel injection case. In addition, the heat release was distributed more uniformly across the combustor span, which led to stronger density gradients across the near-wake reaction zone than in close-coupled-fuelled flames due to a lack of reactants entrainment into the recirculation zone. This enhanced the damping of vorticity due to dilatation, which inhibited the formation and shedding of the large-scale, coherent vortices. When the local density gradient was large enough, the BVK instability was completely suppressed. A parallel, linear stability analysis was performed in order to further understand the influence of the near-wake combustion process heat release upon the wake instability characteristics. The results of this analysis indicate that the products-to-reactants density and velocity ratios in the near-wake are the primary parameters controlling the onset of local absolute instability (a necessary condition for the global, BVK instability) in reacting wakes. Upon comparing these results to the measured data, absolute instability was predicted for all operating conditions in which relatively high-amplitude BVK heat release dynamics were observed. This was the case for close-coupled fuel injection at all global equivalence ratios, as well as upstream fuel injection at lean equivalence ratios, due to the low temperature rise across the reacting shear layers in these cases. Only upstream fuel injection at near stoichiometric fuel-air ratios resulted in local products

  11. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.

    1997-02-01

    The Surtsey Test Facility is used to perform scaled experiments simulating High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). The experiments investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load. The results from Zion and Surry experiments can be extrapolated to other Westinghouse plants, but predicted containment loads cannot be generalized to all Combustion Engineering (CE) plants. Five CE plants have melt dispersal flow paths which circumvent the main mitigation of containment compartmentalization in most Westinghouse PWRs. Calvert Cliff-like plant geometries and the impact of codispersed water were addressed as part of the DCH issue resolution. Integral effects tests were performed with a scale model of the Calvert Cliffs NPP inside the Surtsey test vessel. The experiments investigated the effects of codispersal of water, steam, and molten core stimulant materials on DCH loads under prototypic accident conditions and plant configurations. The results indicated that large amounts of coejected water reduced the DCH load by a small amount. Large amounts of debris were dispersed from the cavity to the upper dome (via the annular gap). 22 refs., 84 figs., 30 tabs.

  12. Seasonal to Decadal Change of Arctic Coastal Bluffs, Barter Island, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, B. M.; Gibbs, A.; Erikson, L. H.; Beitch, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Warming air and sea temperatures in the Arctic are leading to elevated levels of permafrost thaw and longer periods of ice-free conditions during the summer months which can lead to increased coastal exposure to storm surge and wave impacts. Using recently collected time-lapse photography, historical maps and imagery, and DEM's derived from airborne lidar and aerial photography using structure from motion (SfM) algorithms, we document coastal bluff change along a 5 km stretch of coast on Barter Island in NE Alaska during a single summer and over several decades. Time-lapse cameras installed during the summers of 2014 and 2015 on the coastal bluffs are used to create an archive of hourly air temperature and pressure, bluff morphology, and sea conditions allowing us to document individual bluff failure events and conditions at the time of failure. The historical rates of bluff retreat are derived from 1947 T-sheet maps, various periods of satellite imagery, aerial orthophoto mosaics, and more recently acquired lidar and SfM DEM data. Coastal change rates at 50 m transect spacing have been calculated over a seven decade time span. We combine these results with elevation models and bluff geology to estimate overall volume change and sediment contribution to the nearshore. These combined datasets are used to better understand the timing and processes of arctic coastal retreat.

  13. Processes of coastal bluff erosion in weakly lithified sands, Pacifica, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, B.D.; Sitar, N.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal bluff erosion and landsliding are currently the major geomorphic processes sculpting much of the marine terrace dominated coastline of northern California. In this study, we identify the spatial and temporal processes responsible for erosion and landsliding in an area of weakly lithified sand coastal bluffs located south of San Francisco, California. Using the results of a five year observational study consisting of site visits, terrestrial lidar scanning, and development of empirical failure indices, we identify the lithologic and process controls that determine the failure mechanism and mode for coastal bluff retreat in this region and present concise descriptions of each process. Bluffs composed of weakly cemented sands (unconfined compressive strength - UCS between 5 and 30??kPa) fail principally due to oversteepening by wave action with maximum slope inclinations on the order of 65 at incipient failure. Periods of significant wave action were identified on the basis of an empirical wave run-up equation, predicting failure when wave run-up exceeds the seasonal average value and the bluff toe elevation. The empirical relationship was verified through recorded observations of failures. Bluffs composed of moderately cemented sands (UCS up to 400??kPa) fail due to precipitation-induced groundwater seepage, which leads to tensile strength reduction and fracture. An empirical rainfall threshold was also developed to predict failure on the basis of a 48-hour cumulative precipitation index but was found to be dependent on a time delay in groundwater seepage in some cases.

  14. Apparatus And Method For Reducing Drag Of A Bluff Body In Ground Effect Using Counter-Rotating Vortex Pairs

    DOEpatents

    Ortega, Jason M.; Sabari, Kambiz

    2005-12-27

    An aerodynamic base drag reduction apparatus and method for bluff bodies, such as tractor-trailer trucks, utilizing a pair of lift surfaces extending to lift surface tips and located alongside the bluff body such as on opposing left and right side surfaces. In a flowstream substantially parallel to the longitudinal centerline of the bluff body, the pair of lift surfaces generate a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices which confluence together in the wake of the bluff body in a direction orthogonal to the flowstream. The confluence draws or otherwise turns the flowstream, such as the flowstream passing over a top surface of the bluff body, in and around behind a trailing end of the bluff body to raise the pressure on a base surface at the trailing end and thereby reduce the aerodynamic base drag.

  15. Apparatus And Method For Reducing Drag Of A Bluff Body In Ground Effect Using Counter-Rotating Vortex Pairs

    DOEpatents

    Ortega, Jason M.; Salari, Kambiz

    2005-08-09

    An aerodynamic base drag reduction apparatus and method for bluff bodies, such as tractor-trailer trucks, utilizing a pair of lift surfaces extending to lift surface tips and located alongside the bluff body such as on opposing left and right side surfaces. In a flowstream substantially parallel to the longitudinal centerline of the bluff body, the pair of lift surfaces generate a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices which confluence together in the wake of the bluff body in a direction orthogonal to the flowstream. The confluence draws or otherwise turns the flowstream, such as the flowstream passing over a top surface of the bluff body, in and around behind a trailing end of the bluff body to raise the pressure on a base surface at the trailing end and thereby reduce the aerodynamic base drag.

  16. Using Ground Based LiDAR to Quantify Bluff Erosion in the LeSueur River Watershed in Southern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S. S.; Belmont, P.; Gran, K.; Jennings, C.; Wilcock, P.; Johnson, A.; Perg, L.

    2008-12-01

    Preliminary studies indicate that bluffs contribute 31-80% of the total annual suspended sediment load for the LeSueur River basin. In an effort to improve this estimate and better quantify the types and locations of bluffs contributing the most sediment, various remote sensing techniques are being utilized. Bluff height, steepness, and location were measured using aerial LiDAR. This is the best way to objectively map bluffs in the watershed and to quantify attributes of each bluff. Aerial photographs from 1938 and 2006 add a historical dimension, allowing us to determine where bluffs have undergone significant erosion over the past 70 years. For one bluff studied erosion rates were on average 31 centimeters per year over the 68 year period. Because these photographs cover the entire study area, erosion rates from rapidly eroding bluffs throughout the watershed can be estimated. In order to be analyzed using this method the bluffs must be eroding at a minimum rate of 14 cm/year. Error is generated by the equations used to warp the photo when georeferencing and by the accuracy of which the user is able to line up control points. Two methods of error analysis have indicated that error of approximately 8-12 meters can be expected from georeferencing the 1938 aerial photos; this error is reduced as more control points are used and when the area being inspected is close to a control point. . The aerial LiDAR and historical photographs were also used to select a variety of bluffs to survey in more detail using ground-based LiDAR, which offers centimeter-scale resolution. The detail in these data make annual changes possible to detect on select bluffs. Combining these data sets will give a more accurate estimate of the overall volume of bluff erosion in this watershed and the details of where and how that erosion is occurring.

  17. Spark ignition of turbulent nonpremixed bluff-body flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.F.; Marchione, T.; Mastorakos, E.; Balachandran, R.

    2007-10-15

    Spark ignition of turbulent nonpremixed bluff-body flames with radial fuel injection for different fuel and air bulk velocities and swirl conditions has been investigated in terms of stability and ignitability limits and ignition probability (P{sub ign}, defined as the probability of igniting the whole flame from a localized 2-mm spark). The velocity field and the mixture fraction distributions have been measured with laser Doppler velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of acetone, respectively. Successful and failed ignition events have been visualized by high-speed and OH PLIF imaging. The results show that the stability limits are much wider than the ignitability limits, but with swirl, they become closer. The mixture fraction distribution shows high sensitivity to any change in the fuel and air velocities, with the mixture inside the central recirculation zone (CRZ) tending to be relatively well-mixed and rich. Visualization of different spark realizations shows that successful ignition events manage to initiate a flame at the separation corner of the bluff body and that the direction of initial flame propagation depends more on the ignition location than on the flow conditions due to the convection of the flame kernel by the mean flow. With successful spark events inside the CRZ the flame expands in all directions, up to a certain point, when it starts forming the shape of the stable flame. The highest P{sub ign} was close to the CRZ boundaries with low P{sub ign} or no ignition inside CRZ when the mixture there was rich. Under conditions where the CRZ is not close to the rich flammability limit, P{sub ign} is substantial. Downstream of the CRZ, P{sub ign} is uniform but low due to the adverse velocity. The probability of just initiating a kernel is higher than P{sub ign}, especially, in the area above the CRZ. With swirl, the highest P{sub ign} is at the burner exit, with no ignition inside the CRZ because the mixture is too lean. The data

  18. Sedimentological indicators of paleoenvironments and siliciclastic stratigraphic sequences in some Miocene deposits of the Calvert Cliffs, southern Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    Middle Miocene siliciclastic deposits comprising the Calvert Cliffs section at the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company's (BG&E) nuclear power plant site in southern Maryland were analyzed in terms of lithostratigraphy, sedimentary structures, and granulometric parameters, to interprete paleo-environments within a sequence-stratigraphic framework. In terms of sequence-stratigraphic models, the BG&E section can be interpreted as consisting of two genetic stratigraphic sequences (Galloway model), namely, a shelf sequence and an overlying deltaic sequence. Using the Exxon model, the section consists of two third-order (1-5 m.y. duration) depositional sequences. The stratigraphic sequences of the BG&E section reflect both relatively short-term eustatic transgressive events, as well as a long-term regressive trend with associated local deltation and coastal progradation. The regression probably signified a regional basinward shift of depocenters within the Salisbury embayment during Miocene time. -from Author

  19. Twin solution calorimeter determines heats of formation of alloys at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darby, J. B., Jr.; Kleb, R.; Kleppa, O. J.

    1968-01-01

    Calvert-type, twin liquid metal solution calorimeter determines the heats of formation of transition metal alloys at high temperatures. The twin differential calorimeter measures the small heat effects generated over extended periods of time, has maximum operating temperature of 1073 degrees K and an automatic data recording system.

  20. Large-Eddy Simulation of Supersonic Axisymmetric Bluff Body Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourbier, D.; Fasel, H. F.

    1997-11-01

    The time-dependent behavior of the turbulent wake of an axisymmetric bluff body is investigated using Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The axisymmetric body is aligned with a supersonic free stream at a Mach number of M_∞ = 2.46 . It has been shown previously that this flow field is subject to an absolute instability for global Reynolds numbers higher than ReD = 30,000 . As a result of this instability large structures are present in the near wake and render the flow field highly unsteady. These structures have a strong influence on the global behavior of the flow field and thus on the overall drag of the body. Commonly used turbulence models (e.g. in RANS) fail to accurately describe the flow field and are inadequate for drag prediction. Preliminary LES calculations for global Reynolds numbers up to ReD = 400,000 using a Smagorinsky type subgrid-scale model with a fixed constant have shown qualitative agreement with experimental observations in terms of pressure distribution along the blunt base and magnitude of rms values in the wake. However, the model is too dissipative for most parts of the free shear layer emanating from the corner of the base and the evolution of structures in the close vicinity of the corner is suppressed. Therefore, a dynamic subgrid-scale model was implemented into the code and tested to evaluate the performance of the model for this flow configuration.

  1. Dynamic modeling of a turbulent axisymmetric bluff-body wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Georgios; Morgans, Aimee; Morrison, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    En route to chaos the stable laminar wake past axisymmetric bluff bodies undergoes two well-documented transitions by increasing the Reynolds number: a steady bifurcation of the m = 1 azimuthal mode followed by an unsteady bifurcation with m = +/- 1 , the latter giving rise to periodic shedding of vortices with opposite signs, known as vortex shedding. In this study we present experimental evidence that these structures persist far from the critical points at high Reynolds numbers (Re = 2 ×105). We show that a low-order model based on the normal form describing the codimension-two bifurcation captures accurately the dynamic behavior of the large-scale coherent structures associated with the destabilized modes, if noise is appropriately accounted for in the model. The model is validated based on simultaneous aerodynamic force measurements on the base of an axisymmetric bullet-shaped body and Time-Resolved Stereo PIV in the near wake. Finally, we extend the model to include external forcing when periodic blowing and suction is applied at the base below the point of separation.

  2. Experimental aerodynamic study of a car-type bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conan, Boris; Anthoine, Jérôme; Planquart, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    The Ahmed body is used as a reference model for fundamental studies of car-type bluff body aerodynamics, in particular focused on the influence of the rear slant angle on the drag coefficient. The objectives of the present work are to obtain reliable drag coefficient comparable to the literature and to explain, based on the nature of the flow, its variation when changing the rear slant angle from 10° to 40°. The drag coefficients measured in both an open and a closed test sections differ by less than 0.5% which proves the reliability and reproducibility of the results. The sensitivity of the drag coefficient to some parameters such as the model roughness or the oncoming boundary layer and the lack of precise information on these parameters in the literature could explain the difference observed with the Ahmed drag coefficient data. The various types of measurement techniques used in the study underline their complementarity. The combination of particle image velocimetry and oil visualization provides a deeper understanding of the flow behaviour around the Ahmed body and a physical interpretation of the drag coefficient evolution.

  3. Influence of the bluff body shear layers on the wake of a square prism in a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, D. C.; Letchford, C. W.; Amitay, M.; Kopp, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Despite a substantial body of literature dealing with the effects of free-stream turbulence (FST) on two-dimensional square prism, there remain some open questions regarding the influence of the bluff body shear layer development in a highly perturbed environment and the resulting impact on bluff body flow characteristics. Accordingly, flows with ambient and enhanced FST were studied at ReD=5.0 ×104 using long-duration time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV). The data indicate a narrowing and lengthening of the mean wake and an accompanying rise in base pressure. Using triple decomposition, the underlying dynamics of the wake reveal a streamwise lengthening of the individual von Kármán vortex structures, complementing the increase in mean wake length. Close inspection of the shear layer region, in the presence of FST, indicates a substantial increase in curvature towards the body but no pronounced increase in the growth rate. The loci of maximum turbulent kinetic energy and spanwise vorticity in the shear layer region further reveal that the most pronounced changes occur during the very initial stages follow separation. Inspection of a series of instantaneous PIV fields of Q criterion show that the conventional transition pathway, via the formation and subsequent pairing of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices, is bypassed. The KH vortices are observed to immediately cluster and amalgamate before breaking into smaller random eddies. The bypass transition is followed by shear layer reattachment in some cases. This is considered a primary mechanism responsible for the reported changes in the global flow characteristics and the altered wake dynamics. Furthermore, a quantitative definition of the diffusion length is implemented for the square prism wake and its relationship to the Strouhal number and wake formation length is considered.

  4. 33 CFR 207.169 - Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.169 Section 207.169 Navigation... REGULATIONS § 207.169 Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration,...

  5. 33 CFR 207.169 - Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.169 Section 207.169 Navigation... REGULATIONS § 207.169 Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration,...

  6. 33 CFR 207.169 - Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.169 Section 207.169 Navigation... REGULATIONS § 207.169 Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration,...

  7. 33 CFR 207.169 - Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.169 Section 207.169 Navigation... REGULATIONS § 207.169 Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration,...

  8. 33 CFR 207.169 - Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.169 Section 207.169 Navigation... REGULATIONS § 207.169 Oklawaha River, navigation lock and dam at Moss Bluff, Fla.; use, administration,...

  9. Symmetry breaking of rigid/flexible plates in bluff body wakes generates rotation and drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosse, Nicolas; Lacis, Ugis; Lundell, Fredrik; Bagheri, Shervin; Ingremeau, Francois; Kellay, Hamid; Mazzino, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Bluff body wakes have historically been important for understanding nature and aiding industry. For Reynolds numbers above approximately Re ~ 10 , a recirculation bubble develops behind the bluff body. If a solid or elastic appendage is attached to the bluff body, it may exert a torque and a side force on the body. We use theory, numerical simulations and experiments to investigate and explain this phenomenon. More specifically, numerical simulations are carried out for a freely falling cylinder with an attached splitter plate for Re ~ 50 . Experiments of a fixed cylinder with an attached elastic filament are preformed using a vertical soap-film tunnel for Re ~ 2000 . Both experiments and simulations reveal that if a body has an appendage smaller than or of the same order as the body it is attached to, the body rotates and drifts. We explain our findings with a simple model and discuss the implications for propulsion.

  10. Real-time monitoring of bluff stability at Woodway, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baum, R.L.; Harp, E.L.; Likos, W.J.; Powers, P.S.; LaHusen, R.G.; ,

    1998-01-01

    On January 15, 1997, a landslide of approximately 100,000-m3 from a coastal bluff swept five cars of a freight train into Puget Sound at Woodway, Washington, USA, 25 km north of downtown Seattle. The landslide resulted from failure of a sequence of dense sands and hard silts of glacial and non-glacial origin, including the Lawton Clay, a hard, jointed clayey silt that rarely fails in natural slopes. Joints controlled ground-water seepage through the silt and break-up of the landslide mass. During September of 1997, the US Geological Survey began measuring rainfall, ground-water pressures, and slope movement at the bluff where the landslide occurred. Data are collected every 15 minutes and updated hourly on the World-Wide-Web. Pore pressures observed from September 1997 to February 1998 generally were low and pressures near the bluff face, in the upper few meters of the hard clayey silt, increased gradually.

  11. DNS of turbulent flow past a bluff body with a compliant tensegrity surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karandikar, Anish; Bewley, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to study turbulent incompressible flow past a bluff body with a compliant surface. We use a 3D time-dependent coordinate transformation to account for the motion of the bluff body surface. Spatially, the flow domain is discretized using a dealiased pseudospectral method in the axial and azimuthal directions, while the radial (wall-normal) direction is discretized using a finite difference scheme. The grid is stretched in the azimuthal direction, which is handled spectrally. This leads to a unique challenge when solving the Poisson equation in the fractional step method for the time march, which we address with both multigrid and preconditioned BiCGStab algorithms. We are presently extending this flow code with a model for the compliant bluff body surface based on the ``tensegrity fabric'' paradigm which combines compressive members (bars) and tensile members (tendons) in a stable, flexible network.

  12. Study of motion of flexible eel from the wake of bluff body in a cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Vai Kuong; Deng, Wen Yue; Xiao, Wei Hang

    2012-09-01

    In this research, interaction between eel and vortex shedding behind a bluff body is studied numerically, aiming to optimize the oscillation of eels by coupling with the altering vertices. Effects of different factors such as length of eel, width of bluff body and flow speed on vibration of eels are also aimed to be investigated. A 2-dimensional Fluid-Structure Interaction Model that simulates the motion of eel under vortex shedding behind a bluff body is constructed by using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software - COMSOL Multiphysics. Simulations based on laminar flow regime are performed and the results show that undulating motion of the eel is successfully modeled with the Fluid-Structure Interaction Model along with Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method.

  13. National Assessment of Historical Shoreline Change: A Pilot Study of Historical Coastal Bluff Retreat in the Great Lakes, Erie, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Malone, Shamus; Kratzmann, Meredith G.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal bluff retreat is a chronic problem along many high-relief coastlines in the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regard-ing trends and rates of bluff retreat. There is also a need for a comprehensive analysis that is consistent from one coastal region to another. To address these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards Project, conducted a pilot study of bluff retreat along the Lake Erie, Pa., coastline to assess the feasibility of undertaking a larger, multi-state analysis in the Great Lakes region. This report provides an overview of the pilot-study location and bluff geomorphology, the data sources and methodology, results of the analysis, and a discussion of the feasibility of undertaking a similar analysis along eroding bluffs in other Great Lakes states. This pilot study is part of an ongoing effort by the USGS to provide a comprehensive analysis of historical shoreline change and cliff and bluff retreat along open-ocean coastlines of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii, Alaska, and the Great Lakes. One purpose of the work is to develop standard, repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing coastal change so that systematic and consistent periodic updates of coastal erosion can be made nationally. Bluff-retreat evaluations are conducted by comparing the location of a historical bluff edge digitized from aerial photographs with those of recent bluff edges interpreted from both aerial photographs and lidar topographic surveys. The historical bluff edge is from 1938, whereas the more recent bluff edges are from 1998 and 2006 lidar data. Long-term (68-year) rates of retreat are calculated using the available bluff-edge data. The rates of retreat presented in this report represent conditions from the 1930s to 1998/2006, and are not intended for

  14. Wall effect on fluid-structure interactions of a tethered bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumant; Raghav, Vrishank; Komerath, Narayanan; Smith, Marilyn

    2013-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments have shown an unexplained amplification of the free motion of a tethered bluff body in a small wind tunnel relative to that in a large wind tunnel. The influence of wall proximity on fluid-structure interaction is explored using a compound pendulum motion in the plane orthogonal to a steady freestream with a doublet model for aerodynamic forces. Wall proximity amplifies a purely symmetric single degree of freedom oscillation with the addition of an out-of-phase force. The success of this simple level of simulation enables progress to develop metrics for unsteady wall interference in dynamic testing of tethered bluff bodies.

  15. Distributed forcing of the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, Thierry; Bury, Yannick; DAEP Team

    2012-11-01

    The topology of bluff body wakes may be highly sensitive to forcing at frequencies close to intrinsic flow instabilities. In a similar way, a steady but spatially varying forcing at wavelengths close to specific flow instabilities can lead to analogous outcomes. Such forcing is commonly referred to as distributed forcing. However, although distributed forcing has proven to be a relevant control strategy for three-dimensional flows past nominally two-dimensional geometries (e.g. extruded circular cylinder at Re > 180), its impact on the flow past nominally three-dimensional geometries is still unknown. Here we assess the receptivity of the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body to an azimuthally distributed forcing applied at the periphery of the bluff-body base. We show that the impact of RSPa, RSPb and RSPc instabilities on the drag fluctuations experienced by the bluff body can be suppressed, depending on the forcing wavelengths. The authors acknowledge the French Ministry of Defence and DGA for funding this work.

  16. Distributed forcing of the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, Thierry; Bury, Yannick

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we address the influence of a blowing-/suction-type distributed forcing on the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body by means of direct numerical simulations. The forcing is applied via consecutive blowing and suction slots azimuthally distributed along the trailing edge of the bluff body. We examine the impact of the forcing wavelength, amplitude and waveform on the drag experienced by the bluff body and on the occurrence of the reflectional symmetry preserving and reflectional symmetry breaking wake modes, for Reynolds numbers 800 and 1,000. We show that forcing the flow at wavelengths inherent to the unforced flow drastically damps drag oscillations associated with the vortex shedding and vorticity bursts, up to their complete suppression. The overall parameter analysis suggests that this damping results from the surplus of streamwise vorticity provided by the forcing that tends to stabilize the ternary vorticity lobes observed at the aft part of the bluff body. In addition, conversely to a blowing-type or suction-type forcing, the blowing-/suction-type forcing involves strong nonlinear interactions between locally decelerated and accelerated regions, severely affecting both the mean drag and the frequencies representative of the vortex shedding and vorticity bursts.

  17. Maastrichtian ammonites chiefly from the Prairie Bluff Chalk in Alabama and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, W.A.; Kennedy, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Prairie Bluff Chalk of Alabama and Mississippi yields a diverse ammonite fauna of Maastrichtian age. Twenty-eight species, of which three are new, are recorded. The bulk of the fauna can be referred to a Discoscaphites conradi assemblage zone, but some elements in the fauna are significantly older. -Authors

  18. Review of thermal-hydraulic calculations for Calvert Cliffs and H. B. Robinson PTS study. [Pressurized thermal shock

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J.H.; Yuelys-Miksis, C.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic transient calculations performed by LANL using the TRAC-PF1 code and by INEL using the RELAP5 code for the USNRC pressurized thermal shock (PTS) study of the Calvert Cliffs and H.B. Robinson Nuclear Power Plants have been reviewed at BNL including the input decks and steady state calculations. Furthermore, six transients for each plant have been selected for the in-depth review. Simple hand calculations based on the mass and energy balances of the entire reactor system, have been performed to predict the temperature and pressure of the reactor system, and the results have been compared with those obtained by the code calculation. In general, the temperatures and pressures of the primary system calculated by the codes have been very reasonable. The secondary pressures calculated by TRAC appear to indicate that the codes have some difficulty with the condensation model and further work is needed to assess the code calculation of the U-tube steam generator pressure when the cold auxiliary feedwater is introduced to the steam generator. However, it is not expected that this uncertainty would affect the transient calculations significantly.

  19. Drag reduction in flow over a two-dimensional bluff body with a blunt trailing edge using a new passive device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyungmin; Lee, Dongkon; Jeon, Woo-Pyung; Hahn, Seonghyeon; Kim, Jeonglae; Kim, Jungwoo; Choi, Jin; Choi, Haecheon

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, we present a new passive control device for form-drag reduction in flow over a two-dimensional bluff body with a blunt trailing edge. The device consists of small tabs attached to the upper and lower trailing edges of a bluff body to effectively perturb a two-dimensional wake. Both a wind-tunnel experiment and large-eddy simulation are carried out to examine its drag-reduction performance. Extensive parametric studies are performed experimentally by varying the height and width of the tab and the spanwise spacing between the adjacent tabs at three Reynolds numbers of Re {=} u_infty h/nu {=} 20 000, 40 000 and 80 000, where u_infty is the free-stream velocity and h is the body height. For a wide parameter range, the base pressure increases (i.e. drag reduces) at all three Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, a significant increase in the base pressure by more than 30% is obtained for the optimum tab configuration. Numerical simulations are performed at much lower Reynolds numbers of Re {=} 320 and 4200 to investigate the mechanism responsible for the base-pressure increase by the tab. Results from the velocity measurement and numerical simulations show that the tab introduces the spanwise mismatch in the vortex-shedding process, resulting in a substantial reduction of the vortical strength in the wake and significant increases in the vortex formation length and wake width.

  20. Environmental radionuclide concentrations in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant and the Peach Bottom Atomic Power station: 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.S.; Frithsen, J.B.; McLean, R.I.

    1997-02-01

    The Maryland Power Plant Research Program monitors concentrations of natural, weapons, and power plant produced radionuclides in environmental samples collected from the Chesapeake Bay in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) and from the Susquehanna River-Chesapeake Bay system in the vicinity of Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station (PBAPS). The purpose of this monitoring is to determine the fate, transport, and potential effects of power plant produced radionuclides. Radionuclide concentrations in shellfish, finfish, aquatic vegetation, and sediment were measured using high-resolution gamma spectrometry. Radionuclides in environmental samples originated from natural sources, atmospheric weapons testing, and normal operations of CCNPP and PBAPS.

  1. Experiments on spray interactions in the wake of a bluff body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudoff, R. C.; Houser, M. J.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of spray drop interaction within the turbulent wake of a bluff body were investigated using the Aerometrics Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer that determines both drop size and velocity. Detailed measurements obtained included spray drop size, axial and radial velocity, angle of trajectory, and size-velocity correlations. The gas-phase flow field was also ascertained via the behavior of the smallest drops. Results showed dramatic differences in drop behavior when interacting with turbulence for the various size classes. Small drops were recirculated in a pair of toroidal vortices located behind the bluff body, whereas the larger drops followed the general direction of the spray cone angle. The spray field interaction illustrated by these data casts some doubt on attempts to describe sprays via simple integral quantities such as the Sauter mean diameter.

  2. Aerodynamic drag reduction apparatus for gap-divided bluff bodies such as tractor-trailers

    DOEpatents

    Ortega, Jason M.; Salari, Kambiz

    2006-07-11

    An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic drag of a bluff-bodied vehicle such as a tractor-trailer in a flowstream, the bluff-bodied vehicle of a type having a leading portion, a trailing portion connected to the leading portion, and a gap between the leading and trailing portions defining a recirculation zone. The apparatus is preferably a baffle assembly, such as a vertical panel, adapted to span a width of the gap between the leading and trailing portions so as to impede cross-flow through the gap, with the span of the baffle assembly automatically adjusting for variations in the gap width when the leading and trailing portions pivot relative to each other.

  3. Simulations and experiments on the ignition probability in turbulent premixed bluff-body flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitte, Michael Philip; Bach, Ellen; Kariuki, James; Bauer, Hans-Jörg; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2016-05-01

    The ignition characteristics of a premixed bluff-body burner under lean conditions were investigated experimentally and numerically with a physical model focusing on ignition probability. Visualisation of the flame with a 5 kHz OH* chemiluminescence camera confirmed that successful ignitions were those associated with the movement of the kernel upstream, consistent with previous work on non-premixed systems. Performing many separate ignition trials at the same spark position and flow conditions resulted in a quantification of the ignition probability Pign, which was found to decrease with increasing distance downstream of the bluff body and a decrease in equivalence ratio. Flows corresponding to flames close to the blow-off limit could not be ignited, although such flames were stable if reached from a richer already ignited condition. A detailed comparison with the local Karlovitz number and the mean velocity showed that regions of high Pign are associated with low Ka and negative bulk velocity (i.e. towards the bluff body), although a direct correlation was not possible. A modelling effort that takes convection and localised flame quenching into account by tracking stochastic virtual flame particles, previously validated for non-premixed and spray ignition, was used to estimate the ignition probability. The applicability of this approach to premixed flows was first evaluated by investigating the model's flame propagation mechanism in a uniform turbulence field, which showed that the model reproduces the bending behaviour of the ST-versus-u‧ curve. Then ignition simulations of the bluff-body burner were carried out. The ignition probability map was computed and it was found that the model reproduces all main trends found in the experimental study.

  4. The effect of ground proximity on the inviscid flow around three-dimensional bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankbadi, R. R.

    1985-06-01

    The source panel method is used to simulate the inviscid flow field of three-dimensional bluff bodies in ground proximity. The forebody pressure drag is found to decrease as the ground clearance is reduced. The frontal stagnation point moves toward the ground plane with reducing the ground clearance. The ground effect on the top flow is negligible but the bottom flow is strongly influenced by the presence of the ground plane.

  5. Symmetry breaking in 3D wake of a bluff body generates rotation and drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacis, Ugis; Brosse, Nicolas; Bagheri, Shervin; Lundell, Fredrik; Mazzino, Andrea; Olivieri, Stefano; Kellay, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    Bluff body wakes have historically been important for understanding nature and aiding industry. For Reynolds numbers above approximately Re ~ 10 , a recirculation bubble develops behind the bluff body. If a solid or elastic appendage is attached to the bluff body, it may exert a torque and a side force on the body. Previously we have used theory, numerical simulations and experiments to investigate and explain this phenomenon in two dimensions. Now we advance our investigation to three dimensional objects. More specifically, we consider a sphere and attach a sheet of given shape behind it for Re = 200 . We investigate the problem using numerical simulations and extend our theoretical model developed in two dimensions. Then we complement our findings with water tank experiments of freely falling cylinder with sheet of various mass behind it. We show that the torque and side force can be greatly changed if the density of the sheet is different compared to the cylinder. Finally we discuss the possibility of optimal configurations for propulsion generation.

  6. Transition to bluff body dynamics in the wake of vertical axis turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Daniel; Dabiri, John

    2015-11-01

    A unifying characteristic among bluff bodies is a similar wake structure independent of the shape of the body. We present experimental data to demonstrate that the wake of a vertical axis wind/water turbine (VAWT) shares similar features to that of a bluff body, namely a circular cylinder. For a fixed Reynolds number (Re ~ 104) and variable tip-speed ratio, 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to measure the velocity field in the wake of three different laboratory-scale turbines: a 2-bladed, 3-bladed, and 5-bladed VAWT, each with similar geometry. From the PIV measurements, the time-averaged and dynamic characteristics of the wake are evaluated. In all cases, we observe three distinct regions in the VAWT wake: (1) the near wake, where periodic blade shedding dominates; (2) a transition region, where blade vortices decay and growth of a shear layer instability occurs; (3) the far wake, where bluff body wake oscillations dominate. We further characterize this wake transition with regard to turbine solidity and examine its relation to the mean flow, an important metric for power production within a wind farm.

  7. Hydrodynamic and chemical effects of hydrogen dilution on soot evolution in turbulent nonpremixed bluff body ethylene flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Sili; Mueller, Michael E.; Chan, Qing N.; Qamar, Nader H.; Dally, Bassam B.; Alwahabi, Zeyad T.; Nathan, Graham J.

    2015-11-01

    A turbulent nonpremixed bluff body ethylene/hydrogen (volume ratio 2:1) flame is studied and compared with the ethylene counterpart [Mueller et al., Combust. Flame, 160, 2013]. Similar to the ethylene buff body flame, a low-strain recirculation zone, a high-strain neck region, and a downstream jet-like region are observed. However, the maximum soot volume fraction in the recirculation zone of the hydrogen diluted case is significantly lower than the ethylene case. Large Eddy Simulation is used to further investigate soot evolution in the recirculation zone and to elucidate the role of hydrogen dilution. Since the central jet Reynolds numbers in both cases are the same (approximately 30,900), the jet velocity of the hydrogen diluted case is higher, resulting in a shorter and leaner recirculation zone. In addition, hydrogen dilution chemically suppresses soot formation due to the reduction of C/H ratio. Consequently, the reduction of the soot volume fraction for the hydrogen diluted ethylene flame is attributed to two major effects: hydrodynamic and chemical effects.

  8. Drag and lift reduction of a 3D bluff-body using active vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aider, Jean-Luc; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    In this study, a passive flow control experiment on a 3D bluff-body using vortex generators (VGs) is presented. The bluff-body is a modified Ahmed body (Ahmed in J Fluids Eng 105:429-434 1983) with a curved rear part, instead of a slanted one, so that the location of the flow separation is no longer forced by the geometry. The influence of a line of non-conventional trapezoïdal VGs on the aerodynamic forces (drag and lift) induced on the bluff-body is investigated. The high sensitivity to many geometric (angle between the trapezoïdal element and the wall, spanwise spacing between the VGs, longitudinal location on the curved surface) and physical (freestream velocity) parameters is clearly demonstrated. The maximum drag reduction is -12%, while the maximum global lift reduction can reach more than -60%, with a strong dependency on the freestream velocity. For some configurations, the lift on the rear axle of the model can be inverted (-104%). It is also shown that the VGs are still efficient even downstream of the natural separation line. Finally, a dynamic parameter is chosen and a new set-up with motorized vortex generators is proposed. Thanks to this active device. The optimal configurations depending on two parameters are found more easily, and a significant drag and lift reduction (up to -14% drag reduction) can be reached for different freestream velocities. These results are then analyzed through wall pressure and velocity measurements in the near-wake of the bluff-body with and without control. It appears that the largest drag and lift reduction is clearly associated to a strong increase of the size of the recirculation bubble over the rear slant. Investigation of the velocity field in a cross-section downstream the model reveals that, in the same time, the intensity of the longitudinal trailing vortices is strongly reduced, suggesting that the drag reduction is due to the breakdown of the balance between the separation bubble and the longitudinal vortices

  9. Guide to Surficial Geology and River-Bluff Exposures, Noatak National Preserve, Northwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    From its origin in rugged granitic highlands of the central Brooks Range, the Noatak River flows westward between the De Long Mountains and the Baird Mountains before turning south to enter Kotzebue Sound. Glaciers of middle and late Pleistocene age entered the Noatak River valley from the east, north, and south. Glaciers flowed down the upper Noatak River valley from the rugged peaks at its head, merging with tributary glaciers that issued from cirque-headed valleys along its south flank. Farther downvalley, small glaciers flowed northward from the Baird Mountains and much larger glaciers issued from the De Long Mountains. The De Long Mountains glaciers expanded southward to cover parts of the Noatak valley floor; they dammed the Noatak River during successive advances, creating a series of glacial lakes. The more extensive glacial advances dammed huge lakes that filled the Aniuk Lowland to overflowing. At various times, overflow waters spilled northward through Howard Pass, southward via Hunt River into the Kobuk River system, and westward down a series of channelways that skirted south of the glacier margins. Prominent bluffs along the Noatak River and its principal tributaries reveal glacial, glaciolacustrine, fluvial, and eolian sediments. More than 120 measured bluff exposures are described and illustrated in this report. These are dated by 92 radiocarbon age determinations and by the presence of the old Crow tephra, which was deposited about 130,000-140,000 years ago. Six geologic base maps, which cover sections of the Noatak River valley from east to west, show the locations of the river bluffs in relation to the glacial, glaciolacustrine, and fluvial deposits that cover the valley floor. The upper Noatak River valley is dominated by a bulky end moraine near Douglas Creek that was deposited during the last glacial maximum about 25,000-15,000 14C yr BP (termed the Itkillik II phase in the central Brooks Range glacial succession). Bluffs along this section of

  10. Transitions to chaos in the wake of an axisymmetric bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Yannick; Jardin, Thierry

    2012-10-01

    This Letter aims at understanding the dynamical process that leads to the onset of chaos in the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body. On the basis of direct numerical simulations, conducted for Reynolds numbers ranging from 100 to 900, we show that the flow undergoes multiple transitions, successively giving rise to the SS, RSPa, RSPb, RSPc and RSB wake states. In particular, the RSPc state, revealed in this work via long-term computations, is characterized by intermittent vortex stretching denoting the onset of chaos before the symmetry breaking and the occurrence of the RSB state.

  11. A vortex panel analysis of circular-arc bluff-bodies in unsteady flow

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    A method which is capable of calculating the unsteady flow field around circular-arc bluff bodies of zero thickness is presented. This method utilizes linear vortex panels to model the body surface and a portion of the wake surfaces. Discrete vortices are used to model the remainder of the wake surfaces. Separation is assumed to occur at the sharp edges of the bodies. Numerical results for circular-arc bodies with included angles of less than 180/degree/ are compared with experimental data and found to be in good agreement. 31 refs., 15 figs.

  12. A vortex code for flow over rigid or flexible bluff bodies*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, James; Porter, Vicki; Homicz, Greg; Gossler, Albert

    2002-10-01

    In this paper we discuss version 1.0 of the computer code (CURL) that we have developed to simulate unsteady, 3D, incompressible flows around rigid and flexible bluff bodies whose geometries are made up from thin membrane or ribbon elements. The motivation for this work comes from Sandia National Laboratories' need to perform complete numerical simulations of parachute deployment, inflation, and steady descent. First-generation serial and parallel versions of the uncoupled fluids code have been developed. In addition, a fluid-structure coupling scheme has been developed. Preliminary results for both a rigid and a flexible cross parachute are presented herein.

  13. Reduction of Aerodynamic Noise Generated by a Bluff-Shaped Pantograph Head Using Synthetic Jet Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishige, Hiroaki; Minobe, Takayuki; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Masahiro

    With an increase in the maximum speed of Shinkansen trains, it becomes imperative to resolve aerodynamic and aeroacoustic problems related to pantographs. Hence, some methods based on flow control have been studied to improve the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic characteristics. In this study, the authors attempted to control the flow around a pantograph by using synthetic jets. The results of numerical and experimental tests indicate that the synthetic jets can stabilize the flow around the bluff-shaped pantograph head, thus resulting in a reduction in aerodynamic noise.

  14. 230. CCC Camp NP21 was established at the Bluffs (Doughton ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    230. CCC Camp NP-21 was established at the Bluffs (Doughton Park) located on what is now the Doughton Park Maintenance Area. It opened September 1, 1938 and was abandoned July 17, 1942. Crews were assigned to the first landscape development on the parkway in the Cumberland Knob Area. This work entailed removal of debris and downed wood, slope flattening and rounding, seeding shoulders and planting along the road, and improvement of fields and forest to the side of the roadway. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  15. Numerical simulation of turbulent coherent structures of flows past a bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chuanjun; Xu, Chenggang; Zhu, Huiling; Tan, Ming; Wang, Hongchi

    The model used to arrive at the present numerical results of unsteady, two-dimensional turbulent reacting flow past a bluff body is based on Chorin's (1973) random vortex method and a simple line interface calculation for a flame propagation algorithm. A triangular prism is used as a flame holder, and solutions for both reacting and nonreacting flows are obtained. The numerical results encompass the vorticity field, the average velocity field, turbulence statistics, flame contours, and the concentration field, revealing a Karman vortex street coherent structure and illuminating the processes of ignition, stabilization, and propagation of the premixed flame.

  16. Simulation of separated flow past a bluff body using Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghia, K. N.; Ghia, U.; Osswald, G. A.; Liu, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional flow past a bluff body is presently simulated on the basis of an analysis that employs the incompressible, unsteady Navier-Stokes equations in terms of vorticity and stream function. The fully implicit, time-marching, alternating-direction, implicit-block Gaussian elimination used is a direct method with second-order spatial accuracy; this allows it to avoid the introduction of any artificial viscosity. Attention is given to the simulation of flow past a circular cylinder with and without symmetry, requiring the use of either the half or the full cylinder, respectively.

  17. Environmental radionuclide concentrations in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant and the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station: 1996--1997. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, R.I.; Jones, T.S.

    1998-11-20

    The Maryland Power Plant Research Program monitors concentrations of natural, weapons, and power plant produced radionuclides in environmental samples collected from the Chesapeake Bay in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) and from the Susquehanna River-Chesapeake Bay system in the vicinity of Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station (PBAPS). The purpose of this monitoring is to determine the fate, transport, and potential effects of power plant-produced radionuclides. This report contains a description of monitoring activities and data collected during the 1996 and 1997 calendar years. Radionuclide concentrations in shellfish, finfish, aquatic vegetation, and sediment were measured using high-resolution gamma spectrometry. Radionuclides in environmental samples originated from natural sources, historic atmospheric weapons testing, and normal operations of CCNPP and PBAPS.

  18. Using Ground based LiDAR to identify the processes of bluff erosion in the LeSueur River basin in Southern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S. S.; Gran, K. B.; Belmont, P.; Jennings, C. E.; Wawrzyniec, T. F.

    2009-12-01

    Like with aerial LiDAR, the many benefits of ground ground-based LiDAR are continuing to be discovered. Ground Ground-based LiDAR offers high high-resolution surveys of vertical features like bluffs and stream banks. When the surveys are repeated and compared, the data can reveal not only the rate of erosion, but in some cases the processes responsible for erosion. Three years of LiDAR surveys at fifteen sites in the Le Sueur River basin in southern Minnesota have revealed that the bluff composition as well as the degree of consolidation dictates the erosion rate and the processes which cause them to erode. The bluffs in this basin are composed of glacial tills at varying degrees of compaction. Because this basin is incising, many of the bluffs are cut into terraces capped by alluvium. Over-consolidated bluffs tend to fail along joints, as large blocks. The tills which are not over-consolidated fail due to undercutting as the toe of the bluff is eroded by the river. Finally, those bluffs which are capped by alluvium fail do due to undercutting at the toe, as well as by groundwater flow through the gravel layer at the base of the alluvium. Bluffs in the Le Sueur River contribute significantly towards a turbidity impairment in the basin, and understanding both the rate of erosion and the processes by which these bluffs erode can help managers target remediation practices. In this basin ground-based LiDAR has not only helped to quantify bluff erosion, but has also shown the dominant erosion process.

  19. Data supporting the screening risk assessment for the Pine Bluff Arsenal Chemical Demilitarization Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, W.E.

    1995-08-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal is a U.S. Army Armament, Munitions, and Chemical Command (AMCCOM) facility located in Jefferson County, Arkansas; 30 miles southeast of Little Rock and eight miles northwest of Pine Bluff, Arkansas. The arsenal encompasses 14,956 acres of land, most of which (61 percent) is designated as open space/clearance zones. Most of this area is managed for forest products under the arsenal`s timber management program. Approximately 21 percent of the facility supports the munitions supply and storage operations (18 percent conventional munitions, 3 percent chemical agent and munitions). Six percent of the facility contains the conventional munitions maintenance and production areas. The remaining 15 percent of the property is comprised of other administrative, operational, and housing areas along with the Food and Drug Administration`s National Center for Toxicological Research. The arsenal has been in operation since 1941 and has been storing lethal unitary chemical agents since 1942. The arsenal is one of eight sites that stores lethal unitary agents in the United States.

  20. Simulation, Modeling and Feedback Control of the flow around a Square-Back Bluff Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Longa, Laurent; Morgans, Aimee; Imperial College London-Flow Control Team

    2015-11-01

    Because of capacity, aesthetic and comfort requirements, most road vehicles are not streamlined but blunt bluff bodies. The flow exhibits a large wake recirculation area leading to high pressure drag, which at highway speeds, represents the main source of energy loss. In this work, Large Eddy Simulations of the flow past a square-back bluff body with interacting shear layers are performed with the aim of reducing aerodynamic drag. A linear feedback control strategy is applied to increase the back face pressure and therefore obtain drag reduction. Synthetic jets located along the perimeter of the back face are used for actuation while body mounted sensors record the base pressure. System identification, via harmonic actuator forcing, is used to characterize the flow response to actuation, which is assumed to be dynamically linear. Based on the identified frequency response, a feedback controller is designed in the frequency domain which aims to either attenuate or amplify base pressure fluctuations by shaping of the sensitivity transfer function. This is first done for a D-shaped body. Current work extends this strategy to a simplified lorry geometry on which experiments were carried out recently.

  1. Bluff-body stabilized flame dynamics of lean premixed syngas combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hong G.; Kim, Yu Jeong; Lee, Bok Jik; Kaust Team

    2015-11-01

    Recently, syngas combustion has been actively investigated for the potential application to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While lean premixed combustion is attractive for both reduced emission and enhanced efficiency, flame instability becomes often an issue. Bluff-bodies have been adopted as effective flame holders for practical application of premixed flames. In the present study, high-fidelity direct numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of lean premixed syngas flames stabilized on a bluff-body, in particular at the near blow-off regime of the flame. A two-dimensional domain of 4 mm height and 20 mm length with a flame holder of a 1 mm-by-1 mm square geometry is used. For a syngas mixture with the equivalence ratio of 0.5 and the CO:H2 ratio of 1, several distinct flame modes are identified as the inflow velocity approaches to the blowoff limit. The sequences of extinction pathway and combustion characteristics are discussed.

  2. The molluscan fauna of the Alum Bluff group of Florida, Part II, Astartacea, Carditacea, Chamacea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Julia

    1926-01-01

    The first of the series of papers upon the Mollusca of the Alum Bluff group covered the orders of the Prionodesmacea and the Anomalodesmacea. The Mollusca were by the beginning of Miocene time so far advances in development that the great majority are included under the highest of the three orders, the Teleodesmacea, characterized in the adult stages by the differentiation of the hinge teeth into distinct cardinals and laterals. This paper, the second of the series, covers the most primitive of the Teleodesmacea in the Alum Bluff group. All three of the superfamilies considered - the Astartacea, the Carditaeea, and the Chamacea-are included under Dall's group of the Diogenodonta, which is characterized in the normal forms by one or two laterals and not more than three cardinals. The Carditacea are very closely related to the Astartacea in hinge armature but differ in the development of a pronounced radial sculpture. The Chamacea have until recently been considered an offshooting group from the Carditacea that have been greatly modified by their sessile habit. Some doubt has been thrown upon this relationship by the late morphologic studies of Odhner.

  3. Bluff body wakes with free, fixed, and discontinuous separation at low Reynolds numbers and low aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrusma, M. S.; Gai, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    Some comparative experimental results are presented of bluff body wakes with free, fixed, and discontinuous separation. The particular examples considered are a circular cylinder, a plain blunt trailing edge aerofoil and a segemented blunt trailing edge aerofoil. The evolution of the near wake and vortex shedding modes are compared and discussed.

  4. The Dietary guideline 2005 and physical activities role in weight management of University Arkansas at Pine Bluff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the weight loss initiative, researchers at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff conducted an obesity prevention intervention based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans approach. A 12 month study was conducted that focused on interventions to improve physical ...

  5. Flow-induced noise control behind bluff bodies with various leading edges using the surface perturbation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. B.; Halim, D.; Cheng, L.

    2016-05-01

    The present paper is devoted to an investigation on the flow-induced noise control downstream of bluff bodies with various leading edges using the surface perturbation technique. Four typical leading edges used in various engineering applications were studied in this work: the semi-circular, square, 30° symmetric trapezoid and 30° asymmetric trapezoid leading edges. The surface perturbation was created by piezo-ceramic actuators embedded underneath the surface of a bluff body placed in a cross flow. To suppress the flow-induced noise downstream bluff bodies with those leading edges, the surface perturbation technique was implemented. Based on the experiments, a noise reduction in the duct of more than 14.0 dB has been achieved for all leading-edge cases. These results indicated that the vortex shedding and its flow-induced noise have been successfully suppressed by the proposed control scheme. The flow structure alteration around the bluff bodies and the shear layer shift phenomenon observed on the trailing edges were then investigated for interpreting the control mechanism for this flow-induced noise suppression, which were based on the vortex shedding strength suppression and vortex shedding frequency shift phenomenon. The effective control position for various leading edges was also studied for developing optimal control strategies for practical engineering applications.

  6. The effect of splitter plate on fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics past various bluff-body configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumya, Sunakraneni; Prakash, K. Arul

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulation of five different bluff body configurations with splitter plate is carried out to analyse the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics for Reynolds number (Re) ranging from 50-200. The governing equations are discretized using SUPG - finite element method. The bluff body configurations considered are elliptic cylinder of axis ratios (AR =0.5-1.0), square cylinder, rhombus of axis ratios (AR =0.5-1.0), equilateral triangle, and semi-circular cylinder. The splitter plate length varied from L =0.0Dh-6.0Dh,(Dh = Bluff body hydraulic diameter). It is observed that interaction of separated shear layers from top and bottom surfaces of the body is inhibited and vortex shedding is suppressed for certain combinations of bluff body configuration, Re and splitter plate length and wake region is modified significantly. Reduction in drag approximately of the order 2% to 50% is attained and overall heat transfer (Q) is increased due to splitter plate.

  7. Long-term benthic monitoring programs near the Morgantown and Calvert Cliffs power plants - annual report for the first year's studies. Volume III: appendices A-E. Report for Jul 80-Jun 81

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, A.F.; Hiegel, M.H.; Fisher, K.; Hoffman, H.; Johnson, G.F.

    1982-04-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: summary of physical/chemical and sediment data collected between July 1980 and June 1981; Summaries of benthic community data for Calvert Cliffs and Morgantown long-term benthic studies; Summary of biomass data collected between July and December 1980; Summary of size-class distribution data collected for numerically dominant bivalves; and Summary of results of stepwise regression analysis.

  8. Alteration and geochemical zoning in Bodie Bluff, Bodie mining district, eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrera, P.A.; Closs, L.G.; Silberman, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    Banded, epithermal quartz-adularia veins have produced about 1.5 million ounces of gold and 7 million ounces of silver from the Bodie mining district, eastern California. The veins cut dacitic lava flows, pyroclastic rocks and intrusions. Sinter boulders occur in a graben structure at the top of Bodie Bluff and fragments of sinter and mineralized quartz veins occur in hydrothermal breccias nearby. Explosive venting evidently was part of the evolution of the ore-forming geothermal systems which, at one time, must had reached the paleosurface. Previous reconnaissance studies at Bodie Bluff suggested that the geometry of alteration mineral assemblages and distribution of some of the major and trace elements throughout the system correspond to those predicted by models of hot-spring, volcanic rock hosted precious metal deposits (Silberman, 1982; Silberman and Berger, 1985). The current study was undertaken to evaluate these sugestions further. About 500 samples of quartz veins and altered rocks, including sinter, collected over a vertical extent of 200 meters within Bodie Bluff were petrographically examined and chemically analyzed for trace elements by emission spectrographic and atomic absorption methods. Sixty-five samples were analyzed for major elements by X-ray fluorescence methods. The results of these analyses showed that, in general, alteration mineral assemblage and vertical geochemical zoning patterns follow those predicted for hot-spring deposits, but that geochemical zoning patterns for sinter and quartz veins (siliceous deposits), and altered wall rocks are not always similar. The predicted depth-concentration patterns for some elements, notably Au, Ag, Hg, and Tl in quartz veins, and Hg, As and Ag in wall rocks were not as expected, or were perturbed by the main ore producing zone. For both quartz veins and altered wall rocks, the main ore zone had elevated metal contents. Increased concentration of many of these elements could indicate proximity to this

  9. Transitions to chaos in the wake of an axisymmetric bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Yannick; Jardin, Thierry; DAEP Team

    2012-11-01

    This work aims at understanding the dynamical process that leads to the onset of chaos in the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body. On the basis of direct numerical simulations, conducted for Reynolds numbers ranging from 100 to 900, we show that the flow undergoes multiple transitions, successively giving rise to the SS, RSPa, RSPb, RSPc and RSB wake states. In particular, the RSPc state, revealed in this work via long-term computations, is characterized by intermittent vortex stretching denoting the onset of chaos and the potential occurence of a third instability that superimposes to the first and second instability associated with state RSPa and RSPb respectively. Interestingly, the reflectional symmetry that characterizes the RSP states is still retained. Hence, chaos is triggered before the symmetry breaking and the occurence of the RSB state. The authors acknowledge the French Ministry of Defence and DGA for funding this work.

  10. Experimental study on turbulent structure of humid air flame in a bluff-body burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Bing; Zang, Shu-Sheng; Guo, Pei-Qing

    2009-06-01

    The main objective of the present experimental study is to analyze the turbulent structure in humid air non-premixed flame, and determine the effect of humidity on the flow field and the flame stability limit in turbulent non-premixed flame. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is used to capture the instantaneous appearance of vortex structures and obtain the quantitative velocity field. The distributions of Reynolds shear stress, mean and root-mean squared fluctuating (rms) velocities are examined to get insight into the effect of fuel-to-air velocity ratio on velocity flow field. The results show that with steam addition, the air-driven vortex in the bluff-body wake is thinner; the biggest peaks of rms velocity and Reynolds shear stress are lower; the distance between the peaks of rms velocity on the sides of centerline reduces. Besides these, the flame stability is affected. Both central fuel penetration limit and partially quenching limit reduce with steam addition.

  11. High-Speed Linear Raman Spectroscopy for Instability Analysis of a Bluff Body Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Fischer, David

    2013-01-01

    We report a high-speed laser diagnostics technique based on point-wise linear Raman spectroscopy for measuring the frequency content of a CH4-air premixed flame stabilized behind a circular bluff body. The technique, which primarily employs a Nd:YLF pulsed laser and a fast image-intensified CCD camera, successfully measures the time evolution of scalar parameters (N2, O2, CH4, and H2O) in the vortex-induced flame instability at a data rate of 1 kHz. Oscillation of the V-shaped flame front is quantified through frequency analysis of the combustion species data and their correlations. This technique promises to be a useful diagnostics tool for combustion instability studies.

  12. Response dynamics of bluff-body stabilized conical premixed turbulent flames with spatial mixture gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2009-03-15

    Response of bluff-body stabilized conical turbulent premixed flames was experimentally studied for a range of excitation frequencies (10-400 Hz), mean flow velocities (5, 10 and 15 m/s) and three different spatial mixture distributions (uniform, inner and outer enrichment). Upstream excitation was provided by a loudspeaker producing velocity oscillation amplitudes of about 8% of the mean flow velocity. Flame response was detected by a photomultiplier observing the CH{sup *} emission from the flame. The studied turbulent flames exhibited transfer function characteristics of a low-pass filter with a cutoff Strouhal number between 0.08 and 0.12. The amplification factors at low frequencies ranged from 2 to 20 and generally increased for mean flow velocities from 5 to 15 m/s. The highest levels of amplification were found for the outer mixture enrichment followed in decreasing order by uniform and inner mixture gradient cases. The high levels of flame response for the outer enrichment case were attributed to the enhanced flame-vortex interaction in outer jet shear layer. At high excitation levels (u{sup '}/U{sub m}{approx}0.3) for U{sub m}=5 m/ s where non-linear flame response is expected, the flame exhibited a reduced amplitude response in the frequency range between 40 and 100 Hz for the uniform and outer equivalence ratio gradient cases and no discernible effect for the inner equivalence ratio gradient. In all cases, transfer function phase was found to vary linearly with excitation frequency. Finally, a relationship between the amplitude characteristics of the bluff-body wake transfer function and flame blowoff equivalence ratio was presented. (author)

  13. A comparison of dispersion calculations in bluff body wakes using LES and unsteady RANS

    SciTech Connect

    Paschkewitz, J S

    2006-01-19

    Accurate modeling of the dispersion behavior of sprays or particles is critical for a variety of problems including combustion, urban pollution or release events, and splash and spray transport around heavy vehicles. Bluff body wakes are particularly challenging since these flows are both highly separated and strongly unsteady. Attempting to model the dispersion of droplets or particles interacting with bluff body wakes is even more difficult since small differences in the flow field encountered by particles can lead to large differences in the dispersion behavior. Particles with finite inertia can exhibit additional complicating effects such as preferential concentration. In this preliminary study, we consider the dispersion of solid particles in the wake of a rectangular plane at a Reynolds number (Re) of 10000 and that of droplets in the wake of a simplified tractor-trailer geometry at Re = 2 x 10{sup 6} using both the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) turbulence modeling approaches. The calculations were performed using identical meshes for both the LES and URANS models. Particle stresses are not backcoupled to the carrier fluid velocity solution. In the case of the rectangular plane wake, the LES calculation predicts a finer-scale and more persistent wake structure than the URANS one; the resulting particle dispersion is considerably ({approx} 40%) underpredicted for low inertia particles. For the case of the simplified tractor-trailer geometry, although the LES is underresolved, similar trends are observed with strong differences in the vertical and horizontal dispersion of the smallest particles. These results suggest that it may be necessary to use LES to accurately capture the dispersion behavior of small, low inertia particles or droplets, but that URANS may be sufficient for problems in which only large particles with substantial inertia are of primary concern.

  14. Investigation of the near and far wake of a bluff airfoil model with trailing edge modifications using time-resolved particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krentel, Daniel; Nitsche, Wolfgang

    2013-07-01

    Experimental investigations on the topology and the structure of the near and far wake of a quasi-2D blunt NACA0012 airfoil cut at 80 % of the original chord length c master have been performed by means of time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The experiments took place in a closed-loop water tunnel at a model-thickness H-based Reynolds number of Re H = 44,000. The periodic and alternating vortex formation process at the base of the bluff model with a dimensionless frequency of Sr h = 0.2 (relating to the trailing edge height h) was investigated in detail. Subsequently, four modifications of the trailing edge geometry (broken trailing edge, square-wave base, stepped afterbody and extension of the reference model by Δ c/c_master = 7.5 %) have been investigated in order to mitigate the periodic vortex formation and the alternating shedding process. In the far wake, a considerable decrease in momentum loss and resulting drag force in the range of 29 % has been achieved for this specific Reynolds number. Investigations of the time-resolved flow field proved that the periodic, alternating flow separation can be attenuated resulting in an optimized recirculation region and a low-loss wake. It can be inferred that passive flow control means like modifications of the rear end geometry of quasi-2D blunt models are a capable method to improve the flow field with respect to a minimization of momentum losses in the wake.

  15. Laboratory measurements of selected optical, physical, chemical, and remote-sensing properties of five water mixtures containing Calvert clay and a nonfluorescing dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.; Poole, L. R.; Witte, W. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Total suspended solids concentrations ranged from 6.1 ppm to 24.3 ppm and sizes ranged between 1.5 micrometers and 10 micrometers with the most frequently occurring size less than 2 micrometers. Iron concentration was less than 1 percent of the total suspended solids. Nonfluorescing dye concentrations of the two mixtures were 20 ppm and 40 ppm. Attenuation coefficient for the five mixtures ranged from 4.8/m to 21.3/m. Variations in volume scattering function with phase angle were typical. Variations in attenuation and absorption coefficient with wavelength were similar for the mixtures without the dye. Attenuation coefficient of the mixtures with the dye increased for wavelengths less than 600 nm due to the dye's strong absorption peak near 500 nm. Reflectance increased as the concentration of Calvert clay increased and peaked near 600 nm. The nonfluorescent dye decreased the magnitude of the peak, but had practically no effect on the variation for wavelengths greater than 640 nm. At wavelengths less than 600 nm, the spectral variations of the mixtures with the dye were significantly different from those mixtures without the dye.

  16. Theoretical analysis and experimental verification on valve-less piezoelectric pump with hemisphere-segment bluff-body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jing; Zhang, Jianhui; Xia, Qixiao; Wang, Shouyin; Huang, Jun; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2014-05-01

    Existing researches on no-moving part valves in valve-less piezoelectric pumps mainly concentrate on pipeline valves and chamber bottom valves, which leads to the complex structure and manufacturing process of pump channel and chamber bottom. Furthermore, position fixed valves with respect to the inlet and outlet also makes the adjustability and controllability of flow rate worse. In order to overcome these shortcomings, this paper puts forward a novel implantable structure of valve-less piezoelectric pump with hemisphere-segments in the pump chamber. Based on the theory of flow around bluff-body, the flow resistance on the spherical and round surface of hemisphere-segment is different when fluid flows through, and the macroscopic flow resistance differences thus formed are also different. A novel valve-less piezoelectric pump with hemisphere-segment bluff-body (HSBB) is presented and designed. HSBB is the no-moving part valve. By the method of volume and momentum comparison, the stress on the bluff-body in the pump chamber is analyzed. The essential reason of unidirectional fluid pumping is expounded, and the flow rate formula is obtained. To verify the theory, a prototype is produced. By using the prototype, experimental research on the relationship between flow rate, pressure difference, voltage, and frequency has been carried out, which proves the correctness of the above theory. This prototype has six hemisphere-segments in the chamber filled with water, and the effective diameter of the piezoelectric bimorph is 30mm. The experiment result shows that the flow rate can reach 0.50 mL/s at the frequency of 6 Hz and the voltage of 110 V. Besides, the pressure difference can reach 26.2 mm H2O at the frequency of 6 Hz and the voltage of 160 V. This research proposes a valve-less piezoelectric pump with hemisphere-segment bluff-body, and its validity and feasibility is verified through theoretical analysis and experiment.

  17. Terrestrial LIDAR investigation of the December 2003 and January 2007 activations of the Northridge Bluff landslide, Daly City, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Brian D.; Kayen, Robert; Reiss, Thomas; Sitar, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    On December 20, 2003 and again on January 1, 2007, landslides occurred along the coastal bluff that forms the west boundary of Daly City, California sending debris as far as 290 meters downhill and 90 meters into the ocean. This area is known for large landslide events where 150-meter tall coastal bluffs extend southward along the west boundary of San Francisco and San Mateo Counties (Fig. 1). The 2003 and 2007 landslide events occurred west of Northridge Drive in Daly City and just south of Avalon Canyon, which bisects the bluffs in this area (Fig. 2). Residential development, utility lines and roads occupy the land immediately east of this location. As part of a comprehensive project to investigate the failure mechanisms of coastal bluff landslides in weakly lithified sediments along the west coast of the United States, members of the U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology (CMG) Program performed reconnaissance mapping of these landslide events including collection of high-resolution topographic data using CMG's terrestrial LIDAR laser scanning system. This report provides a brief background on each landslide event and presents topographic datasets collected following each event. Downloadable contour data, images, and FGDC-compliant metadata of the surfaces generated from the LIDAR data are also provided. LIDAR data collection and processing techniques used to generate the datasets are outlined. Geometric and volumetric measurements are also presented along with high-resolution cross-sections through various areas of the slide masses and discussion concerning the slides present (2007) configuration is provided.

  18. Boattail Plates With Non-Rectangular Geometries For Reducing Aerodynamic Base Drag Of A Bluff Body In Ground Effect

    DOEpatents

    Ortega, Jason M.; Sabari, Kambiz

    2006-03-07

    An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic base drag of a bluff body having a leading end, a trailing end, a top surface, opposing left and right side surfaces, and a base surface at the trailing end substantially normal to a longitudinal centerline of the bluff body, with the base surface joined (1) to the left side surface at a left trailing edge, (2) to the right side surface at a right trailing edge, and (3) to the top surface at a top trailing edge. The apparatus includes left and right vertical boattail plates which are orthogonally attached to the base surface of the bluff body and inwardly offset from the left and right trailing edges, respectively. This produces left and right vertical channels which generate, in a flowstream substantially parallel to the longitudinal centerline, respective left and right vertically-aligned vortical structures, with the left and right vertical boattail plates each having a plate width defined by a rear edge of the plate spaced from the base surface. Each plate also has a peak plate width at a location between top and bottom ends of the plate corresponding to a peak vortex of the respective vertically-aligned vortical structures.

  19. Large eddy simulation of the flow around bluff body with drag reduction device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Qaied

    This thesis focuses on the use of LES to simulate the flow around elliptical bluff body with blunt trailing edge fitted with open base cavity. The main objective of this study is to determine the effects of the cavity on the drag of the body. A secondary but important objective is to demonstrate that LES can provide accurate representation of the flow around this bluff body. Moreover, LES results can complement the available experimental results in order to provide a much better understanding of the flow. The simulations were carried out at a Reynolds number of 2.6×104 based on the height of the body using Spalart-Allmaras RANS model while the LES were performed using Smagorinsky dynamic model. A grid-independence test was conducted using three grids which contain 0.85M, 1.3M and 1.7M cells, respectively. This test shows that the results are grid-independent. The LES results predicted the mean flow field in the near wake with good accuracy as compared to the experimental mean flow field obtained. The base pressure results show that the base pressure coefficient for the base model was around -0.56, which agrees well with the experimental results .By attaching the cavity, the base pressure has increased. The increase in base pressure coefficient was around 44% using 1/3 h cavity and this agrees well with the experimental measurements. The RANS predicted drag coefficient of 0.56 for the base model and 0.471 for the cavity model. This represents a difference of 8% for the base model and 34% for the cavity model when compared with experiment drag coefficients (0.61 for the base model and 0.35 for the cavity model). For the LES, the drag coefficient of the base model was around 0.65 (6.5% difference) and using the cavity, the drag coefficient was reduced to around 0.37 (5.74% difference). Details of the mean velocity components have been compared with experimental data at various locations in the wake region of the flow. Observation on the comparison between LES and

  20. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Coastal Bluff Erosion near Barrow Alaska over the Past Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofoed, K. B.; Lopez, A. F.; Aguirre, A.; Aiken, Q.; Cody, R. P.; Gaylord, A. G.; Manley, W. F.; Green, E.; Nelson, L.; Lougheed, V.; Velasco, A. A.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic coastal systems are recognized as being one of the most climate change - vulnerable ecosystems on Earth and represent a complex nexus for examining change at the interface between marine, terrestrial, atmospheric, cryospheric and social systems. Although coastal erosion has received increased attention in the Arctic, few studies have examined the fine scale spatiotemporal dynamics and variability in erosion rates relative to the range of factors that act concomitantly to control erosion (e.g. duration of ice free seas, bathymetry, wave action, sea and air temperature, landscape morphology). This study reports on the spatiotemporal dynamics of annual DGPS surveys of eroding coastal bluffs in northern Alaska near the city of Barrow. Surveys along ca. 11km of the Elson Lagoon coast have been conducted since 2002 and additional surveys along ca. 120km of Elson Lagoon and Chuckhi Sea coast have been conducted since 2013. There has been strong inter-annual spatiotemporal variability in erosion rates with no indication of a long term change in erosion rates over time. Factors controlling wave intensity (e.g. wind run, off shore bathymetry, aspect of the coast relative to prevailing winds) explain most variability in erosion rates over time but during relatively calm periods, landscape history and morphology become more important. These findings highlight the extreme fine scale spatiotemporal heterogeneity in erosion rates along the Arctic Coast, and the importance of incorporating both storm-related climatic events and landscape characteristics when forecasting future environmental states in Arctic coastal landscapes. Case studies outlining new remote sensing technologies and future directions of study will also be outlined including terrestrial and airborne LiDAR, and Kite, UAV, and satellite imagery that is being used to derive and monitor topographic and hydrological change near eroding coastal bluffs; a wireless sensor network of micrometeorological and optical

  1. Large eddy simulation of forced ignition of an annular bluff-body burner

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, V.; Domingo, P.; Vervisch, L.

    2010-03-15

    The optimization of the ignition process is a crucial issue in the design of many combustion systems. Large eddy simulation (LES) of a conical shaped bluff-body turbulent nonpremixed burner has been performed to study the impact of spark location on ignition success. This burner was experimentally investigated by Ahmed et al. [Combust. Flame 151 (2007) 366-385]. The present work focuses on the case without swirl, for which detailed measurements are available. First, cold-flow measurements of velocities and mixture fractions are compared with their LES counterparts, to assess the prediction capabilities of simulations in terms of flow and turbulent mixing. Time histories of velocities and mixture fractions are recorded at selected spots, to probe the resolved probability density function (pdf) of flow variables, in an attempt to reproduce, from the knowledge of LES-resolved instantaneous flow conditions, the experimentally observed reasons for success or failure of spark ignition. A flammability map is also constructed from the resolved mixture fraction pdf and compared with its experimental counterpart. LES of forced ignition is then performed using flamelet fully detailed tabulated chemistry combined with presumed pdfs. Various scenarios of flame kernel development are analyzed and correlated with typical flow conditions observed in this burner. The correlations between, velocities and mixture fraction values at the sparking time and the success or failure of ignition, are then further discussed and analyzed. (author)

  2. A note on the stabilization of bluff-body wakes by low density base bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla, A.; Martínez-Bazán, C.

    2006-09-01

    Base blowing is a simple and well-known means of stabilizing both two-dimensional and axisymmetric bluff-body wakes at supercritical Reynolds numbers. In the present Brief Communication we consider a generalization of previous works by studying the effect of the bleed-to-freestream density ratio, S =ρb/ρ∞, on the stability properties of the wake behind an axisymmetric, slender body with a blunt trailing edge. Since a lower density in the slow stream is known to inhibit absolute instability, here we restrict our attention to the case of light bleed fluid, S <1. This mechanism is shown to inhibit the wake for values of the bleed coefficient, defined as the bleed-to-freestream velocity ratio Cb=ub/u∞, smaller than those obtained in the homogeneous case of S =1. Our approach consists of obtaining the basic, axisymmetric flow by integration of the full set of Navier-Stokes and species conservation equations in cylindrical coordinates, and calculating its linear, local, spatio-temporal stability downstream of the body base. The analysis predicts a critical bleed coefficient Cb*, which decreases with the density ratio according to the linear law Cb*≃0.01+0.05S for 0.1⩽S⩽1.

  3. Experimental investigation of the influence of inlet conditions to a bluff body wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallenius, Bengt; Fransson, Jens

    2010-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments have been performed in a bluff body wake with varying inlet conditions in order to enhance the physical understanding of the wake flow instability, which may lead to successful flow control and in turn reduced aerodynamic drag. The geometry consists of a rectangular-based forebody with permeable surfaces, an elliptic leading edge and a blunt trailing edge. Length, width and base height of the forebody is 2.3, 0.5 and 0.04 meters, respectively. Applying continuous suction or blowing, of different levels, through the permeable surfaces along the forebody, varies the wall-normal trailing edge velocity profile in a systematic way and hence the inlet condition to the wake. The streamwise velocity component has been measured both throughout the boundary layer and in the wake behind the body using hot-wire anemometry. High-speed stereo PIV has been used in the wake in order to collect statistics of vortical structures in the wake. The influence of boundary layer parameters on the wake flow characteristics, such as vortex shedding frequency and base pressure, will be presented.

  4. Supersonic Flow past Flat- and Concave-Nosed Bluff-Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Koju; Hinada, Motoki; Higuchi, Hiroshi

    1996-11-01

    Investigation on supersonic flowfield ahead of and behind axisymmetric bluff-bodies was carried out at ISAS. The effect of concave front surface was first examined using a cup-shaped geometry as well as the blunt-nosed cylinder having various levels of concavity. Nominally a steady, symmetrical detached shock wave formed in front of the body, but under certain conditions, in particular, with increased concavity at higher Mach numbers, unsteady asymmetrical bow shock was also observed. Period of the latter shock oscillation varied over a wide range. This phenomenon is believed to be associated with an often catastrophic breathing phenomenon of supersonic parachute. Multi-point pressure measurements and an oil-flow visualization indicated a presence of off-axis tangential flow inside concavity to be distinguished from symmetric oscillations often cited. Further study is being made both experimentally and numerically. The investigation on supersonic wake behind a disk was started in conjunction and results of the initial phase of the experiment will be discussed. *Part of this study was carried out during HH's stay at ISAS funded by the NSF International Program.

  5. On the stabilization of bluff-body wakes by low-density base bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Bazan, Carlos; Sevilla, Alejandro

    2006-11-01

    Base bleed is a simple and well-known means of stabilizing bluff-body wakes at supercritical Reynolds numbers. In the present research we consider a generalization of previous works by studying the effect of the bleed-to-freestream density ratio, S=ρb/ρ∞, on the stability properties of the wake behind an axisymmetric, slender body with a blunt trailing edge. Since a lower density in the slow stream is known to inhibit absolute instability, here we restrict our attention to the case of light bleed fluid, S<1. This mechanism is shown to inhibit the wake for values of the bleed coefficient, defined as the bleed-to-freestream velocity ratio Cb=ub/u∞, smaller than those obtained in the homogeneous case of S=1. Our approach consists of obtaining the basic, axisymmetric flow by integration of the full set of Navier-Stokes and species conservation equations in cylindrical coordinates, and calculating its linear, local, spatio-temporal stability downstream of the body base. The analysis predicts a critical bleed coefficient Cb^*, which decreases with the density ratio according to the linear law Cb^*˜0.01+0.05, for 0.1<=S<=1.

  6. Dynamical-systems analysis and unstable periodic orbits in reacting flows behind symmetric bluff bodies.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jia-Chen; Gunaratne, Gemunu H; Kostka, Stanislav; Jiang, Naibo; Kiel, Barry V; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2013-09-01

    Dynamical systems analysis is performed for reacting flows stabilized behind four symmetric bluff bodies to determine the effects of shape on the nature of flame stability, acoustic coupling, and vortex shedding. The task requires separation of regular, repeatable aspects of the flow from experimental noise and highly irregular, nonrepeatable small-scale structures caused primarily by viscous-mediated energy cascading. The experimental systems are invariant under a reflection, and symmetric vortex shedding is observed throughout the parameter range. As the equivalence ratio-and, hence, acoustic coupling-is reduced, a symmetry-breaking transition to von Karman vortices is initiated. Combining principal-components analysis with a symmetry-based filtering, we construct bifurcation diagrams for the onset and growth of von Karman vortices. We also compute Lyapunov exponents for each flame holder to help quantify the transitions. Furthermore, we outline changes in the phase-space orbits that accompany the onset of von Karman vortex shedding and compute unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) embedded in the complex flows prior to and following the bifurcation. For each flame holder, we find a single UPO in flows without von Karman vortices and a pair of UPOs in flows with von Karman vortices. These periodic orbits organize the dynamics of the flow and can be used to reduce or control flow irregularities. By subtracting them from the overall flow, we are able to deduce the nature of irregular facets of the flows.

  7. Axisymmetric bluff-body flow: A vortex solver for thin shells

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.

    1992-05-01

    A method which is capable of solving the axisymmetric flow field over bluff bodies consisting of thin shells such as disks, partial spheres, rings, and other such shapes is presented in this report. The body may be made up of several shells whose edges are separated by gaps. The body may be moved axially according to arbitrary velocity time histories. In addition, the surfaces may posses axial and radial degrees of flexibility such that points on the surfaces may be allowed to move relative to each other according to some specified function of time. The surfaces may be either porous or impervious. The present solution technique is based on the axisymmetric vorticity transport equation. Physically, this technique simulates the generation of vorticity at body surfaces in the form of discrete ring vortices which are subsequently diffused and convected into the boundary layers and wake of the body. Relatively large numbers of vortices (1000 or more) are required to obtain good simulations. Since the direct calculation of perturbations from large numbers of ring vortices is computationally intensive, a fast multipole method was used to greatly reduce computer processing time. Several example calculations are presented for disks, disks with holes, hemispheres, and vented hemispheres. These results are compared with steady and unsteady experimental data. 45 refs.

  8. Ballography: A Billion Nanosecond History of the Bee Bluff Impact Crater of South Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, R. A.

    2006-07-01

    The Bee Bluff Structure of South Texas in Zavala County near Uvalde has been found to exhibit unusual features permitting study of impactites and meteorite impact processes from the standpoint of grain-level, nanosecond shock-compression science. The site is characterized by a thin cap of Carrizo Sandstone covering a thin hard Indio fm calcareous siltstone. A soft calcareous silt lies below the hard cap. Calculations based on the Earth Impact Effects web-based program indicate that the site is best described by a 60 m diameter iron meteorite striking the ground at 11 km/sec. Such an impact into sandstone is expected to produce a shock pressure of 250 GPa. A large release wave originates from the bottom of the hard target with upward moving melt-vaporization waves of solid, liquid and vapor products that become trapped at the impact interface. Numerous distinctive types of impactites result from this `bottom-up' release behavior. Evidence for hydrodynamic instabilities and resulting density gradients are abundant at the impact interface. An unusually valuable breccia sample called `The Uvalde Crater Rosetta Stone' contains at least seven types of impactites in a well defined arrangement that can be used to read the billion nanosecond history of the impact and identify scattered impactites relative to their place in that history.

  9. Two-phase measurements of a spray in the wake of a bluff body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudoff, R. C.; Houser, M. J.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of spray drop interaction with the turbulent, recirculating wake of a flat disk bluff body were investigated using a phase Doppler particle analyzer to determine drop size and velocity and the gas-phase velocity. Detailed measurements obtained included spray drop size, axial and radial velocity, angle of trajectory, and size-velocity correlations. The gas-phase velocity was determined from seeding of the two-phase flow. Results showed dramatic differences in drop behavior for various size classes when interacting with the turbulent flow field. Small drops were quickly entrained and recirculated, while initially, the larger drops continued in the general direction of the spray cone. Further downstream, significant numbers of large drops recirculated, generating a bifurcated size-velocity correlation. These lateral convections and streamwise accelerations and decelerations strongly influenced the number density along with size and velocity distributions. The complex interaction of the spray with the turbulent air-flow points out the need for spatially-resolved measurements that determine drop behavior for individual size classes, rather than characterizing a spray only via simple integral quantities such as the Sauter mean diameter.

  10. Experimental and numerical investigation of flow control on bluff bodies by passive ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falchi, M.; Provenzano, G.; Pietrogiacomi, D.; Romano, G. P.

    2006-07-01

    In this work, the so-called natural or passive ventilation drag reduction method is investigated experimentally and numerically. Passive ventilation is performed by directly connecting the high pressure region at the front of a body to the lower pressure in the near wake using a venting duct; in this manner, a net mass flux is established within the wake. In particular, in aerodynamic applications it appears suitable to attain a global reduction in the drag of a body moving in a fluid and a reduction in turbulence levels by means of a global modification of the body wake. Velocity field investigations using particle image velocimetry measurements and a Reynolds averaged numerical code are employed at moderately high Reynolds numbers to clarify the effectiveness of drag reduction on a vented bluff body. The numerical and experimental results agree qualitatively, but the amount of reduction for the vented body (about 10%) is underestimated numerically. The effectiveness of drag reduction has been proved both for smooth and rough (single strip) models. Direct balance measurements are used for comparisons.

  11. Erosional history of Cape Halkett and contemporary monitoring of bluff retreat, Beaufort Sea coast, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Benjamin M.; Arp, Christopher D.; Beck, Richard A.; Grosse, Guido; Webster, James M.; Urban, Frank E.

    2009-01-01

    Cape Halkett is located along the Beaufort Sea at the end of a low-lying tundra landscape. The area has been subject to major modifications over the last century as a result of erosion and migration of the coastline inland. Long-term mean annual erosion rates (1955-2009) for the entire cape are 7.6 m/yr, with a gradual increase in rates over the first five time periods of remotely sensed imagery analyzed and a large increase during the most recent time period. Division of the cape into three distinct coastal zones shows very different erosional patterns: the northeast-facing segment (Zone 1) showing a consistent and large increase; the southeast-facing segment (Zone 3) showing a gradual increase with recent, heightened erosion rates; and the east-facing segment (Zone 2) showing decreased rates due to the reformation of a sand and gravel spit. Monitoring of bluff erosion with time-lapse photography, differential GPS surveys, terrestrial and bathymetric surveys, and water level, sea and permafrost temperature data provide insights into the processes driving contemporary patterns of erosion and will provide valuable information for the prediction of future shoreline positions.

  12. Axisymmetric bluff-body flow: A vortex solver for thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, J. H.

    1992-05-01

    A method which is capable of solving the axisymmetric flow field over bluff bodies consisting of thin shells such as disks, partial spheres, rings, and other such shapes is presented in this report. The body may be made up of several shells whose edges are separated by gaps. The body may be moved axially according to arbitrary velocity time histories. In addition, the surfaces may possess axial and radial degrees of flexibility such that points on the surfaces may be allowed to move relative to each other according to some specified function of time. The surfaces may be either porous or impervious. The present solution technique is based on the axisymmetric vorticity transport equation. Physically, this technique simulates the generation of vorticity at body surfaces in the form of discrete ring vortices which are subsequently diffused and convected into the boundary layers and wake of the body. Relatively large numbers of vortices (1000 or more) are required to obtain good simulations. Since the direct calculation of perturbations from large numbers of ring vortices is computationally intensive, a fast multipole method was used to greatly reduce computer processing time. Several example calculations are presented for disks, disks with holes, hemispheres, and vented hemispheres. These results are compared with steady and unsteady experimental data.

  13. Stability of the laminar wake behind spinning axisymmetric bluff bodies: sensitivity and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Gonzalez, Jose Ignacio; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos; Coenen, Wilfried; Manglano, Carlos; Sevilla, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    We carry out direct and adjoint global stability analyses of the laminar wake behind several spinning axisymmetric bluff bodies, i.e. sphere, hemisphere, bullet-shaped bodies of ellipsoidal nose and spherical nose respectively; for moderate Reynolds numbers (Re <= 450) and values of the spin parameter (Ω <= 1), defined as the ratio between the azimuthal velocity at the outer body surface and the free-stream velocity. Both the axisymmetric base flow computations and the assembling of the eigenvalue problems are tackled by means of the finite element solver FreeFEM + + , computing finally the eigenmodes with an Arnoldi algorithm in Matlab. We show that spin acts as a stabilization mechanism for the wake behind bodies with a cylindrical trailing part, while it destabilizes the wake of the other geometries. The computation of the adjoint modes and the identification of the wavemaker allow us to discuss the nature of the different unstable modes found and understand the differences in the stabilizing or destabilizing effect of rotation due to the base flow modifications. The controllability of the unstable regimes by means of base bleed is also addressed. Supported by the Spanish MINECO, Junta de Andalucía and EU Funds under Projects DPI2011-28356-C03-03 and P11-TEP7495.

  14. Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results from the Grant intrusive breccia and coparison to the Permian Downeys Bluff Sill; evidence for Permian igneous activity at Hicks Dome, southern Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    1997-01-01

    Igneous processes at Hicks dome, a structural upwarp at lat 37.5 degrees N., long 88.4 degrees W. in the southern part of the Illinois Basin, may have thermally affected regional basinal fluid flow and may have provided fluorine for the formation of the Illinois-Kentucky Fluorspar district. The timing of both igneous activity and mineralization is poorly known. For this reason, we have dated an intrusive breccia at Hicks dome, the Grant intrusion, using 40Ar/39Ar geochronometric and paleomagnetic methods. Concordant plateau dates, giving Permian ages, were obtained from amphibole (272.1+or-0.7 [1 sigma] Ma) and phlogopite (272.7+or-0.7 [1 sigma] Ma). After alternating-field (AF) demagnetization, specimens that contain titanomagnetite-bearing igneous rock fragments give a mean remanent direction of declination (D)=168.4 degrees; inclination (I)=-8 degrees; alpha 95=8.6 degrees; number of specimens (N)=10; this direction yields a virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) at lat 54.8 degrees N., long 119.0 degrees E., delta p=4.4 degrees, delta m=8.7 degrees, near the late Paleozoic part of the North American apparent pole wander path. A nearly identical magnetization was found for the nearby Downeys Bluff sill (previously dated at about 275+or-24 Ma by the Rb-Sr method), in southern Illinois. Both AF and thermal demagnetization isolated shallow, southeasterly remanent directions carried by magnetite in the sill and from pyrrhotite in the baked contact of the Upper Mississippian Downeys Bluff Limestone: D=158.6 degrees; I=-11.8 degrees; alpha 95=3.8 degrees; N=15, yielding a VGP at lat 53.0 degrees N., long 128.7 degrees E., delta p=2.0 degrees, delta m=3.9 degrees. The paleomagnetic results, isotopic dates, and petrographic evidence thus favor the acquisition of thermal remanent magnetization by the Grant breccia and the Downeys Bluff sill during the Permian. The isotopic dates record rapid cooling from temperatures greater than 550 degrees C to less than 300 degrees C (the

  15. The effects of three dimensional imposed disturbances on bluff body near wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombazis, Nicholas; Bearman, Peter

    1994-04-01

    The three-dimensionality of the near wake of bluff bodies at high Reynolds numbers is studied experimentally. Measurements were carried out in a 0.91 m x 0.91m wind tunnel (for Re =20000 to 60000) and flow visualisation in a 0.6m x 0.6m water flume (for Re=2500). The main purpose is to identify inherent three-dimensional features that may also arise in nominally two-dimensional flows. In order to fix the three-dimensional effects in both time and space, a mild, periodic, geometrical disturbance was imposed on the otherwise two-dimensional geometry of a model with a blunt trailing edge. The trailing edge thus followed a sinusoidal pattern, but a straight edge model was also studied for comparison purposes. Quantitative measurements and flow visualisation revealed that a dual shedding frequency characteristic prevails in the wake of the sinusoidal model. Base drag shows a noticeable drop (in comparison to the straight edge model). Most of the activity seems to happen in the region of the peak, where the dual frequency characteristic is more apparent and also the base drag shows its largest variations. Flow visualisation showed different modes of vortex shedding to exist. Vortical structures in the x- and z- directions were observed for both models. WZ vortices are present in the near wake. It is believed that the observed vortices are responsible for the intense base pressure fluctuations and gradients, and also for thin 'wisps' appearing between Karman' vortices in flow visualisation.

  16. Nonlinear hydrodynamic and thermoacoustic oscillations of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin Yik; Li, Larry Kin Bong; Juniper, Matthew P.; Cant, Robert Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent premixed flames often experience thermoacoustic instabilities when the combustion heat release rate is in phase with acoustic pressure fluctuations. Linear methods often assume a priori that oscillations are periodic and occur at a dominant frequency with a fixed amplitude. Such assumptions are not made when using nonlinear analysis. When an oscillation is fully saturated, nonlinear analysis can serve as a useful avenue to reveal flame behaviour far more elaborate than period-one limit cycles, including quasi-periodicity and chaos in hydrodynamically or thermoacoustically self-excited system. In this paper, the behaviour of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed propane/air flame in a model jet-engine afterburner configuration is investigated using computational fluid dynamics. For the frequencies of interest in this investigation, an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach is found to be appropriate. Combustion is represented using a modified laminar flamelet approach with an algebraic closure for the flame surface density. The results are validated by comparison with existing experimental data and with large eddy simulation, and the observed self-excited oscillations in pressure and heat release are studied using methods derived from dynamical systems theory. A systematic analysis is carried out by increasing the equivalence ratio of the reactant stream supplied to the premixed flame. A strong variation in the global flame structure is observed. The flame exhibits a self-excited hydrodynamic oscillation at low equivalence ratios, becomes steady as the equivalence ratio is increased to intermediate values, and again exhibits a self-excited thermoacoustic oscillation at higher equivalence ratios. Rich nonlinear behaviour is observed and the investigation demonstrates that turbulent premixed flames can exhibit complex dynamical behaviour including quasiperiodicity, limit cycles and period-two limit cycles due to the interactions of various

  17. Unsteady Euler/Lagrange simulation of a confined bluff-body gas-solid turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrigui, Mouldi; Hidouri, Ammar; Sadiki, Amsini; Janicka, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    An unsteady Euler-Lagrangian approach is adopted to predict the gaseous carrier and disperse phases flow dynamics. The turbulence is captured using two different methods, i.e. the unsteady Reynolds averaging based numerical simulation (URANS) and the large eddy simulation (LES). In the latter one, the dynamic Smagorinsky approach is used to model the sub-grid scale stresses. The time-dependent solid particle and gas phase flow properties of a confined bluff-body turbulent flow including two-way coupling effects are evaluated through comparisons with experimental data. The configuration under study features an important recirculation zone and has a mass loading of 22%. So, collision effects are not considered while tracking the disperse phase that consists of glass beads. A thermodynamically consistent turbulence modulation approach is applied for the determination of the source terms that account for the effect of particles on the turbulence level of the carrier phase. Within the URANS technique the dispersion of particles is captured by the Markov sequence approach; this model is modified by integrating a drift factor term while modeling the pressure gradient. A particular emphasis is put on the disperse phase feedback on the carrier phase and coupling procedure within each Eulerian time step along with an unsteady coupling of both codes, the (Eulerian) FASTEST3D and the (Lagrangian) LAG3D codes. Quantitative results of the disperse phase properties as well as those of the carrier phase are presented at different positions around the recirculation zone. The numerical results using both, the LES and/or the URANS delivered comparable results that agree reasonably with experimental data. However, a slight advantage of LES over URANS could be observed.

  18. Blowoff behavior of bluff body stabilized flames in vitiated and partially premixed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Steven G.

    Turbulent flame holding and blowoff characteristics of bluff body stabilized flames were measured in an enclosed rectangular duct with a triangular flame holder in vitiated, premixed and unvitiated, asymmetrically stratified flows. Blowoff stability margins were characterized, with chemiluminescence measurements performed by high-speed imaging to capture flame dynamics during blow off. As the equivalence ratio was decreased, local extinction along the shear layer flames occurred with greater frequency and proximity to the wake stagnation zone. Decreased equivalence ratio resulted in extinction events at the trailing edge of the stagnation zone, where reactants were convected into the recirculation zone and burned. Eventually, increasing reactant dilution of the recirculation zone either increased the ignition time scale or the lowered the strain tolerance of the propagating flames in the flame anchoring region, resulting in lift-off or extinction, and the near field shear layer flames convected to the wake stagnation zone, where they continued to propagate. From there, the flames were convected upstream into the recirculation zone, where they were eventually quenched. Simultaneous PIV and OH PLIF measurements captured the flame edge location and aerodynamic behavior as blowoff was approached. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic stretch alone the flame front and flow field vorticity maps were extracted from the combined PIV/OH PLIF data. The distribution of flame stretch shifted to greater values as the equivalence ratio decreased. Asymmetric fuel distributions, measured with acetone LW, were found to increase the equivalence ratio at blow off from that found with uniformly-fueled flows. This was attributed to the greater wake instability and extinction of the lean-side flames. The asymmetrically fueled flames were more susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities when the shedding frequency was near an acoustic eigenmode of the exhaust duct, due to the decreased

  19. Turbulence effects on the flow and pressure distributions around three-dimensional bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitheeq, Mohamed K.

    Effect of turbulence on the pressure distributions on two surface mounted square prism models, one with dimensions twice the other, are investigated. Mean and fluctuating pressure distributions on the front, side, wake and roof faces of the three-dimensional bluff bodies exposed to a simulated neutral urban boundary layer flow in the wind tunnel are presented. All the measurements were carried out for 0 degree approach wind except for the roof face. For the roof face, measurements were conducted for both 0 and 45 degree wind. Simultaneous pressure measurements at typical locations on the same face of the model as well as on different faces were carried out to obtain pressure correlations. The pressure distributions on the side and roof faces of both models showed reattachment of the flow. The trends of the pressure distributions including the peak pressure distributions were the same for both models. The pressure coefficients for the smaller model was lower than for the taller one due to the different ratios of the heights of model and boundary layer. Side face cross correlation measurements showed clearly side flow reattachment. Smoke flow and sand erosion visualization study also corroborated very well the flow reattachment. From the analysis of pressure spectra, no vortex shedding was observed on the side face. Changing the Reynolds number did not change the small scale content of the turbulence. The characteristics of the boundary layer measured in the wind tunnel were compared with atmospheric data and a model scale of around 1:400 was obtained. A simple cost effective common sample and hold computer controlled data acquisition set-up for simultaneous pressure and velocity measurements was devised. A simple and accurate dynamic calibration technique was developed to determine the optimum upper limit of flat frequency response of pressure transducer-tube systems.

  20. Monitoring channel morphology and bluff erosion at two installations of flow-deflecting vanes, North Fish Creek, Wisconsin, 2000-03

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Faith A.; Peppler, Marie C.; Schwar, Heather E.; Hoopes, John A.; Diebel, Matthew W.

    2005-01-01

    Flow-deflecting vanes were installed in the streambed along two meander bends with eroding bluffs in 2000 and 2001 in the upper main stem of North Fish Creek, a tributary to Lake Superior in Wisconsin. About 45 vanes were arranged in 15 arrays at each site to deflect the flow away from the eroding toe or base of the bluff (outside of a bend) and toward the point bar (inside of a bend). Channel cross-section and bluff-erosion surveys were done and streamflow and stage were measured before, during, and after vane installation to monitor changes in channel morphology and bluff erosion in the context of hydrologic conditions. There were two large floods in the study area in spring 2001 (recurrence interval of approximately 100 years) and in spring 2002 (recurrence intervals of approximately 50 years). Some maintenance and replacement of vanes were needed after the floods. Most of the channel-morphology changes resulted from the large floods, and fewer changes resulted from near-bankfull or at-bankfull flows (one in October 2002 and four in April and May 2003). At the bluff located 16.4 river miles upstream of the creek mouth (site 16.4), the vanes deflected flow and caused the channel to migrate away from the base of the bluff and toward the point bar, allowing sediment to deposit along the bluff base. The 361-foot reach at site 16.4 had a net gain of 6,740 cubic feet of sediment over the entire monitoring period (2000?03). Deposition (10,660 cubic feet) occurred mainly along the base of the bluff in the downstream part of the bend. Erosion occurred at site 16.4 along the streambed, the point bar side of the channel, and along a midchannel bar (1,220, 1,610, and 1,090 cubic feet, respectively). Less channel migration was observed during 2001-03 at another bluff located 12.2 river miles upstream of the creek mouth (site 12.2), which had a net loss of sediment through the 439-foot reach of 2,800 cubic feet over the monitored time period. The main volume of sediment was

  1. Environmental Assessment of the Gering-Stegall 115-kV Transmission Line Consolidation Project, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to consolidate segments of two transmission lines near the Gering Substation in Gering, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska, within the city of Gering. Presently, there are three parallel 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines on separate rights-of-way (ROW) that terminate at the Gering Substation. The project would include dismantling the Archer-Gering wood-pole transmission line and rebuilding the remaining two lines on single-pole steel double circuit structures. The project would consolidate the Gering-Stegall North and Gering-Stegall South 115-kV transmission lines on to one ROW for a 1.33-mile segment between the Gering Substation and a point west of the Gering Landfill. All existing wood-pole H-frame structures would be removed, and the Gering-Stegall North and South ROWs abandoned. Western is responsible for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the line. Western prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the 115-kV transmission line consolidation. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  2. Global mode analysis of axisymmetric bluff-body wakes: Stabilization by base bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmiguel-Rojas, E.; Sevilla, A.; Martínez-Bazán, C.; Chomaz, J.-M.

    2009-11-01

    The flow around a slender body with a blunt trailing edge is unstable in most situations of interest. Usually the flow instabilities are generated within the wake behind the bluff body, inducing fluctuating forces and introducing the possibility of resonance mechanisms with modes of the structure. Base bleed is a simple and well-known means of stabilizing the wake. In the present research, we investigate the global instability properties of the laminar-incompressible flow that develops behind a cylinder with sharp edges and axis aligned with the free stream using a spectral domain decomposition method. In particular, we describe the flow instability characteristics as a function of the Reynolds number, Re=ρW∞D/μ, and the bleed coefficient, defined as the bleed-to-free-stream velocity ratio, Cb=Wb/W∞, where D is the diameter of the body and ρ and μ the density and viscosity of the free stream, respectively. For a truncated cylinder of aspect ratio L /D=5, where L is the length of the body, our calculations reveal the presence of a first steady bifurcation in the wake at Re≃391, as well as a second oscillatory one at Re≃715 with an associated Strouhal number St≃0.0905 for the most unstable azimuthal mode |m|=1. In addition, we report the existence of two critical values of the bleed coefficient Cb1∗(Re,|m |) and Cb2∗(Re,|m |)

  3. Advances in Turbulent Combustion Dynamics Simulations in Bluff-Body Stabilized Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovar, Jonathan Michael

    This work examines the three main aspects of bluff-body stabilized flames: stationary combustion, lean blow-out, and thermo-acoustic instabilities. For the cases of stationary combustion and lean blow-out, an improved version of the Linear Eddy Model approach is used, while in the case of thermo-acoustic instabilities, the effect of boundary conditions on the predictions are studied. The improved version couples the Linear Eddy Model with the full-set of resolved scale Large Eddy Simulation equations for continuity, momentum, energy, and species transport. In traditional implementations the species equations are generally solved using a Lagrangian method which has some significant limitations. The novelty in this work is that the Eulerian species concentration equations are solved at the resolved scale and the Linear Eddy Model is strictly used to close the species production term. In this work, the improved Linear Eddy Model approach is applied to predict the flame properties inside the Volvo rig and it is shown to over-predict the flame temperature and normalized velocity when compared to experimental data using a premixed single step global propane reaction with an equivalence ratio of 0.65. The model is also applied to predict lean blow-out and is shown to predict a stable flame at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 when experiments achieve flame extinction at an equivalence ratio of 0.55. The improved Linear Eddy Model is, however, shown to be closer to experimental data than a comparable reactive flow simulation that uses laminar closure of the species source terms. The thermo-acoustic analysis is performed on a combustor rig designed at the Air Force Research Laboratory. The analysis is performed using a premixed single step global methane reaction for laminar reactive flow and shows that imposing a non-physical boundary condition at the rig exhaust will result in the suppression of acoustic content inside the domain and can alter the temperature contours in non

  4. Modeling 3-D Slope Stability of Coastal Bluffs Using 3-D Ground-Water Flow, Southwestern Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brien, Dianne L.; Reid, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Landslides are a common problem on coastal bluffs throughout the world. Along the coastal bluffs of the Puget Sound in Seattle, Washington, landslides range from small, shallow failures to large, deep-seated landslides. Landslides of all types can pose hazards to human lives and property, but deep-seated landslides are of significant concern because their large areal extent can cause extensive property damage. Although many geomorphic processes shape the coastal bluffs of Seattle, we focus on large (greater than 3,000 m3), deepseated, rotational landslides that occur on the steep bluffs along Puget Sound. Many of these larger failures occur in advance outwash deposits of the Vashon Drift (Qva); some failures extend into the underlying Lawton Clay Member of the Vashon Drift (Qvlc). The slope stability of coastal bluffs is controlled by the interplay of three-dimensional (3-D) variations in gravitational stress, strength, and pore-water pressure. We assess 3-D slope-stability using SCOOPS (Reid and others, 2000), a computer program that allows us to search a high-resolution digital-elevation model (DEM) to quantify the relative stability of all parts of the landscape by computing the stability and volume of thousands of potential spherical failures. SCOOPS incorporates topography, 3-D strength variations, and 3-D pore pressures. Initially, we use our 3-D analysis methods to examine the effects of topography and geology by using heterogeneous material properties, as defined by stratigraphy, without pore pressures. In this scenario, the least-stable areas are located on the steepest slopes, commonly in Qva or Qvlc. However, these locations do not agree well with observations of deep-seated landslides. Historically, both shallow colluvial landslides and deep-seated landslides have been observed near the contact between Qva and Qvlc, and commonly occur in Qva. The low hydraulic conductivity of Qvlc impedes ground-water flow, resulting in elevated pore pressures at the

  5. Vortex dynamics and scalar transport in the wake of a bluff body driven through a steady recirculating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poussou, Stephane B.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-09-01

    The air ventilation system in wide-body aircraft cabins provides passengers with a healthy breathing environment. In recent years, the increase in global air traffic has amplified contamination risks by airborne flu-like diseases and terrorist threats involving the onboard release of noxious materials. In particular, passengers moving through a ventilated cabin may transport infectious pathogens in their wake. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the wake produced by a bluff body driven through a steady recirculating flow. Data were obtained in a water facility using particle image velocimetry and planar laser induced fluorescence. Ventilation attenuated the downward convection of counter-rotating vortices produced near the free-end corners of the body and decoupled the downwash mechanism from forward entrainment, creating stagnant contaminant regions.

  6. "To Bluff like a Man or Fold like a Girl?" – Gender Biased Deceptive Behavior in Online Poker

    PubMed Central

    Palomäki, Jussi; Yan, Jeff; Modic, David; Laakasuo, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary psychology suggests that men are more likely than women to deceive to bolster their status and influence. Also gender perception influences deceptive behavior, which is linked to pervasive gender stereotypes: women are typically viewed as weaker and more gullible than men. We assessed bluffing in an online experiment (N = 502), where participants made decisions to bluff or not in simulated poker tasks against opponents represented by avatars. Participants bluffed on average 6% more frequently at poker tables with female-only avatars than at tables with male-only or gender mixed avatars—a highly significant effect in games involving repeated decisions. Nonetheless, participants did not believe the avatar genders affected their decisions. Males bluffed 13% more frequently than females. Unlike most economic games employed exclusively in research contexts, online poker is played for money by tens of millions of people worldwide. Thus, gender effects in bluffing have significant monetary consequences for poker players. PMID:27383472

  7. Comparison of submodels for conditional velocity and scalar dissipation in CMC simulation of piloted jet and bluff-body flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sreedhara, S.; Lee, Y.; Huh, Kang Y.; Ahn, D.H.

    2008-01-15

    No meaningful difference is observed between the predictions with the conditional velocity modeled by linear scaling and gradient diffusion assumption for the test flames under consideration. The AMC and Girimaji's model for CSDR show similar results, while the pdf integration method results in an asymmetric profile with some deviation from the other two. The difference tends to decrease as mixing proceeds, to result in a lower level of scalar dissipation at downstream locations. Reasonable agreement is achieved with measured scalar dissipation rates at different axial locations for the Sandia Flame D, while direct comparison is difficult due to radially averaged pdfs and no measured scalar dissipation rates being available for the Sydney bluff-body flame.

  8. "To Bluff like a Man or Fold like a Girl?" - Gender Biased Deceptive Behavior in Online Poker.

    PubMed

    Palomäki, Jussi; Yan, Jeff; Modic, David; Laakasuo, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary psychology suggests that men are more likely than women to deceive to bolster their status and influence. Also gender perception influences deceptive behavior, which is linked to pervasive gender stereotypes: women are typically viewed as weaker and more gullible than men. We assessed bluffing in an online experiment (N = 502), where participants made decisions to bluff or not in simulated poker tasks against opponents represented by avatars. Participants bluffed on average 6% more frequently at poker tables with female-only avatars than at tables with male-only or gender mixed avatars-a highly significant effect in games involving repeated decisions. Nonetheless, participants did not believe the avatar genders affected their decisions. Males bluffed 13% more frequently than females. Unlike most economic games employed exclusively in research contexts, online poker is played for money by tens of millions of people worldwide. Thus, gender effects in bluffing have significant monetary consequences for poker players. PMID:27383472

  9. Reconnaissance of Acid Drainage Sources and Preliminary Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives at the Copper Bluff Mine, Hoopa Valley Reservation, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, Charles N.; Hunerlach, Michael P.; Hamlin, Scott N.; Zierenberg, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Acidic drainage from the inactive Copper Bluff mine cascades down a steep embankment into the Trinity River, on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in northern California. The Copper Bluff mine produced about 100,000 tons of sulfide-bearing copper-zinc-gold-silver ore during 1957?1962. This report summarizes the results of a water-resources investigation begun by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1994 with the overall objective of gathering sufficient geochemical, hydrologic, and geologic information so that a sound remediation strategy for the Copper Bluff mine could be selected and implemented by the Hoopa Valley Tribe. This study had the following specific objectives: (1) monitor the quality and quantity of the mine discharge, (2) determine seasonal variability of metal concentrations and loads, (3) map and sample the underground mine workings to determine sources of flow and suitability of mine plugging options, and (4) analyze the likely consequences of various remediation and treatment options. Analysis of weekly water samples of adit discharge over parts of two wet seasons (January to July 1995 and October 1995 to May 1996) shows that dissolved copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) concentrations (in samples filtered with 0.20-micrometer membranes) varied systematically in a seasonal pattern. Metal concentrations increased dramatically in response to the first increase in discharge, or first flush, early in the wet season. The value of Zn/Cu in the adit discharge exhibited systematic seasonal variations; an annual Zn/Cu cycle was observed, beginning with values between 3 and 5 during the main part of the wet season, rising to values between 6 and 10 during the period of lowest discharge late in the dry season, and then dropping dramatically to values less than 3 during the first-flush period. Values of pH were fairly constant in the range of 3.1 to 3.8 throughout the wet season and into the beginning of the dry season, but rose to values between 4.5 and 5.6 during the period of

  10. Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The National Energy Strategy Plan (NES) has called for 900,000 barrels/day production of heavy oil in the mid-1990s to meet our national needs. To achieve this goal, it is important that the Alaskan heavy oil fields be brought to production. Alaska has more than 25 billion barrels of heavy oil deposits. Conoco, and now BP Exploration have been producing from Schrader Bluff Pool, which is part of the super heavy oil field known as West Sak Field. Schrader Bluff reservoir, located in the Milne Point Unit, North Slope of Alaska, is estimated to contain up to 1.5 billion barrels of (14 to 21{degrees}API) oil in place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion; however, the primary recovery will be much smaller than expected. Hence, waterflooding will be implemented earlier than anticipated. The eventual use of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques, such as hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process, is vital for recovery of additional oil from this reservoir. The purpose of this research project was to determine the nature of miscible solvent slug which would be commercially feasible, to evaluate the performance of the hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug process, and to assess the feasibility of this process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir. The laboratory experimental work includes: slim tube displacement experiments and coreflood experiments. The components of solvent slug includes only those which are available on the North Slope of Alaska.

  11. Analysis of river planforms in the New Madrid region and possible relations to tectonic warping across the loess bluffs and within the meander belt of the Mississippi River

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Mayer, L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Stream channel planforms measured from such streams as the Hatchie (H), L'Anguille (LA), St. Francis, White (W) and Little Red (LR) rivers provide a way to study influences of topographic warping between the loess bluffs that bound the Mississippi river valley. Planforms are analyzed using sinuosity, Richardson analysis, and pattern. Pattern changes include transitions from braided to meandering and meandering to straight. Sinuosities of the W and LR rivers show a transition from low sinuosity, [1.3, 1.4] to higher sinuosity [2.6, 2.8], over a short distance, as they cross the bluffs from the uplands to the Western Lowlands. On the east, the Hatchie changes from a braided to meandering pattern upon crossing the bluffs. Its sinuosity varies from a low of about 1.4 to a high of 2.2, coincident with a marsh area. The LA river flows on the west side of Crowley's Ridge and is paralleled by the St. Francis river on the east. These rivers, with very different drainage areas and sinuosities, show matching meander bends at similar wavelengths along Crowley's Ridge. The bends are about 10 km in 1/2 wavelength suggesting some extraordinary influence on pattern perpendicular to the ridge. Richardson analysis indicates that features with a 1/2 wavelength of 2 km may control several rivers' bending patterns. These features are analyzed to determine their spatial relations with one another.

  12. Pulsed Eruptions of the Sentinel Bluffs Member, Grande Ronde Basalt, Determined from Geochemical and Paleomagnetic Characterizations of Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawlan, M. G.; Hagstrum, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The identification of compositionally distinct lava flows is essential to determining the stratigraphy, number of lavas, and hence timing and frequency of eruptions in flood basalt provinces. Here, we address this issue using paired geochemical and paleomagnetic sampling of lavas comprising the Sentinel Bluffs Member (SB), the youngest member of the Grande Ronde Basalt (GRB). We develop the SB stratigraphy using geochemical characterizations of lavas based on ratios and mass-normalized abundances of immobile elements, together with an integrated stratigraphy of sections containing continuous exposures of multiple SB flows. Mass normalization is part of a mass analysis methodology that enables precise determinations of magmatic immobile element abundances of lavas variably enriched by alteration-generated mass loss (see Sawlan, M.G., 2013, Alteration, mass conservation, and magmatic compositions of lavas of the Columbia River flood basalt province: Insights from the Sentinel Bluffs Member, Grande Ronde Basalt: AGU Fall Meeting, V13F-2689). Within the SB chemical stratigraphy five chemical series, each of which includes three or four more precisely defined chemical groups, are recognized. Paleomagnetic directions, averaged by chemical series, show distinct differences between lavas of Series I (I=64.8°, D=351.2°, N=9, α95=3.8°), Series II-IV (I=56.5°, D=4.8°, N=29, α95=1.7°), and Series V (I=71.4°, D=326.0°, N=9, α95=4.6°). These differences in paleomagnetic directions of chemical series indicate SB eruptions occurred in pulsed eruptive episodes during which multiple, closely related, and geochemically distinct magmas erupted. Directions for Series II-IV lavas, near the geomagnetic dipole direction, are indistinguishable from one another (Series II: I=53.4°, D=2.0°, N=5, α95=4.4°; Series III: I=55.7°, D=5.6°, N=15, α95=1.8°; Series IV: I=59.6°, D=5.2°, N=9, α95=4.1°) and indicate that these lavas erupted either closely spaced in time or within

  13. Preliminary assessment of the health and environmental impacts of incinerating M55 rockets stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Lexington-Blue Grass Depot Activity, and/or Anniston Army Depot at Pine Bluff Arsenal

    SciTech Connect

    Boyette, J.A.; Breck, J.E.; Coleman, P.R.; Griffin, G.D.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, P.E.; Kornegay, F.C.; Schweitzer, M.; Sigal, L.L.; Thomas, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose is to provide an assessment of the potential health and environmental impacts associated with converting and operating an incineration facility currently under construction at Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) in Arkansas. The plant is currently designed to dispose of the incapacitating agent BZ, and the converted plant would be designed to incinerate M55 rockets containing the nerve agent GB or VX. For the purposes of this study, the rockets to be incinerated at PBA are those currently stored at PBA and possibly those currently stored at Lexington-Blue Grass Depot Activity in Kentucky and/or at Anniston Army Depot in Alabama. The assessment considers impacts on air quality, ground and surface water, aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, human health, and cultural and socioeconomic resources at PBA and its host region. The assessment considers three basic scenarios during plant operations: normal operations, a minor spill of agent (i.e., the nerve-agent contents of one rocket being released to the biosphere), and an onsite transport accident (i.e., vaporization or aerosolization of the contents of two rockets and a spill of the remaining 13 rockets from an M55 rocket pallet) during disposal operations. For our assessment of accident impacts, we considered two separate sets of meteorological conditions: (1) conservative most likely and (2) worst-case.

  14. Prediction of turbulent recirculating flow field behind a V-shaped bluff body using a nonlinear low Reynolds number k-epsilon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhan

    1998-09-01

    A new localized smoothing filter based on the least squares is proposed in this study. It has been found the use of an appropriate smoothing method is critical to the success of numerical prediction of separating flow problems with nonlinear turbulence models. The new smoothing filter effectively eliminated numerical fluctuations due to the nonlineality of the turbulence model and the higher order approximation. The efficiency of using this scheme is very attractive; less than 20% more CPU time is needed for the extra computation in simulations. Modification has been made to the nonlinear model to take into consideration of low Reynolds number effects. The two-dimensional turbulent recirculating flow field behind a V-shaped bluff body has been investigated numerically. Similar bluff bodies are used in combustion chambers for flame stabilization. The study helps to gain a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of the flame stability and major factors that affect this stability, and thereby establishes a more reasonable physical model. The validation test of turbulent flow over a backward facing step shows that the modified nonlinear turbulence model significantly improved the overall prediction. Predicted results for both mean flow field and turbulence quantities agreed very well experimental results. The prediction error for the characteristic reattachment length has been reduced from 18% to 4% compared with the experimental data. The results of simulation of flow field behind the bluff body are also improved by using this model. The degree of improvement varies for different flow variables. Parametric investigation of the flow field by varying the shape and size of the bluff body is also performed. It has been found that the axial distributions of normalized reverse mass flow rate for different configurations are similar. The maximum reverse mass flow rate increases monotonically with the base height as well as with the included angle of the bluff body, but

  15. Large Eddy Simulations of forced ignition of a non-premixed bluff-body methane flame with Conditional Moment Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Triantafyllidis, A.; Mastorakos, E.; Eggels, R.L.G.M.

    2009-12-15

    Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of forced ignition of a bluff-body stabilised non-premixed methane flame using the Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) turbulent combustion model have been performed. The aim is to investigate the feasibility of the use of CMC/LES for ignition problems and to examine which, if any, of the characteristics already observed in related experiments could be predicted. A three-dimensional formulation of the CMC equation was used with simple and detailed chemical mechanisms, and sparks with different parameters (location, size) were used. It was found that the correct pattern of flame expansion and overall flame appearance were predicted with reasonable accuracy with both mechanisms, but the detailed mechanism resulted in expansion rates closer to the experiment. Moreover, the distribution of OH was predicted qualitatively accurately, with patches of high and low concentration in the recirculation zone during the ignition transient, consistent with experimental data. The location of the spark relative to the recirculation zone was found to determine the pattern of the flame propagation and the total time for the flame stabilisation. The size was also an important parameter, since it was found that the flame extinguishes when the spark is very small, in agreement with expectations from experiment. The stabilisation mechanism of the flame was dominated by the convection and sub-grid scale diffusion of hot combustion products from the recirculation zone to the cold gases that enter the burner, as revealed by analysis of the CMC equation. (author)

  16. A topological study of gravity free-surface waves generated by bluff bodies using the method of steepest descents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Philippe H.

    2016-07-01

    The standard analytical approach for studying steady gravity free-surface waves generated by a moving body often relies upon a linearization of the physical geometry, where the body is considered asymptotically small in one or several of its dimensions. In this paper, a methodology that avoids any such geometrical simplification is presented for the case of steady-state flows at low speeds. The approach is made possible through a reduction of the water-wave equations to a complex-valued integral equation that can be studied using the method of steepest descents. The main result is a theory that establishes a correspondence between different bluff-bodied free-surface flow configurations, with the topology of the Riemann surface formed by the steepest descent paths. Then, when a geometrical feature of the body is modified, a corresponding change to the Riemann surface is observed, and the resultant effects to the water waves can be derived. This visual procedure is demonstrated for the case of two-dimensional free-surface flow past a surface-piercing ship and over an angled step in a channel.

  17. Blowoff characteristics of bluff-body stabilized conical premixed flames with upstream spatial mixture gradients and velocity oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2008-06-15

    This experimental study concerns determination of blowoff equivalence ratios for lean premixed conical flames for different mixture approach velocities ranging from 5 to 16 m/s in the presence of spatial mixture gradients and upstream velocity modulation. Conical flames were anchored on a disk-shaped bluff body that was attached to a central rod in the burner nozzle. A combustible propane-air mixture flowed through a converging axisymmetric nozzle with a concentric insert, allowing radial mixture variation by tailoring the composition in the inner and outer parts of the nozzle. The radial mixture profiles were characterized near the location of the flame holder by laser Rayleigh light scattering. Additionally, a loudspeaker at the nozzle base allowed introduction of periodic velocity oscillations with an amplitude of 9% of the mean flow velocity up to a frequency of 350 Hz. The flame blowoff equivalence ratio was experimentally determined by continuously lowering the fuel flow rates and determining the flame detachment point from the flame holder. Flame detachment was detected by a rapid reduction of CH* emission from the flame base imaged by a photomultiplier detector. It was found that the flame blowoff is preceded by progressive narrowing of the flame cone for the case of higher inner jet equivalence ratios. In this case, the fuel-lean outer flow cannot sustain combustion, and clearly this is not a good way of operating a combustor. Nevertheless, the overall blowoff equivalence ratio is reduced by inner stream fuel enrichment. A possible explanation for this behavior is given based on the radial extent of the variable-equivalence-ratio mixture burning near the flame stabilization region. Fuel enrichment in the outer flow was found to have no effect on blowoff as compared to the case of uniform mixture. The results were similar for the whole range of mean flow velocities and upstream excitation frequencies. (author)

  18. Paleoenvironment of the Ogallala (Neogene) Formation in west-central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Twiss, P.C.; McCahon, T.J.; Oviatt, C.G. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    At Lake Scott (Scott County) in west-central Kansas, the Ogallala Formation unconformably overlies the Niobrara Formation (Cretaceous) and forms the bluffs of the north-trending Ladder Creek valley. Two sections (Devil's Backbone, 23 m thick; Suicide Bluff, 45 m thick) contain fluvial sands that grade upward into probable eolian sands. The lower sections contain poorly cemented, moderately sorted, arkosic sand, some mud gravel, and poorly defined fluvial channels. In the lower part of Devil's Backbone, cross-bedded sand is capped by mud drapes. At Suicide Bluff, beds of cross-bedded and better sorted sand occur high in the section. Paleosols and secondary calcite and opal dominate the sections. Pedogenic calcretes with more than 52% CaCO[sub 3] are especially abundant and range up to morphologic Stage VI. The [delta][sup 13]C and [delta][sup 18]O in the calcretes range from [minus]4.8 to [minus]6.5 and [minus]8.2 to [minus]6.7 per mil (PDB), respectively. Opal-A has replaced most rhizoliths of the Ogallala. Silicified fossil seeds (Celtis sp., Biorbia sp.) and probable fossil mammal burrows also occur in the sections. Rhyolitic tephra, about 10 Ma, occurs 12 m below the calcrete caprock of Suicide Bluff. A massive layer of opal occurs about 8 m above the tephra and below a diatomaceous bed. Siliceous cement occurs throughout each section, possibly originating from opal phytoliths, tephra, and/or diatoms. These sections afford the potential for understanding the stratigraphic succession and paleoclimate during the late Miocene to possibly early Pliocene in the central High Plains region.

  19. Two-stage growth of the Late Miocene Minna Bluff Volcanic Complex, Ross Embayment, Antarctica: implications for ice-sheet and volcanic histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilch, T. I.; McIntosh, W. C.; Panter, K. S.; Dunbar, N. W.; Smellie, J.; Fargo, A. J.; Ross, J. I.; Antibus, J. V.; Scanlan, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    Minna Bluff, a 45km long, 5km wide Late Miocene alkaline volcanic peninsula that extends SE into the Ross Ice Shelf, is a major obstruction to ice flow from the south into the McMurdo Sound region. Interpretations of the abundant paleoclimate and glacial history archives, including the ANDRILL records, need to account for the effects of paleogeography on past ice-flow configurations and sediment transport. Mapping and 40Ar/39Ar dating of volcanic sequences indicate that Minna Bluff was constructed between 12 and 4 Ma. The volcanic complex first emerged as an isolated island in the Ross Sea at about 12 Ma. The edifice, here named Minna Hook Island, was constructed between 12 and 8 Ma. During this first stage of growth, regional ice was able to flow through a ~40 km gap between the island and mainland. The second stage of volcanism built the main arm of Minna Bluff, now called McIntosh Cliffs, between 8 and 4 Ma. The second stage resulted in the eruption of exclusively subaerial cinder cones and lava flows. By approximately 5 Ma the peninsula had fully emerged above sea level, fully obstructing ice flow. Evidence for volcano-ice interaction is common in Minna Hook stratigraphic sequences. Well exposed cliff sections exhibit alternations between rocks erupted in subaerial and subaqueous conditions; these sequences are interpreted to represent syneruptive interactions between lava flows and glacial ice and provide evidence for periodic glaciations between 12 and 8 Ma. The lack of coherent horizontal passage zones between subglacial and subaerial lithofacies and the alternating nature of the deposits suggest that the eruptions did not occur in a large stable ice sheet but instead occurred in a more ephemeral local ice cap or rapidly drained ice sheet. At least two widespread, undulating glacial unconformities mantled by glacial and fluvial sediments are exposed near the base of the Minna Hook sequences. These unconformities record broad scale Antarctic Ice Sheet events

  20. Modification of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of Bluff Bodies Using Synthetic Jet Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitay, Michael; Honohan, Andrew; Glezer, Ari

    1997-11-01

    The apparent aerodynamic shape (and thus lift and drag) of a 2-D cylinder is modified in wind tunnel experiments using a spanwise pair of synthetic jet actuators. The interaction of the jets with the embedding flow leads to the formation of closed recirculation regions and thus to an apparent modification of the flow boundary. Smoke visualization experiments demonstrate that the closed recirculating flow regimes near the surface scale with the momentum coefficient and can displace local streamlines well outside the surface boundary layer. Azimuthal distributions of surface pressure measured over a range of jet angles demonstrate that the jets effect substantial increase in lift (up to C_L=0.6) and a reduction in drag (up to 30%). Velocity measurements in the wake of the cylinder demonstrate that these changes are accompanied by vectoring and loss of symmetry. The small scale motions induced by the actuators in the near wake lead to increased dissipation and a reduction in the turbulent kinetic energy.

  1. Ground-water conditions in the Dutch Flats area, Scotts Bluff and Sioux Counties, Nebraska, with a section on chemical quality of the ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babcock, H.M.; Visher, F.N.; Durum, W.H.

    1951-01-01

    land irrigated for agriculture, has been identified as being susceptible. Biological data were used to evaluate the reliability of the map. In 12 of DOI's 26 study areas, concentrations of selenium measured in bird eggs were elevated sufficiently to significantly reduce hatchability of the eggs. The GIS map identifies 9 of those 12 areas. Deformed bird embryos having classic symptoms of selenium toxicosis were found in four of the study areas, and the map identifies all four as susceptible to irrigation-induced selenium contamination. The report describes the geography, geology, and ground-water resources of the Dutch Flats area in Scotts Bluff and Sioux Counties, Nebr. The area comprises about 60 square miles and consists predominantly of relatively flat-lying terraces. Farming is the principal occupation in the area. The farm lands are irrigated largely from surface water; ground water is used only as a supplementary supply during drought periods. The climate in the area is semiarid, and the mean annual precipitation is about 16 inches. The rocks exposed in the Dutch Flats area are of Tertiary sad Quaternary age. A map showing the areas of outcrop of the rock formations is included in the report. Sufficient unconfined ground water for irrigation supplies is contained in the deposits of the .third terrace, and wells that yield 1,000 to 2,000 gallons a minute probably could be developed. The depth to water in the area ranges from a few feet to about 80 feet sad averages about 30 feet. The depth to water varies throughout the year; it is least in the late summer when the recharge from irrigation is greatest, sad it is greatest in the early spring before irrigation is begun. A map showing the depth to water in September 1949 is included in the report. The ground-water reservoir is recharged by seepage from irrigation canals and laterals, by seepage from irrigation water applied to the farms, and, to a much lesser extent, by precipitation. In the area b

  2. Interglacial Extension of the Boreal Forest Limit in the Noatak Valley, Northwest Alaska: Evidence from an Exhumed River-Cut Bluff and Debris Apron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, M.E.; Hamilton, T.D.; Elias, S.A.; Bigelow, N.H.; Krumhardt, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous exposures of Pleistocene sediments occur in the Noatak basin, which extends for 130 km along the Noatak River in northwestern Alaska. Nk-37, an extensive bluff exposure near the west end of the basin, contains a record of at least three glacial advances separated by interglacial and interstadial deposits. An ancient river-cut bluff and associated debris apron is exposed in profile through the central part of Nk-37. The debris apron contains a rich biotic record and represents part of an interglaciation that is probably assignable to marine-isotope stage 5. Pollen spectra from the lower part of the debris apron closely resemble modern samples taken from the Noatak floodplain in spruce gallery forest, and macrofossils of spruce are also present at this level. Fossil bark beetles and carpenter ants occur higher in the debris apron. Mutual Climatic Range (MCR) estimates from the fossil beetles suggest temperatures similar to or warmer than today. Together, these fossils indicate the presence of an interglacial spruce forest in the western part of the Noatak Basin, which lies about 80 km upstream of the modern limit of spruce forest.

  3. Aerodynamics of the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi: how a bluff body cross-sectional shape contributes to gliding performance.

    PubMed

    Holden, Daniel; Socha, John J; Cardwell, Nicholas D; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-02-01

    A prominent feature of gliding flight in snakes of the genus Chrysopelea is the unique cross-sectional shape of the body, which acts as the lifting surface in the absence of wings. When gliding, the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi morphs its circular cross-section into a triangular shape by splaying its ribs and flattening its body in the dorsoventral axis, forming a geometry with fore-aft symmetry and a thick profile. Here, we aimed to understand the aerodynamic properties of the snake's cross-sectional shape to determine its contribution to gliding at low Reynolds numbers. We used a straight physical model in a water tunnel to isolate the effects of 2D shape, analogously to studying the profile of an airfoil of a more typical flyer. Force measurements and time-resolved (TR) digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) were used to determine lift and drag coefficients, wake dynamics and vortex-shedding characteristics of the shape across a behaviorally relevant range of Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. The snake's cross-sectional shape produced a maximum lift coefficient of 1.9 and maximum lift-to-drag ratio of 2.7, maintained increases in lift up to 35 deg, and exhibited two distinctly different vortex-shedding modes. Within the measured Reynolds number regime (Re=3000-15,000), this geometry generated significantly larger maximum lift coefficients than many other shapes including bluff bodies, thick airfoils, symmetric airfoils and circular arc airfoils. In addition, the snake's shape exhibited a gentle stall region that maintained relatively high lift production even up to the highest angle of attack tested (60 deg). Overall, the cross-sectional geometry of the flying snake demonstrated robust aerodynamic behavior by maintaining significant lift production and near-maximum lift-to-drag ratios over a wide range of parameters. These aerodynamic characteristics help to explain how the snake can glide at steep angles and over a wide range of angles of attack

  4. Aerodynamics of the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi: how a bluff body cross-sectional shape contributes to gliding performance.

    PubMed

    Holden, Daniel; Socha, John J; Cardwell, Nicholas D; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-02-01

    A prominent feature of gliding flight in snakes of the genus Chrysopelea is the unique cross-sectional shape of the body, which acts as the lifting surface in the absence of wings. When gliding, the flying snake Chrysopelea paradisi morphs its circular cross-section into a triangular shape by splaying its ribs and flattening its body in the dorsoventral axis, forming a geometry with fore-aft symmetry and a thick profile. Here, we aimed to understand the aerodynamic properties of the snake's cross-sectional shape to determine its contribution to gliding at low Reynolds numbers. We used a straight physical model in a water tunnel to isolate the effects of 2D shape, analogously to studying the profile of an airfoil of a more typical flyer. Force measurements and time-resolved (TR) digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) were used to determine lift and drag coefficients, wake dynamics and vortex-shedding characteristics of the shape across a behaviorally relevant range of Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. The snake's cross-sectional shape produced a maximum lift coefficient of 1.9 and maximum lift-to-drag ratio of 2.7, maintained increases in lift up to 35 deg, and exhibited two distinctly different vortex-shedding modes. Within the measured Reynolds number regime (Re=3000-15,000), this geometry generated significantly larger maximum lift coefficients than many other shapes including bluff bodies, thick airfoils, symmetric airfoils and circular arc airfoils. In addition, the snake's shape exhibited a gentle stall region that maintained relatively high lift production even up to the highest angle of attack tested (60 deg). Overall, the cross-sectional geometry of the flying snake demonstrated robust aerodynamic behavior by maintaining significant lift production and near-maximum lift-to-drag ratios over a wide range of parameters. These aerodynamic characteristics help to explain how the snake can glide at steep angles and over a wide range of angles of attack

  5. Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Annual report, December 1, 1992--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    The shallow Cretaceous sands of the Schrader Bluff Reservoir occur between depths of 4,000 and 4,800 feet below surface and are estimated to contain up to 1.5 billion barrels of oil in place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion. Initial production indicated that primary recovery will fall short of earlier estimates and waterflooding will have to be employed much earlier than expected. A large portion of the oil-in-place thus would still be left behind in this reservoir after primary and secondary recovery methods have been applied. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques will be needed to recover the additional portion of remaining oil in this huge reservoir and to add significant additional reserves. Slim tube displacement studies, PVT data and asphaltene precipitation studies are needed for Schrader Bluff heavy oil to define possible hydrocarbon solvent suitable for miscible solvent slug displacement process. Such studies are essential because the API gravity of the crude in Schrader Bluff reservoir varies significantly from well to well. Coreflood experiments are also needed to determine effect of solvent slug size, WAG ratio and solvent composition on the oil recovery and solvent breakthrough. A compositional reservoir simulation study will be conducted later to evaluate the complete performance of the hydrocarbon solvent slug process and to assess the feasibility of this process for improving recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir. This report contains the following: reservoir description; slim tube displacement studies; and coreflood experiments.

  6. Chronostratigraphy and biostratigraphy of Paleogene Formations in eastern Gulf Coastal Province

    SciTech Connect

    Siesser, W.G.

    1985-02-01

    Paleogene formations extending from eastern Alabama to Arkansas have been assigned to internationally recognized biostratigraphic zones based on calcareous nannoplankton fossils. All zones from NP 1 to NP 24 are present in the study area, with the exception of NP 11 (within the early Eocene) and NP 23 (within the early Oligocene). Gulf Coast formations correlate to international standard chronostratigraphic stages as follows. The Clayton and Porters Creek formations correlate to the Danian Stage. The Naheola Formation, Salt Mountain Limestone, Nanafalia Formation, Tuscahoma Sand, and lower Hatchetigbee Formation (in part) correlate to the Selandian Stage. The Hatchetigbee (in part) and lower Tallahatta correlate to the Ypresian Stage; the upper Tallahatta and most of the Lisbon and Cook Mountain Formations correlate to the Lutetian Stage. The upper Lisbon and Cook Mountain formations, the Gosport Sand, Moodys Branch, and lowermost Yazoo formations correlate to the Bartonian Stage. The Crystal River and most of the Yazoo Formation correlate to the Priabonian Stage. The uppermost Yazoo Formation, the Bumpnose Limestone, Red Bluff, Forest Hill, and Mint Spring Formations, Marianna and Glendon Limestones, and Byram and Bucatunna Formations correlate to the Rupelian Stage. The Chickasawhay Limestone and Paynes Hammock Formation span the Rupelian-Chattian boundary. The Paleocene-Eocene boundary (approximately the NP 9-NP 10 boundary) is therefore within the lower Hatchetigbee Formation (Bashi Marl Member). The Eocene-Oligocene boundary (within lowermost NP 21) is within the uppermost Yazoo Formation (Shubuta Clay Member) in places, and within the lowermost Bumpnose, Red Bluff, and Forest Hill Formations and Marianna Limestone elsewhere in the region.

  7. The Knowledge Bluff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburg, Willem H.

    2007-01-01

    Our knowledge "system" is built up from disciplines and specialties as its components, which are "wired" by patterns of collaboration that constitute its organization. The intellectual autonomy of these components prevents this knowledge system from adequately accounting for what we have gradually discovered during the past 50 years: In human…

  8. Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Annual report, January 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.D.

    1995-07-01

    Alaska is the second largest oil producing state in the nation and currently contributes nearly 24% of the nations oil production. It is imperative that Alaskan heavy oil fields be brought into production. Schrader Bluff reservoir, located in the Milne Point Unit, which is part of the heavy oil field known as West Sak is estimated to contain 1.5 billion barrels of (14 to 21 degree API) oil-in-place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion. The eventual implementation of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques will be vital for the recovery of additional oil from this reservoir. The availability of hydrocarbon gases (solvents) on the Alaska North Slope make the hydrocarbon miscible solvent injection process an important consideration for the EOR project in Schrader Bluff reservoir. Since Schrader Bluff oil is heavy and viscous, a water-alternating-gas (WAG) type of process for oil recovery is appropriate since such a process tends to derive synergetic benefits from both water injection (which provides mobility control and improvement in sweep efficiency) and miscible gas injection (which provides improved displacement efficiency). A miscible solvent slug injection process rather than continuous solvent injection is considered appropriate. Slim tube displacement studies, PVT data and asphaltene precipitation studies are needed for Schrader bluff heavy oil to define possible hydrocarbon solvent suitable for miscible solvent slug displacement process. Coreflood experiments are also needed to determine the effect of solvent slug size, WAG ratio and solvent composition on the recovery and solvent breakthrough. A compositional reservoir simulation study will be conducted later to evaluate the complete performance of the hydrocarbon solvent slug process and to assess the feasibility of this process for improving recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir.

  9. Vortex Formation in Shallow Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Donald

    2006-11-01

    Vortical structures having a scale much larger than the depth of the flow, which arise in bluff body wakes, jets, and mixing layers generated in shallow layers, show distinctive features due to the influence of bed friction. Cinema techniques of high-image-density particle image velocimetry are employed to characterize quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional aspects of the vortex development in terms of: patterns of vorticity; flow topology involving definition of critical points; and global spectral and cross-spectral analyses, based on simultaneous time records at thousands of grid points of the cinema imaging. Taken together, these representations lead to an understanding of the relationship between coherent vortex development and unsteadiness along the bed and, furthermore, provide a basis for exploration of concepts generic to separated shear layers in shallow flows. These concepts include: suppression of a primary mode of vortex formation due to bed friction and emergence of another mode; resonant coupling between a gravity wave of the shallow layer and vortex formation, leading to large-scale vortices; and passive and active (open loop) control, which can either retard or enhance the onset of vortex formation. These studies suggest opportunities for further investigation on both experimental and numerical fronts. Collaboration with Haojun Fu, Alis Ekmekci, Jung-Chang Lin, and Muammer Ozgoren is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. High altitude flight test of a disk gap band parachute deployed behind a bluff body at a Mach number of 2.69

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, C.; Branscome, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    A flight test was conducted with a 55-foot diameter disk-gap-band parachute located at a trailing distance of 4.4 forebody diameters behind a 15-foot diameter bluff-body planetary entry aeroshell and attached instrumented payload. At the time of parachute deployment the aeroshell-payload combination was oscillating through an angle-of-attack range of plus or minus 40 deg. Continued oscillatory motion of the aeroshell-payload combination and similar motion of the parachute caused rapid changes in parachute shape and loading which resulted in extensive cloth damage in the band and outer disk-edge areas of the parachute canopy. During steady-state descent the damage parachute provided an effective-drag coefficient of about 0.33 which was about 60 percent of that expected.

  11. Hydrology, Water Quality, and Causes of Changes in Vegetation in the Vicinity of the Spring Bluff Nature Preserve, Lake County, Illinois, May 2007-August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, Robert T.; Miner, James J.; Maurer, Debbie A.; Knight, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    Agriculture and urbanization have altered the hydrology and water quality of the coastal wetland complex along the shore of Lake Michigan at the Spring Bluff Nature Preserve and Illinois Beach State Park in northeastern Lake County, Ill., and the adjacent Chiwaukee Prairie State Natural Area in southeastern Wisconsin. Culverts, roads, ditches, and berms installed within the wetland complex have altered the natural directions of surface-water flow and likely have increased the natural hydroperiod in the Spring Bluff Nature Preserve and decreased it in the northern part of the Illinois Beach State Park. Relative to presettlement conditions, surface-water runoff into the wetlands likely is greater in quantity and higher in concentrations of several constituents, including chloride, nitrate, phosphorous, and suspended sediment. These constituent concentrations are affected by a variety of factors, including the amount of agricultural and urban land use in the watersheds. Hydrologic, chemical, and biologic processes within the wetland communities reduce the concentrations of these constituents in surface water before the water discharges to Lake Michigan by as much as 75 percent for chloride, 85 percent for nitrate, 66 percent for phosphorous, and more than an order of magnitude for suspended sediment. However, concentrations of phosphorous and suspended sediment in surface water increased within parts of the wetland complex. Given these changes, the floristic quality of these wetlands has been altered from the historic condition. Specifically, Typha spp. and Phragmites australis occur in greater numbers and over a larger area than in the past. The spread of Typha spp. and Phragmites australis appears to be enhanced by anthropogenic alterations within the wetland complex, such as increased water levels and duration of inundation and, possibly, increases in the total concentration of dissolved constituents in water.

  12. Numerical investigation of flame-vortex interactions in laminar cross-flow non-premixed flames in the presence of bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhumal Shijin, Puthiyaparambath; Raghavan, Vasudevan; Babu, Viswanathan

    2016-07-01

    Flame stabilisation in a combustor having vortices generated by flame holding devices constitutes an interesting fundamental problem. The presence of vortices in many practical combustors ranging from industrial burners to high speed propulsion systems induces vortex-flame interactions and complex stabilisation conditions. The scenario becomes more complex if the flame sustains after separating itself from the flame holder. In a recent study [P.K. Shijin, S.S. Sundaram, V. Raghavan, and V. Babu, Numerical investigation of laminar cross-flow non-premixed flames in the presence of a bluff-body, Combust. Theory Model. 18, 2014, pp. 692-710], the authors reported details of the regimes of flame stabilisation of non-premixed laminar flames established in a cross-flow combustor in the presence of a square cylinder. In that, the separated flame has been shown to be three dimensional and highly unsteady. Such separated flames are investigated further in the present study. Flame-vortex interactions in separated methane-air cross flow flames established behind three bluff bodies, namely a square cylinder, an isosceles triangular cylinder and a half V-gutter, have been analysed in detail. The mixing process in the reactive flow has been explained using streamlines of species velocities of CH4 and O2. The time histories of z-vorticity, net heat release rate and temperature are analysed to reveal the close relationship between z-vorticity and net heat release rate spectra. Two distinct fluctuating layers are visible in the proper orthogonal decomposition and discrete Fourier transform of OH mass fraction data. The upper fluctuating layer observed in the OH field correlates well with that of temperature. A detailed investigation of the characteristics of OH transport has also been carried out to show the interactions between factors affecting fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics that cause multiple fluctuating layers in the OH.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Mid-America Tanning site, Sergeant bBluff, IA. (First remedial action), September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-24

    The 98.7-acre Mid-America Tanning site is a former leather tannery in Sergeant Bluff, Woodbury County, Iowa. Surrounding land use is mixed industrial and agricultural. A portion of the site is bordered by Oxbow Lake and lies within the 100-year floodplain. The Missouri River is approximately 1.5 miles to the southwest of the site and receives discharges from Oxbow Lake. The facility began onsite processing of animal hides in 1970. In 1980, the State confirmed the onsite burial of chromium-containing sludge in trenches, and the company was cited for permit violations. A 1985 EPA investigation identified excessive chromium contamination in onsite soil, sediment, and ground water. In 1990, EPA conducted a removal action that included excavating and consolidating onsite 1,290 cubic yards of sludge from the trench disposal area. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the contaminated soil, impoundment sediment and water, and the excavated trench material. A future ROD will address onsite ground water contamination. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the soil, sediment, debris, sludge, and surface water are metals including chromium and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  14. Health assessment for Mid-America Tanning Company, Sergeant Bluff, Woodbury County, Iowa, Region 7. CERCLIS No. IAD085824688. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-08

    The Mid-America Tanning Company (MAT) Site is proposed to be listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the National Priorities List (NPL). Mid-America Tanning, now U.S. Tanning, is an animal hide processing plant located on 98.7 acres approximately five miles south of Sergeant Bluff, Woodbury County, Iowa. From June 1978 to the present, use of chromium has been extended to the entire process, which involves the treatment of approximately 1000 hides per day. The process utilizes trivalent chromium and produces waste sludge and liquids that are treated on-site at the company wastewater treatment facility. Based on the available information, this site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the likelihood of exposure to hazardous substances via groundwater, surface water and soil. Further environmental characterization and sampling of the site and impacted off-site areas during the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) should be conducted to address the environmental and human exposure pathways discussed above and to further define the extent of contamination at the site.

  15. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ammo Fire Perimeter, San Onofre Bluff Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  16. Habitat quality and recruitment success of cui-ui in the Truckee River downstream of Marble Bluff Dam, Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scoppettone, G. Gary; Rissler, Peter H.; Salgado, J. Antonio; Harry, Beverly

    2013-01-01

    We compared cui-ui (Chasmistes cujus) recruitment from two reaches of the Truckee River with histories of severe erosional downcutting caused by a decline in Pyramid Lake surface elevation. In 1975, Marble Bluff Dam (MBD) was constructed 5 kilometers upstream of the extant mouth of the Truckee River to stabilize the upstream reach of the river; the downstream reach of the river remained unstable and consequently unsuitable for cui-ui recruitment. By the early 2000s, there was a decrease in the Truckee River’s slope from MBD to Pyramid Lake after a series of wet years in the 1990s. This was followed by changes in river morphology and erosion abatement. These changes led to the question as to cui-ui recruitment potential in the Truckee River downstream of MBD. In 2012, more than 7,000 cui-ui spawners were passed upstream of MBD, although an indeterminate number of cui-ui spawned downstream of MBD. In this study, we compared cui-ui recruitment upstream and downstream of MBD during a Truckee River low-flow year (2012). Cui-ui larvae emigration to Pyramid Lake began earlier and ended later downstream of MBD. A greater number of cui-ui larvae was produced downstream of MBD than upstream. This also was true for native Tahoe sucker (Catostomus tahoensis) and Lahontan redside (Richardsonius egregius). The improved Truckee River stability downstream of MBD and concomitant cui-ui recruitment success is attributed to a rise in Pyramid Lake's surface elevation. A decline in lake elevation may lead to a shift in stream morphology and substrate composition to the detriment of cui-ui reproductive success as well as the reproductive success of other native fishes.

  17. Integrating Near-Real Time Hydrologic-Response Monitoring and Modeling for Improved Assessments of Slope Stability Along the Coastal Bluffs of the Puget Sound Rail Corridor, Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirus, B. B.; Baum, R. L.; Stark, B.; Smith, J. B.; Michel, A.

    2015-12-01

    Previous USGS research on landslide potential in hillside areas and coastal bluffs around Puget Sound, WA, has identified rainfall thresholds and antecedent moisture conditions that correlate with heightened probability of shallow landslides. However, physically based assessments of temporal and spatial variability in landslide potential require improved quantitative characterization of the hydrologic controls on landslide initiation in heterogeneous geologic materials. Here we present preliminary steps towards integrating monitoring of hydrologic response with physically based numerical modeling to inform the development of a landslide warning system for a railway corridor along the eastern shore of Puget Sound. We instrumented two sites along the steep coastal bluffs - one active landslide and one currently stable slope with the potential for failure - to monitor rainfall, soil-moisture, and pore-pressure dynamics in near-real time. We applied a distributed model of variably saturated subsurface flow for each site, with heterogeneous hydraulic-property distributions based on our detailed site characterization of the surficial colluvium and the underlying glacial-lacustrine deposits that form the bluffs. We calibrated the model with observed volumetric water content and matric potential time series, then used simulated pore pressures from the calibrated model to calculate the suction stress and the corresponding distribution of the factor of safety against landsliding with the infinite slope approximation. Although the utility of the model is limited by uncertainty in the deeper groundwater flow system, the continuous simulation of near-surface hydrologic response can help to quantify the temporal variations in the potential for shallow slope failures at the two sites. Thus the integration of near-real time monitoring and physically based modeling contributes a useful tool towards mitigating hazards along the Puget Sound railway corridor.

  18. Shatter Complex Formation in the Twin Craters Lava Flow, Zuni-Bandera Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Meerscheidt, H. C.; Bleacher, J. E.; Brand, B. D.; deWet, A.; Samuels, R.; Hamilton, C.; Garry, W. B.; Bandfield, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    . Prominent ';a';a channels travel around the bluff, leaving a 'wake' of uncovered ground on the downstream side. We interpret this shatter area to have been a branching tube network within an active sheet. The limestone bluff acted as an obstacle that caused a backup of lava within the tubes, driving episodes of shattering. The mounds likely represent earlier solidified sections between active, possibly braided, tube branches, which remained as mounds within the shatter area after the adjacent crust subsided. When lava broke out from the pressurized sheet-like lobe, it formed the ';a';a channels. This section of the flow field is interpreted using inferences from shatter ring formation, but is perhaps better termed a shatter sheet or shatter complex. This study has implications for understanding lava flow dynamics at constriction points, as well as the evolution and morphology of shatter rings.

  19. Quaternary geology of the Duck Hawk Bluffs, southwest Banks Island, Arctic Canada: a re-investigation of a critical terrestrial type locality for glacial and interglacial events bordering the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David J. A.; England, John H.; La Farge, Catherine; Coulthard, Roy D.; Lakeman, Thomas R.; Vaughan, Jessica M.

    2014-05-01

    Duck Hawk Bluffs, southwest Banks Island, is a primary section (8 km long and 60 m high) in the western Canadian Arctic Archipelago exposing a long record of Quaternary sedimentation adjacent to the Arctic Ocean. A reinvestigation of Duck Hawk Bluffs demonstrates that it is a previously unrecognized thrust-block moraine emplaced from the northeast by Laurentide ice. Previous stratigraphic models of Duck Hawk Bluffs reported a basal unit of preglacial fluvial sand and gravel (Beaufort Fm, forested Arctic), overlain by a succession of three glaciations and at least two interglacials. Our observations dismiss the occurrence of preglacial sediments and amalgamate the entire record into three glacial intervals and one prominent interglacial. The first glacigenic sedimentation is recorded by an ice-contact sandur containing redeposited allochthonous organics previously assigned to the Beaufort Fm. This is overlain by fine-grained sediments with ice wedge pseudomorphs and well-preserved bryophyte assemblages corresponding to an interglacial environment similar to modern. The second glacial interval is recorded by ice-proximal mass flows and marine rhythmites that were glacitectonized when Laurentide ice overrode the site from Amundsen Gulf to the south. Sediments of this interval have been reported to be magnetically reversed (>780 ka). The third interval of glacigenic sedimentation includes glacifluvial sand and gravel recording the arrival of Laurentide ice that overrode the site from the northeast (island interior) depositing a glacitectonite and constructing the thrust block moraine that comprises Duck Hawk Bluffs. Sediments of this interval have been reported to be magnetically normal (<780 ka). The glacitectonite contains a highly deformed melange of pre-existing sediments that were previously assigned to several formally named, marine and interglacial deposits resting in an undeformed sequence. In contrast, the tectonism associated with the thrust block moraine

  20. Sequential palynostratigraphy of the Queen City and Weches formations (Middle Eocene Claiborne Group), southeast central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Elsik, W.C. )

    1993-02-01

    Palynomorph sequences of several orders of magnitude were found in the Queen City and Weches formations respectively at Six Mile and Burleson bluffs on the Brazos River, Milam and Burleson counties, Texas. The long term development of the subtropical to tropical Claibornian palynoflora included Engelhardtia spp., Friedrichipollis claibornensis, Nudopollis terminalis, Pollenites laesius and Symplocoipollenites spp. Shorter term fluctuations in sea level were reflected by common herbaceous pollen in the Queen City, and common mangrove pollen in the Weches. Paleoenvironments were marginally to fully marine; dinocysts occurred throughout. The Wetzeliella group of dinocysts were present only in the Queen City at Six Mile Bluff. Late Paleocene to Early Eocene pollen, and Early Middle Eocene pollen with last effective occurrences near the Queen City and Weches boundary included Aesculiidites circumstriatus, Annona foveoreticulata and a new species of Platycarya. Five short term warmer-cooler couplet events were represented by successive abundance peaks of Juglandaceae followed by Ulmus; Alnus supports the three upper Ulmus peaks. One deep water event was recorded by an abundance of fresh water Pediastrum at the Queen City and Weches boundary. That boundary event was bracketed by two of the Alnus and Ulmus peaks.

  1. Bluff and Bull in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassoon, David

    2005-01-01

    Telling a lie, according to Harry G. Frankfurt, is different from engaging in bullshit because, while a lie is designed to insert a particular falsehood at a specific point in a set or system of beliefs in order to avoid the consequences of having that occupied by truth, bullshit neither misrepresents the state of affairs to which it refers nor…

  2. Alteration, mass conservation, and magmatic compositions of lavas of the Columbia River flood basalt province: Insights from the Sentinel Bluffs Member, Grande Ronde Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawlan, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding magmatic processes involved in flood basalt volcanism, and the ability to correlate flows within the voluminous, widespread lava fields requires accurate characterization of their magmatic geochemistry. Although evidence of alteration is widespread, modifications to lava chemistry by secondary processes are poorly understood. This results in uncertainty in the interpretation of geochemical analyses of Columbia River Basalt Group lava flows, particularly those of the Grande Ronde Basalt (GRB), in which chemical differences between the lavas are subtle. This problem is addressed here using major and trace element analyses (XRF) of samples of the Sentinel Bluffs Member (SB) of the GRB collected from multiple stratigraphic sections within the Columbia Plateau, Columbia River Gorge and Coast Ranges. Sixteen chemical groups, comprising 1-3 flows each, are recognized among multiple SB lava compositions. Flows assigned to three or four successive chemical groups are, in turn, assigned to more broadly defined chemical series based on shared characteristics such as immobile element ratios. Magmatic and alteration trends among SB compositions are clearly distinguished in Al-Ti variations. Magmatic trends are defined by inverse correlation of Al2O3 and TiO2. Alteration trends, extending from the magmatic array to higher abundances, are characterized by constant Al2O3/TiO2. Paired enrichments in Al and Ti, as well as other immobile elements, result from concentration in the residuum of altered rock that has lost mass due to soluble cation removal. Such enrichments are inversely proportional to mass loss. A mass conservation index (MCI), derived from Al-Ti systematics, quantifies mass retention and has multiple applications. MCI normalization eliminates residual concentration accompanying mass loss such that MCI-normalized immobile element abundances in altered rock agree with those in high-MCI rock. Compositions filtered to high-MCI values more closely reflect

  3. Palaeoenvironmental Indications of Enhanced Primary Productivity During Pliocene Sapropel Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, D.; Hopmans, E. C.; Schouten, S.; van Bergen, P. F.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    Cores taken during the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 160 in the eastern Mediterranean basin revealed periodic, laminated intervals with high organic contents, i.e. sapropels (Emeis et al., 1996). These include Pliocene sediments showing cyclic variations in organic matter deposition strongly correlated to the precession cyclicity of the Earth's orbit (e.g. Rossignol-Strick, 1985; Lourens et al., 1996a). The two main causes for sapropel formation are either climate-related enhanced organic matter productivity and/or increased preservation due to oxygen depletion of the bottom waters (e.g. Calvert et al., 1992; Canfield, 1994). Increased productivity is suggested to be the driving force in generating euxinic conditions leading to sapropel deposition (e.g. Passier et al., 1999). Photic zone euxinia was most probably triggered by large-scale input of nutrients from the Nile and other rivers leading to enhanced primary productivity and consequently high organic matter fluxes. This was based on concentrations of isorenieratene, a biomarker of photic zone euxinia, studied in three lateral time-equivalent Pliocene sapropels (subm. Menzel et al., 2001). Photic zone euxinia was more pronounced at the central and western part of the eastern Mediterranean basin, when compared with the most eastern part, where a deepening of the chemocline resulted from the increased delivery of fresh water. Using additional biomarkers will provide detailed insights in palaeoenvironmental changes that caused high organic matter deposition. The quantitative analysis of compounds specific for phytoplankton classes, e.g. isololiolides and loliolides reflecting Bacillariophyta, C37 - C39 alkenones indicative of Prymnesiophyta etc., will result in reconstruction of compositions of the standing crop and changes thereof at the time of deposition. The quantitative analysis of long-chain n-alkanes, indicating higher land plants, could reveal river input into the basin. Carbon isotope compositions of

  4. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect

    Duane McVay; Walter Ayers, Jr.; Jerry Jensen; Jorge Garduno; Gonzola Hernandez; Rasheed Bello; Rahila Ramazanova

    2006-08-31

    Injection of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds is a plausible method of reducing atmospheric emissions of CO{sub 2}, and it can have the additional benefit of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO{sub 2} disposal in high-rank coals. The objective of this research was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery from, low-rank coals in the Texas Gulf Coast area. Our research included an extensive coal characterization program, including acquisition and analysis of coal core samples and well transient test data. We conducted deterministic and probabilistic reservoir simulation and economic studies to evaluate the effects of injectant fluid composition (pure CO{sub 2} and flue gas), well spacing, injection rate, and dewatering on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery in low-rank coals of the Calvert Bluff formation of the Texas Wilcox Group. Shallow and deep Calvert Bluff coals occur in two, distinct, coalbed gas petroleum systems that are separated by a transition zone. Calvert Bluff coals < 3,500 ft deep are part of a biogenic coalbed gas system. They have low gas content and are part of a freshwater aquifer. In contrast, Wilcox coals deeper than 3,500 ft are part of a thermogenic coalbed gas system. They have high gas content and are part of a saline aquifer. CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Calvert Bluff low-rank coals of East-Central Texas must be located in the deeper, unmineable coals, because shallow Wilcox coals are part of a protected freshwater aquifer. Probabilistic simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection into 20 feet of Calvert Bluff coal in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicates that these coals can store 1.27 to 2.25 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with an ECBM recovery of 0.48 to 0.85 Bcf. Simulation results of flue gas injection (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) indicate that these same coals can store 0.34 to 0

  5. Formation of lunar basin rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, C.A.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the multiple concentric rings that characterize lunar impact basins, and the probable depth and diameter of the transient crater have been widely debated. As an alternative to prevailing "megaterrace" hypotheses, we propose that the outer scarps or mountain rings that delineate the topographic rims of basins-the Cordilleran at Orientale, the Apennine at Imbrium, and the Altai at Nectaris-define the transient cavities, enlarged relatively little by slumping, and thus are analogous to the rim crests of craters like Copernicus; inner rings are uplifted rims of craters nested within the transient cavity. The magnitude of slumping that occurs on all scarps is insufficient to produce major inner rings from the outer. These conclusions are based largely on the observed gradational sequence in lunar central uplifts:. from simple peaks through somewhat annular clusters of peaks, peak and ring combinations and double ring basins, culminating in multiring structures that may also include peaks. In contrast, belts of slump terraces are not gradational with inner rings. Terrestrial analogs suggest two possible mechanisms for producing rings. In some cases, peaks may expand into rings as material is ejected from their cores, as apparently occurred at Gosses Bluff, Australia. A second process, differential excavation of lithologically diverse layers, has produced nested experimental craters and is, we suspect, instrumental in the formation of terrestrial ringed impact craters. Peak expansion could produce double-ring structures in homogeneous materials, but differential excavation is probably required to produce multiring and peak-in-ring configurations in large lunar impact structures. Our interpretation of the representative lunar multiring basin Orientale is consistent with formation of three rings in three layers detected seismically in part of the Moon-the Cordillera (basin-bounding) ring in the upper crust, the composite Montes Rook ring in the underlying

  6. Lithofacies of Spencer Formation, western Tualatin Valley, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Van Atta, R.O.

    1986-04-01

    The Spencer Formation crops out in a narrow band that trends north-northwest on the western edge of the Willamette and Tualatin Valleys, Oregon. It apparently conformably overlies mud rocks of either the Yamhill or the Nestucca Formation and is conformably overlain by the Pittsburgh Bluff Formation. The Spencer Formation consists of two members (informal): a lower highly micaceous sandstone (800-1000 ft) and an upper member that is micaceous siltstone and mudstone (1000-1300 ft). The lower member includes an upper part that is light-gray to creamy-gray, silty to muddy, pebbly lithic arkose to feldspathic litharenite, with minor arkose. Sorting is poor and beds may be laminated to ripple cross-laminated or massive and bioturbated with abundant mollusk shells, carbonized wood, and burrows. The lower part of the lower member is medium-gray to greenish-gray, silty, pumiceous lithic arkose to feldspathic litharenite. The texture tends to be more uniform and better sorted than that of the upper part of the member. Bedding is commonly massive due to bioturbation. The upper member is medium to dark-gray mudstone with thin pebble-conglomerate lenses. It intertongues with the lower member. Bioturbation, burrows, and carbonized wood are common. The trend in depositional environments appears to be from outer to mid-neritic (lower part, lower member) to shallow neritic, nearshore, and lagoonal (upper part, lower member, and upper member). The provenance of the Spencer Formation includes both proximal volcanics and distant plutonic and high-grade metamorphics.

  7. Preliminary assessment of the health and environmental impacts of continuing to store M55 rockets at Lexington-Blue Grass Depot Activity, Anniston Army Depot, Umatilla Depot Activity, Pine Bluff Arsenal, and Tooele Army Depot

    SciTech Connect

    Boyette, J.A.; Breck, J.E.; Coleman, P.R.; Griffin, G.D.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, P.E.; Kornegay, F.C.; Ogles, M.R.; Schweitzer, M.; Sigal, L.L.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose is to provide an assessment of the potential health and environmental impacts of continuing to store M55 rockets filled with nerve agent GB or VX at their current storage locations at Anniston Army Depot in Alabama, Lexington-Blue Grass Depot Activity in Kentucky, Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas, Tooele Army Depot in Utah, and Umatilla Depot Activity in Oregon. The assessment considers the possible impacts of (1) normal storage (with no release to the environment) and (2) two postulated accidents on the air quality, ground and surface water, aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, human health, and cultural and socioeconomic resources in and around the various storage depots. The analysis considers three basic scenarios during storage: (1) normal operations; (2) a minor spill of agent (the contents of one rocket released to the biosphere); and (3) a maximum credible event or MCE. The MCE is an igloo fire resulting in the aerosolization of a small (in the case of GB) or an extremely small (in the case of VX) percentage of the igloo's nerve agent contents to the biosphere. The extremely low probabilities of such accidents, which are reported elsewhere, are noted. Our assessments of the impacts of a minor spill and of an MCE consider two sets of meteorological conditions: conservative most likely and worst-case. In addition, we assume that an agent plume would travel toward the area of highest population density. 21 figs., 47 tabs.

  8. 76 FR 1469 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... for light-water nuclear power reactors,'' which requires that the calculated emergency core cooling system (ECCS) performance for reactors with zircaloy or ZIRLO fuel cladding meet certain criteria, and (2... advanced alloy fuel cladding material for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), in lieu of zircaloy or...

  9. 76 FR 4391 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC, Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... items, that the rate of energy release, hydrogen generation, and cladding oxidation from the metal/water reaction shall be calculated using the Baker-Just equation. The regulations of 10 CFR 50.46 and 10 CFR part... determine the rate of energy release, cladding oxidation, and hydrogen generation) is conservative in...

  10. Godiva Rim Member: A new stratigraphic unit of the Green River Formation in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado. Geology of the Eocene Wasatch, Green River, and Bridger (Washakie) Formations, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect

    Roehler, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    The report names and describes the Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation in the eastern part of the Washakie basin in southwest Wyoming and the central part of the Sand Wash basin in northwest Colorado. The Godiva Rim Member comprises lithofacies of mixed mudflat and lacustrine origin situated between the overlying lacustrine Laney Member of the Green River Formation and the underlying fluvial Cathedral Bluffs Tongue of the Wasatch Formation. The Godiva Rim Member is laterally equivalent to and grades westward into the LaClede Bed of the Laney Member. The Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation was deposited along the southeast margins of Lake Gosiute and is correlated to similar lithologic units that were deposited along the northeast margins of Lake Uinta in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. The stratigraphic data presented provide significant evidence that the two lakes were periodically connected around the east end of the Uinta Mountains during the middle Eocene.

  11. Vortex Formation, Shedding and Energy Harvesting from a Cyber-Physical Pitching Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, Kyohei; Breuer, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    We examine the dynamics and energy harvesting capabilities of an elastically mounted flat plate undergoing large amplitude limit cycle oscillations in a uniform flow. All experiments are performed using a cyber-physical system, wherein the structural inertia, stiffness and damping are numerically simulated using a position-following feedback algorithm. The cyber-physical system also allows for implementation of nonlinear spring and damping coefficients, which control the plate dynamics and subsequent energy harvesting characteristics. Analysis of the plate kinematics and the fluid flow over the plate and in the wake (measured using PIV) are used to understand the interplay between structural motion and vortex formation at the sharp leading and trailing edges of the plate. By varying the structural properties of the system we systematically analyze the formation, strength, stability and separation of the leading edge vortex, as well as the dependence on kinematic parameters and Reynolds number. Connections to previous results on vortex formation time and bluff body aerodynamics are discussed. This research is funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  12. Comet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.

    2014-07-01

    There has been vast progress in our understanding of planetesimal formation over the past decades, owing to a number of laboratory experiments as well as to refined models of dust and ice agglomeration in protoplanetary disks. Coagulation rapidly forms cm-sized ''pebbles'' by direct sticking in collisions at low velocities (Güttler et al. 2010; Zsom et al. 2010). For the further growth, two model approaches are currently being discussed: (1) Local concentration of pebbles in nebular instabilities until gravitational instability occurs (Johansen et al. 2007). (2) A competition between fragmentation and mass transfer in collisions among the dusty bodies, in which a few ''lucky winners'' make it to planetesimal sizes (Windmark et al. 2012a,b; Garaud et al. 2013). Predictions of the physical properties of the resulting bodies in both models allow a distinction of the two formation scenarios of planetesimals. In particular, the tensile strength (i.e, the inner cohesion) of the planetesimals differ widely between the two models (Skorov & Blum 2012; Blum et al. 2014). While model (1) predicts tensile strengths on the order of ˜ 1 Pa, model (2) results in rather compactified dusty bodies with tensile strengths in the kPa regime. If comets are km-sized survivors of the planetesimal-formation era, they should in principle hold the secret of their formation process. Water ice is the prime volatile responsible for the activity of comets. Thermophysical models of the heat and mass transport close to the comet-nucleus surface predict water-ice sublimation temperatures that relate to maximum sublimation pressures well below the kPa regime predicted for formation scenario (2). Model (1), however, is in agreement with the observed dust and gas activity of comets. Thus, a formation scenario for cometesimals involving gravitational instability is favored (Blum et al. 2014).

  13. Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahr, Hubert; Brandner, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    1. Historical notes on planet formation Bodenheimer; 2. The formation and evolution of planetary systems Bouwman et al.; 3. Destruction of protoplanetary disks by photoevaporation Richling, Hollenbach and Yorke; 4. Turbulence in protoplanetary accretion disks Klahr, Rozyczka, Dziourkevitch, Wunsch and Johansen; 5. The origin of solids in the early solar system Trieloff and Palme; 6. Experiments on planetesimal formation Wurm and Blum; 7. Dust coagulation in protoplanetary disks Henning, Dullemond, Wolf and Dominik; 8. The accretion of giant planet cores Thommes and Duncan; 9. Planetary transits: direct vision of extrasolar planets Lecavelier des Etangs and Vidal-Madjar; 10. The core accretion - gas capture model Hubickyj; 11. Properties of exoplanets Marcy, Fischer, Butler and Vogt; 12. Giant planet formation: theories meet observations Boss; 13. From hot Jupiters to hot Neptures … and below Lovis, Mayor and Udry; 14. Disk-planet interaction and migration Masset and Kley; 15. The Brown Dwarf - planet relation Bate; 16. From astronomy to astrobiology Brandner; 17. Overview and prospective Lin.

  14. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-11-01

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. there were two main objectives for this reporting period. first, they wanted to collect wilcox coal samples from depths similar to those of probable sequestration sites, with the objective of determining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and for reservoir simulation. The second objective was to pursue opportunities for determining permeability of deep Wilcox coal to use as additional, necessary data for modeling reservoir performance during CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. In mid-summer, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation agreed to allow the authors to collect Wilcox Group coal samples from a well that was to be drilled to the Austin Chalk, which is several thousand feet below the Wilcox. In addition, they agreed to allow them to perform permeability tests in coal beds in an existing shut-in well. Both wells are in the region of the Sam K. Seymour power station, a site that they earlier identified as a major point source of CO{sub 2}. They negotiated contracts for sidewall core collection and core analyses, and they began discussions with a service company to perform permeability testing. To collect sidewall core samples of the Wilcox coals, they made structure and isopach maps and cross sections to select coal beds and to determine their depths for coring. On September 29, 10 sidewall core samples were obtained from 3 coal beds of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group. The samples were desorbed in 4 sidewall core canisters. Desorbed gas samples were sent to a laboratory for gas compositional analyses, and the coal samples were sent to another laboratory to measure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} sorption isotherms. All analyses should be finished by the end of

  15. Galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P J

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z approximately 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation.

  16. Galaxy formation

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, P. J. E.

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z ∼ 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation. PMID:9419326

  17. Amphiplex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Shannon; Laaser, Jennifer; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-micelle complexes are currently under heavy investigation due to their potential applications in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy, yet the dynamics of the complex formation is still relatively unstudied. By varying the ratios of poly(styrene sulfonate) chains and cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(styrene) micelles and the ionic strength of the system, we created a variety of complex configurations of different sizes and charges. The complexes were characterized dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements which provided information regarding the hydrodynamic radius, distribution of sizes, and effective charge.

  18. Habit formation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle S.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network. PMID:27069378

  19. Habit formation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle S; Graybiel, Ann M

    2016-03-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network.

  20. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2006-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to (1) estimate the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and methane production from, low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in the east-central Texas region, (2) quantify uncertainty associated with these estimates, (3) conduct reservoir and economic analyses of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production using horizontal wells, and (4) compare the results with those obtained from previous studies of vertical wells. To estimate the total volumes of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered in, and total volumes of methane that can be produced from, the Wilcox Group low-rank coals in east-central Texas, we used data provided by Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, data obtained during this research, and results of probabilistic simulation modeling studies we conducted. For the analysis, we applied our base-case coal seam characteristics to a 2,930-mi{sup 2} (1,875,200-ac) area where Calvert Bluff coal seams range between 4,000 and 6,200 ft deep. Results of the probabilistic analysis indicate that potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor, range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf. As part of the technology transfer for this project, we presented the paper SPE 100584 at the 2006 SPE Gas Technology Symposium held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on May 15-18, 2006. Also, we submitted an abstract to be considered for inclusion in a special volume dedicated to CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic media, which

  1. Water-Quality Data, 1999-2005, and Ground-Water Level Data, 2004-2005, for McBaine Bottoms, Including the Eagle Bluffs Conservation Area, Columbia, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Brenda J.; Richards, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Columbia, Missouri, and the Missouri Department of Conservation, collected ground-water quality data from June 1999 through August 2005, surface-water quality data from August 1999 through August 2003, and water-level data from February 2004 through August 2005 in McBaine Bottoms, southwest of Columbia. McBaine Bottoms, adjacent to the Missouri River, is the location of the municipal-supply well field for the city of Columbia, the city of Columbia wastewater-treatment wetlands, and the Missouri Department of Conservation Eagle Bluffs Conservation Area. This report presents water-quality data, which include water-quality analyses of samples collected from 36 water-quality sampling sites (31 were wells and 5 were surface-water sites), and ground-water level data, which include water-level measurements from more than 80 wells. Water samples were analyzed for physical properties, inorganic chemical constituents, nutrients, and dissolved iron. Selected samples were analyzed for trace elements, wastewater organic compounds, and pesticides. In samples from monitoring wells, chloride concentrations ranged from 2.41 to 259 mg/L (milligrams per liter), sodium concentrations ranged from 1.08 to 175 mg/L, and sulfate concentrations ranged from less than 0.2 to 271 mg/L (all concentrations were dissolved). Dissolved nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations ranged from less than 0.05 to 0.46 mg/L. Total phosphorous concentrations ranged from less than 0.04 to 1.68 mg/L, dissolved phosphorous concentrations ranged from less than 0.04 to 1.50 mg/L, and dissolved orthophosphorous concentrations ranged from less than 0.01 to 1.83 mg/L. Dissolved iron concentrations ranged from less than 6 to 42,900 g/L (micrograms per liter). Dissolved arsenic concentrations in samples from two monitoring wells ranged from 11 to 37 g/L. In samples from surface-water sampling sites, chloride concentrations ranged from 8.67 to 289 mg

  2. Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  3. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  4. A model for heavy mineral deposit formation within Pleistocene to Holocene shoreline sequences in Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Cocker, M.D. )

    1993-03-01

    The forms and locations of heavy mineral (HM) deposits, and the geomorphologies and HM suites of the six major Pleistocene paleobarrier island complexes on the Georgia coastal plain and the Holocene shoreline deposits may be the result of physical conditions prevalent during the development of two distinct shoreline sequences. The older Wicomico, Penholoway and Talbot complexes are typified by large, linear, undissected sand bodies and long, linear HM deposits and may have been strongly influenced by a greater sediment supply, a wave-dominated energy regime, and a steeper continental shelf than the younger Pamlico, Princess Anne, Silver Bluff and Holocene complexes. The younger complexes which consist of small, stubby and complexly dissected sand bodies may be the result of a tidal dominated energy regime and a more restricted sediment source. In the younger complexes, HM deposits are short and stubby and are commonly located immediately south of a source river. These relations indicate that only a relatively minor amount of longshore transport has occurred. Location of the HM deposits in the older shoreline sequences at a considerably greater distance south of a source river indicates that a greater degree of transport was involved. The development of stronger and more consistent longshore currents and winds during the earlier part of the Pleistocene may account for the differences in sediment transport and HM deposit formation in the older shoreline sequences. These physical differences may be related to the steeper continental shelf and different climatic conditions during the warmer, interglacial period.

  5. Hydrologic and geochemical data for the Big Brown lignite mine area, Freestone County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorsey, Michael E.

    1985-01-01

    Lignite mining in east and east-central Texas is increasing in response to increased energy needs throughout the State. Associated with the increase in mining activities is a greater need to know the effects of mining activities on the water quantity and quality of near-surface aquifers. The near-surface lignite beds mined at the Big Brown Lignite Mine are from the Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group of Eocene age, which is a minor aquifer generally having water suitable for all uses, in eastern Freestone County, Texas. One of the potential hydro!ogic effects of surface-coal mining is a change in the quality of ground water associated with replacement of aquifer materials by mine spoils. The purpose of this report is to compile and categorize geologic, mineralogic, geochemical, and hydrologic data for the Big Brown Lignite Mine and surrounding area in east-central Texas. Included are results of pasteextract analyses, constituent concentrations in water from batch-mixing experiments, sulfur analyses, and minerals or mineral groups detected by X-ray diffraction in 12 spoil material samples collected from 3 locations at the mine site. Also, common-constituent and trace-constituent concentrations in water from eight selected wells, located updip and downdip from the mine, are presented. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water from batch-mixing experiments vary from 12 to 908 milligrams per liter. Water from selected wells contain dissolved-solids concentrations ranging from 75 to 510 milligrams per liter.

  6. Geologic columns for the ICDP-USGS Eyreville A and C cores, Chesapeake Bay impact structure: Postimpact sediments, 444 to 0 m depth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, L.E.; Powars, D.S.; Browning, J.V.; McLaughlin, P.P.; Miller, K.G.; ,; Kulpecz, A.A.; Elbra, T.

    2009-01-01

    A 443.9-m-thick, virtually undisturbed section of postimpact deposits in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure was recovered in the Eyreville A and C cores, Northampton County, Virginia, within the "moat" of the structure's central crater. Recovered sediments are mainly fine-grained marine siliciclastics, with the exception of Pleistocene sand, clay, and gravel. The lowest postimpact unit is the upper Eocene Chickahominy Formation (443.9-350.1 m). At 93.8 m, this is the maximum thickness yet recovered for deposits that represent the return to "normal marine" sedimentation. The Drummonds Corner beds (informal) and the Old Church Formation are thin Oligocene units present between 350.1 and 344.7 m. Above the Oligocene, there is a more typical Virginia coastal plain succession. The Calvert Formation (344.7-225.4 m) includes a thin lower Miocene part overlain by a much thicker middle Miocene part. From 225.4 to 206.0 m, sediments of the middle Miocene Choptank Formation, rarely reported in the Virginia coastal plain, are present. The thick upper Miocene St. Marys and Eastover Formations (206.0-57.8 m) appear to represent a more complete succession than in the type localities. Correlation with the nearby Kiptopeke core indicates that two Pliocene units are present: Yorktown (57.8-32.2 m) and Chowan River Formations (32.2-18.3 m). Sediments at the top of the section represent an upper Pleistocene channel-fill and are assigned to the Butlers Bluff and Occohannock Members of the Nassawadox Formation (18.3-0.6 m). ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  7. Common File Formats.

    PubMed

    Mills, Lauren

    2014-03-21

    An overview of the many file formats commonly used in bioinformatics and genome sequence analysis is presented, including various data file formats, alignment file formats, and annotation file formats. Example workflows illustrate how some of the different file types are typically used.

  8. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  9. The Format Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oder, Norman

    2002-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of public libraries that investigated trends in audiovisual materials. Highlights include format issues; audiobooks; media budgets for various formats; video collections; DVDs; circulation; collection sizes; music CDs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  10. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  11. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokine, Alexandre

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layout system using customized styles.

  12. Record Formatting: MARC AMC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Lisa B.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses how archivists use the MARC AMC (Archival and Manuscripts Control) format for descriptive information about archival materials. Modifications that MARC AMC introduced to the standard MARC bibliographic formats are explained, and examples of a record in AMC formats on different bibliographic utilities are given. (24 references) (LRW)

  13. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats.

  14. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats. PMID:24338090

  15. Role of extensional tectonics in the formation of Talladega belt--Blue Ridge successor basins

    SciTech Connect

    Tull, J.F. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Polydeformed and metamorphosed sequences occurring unconformably above the Cambrian-Ordovician (C-O) miogeoclinal sequence are nested within the Talladega belt (Talladega Group-TG) and Blue Ridge (Mineral Bluff Group-MBG). These successor basin sequences are 2.5--3 km thick and have a possible age range from Ordovician to Devonian, representing the youngest stratigraphic units east of the foreland. They are dominated by turbiditic metaclastic rocks derived from erosion of Grenville basement and its overlying cover of clastic and carbonate rock. Bimodal volcanic rocks occur in the TG, and within-plate mafic extrusive rocks are found in the MBG. The TG consists of a coarsening, thickening, and shallowing upward sequence with a submarine fan-like unit (Lay Dam Formation-LDF) at the base. The LDF contains a thick proximal boulder-bearing olistostromal facies with debris fan lobes stacked vertically and shed from a proximal fault scarp to the SE or S. The vertical stacking of olistostromal deposits, absence of crystalline-cored thrust sheets of this age at the structural top of the basin, and other relationships indicate that the basin did not result from detached deformation to the SE or transcurrent faulting, but rather from extensional faulting. Relationships within the C-O carbonate sequence (Sylacauga Marble Group) unconformably below the TG indicate that the TG basin developed above shallow shelf miogeoclinal rocks inboard of the continental margin hinge line, and thus indicate that Silurian-Devonian extensional structures affected relatively thick Laurentian crust. Similarities in lithofacies and stratigraphic sequence between the TG and MBG indicate that the settling of the MBG may have also been within an extensional basin but basin boundary faults have not yet been identified within the structural block below the pre-MBG unconformity. This basin developed above Laurentian crust previously thinned during late Protozoic rifting.

  16. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  17. Tropical cyclone formation

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.T.; Farrell, B.F. )

    1993-01-15

    The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level atmospheric data. Recent observations suggest that tropical cyclones are initiated by asymmetric interactions associated with migratory upper-level potential vorticity disturbances and low-level disturbances. Favored theories of cyclones formation, however, focus on internal processes associated with cumulus convection and/or air-sea interaction. This work focuses on external mechanisms of cyclone formation and, using both a two- and three-dimensional moist geostrophic momentum model, investigates the role of upper-level potential vorticity disturbances on the formation process. A conceptual model of tropical cyclone formation is proposed, and implications of the theory are discussed. 71 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layoutmore » system using customized styles.« less

  19. Bedrock geologic map of the Spring Valley, West Plains, and parts of the Piedmont and Poplar Bluff 30'x60' quadrangles, Missouri, including the upper Current River and Eleven Point River drainage basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weary, David J.; Harrison, Richard W.; Orndorff, Randall C.; Weems, Robert E.; Schindler, J. Stephen; Repetski, John E.; Pierce, Herbert A.

    2015-01-01

    Potentially economic mineral resources are present in the subsurface in the map area. Exploration drill-hole data indicate that anomalously high concentrations of base-metal sulfides locally occur within the Cambrian Bonneterre Formation. The geologic setting of these anomalous concentrations is similar to that found in the Viburnum Trend, part of the largest lead-mining district in the world. The southernmost part of the Viburnum Trend extends into the northern part of the map area and is exploited by the Sweetwater Mine. Undeveloped and potentially economic occurrences of base metals are known also beneath Blair Creek, a tributary to the Current River in the north-central part of the map area.

  20. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  1. [Measuring thrombin formation].

    PubMed

    Hemker, H C

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of thrombin formation makes it possible to estimate the risk of haemorrhage or thrombosis much more accurately than by using clotting time. This new technique allows better monitoring of the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic anticoagulant therapy. Thrombin formation is, however, not yet routinely measured. PMID:27650017

  2. Ice Formation on Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, L

    1939-01-01

    This report makes use of the results obtained in the Gottingen ice tunnel in which the atmospheric conditions are simulated and the process of ice formation photographed. The effect of ice formation is threefold: 1) added weight to the airplane; 2) a change in the lift and drag forces; 3) a change in the stability characteristics.

  3. School Formative Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Data-driven instructional improvement relies on developing coherent systems that allow school staff to generate, interpret, and act upon quality formative information on students and school programs. This article offers a formative feedback system model that captures how school leaders and teachers structure artifacts and practices to create…

  4. Entering the Formative Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Keith

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses formative assessment--classroom strategies that ensure students are understanding music concepts. Unlike summative assessments (end-of-process evaluations like final exams, SATs, or auditions), formative assessments need to be non-threatening, helpful, and most of all, effective. The process starts with a teacher…

  5. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  6. Stratigraphy and depositional environments of the upper Pleistocene Chemehuevi Formation along the lower Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malmon, Daniel V.; Howard, Keith A.; House, P. Kyle; Lundstrom, Scott C.; Pearthree, Philip A.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Wan, Elmira; Wahl, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The Chemehuevi Formation forms a conspicuous, widespread, and correlative set of nonmarine sediments lining the valleys of the Colorado River and several of its larger tributaries in the Basin and Range geologic province. These sediments have been examined by geologists since J. S. Newberry visited the region in 1857 and are widely cited in the geologic literature; however their origin remains unresolved and their stratigraphic context has been confused by inconsistent nomenclature and by conflicting interpretations of their origin. This is one of the most prominent stratigraphic units along the river below the Grand Canyon, and the formation records an important event or set of events in the history of the Colorado River. Here we summarize what is known about these deposits throughout their range, present new stratigraphic, sedimentologic, topographic, and tephrochronologic data, and formally define them as a lithostratigraphic unit. The Chemehuevi Formation consists primarily of a bluff-forming mud facies, consisting of gypsum-bearing, horizontally bedded sand, silt, and clay, and a slope-forming sand facies containing poorly bedded, well sorted, quartz rich sand and scattered gravel. The sedimentary characteristics and fossil assemblages of the two facies types suggest that they were deposited in flood plain and channel environments, respectively. In addition to these two primary facies, we identify three other mappable facies in the formation: a thick-bedded rhythmite facies, now drowned by Lake Mead; a valley-margin facies containing abundant locally derived sediment; and several tributary facies consisting of mixed fluvial and lacustrine deposits in the lower parts of major tributary valleys. Observations from the subsurface and at outcrops near the elevation of the modern flood plain suggest that the formation also contains a regional basal gravel member. Surveys of numerous outcrops using high-precision GPS demonstrate that although the sand facies commonly

  7. Intergalactic Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquien, Médéric

    2007-11-01

    The work presented here is about star formation in the unusual environment of collisional debris studied for the first time as such. These peculiar regions have an interstellar medium, and in particular a metallicity, similar to that of star forming regions in galactic discs while not undergoing similar environment effects such as density waves in the spiral arms for instance. This study has been conducted with a selection of exceptional systems that have ejected large quantities of gas into the intergalactic medium while also showing some intergalactic star forming regions. Principal Investigator as well as archive spectroscopy and imaging from multi-wavelength observations ranging from far ultraviolet to mid-infrared have been used. Withal a model has been built in order to reproduce the spectral energy distributions of intergalactic star forming regions and constrain the star formation histories, their extinctions and their fraction of stars coming from the parent galaxies' discs. Comparisons have been performed on the estimation of star formation rates between infrared, Halpha and ultraviolet wavelengths. This thesis has brought the following main new results: * some regions seem to be deprived of any old stellar population, and these are ideal laboratories in which to study star formation ; * the mid-infrared star formation rate estimator is as reliable as it is in spiral galaxies ; * the scatter in the estimation of star formation rates in various bands is similar to that of spiral galaxies and is mainly due to age effects ; * the combination of the extinction uncorrected Halpha line with mid-infrared yields a good estimation of the actual star formation rate ; * an important part of star formation, which can be as high as 85%, takes place in the intergalactic medium showing that in a young universe, in which this type of system is much more common than in the nearby universe, star formation from collisional debris can be an important factor of enrichment of

  8. Sparse Image Format

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. Itmore » supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.« less

  9. Sparse Image Format

    SciTech Connect

    Eads, Damian Ryan

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. It supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.

  10. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  11. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  12. Autonomous Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Strategic Plan for the Aerospace Technology Enterprise includes ambitious objectives focused on affordable air travel, reduced emissions, and expanded aviation-system capacity. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with NASA Ames Research Center, the Boeing Company, and the University of California, Los Angeles, has embarked on an autonomous-formation-flight project that promises to make significant strides towards these goals. For millions of years, birds have taken advantage of the aerodynamic benefit of flying in formation. The traditional "V" formation flown by many species of birds (including gulls, pelicans, and geese) enables each of the trailing birds to fly in the upwash flow field that exists just outboard of the bird immediately ahead in the formation. The result for each trailing bird is a decrease in induced drag and thus a reduction in the energy needed to maintain a given speed. Hence, for migratory birds, formation flight extends the range of the system of birds over the range of birds flying solo. The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) Project is seeking to extend this symbiotic relationship to aircraft.

  13. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  14. Biomarker variations in relation to paleogeography in the Saltos Shale member of the Monterey Formation, Cuyama basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lillis, P.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The Miocene stratigraphy of the Cuyama basin provides an excellent opportunity to correlate geology with molecular organic geochemistry (e.g., biomartker compounds) because the paleogeography and paleobathymetry of the basin are well constrained by surface and subsurface geologic mapping and detailed micropaleontology. The Monterey Formation is composed of biogenous and terrigenous sediments that accumulated in a deep marine borderland basin adjacent to a Miocene shoreline. the lower member, the Saltos Shale, is predominately terrigenous sediment interbedded with impure carbonates that consist of foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils. The upper member, the Whiterock Bluff Shale, is composed of highly biogenous (siliceous and carbonate) sediments. The biomarker composition of the Saltos Shale is dependent on the relative contributions of planktonic and benthonic organisms, bacteria, and terrigenous organic matter transported from the nearby landmass. A general trend in biomarker distribution is observed in relation to paleogeography (i.e. proximity to shoreline). Pristane/phytane ratios, hopane/sterane ratios, oleanane/hopane ratios, and diasterane/sterane ratios are higher near the shoreline (to the east) because of increased terrigenous input. The more distal western basin sediments contain biomarkers that were predominately derived from marine phytoplankton and bacteria. Submarine fan sediments in the Saltos Shale were deposited in the eastern basin east of the penecontemporaneous Cox fault. Ponding of terrigenous organic matter at the base of slope is reflected by high ratios of pristane/phytane (2.7), oleanane/hopane (0.79), C{sub 29}/C{sub 27} {alpha}{alpha}{alpha}2OR steranes (1.56), and relatively large amounts of waxy n-alkanes (C{sub 27}, C{sub 29}, C{sub 31}). In contrast, the prefan and postfan sediments contain lower concentrations of these terrigenous biomarkers.

  15. 75 FR 60147 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... Horizontal Storage Module from 60 F to 64 F. In accordance with 10 CFR 72.16, a Notice of Docketing was published in the Federal Register on January 14, 2010 (75 FR 2163). Pursuant to 10 CFR 72.46(b)(2), on... requirements of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (the Act), and the NRC's rules and regulations....

  16. 75 FR 31835 - Environmental Impact Statement: Calvert and St. Mary's Counties, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ... Counties, Maryland (Federal Register Vol. 72, No. 203; FR Doc. 07-5190) is being withdrawn and an..., pedestrian and bicycle safety along MD 4, while supporting existing and planned development in the...

  17. 76 FR 22935 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... renewed for 40 years. On February 16, 2011, (76 FR 8872) the revised 10 CFR 72.230(b) rule was published... be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing... at 301-415-1677, to request (1) a digital ID certificate, which allows the participant (or...

  18. Planet Formation and Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    alibert, yann

    2016-04-01

    Extrasolar planetary systems show an extreme diversity in mass and orbital architecture, and, very likely, in habitability. Explaining this diversity is one of the key challenges for theoretical models and requires understanding the formation, composition and evolution of planetary systems from the stage of the protoplanetary disk up to the full mature planetary system. I will review in this contribution the different models of planet formation and how they can be related to planetary habitability. In a first part, I will review the main planetary system formation models, and how, from these models, the composition of planets can be predicted. In a second part, I will link the results of these early phases of planetary systems, to the potential planetary habitability. Finally, I will show how it is possible, from transit observations, to put constraints on the water content of extrasolar planets.

  19. Gaussian entanglement of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.M.; Giedke, G.; Krueger, O.; Werner, R. F.; Cirac, J.I.

    2004-05-01

    We introduce a Gaussian version of the entanglement of formation adapted to bipartite Gaussian states by considering decompositions into pure Gaussian states only. We show that this quantity is an entanglement monotone under Gaussian operations and provide a simplified computation for states of arbitrary many modes. For the case of one mode per site the remaining variational problem can be solved analytically. If the considered state is in addition symmetric with respect to interchanging the two modes, we prove additivity of the considered entanglement measure. Moreover, in this case and considering only a single copy, our entanglement measure coincides with the true entanglement of formation.

  20. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  1. Technobabble: File Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    1999-01-01

    Considers the confusion of over 20 different kinds of graphics programs. Briefly distinguishes between some of the more popular graphics formats (Photoshop, TIFF, JPEG, GIF, PICT, and EPS), and describes the benefits and disadvantages of each in the context of journalism education. (SC)

  2. Formation of planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, Stuart J.

    1991-01-01

    Formation of planetesimals is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) nebular structure; (2) aerodynamics of the solid bodies in the nebula; (3) problems with gravitational instability; (4) particle growth by coagulation; properties of fractal aggregates; and (5) coagulation and settling of fractal aggregates.

  3. Carrascolendas: A Formative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laosa, Luis M.

    A formative research project sought to test viewer reactions to two pilot programs of the Carrascolendas series. A total of 360 Puerto Rican-American, Cuban-American, Mexican-American, and Anglo-American children in grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed as they watched the programs. Results indicated that there was high eye contact during the…

  4. Formation of Freirian Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Phyllis

    This paper is written for people who are already familiar with the philosophy and methodology of Paulo Freire's liberatory education and are interested in creating a formation program for adult education facilitators using his ideas. The author describes the paper as "a collection of thoughts, of things to consider," when organizing such a…

  5. Formation in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, Fred; Jacobsen, Douglas; Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt; Thatamanil, John J.; Porterfield, Amanda; Moore, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    What is the relationship between the academic knowledge of the guild and the formation of students in the classroom? This Forum gathers four essays originally presented at a Special Topics Session at the 2009 conference of the American Academy of Religion (Atlanta, Georgia), with a brief introductory essay by Fred Glennon explaining the genesis of…

  6. Concept Formation and Abstraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunzer, Eric A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of concepts and conceptual processes and the manner of their formation. It argues that a process of successive abstraction and systematization is central to the evolution of conceptual structures. Classificatory processes are discussed and three levels of abstraction outlined. (Author/SJL)

  7. Common file formats.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Shonda A; Littlejohn, Timothy G; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2007-01-01

    This appendix discusses a few of the file formats frequently encountered in bioinformatics. Specifically, it reviews the rules for generating FASTA files and provides guidance for interpreting NCBI descriptor lines, commonly found in FASTA files. In addition, it reviews the construction of GenBank, Phylip, MSF and Nexus files. PMID:18428774

  8. Kepler Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler has vastly increased our knowledge of planets and planetary systems located close to stars. The new data shows surprising results for planetary abundances, planetary spacings and the distribution of planets on a mass-radius diagram. The implications of these results for theories of planet formation will be discussed.

  9. Generic file format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgate, Nick

    2002-11-01

    The Generic File Format (GFF) is a file format developed within the UK ASW community for the interchange and storage of underwater sonar data. Originally developed for the interchange of time-series data between analysis systems, it has been extended to provide for storage of processed acoustic data (e.g., power and DEMON spectrum, lofargram grey-scale), nonacoustic data (e.g., own-ship dynamics, sensor configuration) and event data (e.g., tracker output, sonar intercepts). The format employs the chunk concept, as used in the WAV and AIFF file formats, to provide extendability (including local variants) while providing a measure of backward compatability. However, the basic concept has been adapted to allow for the mixing in the one file of multiple channels of different sample-rates and data-types through the inclusion of a data frame concept and multiple data blocks. Chunk cross-referencing has been employed to ensure data consistency. A provision is made in the header of the file to store details of the sensor and processing for the data (e.g., the number of hydrophones, beam direction, FFT size) so that an analysis system does not need to know about the sensor or other system from which the data originated.

  10. The Formation of Trihalomethanes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, R. Rhodes; Umphres, Mark D.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are a number of factors important in the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) including the nature of aquatic humus and the influences of preozonation, bromide, pH, and chlorine. A brief investigation is also conducted into the kinetics of the THM reaction. Several major research needs are represented. (CS)

  11. Pattern formation today

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Richardson, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Patterns are orders embedded in randomness. They may appear as spatial arrangements or temporal series, and the elements may appear identical or with variations. Patterns exist in the physical world as well as in living systems. In the biological world, patterns can range from simple to complex, forming the basic building blocks of life. The process which generates this ordering in the biological world was termed pattern formation. Since Wolpert promoted this concept four decades ago, scientists from molecular biology, developmental biology, stem cell biology, tissue engineering, theoretical modeling and other disciplines have made remarkable progress towards understanding its mechanisms. It is time to review and re-integrate our understanding. Here, we explore the origin of pattern formation, how the genetic code is translated into biological form, and how complex phenotypes are selected over evolutionary time. We present four topics: Principles, Evolution, Development, and Stem Cells and Regeneration. We have interviewed several leaders in the field to gain insight into how their research and the field of pattern formation have shaped each other. We have learned that both molecular process and physico-chemical principles are important for biological pattern formation. New understanding will emerge through integration of the analytical approach of molecular-genetic manipulation and the systemic approach of model simulation. We regret that we could not include every major investigator in the field, but hope that this Special Issue of the Int. J. Dev. Biol. represents a sample of our knowledge of pattern formation today, which will help to stimulate more research on this fundamental process. PMID:19557673

  12. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2005-05-01

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objective for this reporting period was to perform pressure transient testing to determine permeability of deep Wilcox coal to use as additional, necessary data for modeling performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. To perform permeability testing of the Wilcox coal, we worked with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in selecting the well and intervals to test and in designing the pressure transient test. Anadarko agreed to allow us to perform permeability tests in coal beds in an existing shut-in well (Well APCT2). This well is located in the region of the Sam K. Seymour power station, a site that we earlier identified as a major point source of CO{sub 2} emissions. A service company, Pinnacle Technologies Inc. (Pinnacle) was contracted to conduct the tests in the field. Intervals tested were 2 coal beds with thicknesses of 3 and 7 feet, respectively, at approximately 4,100 ft depth in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas. Analyses of pressure transient test data indicate that average values for coalbed methane reservoir permeability in the tested coals are between 1.9 and 4.2 mD. These values are in the lower end of the range of permeability used in the preliminary simulation modeling. These new coal fracture permeability data from the APCT2 well, along with the acquired gas compositional analyses and sorption capacities of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}, complete the reservoir description phase of the project. During this quarter we also continued work on reservoir and economic modeling to evaluate performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery.

  13. CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect

    Duane A. Mcvay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

    2004-02-01

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The primary objectives for this reporting period were to construct a coal geological model for reservoir analysis and to continue modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration performance in coalbed methane reservoirs under various operational conditions. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Therefore, we interpreted and created isopleth maps of coal occurrences, and correlated individual coal seams within the coal bearing subdivisions of the Wilcox Group--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations. Preliminary modeling studies were run to determine if gravity effects would affect the performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbed methane reservoirs. Results indicated that gravity could adversely affect sweep efficiency and, thus, volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced in thick, vertically continuous coals. Preliminary modeling studies were also run to determine the effect of injection gas composition on sequestration in low-rank coalbeds. Injected gas composition was varied from pure CO{sub 2} to pure N{sub 2}, and results show that increasing N{sub 2} content degrades CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production performance. We have reached a Data Exchange Agreement with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation. We are currently incorporating the Anadarko data into our work, and expect these data to greatly enhance the accuracy and value of our studies.

  14. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2006-03-01

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. In this reporting period we revised all of the economic calculations, participated in technology transfer of project results, and began working on project closeout tasks in anticipation of the project ending December 31, 2005. In this research, we conducted five separate simulation investigations, or cases. These cases are (1) CO{sub 2} sequestration base case scenarios for 4,000-ft and 6,200-ft depth coal beds in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of east-central Texas, (2) sensitivity study of the effects of well spacing on sequestration, (3) sensitivity study of the effects of injection gas composition, (4) sensitivity study of the effects of injection rate, and (5) sensitivity study of the effects of coal dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection/sequestration. Results show that, in most cases, revenue from coalbed methane production does not completely offset the costs of CO{sub 2} sequestration in Texas low-rank coals, indicating that CO{sub 2} injection is not economically feasible for the ranges of gas prices and carbon credits investigated. The best economic performance is obtained with flue gas (13% CO{sub 2} - 87% N{sub 2}) injection, as compared to injection of 100% CO{sub 2} and a mixture of 50% CO{sub 2} and 50% N{sub 2}. As part of technology transfer for this project, we presented results at the West Texas Geological Society Fall Symposium in October 2005 and at the COAL-SEQ Forum in November 2005.

  15. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2006-05-01

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to (1) determine the effects of permeability anisotropy on performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation (LCB) of the Wilcox Group coals in east-central Texas, and (2) begin reservoir and economic analyses of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production using horizontal wells. To evaluate the effects of permeability anisotropy on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM in LCB coal beds, we conducted deterministic reservoir modeling studies of 100% CO{sub 2} gas injection for the 6,200-ft depth base case (Case 1b) using the most likely values of the reservoir parameters. Simulation results show significant differences in the cumulative volumes of CH{sub 4} produced and CO{sub 2} injected due to permeability anisotropy, depending on the orientation of injection patterns relative to the orientation of permeability anisotropy. This indicates that knowledge of the magnitude and orientation of permeability anisotropy will be an important consideration in the design of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects. We continued discussions with Anadarko Petroleum regarding plans for additional coal core acquisition and laboratory work to further characterize Wilcox low-rank coals. As part of the technology transfer for this project, we submitted the paper SPE 100584 for presentation at the 2006 SPE Gas Technology Symposium to be held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on May 15-18, 2006.

  16. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 7o S, 172o W (188o E) and shows a remarkable martian geologic deposit known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation, seen here as the raised plateau in the upper two-thirds of the image, is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region the deposit has been heavily eroded by the wind to produce a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These parallel ridges point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to sculpt the dry landscape of Mars. The Medusae Fossae Formation has been completely stripped from the surface in the lower third of the image, revealing a harder layer below that is more resistant to wind erosion. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Several ancient craters that were once completely buried by this deposit are being exposed, or exhumed, as the overlying Medusae Formation is removed. Very few impact craters are visible on this Formation, indicating that the surface seen today is relatively young, and that the processes of erosion are likely to be actively occurring. The Story Medusa of Greek mythology fame, the name-giver to this region, had snaky locks of hair that could turn a person to stone. Wild and unruly, this monster of the underworld could certainly wreak havoc on the world of the human imagination. As scary as she was, Medusa would have no advantage over the fierce, masterful winds blowing across Mars, which once carved the streaky, terrain at the top of this image. Wild and whipping, these winds have slowly eroded away the 'topsoil,' revealing ancient craters and other surface features they once covered. The loosely cemented particles of this 'topsoil' are likely made up of dust

  17. Cosmological structure formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the current forefront problem of physical cosmology, the formation of structures (galaxies, clusters, great walls, etc.) in the universe is presented. Solutions require two key ingredients: (1) matter; and (2) seeds. Regarding the matter, it now seems clear that both baryonic and non-baryonic matter are required. Whether the non-baryonic matter is hot or cold depends on the choice of seeds. Regarding the seeds, both density fluctuations and topological defects are discussed. The combination of isotropy of the microwave background and the recent observations indicating more power on large scales have severly constrained, if not eliminated, Gaussian fluctuations with equal power on all scales, regardless of the eventual resolution of both the matter and seed questions. It is important to note that all current structure formation ideas require new physics beyond SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1).

  18. Emptiness Formation Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Nicholas; Ng, Stephen; Starr, Shannon

    2016-08-01

    We present rigorous upper and lower bounds on the emptiness formation probability for the ground state of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg XXZ quantum spin system. For a d-dimensional system we find a rate of decay of the order {exp(-c L^{d+1})} where L is the sidelength of the box in which we ask for the emptiness formation event to occur. In the {d=1} case this confirms previous predictions made in the integrable systems community, though our bounds do not achieve the precision predicted by Bethe ansatz calculations. On the other hand, our bounds in the case {d ≥ 2} are new. The main tools we use are reflection positivity and a rigorous path integral expansion, which is a variation on those previously introduced by Toth, Aizenman-Nachtergaele and Ueltschi.

  19. Tetrahedron Formation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petruzzo, Charles; Guzman, Jose

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the preliminary development of a general optimization procedure for tetrahedron formation control. The maneuvers are assumed to be impulsive and a multi-stage optimization method is employed. The stages include (1) targeting to a fixed tetrahedron location and orientation, and (2) rotating and translating the tetrahedron. The number of impulsive maneuvers can also be varied. As the impulse locations and times change, new arcs are computed using a differential corrections scheme that varies the impulse magnitudes and directions. The result is a continuous trajectory with velocity discontinuities. The velocity discontinuities are then used to formulate the cost function. Direct optimization techniques are employed. The procedure is applied to the NASA Goddard Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) mission to compute preliminary formation control fuel requirements.

  20. Prominence Formation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, B. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    Martens and Zwaan (ApJ v. 558 872) have proposed a prominence/ filament formation model in which differential rotation drives reconnection between two initially unconnected active regions to form helical field lines that support mass and are held down by overlying field. Using an MHD solver with adaptive refinement we simulated this process by imposing a shear flow meant to mimic differential rotation on two bipolar flux distributions meant to mimic distinct active regions. In some runs the flux systems are initially potential while in others they have been twisted by footpoint rotation to inject helicity prior to imposing the shear flow. The resulting structures are studied to understand the role of helicity in the formation of prominence-like structures.

  1. Formation of bacterial nanocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Mikhail; Kudryashova, Ekaterina; Suzina, Natalia; Ariskina, Elena; Voronkov, Vadim

    1998-07-01

    Existence of nanobacteria received increasing attention both in environmental microbiology/geomicro-biology and in medical microbiology. In order to study a production of nanoforms by typical bacterial cells. Effects of different physical factors were investigated. Treatment of bacterial cultures with microwave radiation, or culturing in field of electric current resulted in formation a few types of nanocells. The number and type of nanoforms were determined with type and dose of the treatment. The produced nanoforms were: i) globules, ii) clusters of the globules--probably produced by liaison, iii) nanocells coated with membrane. The viability of the globules is an object opened for doubts. The nanocells discovered multiplication and growth on solidified nutrient media. The authors suggest that formation of nanocells is a common response of bacteria to stress-actions produced by different agents.

  2. Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, Kentaro; Reddy, Naveen; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark T.

    2016-07-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the current status of observational and computational studies on galaxy formation and evolution. In particular, a joint analysis of star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and metallicities of galaxies throughout cosmic time can shed light on the processes by which galaxies build up their stellar mass and enrich the environment with heavy elements. Comparison of such observations and the results of numerical simulations can give us insights on the physical importance of various feedback effects by supernovae and active galactic nuclei. In Sect. 1, we first discuss the primary methods used to deduce the SFRs, stellar masses, and (primarily) gas-phase metallicities in high-redshift galaxies. Then, we show how these quantities are related to each other and evolve with time. In Sect. 2, we further examine the distribution of SFRs in galaxies following the `Main Sequence' paradigm. We show how the so-called `starbursts' display higher specific SFRs and SF efficiencies by an order of magnitude. We use this to devise a simple description of the evolution of the star-forming galaxy population since z ˜3 that can successfully reproduce some of the observed statistics in the infrared (IR) wavelength. We also discuss the properties of molecular gas. In Sect. 3, we highlight some of the recent studies of high-redshift galaxy formation using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We discuss the physical properties of simulated galaxies such as luminosity function and escape fraction of ionizing photons, which are important statistics for reionization of the Universe. In particular the escape fraction of ionizing photons has large uncertainties, and studying gamma-ray bursts (which is the main topic of this conference) can also set observational constraints on this uncertain physical parameter as well as cosmic star formation rate density.

  3. Simulations of antihydrogen formation

    SciTech Connect

    Robicheaux, F.

    2004-08-01

    The results of simulations of antihydrogen formation in a Penning trap are reported. The antihydrogen atoms are formed by three-body capture. We find that the arrested nature of the three-body capture in the trap greatly reduces the expected binding energy of the antihydrogen. Typically, the formed antihydrogen has larger velocity along the magnetic field than across the field and a binding energy below k{sub B}T.

  4. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    DOEpatents

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  5. Mesospheric cloud formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Formation of mesospheric clouds as a result of deposition of large amounts of H2O by the heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) of the solar power satellite system is discussed. The conditions which must be met in order to form and maintain clouds near the mesopause are described. The frequency and magnitude of H2O injections from the HLLV rocket exhaust are considered.

  6. Hail Formation in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Matthew

    Hail poses a substantial threat to life and property in the state of Florida. These losses could be minimized through better understanding of the relationships between atmospheric variables that impact hail formation in Florida. Improving hail forecasting in Florida requires analyzing a number of meteorological parameters and synoptic data related to hail formation. NOAA archive data was retrieved to create a database that was used to categorize text files of hail days. The text files were entered into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory website to create National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis maps of atmospheric variables for Florida hail days as well as days leading to the hail event. These data were then analyzed to determine the relationship between variables that affect hail formation, in general, across different regions and seasons in Florida using Statistical Product and Service Solutions. The reasoning for the differing factors affecting hail formation between regions, seasons and hail sizes were discussed, as well as forecasting suggestions relating to region and month in Florida. The study found that the majority of all hail that occurs in Florida is during the wet season. A low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water and lower than average Sea Level Pressure, in most cases, is present during hail days in Florida. Furthermore, results show that Vector Wind magnitude increases as hail size increases. Additionally, several atmospheric variables useful to studying hail events, such as Lifted Index, Precipitable Water, Sea Level Pressure, Vector Wind and Temperature have significant correlations with each other depending on the region and season being observed. Strong correlations between low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water values and the occurrence of hail events are discussed, as well as the relationship between temperature anomalies at various

  7. Tetrahedron Formation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Jose J.

    2003-01-01

    Spacecraft flying in tetrahedron formations are excellent instrument platforms for electromagnetic and plasma studies. A minimum of four spacecraft - to establish a volume - is required to study some of the key regions of a planetary magnetic field. The usefulness of the measurements recorded is strongly affected by the tetrahedron orbital evolution. This paper considers the preliminary development of a general optimization procedure for tetrahedron formation control. The maneuvers are assumed to be impulsive and a multi-stage optimization method is employed. The stages include targeting to a fixed tetrahedron orientation, rotating and translating the tetrahedron and/or varying the initial and final times. The number of impulsive maneuvers citn also be varied. As the impulse locations and times change, new arcs are computed using a differential corrections scheme that varies the impulse magnitudes and directions. The result is a continuous trajectory with velocity discontinuities. The velocity discontinuities are then used to formulate the cost function. Direct optimization techniques are employed. The procedure is applied to the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) to compute preliminary formation control fuel requirements.

  8. Terrestrial planet formation.

    PubMed

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids.

  9. Terrestrial planet formation.

    PubMed

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  10. Mars brine formation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Bullock, Mark A.; Stoker, Carol R.

    1993-09-01

    Evaporites, particularly carbonates, nitrates, and sulfates, may be major sinks of volatiles scavenged from the martian atmosphere. Mars is thought to have once had a denser, warmer atmosphere that permitted the presence of liquid surface water. The conversion of atmospheric CO2 into carbonate is hypothesized to have degraded the martian climate to its present state of a generally subfreezing, desiccated desert. The rate for such a conversion under martian conditions is poorly known, so the time scale of climate degradation by this process cannot be easily evaluated. If some models are correct, carbonate formation may have been fast at geological time scales. The experiments of Booth and Kieffer also imply fast (106 - 107 yr) removal of the missing CO2 inventory, estimated to be 1 - 5 bar, by means of carbonate formation. The timing of formation of many of the fluvial features observed on Mars is, in large part, dependent on when and how fast the atmosphere changed. A knowledge of the rate at which carbonates and nitrates formed is also essential for assessing the probability that life, or its chemical precursors, could have developed on Mars. No previous experiments have quantitatively evaluated the rate of solution for a suite of mobile anions and cations from unaltered minerals and atmospheric gases into liquid water under Mars-like conditions. Such experiments are the focus of this task.

  11. Terrestrial planet formation

    PubMed Central

    Righter, K.; O’Brien, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (∼106 y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few × 106 y), and finally embryos to planets (107–108 y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  12. CO{sub 2} SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS

    SciTech Connect

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. There were three main objectives for this reporting period, which related to obtaining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and modeling reservoir performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The first objective was to collect and desorb gas from 10 sidewall core coal samples from an Anadarko Petroleum Corporation well (APCL2 well) at approximately 6,200-ft depth in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas. The second objective was to measure sorptive capacities of these Wilcox coal samples for CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}. The final objective was to contract a service company to perform pressure transient testing in Wilcox coal beds in a shut-in well, to determine permeability of deep Wilcox coal. Bulk density of the APCL2 well sidewall core samples averaged 1.332 g/cc. The 10 sidewall core samples were placed in 4 sidewall core canisters and desorbed. Total gas content of the coal (including lost gas and projected residual gas) averaged 395 scf/ton on an as-received basis. The average lost gas estimations were approximately 45% of the bulk sample total gas. Projected residual gas was 5% of in-situ gas content. Six gas samples desorbed from the sidewall cores were analyzed to determine gas composition. Average gas composition was approximately 94.3% methane, 3.0% ethane, and 0.7% propane, with traces of heavier hydrocarbon gases. Carbon dioxide averaged 1.7%. Coal from the 4 canisters was mixed to form one composite sample that was used for pure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} isotherm analyses. The composite sample was 4.53% moisture, 37.48% volatile matter, 9.86% ash, and 48.12% fixed carbon. Mean vitrinite reflectance was 0

  13. Flow Past a Bluff Body with a Wavy Stagnation Face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darekar, R. M.; Sherwin, S. J.

    2001-04-01

    Numerical investigations have been performed to study the flow past square-section cylinders with a spanwise geometric deformation leading to a stagnation face with a sinusoidal waviness. The computations were performed using a spectral/hp element solver over a range of Reynolds numbers from 10 to 500. Starting from fully developed shedding past a straight cylinder at a Reynolds number of 100, a sufficiently high waviness is impulsively introduced resulting in the stabilization of the the near-wake to a time-independent state. The steady nature of the near-wake is associated with a reduction in total drag of about 16% at a Reynolds number of 100 as compared with a straight, non-wavy cylinder. Further increases in the amplitude of the waviness lead to the emergence of hairpin vortices from the near-wake region, similar to the wake of a sphere at low Reynolds numbers. At higher Reynolds numbers, the drag reduction increases substantially, e.g. at a Reynolds number of 500 it is 34%, principally due to the increase in drag of the nonwavy cylinder. Alternative methods based on three-dimensional forms of bleed are investigated to suppress the von-Kármán vortex street of a straight, non-wavy cylinder.

  14. On vortex shedding from bluff bodies with base cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jinsheng; Chng, Tat Loon

    2009-03-01

    In an extension of a previous drag reduction study via geometric shaping, this paper describes a numerical study of a quasistreamlined body in which the trailing edge is modified to form a base cavity. Here, we seek to establish if any synergistic merits exist through a combination of a spanwise wavy trailing edge with a straight-edged base cavity. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) simulations are conducted to assess the effect of Reynolds number, streamwise cavity length and spanwise waviness on the flow. Two dimensional simulations examining a variation in Reynolds number for a cavity of constant length reveal the presence of three different general wake patterns: the steady wake, the Karman wake, and an asymmetric, deflected wake. Most critically, the origins of the deflected wake pattern are traced to the presence of a vortex which resides within the base cavity. Similarly, for a constant Reynolds number the influence of the cavity length on the flow is also intricately related to this cavity vortex, giving rise to wake topologies which bear a strong resemblance to the above three shedding processes. Reductions in drag are observed for all the investigated cavity configurations and additionally it is found that the magnitude of the reduction obeys a direct relationship with the length of the cavity up to a certain asymptotic value. The results of the 3D simulations reveal that the current base-cavity arrangement appears to yield a potential for further reduction in form drag as compared to earlier studies where the entire base region is modified in the shape of a wave. However, for a fixed cavity length, introducing spanwise waviness reduces the fluctuation intensity of the form drag but offers no obvious added benefit in terms of the time-averaged values. We anticipate that the presence of the straight-edged cavity causes a loss of spanwise coherence of these structures such that further enhancements due to the introduction of waviness are of less consequence.

  15. Atmospheric flow over two-dimensional bluff surface obstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bitte, J.; Frost, W.

    1976-01-01

    The phenomenon of atmospheric flow over a two-dimensional surface obstruction, such as a building (modeled as a rectangular block, a fence or a forward-facing step), is analyzed by three methods: (1) an inviscid free streamline approach, (2) a turbulent boundary layer approach using an eddy viscosity turbulence model and a horizontal pressure gradient determined by the inviscid model, and (3) an approach using the full Navier-Stokes equations with three turbulence models; i.e., an eddy viscosity model, a turbulence kinetic-energy model and a two-equation model with an additional transport equation for the turbulence length scale. A comparison of the performance of the different turbulence models is given, indicating that only the two-equation model adequately accounts for the convective character of turbulence. Turbulence flow property predictions obtained from the turbulence kinetic-energy model with prescribed length scale are only insignificantly better than those obtained from the eddy viscosity model. A parametric study includes the effects of the variation of the characteristics parameters of the assumed logarithmic approach velocity profile. For the case of the forward-facing step, it is shown that in the downstream flow region an increase of the surface roughness gives rise to higher turbulence levels in the shear layer originating from the step corner.

  16. Aerodynamic pitching damping of vehicle-inspired bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubokura, Makoto; Cheng, Seeyuan; Nakashima, Takuji; Nouzawa, Takahide; Okada, Yoshihiro

    2010-11-01

    Aerodynamic damping mechanism of road vehicles subjected to pitching oscillation was investigated by using large-eddy simulation technique. The study was based on two kinds of simplified vehicle models, which represent real sedan-type vehicles with different pitching stability in the on-road test. The simplified vehicle modes were developed so as to reproduce the characteristic flow structures above the trunk deck of the real vehicles measured in a wind-tunnel at the static case without oscillation. The forced sinusoidal pitching oscillation was imposed on the models and their pitching damping factors were evaluated through the phase-averaged pitching moment. Then flow structures in the wake of the models were extracted and its contribution to the damping mechanism was discussed. It was found that slight difference of the front and rear pillars' shape drastically affects the flow structures in the wake of the models, which enhance or restrain the vehicles' pitching instability.

  17. Spanwise bifurcations beneath the bluff-body instability modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Amalendu; Peng, Y. F.; Hwang, R. R.

    2016-06-01

    A new family of bifurcations is detected in a cylinder wake. The simulations reveal the presence of physically significant spanwise wavy flow undulation in the near-wake of a square cylinder which plays an important role in the modal transition. The alternate process of vortex shedding initiates a systematic cross-stream momentum transfer that activates self-sustained spanwise oscillation of the physical wake, leading to the growth of sequence of Hopf bifurcations along the topological cores of von Kármán vortices. The study exhibits how exactly such self-excited spanwise oscillatory fluctuations of pressure, velocity, and KE keep growing along a vortex-core for increased Re and distinctly influence the growth of "Mode A" and "Mode B" instability. It reports existence of two distinct stages of wake undulation over 125 ≤ Re ≤ 240. While the weakly subcritical spanwise-periodic oscillations of pressure, velocity, vorticity, and associated uniform and wider length-scale bifurcations along the von Kármán vortex corelines dominate during "Mode A" instability, the transition to the "Mode B" is prompted following faster and random eruption (and swapping) of significantly smaller but variable length-scaled bifurcations and accompanied low frequency non-uniform fluctuation of flow variables. Such unstable flow perturbations and resulting bifurcations along the von Kármán vortex cores apparently influence generation of longitudinal vortical ribs (Mode A and Mode B) in the wake. The appearance of a slow varying secondary frequency at the bifurcation points seemed crucial for initiating the spanwise flow irregularity and transition to "Mode B."

  18. Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

    2004-09-30

    Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

  19. Mansion on the Bluff Catches Lives on the Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priem, Shannon

    1998-01-01

    Describes Open Meadow Learning Center (Portland, Oregon), a private alternative high school with a long waiting list and a probationary period for new students. School features include an advocacy role for teachers that strengthens teacher/student relationships, 80% attendance requirement, safe and supportive environment, environmental…

  20. Bluff-body drag reduction using a deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourrié, Grégoire; Keirsbulck, Laurent; Labraga, Larbi; Gilliéron, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    A passive flow control on a generic car model was experimentally studied. This control consists of a deflector placed on the upper edge of the model rear window. The study was carried out in a wind tunnel at Reynolds numbers based on the model height of 3.1 × 105 and 7.7 × 105. The flow was investigated via standard and stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, Kiel pressure probes and surface flow visualization. The aerodynamic drag was measured using an external balance and calculated using a wake survey method. Drag reductions up to 9% were obtained depending on the deflector angle. The deflector increases the separated region on the rear window. The results show that when this separated region is wide enough, it disrupts the development of the counter-rotating longitudinal vortices appearing on the lateral edges of the rear window. The current study suggests that flow control on such geometries should consider all the flow structures that contribute to the model wake flow.

  1. Simulations of Bluff Body Flow Interaction for Noise Source Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Medi R.; Lockard David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Neuhart, Dan H.; McGinley, Catherine B.

    2006-01-01

    The current study is a continuation of our effort to characterize the details of flow interaction between two cylinders in a tandem configuration. This configuration is viewed to possess many of the pertinent flow features of the highly interactive unsteady flow field associated with the main landing gear of large civil transports. The present effort extends our previous two-dimensional, unsteady, Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes computations to three dimensions using a quasilaminar, zonal approach, in conjunction with a two-equation turbulence model. Two distinct separation length-to-diameter ratios of L/D = 3.7 and 1.435, representing intermediate and short separation distances between the two cylinders, are simulated. The Mach 0.166 simulations are performed at a Reynolds number of Re = 1.66 105 to match the companion experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. Extensive comparisons with the measured steady and unsteady surface pressure and off-surface particle image velocimetry data show encouraging agreement. Both prominent and some of the more subtle trends in the mean and fluctuating flow fields are correctly predicted. Both computations and the measured data reveal a more robust and energetic shedding process at L/D = 3.7 in comparison with the weaker shedding in the shorter separation case of L/D = 1.435. The vortex shedding frequency based on the computed surface pressure spectra is in reasonable agreement with the measured Strouhal frequency.

  2. Rock formations in the Colorado Plateau of Southeastern Utah and Northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longwell, C.R.; Miser, H.D.; Moore, R.C.; Bryan, Kirk; Paige, Sidney

    1925-01-01

    The field work of which this report is a record was done in the summer and fall of 1921 by members of the United States Geological Survey. A project to build a large storage dam at Lees Ferry, on Colorado River in northern Arizona, called for a detailed topographic survey of the area covered by the project, for the purpose of determining the capacity of the reservoir. This work was undertaken by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southern California Edison Co. Three surveying parties were sent to the field, each accompanied by a geologist, whose specific duty was to study and report on the rock formations within the area to be flooded. One topographic party, under A. T. Fowler, which started at Lees Ferry and worked up stream in Arizona, was accompanied by Kirk Bryan. Another party, under K. W. Trimble, which started near Bluff and worked down the San Juan and thence down the Colorado, was accompanied by H. D. Miser. The third party, under W. R. Chenoweth, worked from Fremont River to the Waterpocket Fold and then returned to Green River, Utah, and traversed Cataract Canyon during the period of low water. C. R. Longwell was with this party until September, when his place was taken by Sidney Paige. Mr. Paige, in company with the Kolb brothers, E. C. La Rue, and Henry Ranch, left the Chenoweth party after Cataract Canyon had been surveyed and rowed down the Colorado to the mouth of the San Juan, where they were joined by Mr. Miser. Then they took a hurried trip by boat down the Colorado to Lees Ferry, making a few short stops and visiting the famous Rainbow Bridge. Thus the geology of the canyons of Colorado and San Juan rivers and of the lower parts of tributary canyons was examined continuously, and reconnaissance work was done in the country back from the rivers. At the same time a fourth party, under R. C. Moore, was mapping parts of Kane, Garfield, and Wayne counties, Utah, to determine whether oil might be found there. The present paper

  3. Model of kimberlite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrovitsky, Sergey; Fiveyskaya, Lyudmila

    2013-04-01

    The critical goals in recognizing the nature of kimberlites are to find out: (1) the primary composition of melt of these rocks and (2) the principal processes of evolution of primary composition of kimberlites while ascending from mantle depth towards earth surface. Suppose, that the primary composition of kimberlite melt-fluid was in fact the composition of asthenosphere melt geochemically being close to alkaline-basalt (Hi-µ) saturated with high CO2. The genetic relation of kimberlites with basaltoids is indicated by a spatial and temporal affinity of their formation (Carlson et al, 2006; Lehmann et al, 2010; Tappe et al, 2012), similarity of the pattern of incompatible elements distribution, presence of megacryst minerals in alkaline basaltoids, Pyr-Alm garnet included, and finally, model calculation of parent melt composition for low-Cr megacryst minerals; it showed this composition to be typical for the alkaline basaltoid (Jones, 1980). At the asthenosphere level there was differentiation of basaltoid melt-fluid which was responsible for formation of its different parts with varying melt to fluid ratio and possibly varying content of alkalis (K2O). The outbreak of asthenosphere substance through lithosphere mantle proceeded by different scenarios: (a) With a noticeable dominance of fluid component kimberlites were formed by the capture and contamination of high-Mg, high-Cr rocks of lithosphere mantle that caused formation of high-Mg kimberlites. That corresponds to model of Russell (2012). (b) With a considerable proportion of melt phase depending on saturation in fluid there formed magnesium-ferriferous and ferriferous-titaniferous petrochemical types of kimberlites. There is no doubt that in formation of these kimberlite types the contamination of lithosphere material was the case, at the much lower level than in formation of high-Mg kimberlites. This model logically explains steady differences of petrochemistry of kimberlites making up clusters of

  4. Formation of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, G.; Coradini, A.

    2003-04-01

    In this presentation we address the problem of the formation of giant planets and their regular satellites. We study in particular the problem of formation of the Jupiter System comparing the results of the model with the present characteristics of the system, in order to identify what are those better represented by our approach. In fact here, using a 3-D hydro-dynamical code, we study the modalities of gas accretion onto a solid core, believed to be the seed from which Jupiter started. To do that we have modelled three main regions: the central planet, a turbulent accretion disk surrounding it and an extended region from which the gas is collected. In the extended region we treat the gas as a frictionless fluid. Our main goal is to identify what are the characteristics of the planet during its growth and the physical parameters affecting its growth at the expenses of the nebular gas present in the feeding zone. Moreover we want to understand what are the thermodynamical parameters characterizing the gas captured by the planet and swirling around it. Finally, we check if a disk can be formed in prograde rotation around the planet and if this disk can survive the final phases of the planet formation. Due to the interaction between the accreting planet and the disk it has been necessary to develop a complete model of the Jupiter’s structure. In fact the radiation emitted by the growing planet heats up the surrounding gas. In turn the planet’s thermodynamic structure depend on the mass accretion rate onto it. When the accretion is rapid, shock waves in the gas are formed close to the planet. This region cannot be safely treated by a numerical code; for this reason we have developed a semi-analytically model of a a turbulent accretion disk to be considered as transition between the planet and the surrounding disk.

  5. What initiated planetesimal formation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Hogan, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The physical structure of primitive (chondritic) meteorites, even after some geological processing and modification, is thought by most to contain clues as to the first stage of accretion of solid matter into objects that might be called planetesimals. However, theoretical understanding of the processes responsible for this important stage is shaky. We note what we believe are fundamental obstacles for the Goldreich-Ward version of rapid and direct planetesimal formation via gravitational instability in a settled particle layer, and describe an alternative scenario which might lead from grainy nebula gas to primitive planetesimals in a way that has intriguing connections to the meteorite evidence.

  6. Modeling river delta formation.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-10-23

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  7. Ultrarelativistic black hole formation.

    PubMed

    East, William E; Pretorius, Frans

    2013-03-01

    We study the head-on collision of fluid particles well within the kinetic energy dominated regime (γ = 8 to 12) by numerically solving the Einstein-hydrodynamic equations. We find that the threshold for black hole formation is lower (by a factor of a few) than simple hoop conjecture estimates, and, moreover, near this threshold two distinct apparent horizons first form postcollision and then merge. We argue that this can be understood in terms of a gravitational focusing effect. The gravitational radiation reaches luminosities of 0.014 c(5)/G, carrying 16 ± 2% of the total energy.

  8. Adiabatic Halo Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzani, A.; Turchetti, G.; Benedetti, C.; Rambaldi, S.; Servizi, G.

    2005-06-08

    In a high intensity circular accelerator the synchrotron dynamics introduces a slow modulation in the betatronic tune due to the space-charge tune depression. When the transverse motion is non-linear due to the presence of multipolar effects, resonance islands move in the phase space and change their amplitude. This effect introduces the trapping and detrapping phenomenon and a slow diffusion in the phase space. We apply the neo-adiabatic theory to describe this diffusion mechanism that can contribute to halo formation.

  9. Flexible formation configuration for terrain following flight: Formation keeping constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latyshev, Simon

    This work suggests a control method for the terrain-following formation motion of a group of communicating autonomous agents. The presented approach centers on defining a suitable set of constraints for formation keeping task that shall be fulfilled while agents are negotiating an unknown terrain toward the predefined goal location. It allows agents to maintain a general geometric formation shape, while allowing each individual formation member freedom of maneuver, required for terrain collision free motion. Formation structure is defined with the use of virtual leader. Formation keeping constraints are defined with plane surfaces, specified relative to position and navigation vector of the virtual leader. Formation navigation and guidance constraints are defined using navigation vectors of formation members and the virtual leader. Alternative designs for the constraints derived with parabolic, cone, and cylindrical surfaces are considered. Formation control is derived using the Udwadia-Kalaba equation, following corresponding approach to the development of control methods for constraint based dynamical systems, including leader-follower systems defined using geometric constraints. Approach to terrain following motion requiring agents to stay within bounds of cylindrical corridor volumes built around their respective navigation vectors is assumed. Individual formation primitives and multi-level, hierarchical, formation structures are considered. Simulations, based on three degrees of freedom nonlinear model of an agent, performed using Mathematica and specifically developed combined Maya-Mathematica modeling and simulation system, demonstrate that a flexible terrain following formation motion is achieved with the presented sets of constraints.

  10. Stratigraphy and depositional environments of the upper Pleistocene Chemehuevi Formation along the lower Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malmon, Daniel V.; Howard, Keith A.; House, P. Kyle; Lundstrom, Scott C.; Pearthree, Philip A.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Wan, Elmira; Wahl, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The Chemehuevi Formation forms a conspicuous, widespread, and correlative set of nonmarine sediments lining the valleys of the Colorado River and several of its larger tributaries in the Basin and Range geologic province. These sediments have been examined by geologists since J. S. Newberry visited the region in 1857 and are widely cited in the geologic literature; however their origin remains unresolved and their stratigraphic context has been confused by inconsistent nomenclature and by conflicting interpretations of their origin. This is one of the most prominent stratigraphic units along the river below the Grand Canyon, and the formation records an important event or set of events in the history of the Colorado River. Here we summarize what is known about these deposits throughout their range, present new stratigraphic, sedimentologic, topographic, and tephrochronologic data, and formally define them as a lithostratigraphic unit. The Chemehuevi Formation consists primarily of a bluff-forming mud facies, consisting of gypsum-bearing, horizontally bedded sand, silt, and clay, and a slope-forming sand facies containing poorly bedded, well sorted, quartz rich sand and scattered gravel. The sedimentary characteristics and fossil assemblages of the two facies types suggest that they were deposited in flood plain and channel environments, respectively. In addition to these two primary facies, we identify three other mappable facies in the formation: a thick-bedded rhythmite facies, now drowned by Lake Mead; a valley-margin facies containing abundant locally derived sediment; and several tributary facies consisting of mixed fluvial and lacustrine deposits in the lower parts of major tributary valleys. Observations from the subsurface and at outcrops near the elevation of the modern flood plain suggest that the formation also contains a regional basal gravel member. Surveys of numerous outcrops using high-precision GPS demonstrate that although the sand facies commonly

  11. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  12. Standard exercise report format (SERF)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This talk summarizes the reasons for the development of draft SERF the Standard Exercise Report Format used for reporting the results of emergency preparedness exercises, and gives a summary of the format and rational behind it.

  13. Formats for Presenting Procedural Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaiwes, Arthur S.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty male college students performed a mock communication controller's task under three different instructional formats, short sentences, logical tree, and coding. It was concluded that format variations mainly influence the more difficult tasks. (Author/DE)

  14. Tooth formation - delayed or absent

    MedlinePlus

    Delayed or absent tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation ... The age at which a tooth comes in varies. Most infants get their first tooth between 6 and 9 months, but it may be earlier or later. ...

  15. Fullerene formation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Mintmire, J.W.

    1996-04-05

    Why does the highly symmetric carbon cluster C{sub 60} form in such profusion under the right conditions? This question was first asked in 1985, when Kroto suggested that the predominance of the C{sub 60} carbon clusters observed in the molecular beam experiments could be explained by the truncated icosahedral (or soccer ball) form. The name given to this cluster, buckminsterfullerene, led to the use of the term fullerenes for the family of hollow-cage carbon clusters made up of even numbers of triply coordinated carbons arranged with 12 pentagonal rings and an almost arbitrary number of hexagonal rings. More than a decade later, we still lack a completely satisfying understanding of the fundamental chemistry that takes place during fullerene formation. Most current models for fullerene formation require a facile mechanism for ring rearrangement in the fullerene structure, but the simplest proposed mechanisms are believed to have unrealistically high activation barriers. In recent research calculations have suggested that atomic carbon in the reaction mixture could act as a catalyst and allow substantially lower activation barriers for fullerene annealing. This article discusses the background for this research and other adjunct research. 14 refs.

  16. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  17. Method for measuring pollutant formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annen, Kurt (Inventor); Stickler, David B. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Diagnostic methods for determining an instantaneous rate of pollutant formation in a combustion system are based on measurement of chemiluminescence intensity generated simultaneously with the formation of the pollutant. The chemiluminescent signal is generated by an analog reaction which occurs in parallel with a key step in the formation of a specific pollutant of interest. The connection between the analog reaction and the pollution reaction is such that the chemiluminescent signal indicates the local, instantaneous formation rate of the pollutant of interest.

  18. Formative Assessment: Simply, No Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos, Kathleen; Neuman, Susan B.

    2012-01-01

    Among the types of assessment the closest to daily reading instruction is formative assessment. In contrast to summative assessment, which occurs after instruction, formative assessment involves forming judgments frequently in the flow of instruction. Key features of formative assessment include identifying gaps between where students are and…

  19. Statins and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Garrett, I R; Gutierrez, G; Mundy, G R

    2001-05-01

    The main therapy needed most in the bone field is an anabolic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis. Current drugs on the market, which included bisphosphonates, calcitonin, estrogen and related compounds, vitamin D analogues trabecular microarchitecture. Therefore, it would be desirable to have a satisfactory and universally and iprifalvone, are essentially bone resorption inhibitors that mainly act to stabilize bone mass. Patients with established osteoporosis have lost more than 50% of their bone mass at critical sites in the skeleton, and more over have marked disruption of acceptable drug that would stimulate new bone formation and correct this disturbance of trabecular microarchitecture characteristic of established osteoporosis. Recently inhibitors of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, which controls the first step in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, have been shown to stimulate bone formation in rodents both in vitro and in vivo. The effect is associated with an increased expression of the bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) gene in bone cells. These statins drugs are widely used agents for lowering cholesterol and reducing heart attacks, however they are also known to elicit numerous pleiotropic effects including inhibition of proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells, inhibition of tumor growth and anti-inflammatory activity. Some of these effects have been attributed to not only to the reduction of cholesterol synthesis by inhibition of the HMG-CoA reductase enzyme but also by the concurrent reduction in downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway such as mevalonate, farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. The findings that statins are capable of increasing bone formation and bone mass in rodents suggests a potential new action for the statins, which may be beneficial in patients with established osteoporosis where marked bone loss has occurred. Recent clinical data suggests that they

  20. Physics of amniote formation.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vincent; Murukutla, Ameya Vaishnavi; Chevalier, Nicolas R; Gallois, Benjamin; Capellazzi-Resta, Marina; Picquet, Pierre; Peaucelle, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    We present a detailed study of the formation of the amniotic sac in the avian embryo, and a comparison with the crocodile amniotic sac. We show that the amniotic sac forms at a circular line of stiffness contrast, separating rings of cell domains. Cells align at this boundary, and this in turn orients and concentrates the tension forces. The tissue fold which forms the amniotic sac is locked exactly along this line due to the colocalization of the stiffness contrast and of the tensile force. In addition, the tensile force plays a regenerative role when the amniotic sac is cut. The fold forming the ventral side of the embryo displays the same characteristics. This work shows that amniote embryogenesis consists of a cascade of buckling events taking place at the boundaries between regions of differing mechanical properties. Hence, amniote embryogenesis relies on a simple and robust biomechanical scheme used repeatedly, and selected ancestrally.

  1. Physics of amniote formation.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vincent; Murukutla, Ameya Vaishnavi; Chevalier, Nicolas R; Gallois, Benjamin; Capellazzi-Resta, Marina; Picquet, Pierre; Peaucelle, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    We present a detailed study of the formation of the amniotic sac in the avian embryo, and a comparison with the crocodile amniotic sac. We show that the amniotic sac forms at a circular line of stiffness contrast, separating rings of cell domains. Cells align at this boundary, and this in turn orients and concentrates the tension forces. The tissue fold which forms the amniotic sac is locked exactly along this line due to the colocalization of the stiffness contrast and of the tensile force. In addition, the tensile force plays a regenerative role when the amniotic sac is cut. The fold forming the ventral side of the embryo displays the same characteristics. This work shows that amniote embryogenesis consists of a cascade of buckling events taking place at the boundaries between regions of differing mechanical properties. Hence, amniote embryogenesis relies on a simple and robust biomechanical scheme used repeatedly, and selected ancestrally. PMID:27627351

  2. Mechanism of GEMS formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R

    2004-03-10

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) were examined using 200 keV analytical transmission electron microscopy. The morphologies and crystallography of embedded relict grains reveal that GEMS are pseudomorphs formed by irradiation processing of crystals free-floating in space. Some GEMS retain a compositional and morphological ''memory'' of the crystal from which they formed. Pseudomorphism rules out condensation, annealing, flash heating, or shock melting as alternative mechanisms of GEMS formation. A significant and often dominant fraction of the atoms in GEMS were sputtered deposited from other grains. Therefore, a normal (solar) isotopic composition is not a reliable indicator of whether GEMS formed in the solar system or in presolar interstellar or circumstellar environments.

  3. Transitions in biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Vernita; Thatcher, Travis; Cooley, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Biofilms are multicellular, dynamic communities formed by interacting unicellular organisms bound to a surface. Forming a biofilm is a developmental process, characterized by sequential changes in gene expression and behavior as bacteria and yeast progress from discrete, free-swimming cells though stages that arrive at a mature biofilm. We are developing automated metrics to identify key transitions in early biofilm formation as cells attach to a surface, populate that surface, and adhere to each other to form early microcolonies. Our metrics use high-throughput tracking and analysis of microscopy movies to localize these transitions in space and time. Each of these transitions is associated with a loss of entropy in the bacterial system and, therefore, with biological activity that drives this loss of entropy. Better understanding of these transitions will allow automated determination of the strength and turn-on of attractive cell-surface and cell-cell interactions as biofilm development progresses.

  4. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Ioka, Kunihito; Nozawa, Takaya E-mail: kunihito.ioka@kek.jp

    2014-07-01

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission.

  5. Group Formation in Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demange, Gabrielle; Wooders, Myrna

    2005-01-01

    Broad and diverse ranges of activities are conducted within and by organized groups of individuals, including political, economic and social activities. These activities have recently become a subject of intense interest in economics and game theory. Some of the topics investigated in this collection are models of networks of power and privilege, trade networks, co-authorship networks, buyer-seller networks with differentiated products, and networks of medical innovation and the adaptation of new information. Other topics are social norms on punctuality, clubs and the provision of club goods and public goods, research and development and collusive alliances among corporations, and international alliances and trading agreements. While relatively recent, the literature on game theoretic studies of group formation in economics is already vast. This volume provides an introduction to this important literature on game-theoretic treatments of situations with networks, clubs, and coalitions, including some applications.

  6. Physics of amniote formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Vincent; Murukutla, Ameya Vaishnavi; Chevalier, Nicolas R.; Gallois, Benjamin; Capellazzi-Resta, Marina; Picquet, Pierre; Peaucelle, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    We present a detailed study of the formation of the amniotic sac in the avian embryo, and a comparison with the crocodile amniotic sac. We show that the amniotic sac forms at a circular line of stiffness contrast, separating rings of cell domains. Cells align at this boundary, and this in turn orients and concentrates the tension forces. The tissue fold which forms the amniotic sac is locked exactly along this line due to the colocalization of the stiffness contrast and of the tensile force. In addition, the tensile force plays a regenerative role when the amniotic sac is cut. The fold forming the ventral side of the embryo displays the same characteristics. This work shows that amniote embryogenesis consists of a cascade of buckling events taking place at the boundaries between regions of differing mechanical properties. Hence, amniote embryogenesis relies on a simple and robust biomechanical scheme used repeatedly, and selected ancestrally.

  7. Biofilm formation by enterococci.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Jamal A; Huang, David B

    2007-12-01

    Enterococci are an important global cause of nosocomial infections, being increasingly associated with urinary tract infections, endocarditis, intra-abdominal and pelvic infections, catheter-related infections, surgical wound infections, and central nervous system infections. The two most common enterococci species are Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Both are capable of producing biofilms, which consist of a population of cells attached irreversibly on various biotic and abiotic surfaces, encased in a hydrated matrix of exopolymeric substances. Many environmental and genetic factors are associated or have been proposed to be associated with the production of biofilm. This review discusses recent advances in knowledge about the biology and genetics of biofilm formation and the role of biofilms in enterococci pathogenesis.

  8. Recipes for planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael R.

    2009-11-01

    Anyone who has ever used baking soda instead of baking powder when trying to make a cake knows a simple truth: ingredients matter. The same is true for planet formation. Planets are made from the materials that coalesce in a rotating disk around young stars - essentially the "leftovers" from when the stars themselves formed through the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds of gas and dust. The planet-making disk should therefore initially have the same gas-to-dust ratio as the interstellar medium: about 100 to 1, by mass. Similarly, it seems logical that the elemental composition of the disk should match that of the star, reflecting the initial conditions at that particular spot in the galaxy.

  9. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 16 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 11o N, 159o W (201o E) and shows examples of the remarkable variations that can be seen in the erosion of the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region, like many others throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, the surface has been eroded by the wind into a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These ridges generally point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to erode the landscape of Mars. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Within this single image it is possible to see differing amounts of erosion and stripping of layers in the Medusae Fossae Formation. Near the bottom (southern) edge of the image a rock layer with a relatively smooth upper surface covers much of the image. Moving upwards (north) in the image this layer becomes more and more eroded. At first there are isolated regions where the smooth unit has been eroded to produce sets of parallel ridges and knobs. Further north these linear knobs increase in number, and only small, isolated patches of the smooth upper surface remain. Finally, at the top of the image, even the ridges have been removed, exposing the remarkably smooth top of hard, resistant layer below. This sequence of layers with differing hardness and resistance to erosion is common on Earth and on Mars, and suggests significant variations in the physical properties, composition, particle size, and/or cementation of these martian layers. As is common throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, very few impact craters are visible, indicating that the surface exposed is relatively young, and that the process of erosion may be active today

  10. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 16 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 11o N, 159o W (201o E) and shows examples of the remarkable variations that can be seen in the erosion of the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region, like many others throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, the surface has been eroded by the wind into a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These ridges generally point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to erode the landscape of Mars. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Within this single image it is possible to see differing amounts of erosion and stripping of layers in the Medusae Fossae Formation. Near the bottom (southern) edge of the image a rock layer with a relatively smooth upper surface covers much of the image. Moving upwards (north) in the image this layer becomes more and more eroded. At first there are isolated regions where the smooth unit has been eroded to produce sets of parallel ridges and knobs. Further north these linear knobs increase in number, and only small, isolated patches of the smooth upper surface remain. Finally, at the top of the image, even the ridges have been removed, exposing the remarkably smooth top of hard, resistant layer below. This sequence of layers with differing hardness and resistance to erosion is common on Earth and on Mars, and suggests significant variations in the physical properties, composition, particle size, and/or cementation of these martian layers. As is common throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, very few impact craters are visible, indicating that the surface exposed is relatively young, and that the process of erosion may be active today

  11. Gas formation. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane.

    PubMed

    Stolper, D A; Lawson, M; Davis, C L; Ferreira, A A; Santos Neto, E V; Ellis, G S; Lewan, M D; Martini, A M; Tang, Y; Schoell, M; Sessions, A L; Eiler, J M

    2014-06-27

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a "clumped isotope" technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models. PMID:24970083

  12. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment.

  13. Nuclear ``pasta'' formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Hughto, J.; Berry, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of complex nonuniform phases of nuclear matter, known as nuclear pasta, is studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations containing 51200 nucleons. A phenomenological nuclear interaction is used that reproduces the saturation binding energy and density of nuclear matter. Systems are prepared at an initial density of 0.10fm-3 and then the density is decreased by expanding the simulation volume at different rates to densities of 0.01fm-3 or less. An originally uniform system of nuclear matter is observed to form spherical bubbles (“swiss cheese”), hollow tubes, flat plates (“lasagna”), thin rods (“spaghetti”) and, finally, nearly spherical nuclei with decreasing density. We explicitly observe nucleation mechanisms, with decreasing density, for these different pasta phase transitions. Topological quantities known as Minkowski functionals are obtained to characterize the pasta shapes. Different pasta shapes are observed depending on the expansion rate. This indicates nonequilibrium effects. We use this to determine the best ways to obtain lower energy states of the pasta system from MD simulations and to place constraints on the equilibration time of the system.

  14. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms leading to bubble generation during fluid handling procedures in a microgravity environment. Several key fluid handling procedures typical for PCG experiments were identified for analysis in that program. Experiments were designed to specifically understand how such procedures can lead to bubble formation. The experiments were then conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which is capable of simulating a low gravity environment by executing a parabolic flight attitude. However, such a flight attitude can only provide a low gravity environment of approximately 10-2go for a maximum period of 30 seconds. Thus all of the tests conducted for these experiments were designed to last no longer than 20 seconds. Several experiments were designed to simulate some of the more relevant fluid handling procedures during protein crystal growth experiments. These include submerged liquid jet cavitation, filling of a cubical vessel, submerged surface scratch, attached drop growth, liquid jet impingement, and geysering experiments. To date, four separate KC-135 flight campaigns were undertaken specifically for performing these experiments. However, different experiments were performed on different flights.

  15. Formation of "bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, K.; Kästner, M.; Miltner, A.

    2009-04-01

    During degradation of organic pollutants in soil, metabolites, microbial biomass, CO2and "bound" residues ("non-extractable" residues in soil organic matter) are formed. Enhanced transformation of these contaminants into "bound" residues has been proposed as an alternative remediation method for polluted soils. However, this kind of residues may pose a potential risk for the environment due to their chemical structure and possible remobilization under different conditions. Therefore particular attention is given actually to "bound" residues. Part of these non-extractable residues may be "biogenic," because microorganisms use the carbon from the pollutant to form their biomass components (fatty acids, amino acids, amino sugars), which subsequently may be incorporated into soil organic matter. Furthermore, the CO2 originating from mineralization of xenobiotics, can be re-assimilated by microorganisms and also incorporated into "biogenic residue". The hazard posed by "bound" residues may be overestimated because they are "biogenic" (contain microbial fatty acids and amino acids). The knowledge about the pathways of "biogenic residue" formation is necessary for a proper assessment of the fate of tested pollutants and their turnover in the soil environment. Moreover, these data are needed to establish the realistic degradation rates of the contaminants in soil. The main objectives of this study are: to quantify the extent of "biogenic residue" (fatty acids, amino acids, amino sugars) formation during the degradation of a model pollutant (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid = 2,4-D) and during CO2 assimilation by microorganisms and to evaluate which components are mainly incorporated into "bound" residues. To investigate the extent of "biogenic residue" formation in soil during the degradation of 2,4-D, experiments with either 14C-U-ring and 13C6-2,4-D or carboxyl-14C 2,4-D were performed. The incubation experiments were performed according to OECD test guideline 307, in the

  16. Prominence formation and oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. F.

    Prominences, or filaments, are a striking phenomenon in the solar atmosphere. Besides their own rich features and dynamics, they are related to many other activities, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In the past several years we have been investigating the prominence formation, oscillations, and eruptions through both data analysis and radiative hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. This paper reviews our progress on these topics, which includes: (1) With updated radiative cooling function, the coronal condensation becomes a little faster than previous work; (2) Once a seed condensation is formed, it can grow via siphon flow spontaneously even if the evaporation stops; (3) A scaling law was obtained to relate the length of the prominence thread to various parameters, indicating that higher prominences tend to have shorter threads, which is consistent with the fact that threads are long in active region prominences and short in quiescent prominences; (4) It was proposed that long-time prominence oscillations out of phase might serve as a precursor for prominence eruptions and CMEs; (5) An ensemble of oscillating prominence threads may explain the counter-streaming motion.

  17. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment. PMID:20069645

  18. Bead lightning formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, G.O.; Saba, M.M.F.

    2005-09-15

    Formation of beaded structures in triggered lightning discharges is considered in the framework of both magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and hydrodynamic instabilities. It is shown that the space periodicity of the structures can be explained in terms of the kink and sausage type instabilities in a cylindrical discharge with anomalous viscosity. In particular, the fast growth rate of the hydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which is driven by the backflow of air into the channel of the decaying return stroke, dominates the initial evolution of perturbations during the decay of the return current. This instability is responsible for a significant enhancement of the anomalous viscosity above the classical level. Eventually, the damping introduced at the current channel edge by the high level of anomalous viscous stresses defines the final length scale of bead lightning. Later, during the continuing current stage of the lightning flash, the MHD pinch instability persists, although with a much smaller growth rate that can be enhanced in a M-component event. The combined effect of these instabilities may explain various aspects of bead lightning.

  19. The formation of dew

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beysens, D.

    Dew is the condensation into liquid droplets of water vapor on a substrate. The presence of a substrate is the origin of the peculiarities and richness of the phenomenon. We review the aspects related to heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth of water droplets. A key point is the drop interaction through drop fusion or coalescence, which leads to scaling in the growth and gives universality to the process. The effects of substrate heterogeneity and gravity effects are also considered. Coalescence events lead to temporal and spatio-temporal fluctuations in the substrate coverage, drop configuration, etc., which give rise to a very peculiar dynamics. When the substrate is a liquid or a liquid crystal, the drop pattern can exhibit special spatial orders, such as crystalline, hexatic phases and fractal contours. And condensation on a solid substrate near its melting point can make the drop jump. The applications of monitoring dew formation are manyfold. Examples can be found in nanoelectronics and optics (vapor deposition and thin films), medicine (sterilization process), agriculture (green houses). We here discuss in greater details the production of clean water by "atmospheric wells".

  20. Large Format Radiographic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. Rohrer; Lacey Stewart; M. D. Wilke; N. S. King; S. A Baker; Wilfred Lewis

    1999-08-01

    Radiographic imaging continues to be a key diagnostic in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiographic recording systems have taken on many form, from high repetition-rate, gated systems to film recording and storage phosphors. Some systems are designed for synchronization to an accelerator while others may be single shot or may record a frame sequence in a dynamic radiography experiment. While film recording remains a reliable standby in the radiographic community, there is growing interest in investigating electronic recording for many applications. The advantages of real time access to remote data acquisition are highly attractive. Cooled CCD camera systems are capable of providing greater sensitivity with improved signal-to-noise ratio. This paper begins with a review of performance characteristics of the Bechtel Nevada large format imaging system, a gated system capable of viewing scintillators up to 300 mm in diameter. We then examine configuration alternatives in lens coupled and fiber optically coupled electro-optical recording systems. Areas of investigation include tradeoffs between fiber optic and lens coupling, methods of image magnification, and spectral matching from scintillator to CCD camera. Key performance features discussed include field of view, resolution, sensitivity, dynamic range, and system noise characteristics.

  1. Beach-cusp formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Field experiments on beach-cusp formation were undertaken to document how the cuspate form develops and to test the edge-wave hypothesis on the uniform spacing of cusps. These involved observations of cusps forming from an initially plane foreshore. The cuspate form was observed to be a product of swash modification of an intertidal beach ridge as follows. A ridge, cut by a series of channels quasi-equally spaced along its length, was deposited onto the lower foreshore. The ridge migrated shoreward with flood tide, while the longshore positions of the channels remained fixed. On ebb tide, changes in swash circulation over the ridge allowed the upwash to flow shoreward through the channels and the channel mouths were eroded progressively wider until adjacent mouths met, effecting a cuspate shape. Measured spacings of cusps, ranging in size from less than 1 m to more than 12 m, agree well with computed spacings due to either zero-mode subharmonic or zero-mode synchronous edge waves. Edge-wave-induced longshore variations in run up will cause water ponded behind a ridge to converge at points of low swash and flow seaward as relatively narrow currents eroding channels spaced at one edge-wave wavelength for synchronous edge waves or one half wavelength for subharmonic edge waves. The channels are subsequently modified into cusp troughs as described above.

  2. The KEA image file format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunting, Peter; Gillingham, Sam

    2013-08-01

    There are a large number of image formats already in use within the remote sensing community but currently there is no format that provides the features of: compression, support for large file sizes, ground control points, raster attribute tables and inbuilt image pyramids. Therefore, a new image format, named KEA, after the New Zealand bird, has been proposed. The KEA format provides a full implementation of the GDAL data model and is implemented within a HDF5 file. A software library with a GDAL driver have been freely provided to the community allowing use through any GDAL based software. The new format has comparable performance with existing formats while producing smaller file sizes and is already within active use for a number of projects within Landcare Research, New Zealand, and the wider community.

  3. Gaining Insight into Star Formation: Resolved Star Formation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebst, Kelley; Scowen, Paul A.

    2014-06-01

    Until recently astronomers have used star formation laws to measure the star formation rate and star formation efficiency of galaxies only on global scales because of the poor resolution of available data. What I am now capable of producing is a spatially resolved star formation law that can provide direct insight into the physical processes that govern star formation and assess the short-term nature of bursts of star formation and the longer-term nature of larger-scale events that can dictate the global distribution of stars and the ultimate fate of a galaxy as a whole. I am using exquisite narrowband optical data from a variety of sources, including the Hubble Space Telescope, and Kitt Peak National Observatory, etc., in conjunction with infrared data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey and the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey, neutral gas data from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, and molecular gas data from the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association Survey of Nearby Galaxies, to provide star formation rates and star formation efficiencies on previously inaccessible small spatial scales across a suite of galaxies that represent a range of star formation environments and scales. My sample includes 18 spiral galaxies ranging from 2.1 to 15.1 Mpc in distance and offers a large range of morphological types (i.e. a large range of star formation environments). I am using these data to test different models of star formation modes under a variety of physical conditions and relate the variations I observe to the known local physical conditions and the associated star formation histories for each locale within each galaxy.This is the heart of the matter - that the nature and evolution of the local physical environment intimately influences how stars can form, how quickly and how massive those stars are allowed to form, and as a result how they shape the local conditions for subsequent star formation. It is this tracking of the stellar ecology that is vital for

  4. BACTERIOPHAGE FORMATION WITHOUT BACTERIAL GROWTH

    PubMed Central

    Price, Winston H.

    1947-01-01

    1. Iodoacetate, fluoride, and azide have been found to prevent the formation of phage and to inhibit the synthesis of ATP by Staphylococcus muscae. It is suggested that energy-rich phosphate is needed for the synthesis of phage. 2. Gramicidin prevented the formation of phage. 3. No differences were found between normal bacteria and phage-infected bacteria in the inorganic phosphate, adenosinetriphosphate, ribonucleic acid, and desoxyribonucleic acid content of the cells. 4. The mechanism of phage formation is discussed. PMID:18896936

  5. Binary stars - Formation by fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1988-01-01

    Theories of binary star formation by capture, separate nuclei, fission and fragmentation are compared, assessing the success of theoretical attempts to explain the observed properties of main-sequence binary stars. The theory of formation by fragmentation is examined, discussing the prospects for checking the theory against observations of binary premain-sequence stars. It is concluded that formation by fragmentation is successful at explaining many of the key properties of main-sequence binary stars.

  6. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An exotic terrain of wind-eroded ridges and residual smooth surfaces are seen in one of the highest resolution images ever taken of Mars from orbit. The Medusae Fossae formation is believed to be formed of the fragmental ejecta of huge explosive volcanic eruptions. When subjected to intense wind-blasting over hundreds of millions of years, this material erodes easily once the uppermost tougher crust is breached. In the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shown on the right, the crust, or cap rock, can be seen in the upper right part of the picture. The finely-spaced ridges are similar to features on Earth called yardangs, which are formed by intense winds plucking individual grains from, and by wind-driven sand blasting particles off, sedimentary deposits.

    The MOC image was taken on October 30, 1997 at 11:05 AM PST, shortly after the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft's 31st closest approach to Mars. The image covers an area 3.6 X 21.5 km (2.2 X 13.4 miles) at 3.6 m (12 feet) per picture element--craters only 11 m (36 feet, about the size of a swimming pool) across can be seen. The context image (left; the best Viking view of the area; VO 1 387S34) has a resolution of 240 m/pixel, or 67 times lower resolution than the MOC frame.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  7. ANTIBODY FORMATION IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, M.

    1961-01-01

    Neutralizing activity against T2 bacteriophage appeared in cultures of lymph node cells from normal rats in response to their in vitro stimulation with a cell-free filtrate derived from homogenized rat macrophages which had been incubated with T2 bacteriophage. This activity was specifically directed against T2 bacteriophage. It resided in a fraction of the culture fluid which had the salting-out properties of serum globulin. Phage neutralization was inhibited by antibody specific for rat serum gamma globulin. Antibody production against T2 bacteriophage in cultures of lymph node cells from normal animals failed to occur if (a) T2 bacteriophage alone was added, (b) if the incubation period of macrophages and T2 phage was unduly shortened, (c) if the cell-free filtrate was heated at 80–100°C for 15 minutes, (d) if more than an optimal amount of T2 bacteriophage was added to the macrophages. Additional factors which prevented the formation of antibody were the heat inactivation of the lymph node cells or the addition to the culture medium of either streptomycin or ribonuclease. Finally, it was found that macrophages and lymph node cells had to be obtained from animals of one and the same species. All essential findings on the production of antibody to T2 bacteriophage in vitro could be confirmed by substitution of the chick embryo for the tissue culture medium. The results are discussed in terms of a possible mechanism of antibody production in which an RNAse-sensitive substance resulting from the interaction of macrophages and antigen is capable of stimulating antibody synthesis in lymphocytic cells. PMID:13893304

  8. Plasmapause formation at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Jia, X.; Jackman, C. M.; Hospodarsky, G.; Coates, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    Cassini observations during a rapid, high-latitude, dawnside pass from Saturn's lobe to inner magnetosphere on 25 June 2009 provide strong evidence for the formation of a "plasmapause" at Saturn by Vasyliunas-type nightside reconnection of previously mass-loaded flux tubes. A population of hot, tenuous plasma that lies between the lobe and the dense inner magnetospheric plasma is consistent with a region formed by very recent injection from a reconnection region in the tail, including low density, high temperature, supercorotational flow, a significant O+ content, and the near-simultaneous observation of enhanced Saturn kilometric radiation emissions. The sharp boundary between that region and the cool dense inner magnetospheric plasma thus separates flux tubes that were involved in the reconnection from those that successfully traversed the nightside without mass loss. This event demonstrates that tail reconnection can strip off inner magnetospheric plasma in to at least dipole L = 8.6. Clear evidence of flux tube interchange driven by the sharp boundary is found, both inward moving flux tubes of hotter plasma and, for the first time, the outward moving cool population. The outward moving cool regions have azimuthal sizes less than 1 RS, were probably created within the past 1.2 h, and have outflow speeds greater than about 5 km/s. At the outer edge of the reconnected region, there is also a possible signature of Dungey-type lobe reconnection following the initial Vasyliunas-type reconnection. Observations from this event are entirely consistent with previously described global MHD simulations of tail reconnection, plasmoid departure, and Saturnward injection of reconnected flux.

  9. Planet formation and searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Ryan Michael

    2009-08-01

    This thesis explores the possibilities for discovery of terrestrial-mass planets in the habitable zones of their host stars. Towards this aim, we present the results of three projects and discuss another two preliminary studies of further explorations. In so doing, we explore a fairly comprehensive range of possibilities regarding the formation and detection of terrestrial- mass planets in the habitable zone. We first study the potential for terrestrial planets to form in situ in and around the habitable zones of M-dwarf stars. We proceed to explore the feasibility of searches for these planets using the transit method via Monte- Carlo simulations. We find that M-dwarfs pose an interesting challenge for study: being inherently dim, widely spread on the sky, and photometrically variable. We present results of simulated ground-based transit search campaigns as well as simulated searches from a modest satellite mission. Our second project is a straightforward extension of the previous study: a collaborative effort to search for transit signals around the nearest M-dwarf: Proxima Centauri. We describe our observations as well as the Monte-Carlo analysis used to place constraints on the possible planetary radii and periods. Our third project is a search for transiting extra-solar Jovian planets using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. We search through the private Keck radial- velocity datasets for undiscovered Rossiter-McLaughlin signals. We present our results in the form of both strong null-result datasets as well as potential transiting systems. We then briefly analyze these larger Jovian planets for potential to harbor potentially habitable terrestrial satellites. Our final preliminary analysis looks into the potential for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope to detect transiting Neptune-mass planets orbiting M-dwarfs which could then lead to terrestrial-mass planet detections. The sum of these efforts is a comprehensive investigation into the likelihood and

  10. Formative Assessment Probes: Is It a Rock? Continuous Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2013-01-01

    A lesson plan is provided for a formative assessment probe entitled "Is It a Rock?" This probe is designed for teaching elementary school students about rocks through the use of a formative assessment classroom technique (FACT) known as the group Frayer Model. FACT activates students' thinking about a concept and can be used to…

  11. The Formation of Galactic Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carollo, C. Marcella; Ferguson, Henry C.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2000-03-01

    Part I. Introduction: What are galactic bulges?; Part II. The Epoch of Bulge Formation: Origin of bulges; Deep sub-mm surveys: High-z ULIRGs and the formation of spheroids; Ages and metallicities for stars in the galactic bulge; Integrated stellar populations of bulges: First results; HST-NICMOS observations of galactic bulges: Ages and dust; Inside-out bulge formation and the origin of the Hubble sequence; Part III. The Timescales of Bulge Formation: Constraints on the bulge formation timescale from stellar populations; Bulge building with mergers and winds; Role of winds, starbursts, and activity in bulge formation; Dynamical timescales of bulge formation; Part IV. Physical Processes in Bulge Formation: the role of bars for secular bulge formation; Bars and boxy/peanut-shaped bulges: an observational point of view; Boxy- and peanut-shaped bulges; A new class of bulges; The role of secondary bars in bulge formation; Radial transport of molecular gas to the nuclei of spiral galaxies; Dynamical evolution of bulge shapes; Two-component stellar systems: Phase-space constraints; Central NGC 2146 - a firehose-type bending instability?; Bulge formation: the role of the multi-phase ISM; Global evolution of a self-gravitating multi-phase ISM in the central kpc region of galaxies; Part V. Bulge Phenomenology: Bulge-disk decomposition of spiral galaxies in the near-infrared; The triaxial bulge of NGC 1371; The bulge-disk orthogonal decoupling in galaxies: NGC 4698 and NGC 4672; The kinematics and the origin of the ionized gas in NGC 4036; Optically thin thermal plasma in the galactic bulge; X-ray properties of bulges; The host galaxies of radio-loud AGN; The centers of radio-loud early-type galaxies with HST; Central UV spikes in two galactic spheroids; Conference summary: where do we stand?

  12. Updated diatom biostratigraphy for Monterey Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    Diatom biostratigraphy for the latest early Miocene to earliest Pliocene of California is updated by new correlations to absolute time, and additional secondary datum levels (first and last occurrences) are identified. As yet, late middle Miocene to latest Miocene (14-6 Ma) diatom datum levels have not been correlated directly with magnetic stratigraphy in the northeast Pacific. Absolute ages are estimated indirectly by correlating northeast Pacific diatom datum levels with tropical Pacific diatom datum levels, which are correlated directly with magnetic stratigraphy. DSDP sections in the northeastern Pacific (Sites 470, 472) and northwestern Pacific (Site 438) contain mixtures of tropical and temperate diatom species. Graphical correlation techniques applied to these sections correlate temperate datum levels to tropical datum levels and, hence, to magnetic stratigraphy. Absolute ages for these datum levels are then estimated using magnetic time scales. W.A. Berggren et al suggested a new correlation of magnetic anomaly 5 (8.92-10.42 Ma) with magnetic polarity Chron 11, rather than with Chron 9. Significant changes in absolute age estimates from late middle Miocene to early late Miocene diatom zones and subzones are as follows: base of Denticulopsis hustedtii-D. lauta zone = 13.8 Ma; base of subzone b = 12.7 Ma; base of subzone c = 11.4 Ma; base of subzone d = 8.9 Ma; base of D. hustedtii zone = 8.4 Ma; top of D. hustedtii zone (base of Thalassiosira antiqua zone) = 7.6 Ma. Graphical correlation techniques have been applied to stratigraphic sections from Newport Beach, Naples coastal bluffs, Lompoc, Monterey, and the type Luisian area near Paso Robles, as well as from DSDP Sites 173, 468, 469, and 470, and have identified 31 secondary diatom datums and 4 silicoflagellate datums that are the most useful for correlations.

  13. The formation of Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfli, G. M.; Hochard, C.; Vérard, C.; Wilhem, C.; vonRaumer, J.

    2013-05-01

    The making of Pangea is the result of large-scale amalgamation of continents and micro-continents, which started at the end of the Neoproterozoic with the formation of Gondwana. As pieces were added to Gondwana on its South-American, Antarctica and Australia side, ribbon-like micro-continents were detached from its African and South-Chinese side: Cadomia in the late Neoproterozoic, Avalonia and Hunia in the Ordovician, Galatia in the Devonian and Cimmeria in the Permian. Cadomia was re-accreted to Gondwana, but the other ribbon-continents were accreted to Baltica, North-China, Laurussia or Laurasia. Finding the origin of these numerous terranes is a major geological challenge. Recently, a global plate tectonic model was developed together with a large geological/geodynamic database, at the Lausanne University, covering the last 600 Ma of the Earth's history. Special attention was given to the placing of Gondwana derived terranes in their original position, using all possible constraints. We propose here a solution for the Variscan terranes, another paper deals with the Altaids. The Galatian super-terrane was detached from Gondwana in the Devonian, during the opening of Paleotethys, and was quickly separated into four sub-terranes that started to by-pass each other. The leading terranes collided at the end of the Devonian with the Hanseatic terrane detached from Laurussia. In the Carboniferous, Gondwana started to impinge onto the amalgamated terranes, creating the Variscan chain and the Pangean super-continent. East of Spain Paleotethys remained opened until the Triassic, subducting northward under Laurasia. Roll-back of the Paleotethyan slab triggered the collapse of most of the European Variscan orogen, which was replaced by series of Permian rifts, some of them becoming oceanized back-arc basins during the Triassic. Major force changes at the Pangean plate limits at the end of the Triassic provoked its break-up, through the opening of the proto

  14. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As ...

  15. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As w...

  16. Portable File Format (PFF) specifications.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2015-02-01

    Created at Sandia National Laboratories, the Portable File Format (PFF) allows binary data transfer across computer platforms. Although this capability is supported by many other formats, PFF files are still in use at Sandia, particularly in pulsed power research. This report provides detailed PFF specifications for accessing data without relying on legacy code.

  17. Bibliography Formatting Software: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stigleman, Sue

    1993-01-01

    Discusses software used for formatting bibliographies and describes 52 programs. Information provided includes type of operating system required, publication formats, citation styles, ability to arrange by subject, use of downloaded references, network versions, costs, and plans for future changes. A directory of the programs and producers is…

  18. Formation Algorithms and Simulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wette, Matthew; Sohl, Garett; Scharf, Daniel; Benowitz, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Formation flying for spacecraft is a rapidly developing field that will enable a new era of space science. For one of its missions, the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) project has selected a formation flying interferometer design to detect earth-like planets orbiting distant stars. In order to advance technology needed for the TPF formation flying interferometer, the TPF project has been developing a distributed real-time testbed to demonstrate end-to-end operation of formation flying with TPF-like functionality and precision. This is the Formation Algorithms and Simulation Testbed (FAST) . This FAST was conceived to bring out issues in timing, data fusion, inter-spacecraft communication, inter-spacecraft sensing and system-wide formation robustness. In this paper we describe the FAST and show results from a two-spacecraft formation scenario. The two-spacecraft simulation is the first time that precision end-to-end formation flying operation has been demonstrated in a distributed real-time simulation environment.

  19. The Apennine Bench Formation revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Hawke, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Apennine Bench Formation consists of pre-mare light plains materials that crop out south of the crater Archimedes, inside the Imbrium basin. This material was ascribed to either impact or volcanic origins. The characteristics of Apollo 15 KREEP basalts and the Apennine Bench Formation are reviewed to determine whether their characteristics are compatible with a volcanic origin.

  20. Star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2009-03-15

    We develop a simple semianalytic model of the star formation rate as a function of time. We estimate the star formation rate for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  1. Tariffs Formation on oil transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzina, T. S.; Kolbysheva, Yu. V.; Grivtsova, I. S.; Dmitrieva, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    Oil transportation via trunk pipelines is an important part of the oil industry's activity. The main instrument of tariff regulation is the method of tariffs formation. Three methods of tariffs formation such as the method of economically justified costs (the Cost plus method), the method of economically justified return on investment capital (the RAB method), and the method of tariffs indexation were considered.

  2. Formative Assessment: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Randy Elliot

    2011-01-01

    This paper covers six interrelated issues in formative assessment (aka, "assessment for learning"). The issues concern the definition of formative assessment, the claims commonly made for its effectiveness, the limited attention given to domain considerations in its conceptualisation, the under-representation of measurement principles in that…

  3. Sibling similarity in family formation.

    PubMed

    Raab, Marcel; Fasang, Anette Eva; Karhula, Aleksi; Erola, Jani

    2014-12-01

    Sibling studies have been widely used to analyze the impact of family background on socioeconomic and, to a lesser extent, demographic outcomes. We contribute to this literature with a novel research design that combines sibling comparisons and sequence analysis to analyze longitudinal family-formation trajectories of siblings and unrelated persons. This allows us to scrutinize in a more rigorous way whether sibling similarity exists in family-formation trajectories and whether siblings' shared background characteristics, such as parental education and early childhood family structure, can account for similarity in family formation. We use Finnish register data from 1987 through 2007 to construct longitudinal family-formation trajectories in young adulthood for siblings and unrelated dyads (N = 14,257 dyads). Findings show that family formation is moderately but significantly more similar for siblings than for unrelated dyads, also after controlling for crucial parental background characteristics. Shared parental background characteristics add surprisingly little to account for sibling similarity in family formation. Instead, gender and the respondents' own education are more decisive forces in the stratification of family formation. Yet, family internal dynamics seem to reinforce this stratification such that siblings have a higher probability to experience similar family-formation patterns. In particular, patterns that correspond with economic disadvantage are concentrated within families. This is in line with a growing body of research highlighting the importance of family structure in the reproduction of social inequality.

  4. Cyanide Formation by Chromobacterium violaceum

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, Ruth; Corpe, W. A.

    1965-01-01

    Michaels, Ruth (Columbia University, New York, N.Y.), and W. A. Corpe. Cyanide formation by Chromobacterium violaceum. J. Bacteriol. 89:106–112. 1965.—The formation of cyanide by a Chromobacterium violaceum strain was studied with growing cultures and with nonproliferating cells grown in complex and chemically defined media. Most of the cyanide was produced during the log-phase growth of the organism, and accumulated in the culture supernatant fluid. A synergistic effect of glycine and methionine on cyanide formation in a chemically defined medium was observed, and the amount of cyanide formed was found to be dependent on the concentrations of the two substances. Cyanide formation by nonproliferating cells was stimulated by preincubation with glycine and methionine. Cyanide formation by adapted cells in the presence of glycine and methionine was stimulated by succinate, malate, or fumarate, and depressed by azide and 2,4-dinitrophenol. Methionine could be replaced by betaine, dimethylglycine, and choline. PMID:14255648

  5. Physics of primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2012-09-01

    The study of primordial star formation has a history of nearly sixty years. It is generally thought that primordial stars are one of the key elements in a broad range of topics in astronomy and cosmology, from Galactic chemical evolution to the formation of super-massive blackholes. We review recent progress in the theory of primordial star formation. The standard theory of cosmic structure formation posits that the present-day rich structure of the Universe developed through gravitational amplification of tiny matter density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang. It has become possible to study primordial star formation rigorously within the framework of the standard cosmological model. We first lay out the key physical processes in a primordial gas. Then, we introduce recent developments in computer simulations. Finally, we discuss prospects for future observations of the first generation of stars.

  6. Dissipative processes in galaxy formation.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, J

    1993-01-01

    A galaxy commences its life in a diffuse gas cloud that evolves into a predominantly stellar aggregation. Considerable dissipation of gravitational binding energy occurs during this transition. I review here the dissipative processes that determine the critical scales of luminous galaxies and the generation of their morphology. The universal scaling relations for spirals and ellipticals are shown to be sensitive to the history of star formation. Semiphenomenological expressions are given for star-formation rates in protogalaxies and in starbursts. Implications are described for elliptical galaxy formation and for the evolution of disk galaxies. PMID:11607396

  7. Antihydrogen Formation using Cold Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Bowe, P.D.; Hangst, J.S.; Amoretti, M.; Carraro, C.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Johnson, I.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bouchta, A.; Doser, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Landua, R.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L.V.

    2004-10-20

    Antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of the hydrogen atom, can be formed by mixing cold samples of antiprotons and positrons. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration succeeded in the first production of cold antihydrogen. By observing and imaging the annihilation products of the neutral, non-confined, antihydrogen atoms annihilating on the walls of the trap we can observe the production in quasi-real-time and study the dynamics of the formation mechanism. The formation mechanism strongly influences the final state of the formed antihydrogen atoms, important for future spectroscopic comparison with hydrogen. This paper briefly summarizes the current understanding of the antihydrogen formation in ATHENA.

  8. Dynamics of rock varnish formation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of rock varnish from the southwestern United States suggest that the Mn-phase in rock varnish has neither the chemistry nor the crystal structure of birnessite. Rather, the Mn-rich phase is non-crystalline and contains Ba, Ca, Fe, Al, and P. Unknowns concerning the formation of this non-crystalline Mn phase must be resolved before researchers are able to define chemical parameters of rock varnish formation based upon conditions of formation of the Mn phase. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Formate dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas oxalaticus.

    PubMed

    Müller, U; Willnow, P; Ruschig, U; Höpner, T

    1978-02-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.2) from Pseudomonas oxalaticus has been isolated and characterized. The enzyme (molecular weight 315000) is a complex flavoprotein containing 2 FMN, 18--25 non-heme iron atoms and 15--20 acid-labile sulphides. In the last step of the purification, a sucrose gradient centrifugation, a second catalytically active species has been found apparently originating from a dissociation of the enzyme into two equal subunits. The enzyme is specific toward its natural substrate formate. It transfers electrons to NAD+, oxygen, ferricyanide, and a lot of nonphysiological acceptors (dyes). In addition electrons are transferred from NADH to these acceptors. The (reversible) removal of FMN requires a reduction step. Reincorporation has been followed by the reappearance of the reactivity against formate and by fluorescence titration. The deflavo enzyme also binds FAD and riboflavin. The resulting enzyme species show characteristic catalytic abilities. Activity against formate is peculiar to the FMN species. PMID:631130

  10. Results of Aluminosilicate Formation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2001-09-11

    The purpose of this work was to examine several experimental parameters of the formation of aluminosilicates under several tank chemistries, examine the conversion of crystalline phases, and determine inherent solubilities of certain crystal phases.

  11. Ultraviolet Mars Reveals Cloud Formation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Images from MAVEN's Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph were used to make this movie of rapid cloud formation on Mars on July 9-10, 2016. The ultraviolet colors of the planet have been rendered in fal...

  12. Star Formation Across Galactic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    2013-01-01

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in AGN-free and quasar host galaxies. These environments are both insightful; quasars are among the most violent objects known, reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to dwarf star-forming galaxies. The AGN-free galaxies are drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey, an Hα-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to avoid continuum luminosity bias. This work studies the KISS galaxies in mid- and far-IR using Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry. These IR bands are interesting because the UV light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-IR (24μm MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transition features in the mid-IR (8.0μm IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This work examines the efficiencies of PAH and dust emission as tracers of star-formation. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has no systematic dependance on galactic mass. My study of quasar host galaxies utilizes images of eight PG quasars from the WFPC2 and NICMOS instruments aboard HST. I use narrow-band images centered on the Hβ, [OII]λ3727, [OIII]λ5007, and Paα emission lines to construct extinction and star formation maps. Additionally, I use line-ratio maps to distinguish AGN-powered line emission from star formation powered line emission. I find star formation, albeit at rates are lower than expected, suggesting that quasar host galaxies are dynamically more advanced than suspected. Seven of the galaxies have higher mass-specific star-formation rates. Additionally, I see evidence of shocked gas, supporting the hypotheses from earlier works that AGN activity quenches star formation in host galaxies by disrupting gas reservoirs.

  13. Cosmic strings and galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    The cosmogonical model proposed by Zel'dovich and Vilenkin (1981), in which superconducting cosmic strings act as seeds for the origin of structure in the universe, is discussed, summarizing the results of recent theoretical investigations. Consideration is given to the formation of cosmic strings, the microscopic structure of strings, gravitational effects, cosmic string evolution, and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Simulation results are presented in graphs, and several outstanding issues are listed and briefly characterized.

  14. Star formation in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shawfeng

    In this thesis, we examine the star formation history and stellar feedback effects of dwarf galaxies under the influence of extragalactic ultraviolet radiation, as well as the evolution of residual gas within tidally-limited dwarf galaxies and globular clusters. Previous work has indicated that the background UV flux can easily ionize the gas within typical dwarf galaxies, delaying or even preventing cooling and star formation within them. Many dwarf galaxies within the Local Group are, however, observed to contain multiple generations of stars, the oldest of which formed in the early epochs of cosmic evolution, when the background UV flux was intense. In order to address this paradox, we consider the dynamical evolution of gas in dwarf galaxies using a one-dimensional, spherically symmetric, Lagrangian numerical scheme which also computes the effects of radiative transfer and photoionization. We include in the scheme a physically-motivated star formation recipe and consider the effects of feedback. This scheme allows us to follow the history of the gas and of star formation within dwarf galaxies, as influenced by both external and internal UV radiation. Our results indicate that star formation in the severe environment of dwarf galaxies is a difficult and inefficient process. In potentials with total mass less than a few 106 M⊙ , and velocity dispersion less than a few km s-1 , residual gas is efficiently photoionized by cosmic background UV radiation. For intermediate mass systems, such as the dSphs around the Galaxy, star formation can proceed within early cosmic epochs despite the intense background UV flux. Triggering processes such as merger events, collisions, and tidal disturbance can lead to density enhancements, reducing the recombination timescale, allowing gas to cool and star formation to proceed. However, the star formation and gas retention efficiency may vary widely in galaxies with similar dark matter potentials, because they depend on many

  15. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  16. Isolated star formation: from cloud formation to core collapse.

    PubMed

    Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2002-01-01

    The formation of stars is one of the most fundamental problems in astrophysics, as it underlies many other questions, on scales from the formation of galaxies to the formation of the solar system. The physical processes involve the turbulent behavior of a partially ionized medium containing a non-uniform magnetic field. Current debate centers around the time taken for turbulence to decay and the relative importance of the roles played by magnetic fields and turbulence. Technological advances such as millimeter-wave cameras have made possible observations of the temperature and density profiles, and statistical calculations of the lifetimes, of objects collapsing under their own self-gravity and those on the verge of collapse. Increased computing power allows more complex models to be made that include magnetic and turbulent effects. No current model can reproduce all of the observations. PMID:11778038

  17. An Adaptable Seismic Data Format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krischer, Lion; Smith, James; Lei, Wenjie; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Ruan, Youyi; de Andrade, Elliott Sales; Podhorszki, Norbert; Bozdağ, Ebru; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-11-01

    We present ASDF, the Adaptable Seismic Data Format, a modern and practical data format for all branches of seismology and beyond. The growing volume of freely available data coupled with ever expanding computational power opens avenues to tackle larger and more complex problems. Current bottlenecks include inefficient resource usage and insufficient data organization. Properly scaling a problem requires the resolution of both these challenges, and existing data formats are no longer up to the task. ASDF stores any number of synthetic, processed or unaltered waveforms in a single file. A key improvement compared to existing formats is the inclusion of comprehensive meta information, such as event or station information, in the same file. Additionally, it is also usable for any non-waveform data, for example, cross-correlations, adjoint sources or receiver functions. Last but not least, full provenance information can be stored alongside each item of data, thereby enhancing reproducibility and accountability. Any data set in our proposed format is self-describing and can be readily exchanged with others, facilitating collaboration. The utilization of the HDF5 container format grants efficient and parallel I/O operations, integrated compression algorithms and check sums to guard against data corruption. To not reinvent the wheel and to build upon past developments, we use existing standards like QuakeML, StationXML, W3C PROV and HDF5 wherever feasible. Usability and tool support are crucial for any new format to gain acceptance. We developed mature C/Fortran and Python based APIs coupling ASDF to the widely used SPECFEM3D_GLOBE and ObsPy toolkits.

  18. The Dynamics of Latifundia Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia. PMID:24376597

  19. The dynamics of latifundia formation.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia. PMID:24376597

  20. The dynamics of latifundia formation.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia.

  1. Modeling of Mitochondrial Donut Formation

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qi; Zhao, Danyun; Fan, Weimin; Yang, Liang; Zhou, Yanshuang; Qi, Juntao; Wang, Xin; Liu, Xingguo

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic cell organelles. Continual cycles of fusion and fission play an important role in mitochondrial metabolism and cellular signaling. Previously, a novel mitochondrial morphology, the donut, was reported in cells after hypoxia-reoxygenation or osmotic pressure changes. However, the mechanism of donut formation remained elusive. Here, we obtained the distribution of donut diameters (D = 2R) and found that 95% are >0.8 μm. We also performed highly precise measurements of the mitochondrial tubule diameters using superresolution and electron microscopy. Then, we set up a model by calculating the mitochondrial bending energy and osmotic potential during donut formation. It shows that the bending energy is increased as the radius of curvature, R, gets smaller in the process of donut formation, especially for radii <0.4 μm, creating a barrier to donut formation. The calculations also show that osmotic potential energy release can balance the rising bending energy through volume expansion. Finally, we revealed the donut formation process in a Gibbs free-energy-dependent model combining calculations and measurements. PMID:26331247

  2. Star formation in Galactic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M < 100 M⊙), and up to sizes approaching 10 pc for higher mass regions (M > 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  3. Biofilm Formation by Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Ramage, Gordon; Vande Walle, Kacy; Wickes, Brian L.; López-Ribot, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an opportunistic yeast closely related to Candida albicans that has been recently implicated in oropharyngeal candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Most manifestations of candidiasis are associated with biofilm formation, with cells in biofilms displaying properties dramatically different from free-living cells grown under normal laboratory conditions. Here, we report on the development of in vitro models of C. dubliniensis biofilms on the surfaces of biomaterials (polystyrene and acrylic) and on the characteristics associated with biofilm formation by this newly described species. Time course analysis using a formazan salt reduction assay to monitor metabolic activities of cells within the biofilm, together with microscopy studies, revealed that biofilm formation by C. dubliniensis occurred after initial focal adherence, followed by growth, proliferation, and maturation over 24 to 48 h. Serum and saliva preconditioning films enhanced the initial attachment of C. dubliniensis and subsequent biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal scanning laser microscopy were used to further characterize C. dubliniensis biofilms. Mature C. dubliniensis biofilms consisted of a dense network of yeasts cells and hyphal elements embedded within exopolymeric material. C. dubliniensis biofilms displayed spatial heterogeneity and an architecture showing microcolonies with ramifying water channels. Antifungal susceptibility testing demonstrated the increased resistance of sessile C. dubliniensis cells, including the type strain and eight different clinical isolates, against fluconazole and amphotericin B compared to their planktonic counterparts. C. dubliniensis biofilm formation may allow this species to maintain its ecological niche as a commensal and during infection with important clinical repercussions. PMID:11526156

  4. VLBI Data Interchange Format (VDIF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan; Kettenis, Mark; Phillips, Chris; Sekido, Mamoru

    2010-01-01

    One important outcome of the 7th International e-VLBI Workshop in Shanghai in June 2008 was the creation of a task force to study and recommend a universal VLBI data format that is suitable for both on-the-wire e-VLBI data transfer, as well as direct disk storage. This task force, called the VLBI Data Interchange Format (VDIF) Task Force, is the first part of a two-part effort, the second of which will address standardization of e-VLBI data-transmission-protocols. The formation of the VDIF Task Force was prompted particularly by increased e-VLBI activity and the difficulties encountered when data arrive at a correlator in different formats from various instruments in various parts of the world. The task force created a streaming packetized data format that may be used for real-time and non-realtime e-VLBI, as well as direct disk storage. The data may contain multiple channels of time-sampled data with an arbitrary number of channels, arbitrary #bits/sample up to 32, and real or complex data; data rates in excess of 100 Gbps are supported. Each data packet is completely self-identifying via a short header, and data may be decoded without reference to any external information. The VDIF task force has completed its work, and the VDIF standard was ratified at the 2009 e-VLBI workshop in Madrid.

  5. Significant melting of ice-wedges and formation of thermocirques on hill-slopes of thermokarst lakes in Central Yakutia (Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Séjourné, Antoine; Costard, François; Gargani, Julien; Fedorov, Alexander; Skorve, Johnny

    2013-04-01

    On Earth, permafrost containing a high ice volume (referred as ice-rich) are sensible to climate change, they have been regionally degraded (thermokarst) during the early Holocene climatic optimum forming numerous thermokarst lakes in Central Yakutia (eastern Siberia). Recent temperature increases in the Arctic and Subarctic have been significantly greater than global averages. The frequency and magnitude of terrain disturbances associated with thawing permafrost are increasing in these regions and are thought to intensify in the future. Therefore, understand how is the current development of thermokarst is a critical question. Here, we describe the significant melting of ice-wedges on slopes of thermokarst lakes that leads to formation of amphitheatrical hollows referred as thermocirques. The evolution of thermocirques in Central Yakutia has been little studied and analyzing their formation could help to understand the recent thermokarst in relation to climate change in Central Yakutia. We studied the thermocirques at two scales: (i) field surveys of different thermocirques in July 2009-2010 and October 2012 to examine the processes and origin of melting of ice-wedges and; (ii) photo-interpretation of time series of satellite images (KH-9 Hexagon images of 6-9 m/pixel and GeoEye images of 50 cm/pixel) to study the temporal evolution of thermocirques. The melting of ground-ice on the scarp of thermocirque triggers falls and small mud-flows that induce the retreat of the scarp parallel to itself. Based on field studies and on GeoEye image comparison, we show that their rate of retrogressive growth is 1-2 m/year. On the hill-slopes of lakes, the thermokarst could be initiated by different processes that lead to the uncover and then melting of ice-wedges: thermal erosion by the waves of the ice-rich bluff; active-layer detachment (a form of slope failure linked to detachment of the seasonally thawed upper ground); flowing of water on the slope (precipitation) or

  6. SW New Mexico Oil Well Formation Tops

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-21

    Rock formation top picks from oil wells from southwestern New Mexico from scout cards and other sources. There are differing formation tops interpretations for some wells, so for those wells duplicate formation top data are presented in this file.

  7. Physicochemical regulation of biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Lars D.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the physical and chemical constraints of environments on biofilm formation. We provide a perspective on how materials science and engineering can address fundamental questions and unmet technological challenges in this area of microbiology, such as biofilm prevention. Specifically, we discuss three factors that impact the development and organization of bacterial communities. (1) Physical properties of surfaces regulate cell attachment and physiology and affect early stages of biofilm formation. (2) Chemical properties influence the adhesion of cells to surfaces and their development into biofilms and communities. (3) Chemical communication between cells attenuates growth and influences the organization of communities. Mechanisms of spatial and temporal confinement control the dimensions of communities and the diffusion path length for chemical communication between biofilms, which, in turn, influences biofilm phenotypes. Armed with a detailed understanding of biofilm formation, researchers are applying the tools and techniques of materials science and engineering to revolutionize the study and control of bacterial communities growing at interfaces. PMID:22125358

  8. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  9. Bundle Formation in Biomimetic Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Maarten; Pape, A C H; Voets, Ilja K; Rowan, Alan E; Portale, Giuseppe; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-08-01

    Bundling of single polymer chains is a crucial process in the formation of biopolymer network gels that make up the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. This bundled architecture leads to gels with distinctive properties, including a large-pore-size gel formation at very low concentrations and mechanical responsiveness through nonlinear mechanics, properties that are rarely observed in synthetic hydrogels. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we study the bundle formation and hydrogelation process of polyisocyanide gels, a synthetic material that uniquely mimics the structure and mechanics of biogels. We show how the structure of the material changes at the (thermally induced) gelation point and how factors such as concentration and polymer length determine the architecture, and with that, the mechanical properties. The correlation of the gel mechanics and the structural parameters obtained from SAXS experiments is essential in the design of future (synthetic) mimics of biopolymer networks.

  10. Spatial competition and price formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Kai; Shubik, Martin; Paczuski, Maya; Bak, Per

    2000-12-01

    We look at price formation in a retail setting, that is, companies set prices, and consumers either accept prices or go someplace else. In contrast to most other models in this context, we use a two-dimensional spatial structure for information transmission, that is, consumers can only learn from nearest neighbors. Many aspects of this can be understood in terms of generalized evolutionary dynamics. In consequence, we first look at spatial competition and cluster formation without price. This leads to establishement size distributions, which we compare to reality. After some theoretical considerations, which at least heuristically explain our simulation results, we finally return to price formation, where we demonstrate that our simple model with nearly no organized planning or rationality on the part of any of the agents indeed leads to an economically plausible price.

  11. Angular momentum and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strittmatter, P. A.

    The present investigation is mainly concerned with the importance of high angular resolution observations in studies of star formation and, in particular, with elucidating the role which angular momentum plays in the process. A brief report is included on recent high angular resolution observations made with the Steward Observatory speckle camera system. A consideration of the angular momentum in interstellar clouds indicates that rotation precludes quasi-spherical contraction. A number of solutions to this angular momentum problem are examined, taking into account questions concerning the help provided by high angular resolution observations for an elucidation of the various possible scenarios of star formation. Technical aspects involved in obtaining suitable data are investigated. It is concluded that high angular resolution observations hold considerable promise for solving at least some of the problems associated with the role of angular momentum in star formation.

  12. Formation dynamics in geostationary ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonova, Sofya

    2016-08-01

    A relative motion model for a satellite formation composed of two Earth-orbiting spacecraft located in the geostationary ring is developed taking into account major gravitational and non-gravitational forces. A previously existing model featuring perturbation due to J_2 is enhanced by the perturbations due to solar radiation pressure arising from unequal area-to-mass ratios, as well as the secular and long-periodic gravitational perturbations due to the Sun and the Moon. The extended relative motion model is validated using several typical formation geometries against a reference generated by numerical integration of the absolute orbits of the two spacecraft. The results of this work can find application in future on-orbit servicing and formation flying missions in near-geostationary orbit.

  13. Mathematical Models for Somite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ruth E.; Schnell, Santiago; Maini, Philip K.

    2009-01-01

    Somitogenesis is the process of division of the anterior–posterior vertebrate embryonic axis into similar morphological units known as somites. These segments generate the prepattern which guides formation of the vertebrae, ribs and other associated features of the body trunk. In this work, we review and discuss a series of mathematical models which account for different stages of somite formation. We begin by presenting current experimental information and mechanisms explaining somite formation, highlighting features which will be included in the models. For each model we outline the mathematical basis, show results of numerical simulations, discuss their successes and shortcomings and avenues for future exploration. We conclude with a brief discussion of the state of modeling in the field and current challenges which need to be overcome in order to further our understanding in this area. PMID:18023728

  14. Granuloma Formation in Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Broos, Caroline E.; van Nimwegen, Menno; Hoogsteden, Henk C.; Hendriks, Rudi W.; Kool, Mirjam; van den Blink, Bernt

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder of unknown cause, affecting multiple organs, but mainly the lungs. The exact order of immunological events remains obscure. Reviewing current literature, combined with careful clinical observations, we propose a model for granuloma formation in pulmonary sarcoidosis. A tight collaboration between macrophages, dendritic cells, and lymphocyte subsets, initiates the first steps toward granuloma formation, orchestrated by cytokines and chemokines. In a substantial part of pulmonary sarcoidosis patients, granuloma formation becomes an on-going process, leading to debilitating disease, and sometimes death. The immunological response, determining granuloma sustainment is not well understood. An impaired immunosuppressive function of regulatory T cells has been suggested to contribute to the exaggerated response. Interestingly, therapeutical agents commonly used in sarcoidosis, such as glucocorticosteroids and anti-TNF agents, interfere with granuloma integrity and restore the immune homeostasis in autoimmune disorders. Increasing insight into their mechanisms of action may contribute to the search for new therapeutical targets in pulmonary sarcoidosis. PMID:24339826

  15. An XML portable chart format.

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, H. C.; Raila, W. F.; Berkowicz, D. A.; Barnett, G. O.

    1998-01-01

    The clinical chart remains the fundamental record of outpatient clinical care. As this information migrates to electronic form, there is an opportunity to create standard formats for transmitting these charts. This paper describes work toward a Portable Chart Format (PCF) that can represent the relevant aspects of an outpatient chart. The main goal of the format is to provide a packaging medium for outpatient clinical charts in a transfer of care scenario. A secondary goal is to support the aggregation of comparable clinical data for outcomes analysis. The syntax used for PCF is Extended Markup Language (XML), a W3C standard. The structure of the PCF is based on a clinically relevant view of the data. The data definitions and nomenclature used are based primarily on existing clinical standards. PMID:9929315

  16. Pathophysiology of glioma cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Adn, Mahmoudreza; Saikali, Stephan; Guegan, Yvon; Hamlat, Abderrahmane

    2006-01-01

    Fluid filled cystic cavities are accompaniments of some cerebral gliomas. These tumoural cysts together with peritumoural vasogenic brain oedema add to the morbid effects of the gliomas in terms of mass effect and increased intracranial pressure. Although different mechanisms have been suggested as to the pathogenesis of glioma-associated cysts, it is still unclear why these cysts appear in only a limited number of cerebral gliomas while brain oedema, a probable precursor of glioma cysts, is a usual accompaniment of most gliomas. Here, the authors present a two-hit hypothesis of brain glioma cyst formation. We suggest that after the formation of vasogenic tumoural brain oedema, microvascular phenomena may lead to the formation of microcysts, which might later become confluent and grow to form macroscopic cysts. Progress in the understanding of pathogenesis of cerebral glioma cysts might set targets for treatment of brain edema and glioma cysts.

  17. Pattern formation in multiplex networks

    PubMed Central

    Kouvaris, Nikos E.; Hata, Shigefumi; Guilera, Albert Díaz-

    2015-01-01

    The advances in understanding complex networks have generated increasing interest in dynamical processes occurring on them. Pattern formation in activator-inhibitor systems has been studied in networks, revealing differences from the classical continuous media. Here we study pattern formation in a new framework, namely multiplex networks. These are systems where activator and inhibitor species occupy separate nodes in different layers. Species react across layers but diffuse only within their own layer of distinct network topology. This multiplicity generates heterogeneous patterns with significant differences from those observed in single-layer networks. Remarkably, diffusion-induced instability can occur even if the two species have the same mobility rates; condition which can never destabilize single-layer networks. The instability condition is revealed using perturbation theory and expressed by a combination of degrees in the different layers. Our theory demonstrates that the existence of such topology-driven instabilities is generic in multiplex networks, providing a new mechanism of pattern formation. PMID:26042606

  18. Physicochemical regulation of biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Renner, Lars D; Weibel, Douglas B

    2011-05-01

    This article reviews the physical and chemical constraints of environments on biofilm formation. We provide a perspective on how materials science and engineering can address fundamental questions and unmet technological challenges in this area of microbiology, such as biofilm prevention. Specifically, we discuss three factors that impact the development and organization of bacterial communities. (1) Physical properties of surfaces regulate cell attachment and physiology and affect early stages of biofilm formation. (2) Chemical properties influence the adhesion of cells to surfaces and their development into biofilms and communities. (3) Chemical communication between cells attenuates growth and influences the organization of communities. Mechanisms of spatial and temporal confinement control the dimensions of communities and the diffusion path length for chemical communication between biofilms, which, in turn, influences biofilm phenotypes. Armed with a detailed understanding of biofilm formation, researchers are applying the tools and techniques of materials science and engineering to revolutionize the study and control of bacterial communities growing at interfaces.

  19. Formation of the first stars.

    PubMed

    Bromm, Volker

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the formation of the first stars is one of the frontier topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Their emergence signalled the end of the cosmic dark ages, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, leading to a fundamental transformation of the early Universe through the production of ionizing photons and the initial enrichment with heavy chemical elements. We here review the state of our knowledge, separating the well understood elements of our emerging picture from those where more work is required. Primordial star formation is unique in that its initial conditions can be directly inferred from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model of cosmological structure formation. Combined with gas cooling that is mediated via molecular hydrogen, one can robustly identify the regions of primordial star formation, the so-called minihalos, having total masses of ~10(6) M⊙ and collapsing at redshifts z ≈ 20-30. Within this framework, a number of studies have defined a preliminary standard model, with the main result that the first stars were predominantly massive. This model has recently been modified to include a ubiquitous mode of fragmentation in the protostellar disks, such that the typical outcome of primordial star formation may be the formation of a binary or small multiple stellar system. We will also discuss extensions to this standard picture due to the presence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, of heating from self-annihalating WIMP dark matter, or cosmic rays. We conclude by discussing possible strategies to empirically test our theoretical models. Foremost among them are predictions for the upcoming James Webb space telescope (JWST), to be launched ~2018, and for 'stellar archaeology', which probes the abundance pattern in the oldest, most-metal poor stars in our cosmic neighborhood, thereby constraining the nucleosynthesis inside the first supernovae.

  20. Conductive Anodic Filament (CAF) Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Antonio

    Conductive anodic filament (CAF) is a failure mode in printed wiring boards (PWBs) which occurs under high humidity and high voltage gradient conditions. The filament, a copper salt, grows from anode to cathode along the epoxy-glass interface. Ready and Turbini (2000) identified this copper salt as the Cu 2(OH)3Cl, atacamite compound. This work has investigated the influence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylene propylene glycol (PEPG) fluxing agents on the chemical nature of CAF. For coupons processed with PEPG flux, with and without chloride, a copper-chloride containing compound was formed in the polymer matrix. This compound was characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as CuCl and an electrochemical mechanism for the formation of the chloride-containing CAF has been proposed. For PEG flux, with and without chloride, it has been shown that CAF only formed, but no copper containing compound formed in the matrix. It appears for PEG fluxed coupons, a PEG-Cu-Cl complex forms, binds the available Cu and acts as a barrier to the formation of CuCl in the polymer matrix. Meeker and Lu Valle (1995) have previously proposed that CAF failure is best represented by two competing reactions -- the formation of a copper chloride corrosion compound (now identified as Cu2(OH)3Cl) and the formation of innocuous trapped chlorine compounds. Since no evidence of any trapped chloride compounds has been found, we propose that the formation of CAF is best represented by a single non-reversible reaction. For coupons processed with a high bromide-containing flux, bromide containing CAF was created and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to be Cu2(OH)3Br. In addition, a copper-containing compound was formed in the polymer matrix and characterized using XPS as CuBr. An electrochemical mechanism for the formation of bromide-containing CAF has been proposed based on the XPS data.

  1. Formation of the first stars.

    PubMed

    Bromm, Volker

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the formation of the first stars is one of the frontier topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Their emergence signalled the end of the cosmic dark ages, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, leading to a fundamental transformation of the early Universe through the production of ionizing photons and the initial enrichment with heavy chemical elements. We here review the state of our knowledge, separating the well understood elements of our emerging picture from those where more work is required. Primordial star formation is unique in that its initial conditions can be directly inferred from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model of cosmological structure formation. Combined with gas cooling that is mediated via molecular hydrogen, one can robustly identify the regions of primordial star formation, the so-called minihalos, having total masses of ~10(6) M⊙ and collapsing at redshifts z ≈ 20-30. Within this framework, a number of studies have defined a preliminary standard model, with the main result that the first stars were predominantly massive. This model has recently been modified to include a ubiquitous mode of fragmentation in the protostellar disks, such that the typical outcome of primordial star formation may be the formation of a binary or small multiple stellar system. We will also discuss extensions to this standard picture due to the presence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, of heating from self-annihalating WIMP dark matter, or cosmic rays. We conclude by discussing possible strategies to empirically test our theoretical models. Foremost among them are predictions for the upcoming James Webb space telescope (JWST), to be launched ~2018, and for 'stellar archaeology', which probes the abundance pattern in the oldest, most-metal poor stars in our cosmic neighborhood, thereby constraining the nucleosynthesis inside the first supernovae. PMID:24168986

  2. Optimal Reconfiguration of Tetrahedral Formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, Geoffrey; Rao, Anil V.; Hughes, Steven P.

    2004-01-01

    The problem of minimum-fuel formation reconfiguration for the Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) mission is studied. This reconfiguration trajectory optimization problem can be posed as a nonlinear optimal control problem. In this research, this optimal control problem is solved using a spectral collocation method called the Gauss pseudospectral method. The objective of this research is to provide highly accurate minimum-fuel solutions to the MMS formation reconfiguration problem and to gain insight into the underlying structure of fuel-optimal trajectories.

  3. Star formation and gas supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catinella, B.

    2016-06-01

    A detailed knowledge of how gas cycles in and around galaxies, and how it depends on galaxy properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate, is crucial to understand galaxy formation and evolution. We take advantage of the most sensitive surveys of cold gas in massive galaxies, GASS and COLD GASS, as well as of the state-of-the-art HI blind survey ALFALFA to investigate how molecular and atomic hydrogen reservoirs vary along and across the main sequence of star-forming galaxies.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic mechanism for pedestal formation.

    PubMed

    Guazzotto, L; Betti, R

    2011-09-16

    Time-dependent two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are carried out for tokamak plasmas with edge poloidal flow. Differently from conventional equilibrium theory, a density pedestal all around the edge is obtained when the poloidal velocity exceeds the poloidal sound speed. The outboard pedestal is induced by the transonic discontinuity, the inboard one by mass redistribution. The density pedestal follows the formation of a highly sheared flow at the transonic surface. These results may be relevant to the L-H transition and pedestal formation in high performance tokamak plasmas.

  5. Star formation and extinct radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the evidence for the existence of now-extinct radioactivities in primitive solar system material, giving attention to implications for the early stages of sun and solar system formation. The characteristics of possible disturbances in dense molecular clouds which can initiate the formation of cloud cores is discussed, with emphasis on these disturbances able to generate fresh radioactivities. A one-solar mass red giant star on the asymptotic giant branch appears to have been the best candidate to account for the short-lived extinct radioactivities in the early solar system.

  6. Pattern formation in the geosciences

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation is a natural property of nonlinear and non-equilibrium dynamical systems. Geophysical examples of such systems span practically all observable length scales, from rhythmic banding of chemical species within a single mineral crystal, to the morphology of cusps and spits along hundreds of kilometres of coastlines. This article briefly introduces the general principles of pattern formation and argues how they can be applied to open problems in the Earth sciences. Particular examples are then discussed, which summarize the contents of the rest of this Theme Issue. PMID:24191107

  7. Star formation and its triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, F.

    2016-06-01

    The relation between star formation and gas density appears linear for galaxies on the main sequence, and when the molecular gas is considered. However, the star formation efficiency (SFE) defined as the ratio of SFR to gas surface densities, can be much higher when SF is triggered by a dynamical process such as galaxy interaction or mergers, or even secular evolution and cold gas accretion. I review recent work showing how the SFE can vary as a function of morphological type, environment, or redshift. Physical processes able to explain positive and negative feedback from supernovae or AGN are discussed.

  8. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in typical and extreme galaxies. The typical galaxies are selected to be free of active galactic nuclei (AGN), while the extreme galaxies host quasars (the most luminous class of AGN). These two environments are each insightful in their own way; quasars are among the most violent objects in the universe, literally reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to small galaxies which are forming stars at unsustainably high rates. The current paradigm of galaxy formation and evolution suggests that extreme circumstances are key stepping stones in the assembly of galaxies like our Milky Way. To test this paradigm and fully explore its ramifications, this dual approach is needed. My sample of AGN-free galaxies is drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. This Halpha-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to detect star-forming galaxies without a bias toward continuum luminosity. This type of selection ensures that this sample is not biased toward galaxies that are large or nearby. My work studies the KISS galaxies in the mid- and far-infrared using photometry from the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. These infrared bands are particularly interesting for star formation studies because the ultraviolet light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-infrared (24mum MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transitions features in the mid-infrared (8.0mum IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The work I present here examines the efficiencies of PAH and thermal dust emission as tracers of star-formation rates over a wide range of galactic stellar masses. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has a highly variable efficiency that does not systematically depend on galactic stellar mass

  9. Paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic significance of freshwater bivalves in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Western Interior, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Steven C.

    2004-05-01

    Freshwater unionid bivalves are spatially and temporally distributed throughout the Morrison depositional basin, and locally dominate the biomass of many aquatic depositional environments. Two bivalve assemblages are identified. Within-channel assemblages are death assemblages that have been transported and may represent mixed assemblages from multiple communities. These assemblages are predominately disarticulated, in current stable orientations, and composed of higher stream velocity ecophenotypes (medium size, lanceolate form, and very thick shells). The floodplain-pond assemblages are disturbed neighborhood assemblages in the mudstones inhabited during life. The bivalves are predominately articulated, variable in size, and composed of low stream velocity ecophenotypes (large maximum sizes, ovate shell shapes, and thinner shells). The glochidial parasitic larval stage of unionid bivalves provides an effective means of dispersing species throughout drainage basins. These larvae attach to fish and are carried through the fluvial drainage where the larvae detach and establish new bivalve communities. Preliminary paleobiogeographic analyses are drawn at the genus level because of the need to reevaluate bivalve species of the Morrison. Unio spp. and Vetulonaia spp. are widespread throughout the Morrison depositional basin, but Hadrodon spp. are restricted to the eastern portion of the Colorado Plateau during Salt Wash Member deposition, suggesting that Salt Wash drainage was isolated from other contemporaneous regions of the basin. Bivalves from five localities in the Morrison Formation were thin-sectioned for growth band analysis. Growth bands of modern unionid bivalves are produced when the valves are forced to close. Closure can produce annual growth bands in response to seasonal variation, such as temperature-induced hibernation, or precipitation-induced aestivation or turbidity. Pseudoannual growth bands form from non-cyclical events such as predation attacks or

  10. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying the data. They can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). ...

  11. Facial Prototype Formation in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inn, Donald; And Others

    This study examined memory representation as it is exhibited in young children's formation of facial prototypes. In the first part of the study, researchers constructed images of faces using an Identikit that provided the features of hair, eyes, mouth, nose, and chin. Images were varied systematically. A series of these images, called exemplar…

  12. Chevrons formation in laminar erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devauchelle, Olivier; Josserand, Christophe; Lagree, Pierre-Yves; Zaleski, Stephane; Nguyen, Khanh-Dang; Malverti, Luce; Lajeunesse, Eric

    2007-11-01

    When eroded by laminar free-surface flows, granular substrates may generate a rich variety of natural patterns. Among them are dunes, similar to the ones observed by Charru and Hinch in a Couette cell (Charru F, Hinch EJ ; Ripple formation on a particle bed sheared by a viscous liquid. Part 1. Steady flow ; JOURNAL OF FLUID MECHANICS 550: 111-121 MAR 10 2006). Chevron-shaped instabilities as those found on the sea-shore, can also be observed, sometimes in competition against dunes formation. These were first pointed out by Daerr et al. when pulling a plate covered with granular material out of a bath of water (Daerr A, Lee P, Lanuza J, et al. ; Erosion patterns in a sediment layer ; PHYSICAL REVIEW E 67 (6): Art. No. 065201 Part 2 JUN 2003). Both instabilities can grow in laminar open-channel flows, an experimental set-up which is more easily controlled. The mechanisms leading to the formation of these patterns are investigated and compared. Whereas dunes formation requires vertical inertia effects, we show that chevrons may result from the non-linear evolution of bars instability, which may grow even in purely viscous flows.

  13. Junction formation during desiccation cracking.

    PubMed

    Toga, K B; Alaca, B Erdem

    2006-08-01

    In order to provide a sound physical basis for the understanding of the formation of desiccation crack networks, an experimental study is presented addressing junction formation. Focusing on junctions, basic features of the network determining the final pattern, provides an elemental approach and imparts conceptual clarity to the rather complicated problem of the evolution of crack patterns. Using coffee-water mixtures a clear distinction between junction formation during nucleation and propagation is achieved. It is shown that for the same drying suspension, one can switch from the well-known symmetric triple junctions that are unique to the nucleation phase to propagation junctions that are purely dictated by the variations of the stress state. In the latter case, one can even manipulate the path of a propagating crack in a deterministic fashion by changing the stress state within the suspension. Clear microscopic evidence is provided for the formation of propagation junctions, and material inhomogeneity is observed to be reflected by a broad distribution of angles, in stark contrast to shrinkage cracks in homogeneous solid films.

  14. Formative Assessment in Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughland, Tony; Kilpatrick, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    This action learning study in a year three classroom explored the implementation of five formative assessment principles to assist students' understandings of the scientific topic of liquids and solids. These principles were employed to give students a greater opportunity to express their understanding of the concepts. The study found that…

  15. Laser-assisted antihydrogen formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, A.; Sinha, C.

    2006-08-15

    Laser-assisted antihydrogen (H) formation cross sections (differential and total) for collisions of antiprotons with positronium (Ps) are studied in the framework of the eikonal approximation for two geometries, when the field polarization is parallel (parallel{sup L}) or perpendicular (perpendicular{sup r}) to the incident Ps momentum. The variations of the H formation cross sections with respect to the field strength and the laser photon energy are studied for the multiphoton (absorption and emission) processes. The contribution of the atomic (both Ps and H) dressing terms to the enhancement of the H formation cross section is studied for both the geometries (parallel{sup L} and (perpendicular{sup r}). The most important prediction from the present work is the enhancement of the field-free (FF) H formation cross sections particularly at lower incident energies when the system (Ps+p) is irradiated by a single mode, linearly polarized laser, the enhancement being more pronounced for a wider range of incident energy in the perpendicular{sup r} geometry than in the parallel{sup L} one.

  16. Pattern Formation in Convective Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    The present article reviews recent progress in the study of pattern formation in convective instabilities. After a brief discussion of the relevant basic hydrodynamic equations as well as a short outline of the mathematical treatment of pattern formation in complex systems the self-organization of spatial and spatio-temporal structures due to convective instabilities is considered. The formation of various forms of convective patterns arising in the Bénard experiment, i.e. in a horizontal fluid layer heated from below, is discussed. Then the review considers pattern formation in the Bénard instability in spherical geometries. In that case it can be demonstrated how the interaction among several convective cells may lead to time dependent as well as chaotic evolution of the spatial structures. Finally, the convective instability in a binary fluid mixture is discussed. In contrast to the instability in a single component fluid the instability may be oscillatory. In that case convection sets in in the form of travelling wave patterns which in addition to a complicated and chaotic temporal behaviour exhibit more or less spatial irregularity already close to threshold.

  17. Formative Assessment in Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Heidi; Lui, Angela; Palma, Maria; Hefferen, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is crucial to students' growth as dancers. When used within the framework of formative assessment, or assessment for learning, feedback results in actionable next steps that dancers can use to improve their performances. This article showcases the work of two dance specialists, one elementary and one middle school teacher, who have…

  18. A standard audit trail format

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, M.

    1995-02-01

    The central role of audit trails, or (more properly) logs, in security monitoring needs little description, for it is too well known for any to doubt it. Auditing, or the analysis of logs, is a central part of security not only in computer system security but also in analyzing financial and other non-technical systems. As part of this process, it is often necessary to reconcile logs from different sources. This speaks of a need for a standard logging format. A standard log format robust enough to meet the needs of heterogeneity, transportability across various network protocols, and flexibility sufficient to meet a variety of needs in very different environments must satisfy two basic properties: extensibility and portability. This report presents the author`s proposed format for a standard log record. In section 3, he shows how and where the translation should be done, and in section 4 he demonstrates how log records from several disparate systems would be put into this format. Section 5 concludes with some observations and suggestions for future work.

  19. Stereotype Formation: Biased by Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Pelley, Mike E.; Reimers, Stian J.; Calvini, Guglielmo; Spears, Russell; Beesley, Tom; Murphy, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that biases in attitude and stereotype formation might arise as a result of learned differences in the extent to which social groups have previously been predictive of behavioral or physical properties. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that differences in the experienced predictiveness of groups with respect to evaluatively neutral…

  20. The EPRDATA Format: A Dialogue

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, III, Henry Grady

    2015-08-18

    Recently the Los Alamos Nuclear Data Team has communicated certain issues of concern in relation to the new electron/photon/relaxation ACE data format as released in the eprdata12 library. In this document those issues are parsed, analyzed, and answered.

  1. Formative Assessment: A Cybernetic Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roos, Bertil; Hamilton, David

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers alternative assessment, feedback and cybernetics. For more than 30 years, debates about the bi-polarity of formative and summative assessment have served as surrogates for discussions about the workings of the mind, the social implications of assessment and, as important, the role of instruction in the advancement of learning.…

  2. Technology Enhanced Distributive Formative Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, David Richard

    2008-01-01

    Quality assurance in instructional development demands an exhaustive formative evaluation effort and applied testing. Unfortunately, this process is expensive and requires large numbers of user testers with characteristics similar to the intended audience. This article presents a procedure for increasing the efficiency of quality assurance efforts…

  3. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  4. Formative Considerations Using Integrative CALL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Philip; Shaver, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Addresses technical and learning issues relating to a formative implementation of a computer assisted language learning (CALL) browser-based intermediate Russian program. Instruction took place through a distance education implementation and in a grouped classroom using a local-area network. Learners indicated the software was clear, motivating,…

  5. Audiences for Contemporary Radio Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lull, James T.; And Others

    A radio audience survey of 110 sample geographic clusters in the Santa Barbara, California, area served a twofold purpose: the construction of a demographic profile of audience types according to radio format choices, and the identification and analysis of various audience subgroups. A skip interval technique of these geographic clusters resulted…

  6. Constraints on galaxy formation theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalay, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    The present theories of galaxy formation are reviewed. The relation between peculiar velocities, temperature fluctuations of the microwave background and the correlation function of galaxies point to the possibility that galaxies do not form uniformly everywhere. The velocity data provide strong constraints on the theories even in the case when light does not follow mass of the universe.

  7. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  8. Mantle dynamics following supercontinent formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip J.

    This thesis presents mantle convection numerical simulations of supercontinent formation. Approximately 300 million years ago, through the large-scale subduction of oceanic sea floor, continental material amalgamated to form the supercontinent Pangea. For 100 million years after its formation, Pangea remained relatively stationary, and subduction of oceanic material featured on its margins. The present-day location of the continents is due to the rifting apart of Pangea, with supercontinent dispersal being characterized by increased volcanic activity linked to the generation of deep mantle plumes. The work presented here investigates the thermal evolution of mantle dynamics (e.g., mantle temperatures and sub-continental plumes) following the formation of a supercontinent. Specifically, continental insulation and continental margin subduction are analyzed. Continental material, as compared to oceanic material, inhibits heat flow from the mantle. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the formation of a stationary supercontinent would elevate sub-continental mantle temperatures due to the effect of continental insulation, leading to the break-up of the continent. By modelling a vigorously convecting mantle that features thermally and mechanically distinct continental and oceanic plates, this study shows the effect of continental insulation on the mantle to be minimal. However, the formation of a supercontinent results in sub-continental plume formation due to the re-positioning of subduction zones to the margins of the continent. Accordingly, it is demonstrated that continental insulation is not a significant factor in producing sub-supercontinent plumes but that subduction patterns control the location and timing of upwelling formation. A theme throughout the thesis is an inquiry into why geodynamic studies would produce different results. Mantle viscosity, Rayleigh number, continental size, continental insulation, and oceanic plate boundary evolution are

  9. Sedimentary pyrite formation: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, Robert A.

    1984-04-01

    Sedimentary pyrite formation during early diagenesis is a major process for controlling the oxygen level of the atmosphere and the sulfate concentration in seawater over geologic time. The amount of pyrite that may form in a sediment is limited by the rates of supply of decomposable organic matter, dissolved sulfate, and reactive detrital iron minerals. Organic matter appears to be the major control on pyrite formation in normal (non-euxinic) terrigenous marine sediments where dissolved sulfate and iron minerals are abundant. By contrast, pyrite formation in non-marine, freshwater sediments is severely limited by low concentrations of sulfate and this characteristic can be used to distinguish ancient organic-rich fresh water shales from marine shales. Under marine euxinic conditions sufficient H 2S is produced that the dominant control on pyrite formation is the availability of reactive iron minerals. Calculations, based on a sulfur isotope model, indicate that over Phanerozoic time the worldwide average organic carbon-to-pyrite sulfur ratio of sedimentary rocks has varied considerably. High C/S ratios during Permo-Carboniferous time can be explained by a shift of major organic deposition from the oceans to the land which resulted in the formation of vast coal swamps at that time. Low C/S ratios, compared to today, during the early Paleozoic can be explained in terms of a greater abundance of euxinic basins combined with deposition of a more reactive type of organic matter in the remaining oxygenated portions of the ocean. The latter could have been due to lower oceanic oxygen levels and/or a lack of transportation of refractory terrestrial organic matter to the marine environment due to the absence of vascular land plants at that time.

  10. The Black Hole Formation Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Drew R.; Piro, Anthony; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. Using the observed BH mass distribution from Galactic X-ray binaries, we investigate the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass. Although the shape of the black hole formation probability function is poorly constrained by current measurements, we believe that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. We also consider some of the implications of this probability distribution, from its impact on the chemical enrichment from massive stars, to its connection with the structure of the core at the time of collapse, to the birth kicks that black holes receive. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be a useful input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment.

  11. Inside-Out Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Chatterjee, Sourav

    2013-07-01

    The compact multi-transiting planet systems discovered by Kepler challenge planet formation theory. Formation in situ from disks with radial mass surface density profiles similar to the minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) but boosted in normalization by factors >10 has been suggested. We propose that a more natural way to create these planets in the inner disk is formation sequentially from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a continuous stream of small (~cm-m size) "pebbles", drifting inwards via gas drag. Pebbles collect at the pressure maximum associated with the transition from a magneto-rotational instability (MRI)-inactive ("dead zone") region to an inner MRI-active zone. A pebble ring builds up until it either becomes gravitationally unstable to form an ~1-10M_Earth planet directly or induces gradual planet formation via core accretion. The planet may undergo Type I migration into the active region, allowing a new pebble ring and planet to form behind it. Alternatively if migration is inefficient, the planet may continue to accrete from the disk until it becomes massive enough to isolate itself from the accretion flow. A variety of densities may result depending on the relative importance of residual gas accretion as the planet approaches its isolation mass. The process can repeat with a new pebble ring gathering at the new pressure maximum associated with the retreating dead zone boundary. Our simple theoretical model for this scenario of inside-out planet formation yields planetary masses, relative mass scalings with orbital radius, and minimum orbital separations consistent with those seen by Kepler. It provides an explanation of how massive planets can form with tightly-packed system architectures, starting from typical protoplanetary disk properties.

  12. Inside-out Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    The compact multi-transiting planet systems discovered by Kepler challenge planet formation theories. Formation in situ from disks with radial mass surface density, Σ, profiles similar to the minimum mass solar nebula but boosted in normalization by factors >~ 10 has been suggested. We propose that a more natural way to create these planets in the inner disk is formation sequentially from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a continuous stream of small (~cm-m size) "pebbles," drifting inward via gas drag. Pebbles collect at the pressure maximum associated with the transition from a magnetorotational instability (MRI)-inactive ("dead zone") region to an inner MRI-active zone. A pebble ring builds up until it either becomes gravitationally unstable to form an ~1 M ⊕ planet directly or induces gradual planet formation via core accretion. The planet may undergo Type I migration into the active region, allowing a new pebble ring and planet to form behind it. Alternatively, if migration is inefficient, the planet may continue to accrete from the disk until it becomes massive enough to isolate itself from the accretion flow. A variety of densities may result depending on the relative importance of residual gas accretion as the planet approaches its isolation mass. The process can repeat with a new pebble ring gathering at the new pressure maximum associated with the retreating dead-zone boundary. Our simple analytical model for this scenario of inside-out planet formation yields planetary masses, relative mass scalings with orbital radius, and minimum orbital separations consistent with those seen by Kepler. It provides an explanation of how massive planets can form with tightly packed and well-aligned system architectures, starting from typical protoplanetary disk properties.

  13. Inside-out planet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2014-01-01

    The compact multi-transiting planet systems discovered by Kepler challenge planet formation theories. Formation in situ from disks with radial mass surface density, Σ, profiles similar to the minimum mass solar nebula but boosted in normalization by factors ≳ 10 has been suggested. We propose that a more natural way to create these planets in the inner disk is formation sequentially from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a continuous stream of small (∼cm-m size) 'pebbles', drifting inward via gas drag. Pebbles collect at the pressure maximum associated with the transition from a magnetorotational instability (MRI)-inactive ('dead zone') region to an inner MRI-active zone. A pebble ring builds up until it either becomes gravitationally unstable to form an ∼1 M {sub ⊕} planet directly or induces gradual planet formation via core accretion. The planet may undergo Type I migration into the active region, allowing a new pebble ring and planet to form behind it. Alternatively, if migration is inefficient, the planet may continue to accrete from the disk until it becomes massive enough to isolate itself from the accretion flow. A variety of densities may result depending on the relative importance of residual gas accretion as the planet approaches its isolation mass. The process can repeat with a new pebble ring gathering at the new pressure maximum associated with the retreating dead-zone boundary. Our simple analytical model for this scenario of inside-out planet formation yields planetary masses, relative mass scalings with orbital radius, and minimum orbital separations consistent with those seen by Kepler. It provides an explanation of how massive planets can form with tightly packed and well-aligned system architectures, starting from typical protoplanetary disk properties.

  14. Wintertime Haze Formation in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy Zamora, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent severe haze events in China have attracted significant public attention due to the severely reduced visibility and unprecedentedly high pollutant concentrations. Particular attention has been given to the high concentrations of particulate matter with a diameter less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5), which can exceed several hundred micrograms per cubic meter over several days. During January and February of 2015, a suite of aerosol instruments was deployed in Beijing to directly measure a comprehensive set of aerosol properties, including the particle size distribution, effective density, and chemical composition. In this presentation, we will discuss the particulate matter formation mechanisms, the evolution of aerosol properties throughout the event, and how the winter formation mechanisms compare with the warmer seasons. We show that the periodic cycles of severe haze episodes in Beijing are largely driven by meteorological conditions. During haze events, stagnation typically develops as a result of a low planetary boundary layer and weak southerly wind from polluted industrial source regions. Stronger northerly winds were frequently observed during the clean period, which carry unpolluted air masses from the less populated northern mountainous areas. Nucleation consistently occurs on clean days, producing a high number concentration of nano particles. The particle mass concentration exceeding several hundred micrograms per cubic meter is attributed to the continuous size growth from the nucleation-mode particles (diameter less than 10 nm) over multiple days to produce a high concentration of larger particles (diameter greater than 100 nm). The particle chemical composition in Beijing is similar to those commonly measured in other urban centers, which is indicative of chemical constituents dominated by secondary aerosol formation. Our results reveal that the severe haze formation in Beijing during the wintertime is similar to the mechanism of haze formation

  15. Inside-Out Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan Charles; Chatterjee, Sourav; Hu, Xiao; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2015-08-01

    The Kepler-discovered systems with tightly-packed inner planets (STIPs), typically with several planets of Earth to super-Earth masses on well-aligned, sub-AU orbits may host the most common type of planets in the Galaxy. They pose a great challenge for planet formation theories, which fall into two broad classes: (1) formation further out followed by migration; (2) formation in situ from a disk of gas and planetesimals. I review the pros and cons of these classes, before focusing on a new theory of sequential in situ formation from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a continuous stream of small (~cm-m size) "pebbles," drifting inward via gas drag. Pebbles first collect at the pressure trap associated with the transition from a magnetorotational instability (MRI)-inactive ("dead zone") region to an inner MRI-active zone. A pebble ring builds up until it either becomes gravitationally unstable to form an Earth to super-Earth-mass planet directly or induces gradual planet formation via core accretion. The planet continues to accrete until it becomes massive enough to isolate itself from the accretion flow via gap opening. The process repeats with a new pebble ring gathering at the new pressure maximum associated with the retreating dead-zone boundary. I discuss the theory’s predictions for planetary masses, relative mass scalings with orbital radius, and minimum orbital separations, and their comparison with observed systems. Finally I speculate about potential causes of diversity of planetary system architectures, i.e., STIPs versus Solar System analogs.

  16. 76 FR 29279 - Calvert Cliffs 3 Nuclear Project, LLC and Unistar Nuclear Operating Services, LLC; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... west shore of the Chesapeake Bay. A notice of availability of the draft EIS was published by the NRC in the Federal Register on April 21, 2010 (76 FR 20867), and by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on April 26, 2010 and April 30, 2010 (76 FR 21625 and 76 FR 22778). The purpose of this notice is...

  17. What Is Formation? A Conceptual Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutphen, Molly; de Lange, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the principles and connotations of the term "formation." In our discussion of formation, we draw on different disciplines in order to widen and deepen our understanding of the concept of formation. We also mirror the formation concept against comparable terms and draw on studies in which it has been applied in…

  18. 40 CFR 1502.10 - Recommended format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recommended format. 1502.10 Section... § 1502.10 Recommended format. Agencies shall use a format for environmental impact statements which will... following standard format for environmental impact statements should be followed unless the...

  19. Standard Formats for Atomic Data: the APED

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R K; Brickhouse, N S; Liedahl, D A; Raymond, J C

    2001-06-05

    Standardized formats for atomic data used in calculating emission from a collisionally-ionized plasma are described. The formats use the astronomical-standard FITS format, and are extendible to other purposes, such as photoionization data. The formats emphasize storing references to the original data source and keeping the data in as-received form, to aid in checking against the original literature.

  20. 40 CFR 1502.10 - Recommended format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recommended format. 1502.10 Section... § 1502.10 Recommended format. Agencies shall use a format for environmental impact statements which will... following standard format for environmental impact statements should be followed unless the...

  1. 40 CFR 1502.10 - Recommended format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recommended format. 1502.10 Section... § 1502.10 Recommended format. Agencies shall use a format for environmental impact statements which will... following standard format for environmental impact statements should be followed unless the...

  2. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  3. ASDF: A new data format for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, P.; Droettboom, M.; Bray, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present the case for developing a successor format for the immensely successful FITS format. We first review existing alternative formats and discuss why we do not believe they provide an adequate solution. The proposed format is called the Advanced Scientific Data Format (ASDF) and is based on an existing text format, YAML, that we believe removes most of the current problems with the FITS format. An overview of the capabilities of the new format is given along with specific examples. This format has the advantage that it does not limit the size of attribute names (akin to FITS keyword names) nor place restrictions on the size or type of values attributes have. Hierarchical relationships are explicit in the syntax and require no special conventions. Finally, it is capable of storing binary data within the file in its binary form. At its basic level, the format proposed has much greater applicability than for just astronomical data.

  4. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  5. Engineering biofilm formation and dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Thomas K.; Hong, Seok Hoon; Ma, Qun

    2011-01-01

    Anywhere water is in the liquid state, bacteria will exist as biofilms, which are complex communities of cells cemented together. Although frequently associated with disease and biofouling, biofilms are also important for engineering applications, such as bioremediation, biocatalysis and microbial fuel cells. Here we review approaches to alter genetic circuits and cell signaling toward controlling biofilm formation, and emphasize utilizing these tools for engineering applications. Based on a better understanding of the genetic basis of biofilm formation, we find that biofilms may be controlled by manipulating extracellular signals and that they may be dispersed using conserved intracellular signals and regulators. Biofilms could also be formed at specific locations where they might be engineered to make chemicals or treat human disease. PMID:21131080

  6. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  7. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  8. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Ralph W.; Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  9. Formation of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Juarros, E.; Côté, R.; Kirby, K.

    2002-05-01

    A variety of experimental techniques have been employed to create a number of ultracold molecules, including CaH, Na_2, K_2, Cs_2, Rb2 and CO. Novel effects are predicted to occur in samples of ultracold polar molecules.(L. Santos et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1791 (2000). We present calculations of the formation rate of ultracold hydrides (LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH), using the most accurate molecular potentials and dipole moments available. We show that these polar molecules can be produced in selected vibrational and rotational states by stimulated radiative association in a mixture of ultracold hydrogen and alkali metal atoms. We study the properties of these atomic mixtures as well as those of the hydrides, and explore the effect of shape resonances on the formation rates. [2ex] *Supported by NSF

  10. Formation of quasiparallel Alfven solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, R. L.; Kennel, C. F.; Mjolhus, E.

    1992-01-01

    The formation of quasi-parallel Alfven solitons is investigated through the inverse scattering transformation (IST) for the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equation. The DNLS has a rich complement of soliton solutions consisting of a two-parameter soliton family and a one-parameter bright/dark soliton family. In this paper, the physical roles and origins of these soliton families are inferred through an analytic study of the scattering data generated by the IST for a set of initial profiles. The DNLS equation has as limiting forms the nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS), Korteweg-de-Vries (KdV) and modified Korteweg-de-Vries (MKdV) equations. Each of these limits is briefly reviewed in the physical context of quasi-parallel Alfven waves. The existence of these limiting forms serves as a natural framework for discussing the formation of Alfven solitons.

  11. The dynamics of city formation*

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J. Vernon; Venables, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines city formation in a country whose urban population is growing steadily over time, with new cities required to accommodate this growth. In contrast to most of the literature there is immobility of housing and urban infrastructure, and investment in these assets is taken on the basis of forward-looking behavior. In the presence of these fixed assets cities form sequentially, without the population swings in existing cities that arise in current models, but with swings in house rents. Equilibrium city size, absent government, may be larger or smaller than is efficient, depending on how urban externalities vary with population. Efficient formation of cities with internalization of externalities involves local government intervention and borrowing to finance development. The paper explores the institutions required for successful local government intervention. PMID:25089087

  12. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  13. THE BLACK HOLE FORMATION PROBABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Drew; Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-02-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment.

  14. The Black Hole Formation Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Drew; Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-02-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P BH(M ZAMS). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P BH(M ZAMS) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P BH(M ZAMS) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P BH(M ZAMS) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment.

  15. Method for fracturing subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, S. W.; Conway, M. W.

    1985-11-19

    The present invention relates to a thermally stable crosslinked gel fracturing fluid for use in the treatment of subterranean formations penetrated by a well bore. The fracturing fluid comprises an aqueous liquid, a gelling agent comprising a selected modified cellulose ether, a crosslinking agent and any additional additives that may be present. The fracturing fluid is thermally stable under shear at temperatures in excess of about 200/sup 0/ F.

  16. Memory Formation Shaped by Astroglia

    PubMed Central

    Zorec, Robert; Horvat, Anemari; Vardjan, Nina; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, the most heterogeneous glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS), execute a multitude of homeostatic functions and contribute to memory formation. Consolidation of synaptic and systemic memory is a prolonged process and hours are required to form long-term memory. In the past, neurons or their parts have been considered to be the exclusive cellular sites of these processes, however, it has now become evident that astrocytes provide an important and essential contribution to memory formation. Astrocytes participate in the morphological remodeling associated with synaptic plasticity, an energy-demanding process that requires mobilization of glycogen, which, in the CNS, is almost exclusively stored in astrocytes. Synaptic remodeling also involves bidirectional astroglial-neuronal communication supported by astroglial receptors and release of gliosignaling molecules. Astroglia exhibit cytoplasmic excitability that engages second messengers, such as Ca2+, for phasic, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), for tonic signal coordination with neuronal processes. The detection of signals by astrocytes and the release of gliosignaling molecules, in particular by vesicle-based mechanisms, occurs with a significant delay after stimulation, orders of magnitude longer than that present in stimulus–secretion coupling in neurons. These particular arrangements position astrocytes as integrators ideally tuned to support time-dependent memory formation. PMID:26635551

  17. NSDF: Neuroscience Simulation Data Format.

    PubMed

    Ray, Subhasis; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Bhalla, Upinder S; Wójcik, Daniel K

    2016-04-01

    Data interchange is emerging as an essential aspect of modern neuroscience. In the areas of computational neuroscience and systems biology there are multiple model definition formats, which have contributed strongly to the development of an ecosystem of simulation and analysis tools. Here we report the development of the Neuroscience Simulation Data Format (NSDF) which extends this ecosystem to the data generated in simulations. NSDF is designed to store simulator output across scales: from multiscale chemical and electrical signaling models, to detailed single-neuron and network models, to abstract neural nets. It is self-documenting, efficient, modular, and scalable, both in terms of novel data types and in terms of data volume. NSDF is simulator-independent, and can be used by a range of standalone analysis and visualization tools. It may also be used to store variety of experimental data. NSDF is based on the widely used HDF5 (Hierarchical Data Format 5) specification and is open, platform-independent, and portable.

  18. Theory of Planetary System Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Observations and theoretical considerations support the idea that the Solar System formed by the collapse of tenuous interstellar matter to a disk of gas and dust (the primitive solar nebula), from which the Sun and other components separated under the action of dissipative forces and by the coagulation of solid material. Thus, planets are understood to be contemporaneous byproducts of star formation. Because the circumstellar disks of new stars are easier to observe than mature planetary systems, the possibility arises that the nature and variety of planets might be studied from observations of the conditions of their birth. A useful theory of planetary system formation would therefore relate the properties of circumstellar disks both to the initial conditions of star formation and to the consequent properties of planets to those of the disk. Although the broad outlines of such a theory are in place, many aspects are either untested, controversial, or otherwise unresolved; even the degree to which such a comprehensive theory is possible remains unknown.

  19. The formation of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.

    The ability of HST to resolve objects ten times smaller than possible from the ground has re-juvenated the study of young star clusters. A recurrent morphological theme found in nearby resolved systems is the observation of young (typically 1-10 Myr), massive (103 - 104 Msolar), compact (ρ≍105 Msolar pc-3) clusters which have evacuated the gas and dust from a spherical region around themselves. New stars are being triggered into formation along the edges of the envelopes, with pillars (similar to the Eagle Nebula) of molecular gas streaming away from the regions of star formation. The prototype for these objects is 30 Doradus. Another major theme has been the discovery of large numbers of young (typically 1-500 Myr), massive (103 - 108 Msolar), compact star clusters in merging, starbursting, and even some barred and spiral galaxies. The brightest of these clusters have all the attributes expected of protoglobular clusters, hence allowing us to study the formation of globular clusters in the local universe rather than trying to ascertain how they formed ≍14 Gyr ago. The prototype is the Antennae Galaxy.

  20. SCALE FORMATION IN CHRYSOPHYCEAN ALGAE

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R. Malcolm; Franke, Werner W.; Kleinig, Hans; Falk, Heinz; Sitte, Peter

    1970-01-01

    The cell wall of the marine chrysophycean alga Pleurochrysis scherfellii is composed of distinct wall fragments embedded in a gelatinous mass. The latter is a polysaccharide of pectic character which is rich in galactose and ribose. These wall fragments are identified as scales. They have been isolated and purified from the vegetative mother cell walls after zoospore formation. Their ultrastructure is described in an electron microscope study combining sectioning, freeze-etch, and negative staining techniques. The scales consist of a layer of concentrically arranged microfibrils (ribbons with cross-sections of 12 to 25 x 25 to 40 A) and underlying radial fibrils of similar dimensions. Such a network-plate is densely coated with particles which are assumed to be identical to the pectic component. The microfibrils are resistant to strong alkaline treatment and have been identified as cellulose by different methods, including sugar analysis after total hydrolysis, proton resonance spectroscopical examination (NMR spectroscopy) of the benzoylated product, and diverse histochemical tests. The formation and secretion of the scales can be followed along the maturing Golgi cisternae starting from a pronounced dilated "polymerization center" as a completely intracisternal process which ends in the exocytotic extrusion of the scales. The scales reveal the very same ultrastructure within the Golgi cisternae as they do in the cell wall. The present finding represents the first evidence on cellulose formation by the Golgi apparatus and is discussed in relation to a basic scheme for cellulose synthesis in plant cells in general. PMID:5513606

  1. Modeling of Dynamic FRC Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Yung; Barnes, Dan; Dettrick, Sean

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a 2-D resistive MHD code, Lamy Ridge, to simulate the entire FRC formation process in Tri Alpha's C2 device, including initial formation, translation, merging and settling into equilibrium. Two FRC's can be created simultaneously, and then translated toward each other so that they merge into a single FRC. The code couples the external circuits around the formation tubes to the partially ionized plasma inside. Plasma and neutral gas are treated as two fluids. Dynamic and energetic equations, which take into account ionization and charge exchange, are solved in a time advance manner. The geometric shape of the vessel is specified by a set of inputs that defines the boundaries, which are handled by a cut-cell algorithm in the code. Multiple external circuits and field coils can be easily added, removed or relocated through individual inputs. The design of the code is modular and flexible so that it can be applied to future devices. The results of the code are in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements on the C2 device.

  2. Supernova Feedback in Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Y.; Teyssier, R.

    2008-06-01

    The hierarchical model of galaxy formation is known to suffer from the ``over-cooling'' problem: the high efficiency of radiative cooling results in too much baryonic matter in a condensed phase (namely, cold gas or stars) when compared to observations. A solution proposed by many authors (see Springel & Hernquist 2003; Fujita et al. 2004; Rasera & Teyssier 2005) is feedback due to supernova (SN) driven winds or active galactic nuclei. Modeling SN feedback by direct injection of thermal energy usually turns out to be inefficient in galaxy-scale simulations, due to the quasi-instantaneous radiation of the SN energy. To avoid this effect, we have developed a new method to incorporate SN feedback in cosmological simulations: using temporary test particles, we reproduce explicitly a local Sedov blast wave solution in the gas distribution. We have performed several self-consistent runs of isolated Navarro, Frenk, & White (1996, hereafter NFW) halos with radiative cooling, star formation, SN feedback and metal enrichment using the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES (Teyssier 2002). We have explored the influence of SN feedback on the formation and the evolution of galaxies with different masses. We have studied the efficiency of the resulting galactic winds, as a function of the mass of the parent halo.

  3. Illusory contour formation survives crowding.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jonathan Siu Fung; Cheung, Sing-Hang

    2012-06-12

    Flanked objects are difficult to identify using peripheral vision due to visual crowding, which limits conscious access to target identity. Nonetheless, certain types of visual information have been shown to survive crowding. Such resilience to crowding provides valuable information about the underlying neural mechanism of crowding. Here we ask whether illusory contour formation survives crowding of the inducers. We manipulated the presence of illusory contours through the (mis)alignment of the four inducers of a Kanizsa square. In the inducer-aligned condition, the observers judged the perceived shape (thin vs. fat) of the illusory Kanizsa square, manipulated by small rotations of the inducers. In the inducer-misaligned condition, three of the four inducers (all except the upper-left) were rotated 90°. The observers judged the orientation of the upper-left inducer. Crowding of the inducers worsened observers' performance significantly only in the inducer-misaligned condition. Our findings suggest that information for illusory contour formation survives crowding of the inducers. Crowding happens at a stage where the low-level featural information is integrated for inducer orientation discrimination, but not at a stage where the same information is used for illusory contour formation.

  4. NSDF: Neuroscience Simulation Data Format.

    PubMed

    Ray, Subhasis; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Bhalla, Upinder S; Wójcik, Daniel K

    2016-04-01

    Data interchange is emerging as an essential aspect of modern neuroscience. In the areas of computational neuroscience and systems biology there are multiple model definition formats, which have contributed strongly to the development of an ecosystem of simulation and analysis tools. Here we report the development of the Neuroscience Simulation Data Format (NSDF) which extends this ecosystem to the data generated in simulations. NSDF is designed to store simulator output across scales: from multiscale chemical and electrical signaling models, to detailed single-neuron and network models, to abstract neural nets. It is self-documenting, efficient, modular, and scalable, both in terms of novel data types and in terms of data volume. NSDF is simulator-independent, and can be used by a range of standalone analysis and visualization tools. It may also be used to store variety of experimental data. NSDF is based on the widely used HDF5 (Hierarchical Data Format 5) specification and is open, platform-independent, and portable. PMID:26585711

  5. Theory of Remote Image Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blahut, Richard E.

    2004-11-01

    In many applications, images, such as ultrasonic or X-ray signals, are recorded and then analyzed with digital or optical processors in order to extract information. Such processing requires the development of algorithms of great precision and sophistication. This book presents a unified treatment of the mathematical methods that underpin the various algorithms used in remote image formation. The author begins with a review of transform and filter theory. He then discusses two- and three-dimensional Fourier transform theory, the ambiguity function, image construction and reconstruction, tomography, baseband surveillance systems, and passive systems (where the signal source might be an earthquake or a galaxy). Information-theoretic methods in image formation are also covered, as are phase errors and phase noise. Throughout the book, practical applications illustrate theoretical concepts, and there are many homework problems. The book is aimed at graduate students of electrical engineering and computer science, and practitioners in industry. Presents a unified treatment of the mathematical methods that underpin the algorithms used in remote image formation Illustrates theoretical concepts with reference to practical applications Provides insights into the design parameters of real systems

  6. Formation mechanisms of metal colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halaciuga, Ionel

    Highly dispersed uniform metallic particles are widely used in various areas of technology and medicine and are likely to be incorporated into many other applications in the future. It is commonly accepted that size, shape and composition of the particles represent critical factors in most applications. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of formation of metal particles and the ways to control the physical (e.g. shape, size) and chemical (e.g. composition) properties is of great importance. In the current research, the formation of uniform silver spheres is investigated experimentally. The parameters that influence the formation of silver particles when concentrated iso-ascorbic acid and silver-polyamine complex solutions are rapidly mixed were studied in the absence of dispersants. We found that by varying the nature of the amine, temperature, concentration of reactants, silver/amine molar ratio, and the nature of the silver salt, the size of the resulting silver particles can be varied in a wide range (0.08--1.5 microm). The silver particles were formed by aggregation of nanosize subunits as substantiated by both electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques and by the vivid rapid color changes during the chemical precipitation process. From the practical standpoint, the goal of this research was to prepare well dispersed spherical silver particles having a relatively smooth surface and a diameter of about 1 microm to satisfy the demands of the current electronic materials market. A two stage particle growth model previously developed to explain the narrow size distribution occurring in synthesis of gold spheres was applied to the present experimental system, and the parameters that control the size distribution characteristics were identified. The kinetic parameter required to match the final particle size was found to be in agreement with the one used previously in modeling formation of gold spheres, suggesting that similar kinetics governs the

  7. Dioxin formation from waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Shibamoto, Takayuki; Yasuhara, Akio; Katami, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    There has been great concern about dioxins-polychlorinated dibenzo dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzo furans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-causing contamination in the environment because the adverse effects of these chemicals on human health have been known for many years. Possible dioxin-contamination has received much attention recently not only by environmental scientists but also by the public, because dioxins are known to be formed during the combustion of industrial and domestic wastes and to escape into the environment via exhaust gases from incinerators. Consequently, there is a pressing need to investigate the formation mechanisms or reaction pathways of these chlorinated chemicals to be able to devise ways to reduce their environmental contamination. A well-controlled small-scale incinerator was used for the experiments in the core references of this review. These articles report the investigation of dioxin formation from the combustion of various waste-simulated samples, including different kinds of paper, various kinds of wood, fallen leaves, food samples, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyvinylidene chloride, polyethylene tetraphthalate (PET), and various kinds of plastic products. These samples were also incinerated with inorganic chlorides (NaCl, KCl, CuCI2, MgCl2, MnCl2, FeCl2, CoCl2, fly ash, and seawater) or organic chlorides (PVC, chlordane, and pentachlorophenol) to investigate the role of chlorine content and/or the presence of different metals in dioxin formation. Some samples, such as newspapers, were burned after they were impregnated with NaCl or PVC, as well as being cocombusted with chlorides. The roles of incineration conditions, including chamber temperatures, O2 concentrations, and CO concentrations, in dioxin formation were also investigated. Dioxins (PCDDs, PCDFs, and coplanar-PCBs) formed in the exhaust gases from a controlled small-scale incinerator, where experimental waste

  8. Core formation in silicate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  9. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Fredheim, Elizabeth Gladys Aarag; Klingenberg, Claus; Rohde, Holger; Frankenberger, Stephanie; Gaustad, Peter; Flaegstad, Trond; Sollid, Johanna Ericson

    2009-04-01

    Infections due to coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) most frequently occur after the implantation of medical devices and are attributed to the biofilm-forming potential of CoNS. Staphylococcus haemolyticus is the second most frequently isolated CoNS from patients with hospital-acquired infections. There is only limited knowledge of the nature of S. haemolyticus biofilms. The aim of this study was to characterize S. haemolyticus biofilm formation. We analyzed the biofilm-forming capacities of 72 clinical S. haemolyticus isolates. A detachment assay with NaIO(4), proteinase K, or DNase was used to determine the main biofilm components. Biofilm-associated genes, including the ica operon, were analyzed by PCR, and the gene products were sequenced. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to elucidate the biofilm structure. Fifty-three isolates (74%) produced biofilms after growth in Trypticase soy broth (TSB) with glucose, but only 22 (31%) produced biofilms after growth in TSB with NaCl. It was necessary to dissolve the biofilm in ethanol-acetone to measure the optical density of the full biofilm mass. DNase, proteinase K, and NaIO(4) caused biofilm detachment for 100%, 98%, and 38% of the isolates, respectively. icaRADBC and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) production were found in only two isolates. CLSM indicated that the biofilm structure of S. haemolyticus clearly differs from that of S. epidermidis. We conclude that biofilm formation is a common phenotype in clinical S. haemolyticus isolates. In contrast to S. epidermidis, proteins and extracellular DNA are of functional relevance for biofilm accumulation, whereas PIA plays only a minor role. The induction of biofilm formation and determination of the biofilm mass also needed to be optimized for S. haemolyticus.

  10. A Fossil Group in Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eric D.; Rappaport, Saul A.; McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Mark W.; Grant, Catherine E.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    In the current picture of hierarchical structure formation, galaxy groups play a vital role as the seeds from which large assemblies of matter form. Compact groups are also important environments in which to watch the fueling of star formation and AGN activity, as the conditions are ideal for galaxy-galaxy interactions. We have identified a galaxy system that may represent an intermediate or transition stage in group evolution. Shakhbazyan 1 (or SHK 1) is a remarkably compact collection of about ten massive, red-sequence galaxies within a region 100 kpc across. Several of these galaxies show signs of AGN activity, and new, deep optical observations with the Discovery Channel Telescope reveal an extended stellar envelope surrounding the galaxies. This envelope is much more extended than what would be expected from a superposition of normal galaxy envelopes, and it indicates a large amount of intra-group starlight, evidence that the galaxies in SHK 1 are dynamically interacting.We here present new Chandra spectral imaging observations of this unusual system that confirm the presence of an X-ray-emitting diffuse intra-group medium (IGM), with a temperature of 1.5 keV and X-ray luminosity of 1043 erg/s. Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, the system is about 1/3 as massive as expected from the optical richness. In addition, three of the ten central galaxies exhibit signatures of X-ray AGN. The under-luminous IGM, high density of bright galaxies, and evidence for galaxy-galaxy interaction indicate that this system may be in a transition stage of galaxy merging, similar to that expected in the formation of a fossil group. Alternatively, SHK 1 may consist of multiple poor groups in the final stages of merging along our line of sight. We explore these scenarios and outline paths of future study for this enigmatic system.

  11. WOUND HEALING AND COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Russell; Benditt, Earl P.

    1961-01-01

    The regular sequence encountered in healing guinea pig skin wounds has been examined by methods of light and electron microscopy. Observations on cell populations, their fine structure, and fibril formation in the connective tissue have been made. Linear incisions in the skin of normal female guinea pigs weighing 300 to 350 grams were allowed to heal. The wounds were then excised, fixed with buffered 2 per cent osmium tetroxide, and postfixed in neutral buffered formalin, at 16 and 24 hours and at 3, 5, 9, and 14 days after wounding. They were then embedded in epoxy resin. In the inflammatory phase the exudate observed in the early wounds consists largely of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes, macrophages, fibrin, and free extracellular organelles from the disrupted inflammatory cells. These organelles later appear in vacuoles in the cytoplasm of the macrophages. Fibroblasts first appear at 24 hours, and show extensive development and dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum, which sometimes contains moderately dense flocculent material. In addition, these fibroblasts have enlarged mitochondria and condensations of filamentous material within the cytoplasm near the cell surface. Occasional myelin figures and moderately dense, 0.5 to 1.0 micron bodies are found within the cytoplasm of the early fibroblasts. Collagen fibrils are first seen at 3 days extracellularly near the cell surfaces. They appear at the later times in two populations of sizes. With increasing wound age the fibroblasts retain their morphology and the wounds decrease in cellularity concomitantly with the formation of increasing amounts of collagen. Several proposed mechanisms of collagen fibril formation are discussed in relation to the observed phenomena. The problem of correlating fibril diameter with the appearance of the periodic structure of collagen in relation to the minimal size fibril which would be anticipated to display this appearance is discussed. PMID:14494202

  12. Pattern formation in geochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsev, Sergei

    2002-08-01

    Compositional patterns are extremely common in natural minerals. While, in many cases, variations in the solid mineral composition reflect the external changes in the environment at the time of the mineral formation, the role of self-organization is increasingly acknowledged. For example, in reaction-transport systems, the patterns may form spontaneously from an unpatterned state at the time of crystal growth and then become preserved by being "frozen" in the solid mineral. In this work, the pattern formation by self-organization is investigated by means of model construction and computer simulations in several minerals from different geologic environments. The impact of environmental noise is investigated on a model of oscillatory zoning in plagioclase feldspar. It is shown that environmental noise can lead to pattern formation such as oscillatory zoning, even when no deterministic periodic solutions exist. Coherence resonance close to the Hopf bifurcation is observed. Oscillatory zoning in barite-celestite system is simulated to quantitatively describe the results of the previously reported nucleation and growth experiments. The zoning is thought to be formed by autocatalytic growth from an aqueous solution. In addition to the description of the reaction-diffusion system in terns of partial and ordinary differential equations, a cellular automata model is proposed for the first time for this oscillatory crystallization type of problems. A quantitative model of banding in Mississippi Valley-type sphalerite is presented. Banded ring-like patterns are shown to arise due to a self-propagating sequence of growth and dissolution (coarsening wave). A two-dimensional model is presented for the first time and the conditions for the pattern generation and preservation are discussed. A number of time series analysis techniques are applied to characterize the compositional patterns observed in natural minerals as well as in the colored rythmites found in the marine clay

  13. Mechanism of formation of hydantoins

    SciTech Connect

    Worman, J.J.; Uhrich, K.; Olson, E.; Diehl, J.; Farnum, S.; Hawthorne, S.

    1985-10-01

    Hydantoins, (I), are biologically active compounds which occur in nature and have been isolated from such sources as sugar beets and butterfly wings. Synthetic analogs have found widespread use as anticonvulsant drugs, bacteriocides, stabilizers in photographic film, and in the preparation of high temperature epoxy resins. Uses, preparation, and reactions of hydantoins have been extensively studied and are reported elsewhere. Recently a number of hydantoin isomers have been detected and identified in coal gasification condensate water from the gasification of Indian Head (ND) lignite in a slagging fixed bed gasifier. The hydantoins constitute a major portion of the organics in the condensate water. In generation the concentrations of hydantoins found in the condensate water from an ash gasifier are smaller than those found from the slagging process. Lignite coal reacting in a slagging gasifier gives the largest concentration of hydantoins in the condensate water. The major isomer in the coal gasification condensate water is 5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DMH). DMH is formed from individual species (acetone, cyanide, ammonia, and carbonate) in the condensate water and does not form directly in the gasifier. The rate of formation of DMH was first order in all of the reactants as expressed by the equation: Rate of formation of DMH = (Acetone) (HCN) (NH/sub 3/) (CO/sub 2/). This kinetic data is valuable in predicting the rate of formation of DMH in coal gasification condensate water, provided the model is applicable. A mechanism consistent with the kinetic data and partially verified by others is shown in Scheme 1. 13 refs.

  14. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Fredheim, Elizabeth Gladys Aarag; Klingenberg, Claus; Rohde, Holger; Frankenberger, Stephanie; Gaustad, Peter; Flaegstad, Trond; Sollid, Johanna Ericson

    2009-04-01

    Infections due to coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) most frequently occur after the implantation of medical devices and are attributed to the biofilm-forming potential of CoNS. Staphylococcus haemolyticus is the second most frequently isolated CoNS from patients with hospital-acquired infections. There is only limited knowledge of the nature of S. haemolyticus biofilms. The aim of this study was to characterize S. haemolyticus biofilm formation. We analyzed the biofilm-forming capacities of 72 clinical S. haemolyticus isolates. A detachment assay with NaIO(4), proteinase K, or DNase was used to determine the main biofilm components. Biofilm-associated genes, including the ica operon, were analyzed by PCR, and the gene products were sequenced. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to elucidate the biofilm structure. Fifty-three isolates (74%) produced biofilms after growth in Trypticase soy broth (TSB) with glucose, but only 22 (31%) produced biofilms after growth in TSB with NaCl. It was necessary to dissolve the biofilm in ethanol-acetone to measure the optical density of the full biofilm mass. DNase, proteinase K, and NaIO(4) caused biofilm detachment for 100%, 98%, and 38% of the isolates, respectively. icaRADBC and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) production were found in only two isolates. CLSM indicated that the biofilm structure of S. haemolyticus clearly differs from that of S. epidermidis. We conclude that biofilm formation is a common phenotype in clinical S. haemolyticus isolates. In contrast to S. epidermidis, proteins and extracellular DNA are of functional relevance for biofilm accumulation, whereas PIA plays only a minor role. The induction of biofilm formation and determination of the biofilm mass also needed to be optimized for S. haemolyticus. PMID:19144798

  15. New Paradigms for Asteroid Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, A.; Jacquet, E.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Morbidelli, A.; Gounelle, M.

    Asteroids and meteorites provide key evidence on the formation of planetesimals in the solar system. Asteroids are traditionally thought to form in a bottom-up process by coagulation within a population of initially kilometer-scale planetesimals. However, new models challenge this idea by demonstrating that asteroids of sizes from 100 to 1000 km can form directly from the gravitational collapse of small particles that have organized themselves in dense filaments and clusters in the turbulent gas. Particles concentrate passively between eddies down to the smallest scales of the turbulent gas flow and inside large-scale pressure bumps and vortices. The streaming instability causes particles to take an active role in the concentration, by piling up in dense filaments whose friction on the gas reduces the radial drift compared to that of isolated particles. In this chapter we review new paradigms for asteroid formation and critically compare them against the observed properties of asteroids as well as constraints from meteorites. Chondrules of typical sizes from 0.1 to 1 mm are ubiquitous in primitive meteorites and likely represent the primary building blocks of asteroids. Chondrule-sized particles are nevertheless tightly coupled to the gas via friction and are therefore hard to concentrate in large amounts in the turbulent gas. We review recent progress on understanding the incorporation of chondrules into the asteroids, including layered accretion models where chondrules are accreted onto asteroids over millions of years. We highlight in the end 10 unsolved questions in asteroid formation where we expect that progress will be made over the next decade.

  16. Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations

    DOEpatents

    Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

    2013-05-28

    Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

  17. Testing Magnetic Star Formation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, Richard M.; Hakobian, Nicholas; Troland, Thomas H.

    2009-02-01

    Zeeman observations of molecular clouds yield the line-of-sight component B LOS of the magnetic vector B, which makes it possible to test the two major extreme-case theories of what drives star formation—ambipolar diffusion or turbulence. However, only one of the three components of B is measurable, so tests have been statistical rather than direct, and they have not been definitive. We report here observations of the Zeeman effect in the 18 cm lines of OH in the envelope regions surrounding four molecular cloud cores toward which detections of B LOS have been achieved in the same lines, and evaluate the ratio of mass-to-magnetic flux, M/Φ, between the cloud core and envelope. This relative M/Φ measurement reduces uncertainties in previous studies, such as the angle between B and the line of sight and the value of [OH/H]. Our result is that for all four clouds, the ratios R of the core to the envelope values of M/Φ are less than 1. Stated another way, the ratios R' of the core to the total cloud M/Φ are less than 1. The extreme case or idealized (no turbulence) ambipolar diffusion theory of core formation requires the ratio of the central to total M/Φ to be approximately equal to the inverse of the original subcritical M/Φ, or R' > 1. The probability that all four of our clouds have R' > 1 is 3 × 10-7 our results are therefore significantly in contradiction with the hypothesis that these four cores were formed by ambipolar diffusion. Highly super-Alfvénic turbulent simulations yield a wide range of relative M/Φ, but favor a ratio R < 1, as we observe. Our experiment is limited to four clouds, and we can only directly test the predictions of the extreme-case "idealized" models of ambipolar-diffusion driven star formation, which have a regular magnetic field morphology. Nonetheless, our experimental results are not consistent with the "idealized" strong field, ambipolar diffusion theory of star formation. Comparisons of our results with more realistic

  18. Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, Yvon

    2009-05-11

    Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

  19. Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Yvon

    2009-05-01

    Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

  20. Formation flight astronomical survey telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    Formation Flight Astronomical Survey Telescope (FFAST) is a project for hard X-ray observation. It consists of two small satellites; one (telescope satellite) has a super mirror covering the energy range up to 80 keV while the other (detector satellite) has an scintillator deposited CCD (SDCCD) having good spatial resolution and high efficiency up to 100 keV. Two satellites will be put into individual Kepler orbits forming an X-ray telescope with a focal length of 20 m. They will be not in pointing mode but in survey mode to cover a large sky region.