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Sample records for cambridge university cambridge

  1. Embedding Sustainable Development at Cambridge University Engineering Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenner, Richard A.; Ainger, Charles M.; Cruickshank, Heather J.; Guthrie, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The paper seeks to examine the latest stage in a process of change aimed at introducing concepts of sustainable development into the activities of the Department of Engineering at Cambridge University, UK. Design/methodology/approach--The rationale behind defining the skills which future engineers require is discussed and vehicles for…

  2. Success in the US: Are Cambridge International Assessments Good Preparation for University Study?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stuart; Bailey, Clare

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the research being conducted by University of Cambridge International Examinations (Cambridge) to ensure that its international assessments prepare students as well as Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate for continued studies in colleges and universities. The primary purpose of the research is to highlight…

  3. Assessing the Impact of Arts and Humanities Research at the University of Cambridge. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Ruth; Celia, Claire; Diepeveen, Stephanie; Chonaill, Siobhan Ni; Rabinovich, Lila; Tiessen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This project for the University of Cambridge and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) assesses the impacts of arts and humanities research at the University of Cambridge. Evidence from interviews, a survey of research staff and detailed case studies indicates that these disciplines already have a broad range of impacts. Many of these…

  4. Plastination in Anatomy Learning: An Experience at Cambridge University.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Rafael; Bainbridge, David; Tavernor, Angie; López Albors, Octavio

    2016-01-01

    Due to lack of objective data, the benefits of using plastination in combination with wet dissection in teaching gross anatomy are unknown. The aim of this study was to obtain objective evidence from students regarding the effectiveness of combining plastinated specimens (PS) with an established gross anatomy education program at Cambridge University that uses wet cadaver dissection and small-group tutorials. For a complete academic year, a total of 135 PS were used alongside wet cadaver dissections. The PS were also available for small-group tutorials. An anonymous closed questionnaire, using a 5-point numerical-estimation Likert scale, was used to gather information relating to the effectiveness of the PS. The level of student satisfaction with the combined use of wet dissections and PS was high, although higher (p<.05) for second-year students (98.4%) than for first-year students (95.5%). Students felt the specimens allowed them to see details that were often more difficult to identify in their dissections, for instance nerves. Voluntary use of PS was higher (p<.01) for second-year students (96.9%), who had previously experienced anatomy teaching with cadaver dissection alone, than for first-year students (77.7%). Overall, 97.7% of all students thought that the PS helped them understand and learn anatomy. All students surveyed (100%) recommended the use of PS in the future. Students considered the use of PS in the dissection room combined with wet cadaver dissection to be beneficial when learning anatomy, particularly when combined with their use during small-group tutorials.

  5. The Target of the Question: A Taxonomy of Textual Features for Cambridge University "O" Levels English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Shanti Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the typical textual features that are most frequently targeted in short-answer reading comprehension questions of the Cambridge University "O" Level English Paper 2. Test writers' awareness of how textual features impact on understanding of meanings in text decisions will determine to great extent their decisions…

  6. Up the Garden Path: A Chemical Trail through the Cambridge University Botanic Garden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Kyd, Gwenda O.; Groom, Colin R.; Allen, Frank H.; Day, Juliet; Upson, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The living world is a rich source of chemicals with many medicines, dyes, flavorings, and foodstuffs having their origins in compounds produced by plants. We describe a chemical trail through the plant holdings of the Cambridge University Botanic Gardens. Visitors to the gardens are provided with a laminated trail guide with 22 stopping points…

  7. Revision Planned for the Cambridge Latin Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebesta, Judith Lynn

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes a discussion on the revision of the Cambridge Latin Course (CLC) held during the 1980 ACL Institute at the University of New Hampshire by CLC users and Cambridge University Press representatives. Emphasizes suggestions by users on grammar instruction strategies better suited to American students' needs. (MES)

  8. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge.

    PubMed

    Ball, Lauren; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Gillam, Stephen; Ray, Sumantra

    2014-01-01

    Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1) the approach to medical nutrition education, 2) evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3) areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the recommended UK medical nutrition education curriculum. This paper is intended to inform other institutions in ongoing efforts in medical nutrition education.

  9. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Lauren; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Gillam, Stephen; Ray, Sumantra

    2014-01-01

    Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1) the approach to medical nutrition education, 2) evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3) areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the recommended UK medical nutrition education curriculum. This paper is intended to inform other institutions in ongoing efforts in medical nutrition education. PMID:24899813

  10. The Cambridge Structural Database.

    PubMed

    Groom, Colin R; Bruno, Ian J; Lightfoot, Matthew P; Ward, Suzanna C

    2016-04-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) contains a complete record of all published organic and metal-organic small-molecule crystal structures. The database has been in operation for over 50 years and continues to be the primary means of sharing structural chemistry data and knowledge across disciplines. As well as structures that are made public to support scientific articles, it includes many structures published directly as CSD Communications. All structures are processed both computationally and by expert structural chemistry editors prior to entering the database. A key component of this processing is the reliable association of the chemical identity of the structure studied with the experimental data. This important step helps ensure that data is widely discoverable and readily reusable. Content is further enriched through selective inclusion of additional experimental data. Entries are available to anyone through free CSD community web services. Linking services developed and maintained by the CCDC, combined with the use of standard identifiers, facilitate discovery from other resources. Data can also be accessed through CCDC and third party software applications and through an application programming interface.

  11. The Cambridge Structural Database

    PubMed Central

    Groom, Colin R.; Bruno, Ian J.; Lightfoot, Matthew P.; Ward, Suzanna C.

    2016-01-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) contains a complete record of all published organic and metal–organic small-molecule crystal structures. The database has been in operation for over 50 years and continues to be the primary means of sharing structural chemistry data and knowledge across disciplines. As well as structures that are made public to support scientific articles, it includes many structures published directly as CSD Communications. All structures are processed both computationally and by expert structural chemistry editors prior to entering the database. A key component of this processing is the reliable association of the chemical identity of the structure studied with the experimental data. This important step helps ensure that data is widely discoverable and readily reusable. Content is further enriched through selective inclusion of additional experimental data. Entries are available to anyone through free CSD community web services. Linking services developed and maintained by the CCDC, combined with the use of standard identifiers, facilitate discovery from other resources. Data can also be accessed through CCDC and third party software applications and through an application programming interface. PMID:27048719

  12. The Cambridge Structural Database.

    PubMed

    Groom, Colin R; Bruno, Ian J; Lightfoot, Matthew P; Ward, Suzanna C

    2016-04-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) contains a complete record of all published organic and metal-organic small-molecule crystal structures. The database has been in operation for over 50 years and continues to be the primary means of sharing structural chemistry data and knowledge across disciplines. As well as structures that are made public to support scientific articles, it includes many structures published directly as CSD Communications. All structures are processed both computationally and by expert structural chemistry editors prior to entering the database. A key component of this processing is the reliable association of the chemical identity of the structure studied with the experimental data. This important step helps ensure that data is widely discoverable and readily reusable. Content is further enriched through selective inclusion of additional experimental data. Entries are available to anyone through free CSD community web services. Linking services developed and maintained by the CCDC, combined with the use of standard identifiers, facilitate discovery from other resources. Data can also be accessed through CCDC and third party software applications and through an application programming interface. PMID:27048719

  13. The Potential Impact of High-Speed Networking on Teaching and Learning: A Case Study from Cambridge University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aston, J.; Gienke, M.

    1995-01-01

    A report on the SuperJANET high-speed network included interviews conducted at Cambridge University (England) on the use of computers and audiovisual aids in university teaching and learning. Results indicated the emergence of two main uses of the technology: (1) as a means of communication between students and teachers, and (2) as a means of…

  14. Degrees of Influence: The Politics of Honorary Degrees in the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, 1900-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Michael; Jons, Heike

    2007-01-01

    The universities of Oxford and Cambridge had developed different attitudes towards the award of honorary degrees through the early and middle decades of the twentieth century. Recently, both have adopted a similar cautious and apolitical stance. This essay describes the role of honorary degrees in the production and reproduction of their cultural…

  15. 33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cambridge Harbor. 117.549 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of the S342 bridge, mile 0.1 at Cambridge, shall open on signal from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.; except that, from...

  16. Assessing the Impact of the Cambridge International Acceleration Program on U.S. University Determinants of Success: A Multi-Level Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stuart; Warren, Jayne; Gill, Tim

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the research being conducted by Cambridge International Examinations (Cambridge) to ensure that its international assessments prepare students as well as other acceleration programs for continued study in U.S. colleges and universities. The study, which builds on previous freshman GPA data modeling work using data supplied…

  17. EDUCATION: Gates Gives Cambridge a Rival to Rhodes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J

    2000-10-20

    Thanks to a new $210 million trust announced on 11 October by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Cambridge University is launching a new high-visibility scholars' program, which each year will fund at least 225 students from outside the United Kingdom. The university will select Gates Cambridge Scholars based on merit, not need, focusing on academic ability and leadership potential.

  18. "A lab of one's own". The Balfour Biological Laboratory for Women at Cambridge University, 1884-1914.

    PubMed

    Richmond, M L

    1997-09-01

    The Balfour Biological Laboratory for Women was established at Cambridge University in 1884 to prepare the students of Newnham and Girton Colleges to sit the Natural Sciences Tripos, first opened to women in 1881. For thirty years, until its closure in 1914, the Balfour Laboratory served as the central conduit for biological instruction for the women of Cambridge, introducing them to the new program of experimental biology developed by the physiologist Michael Foster and the embryologist Francis Maitland Balfour. Directed by distinguished women graduates, the Balfour Laboratory became recognized as the leading center for women's biological instruction in Britain. Its significance, however, extends beyond its nominal status as a teaching laboratory. It provided university positions for able scientists who otherwise would not have been placed, offered advanced students the opportunity to engage in independent research, and, most important, formed the locus for the scientific subculture created by women at Cambridge to compensate for their exclusion from the social community of science. Drawing upon college and university archival records, this essay offers institutional, social, and biographical research that broadens our understanding of the experience of the first generation of women to pursue a higher education in the life sciences at one of the world's premier universities.

  19. Alchemy in Cambridge. An Annotated Catalogue of Alchemical Texts and Illustrations in Cambridge Repositories.

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Alchemy in Cambridge captures the alchemical content of 56 manuscripts in Cambridge, in particular the libraries of Trinity College, Corpus Christi College and St John's College, the University Library and the Fitzwilliam Museum. As such, this catalogue makes visible a large number of previously unknown or obscured alchemica. While extant bibliographies, including those by M.R. James a century ago, were compiled by polymathic bibliographers for a wide audience of researchers, Alchemy in Cambridge benefits from the substantial developments in the history of alchemy, bibliography, and related scholarship in recent decades. Many texts are here identified for the first time. Another vital feature is the incorporation of information on alchemical illustrations in the manuscripts, intended to facilitate research on the visual culture of alchemy. The catalogue is aimed at historians of alchemy and science, and of high interest to manuscript scholars, historians of art and historians of college and university libraries. PMID:26245008

  20. Alchemy in Cambridge. An Annotated Catalogue of Alchemical Texts and Illustrations in Cambridge Repositories.

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Alchemy in Cambridge captures the alchemical content of 56 manuscripts in Cambridge, in particular the libraries of Trinity College, Corpus Christi College and St John's College, the University Library and the Fitzwilliam Museum. As such, this catalogue makes visible a large number of previously unknown or obscured alchemica. While extant bibliographies, including those by M.R. James a century ago, were compiled by polymathic bibliographers for a wide audience of researchers, Alchemy in Cambridge benefits from the substantial developments in the history of alchemy, bibliography, and related scholarship in recent decades. Many texts are here identified for the first time. Another vital feature is the incorporation of information on alchemical illustrations in the manuscripts, intended to facilitate research on the visual culture of alchemy. The catalogue is aimed at historians of alchemy and science, and of high interest to manuscript scholars, historians of art and historians of college and university libraries.

  1. Teachers Learning: Professional Development and Education. Cambridge Education Research Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Colleen, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Teachers Learning: Professional Development and Education" is part of The Cambridge Education Research series, edited by senior colleagues at the University of Cambridge Faculty of Education, which has a longstanding tradition of involvement in high quality, innovative teacher education and continuing professional development.…

  2. 33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cambridge Harbor. 117.549 Section 117.549 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of...

  3. 33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cambridge Harbor. 117.549 Section 117.549 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of...

  4. 33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cambridge Harbor. 117.549 Section 117.549 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of...

  5. 33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cambridge Harbor. 117.549 Section 117.549 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of...

  6. The Whipple Museum and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pippard, Brian

    The Whipple Museum is part of the History and Philosophy of Science Department in the University of Cambridge. It is on your right as soon as you enter Free School Lane from Pembroke Street, and is normally open between 1:30 and 4:30 P.M. on weekdays. The main room, a hall with hammer-beam roof, is a relic of Stephen Perse’s school (1624) now flourishing elsewhere in the city. It houses a large collection of mathematical, physical and astronomical instruments — abaci, Napier’s bones, slide rules; sextants and other surveying instruments; telescopes, compasses and pocket sundials (especially of ivory from Nuremberg 1500-1700); and a Grand Orrery by George Adams (1750). The gallery of a second room is used for special exhibitions, often of items from the well-stocked store. Some specialist catalogues have been compiled and are on sale.

  7. Learner Diary Research with "Cambridge" Examination Candidates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Brian; Benson, Cathy; Jenkins, Michael

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a research project in which volunteers, self-selected from IALS students preparing for one or more of the Cambridge English Examinations, kept journals. Following guidelines, they reflected on their in-class and outside-of-class experiences in the 8 weeks leading up to the exams. They also attended four biweekly meetings with…

  8. Cambridge Elementary students enjoy gift of computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Children at Cambridge Elementary School, Cocoa, Fla., eagerly unwrap computer equipment donated by Kennedy Space Center. Cambridge is one of 13 Brevard County schools receiving 81 excess contractor computers thanks to an innovative educational outreach project spearheaded by the Nasa k-12 Education Services Office at ksc. Behind the children is Jim Thurston, a school volunteer and retired employee of USBI, who shared in the project. The Astronaut Memorial Foundation, a strategic partner in the effort, and several schools in rural Florida and Georgia also received refurbished computers as part of the year-long project. Ksc employees put in about 3,300 volunteer hours to transform old, excess computers into upgraded, usable units. A total of $90,000 in upgraded computer equipment is being donated.

  9. Artificial Pancreas Project at Cambridge 2013.

    PubMed

    Hovorka, R

    2015-08-01

    The development and clinical testing of closed-loop systems (the artificial pancreas) is underpinned by advances in continuous glucose monitoring and benefits from concerted academic and industry collaborative efforts. This review describes the progress of the Artificial Pancreas Project at the University of Cambridge from 2006 to 2014. Initial studies under controlled laboratory conditions, designed to collect representative safety and performance data, were followed by short to medium free-living unsupervised outpatient studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery using a model predictive control algorithm. Accompanying investigations included assessment of the psychosocial impact and key factors affecting glucose control such as insulin kinetics and glucose absorption. Translation to other disease conditions such as critical illness and Type 2 diabetes took place. It is concluded that innovation of iteratively enhanced closed-loop systems will provide tangible means to improve outcomes and quality of life in people with Type 1 diabetes and their families in the next decade.

  10. Investigating the Impact of Cambridge International Assessments on U.S. Stakeholders: Student and Teacher Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    As part of the continuing program to study the impact of its international assessments, the University of Cambridge International Examinations ("Cambridge") has undertaken a series of studies investigating the impact on a range of US stakeholders. This paper reports on research designed to respond to a series of washback and impact questions…

  11. The work of the Animal Research Station, Cambridge.

    PubMed

    Polge, Chris

    2007-06-01

    This paper traces the history of the Animal Research Station, Cambridge from its establishment in 1932 to its closure in 1986. The author worked there for forty years and was Director from 1979. Originally set up as a field station for Cambridge University's School of Agriculture, the Station was expanded after World War II as the Agricultural Research Council's Unit of Animal Reproduction. Beginning with semen and artificial insemination, research at the Station soon embraced superovulation and embryo transfer in farm animals. Many other technologies were also developed here, including IVF in pigs, cloning by nuclear transplantation of early embryonic cells, and the first genetically modified farm animals in Britain. This account recalls the Directors of the Station and their research teams together with details of their pioneering contribution to reproductive biology. PMID:17543843

  12. The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskin, Michael

    Expertly written and lavishly illustrated, The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy offers a unique account of astronomical theory and practice from antiquity to the present day. How did Moslems of the Middle Ages use astronomy to calculate the direction of Mecca from far-flung corners of the Islamic world? Who was the only ancient Greek to suspect that the earth might revolve around the sun? How did Christopher Columbus abuse his knowledge of a lunar eclipse predicted by an astronomical almanac? Packed with anecdotes and intriguing detail, this book describes how we observed the sky and interpreted what we saw at different periods of history; how this influenced our beliefs and mythology; and how great astronomers contributed to what we now know. The result is a lively and highly visual history of astronomy - a compelling read for specialists and non-specialists alike.

  13. An investigation into the impact of question structure on the performance of first year physics undergraduate students at the University of Cambridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Valerie; Jardine-Wright, Lisa; Bateman, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    We describe a study of the impact of exam question structure on the performance of first year Natural Sciences physics undergraduates from the University of Cambridge. The results show conclusively that a student’s performance improves when questions are scaffolded compared with university style questions. In a group of 77 female students we observe that the average exam mark increases by 13.4% for scaffolded questions, which corresponds to a 4.9 standard deviation effect. The equivalent observation for 236 male students is 9% (5.5 standard deviations). We also observe a correlation between exam performance and A2-level marks for UK students, and that students who receive their school education overseas, in a mixed gender environment, or at an independent school are more likely to receive a first class mark in the exam. These results suggest a mis-match between the problem-solving skills and assessment procedures between school and first year university and will provide key input into the future teaching and assessment of first year undergraduate physics students.

  14. The Cambridge Primary Review: A Reply to R. J. Campbell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The author was disappointed by R. J. Campbell's sour critique of the Cambridge Primary Review in "FORUM" Volume 52 Number 1 2010. His description of the Review's proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking, cumbersome and partial" is such a bizarre misjudgement that it calls for some response. The author comments in turn on R. J.…

  15. [Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Studies 9-13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

    These materials are a part of a series of studies sponsored by the Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics which reflects the ideas of CCSM regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics K-12. Feasibility Studies 9-13 contain a wide range of topics. The following are the titles and brief descriptions of these studies. Number…

  16. 77 FR 38086 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab... 7, 2012, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810, made application...

  17. 78 FR 52802 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab... 01, 2013, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810, made application...

  18. 76 FR 13665 - Cambridge Tool & Die, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Action Total Staffing, Cambridge, OH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... Total Staffing, Cambridge, OH; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker... Register on January 26, 2011 (76 FR 4731). At the request of the State agency, the Department reviewed the..., Office of Trade Adjustment Assistance. BILLING CODE 4510-FN-P...

  19. 75 FR 38128 - Sensata Technologies MA, Inc., Power Controls Division, Formerly Known As Airpax Corp., Cambridge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... As Airpax Corp., Cambridge, Maryland, Including Employees of Sensata Technologies MA, Inc., Power Controls Division Formerly Known As Airpax Corp., Cambridge, Maryland Working Off-Site in Falmouth... known as Airpax Corporation, Cambridge, Maryland. The notice will soon be published in the...

  20. 40 CFR 81.205 - Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.205 Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Zanesville-Cambridge Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio) consists of the territorial...

  1. Ideology, Class and Rationality: A Critique of Cambridge International Examinations' "Thinking Skills" Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Leonel

    2012-01-01

    This article undertakes a critique of the aims and objectives of "Thinking Skills", one of the most widely and internationally used curricula in the teaching of thinking, offered by the University of Cambridge International Examinations. By engaging in a critical discourse analysis of how political and class biases are (re-)produced in the forms…

  2. The Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced-Level General Paper Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Nurul Huda; Shih, Chih-Min

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and reviews the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level General Paper (GP) examination. As a written test that is administered to preuniversity students, the GP examination is internationally recognised and accepted by universities and employers as proof of English competence. In this article, the…

  3. Dorothy Hodgkin Lecture 2013: Artificial Pancreas Project at Cambridge 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hovorka, R.

    2015-01-01

    The development and clinical testing of closed-loop systems (the artificial pancreas) is underpinned by advances in continuous glucose monitoring and benefits from concerted academic and industry collaborative efforts. This review describes the progress of the Artificial Pancreas Project at the University of Cambridge from 2006 to 2014. Initial studies under controlled laboratory conditions, designed to collect representative safety and performance data, were followed by short to medium free-living unsupervised outpatient studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery using a model predictive control algorithm. Accompanying investigations included assessment of the psychosocial impact and key factors affecting glucose control such as insulin kinetics and glucose absorption. Translation to other disease conditions such as critical illness and Type 2 diabetes took place. It is concluded that innovation of iteratively enhanced closed-loop systems will provide tangible means to improve outcomes and quality of life in people with Type 1 diabetes and their families in the next decade. PMID:25819473

  4. Diagnosing prosopagnosia: effects of ageing, sex, and participant-stimulus ethnic match on the Cambridge Face Memory Test and Cambridge Face Perception Test.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Devin C; McKone, Elinor; Dawel, Amy; Duchaine, Bradley; Palermo, Romina; Schmalzl, Laura; Rivolta, Davide; Wilson, C Ellie; Yovel, Galit

    2009-07-01

    The Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT) and Cambridge Face Perception Test (CFPT) have provided the first theoretically strong clinical tests for prosopagnosia based on novel rather than famous faces. Here, we assess the extent to which norms for these tasks must take into account ageing, sex, and testing country. Data were from Australians aged 18 to 88 years (N = 240 for CFMT; 128 for CFPT) and young adult Israelis (N = 49 for CFMT). Participants were unselected for face recognition ability; most were university educated. The diagnosis cut-off for prosopagnosia (2 SDs poorer than mean) was affected by age, participant-stimulus ethnic match (within Caucasians), and sex for middle-aged and older adults on the CFPT. We also report internal reliability, correlation between face memory and face perception, correlations with intelligence-related measures, correlation with self-report, distribution shape for the CFMT, and prevalence of developmental prosopagnosia.

  5. The Cambridge MRI database for animal models of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Sawiak, Stephen J; Morton, A Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    We describe the Cambridge animal brain magnetic resonance imaging repository comprising 400 datasets to date from mouse models of Huntington disease. The data include raw images as well as segmented grey and white matter images with maps of cortical thickness. All images and phenotypic data for each subject are freely-available without restriction from (http://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/243361/). Software and anatomical population templates optimised for animal brain analysis with MRI are also available from this site.

  6. Skin Regeneration Symposium Cambridge, 12-13 April 2016.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rosalind

    2016-07-01

    The Annual Skin Regeneration Symposium, held in Cambridge, UK, 12-13 April 2016, explored the latest advancements in skin repair, regeneration and restoration, and the impact this has on patients. With over 140 delegates from the disciplines of burn and trauma care, chronic wounds and esthetic medicine, the symposium sparked lively debate and the sharing of results from interesting case studies, clinical trials and basic research to support the use of a Regenerative Epithelial Suspension produced using the ReCell(®) technology. Furthermore, it enabled delegates and speakers alike to share ideas and discuss how to improve the quality of care for patients.

  7. Skin Regeneration Symposium Cambridge, 12-13 April 2016.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rosalind

    2016-07-01

    The Annual Skin Regeneration Symposium, held in Cambridge, UK, 12-13 April 2016, explored the latest advancements in skin repair, regeneration and restoration, and the impact this has on patients. With over 140 delegates from the disciplines of burn and trauma care, chronic wounds and esthetic medicine, the symposium sparked lively debate and the sharing of results from interesting case studies, clinical trials and basic research to support the use of a Regenerative Epithelial Suspension produced using the ReCell(®) technology. Furthermore, it enabled delegates and speakers alike to share ideas and discuss how to improve the quality of care for patients. PMID:27357476

  8. Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in chemical education.

    PubMed

    Battle, Gary M; Ferrence, Gregory M; Allen, Frank H

    2010-10-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) is a vast and ever growing compendium of accurate three-dimensional structures that has massive chemical diversity across organic and metal-organic compounds. For these reasons, the CSD is finding significant uses in chemical education, and these applications are reviewed. As part of the teaching initiative of the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a teaching subset of more than 500 CSD structures has been created that illustrate key chemical concepts, and a number of teaching modules have been devised that make use of this subset in a teaching environment. All of this material is freely available from the CCDC website, and the subset can be freely viewed and interrogated using WebCSD, an internet application for searching and displaying CSD information content. In some cases, however, the complete CSD System is required for specific educational applications, and some examples of these more extensive teaching modules are also discussed. The educational value of visualizing real three-dimensional structures, and of handling real experimental results, is stressed throughout.

  9. The Cambridge Structural Database in retrospect and prospect.

    PubMed

    Groom, Colin R; Allen, Frank H

    2014-01-13

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC) was established in 1965 to record numerical, chemical and bibliographic data relating to published organic and metal-organic crystal structures. The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) now stores data for nearly 700,000 structures and is a comprehensive and fully retrospective historical archive of small-molecule crystallography. Nearly 40,000 new structures are added each year. As X-ray crystallography celebrates its centenary as a subject, and the CCDC approaches its own 50th year, this article traces the origins of the CCDC as a publicly funded organization and its onward development into a self-financing charitable institution. Principally, however, we describe the growth of the CSD and its extensive associated software system, and summarize its impact and value as a basis for research in structural chemistry, materials science and the life sciences, including drug discovery and drug development. Finally, the article considers the CCDC's funding model in relation to open access and open data paradigms.

  10. Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in chemical education.

    PubMed

    Battle, Gary M; Ferrence, Gregory M; Allen, Frank H

    2010-10-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) is a vast and ever growing compendium of accurate three-dimensional structures that has massive chemical diversity across organic and metal-organic compounds. For these reasons, the CSD is finding significant uses in chemical education, and these applications are reviewed. As part of the teaching initiative of the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a teaching subset of more than 500 CSD structures has been created that illustrate key chemical concepts, and a number of teaching modules have been devised that make use of this subset in a teaching environment. All of this material is freely available from the CCDC website, and the subset can be freely viewed and interrogated using WebCSD, an internet application for searching and displaying CSD information content. In some cases, however, the complete CSD System is required for specific educational applications, and some examples of these more extensive teaching modules are also discussed. The educational value of visualizing real three-dimensional structures, and of handling real experimental results, is stressed throughout. PMID:20877495

  11. The Cambridge Structural Database in retrospect and prospect.

    PubMed

    Groom, Colin R; Allen, Frank H

    2014-01-13

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC) was established in 1965 to record numerical, chemical and bibliographic data relating to published organic and metal-organic crystal structures. The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) now stores data for nearly 700,000 structures and is a comprehensive and fully retrospective historical archive of small-molecule crystallography. Nearly 40,000 new structures are added each year. As X-ray crystallography celebrates its centenary as a subject, and the CCDC approaches its own 50th year, this article traces the origins of the CCDC as a publicly funded organization and its onward development into a self-financing charitable institution. Principally, however, we describe the growth of the CSD and its extensive associated software system, and summarize its impact and value as a basis for research in structural chemistry, materials science and the life sciences, including drug discovery and drug development. Finally, the article considers the CCDC's funding model in relation to open access and open data paradigms. PMID:24382699

  12. Multiple sclerosis in the Cambridge health district of east Anglia.

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, C J; Fraser, M B; Wood, N W; Compston, D A

    1992-01-01

    A survey of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the Cambridge Health District has identified 374 cases in a population of 288,410, giving a prevalence of 130 per 100,000. A total of 322 cases (86%) had either clinically definite or probable multiple sclerosis on 1 July 1990 (112 per 100,000) and 52 cases (14%) had suspected multiple sclerosis (18 per 100,000.) The incidence during 1989-91 was 5.94 per 100,000 per year. The prevalence figure is higher than in recent surveys from other southern parts of the United Kingdom, but correction for the age and sex characteristics of the at risk population eliminates these differences. The overall prevalence of multiple sclerosis is probably between 108 and 120 per 100,000 in the southern United Kingdom. PMID:1431950

  13. Hamming's "open doors" and group creativity as keys to scientific excellence: the example of Cambridge.

    PubMed

    Erren, Thomas C

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Charlton used diverse approaches to identify research institutions which provided home to outstanding scientists and work. One intriguing example of long-lasting scientific excellence is Cambridge with 19 Nobel laureates who worked at the University or at the MRC Molecular Biology Unit when they received the prize between 1947 and 2006. With specific reference to Cambridge, I would like to complement the primarily quantitative assessment and offer considerations as to why and how research achievements may have clustered in space and time. Indeed, observations voiced by the mathematician Richard Hamming as to how great research can be pursued offer explanations for the series of great science in the UK. In my view, the most important determinant of the clustering may be illustrated by Hamming's fitting picture of "open doors": working in environments with the doors open allows constant interactions with peers with various disciplinary backgrounds, and thus fast avoidance of detours or dead ends in science and, ultimately, a focus on and the solution of problems of paramount, rather than of tangential, importance. Narrative insights into a strong argumentative tradition at Cambridge provided by Drs. Watson and Magueijo between 1968 and 2003 are in line with Hamming's suggestion and the value of group creativity. In the internet age with abundant interactions beyond home institutions we should not be surprised if clusters of great science were no longer confined to the usual suspect institutions which were awarded disproportionally with Nobel prizes in the past. PMID:17804173

  14. The Cambridge-Cambridge x-ray serendipity survey. 2: Classification of x-ray luminous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, B. J.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, Martin

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of an intermediate-resolution (1.5 A) spectroscopic study of 17 x-ray luminous narrow emission-line galaxies previously identified in the Cambridge-Cambridge ROSAT Serendipity Survey and the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey. Emission-line ratios reveal that the sample is composed of ten Seyfert and seven starburst galaxies. Measured linewidths for the narrow H alpha emission lines lie in the range 170 - 460 km s(exp -1). Five of the objects show clear evidence for asymmetry in the (OIII) lambda 5007 emission-line profile. Broad H alpha emission is detected in six of the Seyfert galaxies, which range in type from Seyfert 1.5 to 2. Broad H beta emission is only detected in one Seyfert galaxy. The mean full width at half maximum for the broad lines in the Seyfert galaxies is FWHM = 3900 +/- 1750 km s(exp -1). Broad (FWHM = 2200 +/- 600 km s(exp -1) H alpha emission is also detected in three of the starburst galaxies, which could originate from stellar winds or supernovae remnants. The mean Balmer decrement for the sample is H alpha / H beta = 3, consistent with little or no reddening for the bulk of the sample. There is no evidence for any trend with x-ray luminosity in the ratio of starburst galaxies to Seyfert galaxies. Based on our previous observations, it is therefore likely that both classes of object comprise approximately 10 percent of the 2 keV x-ray background.

  15. 1919: psychology and psychoanalysis, Cambridge and London - Myers, Jones and MacCurdy.

    PubMed

    Forrester, John

    2008-01-01

    Viewing the reception of psychoanalysis in Britain from Cambridge, the paper examines the intertwining histories of the post-War British Psychological Society and the founding of the British Psycho-Analytical Society, following the initiatives of the two principal psychological entrepreneurs of the era, Charles Myers and Ernest Jones, Reforms in Cambridge in which psychoanalysis played a significant part are analysed, including the foundation of a Clinic for Nervous Diseases and the establishment of a separate Department of Experimental Psychology. The career of J. T. MacCurdy, Jones's student and Lecturer in Psychopathology at Cambridge, is discussed.

  16. Worries of Pregnant Women: Testing the Farsi Cambridge Worry Scale.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Forough; Akaberi, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy adds many sources of concerns to women's daily life worries. Excessive worry can affect maternal physiological and psychological state that influences the pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to validate the Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS) in a sample of Iranian pregnant women. After translation of the CWS, ten experts evaluated the items and added six items to the 17-item scale. In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 405 of pregnant women booked for prenatal care completed the Farsi CWS. We split the sample randomly. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on the first half of the sample to disclose the factorial structure of the 23-item scale. The results of the EFA on the Farsi CWS indicated four factors altogether explained 51.5% of variances. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was done on the second half of the sample. The results of the CFA showed that the model fit our data (chi-square/df = 2.02, RMSEA = 0.071, SRMR = 0.071, CFI = 0.95, and NNFI = 0.94). Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the Farsi CWS was 0.883. The Farsi CWS is a reliable and valid instrument for understanding common pregnancy worries in the third trimester of pregnancy in Iranian women.

  17. Development and current status of the "Cambridge" loudness models.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J

    2014-10-13

    This article reviews the evolution of a series of models of loudness developed in Cambridge, UK. The first model, applicable to stationary sounds, was based on modifications of the model developed by Zwicker, including the introduction of a filter to allow for the effects of transfer of sound through the outer and middle ear prior to the calculation of an excitation pattern, and changes in the way that the excitation pattern was calculated. Later, modifications were introduced to the assumed middle-ear transfer function and to the way that specific loudness was calculated from excitation level. These modifications led to a finite calculated loudness at absolute threshold, which made it possible to predict accurately the absolute thresholds of broadband and narrowband sounds, based on the assumption that the absolute threshold corresponds to a fixed small loudness. The model was also modified to give predictions of partial loudness-the loudness of one sound in the presence of another. This allowed predictions of masked thresholds based on the assumption that the masked threshold corresponds to a fixed small partial loudness. Versions of the model for time-varying sounds were developed, which allowed prediction of the masked threshold of any sound in a background of any other sound. More recent extensions incorporate binaural processing to account for the summation of loudness across ears. In parallel, versions of the model for predicting loudness for hearing-impaired ears have been developed and have been applied to the development of methods for fitting multichannel compression hearing aids.

  18. Who Needs a Revision? 20 Years of Cambridge Shunt Lab.

    PubMed

    Czosnyka, Zofia; Czosnyka, Marek; Pickard, John D; Chari, Aswin

    2016-01-01

    Shunt testing independent of manufacturers provides knowledge that can significantly improve the management of patients with hydrocephalus. The Cambridge Shunt Evaluation Laboratory was created 20 years ago. Thanks to financial support from the Department of Health (1993-1998), all shunts in use in the UK were systematically evaluated, with "blue reports" being published. Later new devices were tested as they appeared in public domain.Twenty-six models have been evaluated. The majority of the valves had a non-physiologically low hydrodynamic resistance that may result in over-drainage, both related to posture and during nocturnal cerebral vasogenic waves. A long distal catheter increases the resistance of these valves by 100-200 %. Drainage through valves without a siphon-preventing mechanism is very sensitive to body posture. Shunts with siphon-preventing accessories offer a reasonable resistance to negative outlet pressure. Bench parameters were used to test shunt performance in vivo using infusion tests. A criterion for correctly performing a shunt procedure was established. Pressure measured in the shunt prechamber during the plateau phase of infusion should not remain more than 5 mmHg above the le shunt's operating pressure plus hydrodynamic resistance of the valve multiplied by the infusion rate. "Critical levels" for every shunt and every performance level have been used in the shunt testing wizard of ICM+ software.

  19. Worries of Pregnant Women: Testing the Farsi Cambridge Worry Scale.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Forough; Akaberi, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy adds many sources of concerns to women's daily life worries. Excessive worry can affect maternal physiological and psychological state that influences the pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to validate the Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS) in a sample of Iranian pregnant women. After translation of the CWS, ten experts evaluated the items and added six items to the 17-item scale. In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 405 of pregnant women booked for prenatal care completed the Farsi CWS. We split the sample randomly. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on the first half of the sample to disclose the factorial structure of the 23-item scale. The results of the EFA on the Farsi CWS indicated four factors altogether explained 51.5% of variances. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was done on the second half of the sample. The results of the CFA showed that the model fit our data (chi-square/df = 2.02, RMSEA = 0.071, SRMR = 0.071, CFI = 0.95, and NNFI = 0.94). Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the Farsi CWS was 0.883. The Farsi CWS is a reliable and valid instrument for understanding common pregnancy worries in the third trimester of pregnancy in Iranian women. PMID:27293974

  20. Worries of Pregnant Women: Testing the Farsi Cambridge Worry Scale

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Forough; Akaberi, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy adds many sources of concerns to women's daily life worries. Excessive worry can affect maternal physiological and psychological state that influences the pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to validate the Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS) in a sample of Iranian pregnant women. After translation of the CWS, ten experts evaluated the items and added six items to the 17-item scale. In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 405 of pregnant women booked for prenatal care completed the Farsi CWS. We split the sample randomly. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on the first half of the sample to disclose the factorial structure of the 23-item scale. The results of the EFA on the Farsi CWS indicated four factors altogether explained 51.5% of variances. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was done on the second half of the sample. The results of the CFA showed that the model fit our data (chi-square/df = 2.02, RMSEA = 0.071, SRMR = 0.071, CFI = 0.95, and NNFI = 0.94). Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the Farsi CWS was 0.883. The Farsi CWS is a reliable and valid instrument for understanding common pregnancy worries in the third trimester of pregnancy in Iranian women. PMID:27293974

  1. Taxonomic review of the New World spider genus Elaver O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898 (Araneae, Clubionidae).

    PubMed

    Saturnino, Regiane; Bonaldo, Alexandre Bragio

    2015-11-23

    Elaver O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898 is characterized and redescribed, including 49 species occurring from the United States to Argentina. Thirty seven previously known species are redescribed: Elaver achuca (Roddy, 1966) revalidated, E. balboae (Chickering, 1937), E. barroana (Chickering, 1937), E. calcarata (Kraus, 1955), E. carlota (Bryant, 1940), E. chisosa (Roddy, 1966), E. crinophora (Franganillo, 1934), E. crocota (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896), E. albicans (Franganillo, 1930) name restored, E. depuncta O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898, E. elaver (Bryant, 1940), E. excepta (L. Koch, 1866), E. grandivulva (Mello-Leitão, 1930), E. hortoni (Chickering, 1937), E. implicata (Gertsch, 1941), E. juana (Bryant, 1940), E. kohlsi (Gertsch & Jellison, 1939), E. linguata (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900), E. madera (Roddy, 1966), E. mirabilis (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896) new. comb., E. mulaiki (Gertsch, 1935), E. multinotata (Chickering, 1937), E. orvillei (Chickering, 1937), E. placida O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898, E. portoricensis (Petrunkevitch, 1930), E. quadrata (Kraus, 1955), E. richardi (Gertsch, 1941), E. sericea O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898, E. sigillata (Petrunkevitch, 1925), E. simplex (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896), E. texana (Gertsch, 1933), E. tigrina O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898 name restored, E. tricuspis (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900), E. tristani (Banks, 1909), E. tumivulva (Banks, 1909), E. valvula (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900) and E. wheeleri (Roewer, 1933). Ten new species are described: E. candelaria n. sp. and E. helenae n. sp. from Mexico; E. arawakan n. sp. from Haiti; E. lizae n. sp. from Costa Rica; E. darwichi n. sp. from Ecuador; E. juruti n. sp., E. tourinhoae n. sp. and E. vieirae n. sp. from Brazil; E. shinguito n. sp. from Peru and E. beni n. sp. from Bolivia. The female of E. hortoni is described for the first time. Lectotypes are designated for E. sigillata and its actual female is described for the first time. Four new synonyms are proposed: E. languida

  2. Reginald Crundall Punnett: First Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics, Cambridge, 1912

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A. W. F.

    2012-01-01

    R. C. Punnett, the codiscoverer of linkage with W. Bateson in 1904, had the good fortune to be invited to be the first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics at Cambridge University, United Kingdom, in 1912 when Bateson, for whom it had been intended, declined to leave his new appointment as first Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institute. We here celebrate the centenary of the first professorship dedicated to genetics, outlining Punnett’s career and his scientific contributions, with special reference to the discovery of “partial coupling” in the sweet pea (later “linkage”) and to the diagram known as Punnett’s square. His seeming reluctance as coauthor with Bateson to promote the reduplication hypothesis to explain the statistical evidence for linkage is stressed, as is his relationship with his successor as Arthur Balfour Professor, R. A. Fisher. The background to the establishment of the Professorship is also described. PMID:22964834

  3. Reginald Crundall Punnett: first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics, Cambridge, 1912.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A W F

    2012-09-01

    R. C. Punnett, the codiscoverer of linkage with W. Bateson in 1904, had the good fortune to be invited to be the first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics at Cambridge University, United Kingdom, in 1912 when Bateson, for whom it had been intended, declined to leave his new appointment as first Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institute. We here celebrate the centenary of the first professorship dedicated to genetics, outlining Punnett's career and his scientific contributions, with special reference to the discovery of "partial coupling" in the sweet pea (later "linkage") and to the diagram known as Punnett's square. His seeming reluctance as coauthor with Bateson to promote the reduplication hypothesis to explain the statistical evidence for linkage is stressed, as is his relationship with his successor as Arthur Balfour Professor, R. A. Fisher. The background to the establishment of the Professorship is also described.

  4. Cheminformatics Research at the Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics Cambridge

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E; Bender, Andreas; Glen, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    The Centre for Molecular Informatics, formerly Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics (UCMSI), at the University of Cambridge is a world-leading driving force in the field of cheminformatics. Since its opening in 2000 more than 300 scientific articles have fundamentally changed the field of molecular informatics. The Centre has been a key player in promoting open chemical data and semantic access. Though mainly focussing on basic research, close collaborations with industrial partners ensured real world feedback and access to high quality molecular data. A variety of tools and standard protocols have been developed and are ubiquitous in the daily practice of cheminformatics. Here, we present a retrospective of cheminformatics research performed at the UCMSI, thereby highlighting historical and recent trends in the field as well as indicating future directions. PMID:26435758

  5. Water quality in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area, 2005-8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.; Waldron, Marcus C.

    2015-01-01

    During 2005-8, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Water Department, measured concentrations of sodium and chloride, plant nutrients, commonly used pesticides, and caffeine in base-flow and stormwater samples collected from 11 tributaries in the Cambridge drinking-water source area. These data were used to characterize current water-quality conditions, to establish a baseline for future comparisons, and to describe trends in surface-water quality. The data also were used to assess the effects of watershed characteristics on surface-water quality and to inform future watershed management.

  6. Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative, Year-Long Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J. Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. Method: A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements…

  7. What To Look for in ESL Admission Tests: Cambridge Certificate Exams, IELTS, and TOEFL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalhoub-Deville, Micheline; Turner, Carolyn E.

    2000-01-01

    Familiarizes test users with issues to consider when employing assessments for screening and admission purposes. Examines the purpose, content, and scoring methods of three English-as-a-Second-Language admissions tests--the Cambridge certificate exams, International English Language Teaching System, and Test of English as a Foreign…

  8. Genetic Influences on Cognitive Function Using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Jamie J.; MacGregor, Alex J.; Cherkas, Lynn F.; Spector, Tim D.

    2006-01-01

    The genetic relationship between intelligence and components of cognition remains controversial. Conflicting results may be a function of the limited number of methods used in experimental evaluation. The current study is the first to use CANTAB (The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery). This is a battery of validated computerised…

  9. Linguistic Turn and Gendering Language in the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arimbi, Diah A.; Kwary, Deny A.

    2016-01-01

    Language constructs how humans perceive things. Since language is a human construction, it tends to be biased as it is mainly men's construction. Using gender perspectives, this paper attempts to discuss the imbalance in gender representations found in the examples given in an English learner's dictionary, that is, the "Cambridge Advanced…

  10. Legacies, Policies and Prospects: One Year on from the Cambridge Primary Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Robin

    2011-01-01

    This article features the "Cambridge Primary Review." The "Review" has been supported from the beginning by Esmee Fairbairn Foundation, and this has given it the independence which is essential to its credibility. Its remit was to investigate, report and make recommendations on the condition and future of primary education in England. Its scope…

  11. Curriculum, Pedagogy, and the Cambridge Primary Review: A Response to R. J. Campbell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to R.J. Campbell's critique of the "Cambridge Primary Review," which was published in the autumn of 2009. The author argues that Campbell's description of the "Review's" central proposals on curriculum and pedagogy as "backward-looking and inadequately theorised" is so misjudged as to call for a…

  12. Searching the Cambridge Structural Database for the 'best' representative of each unique polymorph.

    PubMed

    van de Streek, Jacco

    2006-08-01

    A computer program has been written that removes suspicious crystal structures from the Cambridge Structural Database and clusters the remaining crystal structures as polymorphs or redeterminations. For every set of redeterminations, one crystal structure is selected to be the best representative of that polymorph. The results, 243,355 well determined crystal structures grouped by unique polymorph, are presented and analysed. PMID:16840806

  13. The Effects of Style and Speaking Rate on /l/- Vocalisation in Local Cambridge English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Susan

    A study examined the effect of language style and variation in speech rate on the vocalization of /l/ in local Cambridge English. This sociolinguistic feature has been described as marking southeastern varieties of British English and as a connected speech process (CSP) in its sensitivity to variation in speaking rate. Language style variables…

  14. The Cambridge Car Memory Test: a task matched in format to the Cambridge Face Memory Test, with norms, reliability, sex differences, dissociations from face memory, and expertise effects.

    PubMed

    Dennett, Hugh W; McKone, Elinor; Tavashmi, Raka; Hall, Ashleigh; Pidcock, Madeleine; Edwards, Mark; Duchaine, Bradley

    2012-06-01

    Many research questions require a within-class object recognition task matched for general cognitive requirements with a face recognition task. If the object task also has high internal reliability, it can improve accuracy and power in group analyses (e.g., mean inversion effects for faces vs. objects), individual-difference studies (e.g., correlations between certain perceptual abilities and face/object recognition), and case studies in neuropsychology (e.g., whether a prosopagnosic shows a face-specific or object-general deficit). Here, we present such a task. Our Cambridge Car Memory Test (CCMT) was matched in format to the established Cambridge Face Memory Test, requiring recognition of exemplars across view and lighting change. We tested 153 young adults (93 female). Results showed high reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .84) and a range of scores suitable both for normal-range individual-difference studies and, potentially, for diagnosis of impairment. The mean for males was much higher than the mean for females. We demonstrate independence between face memory and car memory (dissociation based on sex, plus a modest correlation between the two), including where participants have high relative expertise with cars. We also show that expertise with real car makes and models of the era used in the test significantly predicts CCMT performance. Surprisingly, however, regression analyses imply that there is an effect of sex per se on the CCMT that is not attributable to a stereotypical male advantage in car expertise.

  15. Sir Joseph Barcroft, Cambridge placental and fetal research (1933-1966) and inter-generational Science.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Robert; Boyd, C A Richard

    2010-01-01

    The nature of Cambridge (UK) placental and fetal research in the middle third of the twentieth century is reviewed on the basis of published literature and personal recollection. Joseph Barcroft is a central figure who came to fetal research late in an extremely productive career which is briefly sketched. Contemporaneous Cambridge academics in the field included J.D. Boyd (the authors father), J. Hammond, F.H.A. Marshall, R.A. McCance, J. Needham, A.S. Parkes and Elsie Widdowson. The then current Cambridge academic geography is explained and features of its scientific life such as funding, institutional structure and ethos, teaching and clinical duties, domestic and gender roles, and political context, including war and empire, are briefly considered. The testing of research findings against general principles and use of quantitative thinking are identified as important features. Intergenerational connections, often within individual families, are identified as a striking feature. The long-term impact of Cambridge work of this period; locally, in current trophoblast and feto-placental genetic research, in Oxford in probably influencing G.S. Dawes research leadership, and internationally, especially through D.H. Barron, and through him to the Denver School, is considered. That human placental and embryological specimens collected by J.D. Boyd have received a new lease of life as the "Boyd Collection", including use by Allen Enders is noted. Mechanisms for the maintenance of scientific quality and productivity during the period, mainly through the scientist himself relying on an internalised sense of "obligation", are contrasted with those current in the UK and more widely; formal peer-review at frequent intervals, with subsequent allocation of short-term funding. The strengths and weaknesses of each are considered.

  16. Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.

    1998-01-01

    This Grant was used to publish the Proceedings from the Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun held in Florence, Italy from 3 to 6 October 1995. The Proceedings were published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in their Conference Series, Volume 109 in 1996. This volume was edited by Roberto Pallavicini and Andrea K. Dupree. A copy of the title page and the Table of Contents of the volume is appended.

  17. PET/MRI in the infarcted mouse heart with the Cambridge split magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonincontri, Guido; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

    2013-02-01

    Chronic heart failure, as a result of acute myocardial infarction, is a leading cause of death worldwide. Combining diagnostic imaging modalities may aid the direct assessment of experimental treatments targeting heart failure in vivo. Here we present preliminary data using the Cambridge combined PET/MRI imaging system in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. The split-magnet design can deliver uncompromised MRI and PET performance, for better assessment of disease and treatment in a preclinical environment.

  18. Innovative Primary Care Training: The Cambridge Health Alliance Oral Physician Program

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Brittany Anne; Swann, Brian; Jayaratne, Yasas S. N.; Outlaw, Jason; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the Oral Physician Program, a dental residency sponsored by Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and the Cambridge Health Alliance that offers an innovative model for training dentists to provide limited primary care. The didactic and clinical experiences increased residents' medical knowledge and interviewing skills, and faculty assessments supported their role as oral physicians. Oral physicians could increase patients'—especially patients from underserved groups—access to integrated oral and primary care services. PMID:22994253

  19. Two cases of induced insanity. Helene Deutsch, Cambridge, Mass.

    PubMed

    Roazen, P

    1981-01-01

    "Two cases of induced insanity", hitherto untranslated, was Helene Deutsch's first (1918) psychoanalytic paper; she presented Freud with a copy of it during the beginning of her analysis with him. As an experienced clinician who had studied under both Wagner von Jauregg in Vienna and Emil Kraepelin in Munich, Deutsch observed these cases during World War I as the University of Vienna's psychiatric facilities. Although the general reading public knows her best for her The Psychology of Women, she also wrote some well-known clinical papers; and it is characteristic of her that she brought these two cases without excessive theoretical speculation. In "Two cases in induced insanity" Deutsch described some of the strains of the wartime situation, and how whole families could join in hysterical confabulations in order to cope with emotional distress. One of her most famous later clinical contribution had to do with the emotional impoverishment of 'as if' personalities and their specific suggestibility. In other papers she continued her early concern with disturbed identification. As one examines Deutsch's work it is possible to fill out the history of psychoanalytic psychology. Without ignoring her later increase in theoretical sophistication, in "Two cases of induced insanity" we find Deutsch remarkably tolerant in her willingness to suspend judgement about the sources and fate of morbid thinking. A key therapeutic recommendation of hers was to separate the family members to allow their reality to return. Like some recent critics of undue diagnostic name-calling she advocated hesitation in discerning of disease entities as well as cautionary approach to treatment. The nature of familial love may leave everyone "normal" prone to disturbances which are not necessarily to be treated as a psychiatric illness. This example of one of Deutsch's first professional essays reflects the early thinking of a giant in psychoanalysis. She followed Freud in the conviction that the

  20. Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny.

    PubMed

    Brown, L Michael; Batson, Philip E; Dellby, Niklas; Krivanek, Ondrej L

    2015-10-01

    We provide a brief history of the project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that started in Cambridge (UK) and continued in Kirkland (WA, USA), Yorktown Heights (NY, USA), and other places. We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction research and related work, partly in response to the incomplete context presented in the paper "In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday", recently published in Ultramicroscopy.

  1. Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny.

    PubMed

    Brown, L Michael; Batson, Philip E; Dellby, Niklas; Krivanek, Ondrej L

    2015-10-01

    We provide a brief history of the project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that started in Cambridge (UK) and continued in Kirkland (WA, USA), Yorktown Heights (NY, USA), and other places. We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction research and related work, partly in response to the incomplete context presented in the paper "In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday", recently published in Ultramicroscopy. PMID:26094204

  2. Technology Solutions Case Study: Boiler Control Replacement for Hydronically Heated Multifamily Buildings, Cambridge, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-01

    The ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. (HRI) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, to study improvements to the central hydronic heating system in one of the nonprofit's housing developments. The heating controls in the three-building, 42-unit Columbia Cambridge Alliance for Spanish Tenants housing development were upgraded. Fuel use in the development was excessive compared to similar properties. A poorly insulated thermal envelope contributed to high energy bills, but adding wall insulation was not cost-effective or practical. The more cost-effective option was improving heating system efficiency, which faced several obstacles, including inflexible boiler controls and failed thermostatic radiator valves. Boiler controls were replaced with systems that offer temperature setbacks and one that controls heat based on apartment temperature in addition to outdoor temperature. Utility bill analysis shows that post-retrofit weather-normalized heating energy use was reduced by 10%-31% (average of 19%). Indoor temperature cutoff reduced boiler runtime (and therefore heating fuel consumption) by 28% in the one building in which it was implemented. Nearly all savings were obtained during night which had a lower indoor temperature cut off (68°F) than day (73° F). This implies that the outdoor reset curve was appropriately adjusted for this building for daytime operation. Nighttime setback of heating system supply water temperature had no discernable impact on boiler runtime or gas bills.

  3. Building America Case Study: Boiler Control Replacement for Hydronically Heated Multifamily Buildings, Cambridge, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    The ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. (HRI) of Cambridge, Massachusetts, to study improvements to the central hydronic heating system in one of the nonprofit's housing developments. The heating controls in the three-building, 42-unit Columbia Cambridge Alliance for Spanish Tenants housing development were upgraded. Fuel use in the development was excessive compared to similar properties. A poorly insulated thermal envelope contributed to high energy bills, but adding wall insulation was not cost-effective or practical. The more cost-effective option was improving heating system efficiency. Efficient operation of the heating system faced several obstacles, including inflexible boiler controls and failed thermostatic radiator valves. Boiler controls were replaced with systems that offer temperature setbacks and one that controls heat based on apartment temperature in addition to outdoor temperature. Utility bill analysis shows that post-retrofit weather-normalized heating energy use was reduced by 10%-31% (average of 19%). Indoor temperature cutoff reduced boiler runtime (and therefore heating fuel consumption) by 28% in the one building in which it was implemented. Nearly all savings were obtained during night which had a lower indoor temperature cut off (68 degrees F) than day (73 degrees F). This implies that the outdoor reset curve was appropriately adjusted for this building for daytime operation. Nighttime setback of heating system supply water temperature had no discernable impact on boiler runtime or gas bills.

  4. The factors influencing car use in a cycle-friendly city: the case of Cambridge.

    PubMed

    Carse, Andrew; Goodman, Anna; Mackett, Roger L; Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2013-04-01

    Encouraging people out of their cars and into other modes of transport, which has major advantages for health, the environment and urban development, has proved difficult. Greater understanding of the influences that lead people to use the car, particularly for shorter journeys, may help to achieve this. This paper examines the predictors of car use compared with the bicycle to explore how it may be possible to persuade more people to use the bicycle instead of the car. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the socio-demographic, transport and health-related correlates of mode choice for work, shopping and leisure trips in Cambridge, a city with high levels of cycling by UK standards. The key findings are that commuting distance and free workplace parking were strongly associated with use of the car for work trips, and car availability and lower levels of education were associated with car use for leisure, shopping and short-distanced commuting trips. The case of Cambridge shows that more policies could be adopted, particularly a reduction in free car parking, to increase cycling and reduce the use of the car, especially over short distances.

  5. Liver transplantation in 100 children: Cambridge and King's College Hospital series.

    PubMed Central

    Salt, A; Noble-Jamieson, G; Barnes, N D; Mowat, A P; Rolles, K; Jamieson, N; Johnston, P; Friend, P; Calne, R Y

    1992-01-01

    To review the results of the Addenbrooke's and King's College Hospital children's liver transplantation programme. Retrospective analysis of the first 100 children to receive liver grafts at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, from December 1983 to March 1990. Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, and King's College Hospital, London. 153 children assessed for liver transplantation, of whom 22 died before a donor became available and 31 were considered unsuitable. 100 children received grafts, of whom 27 had second grafts. One year actuarial patient survival was 71%, with 57% one year graft survival. In the last two years survival rates had improved considerably, with 86% of patients and 63% of grafts surviving for at least one year. Sixty five children were alive 12 to 86 months after transplantation; 63 were well and leading normal active lives and 56 had entirely normal liver function. Children's growth and development were essentially normal, with many showing remarkable catch up growth. Liver transplantation offers children with terminal liver disease a high chance of a return to full quality life and normal development. Improved surgical and medical care have progressively improved survival. The timing of transplantation is critical but has been constrained particularly by the availability of donors and resources. PMID:1547389

  6. The factors influencing car use in a cycle-friendly city: the case of Cambridge

    PubMed Central

    Carse, Andrew; Goodman, Anna; Mackett, Roger L.; Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2013-01-01

    Encouraging people out of their cars and into other modes of transport, which has major advantages for health, the environment and urban development, has proved difficult. Greater understanding of the influences that lead people to use the car, particularly for shorter journeys, may help to achieve this. This paper examines the predictors of car use compared with the bicycle to explore how it may be possible to persuade more people to use the bicycle instead of the car. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the socio-demographic, transport and health-related correlates of mode choice for work, shopping and leisure trips in Cambridge, a city with high levels of cycling by UK standards. The key findings are that commuting distance and free workplace parking were strongly associated with use of the car for work trips, and car availability and lower levels of education were associated with car use for leisure, shopping and short-distanced commuting trips. The case of Cambridge shows that more policies could be adopted, particularly a reduction in free car parking, to increase cycling and reduce the use of the car, especially over short distances. PMID:24954981

  7. Factor V Leiden, factor V Cambridge, factor II GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Saadatnia, Mohammad; Salehi, Mansour; Movahedian, Ahmad; Shariat, Seyed Ziaeddin Samsam; Salari, Mehri; Tajmirriahi, Marzieh; Asadimobarakeh, Elham; Salehi, Rasoul; Amini, Gilda; Ebrahimi, Homa; Kheradmand, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Factor V G1691A (FV Leiden), FII GA20210, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutations are the most common genetic risk factors for thromboembolism in the Western countries. However, there is rare data in Iran about cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis (CVST) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of common genetic thrombophilic factors in CVST patients. Materials and Methods: Forty consequently CVST patients from two University Hospital in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences aged more than 15 years from January 2009 to January 2011 were recruited. In parallel, 51 healthy subjects with the same age and race from similar population selected as controls. FV Leiden, FII GA20210, MTHFR C677T, and FV Cambridge gene mutations by polymerase chain reaction technique were evaluated in case and control groups. Results: FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge gene mutations had very low prevalence in both case (5%, 2%, 0%) and control (2.5%, 0%, 0%) and were not found any significant difference between groups. MTHFR C677T mutations was in 22 (55%) of patients in case group and 18 (35.5%) of control group (P = 0.09). Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of FV Leiden, FII GA20210, and FV Cambridge were low. Laboratory investigations of these mutations as a routine test for all patients with CVST may not be cost benefit. PMID:26600830

  8. Bericht uber den 2. Internationalen Kongress fur Angewandte Linguistik. Cambridge 8.-12. IX. 1969. [Report on the Second International Congress for Applied Linguistics, Cambridge, Dec. 8-12, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Peter

    This paper is a summary report on the Second International Congress of Applied Linguistics held in Cambridge, England in September 1969. Because of the large number of papers delivered, only a selection of the papers delivered in any one section of the Congress are considered, and the author attempts to identify current interests and trends in…

  9. Agricultural accidents: A study of 132 patients seen at addenbrooke's hospital, Cambridge, in 12 months

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D. K. C.

    1969-01-01

    In a 12-month study 132 patients injured in agricultural accidents were treated at the Accident Service of Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge. Agricultural machinery and implements were concerned in 50% of the accidents and animals in 10%. The state of immunity against tetanus of these patients was found to be extremely low, only 9% being fully immunized, and 56% having never received a course of prophylactic adsorbed tetanus toxoid. While prevention is obviously the only real solution to accidents of any nature, legislation is not enough to achieve this, and the final responsibility lies with the farmworker to ensure that all safety precautions are followed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5388731

  10. Does the Cambridge Automated Neuropsychological Test Battery (CANTAB) Distinguish Between Cognitive Domains in Healthy Older Adults?

    PubMed

    Lenehan, Megan E; Summers, Mathew J; Saunders, Nichole L; Summers, Jeffery J; Vickers, James C

    2016-04-01

    The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) is a semiautomated computer interface for assessing cognitive function. We examined whether CANTAB tests measured specific cognitive functions, using established neuropsychological tests as a reference point. A sample of 500 healthy older (M = 60.28 years, SD = 6.75) participants in the Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project completed battery of CANTAB subtests and standard paper-based neuropsychological tests. Confirmatory factor analysis identified four factors: processing speed, verbal ability, episodic memory, and working memory. However, CANTAB tests did not consistently load onto the cognitive domain factors derived from traditional measures of the same function. These results indicate that five of the six CANTAB subtests examined did not load onto single cognitive functions. These CANTAB tests may lack the sensitivity to measure discrete cognitive functions in healthy populations or may measure other cognitive domains not included in the traditional neuropsychological battery.

  11. Experience from two decades of the Cambridge Rapid Access Neurology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Axinte, Laura T; Fiddes, Barnaby D; Donaghy, Alastair; Whyte, Adam; Allen, Chris; Sawcer, Stephen J; Adam, Robert J; Stacpoole, Sybil R L

    2015-10-01

    We report on the evolution of the rapid access neurology clinic (established in 1995) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge. Annualised attendance data demonstrate an ever increasing demand, with primary headache disorders now accounting for more than 40% of referrals. Secondary causes of headache (including intracranial tumours, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, carotid or vertebral artery dissection and subdural haematomas) remain infrequent. In all such cases, there were additional diagnostic clues. The number of patients referred with problems related to chronic neurological diseases has fallen considerably, reflecting the roles of specialist nurses and clinics. Imaging investigation of choice shifted from computerised tomography scan (45 to 16%) towards magnetic resonance imaging (17 to 47%). Management is increasingly on an outpatient basis, often without the need for a follow-up appointment. The experience presented here should inform further development of rapid access neurology clinics across the UK and suggests the need for acute headache services, in line with those for transient ischaemic attack and first seizure.

  12. The Cambridge Structural Database: a quarter of a million crystal structures and rising.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H

    2002-06-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) now contains data for more than a quarter of a million small-molecule crystal structures. The information content of the CSD, together with methods for data acquisition, processing and validation, are summarized, with particular emphasis on the chemical information added by CSD editors. Nearly 80% of new structural data arrives electronically, mostly in CIF format, and the CCDC acts as the official crystal structure data depository for 51 major journals. The CCDC now maintains both a CIF archive (more than 73,000 CIFs dating from 1996), as well as the distributed binary CSD archive; the availability of data in both archives is discussed. A statistical survey of the CSD is also presented and projections concerning future accession rates indicate that the CSD will contain at least 500,000 crystal structures by the year 2010.

  13. Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in organic chemistry and crystal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H; Motherwell, W D Samuel

    2002-06-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and its associated software systems have formed the basis for more than 800 research applications in structural chemistry, crystallography and the life sciences. Relevant references, dating from the mid-1970s, and brief synopses of these papers are collected in a database, DBUse, which is freely available via the CCDC website. This database has been used to review research applications of the CSD in organic chemistry, including supramolecular applications, and in organic crystal chemistry. The review concentrates on applications that have been published since 1990 and covers a wide range of topics, including structure correlation, conformational analysis, hydrogen bonding and other intermolecular interactions, studies of crystal packing, extended structural motifs, crystal engineering and polymorphism, and crystal structure prediction. Applications of CSD information in studies of crystal structure precision, the determination of crystal structures from powder diffraction data, together with applications in chemical informatics, are also discussed.

  14. Floodplain management: Land acquisition versus preservation of historic buildings in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Wendy J.; Mitchell, Bruce

    1983-07-01

    Non-structural adjustments in floodplain management are often avoided because they are seen to infringe on personal rights, adversely affect property values and restrict local tax bases. Land acquisition programs in urban areas encounter a further problem when they lead to demolition of buildings and other structures considered to have historical or architectural value. An experience in Cambridge, Ontario demonstrates that the potential conflict between flood damage reduction and historical preservation objectives can be exacerbated as a result of uncoordinated planning efforts, inflexibility in interpreting mandates, unclear roles for participating agencies, and lack of cooperation Many of these dilemmas can be resolved through consultation and discussion early in the planning process as well as through a willingness to be flexible and to search for a compromise

  15. Color discrimination across four life decades assessed by the Cambridge Colour Test.

    PubMed

    Paramei, Galina V

    2012-02-01

    Color discrimination was estimated using the Cambridge Colour Test (CCT) in 160 normal trichromats of four life decades, 20-59 years of age. For each age cohort, medians and tolerance limits of the CCT parameters are tabulated. Compared across the age cohorts (Kruskal-Wallis test), the Trivector test showed increases in the three vectors, Protan, Deutan, and Tritan, with advancing age; the Ellipses test revealed significant elongation of the major axes of all three ellipses but no changes in either the axis ratio or the angle of the ellipse major axis. Multiple comparisons (Mann-Whitney test) between the cohorts of four age decades (20+,…,50+) revealed initial benign deterioration of color discrimination in the 40+ decade, as an incremental loss of discrimination along the Deutan axis (Trivector test), and in the 50+ decade, as an elongation of the major axes of all three ellipses (Ellipses test).

  16. NewsMars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Mars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

  17. The long-term impact of urbanisation on aquatic plants: Cambridge and the River Cam.

    PubMed

    Preston, C D; Sheail, J; Armitage, P; Davy-Bowker, J

    2003-10-01

    Historical and contemporary records have been used to assess the impact of urbanisation on the aquatic plants of the River Cam and its narrow floodplain in Cambridge. Of the 62 native aquatic plant species which have been recorded in the study area since 1660, 40 (65%) were still present in the period 1985-1999 whereas 22 (35%) are apparently extinct. There is a striking relationship between the fate of species and their trophic requirements, with species of less eutrophic habitats having suffered disproportionately. Historical records demonstrate that the River Cam became grossly polluted by sewage from Cambridge in the 19th century, but the chemical and biological quality of the river improved from 1897 onwards. However, the majority of the species recorded from the river and nearby ditches persisted until after maximum incidence of sewage pollution, which may even have stimulated the growth of 'weed' in the river. Losses of aquatic plant species from two riparian commons, Coe Fen (35%) and Sheep's Green (50%), have been particularly great. The level of these and other areas of low-lying common land by the river has been systematically raised by the controlled tipping of waste in hollows, followed by levelling and resowing. The main effects of urbanisation on the flora therefore arose from the transformation of riparian pastures into suburban open spaces. Commons which are used purely for amenity purposes have lost almost all their aquatic plant species. Those which are still grazed retain more, and continuance of grazing is probably essential if a varied aquatic flora is to be maintained. The interpretation of botanical records in terms of recorded management history is likely to throw further light on the processes of urbanisation, although the number of sites with a sufficiently detailed botanical record may be limited. PMID:14499527

  18. A computer-controlled color vision test for children based on the Cambridge Colour Test.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Paulo R K; Bandeira, Marcio L; Tsubota, Daniela; Oiwa, Nestor N; Costa, Marcelo F; Ventura, Dora F

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed at providing conditions for the assessment of color discrimination in children using a modified version of the Cambridge Colour Test (CCT, Cambridge Research Systems Ltd., Rochester, UK). Since the task of indicating the gap of the Landolt C used in that test proved counterintuitive and/or difficult for young children to understand, we changed the target stimulus to a patch of color approximately the size of the Landolt C gap (about 7 degrees of visual angle at 50 cm from the monitor). The modifications were performed for the CCT Trivector test which measures color discrimination for the protan, deutan and tritan confusion lines. Experiment 1 sought to evaluate the correspondence between the CCT and the child-friendly adaptation with adult subjects (n = 29) with normal color vision. Results showed good agreement between the two test versions. Experiment 2 tested the child-friendly software with children 2 to 7 years old (n = 25) using operant training techniques for establishing and maintaining the subjects' performance. Color discrimination thresholds were progressively lower as age increased within the age range tested (2 to 30 years old), and the data--including those obtained for children--fell within the range of thresholds previously obtained for adults with the CCT. The protan and deutan thresholds were consistently lower than tritan thresholds, a pattern repeatedly observed in adults tested with the CCT. The results demonstrate that the test is fit for assessment of color discrimination in young children and may be a useful tool for the establishment of color vision thresholds during development.

  19. Healthy Living Cambridge Kids: a community-based participatory effort to promote healthy weight and fitness.

    PubMed

    Chomitz, Virginia R; McGowan, Robert J; Wendel, Josefine M; Williams, Sandra A; Cabral, Howard J; King, Stacey E; Olcott, Dawn B; Cappello, Maryann; Breen, Susan; Hacker, Karen A

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a community-based healthy weight intervention on child weight and fitness. Cambridge Public Schools (CPS) have monitored BMI and fitness annually since 2000. Annual increases of overweight and obesity from 2000 (37.0%) to 2004 (39.1%), triggered a multidisciplinary team of researchers, educators, health care, and public health professionals to mobilize environmental and policy interventions. Guided by the social-ecological model and community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, the team developed and implemented Healthy Living Cambridge Kids (HLCK), a multicomponent intervention targeting community, school, family, and individuals. The intervention included city policies and community awareness campaigns; physical education (PE) enhancements, food service reforms, farm-to-school-to-home programs; and family outreach and "BMI and fitness reports". Baseline (2004) to follow-up (2007) evaluation design assessed change in children's weight and fitness status. A cohort of 1,858 K-5th grade children participated: 37.3% black, 14.0% Hispanic, 37.1% white, 10.2% Asian, 1.7% other race; 43.3% were lower income. BMI z-score (0.67-0.63 P < 0.001) and proportion obese (20.2-18.0% P < 0.05) decreased, and mean number of fitness tests (0-5) passed increased (3.7-3.9 P < 0.001). Whereas black and Hispanic children were more likely to be obese at baseline (27.0 and 28.5%, respectively) compared with white (12.6%) and Asian (14.3%) children, obesity among all race/ethnicity groups declined. Concurrent with a 3-year community intervention, modest improvements in obesity and fitness were observed among CPS children from baseline to follow-up. The CBPR approach facilitated sustaining policies and program elements postintervention in this diverse community.

  20. M-DCPS Student Performance in International Baccalaureate and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education Programs. Research Brief. Volume 1102

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2011-01-01

    This Research Brief summarizes the performance of M-DCPS students participating in the International Baccalaureate (IB) and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) programs. Outcome data are provided for the eight M-DCPS schools offering the two programs and corresponding examinations. Participation in international…

  1. Source-Water Protection and Water-Quality Investigations in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Supply System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, Marcus C.; Norton, Chip; MacDonald, Timothy W.D.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction The Cambridge Water Department (CWD) supplies about 15 million gallons of water each day to more than 95,000 customers in the City of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Most of this water is obtained from a system of reservoirs located in Cambridge and in parts of five other suburban-Boston communities. The drainage basin that contributes water to these reservoirs includes several potential sources of drinking-water contaminants, including major highways, secondary roads, areas of commercial and industrial development, and suburban residential tracts. The CWD is implementing a comprehensive Source-Water Protection Plan to ensure that the highest quality water is delivered to the treatment plant. A key element of this plan is a program that combines systematic monitoring of the drainage basin with detailed investigations of the effects of nonpoint-source contaminants, such as highway-deicing chemicals, nutrients, oxygen-demanding organic compounds, bacteria, and trace metals arising from stormwater runoff. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working with the CWD and the Massachusetts Highway Department (MassHighway) to develop a better understanding of the sources, transport, and fate of many of these contaminants. This Fact Sheet describes source-water protection and water-quality investigations currently underway in the Cambridge drinking-water supply system. The investigations are designed to complement a national effort by the USGS to provide water suppliers and regulatory agencies with information on the vulnerability of water supplies and the movement and fate of source-water contaminants.

  2. Towards the 1980s: Papers Presented at the BACIE Annual Conference at Trinity College, Cambridge, September 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Association for Commercial and Industrial Education, London (England).

    The annual conference of the British Association for Commercial and Industrial Education (BACIE), held at Trinity College, Cambridge, England, in September 1968, was devoted to educational objectives for England for the 1980's. The three speeches presented were, "The Objectives of Society" (Sir Herbert Butterfield), "Industry in the 1980's (G.A.H.…

  3. Characteristic conformation of Mosher's amide elucidated using the cambridge structural database.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Akio; Ono, Hiroshi; Mikata, Yuji

    2015-07-16

    Conformations of the crystalline 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-methoxy-2-phenylpropanamide derivatives (MTPA amides) deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) were examined statistically as Racid-enantiomers. The majority of dihedral angles (48/58, ca. 83%) of the amide carbonyl groups and the trifluoromethyl groups ranged from -30° to 0° with an average angle θ1 of -13°. The other conformational properties were also clarified: (1) one of the fluorine atoms was antiperiplanar (ap) to the amide carbonyl group, forming a staggered conformation; (2) the MTPA amides prepared from primary amines showed a Z form in amide moieties; (3) in the case of the MTPA amide prepared from a primary amine possessing secondary alkyl groups (i.e., Mosher-type MTPA amide), the dihedral angles between the methine groups and the carbonyl groups were syn and indicative of a moderate conformational flexibility; (4) the phenyl plane was inclined from the O-Cchiral bond of the methoxy moiety with an average dihedral angle θ2 of +21°; (5) the methyl group of the methoxy moiety was ap to the ipso-carbon atom of the phenyl group.

  4. Face recognition performance of individuals with Asperger syndrome on the Cambridge Face Memory Test.

    PubMed

    Hedley, Darren; Brewer, Neil; Young, Robyn

    2011-12-01

    Although face recognition deficits in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), including Asperger syndrome (AS), are widely acknowledged, the empirical evidence is mixed. This in part reflects the failure to use standardized and psychometrically sound tests. We contrasted standardized face recognition scores on the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT) for 34 individuals with AS with those for 42, IQ-matched non-ASD individuals, and age-standardized scores from a large Australian cohort. We also examined the influence of IQ, autistic traits, and negative affect on face recognition performance. Overall, participants with AS performed significantly worse on the CFMT than the non-ASD participants and when evaluated against standardized test norms. However, while 24% of participants with AS presented with severe face recognition impairment (>2 SDs below the mean), many individuals performed at or above the typical level for their age: 53% scored within +/- 1 SD of the mean and 9% demonstrated superior performance (>1 SD above the mean). Regression analysis provided no evidence that IQ, autistic traits, or negative affect significantly influenced face recognition: diagnostic group membership was the only significant predictor of face recognition performance. In sum, face recognition performance in ASD is on a continuum, but with average levels significantly below non-ASD levels of performance.

  5. Swift observations of unidentified radio sources in the revised Third Cambridge Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, A.; Massaro, F.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Liuzzo, E.; Tremblay, G. R.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated a group of unassociated radio sources included in the Third Cambridge Catalogue (3CR) to increase the multifrequency information on them and possibly obtain an identification. We have carried out an observational campaign with the Swift satellite to observe with the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) the field of view of 21 bright NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) sources within the positional uncertainty region of the 3CR sources. Furthermore, we have searched in the recent AllWISE Source Catalogue for infrared sources matching the position of these NVSS sources. We have detected significant emission in the soft X-ray band for nine of the investigated NVSS sources. To all of them, and in four cases with no soft X-ray association, we have associated a Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared counterpart. Eight of these infrared candidates have not been proposed earlier in the literature. In the five remaining cases our candidate matches one among a few optical candidates suggested for the same 3CR source in previous studies. No source has been detected in the UVOT filters at the position of the NVSS objects, confirming the scenario that all of them are heavily obscured. With this in mind, a spectroscopic campaign, preferably in the infrared band, will be necessary to establish the nature of the sources that we have finally identified.

  6. Characteristic conformation of Mosher's amide elucidated using the cambridge structural database.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Akio; Ono, Hiroshi; Mikata, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Conformations of the crystalline 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-methoxy-2-phenylpropanamide derivatives (MTPA amides) deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) were examined statistically as Racid-enantiomers. The majority of dihedral angles (48/58, ca. 83%) of the amide carbonyl groups and the trifluoromethyl groups ranged from -30° to 0° with an average angle θ1 of -13°. The other conformational properties were also clarified: (1) one of the fluorine atoms was antiperiplanar (ap) to the amide carbonyl group, forming a staggered conformation; (2) the MTPA amides prepared from primary amines showed a Z form in amide moieties; (3) in the case of the MTPA amide prepared from a primary amine possessing secondary alkyl groups (i.e., Mosher-type MTPA amide), the dihedral angles between the methine groups and the carbonyl groups were syn and indicative of a moderate conformational flexibility; (4) the phenyl plane was inclined from the O-Cchiral bond of the methoxy moiety with an average dihedral angle θ2 of +21°; (5) the methyl group of the methoxy moiety was ap to the ipso-carbon atom of the phenyl group. PMID:26193245

  7. Item response theory analyses of the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT).

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Wilmer, Jeremy; Herzmann, Grit; McGugin, Rankin Williams; Fiset, Daniel; Van Gulick, Ana E; Ryan, Kaitlin F; Gauthier, Isabel

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT; Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006). First, we assessed the dimensionality of the test with a bifactor exploratory factor analysis (EFA). This EFA analysis revealed a general factor and 3 specific factors clustered by targets of CFMT. However, the 3 specific factors appeared to be minor factors that can be ignored. Second, we fit a unidimensional item response model. This item response model showed that the CFMT items could discriminate individuals at different ability levels and covered a wide range of the ability continuum. We found the CFMT to be particularly precise for a wide range of ability levels. Third, we implemented item response theory (IRT) differential item functioning (DIF) analyses for each gender group and 2 age groups (age ≤ 20 vs. age > 21). This DIF analysis suggested little evidence of consequential differential functioning on the CFMT for these groups, supporting the use of the test to compare older to younger, or male to female, individuals. Fourth, we tested for a gender difference on the latent facial recognition ability with an explanatory item response model. We found a significant but small gender difference on the latent ability for face recognition, which was higher for women than men by 0.184, at age mean 23.2, controlling for linear and quadratic age effects. Finally, we discuss the practical considerations of the use of total scores versus IRT scale scores in applications of the CFMT.

  8. Item Response Theory Analyses of the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT)

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Wilmer, Jeremy; Herzmann, Grit; McGugin, Rankin; Fiset, Daniel; Van Gulick, Ana E.; Ryan, Katie; Gauthier, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Cambridge face memory test (CFMT; Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006). First, we assessed the dimensionality of the test with a bi-factor exploratory factor analysis (EFA). This EFA analysis revealed a general factor and three specific factors clustered by targets of CFMT. However, the three specific factors appeared to be minor factors that can be ignored. Second, we fit a unidimensional item response model. This item response model showed that the CFMT items could discriminate individuals at different ability levels and covered a wide range of the ability continuum. We found the CFMT to be particularly precise for a wide range of ability levels. Third, we implemented item response theory (IRT) differential item functioning (DIF) analyses for each gender group and two age groups (Age ≤ 20 versus Age > 21). This DIF analysis suggested little evidence of consequential differential functioning on the CFMT for these groups, supporting the use of the test to compare older to younger, or male to female, individuals. Fourth, we tested for a gender difference on the latent facial recognition ability with an explanatory item response model. We found a significant but small gender difference on the latent ability for face recognition, which was higher for women than men by 0.184, at age mean 23.2, controlling for linear and quadratic age effects. Finally, we discuss the practical considerations of the use of total scores versus IRT scale scores in applications of the CFMT. PMID:25642930

  9. Plasma-Surface Interaction Research At The Cambridge Laboratory Of Accelerator Studies Of Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. S.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Woller, K. B.; Whyte, D. G.

    2011-06-01

    The material requirements for plasma-facing components in a nuclear fusion reactor are some of the strictest and most challenging facing us today. These materials are simultaneously exposed to extreme heat loads (20 MW/m2 steady-state, 1 GW/m2 in millisecond transients) and particle fluxes (>1024 m-2 s-1) while also undergoing high neutron irradiation (1018 neutrons/m2 s). At the Cambridge Laboratory of Accelerator Studies of Surfaces (CLASS), many of the most important issues in plasma-surface interaction research, such as plasma-driven material erosion and deposition, material transport and irradiation and hydrogenic retention are investigated with the use of a 1.7 MV tandem ion accelerator. Ion-Beam Analysis (IBA) is used to investigate and quantify changes in materials due to plasma exposure and ion irradiation is used as a proxy for neutron irradiation to investigate plasma-surface interactions for irradiated materials. This report will outline the capabilities and current research activities at CLASS.

  10. A statistical survey of the Cambridge structural database concerning density and packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Rozas, Isabel; Elguero, José; Foces-Foces, Concepción; Cano, Félix H.

    1996-09-01

    We have carried out a statistical survey of the Cambridge Structural Database concerning crystallographic density d, averaged atomic weight AAw (defined as molecular weight divided by the number of non-hydrogen atoms) and packing coefficient C. For 97 658 hits we have found the following average values: d = 1.6, AAw = 18.2 and C = 19.4 (instead of 18). We have introduced two other new parameters V 1 = {V}/{Z} the unit cell volume per molecule (or set of molecules in salts and co-crystals) and d i = {M w}/{V M} the intrinsic density (the ratio of molecular weight over molecular volume). The molecular volume has been calculated for 24 496 hits (compounds containing H, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl, Br, I atoms). The equations d = 1.66 ( di × CK) for a compound and ( {d A}/{d B}) = ( {d Ai}/{d Bi}) × ( {C AK}/{C BK}) for a pair of compounds allows to understand the effects of atom nature (light vs. heavy atoms) and shape (smooth vs. rough) on the experimental density d. The tert-butyl subset has been selected to illustrate this analysis.

  11. Highlights from SelectBio 2015: Academic Drug Discovery Conference, Cambridge, UK, 19-20 May 2015.

    PubMed

    Spencer, John; Coaker, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    The SelectBio 2015: Academic Drug Discovery Conference was held in Cambridge, UK, on 19-20 May 2015. Building on the success of academic drug discovery events in the USA, this conference aimed to showcase the exciting new research emerging from academic drug discovery and to help bridge the gap between basic research and commercial application. At the event the authors heard from a number of speakers on a broad array of topics, from partnering models for academia and industry to novel drug discovery approaches across various therapeutic areas, with a few talks, such as those by Susanne Muller-Knapp (Structure Genomics Consortium, Oxford University, Oxford, UK) and Julian Blagg (Institute of Cancer Research, UK), covering both remits, by highlighting a number of such partnerships and then delving into some case studies. The conference concluded with a heated debate on whether phenotypic discovery should be favored over targeted discovery in academia and pharma, in a panel discussion chaired by Roland Wolkowicz (San Diego State University, USA).

  12. The Cambridge Face Tracker: Accurate, Low Cost Measurement of Head Posture Using Computer Vision and Face Recognition Software

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peter B. M.; Baltrušaitis, Tadas; Robinson, Peter; Vivian, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We validate a video-based method of head posture measurement. Methods The Cambridge Face Tracker uses neural networks (constrained local neural fields) to recognize facial features in video. The relative position of these facial features is used to calculate head posture. First, we assess the accuracy of this approach against videos in three research databases where each frame is tagged with a precisely measured head posture. Second, we compare our method to a commercially available mechanical device, the Cervical Range of Motion device: four subjects each adopted 43 distinct head postures that were measured using both methods. Results The Cambridge Face Tracker achieved confident facial recognition in 92% of the approximately 38,000 frames of video from the three databases. The respective mean error in absolute head posture was 3.34°, 3.86°, and 2.81°, with a median error of 1.97°, 2.16°, and 1.96°. The accuracy decreased with more extreme head posture. Comparing The Cambridge Face Tracker to the Cervical Range of Motion Device gave correlation coefficients of 0.99 (P < 0.0001), 0.96 (P < 0.0001), and 0.99 (P < 0.0001) for yaw, pitch, and roll, respectively. Conclusions The Cambridge Face Tracker performs well under real-world conditions and within the range of normally-encountered head posture. It allows useful quantification of head posture in real time or from precaptured video. Its performance is similar to that of a clinically validated mechanical device. It has significant advantages over other approaches in that subjects do not need to wear any apparatus, and it requires only low cost, easy-to-setup consumer electronics. Translational Relevance Noncontact assessment of head posture allows more complete clinical assessment of patients, and could benefit surgical planning in future. PMID:27730008

  13. A robust method of measuring other-race and other-ethnicity effects: the Cambridge Face Memory Test format.

    PubMed

    McKone, Elinor; Stokes, Sacha; Liu, Jia; Cohan, Sarah; Fiorentini, Chiara; Pidcock, Madeleine; Yovel, Galit; Broughton, Mary; Pelleg, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Other-race and other-ethnicity effects on face memory have remained a topic of consistent research interest over several decades, across fields including face perception, social psychology, and forensic psychology (eyewitness testimony). Here we demonstrate that the Cambridge Face Memory Test format provides a robust method for measuring these effects. Testing the Cambridge Face Memory Test original version (CFMT-original; European-ancestry faces from Boston USA) and a new Cambridge Face Memory Test Chinese (CFMT-Chinese), with European and Asian observers, we report a race-of-face by race-of-observer interaction that was highly significant despite modest sample size and despite observers who had quite high exposure to the other race. We attribute this to high statistical power arising from the very high internal reliability of the tasks. This power also allows us to demonstrate a much smaller within-race other ethnicity effect, based on differences in European physiognomy between Boston faces/observers and Australian faces/observers (using the CFMT-Australian). PMID:23118912

  14. A robust method of measuring other-race and other-ethnicity effects: the Cambridge Face Memory Test format.

    PubMed

    McKone, Elinor; Stokes, Sacha; Liu, Jia; Cohan, Sarah; Fiorentini, Chiara; Pidcock, Madeleine; Yovel, Galit; Broughton, Mary; Pelleg, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Other-race and other-ethnicity effects on face memory have remained a topic of consistent research interest over several decades, across fields including face perception, social psychology, and forensic psychology (eyewitness testimony). Here we demonstrate that the Cambridge Face Memory Test format provides a robust method for measuring these effects. Testing the Cambridge Face Memory Test original version (CFMT-original; European-ancestry faces from Boston USA) and a new Cambridge Face Memory Test Chinese (CFMT-Chinese), with European and Asian observers, we report a race-of-face by race-of-observer interaction that was highly significant despite modest sample size and despite observers who had quite high exposure to the other race. We attribute this to high statistical power arising from the very high internal reliability of the tasks. This power also allows us to demonstrate a much smaller within-race other ethnicity effect, based on differences in European physiognomy between Boston faces/observers and Australian faces/observers (using the CFMT-Australian).

  15. Applicability of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to Dog and Cat Owners for Teaching Veterinary Clinical Communications.

    PubMed

    Englar, Ryane E; Williams, Melanie; Weingand, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication in health care benefits patients. Medical and veterinary schools not only have a responsibility to teach communication skills, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education (COE) requires that communication be taught in all accredited colleges of veterinary medicine. However, the best strategy for designing a communications curriculum is unclear. The Calgary-Cambridge Guide (CCG) is one of many models developed in human medicine as an evidence-based approach to structuring the clinical consultation through 71 communication skills. The model has been revised by Radford et al. (2006) for use in veterinary curricula; however, the best approach for veterinary educators to teach communication remains to be determined. This qualitative study investigated if one adaptation of the CCG currently taught at Midwestern University College of Veterinary Medicine (MWU CVM) fulfills client expectations of what constitutes clinically effective communication. Two focus groups (cat owners and dog owners) were conducted with a total of 13 participants to identify common themes in veterinary communication. Participants compared communication skills they valued to those taught by MWU CVM. The results indicated that while the CCG skills that MWU CVM adopted are applicable to cat and dog owners, they are not comprehensive. Participants expressed the need to expand the skillset to include compassionate transparency and unconditional positive regard. Participants also expressed different communication needs that were attributed to the species of companion animal owned.

  16. Applicability of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to Dog and Cat Owners for Teaching Veterinary Clinical Communications.

    PubMed

    Englar, Ryane E; Williams, Melanie; Weingand, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication in health care benefits patients. Medical and veterinary schools not only have a responsibility to teach communication skills, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education (COE) requires that communication be taught in all accredited colleges of veterinary medicine. However, the best strategy for designing a communications curriculum is unclear. The Calgary-Cambridge Guide (CCG) is one of many models developed in human medicine as an evidence-based approach to structuring the clinical consultation through 71 communication skills. The model has been revised by Radford et al. (2006) for use in veterinary curricula; however, the best approach for veterinary educators to teach communication remains to be determined. This qualitative study investigated if one adaptation of the CCG currently taught at Midwestern University College of Veterinary Medicine (MWU CVM) fulfills client expectations of what constitutes clinically effective communication. Two focus groups (cat owners and dog owners) were conducted with a total of 13 participants to identify common themes in veterinary communication. Participants compared communication skills they valued to those taught by MWU CVM. The results indicated that while the CCG skills that MWU CVM adopted are applicable to cat and dog owners, they are not comprehensive. Participants expressed the need to expand the skillset to include compassionate transparency and unconditional positive regard. Participants also expressed different communication needs that were attributed to the species of companion animal owned. PMID:27075274

  17. Validation of the Cambridge Prospective Memory Test (Hong Kong Chinese version) for people with stroke.

    PubMed

    Man, David W K; Chan, M K L; Yip, C C K

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate a Hong Kong Chinese version of the Cambridge Prospective Memory Test (CAMPROMPT-HKCV). Thirty-three subjects at least one year post-stroke participated in the study. They were simultaneously rated on version A of the CAMPROMPT-HKCV by two testers to establish its internal consistency and inter-rater reliability. Raters used the parallel versions of the test (A and B), in rating 10 patients within 2 weeks to establish the parallel form reliability. Another 10 were also assessed on the same day using both version A of the CAMPROMPT-HKCV and the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test-Chinese version (RBMT-CV) to establish concurrent validity. A new group of 40 stroke patients and 44 healthy controls was recruited to establish its sensitivity and specificity. Results indicated that test-retest reliability on time-based, event-based and total scores, and inter-rater reliability for versions A and B of the test were high. Cronbach's alpha of the event-based score was higher than that of the time-based score. The reliability and concurrent validity of the parallel forms were established. There was a significant difference in performance on CAMPROMPT-HKCV (version A) between the stroke group and the healthy control group. ROC analysis showed that the ability of the cut-off CAMPROMPT-HKCV (total score) to differentiate PM problems was 20.5 (out of 36) with sensitivity at 95.5% and specificity at 55.9%. Further study in developing stratified norms across different age groups in Chinese-speaking stroke patients is recommended.

  18. Test well DO-CE 88 at Cambridge, Dorchester County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trapp, Henry; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Meisler, Harold; Leahy, P. Patrick

    1984-01-01

    Test well DO-CE 88 at Cambridge, Maryland, penetrated 3,299 feet of unconsolidated Quaternary, Tertiary and Cretaceous sediments and bottomed in quartz-monzonite gneiss. The well was drilled to provide data for a study of the aquifer system of the northern Atlantic Coastal Plain. Twenty-one core samples were collected. Six sand zones were tested for aquifer properties and sampled for ground-water chemistry. Point-water heads were measured at seven depths. Environmental heads (which ranged from - 18.33 to + 44.16 feet relative to sea level)indicate an upward component of flow. A temperature log showed a maximum temperature of 41.9 degrees Celsius and a mean temperature gradient of 0.00838 degrees Celsius per foot. The water analyses delineated the freshwater-saltwater transition zone between 2,650 and 3,100 feet. The ground water changes progressively downward from a sodium bicarbonate to a sodium chloride character. Clays in the analyzed core samples belong to the montmorillonite and kaolinite groups, and mean cation exchange capacity ranged from 8.3 to 38.9 milliequivalents per 100 grams. Vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivities measured in cores ranged from 1.5 x 10 6 to 1.3 feet per day and from 7.3 x 10 -6 to 1.3 feet per day, respectively, but the most permeable sands were not cored. Porosity was 1.5 percent in the quartz monzonite bedrock and ranged from 22.4 to 41 percent in the overlying sediments. Transmissivities from aquifer tests ranged from 25 to 850 feet squared per day; horizontal hydraulic conductivities ranged from.2.5 to 85 feet squared per day, and intrinsic permeabilities ranged from 0.8 to 23 micrometers squared. Fossils identified in core samples include palynomorphs, dinoflagellates, and foraminifers.

  19. The Cambridge Bachelor of Medicine (MB)/Doctor of Philosophy (PhD): graduate outcomes of the first MB/PhD programme in the UK.

    PubMed

    Cox, Timothy M; Brimicombe, James; Wood, Diana F; Peters, D Keith

    2012-12-01

    We reviewed outcomes of the Cambridge Bachelor of Medicine (MB)/Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) programme for the period 1989-2010. Of the 90 alumni contacted, 80 (89%; 24 women) completed an anonymous questionnaire. Thirty were academic staff and 35 were in general professional (core) or higher medical training. Of the latter, 11 were specialty registrars, six were academic clinical fellows and three held academic foundation year posts. Eight alumni were overseas, including five in North America. Most (95%) respondents considered that their academic career goals were facilitated by the programme. Sixty-eight of the 80 alumni had conducted further research, 63 (79%) were active in research, and 90% had explicit plans for further full-time research. Twelve graduates had further substantive research support (six clinician scientist awards and three senior fellowships) and two were Wellcome Trust postdoctoral MB/PhD fellows. Alumni included two full university professors, one reader, six senior lecturers, two assistant professors and nine university clinical lecturers. MB/PhD programmes offer an alternative training pathway for clinician-scientists in UK medical schools: the Cambridge programme promotes scientific discovery and sustained academic development within the context of contemporary medicine and clinical practice.

  20. Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2008-01-01

    Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2006 (October 2005 through September 2006). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for dissolved calcium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate; total nitrogen and phosphorus; and polar pesticides and metabolites. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir contents for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent of capacity during water year 2006, while monthly reservoir contents for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir was maintained at greater than 83 and 94 percent of capacity, respectively. If water demand is assumed to be 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2006 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 127 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area was about 16 percent greater for the 2006 water year than for the previous water year and was between 12 and 73 percent greater than for any recorded amount since water year 2002. The monthly mean specific-conductance values for all continuously monitored stations within the drinking-water source area were generally within the range of historical data collected since water year 1997, and in many cases were less than the historical medians. The annual mean specific conductance of 738 uS/cm (microsiemens per centimeter) for water discharged from the Cambridge Reservoir was nearly identical to the annual

  1. Cyrtarachne keralensis Jose, 2011 is a junior synonym of Anepsion maritatum (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1877) (Araneae, Araneidae).

    PubMed

    Malamel, Jobi J; Sankaran, Pradeep M; Joseph, Mathew M; Sebastian, Pothalil A

    2015-11-05

    The Indo-pacific araneid genus Anepsion, with A. rhomboides (L. Koch, 1867) as the type species, was erected by Strand in 1929. He proposed the name Anepsion as a replacement name for Anepsia L. Koch, 1871, preoccupied by Anepsia Gistl, 1848, a dipteran genus (OBIS Australia, 2015). The genus was revised by Chrysanthus (1961, 1969) and currently has 16 described species and 1 subspecies (World Spider Catalog 2015). In the present paper, we are reporting the genus from India for the first time and synonymising Cyrtarachne keralensis Jose, 2011 with Anepsion maritatum O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1877. A redescription and illustrations of both male and female of A. maritatum are provided.

  2. Intensive cisplatin/oral etoposide for epithelial ovarian cancer: the Cambridge Gynae-Oncology Centre experience: too toxic for relapse?

    PubMed

    Gounaris, Ioannis; Iddawela, Mahesh; Parkinson, Christine; Pratt, Jennie; Hatcher, Helen; Basu, Bristi; Tan, Li Tee; Brenton, James D; Earl, Helena M

    2016-03-01

    Intensive cisplatin and oral etoposide for relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), commonly known as the van der Burg (VDB) protocol, has been reported to improve response rates and progression-free survival. We report on all patients with relapsed EOC treated on the VDB protocol at the Cambridge Gynae-Oncology Centre. From the institutional databases, we identified all patients treated since 2001. We extracted demographic, clinical, treatment, and toxicity data and outcomes. We used Cox regression to identify predictors of survival. A total of 35 patients were treated on the VDB protocol. Toxicity was significant, with grade 3/4 fatigue, nausea and vomiting affecting 46, 46 and 29% of patients, respectively. Six patients had grade 3/4 infection and four (11%) deaths occurred on treatment. Efficacy was encouraging, with a radiological response rate of 43%, a median progression-free survival of 5.8 months and a median overall survival of 14.1 months. No significant difference in efficacy was seen between platinum-resistant and sensitive patients. We report significant activity of the VDB protocol in a routine clinical setting. However, the high rates of serious toxicity and treatment-related deaths among patients treated with palliative intent proved unacceptable. The Cambridge Gynae-Oncology Centre no longer uses this regimen in women with relapsed EOC.

  3. The Cambridge Face Memory Test for Children (CFMT-C): a new tool for measuring face recognition skills in childhood.

    PubMed

    Croydon, Abigail; Pimperton, Hannah; Ewing, Louise; Duchaine, Brad C; Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    Face recognition ability follows a lengthy developmental course, not reaching maturity until well into adulthood. Valid and reliable assessments of face recognition memory ability are necessary to examine patterns of ability and disability in face processing, yet there is a dearth of such assessments for children. We modified a well-known test of face memory in adults, the Cambridge Face Memory Test (Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006, Neuropsychologia, 44, 576-585), to make it developmentally appropriate for children. To establish its utility, we administered either the upright or inverted versions of the computerised Cambridge Face Memory Test - Children (CFMT-C) to 401 children aged between 5 and 12 years. Our results show that the CFMT-C is sufficiently sensitive to demonstrate age-related gains in the recognition of unfamiliar upright and inverted faces, does not suffer from ceiling or floor effects, generates robust inversion effects, and is capable of detecting difficulties in face memory in children diagnosed with autism. Together, these findings indicate that the CFMT-C constitutes a new valid assessment tool for children's face recognition skills.

  4. Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2007-01-01

    Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2005 (October 2004 through September 2005). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for selected elements, organic constituents, suspended sediment, and Escherichia coli bacteria. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir capacities for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent during water year 2005, while monthly reservoir capacities for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir were maintained at capacities greater than 84 and 96 percent, respectively. Assuming a water demand of 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2005 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 119 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area for the 2005 water year was within 2 inches of the total annual precipitation for the previous 2 water years. The monthly mean specific conductances for the outflow of the Cambridge Reservoir were similar to historical monthly mean values. However, monthly mean specific conductances for Stony Brook near Route 20, in Waltham (U.S. Geological Survey station 01104460), which is the principal tributary feeding the Stony Brook Reservoir, were generally higher than the medians of the monthly mean specific conductances for the period of record. Similarly, monthly mean specific conductances for a small tributary to Stony Brook (U.S. Geological Survey

  5. MIT jar test of the natural polymer chitosan with fresh pond water from the Cambridge Water Department, November-December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Murcott, S.; Harleman, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) jar tests of chitosan using CWD (Cambridge Water Department Treatment Plant) water was to demonstrate the effectiveness of chitosan as a coagulant in drinking water applications. The approach was to compare the performance of the natural organic coagulant, chitosan, to the performance of alum and other chemical coagulants in terms of the parameters turbidity, color, pH and alkalinity. Twenty-five jar tests were conducted during November and December, 1992, at Parsons Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

  6. Healthy travel and the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK: a mixed-methods analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Anna; Guell, Cornelia; Panter, Jenna; Jones, Natalia R; Ogilvie, David

    2012-06-01

    Car use is associated with substantial health and environmental costs but research in deprived populations indicates that car access may also promote psychosocial well-being within car-oriented environments. This mixed-method (quantitative and qualitative) study examined this issue in a more affluent setting, investigating the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK. Our analyses involved integrating self-reported questionnaire data from 1142 participants in the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study (collected in 2009) and in-depth interviews with 50 participants (collected 2009-2010). Even in Britain's leading 'cycling city', cars were a key resource in bridging the gap between individuals' desires and their circumstances. This applied both to long-term life goals such as home ownership and to shorter-term challenges such as illness. Yet car commuting was also subject to constraints, with rush hour traffic pushing drivers to start work earlier and with restrictions on, or charges for, workplace parking pushing drivers towards multimodal journeys (e.g. driving to a 'park-and-ride' site then walking). These patterns of car commuting were socio-economically structured in several ways. First, the gradient of housing costs made living near Cambridge more expensive, affecting who could 'afford' to cycle and perhaps making cycling the more salient local marker of Bourdieu's class distinction. Nevertheless, cars were generally affordable in this relatively affluent, highly-educated population, reducing the barrier which distance posed to labour-force participation. Finally, having the option of starting work early required flexible hours, a form of job control which in Britain is more common among higher occupational classes. Following a social model of disability, we conclude that socio-economic advantage can make car-oriented environments less disabling via both greater affluence and greater job control, and in ways manifested across the full socio

  7. Healthy travel and the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK: A mixed-methods analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Anna; Guell, Cornelia; Panter, Jenna; Jones, Natalia R.; Ogilvie, David

    2012-01-01

    Car use is associated with substantial health and environmental costs but research in deprived populations indicates that car access may also promote psychosocial well-being within car-oriented environments. This mixed-method (quantitative and qualitative) study examined this issue in a more affluent setting, investigating the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK. Our analyses involved integrating self-reported questionnaire data from 1142 participants in the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study (collected in 2009) and in-depth interviews with 50 participants (collected 2009–2010). Even in Britain's leading ‘cycling city’, cars were a key resource in bridging the gap between individuals' desires and their circumstances. This applied both to long-term life goals such as home ownership and to shorter-term challenges such as illness. Yet car commuting was also subject to constraints, with rush hour traffic pushing drivers to start work earlier and with restrictions on, or charges for, workplace parking pushing drivers towards multimodal journeys (e.g. driving to a ‘park-and-ride’ site then walking). These patterns of car commuting were socio-economically structured in several ways. First, the gradient of housing costs made living near Cambridge more expensive, affecting who could ‘afford’ to cycle and perhaps making cycling the more salient local marker of Bourdieu's class distinction. Nevertheless, cars were generally affordable in this relatively affluent, highly-educated population, reducing the barrier which distance posed to labour-force participation. Finally, having the option of starting work early required flexible hours, a form of job control which in Britain is more common among higher occupational classes. Following a social model of disability, we conclude that socio-economic advantage can make car-oriented environments less disabling via both greater affluence and greater job control, and in ways manifested across

  8. A comparison of three infant skinfold reference standards: Tanner-Whitehouse, Cambridge Infant Growth Study, and WHO Child Growth Standards.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth M

    2015-10-01

    As researchers increasingly focus on early infancy as a critical period of development, there is a greater need for methodological tools that can address all aspects of infant growth. Infant skinfold measures, in particular, are measurements in need of reliable reference standards that encompass all ages of infants and provide an accurate assessment of the relative fatness of a population. This report evaluates three published reference standards for infant skinfold measurements: Tanner-Whitehouse, Cambridge Infant Growth Study, and the World Health Organization (WHO) Child Growth Standards. To assess these standards, triceps skinfolds from a population of rural Kenyan infants (n = 250) and triceps skinfolds and subscapular skinfolds from infants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002 (NHANES; n = 1197) were calculated as z-scores from the lambda-mu-sigma curves provided by each reference population. The Tanner-Whitehouse standards represented both the Kenyan and US populations as lean, while the Cambridge standards represented both populations as overfat. The distribution of z-scores based on the WHO standards fell in the middle, but excluded infants from both populations who were below the age of 3 months. Based on these results, the WHO reference standard is the best skinfold reference standard for infants over the age of 3 months. For populations with infants of all ages, the Tanner-Whitehouse standards are recommended, despite representing both study populations as underfat. Ideally, the WHO will extend their reference standard to include infants between the ages of 0 and 3 months.

  9. Surface-water, water-quality, and meteorological data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area, water years 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2011-01-01

    Water samples were collected in nearly all of the subbasins in the Cambridge drinking-water source area and from Fresh Pond during the study period. Discrete water samples were collected during base-flow conditions with an antecedent dry period of at least 3 days. Composite sampl

  10. Comparative Coh-Metrix Analysis of Reading Comprehension Texts: Unified (Russian) State Exam in English vs. Cambridge First Certificate in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solnyshkina, Marina I.; Harkova, Elena V.; Kiselnikov, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    The article summarizes the results of the comparative study of Reading comprehension texts used in B2 level tests: Unified (Russia) State Exam in English (EGE) and Cambridge First Certificate in English (FCE). The research conducted was mainly focused on six parameters measured with the Coh-Metrix, a computational tool producing indices of the…

  11. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 2. Teaching Units that Utilize an Interactive Web-Accessible Subset of the Cambridge Structural Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of online interactive teaching units have been developed that illustrate the use of experimentally measured three-dimensional (3D) structures to teach fundamental chemistry concepts. The units integrate a 500-structure subset of the Cambridge Structural Database specially chosen for their pedagogical value. The units span a number of key…

  12. Performance on Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Subtests Sensitive to Frontal Lobe Function in People with Autistic Disorder: Evidence from the Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozonoff, Sally; Cook, Ian; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Joseph, Robert M.; Klin, Ami; McMahon, William M.; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent structural and functional imaging work, as well as neuropathology and neuropsychology studies, provide strong empirical support for the involvement of frontal cortex in autism. The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) is a computer-administered set of neuropsychological tests developed to examine specific components…

  13. Trajectories of Offending and Their Relation to Life Failure in Late Middle Age: Findings from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquero, Alex R.; Farrington, David P.; Nagin, Daniel S.; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that over the life course, criminal offending varies with problems in other domains, including life failure and physical and mental health. To examine this issue, the authors use data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, a prospective longitudinal survey of 411 South London males first studied at age 8…

  14. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 3. The Cambridge Structural Database System: Information Content and Access Software in Educational Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of…

  15. Teaching Three-Dimensional Structural Chemistry Using Crystal Structure Databases. 4. Examples of Discovery-Based Learning Using the Complete Cambridge Structural Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.; Ferrence, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this series described the educational value of experimental three-dimensional (3D) chemical structures determined by X-ray crystallography and retrieved from the crystallographic databases. In part 1, we described the information content of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and discussed a representative teaching subset of…

  16. Shuttle Astronauts Visit NASA's X-Ray Observatory Operations Control Center in Cambridge to Coordinate Plans for Launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    CAMBRIDGE, MASS.-- June 25, 1998 Eileen Collins, the first U.S. woman commanderof a Space Shuttle mission and her fellow astronauts for NASA s STS-93 mission toured the Operations Control Center (OCC) for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) today. AXAF is scheduled for launch on January 26, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. They met with the staff of the OCC and discussed how the status of the observatory will be monitored while in the shuttle bay and during deployment. "We are honored to have this historic shuttle crew visit us and familiarize themselves with the OCC," said Harvey Tananbaum, director of the AXAF Science Center, which operates the OCC for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory through a contract with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. "It is appropriate that a pathbreaking shuttle mission will deploy the premier X-ray observatory of this century." AXAF is the third of NASA s Great Observatories along with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. It will observe in greater detail than ever before the hot, violent regions of the universe that cannot be seen with optical telescopes. Exploding stars, black holes and vast clouds of gas in galaxy clusters are among the fascinating objects that AXAF is designed to study. The satellite is currently in the final stages of testing at TRW Space and Electronics Group,the prime contractor, in Redondo Beach, California. In late August it will be flown aboard a specially-outfitted Air Force C-5 aircraft to Kennedy Space Center in Florida where it will be integrated with a Boeing booster and then installed in the Shuttle bay. The shuttle crew that will take AXAF into space includes Collins (Col., USAF), Jeffrey Ashby (Cmdr., USN), pilot; Steven Hawley, Ph.D., mission specialist; Catherine Cady Coleman, Ph.D. (Major, USAF), mission specialist; and Michel Tognini (Col., French Air Force), mission specialist. While visiting the OCC the crew learned how critical data

  17. Discrimination thresholds of normal and anomalous trichromats: Model of senescent changes in ocular media density on the Cambridge Colour Test.

    PubMed

    Shinomori, Keizo; Panorgias, Athanasios; Werner, John S

    2016-03-01

    Age-related changes in chromatic discrimination along dichromatic confusion lines were measured with the Cambridge Colour Test (CCT). One hundred and sixty-two individuals (16 to 88 years old) with normal Rayleigh matches were the major focus of this paper. An additional 32 anomalous trichromats classified by their Rayleigh matches were also tested. All subjects were screened to rule out abnormalities of the anterior and posterior segments. Thresholds on all three chromatic vectors measured with the CCT showed age-related increases. Protan and deutan vector thresholds increased linearly with age while the tritan vector threshold was described with a bilinear model. Analysis and modeling demonstrated that the nominal vectors of the CCT are shifted by senescent changes in ocular media density, and a method for correcting the CCT vectors is demonstrated. A correction for these shifts indicates that classification among individuals of different ages is unaffected. New vector thresholds for elderly observers and for all age groups are suggested based on calculated tolerance limits.

  18. Anion Recognition by Pyrylium Cations and Thio-, Seleno- and Telluro- Analogues: A Combined Theoretical and Cambridge Structural Database Study.

    PubMed

    Quiñonero, David

    2015-06-24

    Pyrylium salts are a very important class of organic molecules containing a trivalent oxygen atom in a six-membered aromatic ring. In this manuscript, we report a theoretical study of pyrylium salts and their thio-, seleno- and telluro- analogues by means of DFT calculations. For this purpose, unsubstituted 2,4,6-trimethyl and 2,4,6-triphenyl cations and anions with different morphologies were chosen (Cl-, NO3- and BF4-). The complexes were characterized by means of natural bond orbital and "atoms-in-molecules" theories, and the physical nature of the interactions has been analyzed by means of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory calculations. Our results indicate the presence of anion-π interactions and chalcogen bonds based on both σ- and π-hole interactions and the existence of very favorable σ-complexes, especially for unsubstituted cations. The electrostatic component is dominant in the interactions, although the induction contributions are important, particularly for chloride complexes. The geometrical features of the complexes have been compared with experimental data retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database.

  19. Color vision impairment in type 2 diabetes assessed by the D-15d test and the Cambridge Colour Test.

    PubMed

    Feitosa-Santana, Claudia; Paramei, Galina V; Nishi, Mauro; Gualtieri, Mirella; Costa, Marcelo F; Ventura, Dora F

    2010-09-01

    Color vision impairment emerges at early stages of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) and may precede diabetic retinopathy or the appearance of vascular alterations in the retina. The aim of the present study was to compare the evaluation of the color vision with two different tests - the Lanthony desaturated D-15d test (a traditional color arrangement test), and the Cambridge Colour Test (CCT) (a computerized color discrimination test) - in patients diagnosed with DM2 without clinical signs of diabetic retinopathy (DR), and in sex- and age-matched control groups. Both color tests revealed statistically significant differences between the controls and the worst eyes of the DM2 patients. In addition, the degree of color vision impairment diagnosed by both tests correlated with the disease duration. The D-15d outcomes indicated solely tritan losses. In comparison, CCT outcomes revealed diffuse losses in color discrimination: 13.3% for best eyes and 29% for worst eyes. In addition, elevation of tritan thresholds in the DM2 patients, as detected by the Trivector subtest of the CCT, was found to correlate with the level of glycated hemoglobin. Outcomes of both tests confirm that subclinical losses of color vision are present in DM2 patients at an early stage of the disease, prior to signs of retinopathy. Considering the advantages of the CCT test compared to the D-15d test, further studies should attempt to verify and/or improve the efficiency of the CCT test.

  20. [Experimental Course in Elementary Number Theory, Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Mary Jacqueline

    In the winter of 1965, an experimental course in Elementary Number Theory was presented to a 6th grade class in the Hosmer School, Watertown, Massachusetts. Prior to the introduction of the present material, students had been exposed in class to such topics from the University of Illinois Arithmetic Project as lattices, number lines, frame…

  1. How Do Different Types of Schools Prepare Students for Life at Cambridge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Adamson, Clara; Mercer, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Twenty students from different educational backgrounds within the UK were interviewed to investigate how well they considered their secondary school education had prepared them for the educational and social demands of an "elite" university and life within its most traditional colleges. The study asked them how they perceived students…

  2. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW 12), Cambridge, MA, USA, 13 16 December 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, S.; Katsavounidis, E.

    2008-09-01

    It was a great pleasure and an honor for us to host the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW) at MIT and the LIGO Laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the place where this workshop series started in 1996. This time the conference was held at the conference facilities of the Royal Sonesta Hotel in Cambridge from 13 16 December, 2007. This 12th GWDAW found us with the ground interferometers having just completed their most sensitive search for gravitational waves and as they were starting their preparation to bring online and/or propose more sensitive instruments. Resonant mass detectors continued to observe the gravitational wave sky with instruments that have been operating now for many years. LISA, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, was recently reviewed by NASA's Beyond Einstein Program Assessment Committee (BEPAC) convened by the National Research Council (NRC) and found that 'on purely scientific grounds LISA is the mission that is the most promising and least scientifically risky…thus, the committee gave LISA its highest scientific ranking'. Even so, JDEM, the Joint Dark Energy Mission, was identified to go first, with LISA following a few years after. New methods, analysis ideas, results from the analysis of data collected by the instruments, as well as Mock Data Challenges for LISA were reported in this conference. While data from the most recent runs of the instruments are still being analyzed, the first upper limit results show how even non-detection statements can be interesting astrophysics. Beyond these traditional aspects of GWDAW though, for the first time in this workshop we tried to bring the non-gravitational wave physics and astronomy community on board in order to present, discuss and propose ways to work together as we pursue the first detection of gravitational waves and as we hope to transition to gravitational wave astronomy in the near future. Overview talks by colleagues leading observations in the electromagnetic

  3. Potential reductions of street solids and phosphorus in urban watersheds from street cleaning, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2009-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    Material accumulating and washing off urban street surfaces and ultimately into stormwater drainage systems represents a substantial nonpoint source of solids, phosphorus, and other constituent loading to waterways in urban areas. Cost and lack of usable space limit the type and number of structural stormwater source controls available to municipalities and other public managers. Non-structural source controls such as street cleaning are commonly used by cities and towns for construction, maintenance and aesthetics, and may reduce contaminant loading to waterways. Effectiveness of street cleaning is highly variable and potential improvements to water quality are not fully understood. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and initiated a study to better understand the physical and chemical nature of the organic and inorganic solid material on street surfaces, evaluate the performance of a street cleaner at removing street solids, and make use of the Source Loading and Management Model (SLAMM) to estimate potential reductions in solid and phosphorus loading to the lower Charles River from various street-cleaning technologies and frequencies. Average yield of material on streets collected between May and December 2010, was determined to be about 740 pounds per curb-mile on streets in multifamily land use and about 522 pounds per curb-mile on commercial land-use streets. At the end-of-winter in March 2011, about 2,609 and 4,788 pounds per curb-mile on average were collected from streets in multifamily and commercial land-use types, respectively. About 86 percent of the total street-solid yield from multifamily and commercial land-use streets was greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter (or very fine sand). Observations of street-solid distribution across the entire street width indicated that as

  4. Crystal structures of four δ-keto esters and a Cambridge Structural Database analysis of cyano-halogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Kulsoom; Maurya, Hardesh K; Gupta, Atul; Vasudev, Prema G

    2015-10-01

    The revived interest in halogen bonding as a tool in pharmaceutical cocrystals and drug design has indicated that cyano-halogen interactions could play an important role. The crystal structures of four closely related δ-keto esters, which differ only in the substitution at a single C atom (by H, OMe, Cl and Br), are compared, namely ethyl 2-cyano-5-oxo-5-phenyl-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C19H22N2O3, (1), ethyl 2-cyano-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-oxo-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C20H24N2O4, (2), ethyl 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-cyano-5-oxo-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C19H21ClN2O3, (3), and the previously published ethyl 5-(4-bromophenyl)-2-cyano-5-oxo-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C19H21BrN2O3, (4) [Maurya, Vasudev & Gupta (2013). RSC Adv. 3, 12955-12962]. The molecular conformations are very similar, while there are differences in the molecular assemblies. Intermolecular C-H...O hydrogen bonds are found to be the primary interactions in the crystal packing and are present in all four structures. The halogenated derivatives have additional aromatic-aromatic interactions and cyano-halogen interactions, further stabilizing the molecular packing. A database analysis of cyano-halogen interactions using the Cambridge Structural Database [CSD; Groom & Allen (2014). Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 53, 662-671] revealed that about 13% of the organic molecular crystals containing both cyano and halogen groups have cyano-halogen interactions in their packing. Three geometric parameters for the C-X...N[triple-bond]C interaction (X = F, Cl, Br or I), viz. the N...X distance and the C-X...N and C-N...X angles, were analysed. The results indicate that all the short cyano-halogen contacts in the CSD can be classified as halogen bonds, which are directional noncovalent interactions.

  5. Crystal structures of four δ-keto esters and a Cambridge Structural Database analysis of cyano-halogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Kulsoom; Maurya, Hardesh K; Gupta, Atul; Vasudev, Prema G

    2015-10-01

    The revived interest in halogen bonding as a tool in pharmaceutical cocrystals and drug design has indicated that cyano-halogen interactions could play an important role. The crystal structures of four closely related δ-keto esters, which differ only in the substitution at a single C atom (by H, OMe, Cl and Br), are compared, namely ethyl 2-cyano-5-oxo-5-phenyl-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C19H22N2O3, (1), ethyl 2-cyano-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-oxo-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C20H24N2O4, (2), ethyl 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-cyano-5-oxo-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C19H21ClN2O3, (3), and the previously published ethyl 5-(4-bromophenyl)-2-cyano-5-oxo-3-(piperidin-1-yl)pent-2-enoate, C19H21BrN2O3, (4) [Maurya, Vasudev & Gupta (2013). RSC Adv. 3, 12955-12962]. The molecular conformations are very similar, while there are differences in the molecular assemblies. Intermolecular C-H...O hydrogen bonds are found to be the primary interactions in the crystal packing and are present in all four structures. The halogenated derivatives have additional aromatic-aromatic interactions and cyano-halogen interactions, further stabilizing the molecular packing. A database analysis of cyano-halogen interactions using the Cambridge Structural Database [CSD; Groom & Allen (2014). Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 53, 662-671] revealed that about 13% of the organic molecular crystals containing both cyano and halogen groups have cyano-halogen interactions in their packing. Three geometric parameters for the C-X...N[triple-bond]C interaction (X = F, Cl, Br or I), viz. the N...X distance and the C-X...N and C-N...X angles, were analysed. The results indicate that all the short cyano-halogen contacts in the CSD can be classified as halogen bonds, which are directional noncovalent interactions. PMID:26422224

  6. Potential reductions of street solids and phosphorus in urban watersheds from street cleaning, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2009-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    Material accumulating and washing off urban street surfaces and ultimately into stormwater drainage systems represents a substantial nonpoint source of solids, phosphorus, and other constituent loading to waterways in urban areas. Cost and lack of usable space limit the type and number of structural stormwater source controls available to municipalities and other public managers. Non-structural source controls such as street cleaning are commonly used by cities and towns for construction, maintenance and aesthetics, and may reduce contaminant loading to waterways. Effectiveness of street cleaning is highly variable and potential improvements to water quality are not fully understood. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and initiated a study to better understand the physical and chemical nature of the organic and inorganic solid material on street surfaces, evaluate the performance of a street cleaner at removing street solids, and make use of the Source Loading and Management Model (SLAMM) to estimate potential reductions in solid and phosphorus loading to the lower Charles River from various street-cleaning technologies and frequencies. Average yield of material on streets collected between May and December 2010, was determined to be about 740 pounds per curb-mile on streets in multifamily land use and about 522 pounds per curb-mile on commercial land-use streets. At the end-of-winter in March 2011, about 2,609 and 4,788 pounds per curb-mile on average were collected from streets in multifamily and commercial land-use types, respectively. About 86 percent of the total street-solid yield from multifamily and commercial land-use streets was greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter (or very fine sand). Observations of street-solid distribution across the entire street width indicated that as

  7. Hydrogen-bond landscapes, geometry and energetics of squaric acid and its mono- and dianions: a Cambridge Structural Database, IsoStar and computational study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Wood, Peter A; Bardwell, David A

    2013-10-01

    As part of a programme of work to extend central-group coverage in the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre's (CCDC) IsoStar knowledge base of intermolecular interactions, we have studied the hydrogen-bonding abilities of squaric acid (H2SQ) and its mono- and dianions (HSQ(-) and SQ(2-)) using the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) along with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations for a range of hydrogen-bonded dimers. The -OH and -C=O groups of H2SQ, HSQ(-) and SQ(2-) are potent donors and acceptors, as indicated by their hydrogen-bond geometries in available crystal structures in the CSD, and by the attractive energies calculated for their dimers with acetone and methanol, which were used as model acceptors and donors. The two anions have sufficient examples in the CSD for their addition as new central groups in IsoStar. It is also shown that charge- and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds involving H2SQ and HSQ(-) are similar in strength to those made by carboxylate COO(-) acceptors, while hydrogen bonds made by the dianion SQ(2-) are somewhat stronger. The study reinforces the value of squaric acid and its anions as cocrystal formers and their actual and potential importance as isosteric replacements for carboxylic acid and carboxylate functions.

  8. A Preliminary Validity Study of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery for the Assessment of Executive Function in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Sun; An, Yong Min; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although the executive function subtests of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) have been used to assess cognitive function in diverse psychiatric illnesses, few studies have verified the validity of this battery for Korean psychiatric patients. Therefore, this preliminary study evaluated the construct and concurrent validity of the executive function subtests of the CANTAB for Korean psychiatric patients by comparing it with subtests of the Computerized Neuropsychological Test (CNT). Methods Three subtests of the CANTAB and three subtests of the CNT were administered to 36 patients diagnosed with either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Subtests of the CANTAB included the Intra/Extra-Dimensional Set Shift (IED), Stockings of Cambridge (SOC), and Spatial Working Memory (SWM). Differences between groups on each subtest as well as correlations between the subtests of the CANTAB and the CNT were assessed. Results The schizophrenia group performed significantly more poorly on the IED and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) compared with the bipolar disorder group. Additionally, correlation analyses revealed a significant correlation between the IED and the WCST; a positive correlation between the SOC and the Trail Making Test, Part B and the Stroop test; and a significant correlation between the SWM and the Stroop test. Conclusion This study verified the construct and concurrent validity of the executive function subtests of the CANTAB for Korean psychiatric patients and suggests that the subtests of this battery would be useful and appropriate for assessing deficits in executive function in Korean clinical settings. PMID:25395970

  9. Hydrogen-bond landscapes, geometry and energetics of squaric acid and its mono- and dianions: a Cambridge Structural Database, IsoStar and computational study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Wood, Peter A; Bardwell, David A

    2013-10-01

    As part of a programme of work to extend central-group coverage in the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre's (CCDC) IsoStar knowledge base of intermolecular interactions, we have studied the hydrogen-bonding abilities of squaric acid (H2SQ) and its mono- and dianions (HSQ(-) and SQ(2-)) using the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) along with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations for a range of hydrogen-bonded dimers. The -OH and -C=O groups of H2SQ, HSQ(-) and SQ(2-) are potent donors and acceptors, as indicated by their hydrogen-bond geometries in available crystal structures in the CSD, and by the attractive energies calculated for their dimers with acetone and methanol, which were used as model acceptors and donors. The two anions have sufficient examples in the CSD for their addition as new central groups in IsoStar. It is also shown that charge- and resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds involving H2SQ and HSQ(-) are similar in strength to those made by carboxylate COO(-) acceptors, while hydrogen bonds made by the dianion SQ(2-) are somewhat stronger. The study reinforces the value of squaric acid and its anions as cocrystal formers and their actual and potential importance as isosteric replacements for carboxylic acid and carboxylate functions. PMID:24056361

  10. The ADDITION-Cambridge trial protocol: a cluster – randomised controlled trial of screening for type 2 diabetes and intensive treatment for screen-detected patients

    PubMed Central

    Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Simmons, Rebecca K; Williams, Kate M; Barling, Roslyn S; Prevost, A Toby; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Wareham, Nicholas J; Griffin, Simon J

    2009-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes poses a major public health challenge. Population-based screening and early treatment for type 2 diabetes could reduce this growing burden. However, the benefits of such a strategy remain uncertain. Methods and design The ADDITION-Cambridge study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of (i) a stepwise screening strategy for type 2 diabetes; and (ii) intensive multifactorial treatment for people with screen-detected diabetes in primary care. 63 practices in the East Anglia region participated. Three undertook the pilot study, 33 were allocated to three groups: no screening (control), screening followed by intensive treatment (IT) and screening plus routine care (RC) in an unbalanced (1:3:3) randomisation. The remaining 27 practices were randomly allocated to IT and RC. A risk score incorporating routine practice data was used to identify people aged 40–69 years at high-risk of undiagnosed diabetes. In the screening practices, high-risk individuals were invited to take part in a stepwise screening programme. In the IT group, diabetes treatment is optimised through guidelines, target-led multifactorial treatment, audit, feedback, and academic detailing for practice teams, alongside provision of educational materials for newly diagnosed participants. Primary endpoints are modelled cardiovascular risk at one year, and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity at five years after diagnosis of diabetes. Secondary endpoints include all-cause mortality, development of renal and visual impairment, peripheral neuropathy, health service costs, self-reported quality of life, functional status and health utility. Impact of the screening programme at the population level is also assessed through measures of mortality, cardiovascular morbidity, health status and health service use among high-risk individuals. Discussion ADDITION-Cambridge is conducted in a defined high-risk group accessible through primary

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (CAMBTH00460028) on Town Highway 46, crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00460028 on Town Highway 46 crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 9.94-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Seymour River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 81 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 62.0 mm (0.204 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of the Seymour River is a 38-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 33-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.6 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 0.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 53 (CAMBTH00750053) on Town Highway 75, crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00750053 on Town Highway 75 crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 4.30-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest, except for the downstream right overbank area which has a barn surrounded by grass and shrubs. In the study area, the Brewster River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.05 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 84.4 mm (0.277 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 75 crossing of the Brewster River is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway as surveyed is 10 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft

  13. 5th BSPR-EBI meeting, proteomics: from Technology to New Biology 8-10 July 2008, Wellcome Trust Conference Centre, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK.

    PubMed

    English, Jane A; Polden, Julie; Robinson, Aisling A

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the 5(th) joint British Society for Proteome Research (BSPR) and European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) meeting which took place at the Wellcome Trust Conference Centre, Cambridge, UK, from the 8(th) to 10(th) July, 2008. As in previous years, the meeting attracted leading experts in the field who presented the latest cutting edge in proteomics. The meeting was entitled "Proteomics: From Technology to New Biology" taking into account the major transition proteomics has undergone in the past few years. In particular, the use of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based targeted experiments for absolute quantification and validation of proteins was the hot topic of the meeting. Attended by some 250 delegates, the conference was extremely well organised and provided a great opportunity for discussion and initiation of new collaborations.

  14. Comparability: manufacturing, characterization and controls, report of a UK Regenerative Medicine Platform Pluripotent Stem Cell Platform Workshop, Trinity Hall, Cambridge, 14-15 September 2015.

    PubMed

    Williams, David J; Archer, Richard; Archibald, Peter; Bantounas, Ioannis; Baptista, Ricardo; Barker, Roger; Barry, Jacqueline; Bietrix, Florence; Blair, Nicholas; Braybrook, Julian; Campbell, Jonathan; Canham, Maurice; Chandra, Amit; Foldes, Gabor; Gilmanshin, Rudy; Girard, Mathilde; Gorjup, Erwin; Hewitt, Zöe; Hourd, Paul; Hyllner, Johan; Jesson, Helen; Kee, Jasmin; Kerby, Julie; Kotsopoulou, Nina; Kowalski, Stanley; Leidel, Chris; Marshall, Damian; Masi, Louis; McCall, Mark; McCann, Conor; Medcalf, Nicholas; Moore, Harry; Ozawa, Hiroki; Pan, David; Parmar, Malin; Plant, Anne L; Reinwald, Yvonne; Sebastian, Sujith; Stacey, Glyn; Thomas, Robert J; Thomas, Dave; Thurman-Newell, Jamie; Turner, Marc; Vitillio, Loriana; Wall, Ivan; Wilson, Alison; Wolfrum, Jacqueline; Yang, Ying; Zimmerman, Heiko

    2016-07-01

    This paper summarizes the proceedings of a workshop held at Trinity Hall, Cambridge to discuss comparability and includes additional information and references to related information added subsequently to the workshop. Comparability is the need to demonstrate equivalence of product after a process change; a recent publication states that this 'may be difficult for cell-based medicinal products'. Therefore a well-managed change process is required which needs access to good science and regulatory advice and developers are encouraged to seek help early. The workshop shared current thinking and best practice and allowed the definition of key research questions. The intent of this report is to summarize the key issues and the consensus reached on each of these by the expert delegates.

  15. More on the spider genus Xeropigo O.P.-Cambridge (Araneae, Corinnidae, Corinninae): seven new species and new records from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Leonardo S; Shimano, Yulie; Candiani, David F; Bonaldo, Alexandre B

    2016-01-01

    Seven new species of the spider genus Xeropigo O. P.-Cambridge are described from Brazil, increasing the genus member list up to 16 species. X. piripiri n. sp., X. aitatu n. sp., and X. cajuina n. sp. are described from the state of Piauí. X. crispim n. sp. is described from the states of Ceará, Piauí, and Maranhão. X. oxente n. sp. is described from the state of Rio Grande do Norte. X. canga n. sp. is described from the state of Minas Gerais. X. ufo n. sp. is described from the state of Mato Grosso. The geographical distribution of X. tridentiger, X. camilae, X. pachitea, and X. perene is updated. A key to all species of Xeropigo is presented and possible relationships among all species of the genus are discussed. PMID:27395095

  16. Factors affecting reservoir and stream-water quality in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area and implications for source-water protection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, Marcus C.; Bent, Gardner C.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, Water Department, to assess reservoir and tributary-stream quality in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, and to use the information gained to help guide the design of a comprehensive water-quality monitoring program for the source area. Assessments of the quality and trophic state of the three primary storage reservoirs, Hobbs Brook Reservoir, Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond, were conducted (September 1997-November 1998) to provide baseline information on the state of these resources and to determine the vulnerability of the reservoirs to increased loads of nutrients and other contaminants. The effects of land use, land cover, and other drainage-basin characteristics on sources, transport, and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria, highway deicing chemicals, nutrients, selected metals, and naturally occurring organic compounds in 11 subbasins that contribute water to the reservoirs also was investigated, and the data used to select sampling stations for incorporation into a water-quality monitoring network for the source area. All three reservoirs exhibited thermal and chemical stratification, despite artificial mixing by air hoses in Stony Brook Reservoir and Fresh Pond. The stratification produced anoxic or hypoxic conditions in the deepest parts of the reservoirs and these conditions resulted in the release of ammonia nitrogen orthophosphate phosphorus, and dissolved iron and manganese from the reservoir bed sediments. Concentrations of sodium and chloride in the reservoirs usually were higher than the amounts recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection agency for drinking-water sources (20 milligrams per liter for sodium and 250 milligrams per liter for chloride). Maximum measured sodium concentrations were highest in Hobbs Brook Reservoir (113 milligrams per liter), intermediate in Stony Brook Reservoir (62

  17. More on the spider genus Xeropigo O.P.-Cambridge (Araneae, Corinnidae, Corinninae): seven new species and new records from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Leonardo S; Shimano, Yulie; Candiani, David F; Bonaldo, Alexandre B

    2016-05-17

    Seven new species of the spider genus Xeropigo O. P.-Cambridge are described from Brazil, increasing the genus member list up to 16 species. X. piripiri n. sp., X. aitatu n. sp., and X. cajuina n. sp. are described from the state of Piauí. X. crispim n. sp. is described from the states of Ceará, Piauí, and Maranhão. X. oxente n. sp. is described from the state of Rio Grande do Norte. X. canga n. sp. is described from the state of Minas Gerais. X. ufo n. sp. is described from the state of Mato Grosso. The geographical distribution of X. tridentiger, X. camilae, X. pachitea, and X. perene is updated. A key to all species of Xeropigo is presented and possible relationships among all species of the genus are discussed.

  18. Notes on the genus Harmonicon F.O.P.-Cambridge, 1896 (Araneae, Dipluridae) with description of a new species from French Guyana

    PubMed Central

    Drolshagen, Bastian; Bäckstam, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Information on the genus Harmonicon F.O.P.-Cambridge, 1896, a key to the species and a new diagnosis differing from the one in Maréchal and Marty (1998) are provided. A new species is described: Harmonicon oiapoqueae differing from other species of the genus by the morphology of the posterior sternal sigilla, the more recurved, inverted U–shaped fovea, the amount and arrangement of maxillary cuspules, a single row of teeth on the claws of the palpal tarsus, longer and more slender legs III and IV in females, longer embolus, thinner bulb, and longer, more slender legs in males. The status of the putative junior synonyms of Harmonicon, Pseudohermachura Mello-Leitão, 1927 and Prosharmonicon Mello-Leitão, as well as the two species formerly assigned to Harmonicon, Harmonicon nigridorsi Mello-Leitão, 1924 and Harmonicon riveti Simon, 1903, is discussed. PMID:21976989

  19. Comparability: manufacturing, characterization and controls, report of a UK Regenerative Medicine Platform Pluripotent Stem Cell Platform Workshop, Trinity Hall, Cambridge, 14-15 September 2015.

    PubMed

    Williams, David J; Archer, Richard; Archibald, Peter; Bantounas, Ioannis; Baptista, Ricardo; Barker, Roger; Barry, Jacqueline; Bietrix, Florence; Blair, Nicholas; Braybrook, Julian; Campbell, Jonathan; Canham, Maurice; Chandra, Amit; Foldes, Gabor; Gilmanshin, Rudy; Girard, Mathilde; Gorjup, Erwin; Hewitt, Zöe; Hourd, Paul; Hyllner, Johan; Jesson, Helen; Kee, Jasmin; Kerby, Julie; Kotsopoulou, Nina; Kowalski, Stanley; Leidel, Chris; Marshall, Damian; Masi, Louis; McCall, Mark; McCann, Conor; Medcalf, Nicholas; Moore, Harry; Ozawa, Hiroki; Pan, David; Parmar, Malin; Plant, Anne L; Reinwald, Yvonne; Sebastian, Sujith; Stacey, Glyn; Thomas, Robert J; Thomas, Dave; Thurman-Newell, Jamie; Turner, Marc; Vitillio, Loriana; Wall, Ivan; Wilson, Alison; Wolfrum, Jacqueline; Yang, Ying; Zimmerman, Heiko

    2016-07-01

    This paper summarizes the proceedings of a workshop held at Trinity Hall, Cambridge to discuss comparability and includes additional information and references to related information added subsequently to the workshop. Comparability is the need to demonstrate equivalence of product after a process change; a recent publication states that this 'may be difficult for cell-based medicinal products'. Therefore a well-managed change process is required which needs access to good science and regulatory advice and developers are encouraged to seek help early. The workshop shared current thinking and best practice and allowed the definition of key research questions. The intent of this report is to summarize the key issues and the consensus reached on each of these by the expert delegates. PMID:27404768

  20. The jumping spider genus Thiodina Simon, 1900 reinterpreted, and revalidation of Colonus F.O.P-Cambridge, 1901 and Nilakantha Peckham & Peckham, 1901 (Araneae: Salticidae: Amycoida).

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Abel A; Maddison, Wayne P; Ruiz, Gustavo R S

    2015-09-02

    In this paper we call attention to the identity of the type species of Thiodina Simon, 1900, T. nicoleti Roewer, 1951. When Simon proposed the genus, he characterized it based on morphological features found in species he described, but not found in the type species he designated, and whose type specimens, apparently, he had not examined. Nicolet's original description makes it clear that the type species is not closely related to the more familiar species placed in the genus. This misinterpretation was followed by contemporary researchers and survives until today. Here we designate and describe a neotype for T. nicoleti. We revalidate Colonus F.O.P.-Cambridge, 1901 and Nilakantha Peckham & Peckham, 1901 to transfer most species formerly placed in Thiodina. The combinations Colonus puerperus (Hentz, 1846), Nilakantha cockerelli Peckham & Peckham, 1901 and N. peckhami Bryant, 1940 are restored. The following new combinations are established: Colonus branicki (Taczanowski, 1871) new comb., C. candidus (Mello-Leitão, 1922) new comb., C. germaini (Simon, 1900) new comb., C. hesperus (Richman & Vetter, 2004) new comb., C. melanogaster (Mello-Leitão, 1917) new comb., C. pallidus (C.L. Koch, 1846) new comb., C. pseustes (Chamberlin & Ivie, 1936) new comb., C. punctulatus (Mello-Leitão, 1917) new comb., C. rishwani (Makhan, 2006) new comb., C. robustus (Mello-Leitão, 1945) new comb., C. sylvanus (Hentz, 1846) new comb., C. vaccula (Simon, 1900) new comb., C. vellardi (Soares & Camargo, 1948) new comb., Nilakantha beugelorum (Wolff, 1990) new comb., N. crucifera (F.O.P.-Cambridge, 1901) new comb., and N. inerma (Bryant, 1940) new comb. Thiodina setosa Mello-Leitão, 1947 is tentatively transferred to Cotinusa Simon, 1900.

  1. The jumping spider genus Thiodina Simon, 1900 reinterpreted, and revalidation of Colonus F.O.P-Cambridge, 1901 and Nilakantha Peckham & Peckham, 1901 (Araneae: Salticidae: Amycoida).

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Abel A; Maddison, Wayne P; Ruiz, Gustavo R S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we call attention to the identity of the type species of Thiodina Simon, 1900, T. nicoleti Roewer, 1951. When Simon proposed the genus, he characterized it based on morphological features found in species he described, but not found in the type species he designated, and whose type specimens, apparently, he had not examined. Nicolet's original description makes it clear that the type species is not closely related to the more familiar species placed in the genus. This misinterpretation was followed by contemporary researchers and survives until today. Here we designate and describe a neotype for T. nicoleti. We revalidate Colonus F.O.P.-Cambridge, 1901 and Nilakantha Peckham & Peckham, 1901 to transfer most species formerly placed in Thiodina. The combinations Colonus puerperus (Hentz, 1846), Nilakantha cockerelli Peckham & Peckham, 1901 and N. peckhami Bryant, 1940 are restored. The following new combinations are established: Colonus branicki (Taczanowski, 1871) new comb., C. candidus (Mello-Leitão, 1922) new comb., C. germaini (Simon, 1900) new comb., C. hesperus (Richman & Vetter, 2004) new comb., C. melanogaster (Mello-Leitão, 1917) new comb., C. pallidus (C.L. Koch, 1846) new comb., C. pseustes (Chamberlin & Ivie, 1936) new comb., C. punctulatus (Mello-Leitão, 1917) new comb., C. rishwani (Makhan, 2006) new comb., C. robustus (Mello-Leitão, 1945) new comb., C. sylvanus (Hentz, 1846) new comb., C. vaccula (Simon, 1900) new comb., C. vellardi (Soares & Camargo, 1948) new comb., Nilakantha beugelorum (Wolff, 1990) new comb., N. crucifera (F.O.P.-Cambridge, 1901) new comb., and N. inerma (Bryant, 1940) new comb. Thiodina setosa Mello-Leitão, 1947 is tentatively transferred to Cotinusa Simon, 1900. PMID:26623852

  2. The Polish Collection at the Alliance College Library in Cambridge Springs, PA: The Origins of the Collection in 1950, Its Rapid Development in the 1970's and the Introduction of the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) in 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozaczka, Stanley J.

    This essay outlines the development, present condition, and future direction of the 20,000-volume Polish research collection at Alliance College, located in Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania. Alliance College was founded in 1912 by the Polish National Alliance (PNA), a life insurance fraternal organization. In 1931 its entire library collection was…

  3. Methods and Skills for Research on Foreign Educational Systems. A Report on the NASFA/EAIE 1994 Seminars (Coral Gables, Florida, June 3-5 [and] Cambridge, England, United Kingdom, November 22-23). PIER World Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldrich-Langen, Caroline, Ed.

    The report presents results of two seminars, held in Miami (Florida) and Cambridge (England), in which representatives of two groups, The European Association for International Education and the National Association for Foreign Student Affairs: Association of International Educators, met for intensive discussion of the methods for and design of…

  4. Data-driven high-throughput prediction of the 3-D structure of small molecules: review and progress. A response to the letter by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Pierre

    2011-12-27

    A response is presented to sentiments expressed in "Data-Driven High-Throughput Prediction of the 3-D Structure of Small Molecules: Review and Progress. A Response from The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre", recently published in the Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, (1) which may give readers a misleading impression regarding significant impediments to scientific research posed by the CCDC.

  5. Data-driven high-throughput prediction of the 3-D structure of small molecules: review and progress. A response to the letter by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Pierre

    2011-12-27

    A response is presented to sentiments expressed in "Data-Driven High-Throughput Prediction of the 3-D Structure of Small Molecules: Review and Progress. A Response from The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre", recently published in the Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, (1) which may give readers a misleading impression regarding significant impediments to scientific research posed by the CCDC. PMID:22107601

  6. Face ethnicity and measurement reliability affect face recognition performance in developmental prosopagnosia: evidence from the Cambridge Face Memory Test-Australian.

    PubMed

    McKone, Elinor; Hall, Ashleigh; Pidcock, Madeleine; Palermo, Romina; Wilkinson, Ross B; Rivolta, Davide; Yovel, Galit; Davis, Joshua M; O'Connor, Kirsty B

    2011-03-01

    The Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT, Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006) provides a validated format for testing novel face learning and has been a crucial instrument in the diagnosis of developmental prosopagnosia. Yet, some individuals who report everyday face recognition symptoms consistent with prosopagnosia, and are impaired on famous face tasks, perform normally on the CFMT. Possible reasons include measurement error, CFMT assessment of memory only at short delays, and a face set whose ethnicity is matched to only some Caucasian groups. We develop the "CFMT-Australian" (CFMT-Aus), which complements the CFMT-original by using ethnicity better matched to a different European subpopulation. Results confirm reliability (.88) and validity (convergent, divergent using cars, inversion effects). We show that face ethnicity within a race has subtle but clear effects on face processing even in normal participants (includes cross-over interaction for face ethnicity by perceiver country of origin in distinctiveness ratings). We show that CFMT-Aus clarifies diagnosis of prosopagnosia in 6 previously ambiguous cases. In 3 cases, this appears due to the better ethnic match to prosopagnosics. We also show that face memory at short (<3-min), 20-min, and 24-hr delays taps overlapping processes in normal participants. There is some suggestion that a form of prosopagnosia may exist that is long delay only and/or reflects failure to benefit from face repetition.

  7. The conquest of vitalism or the eclipse of organicism? The 1930s Cambridge organizer project and the social network of mid-twentieth-century biology.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Erik

    2014-06-01

    In the 1930s, two concepts excited the European biological community: the organizer phenomenon and organicism. This essay examines the history of and connection between these two phenomena in order to address the conventional 'rise-and-fall' narrative that historians have assigned to each. Scholars promoted the 'rise-and-fall' narrative in connection with a broader account of the devitalizing of biology through the twentieth century. I argue that while limited evidence exists for the 'fall of the organizer concept' by the 1950s, the organicism that often motivated the organizer work had no concomitant fall--even during the mid-century heyday of molecular biology. My argument is based on an examination of shifting social networks of life scientists from the 1920s to the 1970s, many of whom attended or corresponded with members of the Cambridge Theoretical Biology Club (1932-1938). I conclude that the status and cohesion of these social networks at the micro scale was at least as important as macro-scale conceptual factors in determining the relative persuasiveness of organicist philosophy.

  8. The Imperial College Cambridge Manchester (ICCAM) platform study: An experimental medicine platform for evaluating new drugs for relapse prevention in addiction. Part A: Study description.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Louise M; Flechais, Remy S A; Murphy, Anna; Reed, Laurence J; Abbott, Sanja; Boyapati, Venkataramana; Elliott, Rebecca; Erritzoe, David; Ersche, Karen D; Faluyi, Yetunde; Faravelli, Luca; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Kalk, Nicola J; Kuchibatla, Shankar S; McGonigle, John; Metastasio, Antonio; Mick, Inge; Nestor, Liam; Orban, Csaba; Passetti, Filippo; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Smith, Dana G; Suckling, John; Tait, Roger; Taylor, Eleanor M; Waldman, Adam D; Robbins, Trevor W; Deakin, J F William; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2015-09-01

    Drug and alcohol dependence are global problems with substantial societal costs. There are few treatments for relapse prevention and therefore a pressing need for further study of brain mechanisms underpinning relapse circuitry. The Imperial College Cambridge Manchester (ICCAM) platform study is an experimental medicine approach to this problem: using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques and selective pharmacological tools, it aims to explore the neuropharmacology of putative relapse pathways in cocaine, alcohol, opiate dependent, and healthy individuals to inform future drug development. Addiction studies typically involve small samples because of recruitment difficulties and attrition. We established the platform in three centres to assess the feasibility of a multisite approach to address these issues. Pharmacological modulation of reward, impulsivity and emotional reactivity were investigated in a monetary incentive delay task, an inhibitory control task, and an evocative images task, using selective antagonists for µ-opioid, dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) and neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors (naltrexone, GSK598809, vofopitant/aprepitant), in a placebo-controlled, randomised, crossover design. In two years, 609 scans were performed, with 155 individuals scanned at baseline. Attrition was low and the majority of individuals were sufficiently motivated to complete all five sessions (n=87). We describe herein the study design, main aims, recruitment numbers, sample characteristics, and explain the test hypotheses and anticipated study outputs.

  9. Test-retest reliability analysis of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Automated Tests for the assessment of dementia in older people living in retirement homes.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marta Matos; Pinho, Maria Salomé; Simões, Mário R

    2016-01-01

    The validity of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Automated Tests has been widely studied, but their reliability has not. This study aimed to estimate the test-retest reliability of these tests in a sample of 34 older adults, aged 69 to 90 years old, without neuropsychiatric diagnoses and living in retirement homes in the district of Lisbon, Portugal. The battery was administered twice, with a 4-week interval between sessions. The Paired Associates Learning (PAL), Spatial Working Memory (SWM), Rapid Visual Information Processing, and Reaction Time tests revealed measures with high-to-adequate test-retest correlations (.71-.89), although several PAL and SWM measures showed susceptibility to practice effects. Two estimated standardized regression-based methods were found to be more efficient at correcting for practice effects than a method of fixed correction. We also found weak test-retest correlations (.56-.68) for several measures. These results suggest that some, but not all, measures are suitable for cognitive assessment and monitoring in this population.

  10. An analysis of infection control of varicella-zoster virus infections in Addenbrooke's Hospital Cambridge over a 5-year period, 1987-92.

    PubMed Central

    Wreghitt, T. G.; Whipp, J.; Redpath, C.; Hollingworth, W.

    1996-01-01

    This prospective study analyses infections with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge during 1987-92 and examines the spread of infection. In total, 93 patients and staff experienced VZV infection. Twenty-one patients had varicella and 49 experienced zoster. None of 101 patients and 1 of 625 staff members in contact with varicella cases acquired infection. By contrast, 2 of 227 patients, and 5 of 1039 staff in contact with zoster cases acquired varicella. One out of 28 (3.6%) VZV antibody-negative patients and staff in contact with varicella acquired infection, compared with 5 out of 29 (17.2%) VZV antibody-negative patients and staff in contact with zoster. Thus, zoster was found to be a more frequent cause of nosocomial infection than varicella. Fourteen members of staff had VZV infection during the study period. One of 99 patients and none of 389 staff members in contact with these cases developed varicella. The cost of dealing with infection control for VZV infections in our hospital is estimated to be Pounds 714 per patient case and a total of Pounds 13,204 per year. PMID:8760965

  11. Comparison of the Diagnostic Accuracy of Neuropsychological Tests in Differentiating Alzheimer's Disease from Mild Cognitive Impairment: Can the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Be Better than the Cambridge Cognitive Examination?

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, José Eduardo; Cecato, Juliana Francisca; Bartholomeu, Daniel; Montiel, José Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering the lack of studies on measures that increase the diagnostic distinction between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and on the role of the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG) in this, our study aims to compare the utility of the CAMCOG, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) in helping to differentiate AD from MCI in elderly people with >4 years of schooling. Method A total of 136 elderly subjects – 39 normal controls as well as 52 AD patients and 45 MCI patients treated at the Institute of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Porto Alegre, Brazil – were assessed using the MMSE, CAMCOG, clock drawing test (CDT), verbal fluency test (VF), Geriatric Depression Scale and Pfeffer Functional Activities Questionnaire. Results The results obtained by means of a receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the MoCA is a better screening test for differentiating elderly subjects with AD from those with MCI than the CAMCOG and MMSE as well as other tests such as the CDT and VF. Conclusion The MoCA, more than the CAMCOG and the other tests, was shown to be able to differentiate AD from MCI, although, as Roalf et al. [Alzheimers Dement 2013;9:529-537] pointed out, further studies might lead to measures that will improve this differentiation. PMID:24987399

  12. International Workshop on Counselling in Distance Education Conference (2nd, Cambridge, England, September 15-17, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tait, Alan, Ed.

    The 16 conference papers in this collection describe various ways in which counselling is used in distance education in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Thailand, the United Kingdom, West Germany, and Zambia. Following an introduction by Alan Tait, the following papers are presented: (1) "Counselling in the Open University of the…

  13. Lifelong Learning, Equity and Inclusion. Proceedings [of the] UACE Conference (Cambridge, England, March 29-31, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ground, Ian, Ed.

    This document contains 41 plenary papers, speeches, papers, abstracts, and workshop presentations from a conference on continuing education, lifelong learning, equity, and inclusion in further education (FE) and higher education (HE). The following are among the papers included: "A New Way of Learning: The UfI (University for Industry) Network…

  14. The University for Industry and Local Information, Advice and Guidance Partnerships. Report on a NICEC/CRAC Policy Consultation Held in Association with the National Advisory Council for Careers and Educational Guidance (Cambridge, England, February 24-25, 1999). Conference Briefing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Tony

    The University for Industry (UFI) and local information, advice, and guidance (IAG) partnerships are two key aspects of the British Government's lifelong learning strategy. UFI's key role is to expand the demand for and supply of learning and to exploit the learning potential of information and communication technologies. The main UFI activities…

  15. Investigation of prolific sheep from UK and Ireland for evidence on origin of the mutations in BMP15 (FecX(G), FecX(B)) and GDF9 (FecG(H)) in Belclare and Cambridge sheep.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Michael P; Hanrahan, James P; Howard, Dawn J; Powell, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns the likely origin of three mutations with large effects on ovulation rate identified in the Belclare and Cambridge sheep breeds; two in the BMP15 gene (FecX(G) and FecX(B)) and the third (FecG(H)) in GDF9. All three mutations segregate in Belclare sheep while one, FecX(B), has not been found in the Cambridge. Both Belclare and Cambridge breeds are relatively recently developed composites that have common ancestry through the use of genetic material from the Finnish Landrace and Lleyn breeds. The development of both composites also involved major contributions from exceptionally prolific ewes screened from flocks in Ireland (Belclare) and Britain (Cambridge) during the 1960s. The objective of the current study was to establish the likely origin of the mutations (FecX(G), FecX(B) and FecG(H)) through analysis of DNA from Finnish Landrace and Lleyn sheep, and Galway and Texel breeds which contributed to the development of the Belclare breed. Ewes with exceptionally high prolificacy (hyper-prolific ewes) in current flocks on Irish farms were identified to simulate the screening of ewes from Irish flocks in the 1960s. DNA was obtained from: prolific ewes in extant flocks of Lleyn sheep (n = 44) on the Lleyn peninsula in Wales; hyper-prolific ewes (n = 41); prolific Galway (n = 41) ewes; Finnish Landrace (n = 124) and Texel (n = 19) ewes. The FecX(G) mutation was identified in Lleyn but not in Finnish Landrace, Galway or Texel sheep; FecX(B) was only found among the hyper-prolific ewes. The FecG(H) mutation was identified in the sample of Lleyn sheep. It was concluded from these findings that the Lleyn breed was the most likely source of the FecX(G) and FecG(H) mutations in Belclare and Cambridge sheep and that the FecX(B) mutation came from the High Fertility line that was developed using prolific ewes selected from commercial flocks in Ireland in the 1960's and subsequently used in the genesis of the Belclare.

  16. Health-related quality of life in the Cambridge City over-75s Cohort (CC75C): development of a dementia-specific scale and descriptive analyses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The assessment of Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL) is important in people with dementia as it could influence their care and support plan. Many studies on dementia do not specifically set out to measure dementia-specific HRQL but do include related items. The aim of this study is to explore the distribution of HRQL by functional and socio-demographic variables in a population-based setting. Methods Domains of DEMQOL’s conceptual framework were mapped in the Cambridge City over 75’s Cohort (CC75C) Study. HRQL was estimated in 110 participants aged 80+ years with a confirmed diagnosis of dementia with mild/moderate severity. Acceptability (missing values and normality of the total score), internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha), convergent, discriminant and known group differences validity (Spearman correlations, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests) were assessed. The distribution of HRQL by socio-demographic and functional descriptors was explored. Results The HRQL score ranged from 0 to 16 and showed an internal consistency Alpha of 0.74. Validity of the instrument was found to be acceptable. Men had higher HRQL than women. Marital status had a greater effect on HRQL for men than it did for women. The HRQL of those with good self-reported health was higher than those with fair/poor self-reported health. HRQL was not associated with dementia severity. Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first study to examine the distribution of dementia-specific HRQL in a population sample of the very old. We have mapped an existing conceptual framework of dementia specific HRQL onto an existing study and demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. Findings in this study suggest that whereas there is big emphasis in dementia severity, characteristics such as gender should be taken into account when assessing and implementing programmes to improve HRQL. PMID:24512291

  17. Specific Features of Executive Dysfunction in Alzheimer-Type Mild Dementia Based on Computerized Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmickienė, Jurgita; Kaubrys, Gintaras

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary manifestation of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is decline in memory. Dysexecutive symptoms have tremendous impact on functional activities and quality of life. Data regarding frontal-executive dysfunction in mild AD are controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the presence and specific features of executive dysfunction in mild AD based on Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) results. Material/Methods Fifty newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve, mild, late-onset AD patients (MMSE ≥20, AD group) and 25 control subjects (CG group) were recruited in this prospective, cross-sectional study. The CANTAB tests CRT, SOC, PAL, SWM were used for in-depth cognitive assessment. Comparisons were performed using the t test or Mann--Whitney U test, as appropriate. Correlations were evaluated by Pearson r or Spearman R. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results AD and CG groups did not differ according to age, education, gender, or depression. Few differences were found between groups in the SOC test for performance measures: Mean moves (minimum 3 moves): AD (Rank Sum=2227), CG (Rank Sum=623), p<0.001. However, all SOC test time measures differed significantly between groups: SOC Mean subsequent thinking time (4 moves): AD (Rank Sum=2406), CG (Rank Sum=444), p<0.001. Correlations were weak between executive function (SOC) and episodic/working memory (PAL, SWM) (R=0.01–0.38) or attention/psychomotor speed (CRT) (R=0.02–0.37). Conclusions Frontal-executive functions are impaired in mild AD patients. Executive dysfunction is highly prominent in time measures, but minimal in performance measures. Executive disorders do not correlate with a decline in episodic and working memory or psychomotor speed in mild AD. PMID:27717954

  18. Relationship of γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate+glutamine concentrations in the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex with performance of Cambridge Gambling Task.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Kazuyuki; Narita, Kosuke; Suzuki, Yusuke; Takei, Yuichi; Suda, Masashi; Tagawa, Minami; Ujita, Koichi; Sakai, Yuki; Narumoto, Jin; Near, Jamie; Fukuda, Masato

    2015-04-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), consisting of the perigenual ACC (pgACC) and mid-ACC (i.e., affective and cognitive areas, respectively), plays a significant role in the performance of gambling tasks, which are used to measure decision-making behavior under conditions of risk. Although recent neuroimaging studies have suggested that the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration in the pgACC is associated with decision-making behavior, knowledge regarding the relationship of GABA concentrations in subdivisions of the ACC with gambling task performance is still limited. The aim of our magnetic resonance spectroscopy study is to investigate in 20 healthy males the relationship of concentrations of GABA and glutamate+glutamine (Glx) in the pgACC, mid-ACC, and occipital cortex (OC) with multiple indexes of decision-making behavior under conditions of risk, using the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT). The GABA/creatine (Cr) ratio in the pgACC negatively correlated with delay aversion score, which corresponds to the impulsivity index. The Glx/Cr ratio in the pgACC negatively correlated with risk adjustment score, which is reported to reflect the ability to change the amount of the bet depending on the probability of winning or losing. The scores of CGT did not significantly correlate with the GABA/Cr or Glx/Cr ratio in the mid-ACC or OC. Results of this study suggest that in the pgACC, but not in the mid-ACC or OC, GABA and Glx concentrations play a distinct role in regulating impulsiveness and risk probability during decision-making behavior under conditions of risk, respectively.

  19. Changes in physical activity and modelled cardiovascular risk following diagnosis of diabetes: 1-year results from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial cohort

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, A; Williams, K M; Prevost, A T; Kinmonth, A-L; Wareham, N J; Griffin, S J; Simmons, R K

    2013-01-01

    Aims To describe change in physical activity over 1 year and associations with change in cardiovascular disease risk factors in a population with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes. Methods Eight hundred and sixty-seven individuals with screen-detected diabetes underwent measurement of self-reported physical activity, cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled cardiovascular disease risk at baseline and 1 year (n = 736) in the ADDITION-Cambridge trial. Multiple linear regression was used to quantify the association between change in different physical activity domains and cardiovascular disease risk factors at 1 year. Results There was no change in self-reported physical activity over 12 months. Even relatively large changes in physical activity were associated with relatively small changes in cardiovascular disease risk factors after allowing for changes in self-reported medication and diet. For every 30 metabolic equivalent-h increase in recreational activity (equivalent to 10 h/brisk walking/week), there was an average reduction of 0.1% in HbA1c in men (95% CI −0.15 to −0.01, P = 0.021) and an average reduction of 2 mmHg in systolic blood pressure in women (95% CI −4.0 to −0.05, P = 0.045). Conclusions Few associations were observed between change in different physical activity domains and cardiovascular disease risk factors in this trial cohort. Cardiovascular disease risk reduction appeared to be driven largely by factors other than changes in self-reported physical activity in the first year following diagnosis. PMID:22913463

  20. Changes in diet, cardiovascular risk factors and modelled cardiovascular risk following diagnosis of diabetes: 1-year results from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial cohort

    PubMed Central

    Savory, L A; Griffin, S J; Williams, K M; Prevost, A T; Kinmonth, A-L; Wareham, N J; Simmons, R K

    2014-01-01

    Aims To describe change in self-reported diet and plasma vitamin C, and to examine associations between change in diet and cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled 10-year cardiovascular disease risk in the year following diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. Methods Eight hundred and sixty-seven individuals with screen-detected diabetes underwent assessment of self-reported diet, plasma vitamin C, cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled cardiovascular disease risk at baseline and 1 year (n = 736) in the ADDITION-Cambridge trial. Multivariable linear regression was used to quantify the association between change in diet and cardiovascular disease risk at 1 year, adjusting for change in physical activity and cardio-protective medication. Results Participants reported significant reductions in energy, fat and sodium intake, and increases in fruit, vegetable and fibre intake over 1 year. The reduction in energy was equivalent to an average-sized chocolate bar; the increase in fruit was equal to one plum per day. There was a small increase in plasma vitamin C levels. Increases in fruit intake and plasma vitamin C were associated with small reductions in anthropometric and metabolic risk factors. Increased vegetable intake was associated with an increase in BMI and waist circumference. Reductions in fat, energy and sodium intake were associated with reduction in HbA1c, waist circumference and total cholesterol/modelled cardiovascular disease risk, respectively. Conclusions Improvements in dietary behaviour in this screen-detected population were associated with small reductions in cardiovascular disease risk, independently of change in cardio-protective medication and physical activity. Dietary change may have a role to play in the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk following diagnosis of diabetes. PMID:24102972

  1. Raouf Ibrahim, Liquid Sloshing Dynamics: Theory and Applications , Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (2005) ISBN 0-521-83885-1 pp. xxi+948, £160, US$275, hbk.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohayon, Roger

    2008-08-01

    The appearance of this book is an event. Written by Professor Raouf Ibrahim, an internationally recognized expert in nonlinear vibrations and random responses of liquid-free surface and more generally liquid sloshing dynamics, this book is particularly welcome as it appears as a monumental monograph on various phenomena occurring in sloshing problems, mostly based on analytical results and discussions resulting from various particular tank geometries. As a consequence, this book will be a useful complement to computational mechanics studies of free surface sloshing effects-linear and nonlinear, periodic and random-in earthquake engineering, civil engineering (storage tanks), aerospace engineering (such as liquid propelled launchers), nuclear engineering, naval and offshore engineering, etc.

  2. Water-quality conditions, and constituent loads and yields in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, Massachusetts, water years 2005–07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2013-01-01

    The source water area for the drinking-water supply of the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, encompasses major transportation corridors, as well as large areas of light industrial, commercial, and residential land use. Because of ongoing development in the drinking-water source area, the Cambridge water supply has the potential to be affected by a wide variety of contaminants. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored surface-water quality in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins, which compose the drinking-water source area, since 1997 (water year 1997) through continuous monitoring and discrete sample collection and, since 2004, through systematic collection of streamwater samples during base-flow and stormflow conditions at five primary sampling stations in the drinking-water source area. Four primary sampling stations are on small tributaries in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins; the fifth primary sampling station is on the main stem of Stony Brook and drains about 93 percent of the Cambridge drinking-water source area. Water samples also were collected at six secondary sampling stations, including Fresh Pond Reservoir, the final storage reservoir for the raw water supply. Storm runoff and base-flow concentrations of calcium (Ca), chloride (Cl), sodium (Na), and sulfate (SO4) were estimated from continuous records of streamflow and specific conductance for six monitoring stations, which include the five primary sampling stations. These data were used to characterize current water-quality conditions, estimate loads and yields, and describe trends in Cl and Na in the tributaries and main-stem streams in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins. These data also were used to describe how streamwater quality is affected by various watershed characteristics and provide information to guide future watershed management. Water samples were analyzed for physical properties and concentrations of Ca, Cl, Na, and SO4, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP

  3. The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge Companions to Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Molly

    2010-01-01

    John Dewey (1859-1952) was a major figure of the American cultural and intellectual landscape in the first half of the twentieth century. While not the originator of American pragmatism, he was instrumental to its articulation as a philosophy and the spread of its influence beyond philosophy to other disciplines. His prolific writings encompass…

  4. Water-quality conditions, and constituent loads and yields in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, Massachusetts, water years 2005–07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2013-01-01

    The source water area for the drinking-water supply of the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, encompasses major transportation corridors, as well as large areas of light industrial, commercial, and residential land use. Because of ongoing development in the drinking-water source area, the Cambridge water supply has the potential to be affected by a wide variety of contaminants. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored surface-water quality in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins, which compose the drinking-water source area, since 1997 (water year 1997) through continuous monitoring and discrete sample collection and, since 2004, through systematic collection of streamwater samples during base-flow and stormflow conditions at five primary sampling stations in the drinking-water source area. Four primary sampling stations are on small tributaries in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins; the fifth primary sampling station is on the main stem of Stony Brook and drains about 93 percent of the Cambridge drinking-water source area. Water samples also were collected at six secondary sampling stations, including Fresh Pond Reservoir, the final storage reservoir for the raw water supply. Storm runoff and base-flow concentrations of calcium (Ca), chloride (Cl), sodium (Na), and sulfate (SO4) were estimated from continuous records of streamflow and specific conductance for six monitoring stations, which include the five primary sampling stations. These data were used to characterize current water-quality conditions, estimate loads and yields, and describe trends in Cl and Na in the tributaries and main-stem streams in the Hobbs Brook and Stony Brook Basins. These data also were used to describe how streamwater quality is affected by various watershed characteristics and provide information to guide future watershed management. Water samples were analyzed for physical properties and concentrations of Ca, Cl, Na, and SO4, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP

  5. Screening for type 2 diabetes and population mortality over 10 years (ADDITION-Cambridge): a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Rebecca K; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Sharp, Stephen J; Sargeant, Lincoln A; Williams, Kate M; Prevost, A Toby; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Wareham, Nicholas J; Griffin, Simon J

    2012-01-01

    ). We noted no significant reduction in cardiovascular (HR 1·02, 95% CI 0·75–1·38), cancer (1·08, 0·90–1·30), or diabetes-related mortality (1·26, 0·75–2·10) associated with invitation to screening. Interpretation In this large UK sample, screening for type 2 diabetes in patients at increased risk was not associated with a reduction in all-cause, cardiovascular, or diabetes-related mortality within 10 years. The benefits of screening might be smaller than expected and restricted to individuals with detectable disease. Funding Wellcome Trust; UK Medical Research Council; National Health Service research and development support; UK National Institute for Health Research; University of Aarhus, Denmark; Bio-Rad. PMID:23040422

  6. The Cambridge Double Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacEvoy, Bruce; Tirion, Wil

    2015-12-01

    Preface; What are double stars?; The binary orbit; Double star dynamics; Stellar mass and the binary life cycle; The double star population; Detecting double stars; Double star catalogs; Telescope optics; Preparing to observe; Helpful accessories; Viewing challenges; Next steps; Appendices: target list; Useful formulas; Double star orbits; Double star catalogs; The Greek alphabet.

  7. RFID solution benefits Cambridge hospital.

    PubMed

    James, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Keeping track of thousands of pieces of equipment in a busy hospital environment is a considerable challenge, but, according to RFID tagging and asset tracking specialist, Harland Simon, RFID technology can make the task considerably simpler. Here Andrew James, the company's RFID sales manager, describes the positive benefits the technology has brought the Medical Equipment Library (MEL) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, one of the world's most famous teaching hospitals.

  8. Sea Consultants Inc, Cambridge, MA

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.F. )

    1989-06-01

    The EPA is currently developing regulations to limit the radon concentration in public water supplies. Based on the latest scientific evaluations, it appears that the health impact of radon is larger than suggested by guidelines used at the state level. The radon maximum contaminant level being discussed would impact over half of the groundwater supplies in the country and a larger percentage in the New England States. In Friendship, Maine, a public water system was recently placed into operation that uses a bedrock well as a source. High radon levels are treated using granulated activated carbon contactors. Performance testing was completed that provides insight into process effectiveness and the flexibility of GAC to respond to varying loading rates. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Buckling of structures; Proceedings of the Symposium, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., June 17-21, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budiansky, B.

    1976-01-01

    The papers deal with such topics as the buckling and post-buckling behavior of plates and shells; methods of calculating critical buckling and collapse loads; finite element representations for thin-shell instability analysis; theory and experiment in the creep buckling of plates and shells; creep instability of thick shell structures; analytical and numerical studies of the influence of initial imperfections on the elastic buckling of columns; mode interaction in stiffened panels under compression; imperfection-sensitivity in the interactive buckling of stiffened plates; buckling of stochastically imperfect structures; and the Liapunov stability of elastic dynamic systems. A special chapter is devoted to design problems, including the design of a Mars entry 'aeroshell', and buckling design in vehicle structures. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  10. Our Public Intellectual: Matthew Battles--Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Many people take for granted the tools of the librarian's trade: typography, books, even the idea of a library. But when Matthew Battles looks at these things, he sees responses that evolved to meet human needs and wants to know more. What purposes were these tools put to and what do they tell people about the culture that produced them? What does…

  11. Assessing communication quality of consultations in primary care: initial reliability of the Global Consultation Rating Scale, based on the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to the Medical Interview

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Jenni; Abel, Gary; Elmore, Natasha; Campbell, John; Roland, Martin; Benson, John; Silverman, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate initial reliability of the Global Consultation Rating Scale (GCRS: an instrument to assess the effectiveness of communication across an entire doctor–patient consultation, based on the Calgary-Cambridge guide to the medical interview), in simulated patient consultations. Design Multiple ratings of simulated general practitioner (GP)–patient consultations by trained GP evaluators. Setting UK primary care. Participants 21 GPs and six trained GP evaluators. Outcome measures GCRS score. Methods 6 GP raters used GCRS to rate randomly assigned video recordings of GP consultations with simulated patients. Each of the 42 consultations was rated separately by four raters. We considered whether a fixed difference between scores had the same meaning at all levels of performance. We then examined the reliability of GCRS using mixed linear regression models. We augmented our regression model to also examine whether there were systematic biases between the scores given by different raters and to look for possible order effects. Results Assessing the communication quality of individual consultations, GCRS achieved a reliability of 0.73 (95% CI 0.44 to 0.79) for two raters, 0.80 (0.54 to 0.85) for three and 0.85 (0.61 to 0.88) for four. We found an average difference of 1.65 (on a 0–10 scale) in the scores given by the least and most generous raters: adjusting for this evaluator bias increased reliability to 0.78 (0.53 to 0.83) for two raters; 0.85 (0.63 to 0.88) for three and 0.88 (0.69 to 0.91) for four. There were considerable order effects, with later consultations (after 15–20 ratings) receiving, on average, scores more than one point higher on a 0–10 scale. Conclusions GCRS shows good reliability with three raters assessing each consultation. We are currently developing the scale further by assessing a large sample of real-world consultations. PMID:24604483

  12. Effect of changing the amount and type of fat and carbohydrate on insulin sensitivity and cardiovascular risk: the RISCK (Reading, Imperial, Surrey, Cambridge, and Kings) trial1234

    PubMed Central

    Jebb, Susan A; Lovegrove, Julie A; Griffin, Bruce A; Frost, Gary S; Moore, Carmel S; Chatfield, Mark D; Bluck, Les J; Williams, Christine M; Sanders, Thomas AB

    2010-01-01

    Background: Insulin sensitivity (Si) is improved by weight loss and exercise, but the effects of the replacement of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) or carbohydrates of high glycemic index (HGI) or low glycemic index (LGI) are uncertain. Objective: We conducted a dietary intervention trial to study these effects in participants at risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Design: We conducted a 5-center, parallel design, randomized controlled trial [RISCK (Reading, Imperial, Surrey, Cambridge, and Kings)]. The primary and secondary outcomes were changes in Si (measured by using an intravenous glucose tolerance test) and cardiovascular risk factors. Measurements were made after 4 wk of a high-SFA and HGI (HS/HGI) diet and after a 24-wk intervention with HS/HGI (reference), high-MUFA and HGI (HM/HGI), HM and LGI (HM/LGI), low-fat and HGI (LF/HGI), and LF and LGI (LF/LGI) diets. Results: We analyzed data for 548 of 720 participants who were randomly assigned to treatment. The median Si was 2.7 × 10−4 mL · μU−1 · min−1 (interquartile range: 2.0, 4.2 × 10−4 mL · μU−1 · min−1), and unadjusted mean percentage changes (95% CIs) after 24 wk treatment (P = 0.13) were as follows: for the HS/HGI group, −4% (−12.7%, 5.3%); for the HM/HGI group, 2.1% (−5.8%, 10.7%); for the HM/LGI group, −3.5% (−10.6%, 4.3%); for the LF/HGI group, −8.6% (−15.4%, −1.1%); and for the LF/LGI group, 9.9% (2.4%, 18.0%). Total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B concentrations decreased with SFA reduction. Decreases in TC and LDL-cholesterol concentrations were greater with LGI. Fat reduction lowered HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1 and B concentrations. Conclusions: This study did not support the hypothesis that isoenergetic replacement of SFAs with MUFAs or carbohydrates has a favorable effect on Si. Lowering GI enhanced reductions in TC and LDL-cholesterol concentrations in subjects, with tentative

  13. Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation frequency and antithrombin activity levels in 120 of deep venous thrombosis and 150 of cerebral infarction patients in a single center in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-sen; Tang, Yang-ming; Tang, Mei-qing; Qing, Zi-Ju; Shu, Chang; Tang, Xiang-qi; Deng, Ming-yang; Tan, Li-ming

    2010-09-01

    Antithrombin Cambridge II(A384S) mutation shows a relatively high frequency in western population. Some studies suggest that the mutation is an independent genetic risk factor both for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and for arterial thrombosis, but whether the mutation has racial difference or has a general significance for thrombophilia remains unclear. In this study we performed an analysis of the prevalence of the mutation in Chinese southern population; Also, the antithrombin activity levels were evaluated in each investigated individual. The studies included 120 patients with DVT, 150 patients with cerebral infarction, and 110 controls. The mutation was detected using polymerase chain reaction/PvuII restrictive fragment length polymorphism procedures. Antithrombin activity assay was done using chromogenic substrate method. The results showed that no antithrombin Cambridge II mutation was detected in all three groups (DVT, cerebral infarction and controls), the incidence was 0/380. Plasma antithrombin activity was 91.37% +/- 16.15% in the DVT patients and 102.68% +/- 13.10% in the controls; the antithrombin activity was significantly reduced in the DVT group (P < 0.0001). In DVT patients, eight cases were identified as primary antithrombin deficiency, accounting for an incidence of 6.7%. No significant difference was found for antithrombin activity between cerebral infarction group and controls. These results suggest that antithrombin Cambridge II mutation has a racial difference, and may not be a valuable risk factor of thrombophilia in Asian population, and antithrombin deficiency remains a major genetic risk factor for DVT patients in China.

  14. On the type species of the genus Aetius O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896: The first description of male with notes on cymbial notch and mating plug (Araneae: Corinnidae: Castianeirinae).

    PubMed

    Sudhin, Puthoor Pattammal; Nafin, Karunnappilli Shamsudheen; Simmons, Zoë; Sudhikumar, Ambalaparambil Vasu

    2016-08-23

    The rare ant mimicking sac spider genus Aetius was erected by O. Pickard-Cambridge in 1896 based on an unspecified number of female specimen(s) collected from Sri Lanka. The type species of the genus, A. decollatus O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896, has been redescribed twice based on the holotype (Majumder & Tikader 1991; Deeleman-Reinhold 2001). Reimoser (1934) recorded the genus for the first time from India, who collected a male specimen from Mudumalai Tiger Reserve in Tamil Nadu State of southern India. This specimen was identified as A. decollatus, but it was never formally described and was later recognised to be a penultimate male (Dankittipakul & Singtripop 2013). Deeleman-Reinhold (2001) described the second representative of the genus, A. nocturnus, based on a single female specimen from Borneo, 105 years after the establishment of the genus. Dankittipakul & Singtripop (2013) described the male of A. nocturnus, thereby revealing the male genitalia of the genus, but the type species was still known only from the female sex.

  15. On the type species of the genus Aetius O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896: The first description of male with notes on cymbial notch and mating plug (Araneae: Corinnidae: Castianeirinae).

    PubMed

    Sudhin, Puthoor Pattammal; Nafin, Karunnappilli Shamsudheen; Simmons, Zoë; Sudhikumar, Ambalaparambil Vasu

    2016-01-01

    The rare ant mimicking sac spider genus Aetius was erected by O. Pickard-Cambridge in 1896 based on an unspecified number of female specimen(s) collected from Sri Lanka. The type species of the genus, A. decollatus O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896, has been redescribed twice based on the holotype (Majumder & Tikader 1991; Deeleman-Reinhold 2001). Reimoser (1934) recorded the genus for the first time from India, who collected a male specimen from Mudumalai Tiger Reserve in Tamil Nadu State of southern India. This specimen was identified as A. decollatus, but it was never formally described and was later recognised to be a penultimate male (Dankittipakul & Singtripop 2013). Deeleman-Reinhold (2001) described the second representative of the genus, A. nocturnus, based on a single female specimen from Borneo, 105 years after the establishment of the genus. Dankittipakul & Singtripop (2013) described the male of A. nocturnus, thereby revealing the male genitalia of the genus, but the type species was still known only from the female sex. PMID:27615855

  16. The Filistatidae in the Caribbean region, with a description of the new genus Antilloides, revision of the genus Filistatoides F. O. P.-Cambridge and notes on Kukulcania Lehtinen (Arachnida, Araneae).

    PubMed

    Brescovit, Antonio D; Ruiz, Alexander Sánchez; Garcia, Giraldo Alayón

    2016-07-07

    A synopsis of Caribbean filistatid diversity is recorded herein. A new genus, Antilloides, is proposed for five new species exclusively found in the Antilles: A. abeli n. sp., A. cubitas n. sp., and A. mesoliticus n. sp. from Cuba; A. haitises n. sp. from the Dominican Republic; and A. zozo n. sp. from the U. S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. The genus Filistatoides is revised and includes four species: the type species F. insignis F.O.P. Cambridge, which occurs only in Guatemala; the female is described here for the first time; F. polita Franganillo sp. reval., comb. nov., which occurs only in Cuba; F. xichu n. sp. described from Mexico; and F. milloti (Zapfe) which does not appear to belong to the genus based on morphological structures. Additionally, Kukulcania isolinae Alayón is synonymized with Kukulcania hibernalis (Hentz), and new records of its distribution are included for the Greater and Lesser Antilles.

  17. The Filistatidae in the Caribbean region, with a description of the new genus Antilloides, revision of the genus Filistatoides F. O. P.-Cambridge and notes on Kukulcania Lehtinen (Arachnida, Araneae).

    PubMed

    Brescovit, Antonio D; Ruiz, Alexander Sánchez; Garcia, Giraldo Alayón

    2016-01-01

    A synopsis of Caribbean filistatid diversity is recorded herein. A new genus, Antilloides, is proposed for five new species exclusively found in the Antilles: A. abeli n. sp., A. cubitas n. sp., and A. mesoliticus n. sp. from Cuba; A. haitises n. sp. from the Dominican Republic; and A. zozo n. sp. from the U. S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. The genus Filistatoides is revised and includes four species: the type species F. insignis F.O.P. Cambridge, which occurs only in Guatemala; the female is described here for the first time; F. polita Franganillo sp. reval., comb. nov., which occurs only in Cuba; F. xichu n. sp. described from Mexico; and F. milloti (Zapfe) which does not appear to belong to the genus based on morphological structures. Additionally, Kukulcania isolinae Alayón is synonymized with Kukulcania hibernalis (Hentz), and new records of its distribution are included for the Greater and Lesser Antilles. PMID:27395727

  18. University Choice: What Influences the Decisions of Academically Successful Post-16 Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Joan M.; Raffan, John; Deaney, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    The questionnaire survey reported in this paper is part of an ongoing evaluation of the effect of a bursary scheme on recruitment to Cambridge University. It sought to identify factors that encouraged or discouraged highly successful A Level students from applying to Cambridge. Findings reveal three main dimensions associated with the decision to…

  19. [Adaptation and validation of CAMDEX-DS (Cambridge Examination for Mental Disorders of Older People with Down's Syndrome and others with intellectual disabilities) in Spanish population with intellectual disabilities].

    PubMed

    Esteba-Castillo, Susanna; Dalmau-Bueno, Albert; Ribas-Vidal, Núria; Vilà-Alsina, Marta; Novell-Alsina, Ramon; García-Alba, Javier

    2013-10-16

    Introduccion. La demencia causada por la enfermedad de Alzheimer afecta comunmente a la poblacion adulta con sindrome de Down. Esta poblacion presenta dos rasgos clinicos caracteristicos: la presencia de demencia con semiologia distinta a la enfermedad de Alzheimer tipica y deficits intelectuales previos que pueden confundir el diagnostico clinico. Existe una evidente necesidad de validar instrumentos especificos en castellano adaptados a esta poblacion. Objetivo. Adaptar y validar el Cambridge Examination for Mental Disorders of Older People with Down's Syndrome and Others with Intellectual Disabilities (CAMDEX-DS) en poblacion española. Pacientes y metodos. Se consideraron 146 pacientes con discapacidad intelectual (leve-moderada). Se realizo un estudio de validacion de tipo observacional, transversal y multicentrico. Se administraron los siguientes tests: CAMDEX-DS, test breve de inteligencia de Kaufman y Dementia Questionnaire for Persons with Mental Retardation. Se calculo la fiabilidad test-retest, la fiabilidad interjueces, la concordancia del CAMDEX-DS para el diagnostico clinico y la validez. Resultados. La fiabilidad test-retest e interjueces obtuvo un coeficiente kappa de 0,92 y 0,91, respectivamente. El indice kappa del CAMDEX-DS para el diagnostico clinico respecto al resto de los criterios clinicos utilizados fue alto: CAMDEX-DS frente a DSM-IV (kappa = 0,95; p < 0,001); CAMDEX-DS frente a Clasificacion Internacional de Enfermedades, decima revision (kappa = 0,97; p = 0,000). Todas las correlaciones item-test oscilaban entre 0,31 y 0,69. La fiabilidad interna calculada mediante el alfa de Cronbach fue de 0,93. Conclusiones. La version española del CAMDEX-DS es un instrumento valido, de alta aplicabilidad a personas con discapacidad intelectual, que muestra buenas propiedades psicometricas. El Cambridge Cognitive Examination for Older Adults with Down's Syndrome (CAMCOG-DS) permite establecer dos puntos de corte para la sospecha de deterioro

  20. Can they recover? An assessment of adult adjustment problems among males in the abstainer, recovery, life-course persistent, and adolescence-limited pathways followed up to age 56 in the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Wesley G; Rocque, Michael; Fox, Bryanna Hahn; Piquero, Alex R; Farrington, David P

    2016-05-01

    Much research has examined Moffitt's developmental taxonomy, focusing almost exclusively on the distinction between life-course persistent and adolescence-limited offenders. Of interest, a handful of studies have identified a group of individuals whose early childhood years were marked by extensive antisocial behavior but who seemed to recover and desist (at least from severe offending) in adolescence and early adulthood. We use data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development to examine the adult adjustment outcomes of different groups of offenders, including a recoveries group, in late middle adulthood, offering the most comprehensive investigation of this particular group to date. Findings indicate that abstainers comprise the largest group of males followed by adolescence-limited offenders, recoveries, and life-course persistent offenders. Furthermore, the results reveal that a host of adult adjustment problems measured at ages 32 and 48 in a number of life-course domains are differentially distributed across these four offender groups. In addition, the recoveries and life-course persistent offenders often show the greatest number of adult adjustment problems relative to the adolescence-limited offenders and abstainers.

  1. A combined theoretical and Cambridge Structural Database study of π-hole pnicogen bonding complexes between electron rich molecules and both nitro compounds and inorganic bromides (YO2Br, Y = N, P, and As).

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Ramis, Rafael; Frontera, Antonio

    2014-04-17

    Quantum calculations at the DFT-D3/def2-TZVPD level of theory have been used to examine complexes between O2YBr (Y═N, P, and As) molecules and several Lewis bases, that is, NH3, H2O, and HF. The interactions of the lone pair of the ammonia, water, and hydrogen fluoride with the σ-hole and π-hole of O2YBr molecules have been considered. In general, the complexes where the Lewis base lone pair interacts with the π-hole are more favorable than those with σ-hole. The nature of the interactions has been characterized with the Bader theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). We have also studied the ability of trifluoronitromethane and nitromethane to interact with anions using their π-hole along with an analysis the Cambridge Structural Database. We have found a large number of hits that provide strong experimental support for ability of the nitryl (-NO2) group to interact with anions and Lewis bases. In some X-ray structures, the π-hole interaction is crucial in the crystal packing and has a strong influence in the solid state architecture of the complexes. Finally, due to the relevance in atmospheric chemistry, we have studied noncovalent σ/π-hole complexes of nitryl bromide with ozone. PMID:24679186

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolutions, Interactions (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics) Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolutions, Interactions (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, Alan

    2010-05-01

    In this book the use of inhomogeneous models in cosmology, both in modelling structure formation and interpreting cosmological observations, is discussed. The authors concentrate on exact solutions, and particularly the Lemaitre-Tolman (LT) and Szekeres models (the important topic of averaging is not discussed). The book serves to demonstrate that inhomogeneous metrics can generate realistic models of cosmic structure formation and nonlinear evolution and shows that general relativity has a lot more to offer to cosmology than just the standard spatially homogeneous FLRW model. I would recommend this book to people working in theoretical cosmology. In the introduction (and in the concluding chapter and throughout the book) a reasonable discussion of the potential problems with the standard FLRW cosmology is presented, and a list of examples illustrating the limitations of standard FLRW cosmology are discussed (including potential problems with perturbation methods). In particular, the authors argue that the assumptions of isotropy and spatial homogeneity (and consequently the Copernican principle) must be properly challenged and revisited. Indeed, it is possible for `good old general relativity' to be used to explain cosmological observations without introducing speculative elements. In part I of the book the necessary background is presented (readers need a background in general relativity theory at an advanced undergraduate or graduate level). There is a good (and easy to read) review of the exact spherically symmetric dust Lemaitre-Tolman model (LT) (often denoted the LTB model) and the Lemaitre and Szekeres models. Light propogation (i.e. null geodesics, for both central and off-center observers) in exact inhomogeneous (LT) models is reviewed. In part II a number of applications of exact inhomogeneous models are presented (taken mainly from the authors' own work). In chapter 4, the evolution of exact inhomogeneous models (primarily the LT model, but also the Szekeres model) is studied regarding structure formation. I thought that the authors describe the advantages and drawbacks of the idealized exact solutions used in the physical modelling in a reasonable manner (although more concise conclusions might have been useful). The authors also address the formation of a galaxy with a central black hole, the formation and evolution of rich galactic clusters and voids and other structures, and the effects of radiation in the models. The most interesting application is presented in chapter 5; namely, the effects of inhomogeneities on observations such as the luminosity distance relation and the explanation of the observed dimming of distant SN Ia (which is usually interpreted within the standard FLRW model in terms of the existence of dark energy). The main conclusion of this work is that data can be reproduced within the LT model (via inhomogeneities in general relativity, but without introducing dark energy). In particular, a number of exact LT solutions were surveyed, and a full discussion of various models in the literature (and a critique of the various assumptions) is presented. In the next chapter the possible resolution of the horizon problem without inflation, in terms of shell crossing in a LT model, is discussed. This is perhaps the most controversial chapter of the book. In the final chapter 7, the influence of inhomogeneous structures in the path of a light ray (for both center and off-center observers in a special Szekeres Swiss cheese model) on the observed temperature distribution of the CMB is discussed. This is a very important topic, but only a heuristic and qualitative study is presented here; more work on the multipole moments of higher order would be necessary for a more comprehensive analysis.

  3. 3. Photocopy of photograph from Harvard University Archives James F. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph from Harvard University Archives James F. and Jean B. O'Gorman, photographers January 6, 1964 INNER COURT FROM SECOND TIER (THIRD FLOOR), LOOKING EAST - The Dunster, Dunster Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  4. 6. Photocopy of photograph (from 1867 Class Album, Harvard University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of photograph (from 1867 Class Album, Harvard University Archives, portfolio 24) Photographer unknown 1867 HOUSE ON ORIGINAL SITE - Garden House, 88 Garden Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  5. 2. Photocopy of photograph from Harvard University Archives James F. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of photograph from Harvard University Archives James F. and Jean B. O'Gorman, photographers January 6, 1964 INNER COURT FROM SECOND TIER (THIRD FLOOR), LOOKING SOUTHEAST - The Dunster, Dunster Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  6. Metamorphoses of Visualisation: Experiences of Interpreting Stained-Glass Artworks of Anglican Emmanuel College Chapel of Cambridge University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofronova, Lidia V.; Chugunova, Tatiana G.; Khazina, Anna V.; Babayeva, Anastasiya V.; Shmeleva, Natalia V.

    2016-01-01

    This research was caused by an accidental discovery of a photo reproduction of one unknown in Russia masterpiece of British stained glass art of the Victorian age found on open spaces of the Internet: a full-height portrait of John Colet, a famous member of clergy of the pre-reform period, Erasmus' and Thomas More's friend and mentor. Exquisite…

  7. Seismic Imaging and Inversion: Application of Linear Theory (2012), Cambridge University Press, co-authored with Bob Stolt

    SciTech Connect

    Weglein, Arthur B.; Stolt, Bob H.

    2012-03-01

    Extracting information from seismic data requires knowledge of seismic wave propagation and reflection. The commonly used method involves solving linearly for a reflectivity at every point within the Earth, but this book follows an alternative approach which invokes inverse scattering theory. By developing the theory of seismic imaging from basic principles, the authors relate the different models of seismic propagation, reflection and imaging - thus providing links to reflectivity-based imaging on the one hand and to nonlinear seismic inversion on the other. The comprehensive and physically complete linear imaging foundation developed presents new results at the leading edge of seismic processing for target location and identification. This book serves as a fundamental guide to seismic imaging principles and algorithms and their foundation in inverse scattering theory and is a valuable resource for working geoscientists, scientific programmers and theoretical physicists.

  8. Solar and interplanetary dynamics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., August 27-31, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M. (Editor); Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1980-01-01

    The symposium focuses on solar phenomena as the source of transient events propagating through the solar system, and theoretical and observational assessments of the dynamic processes involved in these events. The topics discussed include the life history of coronal structures and fields, coronal and interplanetary responses to long time scale phenomena, solar transient phenomena affecting the corona and interplanetary medium, coronal and interplanetary responses to short time scale phenomena, and future directions.

  9. The Cambridge Guide to the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    2011-03-01

    Part I. Changing Views and Fundamental Concepts: 1. Evolving perspectives: a historical prologue; 2. The new, close-up view from space; 3. The invisible buffer zone with space: atmospheres, magnetospheres and the solar wind; Part II. The Inner System - Rocky Worlds: 4. Third rock from the Sun: restless Earth; 5. The Moon: stepping stone to the planets; 6. Mercury: a dense battered world; 7. Venus: the veiled planet; 8. Mars: the red planet; Part III. The Giant Planets, Their Satellites and Their Rings - Worlds of Liquid, Ice and Gas: 9. Jupiter: a giant primitive planet; 10. Saturn: lord of the rings; 11. Uranus and Neptune; Part IV. Remnants of Creation - Small Worlds in the Solar System: 12. Asteroids and meteorites; 13. Colliding worlds; 14. Comets; 15. Beyond Neptune; Part V. Origin of the Solar System and Extrasolar Planets: 16. Brave new worlds; Index.

  10. And Now What about Reforming Cambridge Governance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    After its recent Assurance visit from HEFCE, Oxford went through a high profile public debate at the end of which its academic community voted against moving to a governance structure which would have given Oxford a majority of external members on its Council. The Higher Education Funding Council asked Oxford to answer eight questions justifying…

  11. Family Theory According to the Cambridge Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Stephen L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper is a summary of and an introduction to the family systems theory of David Kantor and William Lehr as expressed in their book, Inside the Family. Their concepts of family boundaries, dimensions, typal arrangements, and the four player system are presented and discussed. (Author)

  12. The Cambridge encyclopedia of space (revised edition)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Allest, Frederic; Arets, Jean; Baker, Phillip J.; Balmino, Georges; Barth, Hans; Benson, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive and intensively illustrated development history is presented for spaceflight, ranging over its basic concepts' speculative and fictional origins, the historical roots of rocket-related technologies, and the scientific accomplishments of earth orbit and interplanetary missions to date. Attention is given to propulsion systems, spaceflight launch centers, satellite systems, and solar system exploration by the U.S. and the Soviet Union. Current space-related activities encompass the meteorology, remote sensing, telecommunications and direct broadcasting, and navigation functions of unmanned satellites, as well as such manned spacecraft roles as medical and materials science research. The military uses of space, and increasingly important space industrialization concepts, are discussed as well.

  13. Copy-Editing: The Cambridge Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Judith

    This handbook is designed as a reference manual for copy editors who prepare typescript for printing. It deals with the following topics: the copy editor's function; the work to be done at each stage in the production process; some difficult points of spelling, capitalization, and other features collectively known as "house style"; the parts of a…

  14. Schools and Delinquency. Cambridge Criminology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfredson, Denise C.

    This book links theory and empirical evidence to derive implications for designing school-based delinquency prevention programs. It examines how school environment and behavior interact, discusses the multiple levels of influence in and around schools that combine with student characteristics to lead to delinquency, and addresses the malleability…

  15. Analysis of N-H···O hydrogen bonds in new C(O)-NH-P(O)-based phosphoric triamides and analogous structures deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database.

    PubMed

    Pourayoubi, Mehrdad; Toghraee, Maryam; Divjakovic, Vladimir; van der Lee, Arie; Mancilla Percino, Teresa; Leyva Ramírez, Marco A; Saneei, Anahid

    2013-04-01

    Five new compounds belonging to the phosphoric triamide family have been synthesized: two of them with the formula XC(O)NHP(O)Y [X = CF3 (1) and CClF2 (2), Y = NHCH2C(CH3)2CH2NH] involving a 1,3-diazaphosphorinane ring part, and three 2,6-Cl2C6H3C(O)NHP(O)Z2 phosphoric triamides [Z = NHC(CH3)3 (3), N(CH3)(C6H11) (4) and N(CH3)(CH2C6H5) (5)]. The characterization was performed by (31)P{(1)H}, (1)H, (13)C NMR, IR spectroscopy besides (19)F NMR for fluorine containing compounds (1) and (2), and X-ray single-crystal structure analysis for (1), (3), (4) and (5). In each molecule the P atom has a distorted tetrahedral environment. The N atoms bonded to P atom have mainly sp(2) character with a very slight tendency to a pyramidal coordination for some amido groups. Different types of N-H···O hydrogen bonds have been analyzed for (1), (3), (4) and (5) and 118 other structures (including 194 hydrogen bonds) deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database, containing either C(O)-NH-P(O)[N(C)(C)]2 or C(O)-NH-P(O)[NH(C)]2. The participation of N(CP)-H···O=P [N(CP) = the nitrogen atom of the C(O)-NH-P(O) fragment], N-H···O=P, N-H···O=C and N(CP)-H···O=C hydrogen bonds in different hydrogen-bonded motifs are discussed. Moreover, the involvement of the O atoms of C=O or P=O in the [N(CP)-H][N-H]···O=P, [N-H]2···O=P, [N-H]2···O=C and [N-H]3···O=C groups are considered. A histogram of N···O distances, the distribution of N-H···O angles and the scatterplot of N-H···O angles versus N···O distances are studied.

  16. Are changes in glycaemic control associated with diabetes-specific quality of life and health status in screen-detected type 2 diabetes patients? Four-year follow up of the ADDITION-Cambridge cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, L; Long, G H; Griffin, S J; Simmons, R K

    2015-01-01

    Background Interventions that improve HbA1c levels do not necessarily improve health-related quality of life (QoL). This issue may be particularly relevant in asymptomatic diabetes patients detected earlier in the course of the disease. Methods HbA1c, diabetes-specific QoL (ADDQoL) and health status were measured in 510 screen-detected diabetes patients from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial at 1 and 5 years post diagnosis. Multivariable logistic/linear regression was used to quantify the longitudinal association between change in HbA1c from 1 to 5 years and ADDQoL and health status at 5 years, adjusting for age, sex, education and trial group; alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, plasma vitamin C, HbA1c, ADDQoL or health status at 1 year, and glucose-lowering medication at 5 years. Results From 1 to 5 years, median HbA1c interquartile range increased from 6.3% (5.9–6.8) to 6.8% (6.4–7.4); the median ADDQoL score and mean health status physical health summary score decreased from -0.4 (-1 to -0.08) to -0.5 (-1.08 to -0.09) (suggesting an adverse impact of diabetes on QoL) and by -0.79 (8.94) points, respectively. Increases in HbA1c were independently associated with reporting a negative impact of diabetes on QoL (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.85) but not with the health status summary scores. Conclusions Increases in HbA1c from 1 to 5 years post-diagnosis were independently associated with increased odds of reporting a negative impact of diabetes on QoL. While our results suggest that efforts to reduce HbA1c do not adversely affect health-related QoL, large numbers of participants still report a negative impact of diabetes on their QoL 5 years post-diagnosis. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24817063

  17. Book Review: A philosopher's understanding of quantum mechanics. Possibilities and impossibilities of a modal interpretation. Pieter Vermaas, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999, pp. xi+295, US 69.95 hardback, ISBN 0521651085

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placek, T.

    Despite the overwhelming empirical adequacy of quantum mechanics, 80 years after its inception, there is still no consensus as to what the theory says about the world. This fact appears to be exceptional in the history of physics. To compare, 80 years after Newton's Principia or 80 years after formulation of Maxwell's equations, there was no controversy as to what classical mechanics or Maxwell's electromagnetism said about the world. What calls for an interpretation of quantum mechanics is an internal conflict in this theory (known as the measurement problem) between the continuous and deterministic evolution governed by the Schrödinger equation on the one hand, and chancy occurrences of measurement results, as described by the statistical algorithm, on the other. A related issue relies upon facts like Gleason's theorem, the Kochen-Specker paradox or Bell's theorems that constrain the possibility of construing the theory as referring to pre-existing properties of systems, i.e., properties that exist before, and are only revealed by, a measurement.

  18. Book Review: Models as mediators: perspectives on natural and social science (Ideas in context, Vol. 52). M. S. Morgan and M. Morrison (Eds.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999, 401 pp., US 24.95 pbk, ISBN 0521655714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Paul

    This collection of articles is an outgrowth of a research group, based primarily at the London School of Economics and Amsterdam, the principal focus of which is modeling, with special emphasis on physics and economics. Due to space constraints and the interests of this journal, my review will discuss only selected essays on physics.

  19. Book review: Modern Plasma Physics, Vol. I: Physical Kinetics of Turbulent Plasmas, by Patrick H. Diamond, Sanae-I. Itoh and Kimitaka Itoh, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (UK), 2010, IX, 417 p., ISBN 978-0-521-86920-1 (Hardback)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somov, B. V.

    If you want to learn not only the most fundamental things about the physics of turbulent plasmas but also the current state of the problem including the most recent results in theoretical and experimental investigations - and certainly many physicists and astrophysicists do - this series of three excellent monographs is just for you. The first volume "Physical Kinetics of Turbulent Plasmas" develops the kinetic theory of turbulence through a focus on quasi-particle models and dynamics. It discusses the concepts and theoretical methods for describing weak and strong fluid and phase space turbulence in plasma systems far from equilibrium. The core material includes fluctuation theory, self-similar cascades and transport, mean field theory, resonance broadening and nonlinear wave-particle interaction, wave-wave interaction and wave turbulence, strong turbulence theory and renormalization. The book gives readers a deep understanding of the fields under consideration and builds a foundation for future applications to multi-scale processes of self-organization in tokamaks and other confined plasmas. In spite of a short pedagogical introduction, the book is addressed mainly to well prepared readers with a serious background in plasma physics, to researchers and advanced graduate students in nonlinear plasma physics, controlled fusions and related fields such as cosmic plasma physics

  20. The Influence of British and German Universities on the Historical Development of American Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron

    This monograph provides a historical review of British and German influences on the development of American universities. The paper traces the foundations of modern universities to medieval institutions, such as the universities of Paris and Bologna, to such institutions as Oxford and Cambridge, and to German universities, which were founded as…

  1. The Cambridge-Cambridge X-ray Serendipity Survey: I X-ray luminous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, B. J.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the first results obtained from a new optical identification program of 123 faint X-ray sources with S(0.5-2 keV) greater than 2 x 10(exp -14) erg/s/sq cm serendipitously detected in ROSAT PSPC pointed observations. We have spectroscopically identified the optical counterparts to more than 100 sources in this survey. Although the majority of the sample (68 objects) are QSO's, we have also identified 12 narrow emission line galaxies which have extreme X-ray luminosities (10(exp 42) less than L(sub X) less than 10(exp 43.5) erg/s). Subsequent spectroscopy reveals them to be a mixture of star-burst galaxies and Seyfert 2 galaxies in approximately equal numbers. Combined with potentially similar objects identified in the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey, these X-ray luminous galaxies exhibit a rate of cosmological evolution, L(sub X) varies as (1 + z)(exp 2.5 +/- 1.0), consistent with that derived for X-ray QSO's. This evolution, coupled with the steep slope determined for the faint end of the X-ray luminosity function (Phi(L(sub X)) varies as L(sub X)(exp -1.9)), implies that such objects could comprise 15-35% of the soft (1-2 keV) X-ray background.

  2. 77 FR 3118 - Security Zone; Choptank River and Cambridge Channel, Cambridge, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... 3118-3121] [FR Doc No: 2012-1172] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket... effect from 8 a.m. on January 25, 2012, through 11:59 p.m. on January 27, 2012. The security zone will... Golf Resort, Spa and Marina's Breakwater Pavilion, in approximate position latitude 38[deg]33'54''...

  3. Gambling with the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2002-05-01

    This is an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's book The Universe in a Nutshell. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, were able to show that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied that the universe and time itself must have had a beginning in a tremendous explosion. The discovery of the expansion of the universe is one of the great intellectual revolutions of the twentieth century.

  4. Using Digital Materials in Online Courses: A Cautionary Tale of Georgia State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talab, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    On April 15, 2008, a lawsuit was filed against Georgia State University by Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, and Sage, supported by the American University Presses (AAP). The complaint asserted ""pervasive, flagrant, and ongoing" unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials...through its electronic course reserves service,…

  5. Kristian Camilleri: Heisenberg and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics—The Physicist as Philosopher. Cambridge University Press, 2009, ISBN-13:9780521884846, 211 pp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleemans, Machiel

    2010-11-01

    The book Heisenberg and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics—The Physicist as Philosopher, by Kristian Camilleri is critically reviewed. The work details Heisenberg’s philosophical development from an early positivist commitment towards a later philosophy of language. It is of interest to researchers and graduate students in the history and philosophy of quantum mechanics.

  6. The Psychosocial Effect of Residentially-Based Learning Communities on First Year Honors Students in a Highly Selective Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Henry J., III.

    2010-01-01

    Colleges and universities in the United States are currently in the midst of a debate on how to integrate students' academic and social lives in a manner similar to the centuries old model of Oxford and Cambridge. One of the major initiatives by colleges and universities is the re-establishment of residentially-based learning communities whose use…

  7. Assessment of a Cambridge Structural Database-driven overlay program.

    PubMed

    Giangreco, Ilenia; Olsson, Tjelvar S G; Cole, Jason C; Packer, Martin J

    2014-11-24

    We recently published an improved methodology for overlaying multiple flexible ligands and an extensive data set for validating pharmacophore programs. Here, we combine these two developments and present evidence of the effectiveness of the new overlay methodology at predicting correct superimpositions for systems with varying levels of complexity. The overlay program was able to generate correct predictions for 95%, 73%, and 39% of systems classified as easy, moderate, and hard, respectively.

  8. Cambridge journals blog: Improving feed efficiency in dairy production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because the cost of feeding animals is one of the greatest expenses in dairy production (40-60% of production costs), research focused on ways to identify and select for animals that are the most efficient at converting feed into milk has greatly expanded during the last decade. The animal Article o...

  9. Learning about Intermolecular Interactions from the Cambridge Structural Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    A clear understanding and appreciation of noncovalent interactions, especially hydrogen bonding, are vitally important to students of chemistry and the life sciences, including biochemistry, molecular biology, pharmacology, and medicine. The opportunities afforded by the IsoStar knowledge base of intermolecular interactions to enhance the…

  10. Imitation in Infancy. Cambridge Studies in Cognitive and Perceptual Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadel, Jacqueline, Ed.; Butterworth, George, Ed.

    Modern research has suggested that imitation is a natural mechanism of learning and communication, yet the possibility of imitation in newborn humans has been controversial. This book looks at evidence for innate imitation in babies. The chapters in the first section of the book reassess the Piagetian tradition, especially concerning the relation…

  11. Bibliography for Conference on Thinking. Cambridge, Massachusetts, August 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipollone, Anthony, Comp.

    Drawn from several comprehensive bibliographies and computer searches of volumes by speakers at the Conference on Thinking, this brief bibliography presents resources for researchers and practitioners interested in the areas of cognitive and critical thinking skills. The materials are divided into the following topic areas: (1) general, (2)…

  12. Language and the Brain. Cambridge Approaches to Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obler, Loraine K.; Gjerlow, Kris

    This book examines how the brain enables people to speak creatively and build up an understanding of language. The discussion looks at the linguistic and neuro-anatomical underpinnings of language and considers how language skills can systematically break down in individuals with different types of brain damage. By studying children with language…

  13. Managing Organization Vitality. M.S. Thesis - MIT, Cambridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, G. P., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The three major objectives are: (1) to measure the extent to which the organization renewal techniques have been adopted by organizations in both the private and public sectors; (2) to determine the overall results of these applications; and (3) to test a number of specific hypotheses regarding situational determinants of the success of this approach. It appears that top management involvement is the single most crucial determinant of the success of organization renewal. Organization renewal has considerable potential for increasing the commitment of individuals, and can have a significant positive influence on the results of the organization.

  14. The Ecology of Language Evolution. Cambridge Approaches to Language Contact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mufwene, Salikoko S.

    This book explores the development of creoles and other new languages, highlighting conceptual and methodological issues for genetic linguistics and discussing the significance of ecologies that influence language evolution. It presents examples of changes in the structure, function, and vitality of languages, suggesting that similar ecologies…

  15. 76 FR 12729 - Cambridge Environmental Inc; Transfer of Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ...) 305-8338 e-mail address: steadman.mario@epa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. General Information A... procurement will also provide additional support to EPA in investigating science policy issues related to.... The scientific quality of reviews, assessments, reports, model tools, and software and their...

  16. Second Language Vocabulary Acquisition. The Cambridge Applied Linguistics Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coady, James, Ed.; Huckin, Thomas, Ed.

    A collection of essays on second language vocabulary learning includes: "Historical Trends in Second Language Vocabulary Instruction" (Cheryl Boyd Zimmerman); "The Lexical Plight in Second Language Reading: Words You Don't Know, Words You Think You Know, and Words You Can't Guess" (Batia Laufer); "Orthographic Knowledge in L2 Lexical Processing: A…

  17. BRAILLE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE, PROCEEDINGS (CAMBRIDGE, NOVEMBER 18, 1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge. Sensory Aids Evaluation and Development Center.

    THESE PAPERS ARE FROM THE BRAILLE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE SPONSORED BY THE SENSORY AIDS EVALUATION DEVELOPMENT CENTER ON NOVEMBER 18, 1966. THE PAPERS PRESENTED ARE--"A STUDY OF BRAILLE PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND USE," BY LOUIS GOLDISH, "AUTOMATED BRAILLE AND THE PROFESSION OF PROGRAMMING FOR THE BLIND," BY THEODOR D. STERLING,…

  18. Adjunct Mentoring, a Vital Responsibility in a Changing Educational Climate: The Lesley University Adjunct Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Carol A.; Reiff, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, has established an adjunct mentoring process in response to its growing number of adjunct faculty. Lesley's adjunct corps serves in Lesley programs offered both on and off campus. The primary goals of the mentoring program are to support excellence in teaching, and to engage in mentoring that…

  19. 75 FR 58431 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register (66 FR 51464, October 9, 2001) from four to seven... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard... Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains...

  20. Two Approaches to the Use of Blogs in Pre-Service Foreign Language Teachers' Professional Development: A Comparative Study in the Context of Two Universities in the UK and the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Linda; Kim, Deoksoon

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the use of blogs for pre-service language teacher education in two national settings, the UK (University of Cambridge) and the US (University of South Florida). Taking two approaches to blogging and to learning through blogging (one based on self-reflection and a constructivist approach and one based on social and…

  1. Mass Deacidification in the Harvard University Library. A Report on the 1991/92 Pilot Operational Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Univ. Library.

    This report examines the institutional level deacidification program that was formalized and instituted at Harvard University (Cambridge, Massachusetts)) for its research libraries. The report is organized into six sections. The first section, which describes the project's background, discusses the acidic paper problem, available mass…

  2. TOEFL and FCE Tests as Predictors of Academic Success for Undergraduate Students at the University of Bahrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Musawi, Nu'man M.; Al-Ansari, Saif H.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the multivariate relationship of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the First Certificate of English (FCE), administered by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate, and to determine whether students' total score on the TOEFL or their overall score on the FCE tends to be a…

  3. 78 FR 38945 - University of Hawaii at Manoa, et al.; Notice of Decision on Applications for Duty-Free Entry of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... Systems, Belgium. Intended Use: See notice at 78 FR 27186, May 9, 2013. Comments: None received. Decision.... Manufacturer: Gatan, United Kingdom. Intended Use: See notice at 78 FR 27186, May 9, 2013. Comments: None.... Manufacturer: University of Cambridge/Cavendish Laboratory. Intended Use: See notice at 78 FR 27186, May...

  4. Book Review: Conceptual mathematics: a first introduction to categories. F. William Lawvere and Stephen H. Schanuel, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1997 (reprinted with corrections 1998), xvi+358 pp., index, hbk, ISBN 0-521-47249-0, pbk, ISBN 0-521-47817-0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corfield, David

    Casting scientific or mathematical research activity in the form of programmes with a view to gauging its progressiveness is no straightforward business, as Imre Lakatos discovered. The category theory "programme", now over half a century old, has certainly become too large to be judged as a united enterprise whose members share a common mission. Speaking about Bayesian statistics, Edwin Jaynes could imagine a time when its methods had become so pervasive that its practitioners found their common interests insufficiently extensive to cause them to gather together for conferences, just as the time when researchers could meet up to discuss the uses of Fourier transforms is long past. Well, category theory has already progressed a certain way towards this stage. Its penetration into the various branches of mathematics has been uneven, but in some cases it has been profound. For instance, any algebraic topologist or algebraic geometer just must use a considerable amount of category theory as part of their job. It has also made inroads into logic and, from there, to theoretical computer science (see e.g., Taylor, 1999). Its reach even extends to mathematical physics where, for example, we find topological quantum field theories defined in terms of functors between categories (Atiyah, 1988), and the intriguing prospect that higher-dimensional categories will feature in subsequent developments.

  5. "Universe" event at AIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    Report of event of 11 May 2008 held at the African Institute of Mathematical Sciences (Muizenberg, Cape), with speakers Michael Griffin (Administrator of NASA), Stephen Hawking (Cambridge), David Gross (Kavli Institute, Santa Barbara) and George Smoot (Berkeley).

  6. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of undated photo after ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of undated photo after 1903 in Harvard Archives, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts EXTERIOR FROM CORNER OF QUINCY AND CAMBRIDGE STREETS - Mrs. David Greenough House, 42 Quincy Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  7. British Telecom and Project Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, G. H. L.; Morrow, G.

    1983-07-01

    Factors influencing the emergence of local area network (LANs) are covered along with British Telecom's involvement in Project Universe, an experiment to produce high-speed data links between several LANs in the United Kingdom with the Orbital Test Satellite (OTS). Other functions of Project Universe include measuring the network components performance, developing procedures for using the system for computer-computer and terminal-computer operations, and investigating the use of LAN satellites for business and computer communications. British Telecom has been involved with Project Universe since its inception. A standard Videotex system has been connected to the Cambridge Ring, consequently providing Videotex terminals attached to the ring access to a special Universe Prestel system. Future goals include replacing the OTS with a new satellite with a terminal operating at 8-10 Mbit/s. Block diagrams are provided.

  8. Ingestion of phosphorus-32 at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, identified on August 19, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    On Monday, October 16, 1995, the Massachussetts Institue of Technology (MIT, the licensee) notified the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of an incident involving ingestion of phosphorus-32 by a researcher at the MIT Center for Cancer Research. The licensee informed the NRC that a researcher had reported the incident on August 19. The licensee initially estimated the intake as 500 microcuries (19 MBq) and the dose as 4000 millirem (40 mSv) to the individual. On October 12, the licensee informed the researcher that its final intake estimate was 579 microcuries (21 MBq), just under the 600 microcuries (22 MBq) which would represent an overexposure. On October 17, the NRC established an Incident Investigation Team to investigate the case. NRC also contracted with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education to do independent dose assessments of the urine sample data and the whole-body data. The Team concluded that the licensee`s final intake and dose estimates were in accordance with accepted scientific references and NRC guidance. However, recognizing the uncertainties involved in the use of models to simulate human characteristics, the Team determined the intake would be better characterized as likely falling within a range of 500 to 750 microcuries (19--28 NMq). An NRC medical consultant concluded that no symptoms or acute effects should be observed from an intake of this level.

  9. Locating Gender: Occupational Segregation, Wages and Domestic Responsibilities. Cambridge Studies in Work and Social Inequality 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siltanen, Janet

    This text combines a case-study approach with significant theoretical development to challenge existing explanations of occupational segregation. Chapter 1 reviews issues raised by the conceptual status of "gender" in attempting to explain women's and men's employment experience and introduces the study that forms the core of the research--the…

  10. Photovoltaics for commercial solar power applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, Sept. 18, 19, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, David

    1986-01-01

    Papers are presented on efficient multijunction monolithic cascade solar cells, high efficiency silicon solar cells, point contact silicon cells, and space solar cell research. Also considered are photovoltaic power plants, the reliability of photovoltaic modules, the continuous fabrication of amorphous silicon solar cells on polymer substrates, and the density of states of amorphous silicon. Other topics include breaking the efficiency-stability-production barrier in amorphous photovoltaics, the development of flexible a-SiC/a-Si heterojunction solar cells and stable a-SiC/a-Si tandem cells with blocking barriers, and performance aspects for thin-film-silicon-hydrogen solar cells.

  11. Grammatical Theory in the United States from Bloomfield to Chomsky. Cambridge Studies in Linguistics: 67.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, P. H.

    A survey of the history of linguistic theory concerning grammar in the United States traces the development of theory since 1910. It begins with a general historical review of American linguistics. The subsequent three chapters focus on grammar. The first of these deals with morphology, beginning with Leonard Bloomfield's ideas in both his early…

  12. The Impact of Cambridge and the Determination of Fair Use in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    The Fair Use exemption to copyright infringement is a difficult concept for those within the legal community because of its unique "case-by-case" application. Without any red line rules, providing guidance to typical users is even more challenging. This paper reviews several recent cases regarding the application of Fair Use and how the…

  13. Mobile robots II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, Nov. 5, 6, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.J.; Chun, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    Topics discussed are autonomous vehicle guidance, three-dimensional systems, the Mars rover, motion analysis, and planning and navigation. Particular papers are presented on a real-time system architecture for a mobile robot, distributed scene analysis for autonomous road vehicle guidance, the vision system for a Mars rover, the recovery of motion parameters using optical flow, and Prolog-based world models for mobile robot navigation.

  14. 77 FR 64143 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... Lab By Notice dated June 18, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on June 26, 2012, 77 FR 38086... Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as a bulk manufacturer of Morphine (9300),...

  15. Second Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giampapa, M. S. (Editor); Golub, L. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Solar and stellar atmospheric phenomena and their fundamental physical properties such as gravity, effective temperature and rotation rate, which provides the range in parameter space required to test various theoretical models were investigated. The similarity between solar activity and stellar activity is documented. Some of the topics discussed are: atmospheric structure, magnetic fields, solar and stellar activity, and evolution.

  16. Multi-modal courtship in the peacock spider, Maratus volans (O.P.-Cambridge, 1874).

    PubMed

    Girard, Madeline B; Kasumovic, Michael M; Elias, Damian O

    2011-01-01

    The peacock spider, Maratus volans, has one of the most elaborate courtship displays in arthropods. Using regular and high-speed video segments captured in the lab, we provide detailed descriptions of complete male courtship dances. As research on jumping spiders has demonstrated that males of some species produce vibrations concurrently with visual displays, we also used laser vibrometry to uncover such elements for this species. Our recordings reveal and describe for the first time, that M. volans males use vibratory signals in addition to complex body ornaments and motion displays. The peacock spider and other closely related species are outstanding study organisms for testing hypotheses about the evolution and functional significance of complex displays, thus, this descriptive study establishes a new model system for behavioral ecology, one that certainly stands to make important contributions to the field. PMID:21980440

  17. The sound of moving bodies. Ph.D. Thesis - Cambridge Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth Steven

    1990-01-01

    The importance of the quadrupole source term in the Ffowcs, Williams, and Hawkings (FWH) equation was addressed. The quadrupole source contains fundamental components of the complete fluid mechanics problem, which are ignored only at the risk of error. The results made it clear that any application of the acoustic analogy should begin with all of the source terms in the FWH theory. The direct calculation of the acoustic field as part of the complete unsteady fluid mechanics problem using CFD is considered. It was shown that aeroelastic calculation can indeed be made with CFD codes. The results indicate that the acoustic field is the most susceptible component of the computation to numerical error. Therefore, the ability to measure the damping of acoustic waves is absolutely essential both to develop acoustic computations. Essential groundwork for a new approach to the problem of sound generation by moving bodies is presented. This new computational acoustic approach holds the promise of solving many problems hitherto pushed aside.

  18. Who attends a UK diabetes screening programme? Findings from the ADDITION-Cambridge study

    PubMed Central

    Sargeant, LA; Simmons, RK; Barling, RS; Butler, R; Williams, KM; Prevost, AT; Kinmonth, AL; Wareham, NJ; Griffin, SJ

    2012-01-01

    Aims One of the factors influencing the cost-effectiveness of population screening for type 2 diabetes may be uptake. We examined attendance and practice- and individual-level factors influencing uptake at each stage of a diabetes screening programme in general practice. Methods A stepwise screening programme was undertaken among 135,825 people aged 40-69 years without known diabetes in 49 general practices in East England. The programme included a score based on routinely available data (age, sex, BMI and prescribed medication) to identify those at high risk who were offered random capillary blood glucose (RBG) and glycosylated haemoglobin tests. Those screening positive were offered fasting capillary blood glucose (FBG) and confirmatory oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). Results 33,539 high risk individuals were invited for a RBG screening test; 24,654 (74%) attended. 94% attended the follow-up FBG test and 82% the diagnostic OGTT. 70% of individuals completed the screening programme. Practices with higher GP staff complements and those located in more deprived areas had lower uptake for RBG and FBG tests. Male sex and a higher BMI were associated with lower attendance for RBG testing. Older age, prescription of antihypertensive medication and a higher risk score were associated with higher attendance for FBG and RBG tests. Conclusions High attendance rates can be achieved by targeted stepwise screening of individuals assessed as high risk by data routinely available in general practice. Different strategies may be required to increase initial attendance, ensure completion of the screening programme, and reduce the risk that screening increases health inequalities. PMID:20722672

  19. The Cambridge History of the English Language. Volume VI: English in North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algeo, John, Ed.

    This book is one volume in a series that examines the history of English. It traces the history of English in North America during the past 400 years, from its British background to its present position among the varieties of English used worldwide. Influences that have formed American English include political, social, and cultural changes in…

  20. The Cambridge History of the English Language. Volume IV: 1776-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romaine, Suzanne, Ed.

    The volume, which is part of a series providing a full account of the history of the English language, details the history of English from 1776 to 1997. An extensive introduction explains the changing socio-historic setting in which English has developed in response to a continuing background of diversity as it was transplanted to North America…

  1. Analog optical processing and computing; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, October 25, 26, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Caulfield, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Developments in optical signal processing are discussed, taking into account acousto-optic processors for passive surveillance, innovative and compact architectures for real-time two-dimensional correlation, scale-invariant Wigner distribution and ambiguity functions, an acousto-optic convolver for digital pulses, holography and four-wave mixing to see through the skin, the phase-conjugate of a Fourier hologram using four-wave mixing in BSO crystal, and a tunable, variable bandwidth, acousto-optic filter. Subjects related to pattern recognition are also explored, giving attention to optimal linear discriminant functions, orientation variability in generalized matched filters, an adaptive acousto-optic processor, an optical implementation of the synthetic discrimination function, and optimality considerations in modified matched spatial filters. A hybrid digital/integrated optical processor for on-line classification is considered along with white-light optical signal processing with a programmable magneto-optic device, and Lloyd's mirror as an optical processor.

  2. Multi-Modal Courtship in the Peacock Spider, Maratus volans (O.P.-Cambridge, 1874)

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Madeline B.; Kasumovic, Michael M.; Elias, Damian O.

    2011-01-01

    The peacock spider, Maratus volans, has one of the most elaborate courtship displays in arthropods. Using regular and high-speed video segments captured in the lab, we provide detailed descriptions of complete male courtship dances. As research on jumping spiders has demonstrated that males of some species produce vibrations concurrently with visual displays, we also used laser vibrometry to uncover such elements for this species. Our recordings reveal and describe for the first time, that M. volans males use vibratory signals in addition to complex body ornaments and motion displays. The peacock spider and other closely related species are outstanding study organisms for testing hypotheses about the evolution and functional significance of complex displays, thus, this descriptive study establishes a new model system for behavioral ecology, one that certainly stands to make important contributions to the field. PMID:21980440

  3. ONR Conference on CAI Languages Held at Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2-3 March 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Entelek, Inc., Newburyport, MA.

    An invitational meeting was held to consider computer-assisted instruction. Topics discussed included the BBM (Bolt, Beranek, Newman, Inc.) Mathematics program and programing languages, such as, Coursewriter, AUTHOR (Automatically Translating Heuristically Organized Routines), and PLATO/CATO (Programed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations/PLATO…

  4. Executive Functions as Endophenotypes in ADHD: Evidence from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Battery (CANTAB)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Shang, Chi-Yung

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about executive functions among unaffected siblings of children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and there is lack of such information from non-Western countries. We examined verbal and nonverbal executive functions in adolescents with ADHD, unaffected siblings and controls to test whether executive…

  5. Seismic profile analysis of sediment deposits in Brownlee and Hells Canyon Reservoirs near Cambridge, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flocks, James; Kelso, Kyle; Fosness, Ryan; Welcker, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, in cooperation with the USGS Idaho Water Science Center and the Idaho Power Company, collected high-resolution seismic reflection data in the Brownlee and Hells Canyon Reservoirs, in March of 2013.These reservoirs are located along the Snake River, and were constructed in 1958 (Brownlee) and 1967 (Hells Canyon). The purpose of the survey was to gain a better understanding of sediment accumulation within the reservoirs since their construction. The chirp system used in the survey was an EdgeTech Geo-Star Full Spectrum Sub-Bottom (FSSB) system coupled with an SB-424 towfish with a frequency range of 4 to 24 kHz. Approximately 325 kilometers of chirp data were collected, with water depths ranging from 0-90 meters. These reservoirs are characterized by very steep rock valley walls, very low flow rates, and minimal sediment input into the system. Sediments deposited in the reservoirs are characterized as highly fluid clays. Since the acoustic signal was not able to penetrate the rock substrate, only the thin veneer of these recent deposits were imaged. Results from the seismic survey indicate that throughout both of the Brownlee and Hells Canyon reservoirs the accumulation of sediments ranged from 0 to 2.5 m, with an average of 0.5 m. Areas of above average sediment accumulation may be related to lower slope, longer flooding history, and proximity to fluvial sources.

  6. Optical systems engineering IV; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, October 23, 24, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, P. R., Jr.

    Aspects of systems design are considered, taking into account the optical industry's contribution to the development of commercial electro-optical equipment, the characteristics of a new compact video rate optical scanner, the optical design of a compact thermal scanner, the image quality of optical systems for truncated Gaussian laser beams, design considerations for night vision goggles, design and fabrication of high performance relay lenses, and the development of a compact far infrared zoom telescope. Attention is also given to analytical considerations, component/system manufacture and test, and structural and thermal engineering. A new CAD technique for (narrow band) inhomogeneous thin film filters is discussed along with the impact of tight tolerances and other factors on the cost of optical components, the optical detection of surface flaws on extruded cables, the Hubble Space Telescope star simulator test stand, finite element methods for evaluating optical system performance, and boundary element formulations.

  7. Who Runs Our Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, David

    2012-01-01

    Inside the academy there is a cultural perspective that it should run itself, in the sense that "business as usual" should be done with no one's hands obviously on the levers. This theory reaches its high point in the "self-government" of Oxford and Cambridge colleges. In this article, the author explores the question, "who runs our…

  8. Removing Part of Skull After Severe Head Injury Brings Mixed Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... author Peter Hutchinson. He's a research professor of neuroscience at the University of Cambridge in England. "Doctors ... Peter Hutchinson, MBBS, Ph.D., FRCS, research professor, neuroscience, University of Cambridge, England; Richard Temes, M.D., ...

  9. [Book review] Skua and penguin: Predator and prey, by Euan Young

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pietz, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Review of: Skua and Penguin: Predator and Prey. Euan Young. 1994. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom. xvi + 452 pp., 53 line diagrams, 44 half-tones. ISBN 0-521-32251-0. $99.95 cloth

  10. 76 FR 57757 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ....) held in zoos in the United States to the Department of Anthropology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge... activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Los Angeles Zoo and...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1162 - Regulation for bicycle use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... University; (2) Harvard Square, Cambridge to Union Square, Allston; (3) Union Square, Somerville to Central Square, Cambridge; (4) Union Square, Allston to Government Center; (5) Harvard Square, Cambridge to... Boston City Hospital; and (17) Charlestown, Longfellow, Harvard, Boston University, River Street,...

  12. 40 CFR 52.1162 - Regulation for bicycle use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... University; (2) Harvard Square, Cambridge to Union Square, Allston; (3) Union Square, Somerville to Central Square, Cambridge; (4) Union Square, Allston to Government Center; (5) Harvard Square, Cambridge to... Boston City Hospital; and (17) Charlestown, Longfellow, Harvard, Boston University, River Street,...

  13. 40 CFR 52.1162 - Regulation for bicycle use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... University; (2) Harvard Square, Cambridge to Union Square, Allston; (3) Union Square, Somerville to Central Square, Cambridge; (4) Union Square, Allston to Government Center; (5) Harvard Square, Cambridge to... Boston City Hospital; and (17) Charlestown, Longfellow, Harvard, Boston University, River Street,...

  14. 40 CFR 52.1162 - Regulation for bicycle use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... University; (2) Harvard Square, Cambridge to Union Square, Allston; (3) Union Square, Somerville to Central Square, Cambridge; (4) Union Square, Allston to Government Center; (5) Harvard Square, Cambridge to... Boston City Hospital; and (17) Charlestown, Longfellow, Harvard, Boston University, River Street,...

  15. 40 CFR 52.1162 - Regulation for bicycle use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... University; (2) Harvard Square, Cambridge to Union Square, Allston; (3) Union Square, Somerville to Central Square, Cambridge; (4) Union Square, Allston to Government Center; (5) Harvard Square, Cambridge to... Boston City Hospital; and (17) Charlestown, Longfellow, Harvard, Boston University, River Street,...

  16. William Band at Yenching University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Danian

    2008-04-01

    William Band (1906-1993) has been widely remembered by his American colleagues and students as ``a fine physicist and teacher,'' who taught at Washington State University in Pullman between 1949 and 1971 and authored Introduction to Quantum Statistics (1954) and Introduction to Mathematical Physics (1959). Not many, however, knew much about Band's early career, which was very ``uncommon and eventful.'' Born in England, Band graduated from University of Liverpool in 1927 with an MsSc degree in physics. Instead of pursuing his Ph.D. at Cambridge, he chose to teach physics at Yenching University, a prestigious Christian university in Beijing, China. Arriving in 1929, Band established his career at Yenching, where he taught and researched the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, pioneered the study on low-temperature superconductivity in China, founded the country's first graduate program in physics, and chaired the Physics Department for 10 years until he fled from Yenching upon hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It took him two years to cross Japanese occupied areas under the escort of the Communist force; he left China in early 1945. This presentation will explore Band's motivation to work in China and his contributions to the Chinese physics research and education.

  17. Laser research and development in the Northeast; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, Sept. 16, 17, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Trainor, D.W.; Chicklis, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    The development and scaling of excimer lasers with emphasis on both electron-beam and discharge pumpings; a chemical means of generating laser action in the visible region; the use of stimulated Raman techniques to improve the beam quality output of systems employing excimer lasers; the research and development of CO/sub 2/ lasers; a CO/sub 2/ laser amplifier for radar applications; medical laser usage; and laser monitors for trace species in environmental and industrial processes are examined. Consideration is given to high power laser research and development for laser energetics; linear and nonlinear frequency converters; 450 nm laser operation in Tm(3+):YLF; alexandrite lasers and their applications; and the performance limitations of vibronic lasers. Topics discussed include the laser ignition of oil spills; the application of laser rangers to submunitions; the design and application of laser intensity stabilizers; and a 535 nm active atomic line filter that uses the Tl metastable state as an absorbing medium.

  18. The application of two-dimensional imaging to very high energy gamma ray astronomy. [Smithsonian Institution Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Weekes, T.C.

    1992-12-01

    After an introductory overview of gamma-ray astronomy, very brief summaries of research results are given. Summary topics may be grouped as follows: observations (survey of candidate gamma-ray sources; Cygnus X-3; Markarian 421; AGN's: general survey; Crab observations: pulsar outburst; Geminga; AE Aqr; bursts; ARTEMIS; muon telescope), technical developments (11m telescope: dedication and performance; 10m mount control; CCD cameras; light cones; filters; GRANITE upgrade; trigger configuration; miror coatings; lightning protection), data analysis (quick look; optical disk archive; false source method), infrastructure, and reviews.

  19. Beyond Logic and Argument Analysis: Critical Thinking, Everyday Problems and Democratic Deliberation in Cambridge International Examinations' Thinking Skills Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Leonel

    2011-01-01

    It is widely held that, by teaching individuals how to reason through and analyse everyday problems, the teaching of critical thinking develops the deliberative capacities essential to the healthy functioning of democracy. Implicit in this view is the assumption that a certain commensurability exists between the problems presented in such…

  20. What Is a Child? Children's Perceptions, the Cambridge Primary Review and Implications for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Debate about the definition of a "child" occurs in multi-disciplinary contexts, most recently located in the new sociology of childhood where social constructionism is the dominant discourse. Given that the child's voice has become an increasingly valued component of research, this paper reports on one aspect of a study which…

  1. The contribution of media analysis to the evaluation of environmental interventions: the commuting and health in Cambridge study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Media content can increase awareness of, and shape interactions with, public health interventions. As part of a natural experimental evaluation of the travel, physical activity and health impacts of the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway, we analysed print and social media discourse and interview data to understand the nature of new transport infrastructure and how it was experienced. Methods Newspaper articles were systematically retrieved from the LexisNexis database and tweets were identified from an online archive. Interviews were conducted as part of the larger evaluation study with 38 adults. Inductive thematic analysis was performed and comparisons were drawn between datasets. Results The findings are discussed in relation to five themes. First, an understanding of the intervention context and how the intervention was experienced was developed through accounts of events occurring pre and post the busway’s opening. Second, the media captured the dynamic nature of the intervention. Third, the media constructed idealised portrayals of the anticipated busway which in some cases were contradicted by the impact of the busway on the existing context and people’s lived experiences. Fourth, differential media coverage of the intervention components suggested that a lesser value was placed on promoting active travel compared with public transport. Lastly, interview data provided support for the hypothesis that the media increased awareness of the busway and served as a frame of reference for constructing expectations and comparing experiences. Conclusions This analysis has contributed to the wider evaluation of the busway, helping to understand its nature and implementation and informing hypotheses about how the local population interact with the infrastructure by attending to the significance of representations in the media. PMID:24884435

  2. The coming of the electronic age to the Cambridge Physiological Laboratory: E.D. Adrian's valve amplifier in 1921.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J K; Tansey, E M

    1996-07-01

    E.D. Adrian, F.R.S. (1889-1975) was one of Britain's most distinguished neurophysiologists, who, during a long and productive lifetime, achieved most honours and distinctions available to a scientific man. These included the 1932 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, shared with Sir Charles Sherrington, F.R.S., the Order of Merit (1942), and Presidency of the Royal Society (1950-55). His interest in the nervous system started at the beginning of his undergraduate career, much influenced by his Director of Studies, Keith Lucas, F.R.S. (1879-1916). Lucas, a skilled and imaginative neurophysiologist, was particularly renowned for his technical ability to design and build new equipment. In turn, his pupil's work on recording and analysing the electrical impulses in nervous tissue was also facilitated by the development of appropriate, sensitive instrumentation. This paper will describe Adrian's first use of valve amplifiers to enlarge the extremely small electrical signals then obtainable in the physiological laboratory, a development that epitomized the beginning of the electronic revolution in life sciences' laboratories.

  3. The Cambridge Mindreading (CAM) Face-Voice Battery: Testing Complex Emotion Recognition in Adults with and without Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golan, Ofer; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Hill, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    Adults with Asperger Syndrome (AS) can recognise simple emotions and pass basic theory of mind tasks, but have difficulties recognising more complex emotions and mental states. This study describes a new battery of tasks, testing recognition of 20 complex emotions and mental states from faces and voices. The battery was given to males and females…

  4. International Symposium on Wave and Tidal Energy, 2nd, St. John's College, Cambridge, England, September 23-25, 1981, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, H.S.; Stapleton, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    Topics discussed include wave power device interactions, the mathematical modeling of tidal power, and wave power with air turbines. Particular attention is given to the hydrodynamic characteristics of the Bristol Cylinder, the Strangford Lough tidal energy project, and the Foilpropeller for wave power propulsion. Consideration is also given to a submerged oscillating water column device, models of wave energy transformation near a coast, and the environmental implications of tidal power.

  5. A resolution commemorating the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Brown, Scott P. [R-MA

    2011-05-23

    05/23/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3244-3245; text as passed Senate: CR S3244-3245; text of measure as introduced: CR S3229-3230) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. National Planning for Bibliographic Control. Minutes of the Ninety-Fourth Meeting, May 10-11, 1979 at Cambridge, Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC.

    The minutes of this meeting provide the texts of the seven addresses given during the program sessions, as well as the discussions that followed each session: C. Lee Jones, "Bibliographic Service Development Program"; Henriette D. Avram, "The Role of the Library of Congress in National Planning for Bibliographic Control"; James F. Govan,…

  7. Executive Function Deficits in Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) Measured Using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Tests Automated Battery (CANTAB)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, C. R.; Mihic, A. M.; Nikkel, S. M.; Stade, B. C.; Rasmussen, C.; Munoz, D. P.; Reynolds, J. N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Chronic prenatal alcohol exposure causes a spectrum of deleterious effects in offspring, collectively termed fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), and deficits in executive function are prevalent in FASD. The goal of this research was to test the hypothesis that children with FASD exhibit performance deficits in tasks that assess…

  8. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Volume 31; Proceedings of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference, MIT, Cambridge, MA, Aug. 12-16, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, R. W. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on the applications of state-of-the-art cryogenic engineering technologies considers topics associated with the development status of the 'Superconducting SuperCollider', superconducting magnetic energy storage methods, large magnets for fusion and other physics researches, cryogenic hardware improvements, and phenomena and applications of superconducting magnet-employing acoustic emission test equipment. Also discussed are design criteria for superconducting magnet stability, heat exchangers and heat transfer to liquid He and N, heat and mass transfer characteristics of He II, refrigeration techniques for magnetic resonance imaging and other small systems, refrigeration for liquefaction and for superconducting fusion as well as for accelerator and generator systems, magnetic refrigeration, cryocooling and refrigeration for space applications, the storage and transfer of cryogenic fluids, the properties of cryogenic liquids, and air liquefaction equipment.

  9. The Cambridge Hospital Latino Health Clinic: a model for interagency integration of health services for Latinos at the provider level.

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, J. E.; de la Cancela, V.

    1992-01-01

    Latinos who present for health services often suffer from a complex interaction of medical and mental health needs, requiring a multifaceted intervention. An essential element of this multilevel approach is cultural and linguistic sensitivity on the part of health providers. New, innovative models of health service organization are needed to address the unique needs of the Latino population. Some of the key characteristics these models need to focus on include interagency collaboration rather than competition for resources, interdisciplinary teams of primary-care providers that also involve other nonmedical professional members, centralized case coordination and decentralized service delivery, flexibility and adaptability to changing priorities, continuity of care for all patients, and mutual support among providers to minimize the effects of stress and burnout. PMID:1608063

  10. Summary Proceedings of the Congress of International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (2nd, Cambridge, England, April, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, Inc., Boston, MA.

    This conference was held to alert physicians worldwide of the mortal peril of nuclear war to public health, with the hope that they will help educate their communities about the effects of nuclear war. Summary papers prepared during the conference include: medical consequences of nuclear war with special reference to Europe--immediate problems for…

  11. The Cambridge Garden House Hotel Riot of 1970 and Its Place in the History of British Student Protests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, David

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights a violent incident in the history of British student protests and outlines the judicial process that resulted. A wider consideration of student protests of the late 1960s and early 1970s, both in the UK and overseas is offered, together with some consideration of the significance of this particular case. At the time of the…

  12. Seeing It through: Advanced Strategies "for" Influencing Education Policy. Education Grantmakers Institute (Cambridge, Massachusetts, May 19-21, 2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackinnon, Anne

    2009-01-01

    "No education grantmaker can afford to ignore public policy. Local, state and federal policies shape the context in which we work by establishing education standards, allocating resources and setting priorities for people working in education." So begins the report on Grantmakers for Educations' 2005 Grantmakers Institute, Foundation Strategies…

  13. Pain reporting in older adults: the influence of cognitive impairment – results from the Cambridge City >75 Cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Docking, Rachael E; Fleming, Jane; Brayne, Carol; Zhao, Jun; Macfarlane, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Evidence suggests that while disabling back pain (BP), and rheumatic diseases associated with pain, continues to increase with age, the prevalence of non-disabling BP reaches a plateau, or even decreases, in the oldest old. This study aimed to determine whether this age-related pattern of non-disabling BP is a function of increasing cognitive impairment. Methods: Cross-sectional study of adults aged >77 years. Participants answered interviewer-administered questions on BP and cognitive function, assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination, categorised into normal versus mild, moderate or severe impairment. The relationship between cognitive function and BP was examined using multinomial logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex and residence. Results: Of 1174 participants with BP data, 1126 (96%) completed cognitive assessments. The relationship between cognitive function and BP differed for disabling and non-disabling BP. Across categories of cognitive impairment, increasingly higher prevalence of disabling BP was reported, compared to those with normal cognition, although this was not statistically significant (odds ratio (OR) = 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.7–4.6). No association was found between cognitive function and non-disabling BP (OR = 0.8; 95% CI = 0.4–1.6). Conclusion: This study found no association between the reporting of BP and level of cognitive impairment, suggesting that increasing cognitive impairment is an inadequate explanation for age-related decline in self-reported non-disabling BP. Future research should determine the reasons for the decline in non-disabling pain in older adults, although, meanwhile, it is important to ensure that this group receive appropriate pain assessment and pain management. Key points Prevalence of non-disabling back pain decreases in the oldest old. Some have proposed that this may be a function of cognitive impairment in older age, and an increasing inability to adequately report pain. Our findings do not support this hypothesis. PMID:26516543

  14. Astronomers Take the Measure of Dark Matter in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have obtained their most accurate determination to date of the amount of dark matter in galaxy clusters, the most massive objects in the universe. The results provide an important step towards a precise measurement of the total matter density of the universe. These results were presented today by Steven W. Allen of the Institute of Astronomy in Cambridge, UK at a press conference at the `Two Years of Science with Chandra' symposium in Washington, DC. Allen and his colleagues Robert W. Schmidt and Andrew C. Fabian at the Institute of Astronomy observed a carefully chosen sample of five of the largest clusters of galaxies known, whose distances range from 1.5 to 4 billion light years. The team made temperature maps of the hot multimillion-degree gas that fills the clusters. "The temperature maps can be used to determine the mass needed to prevent the hot gas from escaping the clusters" explained Allen. "We found that the stars in the galaxies and hot gas together contribute only about 13 percent of the mass. The rest must be in the form of dark matter." The nature of the dark matter is not known, but most astronomers think that it is in the form of an as yet unknown type of elementary particle that contributes to gravity through its mass but otherwise interacts weakly with normal matter. These dark matter particles are often called WIMPs, an acronym for `weakly interacting massive particles'. Clusters of galaxies are vast concentrations of galaxies, hot gas and dark matter spanning millions of light years, held together by gravity. Because of their size, clusters of galaxies are thought to provide a fair sample of the proportion of dark matter in the universe as a whole. "The implication of our results is that we live in a low-density universe" said Allen. "The total mass-density is only about thirty percent of that needed to stop the universe from expanding forever." The result reinforces recent findings from

  15. Facial expressions of emotion are not culturally universal.

    PubMed

    Jack, Rachael E; Garrod, Oliver G B; Yu, Hui; Caldara, Roberto; Schyns, Philippe G

    2012-05-01

    Since Darwin's seminal works, the universality of facial expressions of emotion has remained one of the longest standing debates in the biological and social sciences. Briefly stated, the universality hypothesis claims that all humans communicate six basic internal emotional states (happy, surprise, fear, disgust, anger, and sad) using the same facial movements by virtue of their biological and evolutionary origins [Susskind JM, et al. (2008) Nat Neurosci 11:843-850]. Here, we refute this assumed universality. Using a unique computer graphics platform that combines generative grammars [Chomsky N (1965) MIT Press, Cambridge, MA] with visual perception, we accessed the mind's eye of 30 Western and Eastern culture individuals and reconstructed their mental representations of the six basic facial expressions of emotion. Cross-cultural comparisons of the mental representations challenge universality on two separate counts. First, whereas Westerners represent each of the six basic emotions with a distinct set of facial movements common to the group, Easterners do not. Second, Easterners represent emotional intensity with distinctive dynamic eye activity. By refuting the long-standing universality hypothesis, our data highlight the powerful influence of culture on shaping basic behaviors once considered biologically hardwired. Consequently, our data open a unique nature-nurture debate across broad fields from evolutionary psychology and social neuroscience to social networking via digital avatars.

  16. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey George M. Cushing, Photographer October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey George M. Cushing, Photographer October 1967 GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Harvard University, Lawrence Hall, 3 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  17. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey George M. Cushing, Photographer October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey George M. Cushing, Photographer October 1967 DETAIL OF RESIDENCE WING, LOOKING NORTH - Harvard University, Lawrence Hall, 3 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  18. On the universal stellar law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander

    stars. In this connection, comparison with estimations of temperatures using of the regression dependences for multi-planet extrasolar systems [8] testifies the obtained results entirely. References 1. Krot, A.M.:2009, A statistical approach to investigate the formation of the solar system. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals41(3), 1481-1500. 2. Krot, A.M.:2012, A models of forming planets and distribution of planetary distances and orbits in the solar system based on the statistical theory of spheroidal bodies. In:Solar System: Structure, Formation and Exploration, ch.9 (Ed. by Matteo de Rossi). New York, Nova Science Publishers, pp. 201-264. - ISBN: 978-1-62100-057-0. 3. Krot, A. M.:2012, A statistical theory of formation of gravitating cosmogonicbodies. Minsk,Bel. Navuka, 4. 448 p. - ISBN 978-985-08-1442-5 [monograph in Russian]. 5. Eddington, A.S.: 1916,On the radiative equilibrium of the stars.Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc.84 (7), 525-528. 6. Jeans, J.: 1929, Astronomy and cosmogony. Cambridge, University Press. 7. Chandrasekhar, S.:1939, An introduction to the study of stellar structure.Cambridge, University Press. 8. Pintr, P., Peřinová, V., Lukš, A., Pathak, A.:2013, Statistical and regression analyses of detected extrasolar systems. Planetary and Space Science, 75(1), 37-45.

  19. Oxbridge Redivivus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainley, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    How the dominance of the two medieval universities, namely, (1) The University of Oxford; and (2) The University of Cambridge, was gained and maintained is the subject of the institutional histories by Gillian Evans. She has long been a thorn in the side of successive Cambridge Vice-Chancellors' aspirations to turn that institution--at which she…

  20. National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST). Annual Meeting (65th, Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 21-25, 1992). Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Govindarajan, Girish, Ed.

    This product of an annual meeting presents abstracts of symposia, contributed papers, paper sets, discussion groups, reports, poster sessions, and panel presentations. Topics include: science teaching, gender differences, science education reform, constructivism, biological concepts, concept mapping, attitude/behavior change, conceptual…

  1. Inter-Noise 86 - Progress in noise control; Proceedings of the International Conference on Noise Control Engineering, Cambridge, MA, July 21-23, 1986. Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, R.

    1986-01-01

    The conference presents papers on legislative structure and engineering manpower in noise abatement legislation in Australia, fluid borne noise generation and transmission in hydraulic piping systems, and the application of the Fast Field Program to outdoor sound propagation. Other topics include a prediction model for airport ground noise propagation, diffraction by a barrier with finite acoustic impedance, sound propagation over curved barriers, the damping capacity of graphite epoxy composites in a vacuum, the realization of an airport noise monitoring system for determining the traffic flow in the surroundings of a military airbase, and the prediction of aircraft noise around airports by a simulation procedure. Papers are also presented on the effects of weather conditions on airport noise prediction, a prediction of the light aircraft interior sound pressure level from the measured sound pressure flowing into the cabin, and measurements with reference sources in the ISO 3740 series.

  2. Institutional Research in a Changing Society. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (18th, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 16-19, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Karen, Ed.

    This document contains formal papers, keynote speeches and selected panel presentations delivered at a conference that addressed the issues, responsibilities and challenges faced by institutional researchers now and in the future. Papers are as follows: "Attrition and C.I.R.P. Correlates of a Measure of Self-Confidence Regarding Transition into…

  3. The Psychology of Second Language Learning: Papers from the Second International Congress of Applied Linguistics, Cambridge, 8-12 September 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pimsleur, Paul, Ed.; Quinn, Terence, Ed.

    The 19 papers in this collection cover diversified topics in the general area of psychology and second language learning. No single method of language teaching emerges, but the complexity of second language behavior and the importance of psychology in the field are underlined. Several trends seem to be most prevalent. There is a new focus on the…

  4. IECON '87: Industrial applications of control and simulation; Proceedings of the 1987 International Conference on Industrial Electronics, Control, and Instrumentation, Cambridge, MA, Nov. 3, 4, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in control-system design and simulation are discussed in reviews and reports. Among the topics considered are fast algorithms for generating near-optimal binary decision programs, trajectory control of robot manipulators with compensation of load effects via a six-axis force sensor, matrix integrators for real-time simulation, a high-level control language for an autonomous land vehicle, and a practical engineering design method for stable model-reference adaptive systems. Also addressed are the identification and control of flexible-limb robots with unknown loads, adaptive control and robust adaptive control for manipulators with feedforward compensation, adaptive pole-placement controllers with predictive action, variable-structure strategies for motion control, and digital signal-processor-based variable-structure controls.

  5. Change in cardio-protective medication and health-related quality of life after diagnosis of screen-detected diabetes: Results from the ADDITION-Cambridge cohort

    PubMed Central

    Black, J.A.; Long, G.H.; Sharp, S.J.; Kuznetsov, L.; Boothby, C.E.; Griffin, S.J.; Simmons, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Establishing a balance between the benefits and harms of treatment is important among individuals with screen-detected diabetes, for whom the burden of treatment might be higher than the burden of the disease. We described the association between cardio-protective medication and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among individuals with screen-detected diabetes. Methods 867 participants with screen-detected diabetes underwent clinical measurements at diagnosis, one and five years. General HRQoL (EQ5D) was measured at baseline, one- and five-years, and diabetes-specific HRQoL (ADDQoL-AWI) and health status (SF-36) at one and five years. Multivariable linear regression was used to quantify the association between change in HRQoL and change in cardio-protective medication. Results The median (IQR) number of prescribed cardio-protective agents was 2 (1 to 3) at diagnosis, 3 (2 to 4) at one year and 4 (3 to 5) at five years. Change in cardio-protective medication was not associated with change in HRQoL from diagnosis to one year. From one year to five years, change in cardio-protective agents was not associated with change in the SF-36 mental health score. One additional agent was associated with an increase in the SF-36 physical health score (2.1; 95%CI 0.4, 3.8) and an increase in the EQ-5D (0.05; 95%CI 0.02, 0.08). Conversely, one additional agent was associated with a decrease in the ADDQoL-AWI (−0.32; 95%CI −0.51, −0.13), compared to no change. Conclusions We found little evidence that increases in the number of cardio-protective medications impacted negatively on HRQoL among individuals with screen-detected diabetes over five years. PMID:25937542

  6. Institutional Research: Leadership through Excellence. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (28th, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 17-20, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    The theme of the 2001 annual conference of the Northeast Association for Institutional Research was Institutional Research: Leadership through Excellence. These proceedings represent the intellectual content and insights shared during the conference. The papers are: (1) The Rocky Road to Graduation: An Academic Career Flow Model for Tracking…

  7. PESC '82; Annual Power Electronics Specialists Conference, 13th, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, June 14-17, 1982, Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspects of power electronics are addressed. The general topics discussed include: inverters and converters, modelling and analysis, motor drives, power conditioning appliances, power semiconductor devices, and power components and protection. Individual subjects considered include: dual-mode forward/flyback converter; a solar cell power supply system using a boost-type bidirectional DC-DC converter; complete DC analysis of the series resonant converter; variable structure control with sliding mode for DC drive speed regulation; a low-cost single-phase induction generator. Also covered are: small-signal modelling of a push-pull current-fed converter; programmable power processor for high-power space applications; high efficiency 3kW switch mode battery charger; comparison of BIMOS device types; power MOSFET temperature measurements; protection of power transistors in electric vehicle drives; general purpose variable frequency inverter using integrated power modules and LSI. For individual items see A84-18377 to A84-18408

  8. β/δ-PrIT1, a highly insecticidal toxin from the venom of the Brazilian spider Phoneutria reidyi (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1897).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Leida Calegário; Campos, Fabiana V; Figueiredo, Suely Gomes; Cordeiro, Marta N; Adaime, Beatriz R; Richardson, Michael; Pimenta, Adriano M C; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Beirão, Paulo S L; De Lima, Maria Elena

    2015-09-15

    A potent insecticidal toxin, β/δ-PrIT1, molecular mass of 5598.86 [M+H](+), was characterized from Phoneutria reidyi spider venom. Its partial amino acid sequence showed high similarity with insecticidal spider toxins from the genus Phoneutria. β/δ-PrIT1 was very toxic (LD50 = 4 nmol/g) to flies (Musca domestica), but not to mice (Mus musculus). Kinetic studies showed that (125)I-β/δ-PrIT1 binds to two distinct sites in insect sodium channels, with close affinity (Kd1 = 34.7 pM and Kd2 = 35.1 pM). Its association is rather fast (t1/2(1) = 1.4 min, t1/2(2) = 8.5 min) and its dissociation is a slower process (t1/2(1) = 5.4 min, t1/2(2) = 32.8 min). On rat brain synaptosomes β/δ-PrIT1 partially competed (∼30%) with the beta-toxin (125)I-CssIV, but did not compete with the alpha-toxin of reference (125)I-AaII, nor with the beta-toxin (125)I-TsVII. On cockroach nerve cord synaptosomes, β/δ-PrIT1 did not compete with the anti-insect toxin (125)I-LqqIT1, but it competed (IC50 = 80 pM) with the "alpha-like" toxin (125)I-BomIV. In cockroach neurons, β/δ-PrIT1 inhibited the inactivation of Nav-channels and it shifted the sodium channel activation to hyperpolarizing potentials. These results indicate two different binding sites for β/δ-PrIT1, leading to two different pharmacological responses. β/δ-PrIT1 is one of the most toxic spider toxins to insects without apparent toxicity to mammals, and provide new model for the development of insecticides.

  9. IECON '87: Signal acquisition and processing; Proceedings of the 1987 International Conference on Industrial Electronics, Control, and Instrumentation, Cambridge, MA, Nov. 3, 4, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederjohn, Russell J.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical and applications aspects of signal processing are examined in reviews and reports. Topics discussed include speech processing methods, algorithms, and architectures; signal-processing applications in motor and power control; digital signal processing; signal acquisition and analysis; and processing algorithms and applications. Consideration is given to digital coding of speech algorithms, an algorithm for continuous-time processes in discrete-time measurement, quantization noise and filtering schemes for digital control systems, distributed data acquisition for biomechanics research, a microcomputer-based differential distance and velocity measurement system, velocity observations from discrete position encoders, a real-time hardware image preprocessor, and recognition of partially occluded objects by a knowledge-based system.

  10. Task Force on Women, Minorities and the Handicapped in Science and Technology: Public Hearing. Report of the Proceedings (Cambridge, Massachusetts, April 7, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology, Washington, DC.

    The Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology was established by the U.S. Congress in Public Law 99-383 with the purpose of developing a long-range plan for broadening participation in science and engineering. Public hearings were held in Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Baltimore (Maryland), Boston…

  11. The Computer as a Teaching Tool: Promising Practices. Conference Report (Cambridge, Massachusetts, July 12-13, 1984). CR85-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Joseph P.; And Others

    This report of a 1984 conference on the computer as a teaching tool provides summaries of presentations on the role of the computer in the teaching of science, mathematics, computer literacy, and language arts. Analyses of themes emerging from the conference are then presented under four headings: (1) The Computer and the Curriculum (the computer…

  12. NSF CAREER: Establishing at the University of New Mexico a Student Residential College/Honors Program with Extensive Faculty Involvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    As the educational component of my CAREER grant, I proposed integrating in an organized and widespread manner aspects of a Residential College / Honors Program into the culture of the University of New Mexico (UNM). Having such a program would provide UNM students the benefit of enhanced interactions with a variety of professors outside the classroom on a regular and personal basis. It would result not only in more visibility of professors' research and knowledge to students, but also in additional personal mentoring and encouragement. Similar programs already exist at Northwestern, Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, Yale, and Princeton Universities, to name a few. As a student, I myself experienced the benefits of a Residential College Program at Northwestern University. In the first year of my CAREER award, I volunteered and served on a campus-wide Honors College Task Force wherein we generated a report for the Provost as to whether UNM should pursue establishing an Honors College having a residential component. Through this experience, I learned that there are many other faculty across campus excited about the possibilities offered by a Residential College / Honors Program, but also about the hurdles involved in gaining momentum and campus-wide and administrative support for such an endeavor. Here, I will present what I see as the benefits of a Residential College / Honors Program at Universities, my vision for one at UNM, and the challenges encountered and lessons learned thus far.

  13. In Living Memory: The Dying Art of Learning Poetry and a Case for Revival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullinger, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the practice of learning poems and the value of poetry in the memory, and emerges from the Cambridge Poetry Teaching Project, a small-scale research study co-ordinated through the Faculty of Education at the University of Cambridge. Drawing on the subset of findings in relation to learning and memory, the essay locates the…

  14. Oral Corrective Feedback in the Foreign Language Classroom: How It Affects Interaction in Analytic Foreign Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochtman, Katja

    2002-01-01

    The discussion on the role of corrective feedback is part of a larger discussion on the role of "focusing on form" in foreign language teaching ("Focus on form in classroom second language acquisition," Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1998). Studies conducted in communicative and content-based foreign language teaching (FLT) settings have…

  15. Ecology for conserving our sirenians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonde, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Review of: Ecology and conservation of the sirenia: dugongs and manatees. Helene Marsh, Thomas J. O'Shea and John E. Reynolds III. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2012, 521 pp, ISBN 978-0-521-88828-8, US$135 and 978-0-521-71643-7, US$65.

  16. An Observing Session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyle, Bob; Argyle, R. W.

    In this chapter I describe a typical observing session with the 8-in. (20-cm) Thorrowgood refractor at the Institute of Astronomy in Cambridge. The telescope belongs to the Royal Astronomical Society but is on permanent loan to the Cambridge University Astronomical Society and has been on its present site since 1930 (Fig. 24.1).

  17. 75 FR 427 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Permits, Division of Management Authority. [FR Doc. E9-31270 Filed 1-4-10; 8:45 am ]BILLING CODE 4310-55-S ..., PRT-223447 The applicant requests a permit to export biological samples from Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) to Cambridge University, Department Of Veterinary Medicine, Cambridge, United...

  18. Gendered Language in Interactive Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussey, Karen A.; Katz, Albert N.; Leith, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Over two studies, we examined the nature of gendered language in interactive discourse. In the first study, we analyzed gendered language from a chat corpus to see whether tokens of gendered language proposed in the gender-as-culture hypothesis (Maltz and Borker in "Language and social identity." Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp…

  19. Argumentation and Participation Patterns in General Chemistry Peer-Led Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulatunga, Ushiri; Moog, Richard S.; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of Toulmin's argumentation scheme to investigate the characteristics of student group argumentation in Peer-Led Guided Inquiry sessions for a General Chemistry I course. A coding scheme based on Toulmin's [Toulmin [1958] "The uses of argument." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] argumentation…

  20. Seedlings Finally Get Their Due: Book Review of Seedling Ecology and Evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Book Review of: Seedling Ecology and Evolution. Ed. Leck, Mary Allessio, Parker, V. Thomas and Simpson, Robert L. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. 2008. Many plant demographers find themselves, at some point, staring at a dataset full of detailed information on juvenile and adult plants,...

  1. The Linguistically Aware Teacher and the Teacher-Aware Linguist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Elspeth; Ellis, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This review evaluates issues of teacher linguistic knowledge relating to their work with children with speech, language and communication difficulties (SLCD). Information is from Ellis and McCartney [(2011a). "Applied linguistics and primary school teaching." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press], a state-of-the-art text deriving from a British…

  2. Thresholds for Color Discrimination in English and Korean Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Debi; Hanley, J. Richard; Pak, Hyensou

    2009-01-01

    Categorical perception (CP) is said to occur when a continuum of equally spaced physical changes is perceived as unequally spaced as a function of category membership (Harnad, S. (Ed.) (1987). Psychophysical and cognitive aspects of categorical perception: A critical overview. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press). A common suggestion is that CP…

  3. Rhetorical Structure of Biochemistry Research Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanoksilapatham, Budsaba

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a move analysis [Swales, J. (1990). "Genre analysis." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] of 60 biochemistry research articles. First, a corpus was systematically compiled to ensure that it represents core journals in the focused discipline. Then, coding reliability analysis was conducted to demonstrate…

  4. Sounding Sense: The Place, Problems and Potential of Performance in Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullinger, Debbie; Whitley, David

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on a strand of findings from the Cambridge Poetry Teaching Project, a small-scale research study co-ordinated through the Faculty of Education at the University of Cambridge, this article examines contemporary understandings of poetry performance in teaching contexts. Positioning these understandings in relation to past practices, we…

  5. Self-Access and the Adult Language Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esch, Edith, Ed.

    The immediate stimulus for this collection of papers was a conference, Self-Access and the Adult Language Learner, organized by the Centre for Information on Language Teaching and Research (CILT) and the Language Centre of the University of Cambridge in December 1992 at Queen's College, Cambridge. Several 1-day conferences on the same theme were…

  6. Entrepreneurship Education in an Entrepreneurial Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyclak, Thomas; Barakat, Shima

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the evolution of programmes of enterprise education and technology transfer at the University of Cambridge in response to the growth of the Cambridge Cluster and public policy programmes designed to enhance the economic impact of higher education institutions. The authors highlight the way education programmes developed by the…

  7. Stacking up against Alternative Conceptions: Using Uno Cards to Introduce Discourse and Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunac, Patricia S.; Demi, Kadir

    2013-01-01

    We engaged secondary science students in a teacher and student constructed Uno card game (UCG) to change their conceptual understanding of the various energy transformations. The paper outlines how we incorporated Toulmin's argumentation pattern (Toulmin 1958 "The Uses of Argument"(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)) in the UCG,…

  8. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of Wood Engraving of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of Wood Engraving of Lawrence Hill From Hamilton Vaughan Bail, Views of Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1949 - Plate LXI. Plate taken from Gleason's Pictorial Drawing Room Companion, Vol. 7, No. 7, June 14, 1851, p. 112. - Harvard University, Lawrence Hall, 3 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  9. Researching "Practiced Language Policies": Insights from Conversation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonacina-Pugh, Florence

    2012-01-01

    In language policy research, "policy" has traditionally been conceptualised as a notion separate from that of "practice". In fact, language practices were usually analysed with a view to evaluate whether a policy is being implemented or resisted to. Recently, however, Spolsky in ("Language policy". Cambridge University press, Cambridge, 2004;…

  10. Problem Articulation and the Processes of Assistance: An Activity Theoretic View of Mediation in Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Lynda D.; Gutierrez, Kris D.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we study a local adaptation of the Fifth Dimension [Cole, M. (1996). "Cultural psychology: A once and future discipline." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] known as Las Redes (i.e., Networks of Collaboration in the Fifth Dimension) to examine how the multiple activity systems of Las Redes, e.g. the undergraduate course and…

  11. On the concept of virtual current as a means to enhance verification of electromagnetic flowmeters On the concept of virtual current as a means to enhance verification of electromagnetic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Roger C.

    2011-10-01

    Figure 2 contains an incorrect label 0.5 where it should say 2.0. The correct figure appears below. Figure 2. Approximate layout of the Shercliff weight function (after Shercliff [2]). Reference [2] Shercliff J A 1987 The Theory of Electromagnetic Flow-measurement 2nd edn (1st edn 1962) (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)

  12. Developing Outcome Measures for a Family Intensive Support Service for Children Presenting with Challenging Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Bethany; John, Mary; Coombes, Rachel; Singh, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Seven per cent of individuals with learning disabilities also display challenging behaviour ("Challenging behaviour: analysis and intervention in people with severe intellectual disabilities," 2001, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press), which has an effect on the whole family. Services need to be developed to support and reflect this…

  13. The Structure & Evolution of the Universe Education Forum: Opportunities for scientist involvement in education and public outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steel, S. J.; Gould, R. R.; Dussault, M. E.; Grier, J. A.

    2004-08-01

    The Universe Forum is one of four Education and Public Outreach forums funded by NASA's Office of Space Science. We are located at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. This poster will present examples of high leverage education and public outreach programs developed by the Forum in collaboration with NASA SEU missions and other members of NASA's OSS E/PO effort. These include a professional development experience for teachers in the Cambridge, MA public school system, community workshops with organizations such as the Girl Scouts, and working with SEU mission E/PO partners to present a short course on modeling the universe, which debuted at the 2004 NSTA national meeting and will be offered at the 2004 AAS HEAD meeting. We will also detail future projects and opportunities for scientist involvement in E/PO in both formal and informal education arenas. Particular emphasis will be given to opportunities in 2005, a year that marks both the World Year of Physics and the Einstein Centennial celebrations.

  14. 78 FR 34131 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Carnegie Institution, was curated by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and by the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Boulder, CO. In February...

  15. BOOK REVIEW: The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, B. A.

    2005-07-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music—a new type of `cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson,\\endcolumn hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature’s code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one’s mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  16. Dark Energy Found Stifling Growth in Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-12-01

    WASHINGTON -- For the first time, astronomers have clearly seen the effects of "dark energy" on the most massive collapsed objects in the universe using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. By tracking how dark energy has stifled the growth of galaxy clusters and combining this with previous studies, scientists have obtained the best clues yet about what dark energy is and what the destiny of the universe could be. This work, which took years to complete, is separate from other methods of dark energy research such as supernovas. These new X-ray results provide a crucial independent test of dark energy, long sought by scientists, which depends on how gravity competes with accelerated expansion in the growth of cosmic structures. Techniques based on distance measurements, such as supernova work, do not have this special sensitivity. Scientists think dark energy is a form of repulsive gravity that now dominates the universe, although they have no clear picture of what it actually is. Understanding the nature of dark energy is one of the biggest problems in science. Possibilities include the cosmological constant, which is equivalent to the energy of empty space. Other possibilities include a modification in general relativity on the largest scales, or a more general physical field. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Ghostly Glow Reveals a Hidden Class of Long-Wavelength Radio Emitters Powerful Nearby Supernova Caught By Web Cassiopeia A Comes Alive Across Time and Space To help decide between these options, a new way of looking at dark energy is required. It is accomplished by observing how cosmic acceleration affects the growth of galaxy clusters over time. "This result could be described as 'arrested development of the universe'," said Alexey Vikhlinin of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., who led the research. "Whatever is forcing the expansion of the universe to speed up is also forcing its

  17. Evaluating the Stage Learning Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Hoben

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for evaluating the Genevan stage learning hypothesis is illustrated by analyzing Inhelder, Sinclair, and Bovet's guided learning experiments (in "Learning and the Development of Cognition." Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1974). (Author/MP)

  18. Communities Complicate Gene Transplant Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1976-01-01

    Confrontations have arisen between local communities and universities involved in molecular biology research. The situation in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is described in which citizens have opposed work undertaken at Harvard and MIT. (LBH)

  19. Chemical Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  20. Ideas in Context and the Idea of Renaissance Philosophy.

    PubMed

    Celenza, Christopher S

    2014-10-01

    This contribution to the symposium marking the publication of the 100th volume in the series Ideas in Context (Cambridge University Press) assesses the significance of the series for work on Renaissance philosophy.

  1. So You Thought Librarianship Was About Books!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, J.

    Every library is modified by its users. Computers must be servants, not masters, and allowance must be made for obsolescence. Availability of useful information from the University of Cambridge is discussed.

  2. Transporte de radiación en 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, A.; Cidale, L.

    We solve the equation of radiative transfer in a three-dimensional system following the two dimensional problem discussed by Cannon in ``The transfer of spectral line radiation'', Cambridge University Press, 319, 1985.

  3. Dark Energy Found Stifling Growth in Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-12-01

    WASHINGTON -- For the first time, astronomers have clearly seen the effects of "dark energy" on the most massive collapsed objects in the universe using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. By tracking how dark energy has stifled the growth of galaxy clusters and combining this with previous studies, scientists have obtained the best clues yet about what dark energy is and what the destiny of the universe could be. This work, which took years to complete, is separate from other methods of dark energy research such as supernovas. These new X-ray results provide a crucial independent test of dark energy, long sought by scientists, which depends on how gravity competes with accelerated expansion in the growth of cosmic structures. Techniques based on distance measurements, such as supernova work, do not have this special sensitivity. Scientists think dark energy is a form of repulsive gravity that now dominates the universe, although they have no clear picture of what it actually is. Understanding the nature of dark energy is one of the biggest problems in science. Possibilities include the cosmological constant, which is equivalent to the energy of empty space. Other possibilities include a modification in general relativity on the largest scales, or a more general physical field. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Ghostly Glow Reveals a Hidden Class of Long-Wavelength Radio Emitters Powerful Nearby Supernova Caught By Web Cassiopeia A Comes Alive Across Time and Space To help decide between these options, a new way of looking at dark energy is required. It is accomplished by observing how cosmic acceleration affects the growth of galaxy clusters over time. "This result could be described as 'arrested development of the universe'," said Alexey Vikhlinin of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., who led the research. "Whatever is forcing the expansion of the universe to speed up is also forcing its

  4. Expansive learning in the university setting: the case for simulated clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Jacquelyn

    2007-03-01

    This paper argues that simulated practice in the university setting is not just a second best to learning in the clinical area but one which offers the potential for deliberation and deep learning [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136]. The context of student learning in an undergraduate midwifery programme is analysed using human activity theory [Engeström, Y., 2001. Expansive learning at work: toward an activity theoretical reconceptualization. Journal of Education and Work, 14, 133-156]. The advantages of this approach to student learning as opposed to situated learning theory and the concept of legitimate peripheral participation [Lave, J., Wenger, E., 1991. Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge University Press, New York] are discussed. An activity system changes as a result of contradictions and tensions between what it purports to produce and the views of stakeholders (multi-voicedness) as well as its historical context (Historicity of activity). A focus group with students highlights their expressed need for more simulated practice experience. The views of midwifery lecturers are sought as an alternative voice on this tension in the current programme. Qualitative differences in types of simulated experience are explored and concerns about resources are raised in the analysis. Discussion considers the value of well planned simulations in encouraging the expression of tacit understanding through a group deliberative learning process [Eraut, M., 2000. Non-formal learning, implicit learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, 113-136].

  5. Computers and Early Books. Report of the LOC Project Investigating Means of Compiling a Machine-Readable Union Catalogue of Pre-1801 Books in Oxford, Cambridge and the British Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1974

    A union list of pre-1801 books in British libraries has long been needed, but its compilation has always fallen outside the capacities of existing manual systems. This report discusses an experimental project to devise, test, and evaluate techniques for the compilation of such a union catalog. To scale down the proposed catalog for the experiment,…

  6. Intelligent robots; Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Robot Vision and Sensory Controls RoViSeC3, Cambridge, MA, November 7-10, 1983. Parts 1 & 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasent, D. P.; Hall, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pattern recognition for intelligent robots are discussed, taking into account linear algebra based object recognition algorithms for computer vision, planar object recognition by the computer vision method, real time textured-image segmentation based on noncausal Markovian random field models, model driven vision to control a surface finishing robot, robotic acquisition of jumbled parts from bins by visual and tactile guidance, and imaging using eddy current sensors. Other subjects explored are related to curved object recognition for robot vision, robot image understanding, robot applications, three-dimensional measurements for robot vision, robot vision, tactile and multirobot sensors, and precision robot vision measurements. Attention is given to mode locked lasers in modulation rangefinders, advanced architectures for factory vision, hierarchical contour coding and generalization of shape, problems in three-dimensional imaging, a vision system to identify car body types for a spray painting robot, and an adaptive gas metal arc welder.

  7. Financing Public Schools: Selected Papers from a New England School Development Council Conference (Cambridge, Massachusetts, January 7-8, 1972.) Federal Reserve Bank of Boston Conference Series No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keppel, Francis; And Others

    This publication contains papers by experts on various current problems in the field of education finance. The authors and their topics are: (1) Francis Keppel, "The Cost-Revenue Squeeze"; (2) Steven J. Weiss and Deborah Driscoll, "Comparative School Finance Data, New England States vs. California"; (3) Arthur E. Wise, "Inequities in the Benefits…

  8. Home Internationals: Adult Guidance Policy Developments in Britain and Ireland. Report on a NICEC/CRAC Policy Consultation (Cambridge, England, October 19-20, 1999). CRAC NICEC Conference Briefing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Tony

    A total of 26 representatives of government departments, relevant national bodies, and guidance professional associations in England, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, Scotland, and Wales met to identify ways they might work together to improve the information, advice, and guidance services available to adults in their respective…

  9. Intelligent robots. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Robot Vision and Sensory Controls RoViSeC3, Cambridge, MA, November 7-10, 1983. Parts 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.P.; Hall, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pattern recognition for intelligent robots are discussed, taking into account linear algebra based object recognition algorithms for computer vision, planar object recognition by the computer vision method, real time textured-image segmentation based on noncausal Markovian random field models, model driven vision to control a surface finishing robot, robotic acquisition of jumbled parts from bins by visual and tactile guidance, and imaging using eddy current sensors. Other subjects explored are related to curved object recognition for robot vision, robot image understanding, robot applications, three-dimensional measurements for robot vision, robot vision, tactile and multirobot sensors, and precision robot vision measurements. Attention is given to mode locked lasers in modulation rangefinders, advanced architectures for factory vision, hierarchical contour coding and generalization of shape, problems in three-dimensional imaging, a vision system to identify car body types for a spray painting robot, and an adaptive gas metal arc welder.

  10. Commending the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and its 231st Class of members on the occasion of the institution's October 1, 2011, Induction ceremony in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Capuano, Michael E. [D-MA-8

    2011-09-29

    09/29/2011 Referred to the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. (text of measure as introduced: CR E1732) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Microworlds and Expert Systems: Is It Either or Can It Be Both? Report of a Conference Sponsored by the Educational Technology Center (Cambridge, Massachusetts, January 11-12, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Joseph P.

    This report summarizes the proceedings of a conference held at the Harvard Graduate School of Education which focused on the conceptual distinction between microworld software and expert system software in education. Microworld software is defined as software which lacks a specific teaching and learning agenda, and expert systems as software that…

  12. Conveying the Meaning of the Economic Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Luke A.

    2010-01-01

    In the late summer of 2008, after the 2007-2008 fiscal year's books had closed, the nation's wealthiest universities were confronted with an unfamiliar sight: single-digit endowment returns. Not since 2003 had Harvard University (Cambridge, Massachusetts), Princeton University (Princeton, New Jersey), or Stanford University (Stanford, California)…

  13. Graduate Education in Government: In England, France, and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernardakis, George

    This book reports findings of a study comparing how the leading institutions of higher education in England, France, and the United States conduct their graduate programs in political science. Institutions studied were: Cambridge University, Oxford University, and the University of London in England; the University of Paris 1 (Sorbonne), Institute…

  14. The UK-Japan Young Scientist Workshop Programme...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albone, Eric; Okano, Toru

    2012-01-01

    The authors have been running UK-Japan Young Scientist Workshops at universities in Britain and Japan since 2001: for the past three years in England with Cambridge University and, last year, also with Kyoto University and Kyoto University of Education. For many years they have worked jointly with colleagues in a group of Super Science High…

  15. 78 FR 34125 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, San Juan National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University; University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Boulder... Carnegie Institution, was curated by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and by the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Boulder, CO. In February...

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Universe or Multiverse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2008-11-01

    More than 2000 years ago, Epicurus taught that there are an infinite number of other worlds, both like and unlike ours, and Aristotle taught that there are none. Neither hypothesis can currently be falsified, and this issue of potential for falsification (that is testability) goes to the heart of many of the chapters in Carr's book. All but one of the 27 chapters, provided by 27 pundits (almost but not quite a one-to-one mapping) are written versions of talks given at one of three meetings, held between 2001 and 2005 at Stanford and Cambridge Universities and partly sponsored by the Templeton Foundation. Every reader will surely find some chapters interesting and informative, some provocative, and some rather vacuous. These will not be the same chapters for all readers. Two 'conflict of interest' statements: first, I spoke at one of these meetings, but was not one of those asked to provide a chapter. And, second, the first time I suggested in a lecture for scientists that 'many universes, either in temporal succession or embedded in higher dimensional space' was a possible explanation of the habitability of ours was fall 1974, shortly after Brandon Carter's first paper on anthropic principles and explanations, but before Bernard Carr and Martin Rees's 1979 Nature paper, which presented all the anthropic arguments then known and divided them into numbers that required no additional physics beyond the four standard forces (like the number of particles in a star) and those that seemed essential for life but not calculable (like the ratio of the electromagnetic to nuclear force constant). My other three possibilities were 'G.d has been very careful' (now called intelligent design), additional physics to be learned, and shear complexity. The core multiverse concept is that our universe (the 4-dimensional spacetime with which we are or could be connected and all its contents) is one of many, perhaps infinitely many, probably with different values of the constants of

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Universe or Multiverse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2008-11-01

    More than 2000 years ago, Epicurus taught that there are an infinite number of other worlds, both like and unlike ours, and Aristotle taught that there are none. Neither hypothesis can currently be falsified, and this issue of potential for falsification (that is testability) goes to the heart of many of the chapters in Carr's book. All but one of the 27 chapters, provided by 27 pundits (almost but not quite a one-to-one mapping) are written versions of talks given at one of three meetings, held between 2001 and 2005 at Stanford and Cambridge Universities and partly sponsored by the Templeton Foundation. Every reader will surely find some chapters interesting and informative, some provocative, and some rather vacuous. These will not be the same chapters for all readers. Two 'conflict of interest' statements: first, I spoke at one of these meetings, but was not one of those asked to provide a chapter. And, second, the first time I suggested in a lecture for scientists that 'many universes, either in temporal succession or embedded in higher dimensional space' was a possible explanation of the habitability of ours was fall 1974, shortly after Brandon Carter's first paper on anthropic principles and explanations, but before Bernard Carr and Martin Rees's 1979 Nature paper, which presented all the anthropic arguments then known and divided them into numbers that required no additional physics beyond the four standard forces (like the number of particles in a star) and those that seemed essential for life but not calculable (like the ratio of the electromagnetic to nuclear force constant). My other three possibilities were 'G.d has been very careful' (now called intelligent design), additional physics to be learned, and shear complexity. The core multiverse concept is that our universe (the 4-dimensional spacetime with which we are or could be connected and all its contents) is one of many, perhaps infinitely many, probably with different values of the constants of

  18. Universal prediction of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in organic crystals.

    PubMed

    Galek, Peter T A; Fábián, László; Allen, Frank H

    2010-04-01

    A complete exploration of intramolecular hydrogen bonds (IHBs) has been undertaken using a combination of statistical analyses of the Cambridge Structural Database and computation of ab initio interaction energies for prototypical hydrogen-bonded fragments. Notable correlations have been revealed between computed energies, hydrogen-bond geometries, donor and acceptor chemistry, and frequencies of occurrence. Significantly, we find that 95% of all observed IHBs correspond to the five-, six- or seven-membered rings. Our method to predict a propensity for hydrogen-bond occurrence in a crystal has been adapted for such IHBs, applying topological and chemical descriptors derived from our findings. In contrast to intermolecular hydrogen bonding, it is found that IHBs can be predicted across the complete chemical landscape from a single optimized probability model, which is presented. Predictivity of 85% has been obtained for generic organic structures, which can exceed 90% for discrete classes of IHB. PMID:20305358

  19. Economic dynamics with financial fragility and mean-field interaction: A model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Guilmi, C.; Gallegati, M.; Landini, S.

    2008-06-01

    Following Aoki’s statistical mechanics methodology [Masanao Aoki, New Approaches to Macroeconomic Modeling, Cambridge University Press, 1996; Masanao Aoki, Modeling Aggregate Behaviour and Fluctuations in Economics, Cambridge University Press, 2002; Masanao Aoki, and Hiroshi Yoshikawa, Reconstructing Macroeconomics, Cambridge University Press, 2006], we provide some insights into the well-known works of [Bruce Greenwald, Joseph Stiglitz, Macroeconomic models with equity and credit rationing, in: R. Hubbard (Ed.), Information, Capital Markets and Investment, Chicago University Press, Chicago, 1990; Bruce Greenwald, Joseph Stiglitz, Financial markets imperfections and business cycles, Quarterly journal of Economics (1993)]. Specifically, we reach analytically a closed form solution of their models overcoming the aggregation problem. The key idea is to represent the economy as an evolving complex system, composed by heterogeneous interacting agents, that can be partitioned into a space of macroscopic states. This meso level of aggregation permits to adopt mean-field interaction modeling and master equation techniques.

  20. Open Access Metadata, Catalogers, and Vendors: The Future of Cataloging Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Emily Alinder

    2013-01-01

    The open access (OA) movement is working to transform scholarly communication around the world, but this philosophy can also apply to metadata and cataloging records. While some notable, large academic libraries, such as Harvard University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Cambridge, released their cataloging records under OA…

  1. Microscopy of semiconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennycook, S. J.

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of the trip was to present an invited talk at the 7th Oxford Conference on Microscopy of Semiconducting Materials entitled, High-Resolution Z-Contrast Imaging of Heterostructures and Superlattices, (Oxford, United Kingdom) and to visit VG Microscopes, East Grinstead, for discussions on the progress of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 300-kV high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), which is currently on order. The traveler also visited three other institutions with 100-kV STEMs that either have or intend to purchase the necessary modifications to provide Z-contrast capability similar to that of the existing ORNL machine. Specifically, Max-Planck Institut fuer Metallforschung (Stuttgart, Germany); Cambridge University, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy (Cambridge, United Kingdom); and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University (Cambridge, United Kingdom) were visited. In addition, discussions were held with C. Humphreys on the possibility of obtaining joint funding for collaborative research involving electron beam writing and Z-contrast imaging in the Cambridge and Oak Ridge STEMs, respectively.

  2. Improving the Quality of Teaching and Learning through Leadership for Learning: Changing Scenarios in Basic Schools of Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malakolunthu, Suseela; McBeath, John; Swaffield, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This article emerged as a case study from a fact-finding mission of a joint programme between the Centre for Commonwealth Education (CCE) in Cambridge University and the Institute for Educational Planning and Administration (IEPA) in University of Cape Coast, Ghana, to embed innovative approaches to teaching and learning in the basic schools of…

  3. Inclusive Education at a BRAC School--Perspectives from the Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahbub, Tahiya

    2008-01-01

    Tahiya Mahbub is a lecturer in English studies at North South University located in Dhaka, Bangladesh. In this article, she presents some of the data on which her MPhil thesis, completed at the University of Cambridge Faculty of Education, was based. This research was carried out in Bangladesh, focusing on a primary school run by the…

  4. Digital Preservation and the Cedars Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Kelly

    1998-01-01

    Defines and discusses strategies for digital preservation. Describes the United Kingdom's CURL (Consortium of University Research Libraries) exemplars in digital archives project "Cedars" led by the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, and Leeds to address strategic, methodological, and practical issues, and to provide guidance in best practice for…

  5. Group Face in Korea and the United States: Taking Responsibility for the Individual and the Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Jee-Won; Hatfield, Hunter

    2011-01-01

    Brown and Levinson's ([1978] Politeness: Some universals in language use, Cambridge University Press, 1987) politeness theory has been criticized as being ethnocentric by displaying a Western preoccupation with autonomy and individualism. Many non-western societies, it is argued, are better understood by appealing to cultural discernment or group…

  6. Living with a Disability that Others do Not Understand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munyere, Alex

    2004-01-01

    Last year, Martyn Rouse organised a project focused on inclusive education for the British Council. As part of the link between the University of Cambridge, the Ministry of Education in Kenya and Kenyatta University, your editor was lucky enough to be invited to visit Kenya. Martyn and I spent much of our time running workshops and attending…

  7. A New Pathway for Advanced Learning: A Bilingual School Adopts the Advanced International Certificate of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvie, Martin A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the experiences of St. Hilda's College, a bilingual school in Buenos Aires, in introducing the new set of pre-university examinations offered by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate to replace the outmoded "A" level examination scheme. The Advanced International Certificate of Education curriculum should interest…

  8. Chandra Sees Shape of Universe During Formative, Adolescent Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Scientists using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have taken a snapshot of the adolescent universe from about five billion years ago when the familiar web-like structure of galaxy chains and voids first emerged. The observation reveals distant and massive galaxies dotting the sky, clustered together under the gravitational attraction of deep, unseen pockets of dark matter. This provides important clues of how the universe matured from its chaotic beginnings to its elegant structure we see today. These results are presented today in a press conference at the meeting of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society at Mt. Tremblant, Quebec. "Piece by piece, we are assembling a photo album of the universe through the ages," said Yuxuan Yang, a doctorate candidate at the University of Maryland, College Park, who conducted the analysis. "Last month we saw a picture of the infant universe taken with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. Now we can add a snapshot of its adolescence." The Chandra observation traced a patch of sky known as the Lockman Hole in the constellation Ursa Major (containing the Big Dipper). Chandra saw a rich density of active galaxies, seven times denser than what has been detected in previous optical and radio surveys at similar distances. This provides the clearest picture yet at the large-scale structure of the universe at such distances (and age), according to Dr. Richard Mushotzky of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., who led the observation. Lockman Hole JPEG, TIFF, PS An image that has been "blurred" to allow better view of the structures outlined by the X-ray sources. The color represents the spectra of the AGN. The red color indicates the sources on average radiates at longer wavelength while green and blue colors indicates the sources radiates at shorter wavelength. The Green and blue regions appear to form a wall, or shows more lumpiness than the "red" sources. If one could capture the

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Frank O. Branzetti, Photographer Aug. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Frank O. Branzetti, Photographer Aug. 21, 1940 (ll) GRAVESTONE OF ABRAHAM IRELAND, cor. MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE & GARDEN STREET, CAMBRIDGE - Abraham Ireland Gravestone, Massachusetts Avenue & Garden Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  10. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen drawing dated 1878, Longfellow & Clark, in possession of owner, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge Street, Massachusetts SECOND FLOOR PLAN - Edward S. Dodge House, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  11. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen drawing dated 1878, Longfellow & Clark, in possession of owner, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge Street, Massachusetts FIRST FLOOR PLAN - Edward S. Dodge House, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  12. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen drawing dated 1878, Longfellow & Clark, in possession of owner, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge Street, Massachusetts WEST ELEVATION DRAWING - Edward S. Dodge House, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  13. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen drawing dated 1878, Longfellow & Clark, in possession of owner, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge Street, Massachusetts BASEMENT PLAN - Edward S. Dodge House, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  14. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen drawing dated 1878, Longfellow & Clark, in possession of owner, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge Street, Massachusetts EAST ELEVATION DRAWING - Edward S. Dodge House, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  15. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen drawing dated 1878, Longfellow & Clark, in possession of owner, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge Street, Massachusetts SOUTH ELEVATION DRAWING - Edward S. Dodge House, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  16. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen drawing dated 1878, Longfellow & Clark, in possession of owner, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge Street, Massachusetts ATTIC PLAN - Edward S. Dodge House, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  17. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of ink on linen drawing dated 1878, Longfellow & Clark, in possession of owner, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge Street, Massachusetts NORTH ELEVATION DRAWING - Edward S. Dodge House, 70 Sparks Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  18. Punnett's square.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A W F

    2012-03-01

    The origin and development of Punnett's Square for the enumeration and display of genotypes arising in a cross in Mendelian genetics is described. Due to R. C. Punnett, the idea evolved through the work of the 'Cambridge geneticists', including Punnett's colleagues William Bateson, E. R. Saunders and R. H. Lock, soon after the rediscovery of Mendel's paper in 1900. These geneticists were thoroughly familiar with Mendel's paper, which itself contained a similar square diagram. A previously-unpublished three-factor diagram by Sir Francis Galton existing in the Bateson correspondence in Cambridge University Library is then described. Finally the connection between Punnett's Square and Venn Diagrams is emphasized, and it is pointed out that Punnett, Lock and John Venn overlapped as Fellows of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. Copious illustrations are given. PMID:22326091

  19. Punnett's square.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A W F

    2012-03-01

    The origin and development of Punnett's Square for the enumeration and display of genotypes arising in a cross in Mendelian genetics is described. Due to R. C. Punnett, the idea evolved through the work of the 'Cambridge geneticists', including Punnett's colleagues William Bateson, E. R. Saunders and R. H. Lock, soon after the rediscovery of Mendel's paper in 1900. These geneticists were thoroughly familiar with Mendel's paper, which itself contained a similar square diagram. A previously-unpublished three-factor diagram by Sir Francis Galton existing in the Bateson correspondence in Cambridge University Library is then described. Finally the connection between Punnett's Square and Venn Diagrams is emphasized, and it is pointed out that Punnett, Lock and John Venn overlapped as Fellows of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. Copious illustrations are given.

  20. The production of oxygen and metal from lunar regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandt, Carsten; Hamilton, James A.; Fray, Derek J.; Crawford, Ian A.

    2012-12-01

    The present article summarises the various methods that have been, and still are, explored for the production of oxygen from lunar materials. These include the classical concepts based on chemical reduction with hydrogen or methane, vapour phase pyrolysis, sulphuric acid treatment, and molten oxide electrolysis. Our main focus in this paper is on a novel approach developed at the University of Cambridge that employs molten salt electrochemistry to achieve the combined winning of oxygen and metal from solid lunar materials of varying composition. This makes the Cambridge process attractive because it will work equally well in mare as in highland regions. We also discuss the implications of the recent apparent discovery of water ice at the poles of the Moon and conclude that, even if this discovery is confirmed, it will nevertheless be desirable to provide oxygen at non-polar localities, and the Cambridge process is a strong candidate for achieving this.

  1. A natural history of mathematics: George Peacock and the making of English algebra.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    In a series of papers read to the Cambridge Philosophical Society through the 1820s, the Cambridge mathematician George Peacock laid the foundation for a natural history of arithmetic that would tell a story of human progress from counting to modern arithmetic. The trajectory of that history, Peacock argued, established algebraic analysis as a form of universal reasoning that used empirically warranted operations of mind to think with symbols on paper. The science of counting would suggest arithmetic, arithmetic would suggest arithmetical algebra, and, finally, arithmetical algebra would suggest symbolic algebra. This philosophy of suggestion provided the foundation for Peacock's "principle of equivalent forms," which justified the practice of nineteenth-century English symbolic algebra. Peacock's philosophy of suggestion owed a considerable debt to the early Cambridge Philosophical Society culture of natural history. The aim of this essay is to show how that culture of natural history was constitutively significant to the practice of nineteenth-century English algebra.

  2. A natural history of mathematics: George Peacock and the making of English algebra.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    In a series of papers read to the Cambridge Philosophical Society through the 1820s, the Cambridge mathematician George Peacock laid the foundation for a natural history of arithmetic that would tell a story of human progress from counting to modern arithmetic. The trajectory of that history, Peacock argued, established algebraic analysis as a form of universal reasoning that used empirically warranted operations of mind to think with symbols on paper. The science of counting would suggest arithmetic, arithmetic would suggest arithmetical algebra, and, finally, arithmetical algebra would suggest symbolic algebra. This philosophy of suggestion provided the foundation for Peacock's "principle of equivalent forms," which justified the practice of nineteenth-century English symbolic algebra. Peacock's philosophy of suggestion owed a considerable debt to the early Cambridge Philosophical Society culture of natural history. The aim of this essay is to show how that culture of natural history was constitutively significant to the practice of nineteenth-century English algebra. PMID:23961689

  3. 2010 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    NASA has announced the selection of the 2010 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2010. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Simona Giacintucci (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Boaz Katz (Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton, N.J.) * Matthew Kerr (Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.) * Matthew Kistler (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Emily Levesque (University of Colorado, Boulder) * Xin Liu (Harvard, Cambridge, Mass.) * Tony Mroczkowski (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia) * Ryan O'Leary (University of California at Berkeley) * Dov Poznanski (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Berkeley, Calif.) * Nicolas Yunes (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) The Einstein Fellowships are administered for NASA by the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Along with the Hubble and Sagan Fellowships, the Einstein Fellowships are made possible by the Astrophysics Division within NASA's Science Mission Directorate. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/CfPfellow.2009.html

  4. Basic ideas and concepts in hot wire anemometry: an experimental approach for introductory physics students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Abed, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of hot wire anemometry is to measure the speed of an air stream. The classical method is based on the measure of the value of a temperature dependant resistor inserted in a Wheatstone bridge (Lomas 1986 Fundamentals of Hot Wire Anemometry (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)). In this paper we exhibit the physics behind this method and show that by using a wire whose resistance does not vary on the field of temperature explored (from 20 °C to 200 °C), it is however possible to make accurate measurements. Finally, limitations of the method are discussed.

  5. Stability and periodicity in the Sitnikov three-body problem when primaries are oblate spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. A.; Garain, D. N.; Hassan, M. R.

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with the effect of oblateness of the primaries of equal masses on the series solutions of the Sitnikov problem of three bodies. Effects of oblateness have also been shown on the stability of libration points and Poincare surface of section. Here series solutions have been developed with the help of iteration process of Green's function and by the Lindstedt-Poincare method. Following Murray and Dermott (Solar System Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999) we have checked the stability of the equilibrium points in the Sitnikov problem. Periodicity and quasi-periodicity have been examined by drawing the Poincare surfaces of section using the mathematical software.

  6. Responding to uncertainty in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C; Dowding, D

    2001-10-01

    Uncertainty is a fact of life for practising clinicians and cannot be avoided. This paper outlines the model of uncertainty presented by Katz (1988, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. pp. 544-565) and examines the descriptive and normative power of three broad theoretical and strategic approaches to dealing with uncertainty: rationality, bounded rationality and intuition. It concludes that nursing research and development (R&D) must acknowledge uncertainty more fully in its R&D agenda and that good-quality evaluation studies which directly compare intuitive with rational-analytical approaches for given clinical problems should be a dominant feature of future R&D.

  7. 75 FR 16178 - Antitrust Division

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... Venture Agreement Between Cambridge Major Laboratories, Inc. and Konarka Technologies, Inc., in..., 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Joint Venture Agreement Between Cambridge Major Laboratories...- 00-7749) (``Cambridge and Konarka 00-00-7749'') has filed written notifications simultaneously...

  8. 77 FR 68769 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Abt Associates, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    .... (Abt) of Cambridge, MA, to access information which has been submitted to EPA under section 8 of the...? Under EPA Contract Number EP-W-12-001, contractor Abt of 55 Wheeler Street, Cambridge, MA is assisting... at EPA Headquarters and Abt's Bethesda, MD and Cambridge, MA sites, in accordance with EPA's TSCA...

  9. Exploring Key Sustainable Development Themes through Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruickshank, Heather; Fenner, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to examine how a number of key themes are introduced in the Master's programme in Engineering for Sustainable Development, at Cambridge University, through student-centred activities. These themes include dealing with complexity, uncertainty, change, other disciplines, people, environmental limits, whole life…

  10. Darwin and Teacher: An Analysis of the Mentorship between Charles Darwin and Professor John Henslow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGreevy, Ann

    1990-01-01

    The paper examines the mentorship between Charles Darwin and his teacher, John Stevens Henslow of Cambridge University (England). The importance of a mentor in stimulating creative productivity is demonstrated through discussion of their teaching and learning styles, their interests, their time spent together, and Henslow's character traits.…

  11. Threshold Concepts as Focal Points for Supporting Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Katy; Tracy, Frances; Johnstone, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The Plant Sciences Pedagogy Project conducted research into undergraduate teaching and learning in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of Cambridge and has translated the research findings into interventions to improve support for student learning. A key research objective for the project was to investigate how teachers within the…

  12. One, Two, Three, Four, Nothing More: An Investigation of the Conceptual Sources of the Verbal Counting Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Corre, Mathieu; Carey, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Since the publication of [Gelman, R., & Gallistel, C. R. (1978). "The child's understanding of number." Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.] seminal work on the development of verbal counting as a representation of number, the nature of the ontogenetic sources of the verbal counting principles has been intensely debated. The present…

  13. Drowning or Waving? Coping Strategies among Scottish Head Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBeath, John; O'Brien, Jim; Gronn, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In the year 2007 in Scotland, in common with countries elsewhere in the world, the difficulty of recruiting high-calibre school leaders was becoming an increasing concern. The recruitment and retention study, commissioned by the Scottish Government and undertaken by three universities (Cambridge, Edinburgh and Glasgow), was charged with exploring…

  14. A New Model for American Colleges Abroad: Quiet Partner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    For the past two years, a steady stream of visitors from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has made the roughly 7,000-mile trek from Cambridge to Abu Dhabi to help build what aspires to be the first graduate-level research university devoted entirely to fostering renewable, clean, and sustainable sources of energy. Set to open this…

  15. Harvesting the Sun's Energy with Antennas

    ScienceCinema

    INL

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory, along with partners at Microcontinuum Inc. (Cambridge, MA) and Patrick Pinhero of the University of Missouri, are developing a novel way to collect energy from the sun with a technology that could potentially cost pennies a yard, be imprinted on flexible materials and still draw energy after the sun has set.

  16. Fair Use: Articulating the Liberal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Anthony, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Within the context of "Cambridge University Press et al. v. Patton et al.", this article provides the rationale for the academic distribution of scholarly articles without requesting copyright permission or paying the corresponding fees. The fair use of scholarly articles is examined legally, historically, and in an economic context. This article…

  17. Changing Perceptions Is One Thing…: Barriers to Transforming Leadership and Learning in Ghanaian Basic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jull, Stephen; Swaffield, Sue; MacBeath, John

    2014-01-01

    School leadership, head teacher professional development and school management practices in sub-Saharan Africa have varied little from the model of schooling established during colonial rule. Leadership for Learning (LfL) is a programme of school leadership developed at the University of Cambridge over a period of 10 years in conjunction with an…

  18. Anthropology and Interdisciplinarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strathern, Marilyn

    2005-01-01

    Professor Marilyn Strathern in conversation with Professor Ludmilla Jordanova in the series "Conversations at CRASSH" (Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, at Cambridge University), an extensive two-year programme convened by Ludmilla Jordanova as CRASSH Director. Professor Strathern speaks on "Why anthropology matters"…

  19. Who Needs Replication?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porte, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the editor of a recent Cambridge University Press book on research methods discusses replicating previous key studies to throw more light on their reliability and generalizability. Replication research is presented as an accepted method of validating previous research by providing comparability between the original and replicated…

  20. The Work of the Prince's Teaching Institute--Insisting that Established Subjects Matter to All Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The Prince's Teaching Institute (PTI), which has evolved out of the Summer Schools for English Literature and History which The Prince of Wales inaugurated in 2002, now provides a variety of courses in the major subjects of the secondary curriculum. In partnership with Cambridge University it enables teachers to update and extend their subject…

  1. Book review: Disease and Threatened Birds, edited by J. E. Cooper

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sileo, L.

    1992-01-01

    Review of: Disease and threatened birds : based on the proceedings of a symposium held at the XIX World Conference of the International Council for Bird Preservation, June 1986, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Edited by J. E. Cooper. Cambridge, England : International Council for Bird Preservation, 1989. ICBP technical publication ; no. 10.

  2. Why Bringing Back Grammar Schools Is Not Proving a Popular Idea: Two Successes for the Comprehensive Argument in Recent Student Union Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benn, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    As moves grow once more to expand selective education in the United Kingdom, this is a short report of two lively and well-attended debates at the universities of Manchester and Cambridge in the early part of 2015. Both debates were resoundingly won by those arguing against a return to a divisive system based on the 11+. Instead, audiences…

  3. School Voices in Leadership for Learning within the Greek Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demertzi, Vasiliki; Bagakis, George; Georgiadou, Sofia

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the outcomes in one of the three Greek schools participating in the "Carpe Vitam: Leadership for Learning" project based at Cambridge University. It focuses on the data obtained from teacher and student interviews and uses a framework of analysis based on two qualitative methodological approaches for analysing narrative…

  4. Self Concept in People with Williams Syndrome and Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plesa-Skwerer, Daniela; Sullivan, Kate; Joffre, Kristen; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2004-01-01

    This study explored self concepts in matched groups of adolescents and adults with Williams syndrome (WS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), using Damon and Hart's [Self-understanding in Childhood and Adolescence, Cambridge University Press, New York, 1988] semi-structured interview. The main findings were that the WS participants were more…

  5. The Patchwork Text in Teaching Greek Tragedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the rewards and challenges of using the Patchwork Text to teach Greek Tragedy to Cambridge University English final-year students. The article uses close reading of the students' texts, analysis and reflection to discuss both the products and the process of Patchwork writing. (Author/AEF)

  6. Whiston, William (1667-1752)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Born in Norton, Leicestershire, became the controversial third Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University, succeeding ISAAC NEWTON. He used the principles of the Principia in a popular book to explain the Book of Genesis and the Flood, which he envisaged as caused by the near approach of a comet, an interesting foreshadowing of current theories. He published in 1716 the first under...

  7. Harvesting the Sun's Energy with Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    INL

    2008-05-28

    Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory, along with partners at Microcontinuum Inc. (Cambridge, MA) and Patrick Pinhero of the University of Missouri, are developing a novel way to collect energy from the sun with a technology that could potentially cost pennies a yard, be imprinted on flexible materials and still draw energy after the sun has set.

  8. Final PV module degradation-analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Themelis, M P

    1982-06-01

    Visual and electrical degradation analyses were performed on 47 modules from: the Natural Bridges National Monument (NBNM) in Utah; Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts; and the University of Nebraska at Mead, Nebraska. Such problems as discoloration, cracking, scratches, and electrical degradation were detected. (LEW)

  9. Knowledge and Learning in the Andes: Ethnographic Perspectives. Liverpool Latin American Studies, New Series 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stobart, Henry, Ed.; Howard, Rosaleen, Ed.

    This book presents research into the ways in which Indigenous peoples of the Andes create, transmit, maintain, and transform their knowledge, and the related processes of teaching and learning. Most chapters are based on papers delivered at a round-table conference at the University of Cambridge (England) in 1996 and include contributions from…

  10. Child Abuse: Betrayal and Disclosure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foynes, Melissa Ming; Freyd, Jennifer J.; DePrince, Anne P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The current study tested several hypotheses about disclosure of childhood sexual, physical, and emotional abuse derived from Betrayal Trauma Theory [Freyd, J. J. (1996). Betrayal trauma: The logic of forgetting childhood abuse. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press]. We predicted that the duration of time from abuse to its disclosure…

  11. Ninth Annual V. M. Goldschmidt Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Ninth Annual V. M. Goldschmidt Conference, August 22-27, 1999, hosted by the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. The meeting is a forum for presenting and discussing new chemical and isotopic measurements, experimental and theoretical results, and discoveries in geochemistry and cosmochemistry.

  12. L1 Influence on the Acquisition Order of English Grammatical Morphemes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murakami, Akira; Alexopoulou, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    We revisit morpheme studies to evaluate the long-standing claim for a universal order of acquisition. We investigate the L2 acquisition order of six English grammatical morphemes by learners from seven L1 groups across five proficiency levels. Data are drawn from approximately 10,000 written exam scripts from the Cambridge Learner Corpus. The…

  13. Looking from a CHAT-IT Perspective to Undergraduate Mexican Physics: Organizational Trajectories or Professors as Agents of Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahveci, Ajda

    2010-01-01

    Recent elaborations on cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) (Engestrom et al., eds., "Perspectives on activity theory." New York: Cambridge University Press, "1999") and its relation to organizational theories have produced a theoretical amalgam of these earlier ideas, which allow for the exploration of learning in formal organizational…

  14. From Teacher Research to Teacher Leadership: The Case of the Hertfordshire Learning Preferences Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, David; Roberts, Julie

    2004-01-01

    The article provides an account of a school improvement project which began with a single teacher's classroom-based action research and subsequently involved a number of Hertfordshire secondary schools, their local education authority and the University of Cambridge Faculty of Education. Julie Roberts had used a learning preferences profiling…

  15. 76 FR 35464 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... unless a Federal permit is issued that allows such activities. Both laws require that we invite public... analyses of, the applicable laws and regulations. We will not consider or include in our administrative... a 5-year period. Applicant: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, MA;...

  16. 75 FR 9428 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, that meet the definitions of ``sacred objects...; museum records; consultation evidence; and expert opinion. Officials of the Peabody Museum of...

  17. 76 FR 14047 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, that meet the definition of unassociated... ornaments was donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology by Mary S. Felton and Dr....

  18. Bootstrapping Word Order in Prelexical Infants: A Japanese-Italian Cross-Linguistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Nespor, Marina; Mazuka, Reiko; Horie, Ryota; Mehler, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Learning word order is one of the earliest feats infants accomplish during language acquisition [Brown, R. (1973). "A first language: The early stages", Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.]. Two theories have been proposed to account for this fact. Constructivist/lexicalist theories [Tomasello, M. (2000). Do young children have adult…

  19. The giant and the thief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socrates Bardi, Jason

    2010-01-01

    In 1696 Isaac Newton made what seems like a bizarre career move. Abandoning Cambridge University and the mathematical pursuits that made him famous, the 53-year-old scientist upped sticks for London to become warden of the Royal Mint. Part administrator, part coining expert, and part criminal prosecutor, this new role would occupy Newton for the remaining three decades of his life.

  20. Pursuing a career in veterinary public health.

    PubMed

    Radakovic, Milorad

    2015-11-14

    Milorad Radakovic is a teaching fellow in veterinary public health (VPH) at the University of Cambridge. Here, he explains why he believes the challenges in this field of veterinary medicine make for an exciting career path. In a second article to be published in Vet Record Careers next week, he will share some of his own experiences of working in this field. PMID:26564896

  1. Modelling Mathematical Argumentation: The Importance of Qualification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Matthew; Mejia-Ramos, Juan; Simpson, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    In recent years several mathematics education researchers have attempted to analyse students' arguments using a restricted form of Toulmina's ["The Uses of Argument," Cambridge University Press, UK, 1958] argumentation scheme. In this paper we report data from task-based interviews conducted with highly talented postgraduate mathematics students,…

  2. What Can Be Learned from a Laboratory Model of Conceptual Change? Descriptive Findings and Methodological Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlsson, Stellan; Cosejo, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of how people process novel and unexpected information--"deep learning" (Ohlsson in "Deep learning: how the mind overrides experience." Cambridge University Press, New York, 2011)--is central to several fields of research, including creativity, belief revision, and conceptual change. Researchers have not converged…

  3. MIT Orients Course Materials Online to K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Many science and mathematics educators across the country are taking advantage of a Web site created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the famed research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which offers free video, audio, and print lectures and course material taken straight from the school's classes. Those resources…

  4. Russell, Henry Norris (1877-1957)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, born in Oyster Bay, NY, spent nearly all his life working at Princeton University. He spectroscopically studied eclipsing binary stars to determine the masses of their component stars. At first collaborating with the British astronomer Hinks at Cambridge, he started to measure stellar parallaxes and, plotting the absolute magnitudes of stars whose distance he had thus measured, agains...

  5. Knowledge-Building and Networking: The Leadership for Learning Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Leadership for learning (LfL) is conceived as a network rather than as a centre within the University of Cambridge Faculty of Education. This paper explores what is understood by the term network, both within LfL and in the wider educational and research communities, and how these understandings are reflected in a number of projects carried out…

  6. Conflict in the Cosmos: the Hoyle-Ryle clashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitton, S.

    2005-08-01

    Fred Hoyle (1915-2001) made great contributions to both astrophysics and cosmology. His work in accretion theory (1939-45) and nuclear astrophysics (1946-57) continues to be admired and widely quoted. In cosmology, the field for which he is best known among the general public, his achievement is more questionable and marked by controversy. He was the first to use the expression Big Bang to describe the evolving universes of Eddington, Lemaitre, and Gamow. He named his own theory Continuous Creation, although the expression Steady State, coined by Bondi and Gold, became associated with Hoyle's model of a universe of infinite age, infinite extent, and matter creation. By 1952 the Cambridge radio astronomer Martin Ryle (1918-84) realised that his group could join the observational cosmology game. They would use counts of radio sources to discriminate between evolution and steady state. Ryle's first two surveys were inadequate and unreliable, although he did not see it that way, believing from the outset that he had proved Hoyle wrong. The third and fourth surveys did point to an evolutionary universe, but Hoyle refused to accept this, given Ryle's earlier track record in observational cosmology. The two argued passionately for a period of 20 years in a way that came to do serious harm to the standing of astronomy in the University of Cambridge. The paper examines the reasons for the failure of the two Cambridge astronomers to be more co-operative. This research was supported by St Edmund's College, Cambridge.

  7. "My Place": Exploring Children's Place-Related Identities through Reading and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlton, Emma; Cliff Hodges, Gabrielle; Pointon, Pam; Nikolajeva, Maria; Spring, Erin; Taylor, Liz; Wyse, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers how children perceive and represent their placed-related identities through reading and writing. It reports on the findings of an 18-month interdisciplinary project, based at Cambridge University Faculty of Education, which aimed to consider children's place-related identities through their engagement with, and creation…

  8. Figured World of History Learning in a Social Studies Methods Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Cecil

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers how one teacher educator, Dr. Gomez, took up revisionist history and inquiry in her social studies methods classroom. The concepts of figured worlds (Holland et al., 1998) [Holland, D., Lachicotte, W. Jr., Skinner, D., & Cain, C. (1998). "Identity and agency in cultural worlds." Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press], and…

  9. Frontiers in Geographical Teaching. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chorley, Richard J., Ed.; Haggett, Peter, Ed.

    Composed of three parts, "Concepts,""Techniques," and "Teaching," this volume of essays by British geographers emerged from the editors' geography education courses and symposia at Cambridge University. It is addressed to two questions: what is happening in geography? and, what impact does this have on school geography? "Concepts" has seven essays…

  10. People and Events in Language Testing--A Sort of Memoir. An Interview with Bernard Spolsky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Nick; Kunnan, Antony

    2006-01-01

    This interview took place at the Language Testing Research Colloquium in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (at the Chateau Laurier Hotel on July 21, 2005), at which Professor Bernard Spolsky was presented with the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate/International Language Testing Association Lifetime Achievement Award. The conference…

  11. Ludwig: My Pedagogical Part

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, David

    2009-01-01

    Ludwig Wittgenstein taught only a couple of Australian philosophers, at Cambridge in the late 1940s, and one of them, Frank "Camo" Jackson (Chair, Philosophy, Monash University) taught the author epistemology and philosophical psychology in the 1970s. In this article, the author describes how this teaching was central to his subsequent work in…

  12. Crystallography: To Infinity and Beyond…

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles

    2014-01-01

    William Henry Bragg moved from Cambridge in Britain to South Australia to take up a professorship at the University of Adelaide in 1885. He brought with him a broad interest in many areas of physics, but when Wilhelm Roentgen discovered X-rays in the 1890s, Bragg's interest was stimulated. William's Australian-born son, Lawrence (WL…

  13. Leadership--A Story about William George Demmert, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Rosemary A.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes 40 years of interactive friendship and work between William Demmert, Jr. and Rosemary Christensen, who met during the First Convocation of American Indian Scholars in March 1970 at Princeton University and then in the fall of that same year as they both arrived in Cambridge, Massachusetts as graduate students in the first…

  14. The Politics of Teaching Evolution, Science Education Standards, and "Being" a Creationist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, David E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes recent research conclusions regarding biology teacher attitudes toward evolution, and the variable implementation of evolution in the high schools nationwide. Berkman and Plutzer (2010. "Evolution, creationism, and the battle to control America's classrooms." New York: Cambridge University Press) conclude that due to a large…

  15. Cultural Consumption Patterns in South Africa: An Investigation of the Theory of Cultural Omnivores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowball, J. D.; Jamal, M.; Willis, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to Bourdieu's theory ("Distinction: A social critique of the judgment of taste". Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press (1984)) that cultural consumption of so-called "high" versus popular culture is determined by socio-economic class, Peterson ("Poetics" 21:243-258, 1992; "Poetics" 33:257-282, 2005) finds that higher income…

  16. Mouse tracking traces the "Camrbidge Unievrsity" effects in monolingual and bilingual minds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Pei-Ying

    2016-06-01

    Previous monolingual studies have consistently suggested that there was flexibility of letter position encoding in different alphabetic writing systems. This robust letter transposition was named the "Cambridge University" effect. However, to date whether the orthographic neighborhood and cross-language script similarity would modulate the magnitude of the Cambridge University effect during the second-language word recognition in bilingual minds was unknown. We address this question using a mouse-tracking experimental paradigm to trace the internal lexical matching processes underlying the lexical access. Our linear mixed effects models and growth curve analyses revealed that a low orthographic neighborhood can trigger a large magnitude of the Cambridge University effect for monolinguals and bilinguals on their hand trajectories. We also found that different-script bilinguals (Chinese-English bilinguals) exhibited a greater Cambridge University effect than similar-script bilinguals (Spanish-English bilinguals) and English monolinguals. The findings offer compelling evidence that a human lexical match criterion of recognition system can be modified by neighborhood density and cross-language script similarity of readers. PMID:27107983

  17. Does the Modality Effect Exist? And if so, Which Modality Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinwein, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The modality effect is a central issue in multimedia learning [see Mayer (Cambridge University Press, 2005a), for a review]. Sweller's Cognitive Load Theory (CLT), for example, presumes that an illustrated text is better understood when presented visually rather than orally. The predictive power of CLT lies in how it links in to Baddeley's (1986)…

  18. What Does It Take to Achieve Equality of Opportunity in Education?: An Empirical Investigation Based on Brazilian Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltenberg, Fabio D.; Vandenberghe, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Roemer's [Roemer, J. (1998). "Equality of opportunity". Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.] seminal work on equality of opportunity has contributed to the emergence of a theory of justice that is modern, conceptually clear and easy to mobilize in policy design. Inspired by Roemer's theory, this paper is fundamentally a policy-modeling…

  19. The Second Student-Run Homeless Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seider, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    From 1983-2011, the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was the only student-run homeless shelter in the United States. However, college students at Villanova, Temple, Drexel, the University of Pennsylvania, and Swarthmore drew upon the HSHS model to open their own student-run homeless shelter in Philadelphia,…

  20. Predicting Early Spelling: The Contribution of Children's Early Literacy, Private Speech during Spelling, Behavioral Regulation, and Parental Spelling Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aram, Dorit; Abiri, Shimrit; Elad, Lili

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to extend understanding of preschoolers' early spelling using the Vygotskian ("Mind in society: the development of higher psychological processes," Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1978) paradigm of child development. We assessed the contribution of maternal spelling support in predicting children's…

  1. (Re)Framing Educational Possibility: Attending to Power and Equity in Shaping Access to and within Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, V.; Penuel, W. R.; Gutierrez, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Accounts of how culture constitutes the learning activities we accomplish with others are flourishing. These accounts illustrate how participants draw upon, adapt, and contest historically situated social practices, tools, and relations to accomplish their learning goals [Vygotsky: Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1978]. Yet, they often lack…

  2. Academic Literacy and Plagiarism: Conversations with International Graduate Students and Disciplinary Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abasi, Ali R.; Graves, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examine how university plagiarism policies interact with international graduate students' academic writing in English as they develop identities as authors and students. The study is informed by the sociocultural theoretical perspective [Vygotsky, L. (1978). "Mind in society: The development of higher mental processes." Cambridge,…

  3. ICTP appoints new director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2009-11-01

    Fernando Quevedo of the University of Cambridge in the UK has been appointed as the new director of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy. Quevedo will officially begin his new role this month and replaces Katepalli Sreenivasan, the India-born physicist who has led the institute since 2003.

  4. Beyond Conservation and Liberation: The Education of Our Aspirations. Thirteenth David Dodds Henry Lecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Linda S.

    This booklet presents the text of a lecture by Linda S. Wilson, president of Radcliffe College (Cambridge, Massachusetts) on the role of higher education as well as the responses, questions and discussion that followed. The lecture is preceded by a preface and an introduction by Morton W. Weir, chancellor of the University of Illinois at…

  5. Cultures of Teaching in Childhood: Formal Schooling and Maya Sibling Teaching at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Ashley E.

    2004-01-01

    Culture can be thought of a set of shared practices, beliefs, and values that are transmitted across generations through language [Bruner, J. (1990). "Acts of meaning". Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press]. Teaching is one way that culture is transmitted, but forms of teaching vary across cultures and across activity settings within cultures.…

  6. Woodrow Wilson on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Isaiah

    2012-01-01

    In this 1960 article Isaiah Berlin compares Woodrow Wilson's emphasis on the need to educate university students for life in the real world with the difference between Oxford "realism" and Cambridge "idealism" in the nineteenth century. Oxford favoured a Wilsonian preference for general education over (but not to the exclusion of) pure…

  7. The Year of Secret Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Jaclyn

    2004-01-01

    The path to "novelist" was a convoluted one for Moriarty, who began writing fiction as doctoral student at Cambridge University. Her interest in young adults stems from an appreciation for the "troubles, strengths, and surprises of that age group." Now, in a uniquely formatted book titled "The Year of Secret Assignments," we peek inside the mind…

  8. Mathematics and Literature: Educators' Perspectives on Utilizing a Reformative Approach to Bridge Two Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesmith, Suzanne J.

    2008-01-01

    The existence of two distinct cultures within our society, the arts and the sciences, was introduced by physicist C. P. Snow in his 1959 Reed Lecture at Cambridge University and was further illuminated by Snow in "The Two Cultures, a Second Look" (1964). Lamenting the existence of the cultural chasm while also fearing a widening of the…

  9. Hawking, Stephen W (1942-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Cosmologist and theoretical astrophysicist, born in Oxford, England, where he studied physics at University College. Moved to Cambridge to take up research in general relativity and cosmology, became Lucasian professor (an appointment earlier held by ISAAC NEWTON, with whom Hawking has been compared). Hawking worked to develop a valid mathematical treatment of the `singularities' in the theor...

  10. A debate on open inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    1999-07-01

    This is a reproduction of Professor Stephen Hawking's part in a debate, which took place at the COSMO 98 Coference, in Monterey, California. Two other physicists, Andrei Linde and Alexander Villenkin, also took part. Professor Hawking is the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, in England.

  11. Physics and philanthropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, Leila; Ragtime; Nolowerboundonsize; Quandry12

    2014-05-01

    In reply to the news story “Cambridge physicists divided over Hawking chair” (April p12, http://ow.ly/vyLil) about the university's new Stephen W Hawking Professorship, which must, according to its philanthropic funders, have an associated salary “equal to or greater than the average” for other professorships of similar rank in the department.

  12. String theorist takes over as Lucasian Professor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    String theorist Michael Green will be the next Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University. Green, 63, will succeed Stephen Hawking, who held the chair from 1980 before retiring last month at the age of 67 and taking up a distinguished research chair at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Canada (see above).

  13. Identity Production in Figured Worlds: How Some Multiracial Students become Racial Atravesados/as

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Using Holland et al.'s ("Identity and agency in cultural worlds," Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1998) theory of identity and their concept of figured worlds, this article provides an overview of how twenty-five undergraduates of color came to produce a Multiracial identity. Using Critical Race Theory methodology with…

  14. Assessment of Gifted Students for Identification Purposes: New Techniques for a New Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The augmented theory of successful intelligence [Sternberg, R. J. (2003b). "Wisdom, intelligence, and creativity synthesized." New York: Cambridge University Press] postulates that intelligence comprises creative skills in generating novel ideas; analytical skills in discerning whether they are good ideas; practical skills in implementing the…

  15. Q&A: The nanomaterials designer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibney, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Ali Yetisen's research includes using nanotechnology and biosensors to make environmentally responsive materials for clothes, tattoos, accessories and contact lenses -- materials that could be the future of fashion. Here, Yetisen, who works at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital in Cambridge, talks about mimicking the diffraction in butterfly wings, transforming gowns, and what fashion designers and materials scientists can learn from each other.

  16. Most Powerful Eruption in the Universe Discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    Astronomers have found the most powerful eruption seen in the Universe using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. A supermassive black hole generated this eruption by growing at a remarkable rate. This discovery shows the enormous appetite of large black holes, and the profound impact they have on their surroundings. The huge eruption is seen in a Chandra image of the hot, X-ray emitting gas of a galaxy cluster called MS 0735.6+7421. Two vast cavities extend away from the supermassive black hole in the cluster's central galaxy. The eruption - which has lasted for 100 million years and is still going - has generated the energy equivalent to hundreds of millions of gamma-ray bursts. Animation of Eruption from Supermassive Black Hole Animation of Eruption from Supermassive Black Hole This event was caused by gravitational energy release as enormous amounts of matter fell toward a black hole. Most of the matter was swallowed, but some of it was violently ejected before being captured by the black hole. "I was stunned to find that a mass of about 300 million Suns was swallowed," said Brian McNamara of Ohio University in Athens, lead author of the study that appears in the January 6, 2005 issue of Nature. "This is almost as massive as the supermassive black hole that swallowed it." Astronomers are not sure where such large amounts of matter came from. One theory is that gas from the host galaxy catastrophically cooled and was then swallowed by the black hole. Illustration of MS 0735.6+742 Illustration of MS 0735.6+742 The energy released shows that the black hole in MS 0735 has grown very dramatically during this eruption. Previous studies suggest that other large black holes have grown very little in the recent past, and that only smaller black holes are still growing quickly. "This new result is as surprising as it is exciting", said co-author Paul Nulsen of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center of Astrophysics. "This black hole is feasting when it should be fasting." Radio

  17. Asperger through the looking glass: an exploratory study of self-understanding in people with Asperger's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Paul; Skirrow, Paul; Hare, Dougal Julian

    2012-05-01

    Hobson (Autism and the development of mind. Lawrence Erlbaum, Hove, UK 1993) has proposed that the cognitive and linguistic disabilities that characterise autism result from abnormalities in inter-subjective engagement during infancy, which in turn results in impaired reflective self-awareness. The aim of the present study was to test Hobson's hypothesis by examining self-understanding in Asperger's syndrome (AS) using Damon and Hart's (Self-understanding in childhood and adolescence. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1988) model of self-concept. Ten participants with Asperger's syndrome were compared with ten non AS controls using the Self-understanding Interview (Damon and Hart in Self-understanding in Childhood and Adolescence. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1988). The study found that the Asperger's group demonstrated impairment in the "self-as-object" and "self-as-subject" domains of the Self-understanding Interview, which supported Hobson's concept of an impaired capacity for self-awareness and self-reflection in people with ASD. The results are discussed with reference to previous research regarding the development of self-understanding in people with ASD.

  18. Stability of libration points in the restricted four-body problem with variable mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Amit; Aggarwal, Rajiv; Suraj, Md. Sanam; Bisht, Virender Singh

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the stability of the Lagrangian solutions for the restricted four-body problem with variable mass. It has been assumed that the three primaries with masses m1, m2 and m3 form an equilateral triangle, wherein m2=m3. According to Jeans' law (Astronomy and Cosmogony, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1928), the infinitesimal body varies its mass m with time. The space-time transformations of Meshcherskii (Studies on the Mechanics of Bodies of Variable Mass, GITTL, Moscow, 1949) are used by taking the values of the parameters q=1/2, k=0, n=1. The equations of motion of the infinitesimal body with variable mass have been determined. The equations of motion of the current problem differ from the ones of the restricted four-body problem with constant mass. There exist eight libration points, out of which two are collinear with the primary m1 and the rest are non-collinear for a fixed value of parameters γ (m {at time} t/m {at initial time}, 0<γ≤1 ), α (the proportionality constant in Jeans' law (Astronomy and Cosmogony, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1928), 0≤α≤2.2) and μ=0.019 (the mass parameter). All the libration points are found to be unstable. The zero velocity surfaces (ZVS) are also drawn and regions of motion are discussed.

  19. [Actors of journal publishing in the social and medical sciences].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2015-04-19

    Journals published by universities take up a modest part of the scientific literature at the moment, but there are several signs and even more reasons to believe that their significance is rising. Recently, the most significant increase can be detected in social sciences. The top list of university rankings based on journal publishing activity brings into the forefront - beside some obvious favorites (Oxford, Cambridge, Chicago) - some less expected universities, as well.

  20. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ON TRACK FOR MEASURING THE EXPANSION RATE OF THE UNIVERSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Greenwich Observatory, Cambridge), G. Illingworth (University of California, Santa Cruz), B.F. Madore (IPAC/Caltech), R. Phelps (Carnegie Observatories), A. Saha (Space Telescope Science Institute), N. Silbermann (IPAC), P. Stetson (Dominion Astrophysical Observatory), and S. Sakai (IPAC). Members of the Sandage team include A. Sandage (Carnegie Observatories), A. Saha (Space Telescope Science Institute), G.A. Tammann, and L. Labhardt (Astronomical Institute, University of Basel), F.D. Macchetto and N. Panagia (Space Telescope Science Institute/European Space Agency).

  1. First AXAF Fellowships Awarded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    The AXAF (Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility) Science Center has announced the selection of five scientists to inaugurate the AXAF Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. Competition for the fellowships was open to all recent astronomy and astrophysics graduates worldwide. The AXAF Fellows will work for three years at a host astronomical institution in the United States where they will investigate topics broadly related to the scientific mission of AXAF. Additional AXAF Fellows will be selected each year over the course of the program. The AXAF Fellowship Program is a joint venture between NASA and the AXAF Science Center in cooperation with the host institutions. The AXAF Science Center is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts and funded by NASA through the Marshall Space Flight Center. "We are elated at the outstanding group of Fellows," said Harvey Tananbaum, the Director of the AXAF Science Center. "They will be working during the exciting period when the first X-ray images will be received from AXAF." Nancy Remage Evans, AXAF Fellowship Program Coordinator added, "The program will also encourage AXAF related work at institutions throughout the United States." An independent panel of scientists selected the honorees. The first AXAF Fellows and the host institutions at which they will hold their fellowships are: David Buote (University of California, Santa Cruz), Tiziana Di Matteo (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), Ann Esin (California Institute of Technology), Joseph Mohr (University of Chicago), and Edward Moran (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). AXAF, the third of NASA's Great Observatories after the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, is the largest and most sophisticated X-ray telescope ever built. When it is launched in December of this year, AXAF's high resolution will provide new information about exploding stars, black holes, colliding galaxies, and other extremely hot

  2. Universal Usability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Sarah; Leventhal, Laura

    Universal usability of World Wide Web (Web) environments—that is, having 90% of households as successful users—requires universal access, usability, and universal design. Factors such as Web technology and user-centered design contribute to universal access and usability, but key to universal usability is a universal design methodology. Universal design principles for the Web follow from universal design principles for the built environment, and emphasize perceptibility, self-explanation, and tailorability for the user. Universally usable Web environments offer the benefit of expanded participation, as well as the unanticipated benefits that generally follow from innovative design initiatives. However, to achieve Web universal usability, Web designers need tools that facilitate the design of intuitive interfaces without sacrificing universal access.

  3. 2011 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    ASA has announced the selection of the 2011 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2011. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Akos Bogdan (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Samuel Gralla (University of Maryland, College Park, Md.) * Philip Hopkins (University of California at Berkeley) * Matthew Kunz (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.) * Laura Lopez (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) * Amy Reines (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, Virg.) * Rubens Reis (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) * Ken Shen (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif.) * Jennifer Siegal-Gaskins (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Lorenzo Sironi (Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.) NASA has two other astrophysics theme-based fellowship programs: the Sagan Fellowship Program, which supports research into exoplanet exploration, and the Hubble Fellowship Program, which supports research into cosmic origins. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/

  4. Six NSF-NATO postdocs go to geoscientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six Earth scientists will study in the United Kingdom, Norway, and Italy on postdoctoral fellowships administered by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of a program sponsored by the North American Treaty Organization (NATO). In all, 57 NSF-NATO postdoctoral fellowships in science were awarded in March 1988 for study abroad for up to 12 months.The six students that received fellowships for study in geosciences are Henry N. (Spike) Berry (University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass.), to study geology at the University of Oslo, Norway; Marcus I. Bursik (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.), to study geology at Cambridge University, Cambridge, U.K.; Mary S. Hubbard (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.), to study geology at the University of Leicester, Leicester, U. K.); Paul R. Lundgren (Northwestern University, Chicago, III.), to study geophysics at the National Institute of Geophysics, Rome; James Webster (U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Va.), to study experiment petrology at the University of Edinburgh, U.K.; and Joseph R. Pawlik (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.), to study biological oceanography at the Marine Science Laboratories, Menai Bridge, U.K.

  5. An Explosive End to Intermediate-Mass Zero-Metallicity Stars and Early Universe Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Herbert H.B.; Stancliffe, Richard J.; Tout, Christopher A.

    2008-03-11

    We use the Cambridge stellar evolution code STARS to model the evolution of 5 M{sub {center_dot}} and 7 M{sub {center_dot}} zero-metallicity stars. With enhanced resolution at the hydrogen and helium burning shell in the AGB phases, we are able to model the entire thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase. The helium luminosities of the thermal pulses are significantly lower than in higher metallicity stars so there is no third dredge-up. The envelope is enriched in nitrogen by hot-bottom burning of carbon that was previously mixed in during second dredge-up. There is no s-process enrichment owing to the lack of third dredge up. The thermal pulses grow weaker as the core mass increases and they eventually cease. From then on the star enters a quiescent burning phase which lasts until carbon ignites at the centre of the star when the CO core mass is 1.36 M{sub {center_dot}}. With such a high degeneracy and a core mass so close to the Chandrasekhar mass, we expect these stars to explode as type 1.5 supernovae, very similar to Type Ia supernovae but inside a hydrogen rich envelope.

  6. A purely local experiment - Poynting and the mean density of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, Isobel

    1999-06-01

    These days John Henry Poynting is best known for his association with the Poynting vector, which describes the flow of energy in an electromagnetic field, and little is known of his life or work. Yet in the 1890s he caught the popular imagination as `the man who weighed the Earth'. His experiment, using a novel method with a common balance, was part of a heroic tradition, gained him Cambridge University's Adams Prize, and set new standards of precision. Yet in performing this experiment, Poynting seemed to step outside the traditions of late nineteenth century Cambridge University where he was educated, and it is probably significant that he was a Unitarian throughout his life. This paper examines Poynting's experiment and his interpretation of it in the context of the rest of his life and work.

  7. William Cavendish: the man behind the lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    It is not at all unusual for a wealthy aristocrat to provide substantial funds for building an academic institution. But it is highly unusual that the aristocrat concerned should have been steeped in the education, science and industry for which the institution would become justly famous. The man who provided all the necessary funds to build and equip the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University in the UK was William Cavendish, who succeeded his father's cousin as 7th Duke of Devonshire in 1858 and became chancellor of the university in 1861. He had crowned his own undergraduate career at Cambridge in 1829 at Trinity College with the awards of second Wrangler and first Smiths Prize, and in the same year, aged just 21, was elected a fellow of the Royal Society.

  8. 75 FR 66070 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; General Provisions for Domestic Fisheries; Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... Regional Administrator), is soliciting public comment on an EFP application submitted by Wallace..., Wallace & Associates, of Cambridge, MD, requests on behalf of Truex Enterprises, a renewal of...

  9. 77 FR 74028 - Hearings of the Judicial Conference Advisory Committee on Rules of Criminal Procedure; Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ...; Federal Register Citation of Previous Announcement: 77 FR 49828 AGENCY: Judicial Conference of the United... has been canceled: Criminal Rules Hearing, January 4, 2013, Cambridge, MA. FOR FURTHER...

  10. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey George M. Cushing, Photographer October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey George M. Cushing, Photographer October 1967 GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Guyot-Horsford House & Stable, 27 Craigie Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, MA

  11. Baby universes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TOPOLOGY CHANGE AND THIRD QUANTIZATION IN 0+1 DIMENSIONS * Third Quantization of Free One-dimensional Universes * Third Quantization of Interacting One-Dimensional Universes * The Single-Universe Approximation and Dynamical Determination of Coupling Constants * The Third Quantized Uncertainty Principle * THIRD QUANTIZATION IN 3+1 DIMENSIONS * The Gauge Invariant Action * Relation to Other Formalisms * PARENT AND BABY UNIVERSES * The Hybrid Action * Baby Universe Field Operators and Spacetime Couplings * INSTANTONS-FROM QUANTUM MECHANICS TO QUANTUM GRAVITY * Quantum Mechanics * Quantum Field Theory * Quantum Gravity * Axionic Instantons * The Small Expansion Parameter * THE AXION MODEL AND THE INSTANTON APPROXIMATION * THE COSMOLOGICAL CONSTANT * The Hawking-Baum Argument * Baby Universes and Coleman's Argument * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  12. Flickering Quasar Helps Chandra Measure the Expansion Rate of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    Astronomers using the Chandra X-ray Observatory have identified a flickering, four-way mirage image of a distant quasar. A carefully planned observation of this mirage may be used to determine the expansion rate of the universe as well as to measure the distances to extragalactic objects, arguably two of the most important pursuits in modern astronomy. quasar RX J0911.4+0551 This figure is a composite of the X-ray image of the gravitational lens RX J0911.4+551 (top panel) and the light curves of the lensed images A2 (left panel) and A1 (right panel). Credit: NASA George Chartas, senior research associate at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) and Marshall W. Bautz, principal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Center for Space Research, present their findings today at the meeting of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society in Honolulu, Hawaii. "With a carefully planned follow-up, the Chandra observation of quasar RX J0911.4+0551 may lead to a measurement of the Hubble constant, the expansion rate of the universe, in less than a day," said Chartas. The observation would be done not with mirrors but with mirages--four images of a single quasar that capture the quasar's light at different moments of time due to the speed of light and the location of the mirages. Quasars are extremely distant galaxies with cores that glow with the intensity of 10 trillion Suns, a phenomenon likely powered by a supermassive black hole in the heart of the galaxy. This single "point source" image of a quasar may appear as four or five sources when the quasar--from our vantage point on Earth--is behind a massive intervening deflector, such as a dim galaxy. A mirage of images form when the gravity of the intervening deflector forces light rays to bend and take different paths to reach us. The time it takes for light to reach us from the distant object will depend on which path a ray decides to take. "An

  13. Journey Through Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. N.

    2013-05-01

    My first involvement with statistical mechanics and the many body problem was when I was a student at The National Southwest Associated University in Kunming during the war. At that time Professor Wang Zhu-Xi had just come back from Cambridge, England, where he was a student of Fowler, and his thesis was on phase transitions, a hot topic at that time, and still a very hot topic today...

  14. Toward a formal verification of a floating-point coprocessor and its composition with a central processing unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Jing; Levitt, Karl N.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed here is work to formally specify and verify a floating point coprocessor based on the MC68881. The HOL verification system developed at Cambridge University was used. The coprocessor consists of two independent units: the bus interface unit used to communicate with the cpu and the arithmetic processing unit used to perform the actual calculation. Reasoning about the interaction and synchronization among processes using higher order logic is demonstrated.

  15. Flexible electronics enters the e-reader market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2010-02-01

    A company that was spun off from the physics department at the University of Cambridge in the UK 10 years ago released its first product last month. Plastic Logic, founded by Henning Sirringhaus and Richard Friend, launched an electronic reader that can display books, magazines and newspapers on a flexible, lightweight plastic display. The reader commercializes pioneering work first started over 20 years ago at the lab by the two physicists, who are based in the department's optoelectronics group.

  16. Theory institute appoints new head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2008-06-01

    The cosmologist Neil Turok has been appointed as the next executive director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada. Turok, who is currently chair of mathematical physics at the University of Cambridge in the UK, will take over the reins in October. The 50- year-old cosmologist described the move as the "opportunity of a lifetime" and says he plans to make the institute "the leading centre in the world for theoretical physics".

  17. Reflective scientific sense-making dialogue in two languages: The science in the dialogue and the dialogue in the science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, Doris

    2004-11-01

    In this paper I focus on the transition from everyday to scientific ways of reasoning, and on the intertwined roles of meaning-making dialogue and science content as they contribute to scientific literacy. I refer to views of science, and how scientific understanding is advanced dialogically, by Hurd (Science Education, 1998, 82, 402-416), Brown (The Journal of Learning Sciences, 1992, 2(2), 141-178), Bruner (Acts of Meaning, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1990), Roth (In J. Brophy (Ed.), Social Constructivist Teaching: Affordances and Constraints (Advances in Research on Teaching Series, Vol. 9), New York: Elsevier/JAI, 2003), and Wells (Dialogic Inquiry: Towards a Sociocultural Practice and Theory of Education, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999). I argue that family collaborative dialogues in nonschool settings can be the foundations for scientific ways of thinking. I focus on the particular reflective family dialogues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, when family members remembered and synthesized essential biological themes, centering on adaptation, from one visit to the next, in both Spanish and English. My approach is informed by sociocultural theory, with emphasis on the negotiations of meaning in the zone of proximal development (Vygotsky, 1978), as learners engage in joint productive activity (Tharp & Gallimore, Rousing Minds to Life: Teaching, Learning and Schooling in Social Context, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988). Over the past decades, researchers have discovered that observing social activity, conversation, and meaning-making in informal settings (Crowley & Callanan, 1997; Guberman, 2002; Rogoff, 2001; Vasquez, Pease-Alvarez, & Shannon, Pushing Boundaries: Language and Culture in a Mexicano Community, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994) has much to teach us regarding learning in general. To date there has been little research with Spanish-speaking families in informal learning settings and virtually none that

  18. Innovative Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsi, Louis M.; Kaebnick, Gweneth W.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of innovation within the university is examined, noting the possibility of innovation as a key to college vitality. A study was conducted using a group of institutions that demonstrated recent innovative spirit. Members of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), each has been recognized in an annual…

  19. Challenged Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, Malcolm

    1995-01-01

    Pricing and financial aid issues affecting research universities, particularly private universities, are examined, including underpricing of services, decentralization, and diversification of higher education in the United States. The growth of federal regulation is also considered, especially the State Postsecondary Review Entities (SPREs)…

  20. Universal Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a week-long activity for general to honors-level students that addresses Hubble's law and the universal expansion theory. Uses a discrepant event-type activity to lead up to the abstract principles of the universal expansion theory. (JRH)

  1. Overseas Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-University Council for Higher Education Overseas, London (England).

    The following articles and reports are presented in this publication of "Overseas Universities:""Appropriate Technology and University Education," by John Twidell; "The Training of Engineering Staff for Higher Education Institutions in Developing Countries," by D. W. Daniel, C. A. Leal, J. H. Maynes and T. Wilmore; "A Case Study of an Academic…

  2. University Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Recent radical changes to university education in England have been discussed largely in terms of the arrangements for transferring funding from the state to the student as consumer, with little discussion of what universities are for. It is important, while challenging the economic rationale for the new system, to resist talking about higher…

  3. University Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Brian

    This book explores how universities relate their built environment to academic discourse, asserting that the character of universities is often a charming dialogue between order and disarray. It contains numerous photographs and building plans for example campuses throughout the world. In part 1, "The Campus," chapters are: (1) "Academic Mission…

  4. Our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  5. Konrad Bajer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    These Proceedings are dedicated to our co-editor Konrad Bajer, who carried the lion's share of the work involved until his sudden and untimely death from cancer on 29th August 2014. Konrad was one of the key Organisers of the program "Topological Dynamics in the Physical and Biological Sciences" held at the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Cambridge from July to December 2012. During that time, he was on leave from the University of Warsaw, and held a Visiting Fellow Commonership at Trinity College, Cambridge. He had particular responsibility for the satellite workshop Tangled Magnetic Fields in Astro- and Plasma Physics, held at ICMS, Edinburgh, in October 2012. Konrad graduated in Physics from the University of Warsaw in 1980, and took his PhD in Fluid Dynamics at DAMTP, Cambridge, 1984-89. He was active in EUROMECH, having been a principal organiser of the European Turbulence Conference (ETC13) in Warsaw 2011, and the meeting Turbulence: the Historical Perspective that followed it. He has been equally active in IUTAM; his distinction was recognised by his very recent election to the Congress Committee of IUTAM. Konrad's research interests were in magnetohydrodynamics and vortex dynamics in classical and quantum systems; also in problems of gasifcation, in which he played a coordinating role at the University of Warsaw. He impressed all with his exceptionally warm and friendly personality, and will be greatly missed in the whole scientifc community.

  6. Universe Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay; Russo, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an educational programme coordinated by Leiden University that uses the beauty and grandeur of the Universe to encourage young children, particularly those from an underprivileged background, to have an interest in science and technology and foster their sense of global citizenship from the earliest age.UNAWE's twofold vision uses our Universe to inspire and motivate very young children: the excitement of the Universe provides an exciting introduction to science and technology, while the vastness and beauty of the Universe helps broaden the mind and stimulate a sense of global citizenship and tolerance. UNAWE's goals are accomplished through four main activities: the coordination of a global network of more than 1000 astronomers, teachers and educators from more than 60 countries, development of educational resources, teacher training activities and evaluation of educational activities.Between 2011 and 2013, EU-UNAWE, the European branch of UNAWE, was funded by the European Commission to implement a project in 5 EU countries and South Africa. This project has been concluded successfully. Since then, the global project Universe Awareness has continued to grow with an expanding international network, new educational resources and teacher trainings and a planned International Workshop in collaboration with ESA in October 2015, among other activities.

  7. Einstein's Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Eric; Wald, Robert

    1979-01-01

    Presents a guide to be used by students and teachers in conjunction with a television program about Einstein. Provides general information about special and general relativity, and the universe. Includes questions for discussion after each section and a bibliography. (MA)

  8. Universal Truths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, John

    1990-01-01

    Described is a symposium of Nobel laureates held in the summer of 1990 to discuss cosmology. Different views on the structure and evolution of the universe are presented. Evidence for different theories of cosmology is discussed. (CW)

  9. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A universe that expands with time. Although the possibility had been raised earlier through theoretical work carried out by Willem de Sitter (1872-1934), Aleksandr Friedmann (1888-1925), and the Abbé Georges Lemaître (1894-1966), that our universe is expanding was first demonstrated observationally in 1929 by Edwin P Hubble (1889-1953), through his measurements of the redshifts in the spectra of ...

  10. Undulant Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Advanced fit technique for astrophysical spectra (Bukvic+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukvic, S.; Spasojevic, Dj.; Zigman, V.

    2007-11-01

    Simple FORTRAN90 Demo of a complete program that uses DLSFIT routine (Bukvic, Spasojevic, and Zigman) for robust data fitting. The program consists of: 1) main program: DLSFITAADemo 2) subroutine DLSFIT, which performs DSL data fitting, 3) subroutine fit - WLS "working engine" for DLSFIT, 4) copyright protected FORTRAN77 subroutines: mrqmin, mrqcof, lfit, covsrt, gaussj, zbrent from: Numerical Recipes in Fortran 77: The Art of Scientific Computing, by Press, W.H., Teukolsky, S.A., Vetterling, W.T., and Flannery, B.P., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2001, software version 2.10: available on WEB site: http//www.nr.com Tested with Compaq Visual Fortran 6.6 and Intel 9.1 compilers. Should be compiled with REAL(8) as default real kind. (1 data file).

  12. Stacking up against alternative conceptions: using Uno cards to introduce discourse and argumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunac, Patricia S.; Demir, Kadir

    2013-11-01

    We engaged secondary science students in a teacher and student constructed Uno card game (UCG) to change their conceptual understanding of the various energy transformations. The paper outlines how we incorporated Toulmin’s argumentation pattern (Toulmin 1958 The Uses of Argument (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)) in the UCG, using discourse (Erduran et al 2004 Sci. Educ. 88 915-33) and through a 5E learning cycle (Bybee 1997 Achieving Scientific Literacy: From Purposes to Practices (Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann Educational Books)). The activity helped students develop a deeper understanding of the energy transformation among and between different sources. Students experienced a conceptual gain in their ways of thinking, in contrast to traditional teaching and learning practices. The collaboration and interaction between teacher-student(s) and between students fostered an environment where they became co-constructors of knowledge.

  13. Sitnikov cyclic configuration of N+1-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbaz Ullah, M.; Hassan, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    This manuscript deals with the generalisation of all previous works on series solutions and linear stability of equilibrium points of the Sitnikov problem. Following Giacaglia (1967), in Sect. 2 we have derived the equation of motion of the infinitesimal mass moving along the z-axis about which the plane of motion is rotating with unit angular velocity. In Sects. 3, 4 and 5 the series solutions of the Sitnikov problem have been developed by the method of MacMillan, Lindstedt-Poincaré and iteration of Green's function respectively. In Sect. 6 the three series solutions have been compared graphically by putting N=2, 3, 4. In Sect. 7 the coordinates of equilibrium points have been calculated. In Sect. 8 the linear stability of equilibrium points has been examined by the method of Murray and Dermott (Solar System Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999) and it was found that the equilibrium points are stable in Sitnikov problem.

  14. Ask not what physics can do for biology--ask what biology can do for physics.

    PubMed

    Frauenfelder, Hans

    2014-10-08

    Stan Ulam, the famous mathematician, said once to Hans Frauenfelder: 'Ask not what Physics can do for biology, ask what biology can do for physics'. The interaction between biologists and physicists is a two-way street. Biology reveals the secrets of complex systems, physics provides the physical tools and the theoretical concepts to understand the complexity. The perspective gives a personal view of the path to some of the physical concepts that are relevant for biology and physics (Frauenfelder et al 1999 Rev. Mod. Phys. 71 S419-S442). Schrödinger's book (Schrödinger 1944 What is Life? (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)), loved by physicists and hated by eminent biologists (Dronamraju 1999 Genetics 153 1071-6), still shows how a great physicist looked at biology well before the first protein structure was known.

  15. The 1909 Darwin celebration. Reexamining evolution in the light of Mendel, mutation, and meiosis.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Marsha L

    2006-09-01

    In June 1909, scientists and dignitaries from 167 different countries gathered in Cambridge to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth and the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Origin of Species. The event was one of the most magnificent commemorations in the annals of science. Delegates gathered within the cloisters of Cambridge University not only to honor the "hero" of evolution but also to reassess the underpinnings of Darwinism at a critical juncture. With the mechanism of natural selection increasingly under attack, evolutionary theory was in disarray. Against this backdrop, biologists weighed the impact of several new developments--the rediscovery of Mendel's laws of heredity, de Vriesian mutation theory, and the linkage of sex-cell division (recently named "meiosis") to the mechanism of heredity. The 1909 Darwin celebration thus represents a significant watershed in the history of modem biology that allows historians to assess the status of evolution prior to the advent of the chromosome theory of genetics.

  16. Third Annual Open Meeting of the UK Pharmacogenomics and Stratified Medicine Network Conference.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth H

    2015-07-01

    Third Annual Open Meeting of the UK Pharmacogenetics and Stratified Medicine Network 14 January 2015, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK The third Annual Open Meeting of the UK Pharmacogenetics and Stratified Medicine Network was held on 14 January 2015 in association with the Wellcome Trust on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus at Hinxton, Cambridge, UK. In the morning, speakers from Cancer Research UK, the Medical Research Council, Genomics England, Innovate UK (formerly TSB) and the Department of Health described the current major projects they are funding. In the afternoon, speakers from various universities around the United Kingdom presented data on pharmacogenetics and stratified medicine research covering diverse disease areas including cancers, warfarin dosing, Gaucher disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Ask not what physics can do for biology--ask what biology can do for physics.

    PubMed

    Frauenfelder, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Stan Ulam, the famous mathematician, said once to Hans Frauenfelder: 'Ask not what Physics can do for biology, ask what biology can do for physics'. The interaction between biologists and physicists is a two-way street. Biology reveals the secrets of complex systems, physics provides the physical tools and the theoretical concepts to understand the complexity. The perspective gives a personal view of the path to some of the physical concepts that are relevant for biology and physics (Frauenfelder et al 1999 Rev. Mod. Phys. 71 S419-S442). Schrödinger's book (Schrödinger 1944 What is Life? (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)), loved by physicists and hated by eminent biologists (Dronamraju 1999 Genetics 153 1071-6), still shows how a great physicist looked at biology well before the first protein structure was known. PMID:25292354

  18. Soft Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles de Gennes, Pierre; Edwards, Introduction By Sam

    1997-04-01

    Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, one of the greatest physicists of the twentieth century, died in 1984. Dirac's college, St. John's of Cambridge, generously endowed annual lectures to be held at Cambridge University in his memory. This volume contains a much expanded version of the 1994 Dirac Lecture by Nobel Laureate Pierre Gilles de Gennes. The book presents an impressionistic tour of the physics of soft interfaces. Full of insight and interesting asides, it not only provides an accessible introduction to this topic, but also lays down many markers and signposts that will be of interest to researchers in physics or chemistry. Features discussions of wetting and dewetting, the dynamics of different types of interface and adhesion and polymer/polymer welding.

  19. Sir Joseph Barcroft: one victorian physiologist's contributions to a half century of discovery.

    PubMed

    Longo, Lawrence D

    2016-03-01

    During the first half of the 20th Century, Joseph Barcroft, KBE, FRS of Cambridge University became a world leader in respiratory physiology. He determined the role of neural stimulation in the oxygen consumption of several organs, established many of the factors that regulate the binding of oxygen to haemoglobin, explored the determinants of a human's acclimatization to high altitude and developed the field of fetal cardiovascular physiology. Chair of the Cambridge Department of Physiology from 1925 to 1937, he served as a consultant and member of many UK governmental committees. During World War I, he led a British research unit exploring the effects of poisonous gases on pulmonary function and related problems. In addition to his almost 300 publications, several of his monographs are considered as classics. PMID:25929679

  20. Beagle I and II Voyages: Charles Darwin's rocks and the quest for Mars rock; the Open University's virtual microscope has both

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Tindle, A. G.; Anand, M.; Gibson, E. K.; Pearson, V. K.; Pemberton, D.; Pillinger, C.; Smith, C. L.; Whalley, P.; Kelley, S. P.

    2011-12-01

    Exploration is in itself a fascinating subject, and a strong draw to engaging the public in understanding science. Nearly two hundred years ago Charles Darwin took part in an exploration of the Earth, and more recently we have begun to explore the solar system and in particular the surface of Mars. The engagement is made easier if an element of exploration is involved in the public engagement, using modern internet and even mobile technologies. The Open University combines all those aspects in a series of virtual microscopes for Earth science that are freely available on the web, installed in museums, or built into its teaching material. The basis of the virtual microscope is a mosaic of several hundred microscopic images of each thin section taken in plane polarised light, between crossed polars and in reflected light, which are then assembled into three high resolution images. Rotation movies for selected points in the thin section illustrate changing optical properties such as birefringence. The user is able to pan and zoom around to explore the section, studying the mineralogy and rock texture, and view the rotation movies linked to points in the section to see the changing birefringence colours. We have created several collections of terrestrial rocks, mainly for teaching purposes, and outreach directly linked to exploration: Charles Darwin returned from the Voyage of the Beagle with a large variety of rock samples, and although thin sections were not being made at that time, they were created from his rocks in the late 19th century. The historic material is part of the "Darwin the Geologist" exhibition at the Sedgwick Museum in Cambridge. Our Darwin virtual microscope includes hand specimen illustrations and thin sections together with documentation and an interactive map allow internet users and museum visitors alike to have a close look at Darwin's rocks and study the petrology of them. Charles Darwin explored distant horizons on Earth in the 19th century