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Sample records for camp canada evidence

  1. The Bunkhouse Man. A Study of Work and Pay in the Camps of Canada 1903-1914.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradwin, Edmund W.

    The book describes working and living conditions among migrant laborers in the northern Canadian work camps, 1903-1914. The early chapters sketch the development of Canada's transportation systems from the mid-19th century as the setting for the development of labor camps, and describe the contract system in railway construction. The heart of the…

  2. The Bunkhouse Man. A Study of Work and Pay in the Camps of Canada 1903-1914.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradwin, Edmund W.

    The book describes working and living conditions among migrant laborers in the northern Canadian work camps, 1903-1914. The early chapters sketch the development of Canada's transportation systems from the mid-19th century as the setting for the development of labor camps, and describe the contract system in railway construction. The heart of the…

  3. Weight of evidence: regulatory toxicology in Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, E.

    1986-12-01

    The legislative application of regulatory toxicology in Canada is reviewed, together with the sources of experimental evidence used for action. Examples are given of the critical toxicological information that led to a regulatory decision. Risk numbers have only been used to a limited extent in Canada. Some possibilities for future research are offered.

  4. Transformation and Mobilization of Arsenic in the Historic Cobalt Mining Camp, Ontario, Canada.

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong,J.; Beauchemin, S.; Hossain, F.; Gould, D.

    2007-01-01

    More than eight decades of silver mining in the Cobalt mining camp of northern Ontario, Canada, have left large volumes of As-bearing mine wastes widely distributed in and along watercourses in the Cobalt area. Metal leaching from these mine wastes has led to the contamination of the area drainage with dissolved As concentrations at least an order of magnitude higher than the Canadian drinking water criterion of 0.025 mg l{sup -1}. To clarify the transformation and mobilization of arsenic in the historic mining camp, a portion of an extensive wetland located in northeast Cobalt and partially filled with historic tailings has been sampled for detailed characterization, chemical analysis and extraction tests. Field deployment of anionic exchange membranes, As sorption isotherm and desorption analyses in conjunction with chemical and mineralogical analyses indicate that: (1) the submerged tailings are likely a source instead of a sink of arsenic to the local streams; and (2) Al-minerals are the main sorbents for As with significant P competing for the available sorbing sites. Subjecting selected samples to a laboratory redox experiment complemented with X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses confirms that changes in arsenic speciation readily occur with changes in redox conditions in the surface sediments, resulting in rapid mobilization of arsenic. Preliminary enumeration of iron- and sulfur-reducing bacteria at selected sites coupled with scanning electron microscopic analyses show that microbial sulfate reduction occurs locally in the wetland, possibly leading to co-precipitation of arsenic as a sulfide in associated with framboidal pyrite. Further detailed study of the bacteria responsible for the arsenic transformation in conjunction with arsenic speciation analysis is recommended.

  5. Assessing Disaster Preparedness Among Select Children's Summer Camps in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Chang, Megan; Sielaff, Alan; Bradin, Stuart; Walker, Kevin; Ambrose, Michael; Hashikawa, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Children's summer camps are at risk for multiple pediatric casualties during a disaster. The degree to which summer camps have instituted disaster preparedness is unknown. We assessed disaster preparedness among selected camps nationally for a range of disasters. We partnered with a national, web-based electronic health records system to send camp leadership of 315 camp organizations a 14-question online survey of disaster preparedness. One response from each camp was selected in the following order of importance: owner, director, physician, nurse, medical technician, office staff, and other. The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. A total of 181 camps responses were received, 169 of which were complete. Camp types were overnight (60%), day (21%), special/medical needs (14%), and other (5%). Survey respondents were directors (52%), nurses (14%), office staff (10%), physicians (5%), owners (5%), emergency medical technicians (2%), and other (12%). Almost 18% of camps were located >20 mi from a major medical center, and 36% were >5 mi from police/fire departments. Many camps were missing emergency supplies: car/booster seats for evacuation (68%), shelter (35%), vehicles for evacuation (26%), quarantine isolation areas (21%), or emergency supplies of extra water (20%) or food (17%). Plans were unavailable for the following: power outages (23%); lockdowns (15%); illness outbreaks (15%); tornadoes (11%); evacuation for fire, flood, or chemical spill (9%); and other severe weather (8%). Many camps did not have online emergency plans (53%), plans for children with special/medical needs (38%), methods to rapidly communicate information to parents (25%), or methods to identify children for evacuation/reunification with parents (40%). Respondents reported that staff participation in disaster drills varied for weather (58%), evacuations (46%), and lockdowns (36%). The majority (75%) of respondents had not collaborated with medical organizations for planning. A

  6. Evidences for involvement of endogenous cAMP in Arabidopsis defense responses to Verticillium toxins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Fan, Ling Wen; Wu, Wei Hua

    2005-08-01

    Although there were reports suggesting the involvement of endogenous cAMP in plant defense signaling cascades, there is no direct evidence supporting this notion yet and the detailed mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we have used pathogenic fungi Verticillium dahliae and Arabidopsis plants as a model system of plant-microb interaction to demonstrate the function of endogenous cAMP in Arabidopsis defense responses. Both V. dahliae inoculation and Verticillium toxins injection induced typical "wilt" symptoms in Arabidopsis seedlings. When either 8-Br-AMP (a membrane permeable cAMP analogue) or salicylic acid (SA) was applied to Arabidopsis, the plants became resistant to V. dahliae toxins. However, addition of 8-Br-AMP did not increase the resistance of Arabidopsis transgenic plants deficient in SA to the toxins, suggesting that cAMP might act upstream of SA in plant defense signaling pathway. Indeed, 8-Br-cAMP and forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, significantly stimulated the endogenous SA level in plants, whereas DDA, an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase dramatically reduced toxin-induced SA increase. Both the endogenous cAMP and SA increased significantly in Arabidopsis seedlings treated with toxins. Furthermore, transcription level of pathogenesis-related protein 1 gene (PR1) was strongly induced by both 8-Br-cAMP and the toxin treatment. Taken together, our data demonstrate that endogenous cAMP is involved in plant defense responses against Verticillium-secreted toxins by regulating the production of the known signal SA in plant defense pathway.

  7. Tourism climatology for camping: a case study of two Ontario parks (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewer, Micah J.; Scott, Daniel; Gough, William A.

    2015-08-01

    Climate and weather act as central motivators for the travel decisions of tourists. Due to their seasonality, these factors determine the availability and quality of certain outdoor recreational activities. Park visitation in Ontario, Canada, has been identified as a weather sensitive tourism and recreation activity. This study used a survey-based approach to identify and compare stated weather preferences and thresholds, as well as weather-related decision-making for campers at two provincial parks in Ontario, Canada. The two parks were selected for differing physical and environmental characteristics (forested lake versus coastal beach). Statistically significant differences were detected between the two parks in relation to the importance of weather and weather-based decision-making. Specific temperatures that were considered ideal and thresholds that were too cool and too warm were identified for both parks, both during the day and the night. Heavy rain and strong winds were the most influential factors in weather-related decision-making and on-site behavioural adaptations. Beach campers placed greater importance on the absence of rain and the presence of comfortable temperatures compared to forest campers. In addition, beach campers were more likely to leave the park early due to incremental weather changes. The results of this study suggest that beach campers are more sensitive to weather than forest campers.

  8. Preliminary evidence to support a "boot camp" approach to wheelchair skills training for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Edward M; Wilson, Nicole; Schneider, Andrea; Bains, Derek; Hall, Jonathan; Miller, William C

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of providing intensive large-group training on wheelchair-specific self-efficacy and skill capacity among occupational therapy students. Intervention study using before-after trial. Universities. Volunteer sample of master of occupational therapy students (N=65). Two instructors provided a total of 4.5 hours of wheelchair skills training to groups of 14 to 19 students in a boot camp format, which included a brief lecture, instruction, demonstration, and hands-on practice. Wheelchair skill capacity (Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire [WST-Q]), with scores ranging from 0 to 64, and wheelchair-specific self-efficacy (Wheelchair Use Confidence Scale for Manual Wheelchair Users [WheelCon-M]), with scores ranging from 0 to 10. At postintervention, the mean WST-Q score increased by 24.7 (95% confidence interval, 22.1-27.3; P=.000), reflecting a 38.6% improvement (Cohen d=2.8). The mean WheelCon-M score improved by 3.0 (95% confidence interval, 2.5-3.3; P=.000). To our knowledge, this is the first study to measure and demonstrate improvement in wheelchair-specific self-efficacy among student clinicians. Participants demonstrated substantively larger improvements and acquired more advanced skills than previous studies using shorter training sessions with smaller groups. This study provides evidence for using a boot camp format as an effective strategy to increase occupational therapy students' confidence and skill with wheelchair mobility, preparing them to place greater emphasis on, and achieve better success in, training future clients. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence-informed health policy making in Canada: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Jennifer A

    2015-11-01

    Evidence-informed health policy making (EIHP) is becoming a necessary means to achieving health system reform. Although Canada has a rich and well documented history in the field of evidence-based medicine, a concerted effort to capture Canada's efforts to support EIHP in particular has yet to be realized. This paper reports on the development of EIHP in Canada, including promising approaches being used to support the use of evidence in policy making about complex health systems issues. In light of Canada's contributions, this paper suggests that scholars in Canada will continue engaging in the field of EIHP through further study of interventions underway, as well as by sharing knowledge within and beyond Canada's borders about approaches that support EIHP.

  10. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use sodium flufenamate, a compound that inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production in the pituitary, to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. Quartered male pituitaries were perifused at 37/sup 0/C and sequential effluent fractions collected every 10 min. Infusions of GnRH resulted in a twofold increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion. Cycloheximide, 5 ..mu..M, completely inhibited the GnRH-stimulated LH and FSH secretion. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate had similar effects on gonadotropin secretion as cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate restored the secretory responses of both hormones. The flufenamate-inhibited GnRH stimulated LH and FSH release, which was restored by DBcAMP and appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP.These results suggest an indirect role for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. However, in contrast to female pituitaries, the secretion of these hormones form male pituitaries is completely dependent on cAMP and de novo protein synthesis.

  11. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from female pituitaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    Sodium flufenamate, which inhibited gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated increases in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion. Quartered pituitaries from diestrous II female rats were perifused at 37/sup 0/C, and sequential effluent fractions were collected every 10 min. Administration of GnRH resulted in a characteristic biphasic response for both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), whereas 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide inhibited the secondary augmented responses (phase II) of both hormones. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate inhibited GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion in a manner similar to that of cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate resulted in the restoration of LH and FSH secretion. The dibutyryl cAMP-restored response appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP. These results suggest that although the cyclic nucleotide is not involved in the acute release of LH and FSH, it does appear to play a pivotal but indirect role in phase II release of the hormones, by effects involving the stimulation of de novo protein synthesis.

  12. Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, Virginia

    1991-01-01

    Lists and annotates 130 publications from the federal government of Canada and from the various Canadian provinces. Major topics include environmental concerns, particularly ecologically responsible forestry, global warming, and waste disposal/recycling; education at all levels, including bilingual concerns; and the Belanger-Campeau report, which…

  13. DIRECTORY OF CAMPS FOR THE HANDICAPPED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Chicago, IL.

    ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-SEVEN RESIDENT CAMPS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA AND 77 DAY CAMPS IN THE UNITED STATES WHICH SERVE CHILDREN OR ADULTS WITH PHYSICAL, MENTAL, SOCIAL, AND EMOTIONAL HANDICAPS ARE LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY STATE. FOR EACH CAMP, INFORMATION ON TYPES OF THE HANDICAPPED WHO ARE ACCEPTED, SPECIFIC EXCLUSIONS, AGE RANGE, NUMBER…

  14. Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean: Evidence against a rotational origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Larry S.

    The most widely accepted model for the opening of Canada Basin invokes 66° of counterclockwise rotation of Arctic Alaska and Chukotka away from the Canadian Arctic in Early Cretaceous time. Late Paleozoic structural trends and paleogeography have been used in support of the rotation hypothesis. Recent refinements in the ages of Paleozoic tectonic events in Arctic Alaska, Yukon, and the Canadian Arctic Islands provide new controls on correlations of late Paleozoic paleogeography and raise doubts about whether the Paleozoic tectonics of the Arctic Alaska-Yukon region necessitate a rotational reconstruction of Arctic Alaska against the Canadian Arctic Islands. A rotational restoration of Arctic Alaska requires the Alaskan and Canadian margins to be conjugates of comparable age and evolution. The rift-drift transition age for the Alaskan margin is most likely Hauterivian (Early Cretaceous), but for the Canadian Arctic margin it is most likely post-Albian (mid-Cretaceous). Crustal structure data from the Beaufort Sea continental margin in Canada define a rifted margin segmented by fracture zones which constrain the kinematics of ocean spreading to be northwestward, perpendicular to that required by the rotation hypothesis but subparallel to that suggested by seismic velocity anisotropy in the upper mantle. The Alaska-Chukotka rotation hypothesis also fails to account for up to 600 km of continental overlap upon restoration of 66° of rotation and the absence of any accommodating contractional structures in northern Yukon and adjacent Northwest Territories. Because the Alaska-Chukotka rotation hypothesis fails to account for much of the available data, serious doubt is cast on its viability. An existing multistage tectonic model for the evolution of Canada and Makarov basins is summarized as an example of a model which can account for the existing data.

  15. Archaeology Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John R.

    1984-01-01

    A summer camp for gifted youth (13-16 years old) featured two field archaeology sessions in which students participated in excavation and field trips to nearby archaeological sites along with traditional camp activities. (CL)

  16. Summer Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Maxine; And Others

    Government regulation of children's summer camps, particularly involving health and safety standards, is discussed in a series of brief interviews with camp directors and representatives of camp associations. Transcribed from the National Public Radio weekly broadcast, "Options in Education," the program includes a lengthy montage of…

  17. Astro Camp

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-12

    Each year, more than 400 Mississippi and out-of-state youths visit Stennis Space Center for weeklong Astro Camp activities. Astro Camp sessions are for children ages 7-12. The focus for 2012 Astro Camp participants was on 'What's Next for NASA! Moon, Mars, Asteroids and Beyond.'

  18. Summer Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfisterer, Bill

    About 50 participants and 8 supervisors attended the Summer Camp. Visitors were encouraged and parents often came to see what their kids were doing. Before arriving at camp, the students learned how important balancing the supplies was when loading the boats. On the way to camp, students studied the: (1) landmarks so that they could find their way…

  19. Canada urgently needs a national network of libraries to access evidence.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Jessie; Straus, Sharon E; Tugwell, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Canadian health professionals and their patients are deprived of important evidence to guide health and healthcare decisions, ensure quality and avoid unnecessary deaths because, unlike other developed countries, Canada does not have a national medical library as can be found in the United States' National Library of Medicine and the United Kingdom's National Health Service.

  20. Evidence and ethics in public health: the experience of SARS in Canada.

    PubMed

    Upshur, Ross E G

    2012-01-01

    Making decisions on the basis of evidence is a central tenet of all health-care disciplines, including public health. However, it is not entirely clear what it means to base decisions on evidence; debates on evidence-based approaches often lack a clear understanding of the nature of evidence and obscure the normative underpinnings of evidence. Public health decision making requires an acceptance of limitations such as the availability of funding for research to provide complete evidence for any given decision, the ethical constraints on the creation of certain types of evidence and the ongoing dilemma between the need to take action and the need to gather more information. Using the example of the SARS outbreak in Canada, the inter-relationships between evidence and ethics are explored. I outline a set of critical questions for the global public health community to discuss regarding the nature of the relationship between evidence-based public health practice and ethics.

  1. Evidence for Differentiation by Crystal Fractionation in Theo's Flow, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, R. C.; Collins, L. E.; McCoy, T. J.; Taylor, J.

    2003-12-01

    Theo's Flow, a 120-m thick differentiated lava flow in Munro Twp, Ontario, is an unusual magma body which calls for an unusual formation mechanism. New systematic sampling of the flow for geochemistry and petrography offers additional clues to its post-emplacement differentiation. Evidence for differentiation comes from both petrography and geochemistry. Theo's has four lithologic units: a basal peridotite (3-9 m), a thick pyroxenite (50 m) and gabbro (40 m), and a capping (8-12 m) hyaloclastite. Contacts between lithologic layers are gradual, mostly marked by changes in modal mineralogy, although there is also a distinct change in plagioclase morphology concurrent with its modal increase. From pyroxenite to gabbro, plagioclase shifts from fine, interstitial sprays to large laths in a subophitic intergrowth with pyroxene. Whole rock and pyroxene compositions display typical fractionation trends (e.g. Fe/Mg, Ti, Zr, Nb increase upsection). Furthermore, a weighted sum of 22 whole rock compositions from the internal layers match the hyaloclastite composition well for most non-mobile elements. All these factors suggest formation of the three internal layers by fractional crystallization and evolution of a magma whose composition is represented by the hyaloclastite. Any proposed differentiation process must address some specific observations. Cluster and CSD analysis reveal that pyroxene grains grew in clusters under steady-state conditions of nucleation and growth. Pyroxene grain size is nearly uniform throughout the pyroxenite, suggesting thermal conditions were maintained over a long crystallization interval. Progression of a typical solidification front would produce a fine-grained roof crust beneath the quenched top, but there is no evidence of such a layer in Theo's. Unlike magmas for which solidification fronts are invoked, Theo's parent magma was highly mafic and Al-poor, yielding a low viscosity magma (4 Pa-s) that crystallized only pyroxene over a long

  2. Camp Chinkapin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook County School District, Prineville, OR.

    The Camp Chinkapin program, begun in 1957-58 as a pilot program for the State of Oregon, provides all sixth grade students in Crook County (Oregon) with a 5-day session in a resident camp setting in the early summer. The book serves as an introduction to and workbook for students attending the Crook County Outdoor Classroom at Suttle Lake. The…

  3. cAMP and Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Valsecchi, Federica; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier S.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins has emerged as a major regulatory mechanism for metabolic adaptation. cAMP signaling and PKA phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins have just started to be investigated, and the presence of cAMP-generating enzymes and PKA inside mitochondria is still controversial. Here, we discuss the role of cAMP in regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics through protein phosphorylation and the evidence for soluble adenylyl cyclase as the source of cAMP inside mitochondria. PMID:23636265

  4. Building the evidence base for chronic disease self-management support interventions across Canada.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Sharon; Liddy, Clare; Mill, Karina; Irving, Hannah

    2012-11-06

    The objective of this project was to determine how to improve evaluation of self-management support (SMS) in Canada to generate high-quality evidence to guide policy-makers, implementers, providers and participants. This project used a multi-method approach, including a scoping and a focused literature review, an internet scan, interviews with key stakeholders, a review of existing theoretical evaluation frameworks and a consensus meeting with experts. Four themes were identified through the collection and analysis of data: 1) diverse SMS interventions are identifiable; 2) emerging evaluation activity in Canada is limited to mostly disease-specific, clinic-based programs; 3) there is little evaluation capacity among program implementers in Canada; and 4) there is a gap between the evidence and expectations. Policy-makers, community organizations and health care teams, regional health authorities and, most importantly, people living with chronic conditions, need better evidence about how to support self-management in their communities. Measuring outcomes must be an explicit part of program implementation and development and requires coordinated support. A common evaluation framework may provide researchers, practitioners and decision- or policy-makers with a systems approach to understanding the possible structural and process factors that can affect self-management outcomes, and could support capacity building in evaluation.

  5. Transitioning Traditions: Rectifying an Ontario Camp's Indian Council Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes, Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Council Ring has always been a very special event, remembered fondly by generations of campers. Taylor Statten Camps (TSC) are not the only camps to cherish such an activity. Across Canada there are dozens of camps that have supported "Indian" assemblies in the past, but a select few still do. Most organizations abandoned them during the…

  6. Astro Camp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Children who attend NASA's summer Astro Camp at Stennis Space Center enjoy a week of fun-filled activities. Campers learn what it feels like to be a couple of inches taller in space and treck through an astronaut obstacle course. They also have the opportunity to build their own model rockets, which are then launched on the last day of each camp. Campers also travel on field trips to places such as the Challenger Learning Center at the Louisiana Arts and Science Center in Baton Rouge. Four weeks of Astro Camp are held each year during the summer-two camps for 8- to 10-year-olds and two for 11- to 13-year olds.

  7. Astro Camp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Children who attend NASA's summer Astro Camp at Stennis Space Center enjoy a week of fun-filled activities. Campers learn what it is like to be a couple of inches taller in space and go through an astronaut obstacle course. They also learn how to build their own model rockets, which are launched on the last day of each camp. Campers also attend field trips to places such as the Challenger Learning Center at the Louisiana Arts and Science Center in Baton Rouge. Four weeks of Astro Camp are held during the summer each year-two camps for 8- to 10-year-olds and two for 11- to 13-year olds.

  8. Does socioeconomic status affect lengthy wait time in Canada? Evidence from Canadian Community Health Surveys.

    PubMed

    Hajizadeh, Mohammad

    2017-04-07

    Reasonable access to health services without financial or other barriers is a primary objective of the Canadian health system. Notwithstanding such concern about accessibility of services, long waiting times for health services have been a prominent health policy issue in recent years. Using pooled data from four nationally representative Canadian Community Health Surveys (CCHSs, 2000/01, 2003, 2005 and 2010; n = 266,962) we examine socioeconomic inequality in lengthy wait time (LWT) to health care among adults (aged 18-65) in Canada. The relative and absolute concentration indices (RC and AC, respectively) are used to quantify income-related inequality in LWT in Canada and for its provinces. Additionally, we decompose the RC and AC indices to identify factors affecting income-related inequality in LWT. Our descriptive results show that, on average, 5% of Canadian adults experienced LWT to access health services in the past 12 months. While 3% of the residents of British Columbia and Saskatchewan reported LWT to access health care services, this figure was 7% in Quebec. Our findings also demonstrated that LWT was mainly concentrated among the poor in Canada [RC = -0.039; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.049 to -0.028 and AC = -0.067; CI -0.086 to -0.049]. The RC and AC suggested statistically significant pro-rich inequality of LWT in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and British Columbia. Decomposition analyses indicate that, besides income itself, health status (measured by a set of 15 chronic condition indicators), immigration status and geographical factors were the most important factors contributing to the concentration of LWT among the poor in Canada. These results provide some evidence that low-income individuals tend to have lengthier wait times for publicly-funded health care in Canada in comparison to their high-income counterparts. The observed negative gradient between income and long waiting time may be interpreted as

  9. Let's go to camp! An innovative pediatric practice placement.

    PubMed

    Schick Makaroff, Kara; Scobie, Robin; Williams, Cheryl; Kidd, Janeen

    2013-01-01

    Each year, children living with disabilities escape from their families for 1 week at camp armed with their sun block, sleeping bags and talent-show costumes. In British Columbia, Canada, Easter Seals Camps offer such adventures to over 800 children/teens with physical/mental disabilities, providing free, overnight camping with on-site nurses. Easter Seals Camps offer pediatric placements to nursing students to work with nurses in a multidisciplinary team. In this paper, we describe this partnership, explain the role of camp nurse, portray student learning opportunities and offer recommendations to pediatric nurses who may consider participating in similar innovative placements in pediatric camps.

  10. [Hemophilia camps.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Sierra, Julieta; Del Pilar Torres-Arreola, Laura; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Dueñas-González, María Teresa; Monteros-Rincón, Martha Patricia; Osorio-Guzmán, Maricela

    2013-01-01

    We reported the experience of hemophilia camps which was accomplished with patients from hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. The aim was to prepare the families and patients regarding the disease treatment, in order to promote the self sufficiency and to know the impact of the program on the course of the disease. Surveys were applied about treatment items and personal opinions were collected. The results of the national hemophilia camp were: group of 56 patients, average 14 years, 2 % women, 51 % severe hemophilia and 43 % had hemophilic brothers. Benefits: patients increased their knowledge about earlier bleeding identification and the self-infusion method; they became aware on their responsibility in self care, timely treatment and duties at home. Hemophilia camps with patients are an option for attitude change before disease complications. Social network creation and the increase in self-sufficiency are other benefits.

  11. Organized Camping's Honorable Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Wilma

    1990-01-01

    Profiles three twentieth-century outdoor camping leaders. Describes early camping programs as "experimental intentional communities" teaching personal and social empowerment. Portia Mansfield's Wyonegonic Camps emphasized cooperation and artistic freedom. Joshua Lieberman's Pioneer Youth Camp taught workers' children social…

  12. Organized Camping's Honorable Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Wilma

    1990-01-01

    Profiles three twentieth-century outdoor camping leaders. Describes early camping programs as "experimental intentional communities" teaching personal and social empowerment. Portia Mansfield's Wyonegonic Camps emphasized cooperation and artistic freedom. Joshua Lieberman's Pioneer Youth Camp taught workers' children social…

  13. Camp Minden

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Camp Minden is a Superfund Site located near the City of Minden, Louisiana. In October 2012, one of the storage bunkers exploded. In October 2014, the EPA signed a Settlement Agreement and selected a method to dispose of the remaining explosives.

  14. Teaching Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine in the US and Canada.

    PubMed

    Shurtz, Suzanne; Fajt, Virginia; Heyns, Erla P; Norton, Hannah F; Weingart, Sandra

    2016-07-14

    There is no comprehensive review of the extent to which evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) is taught in AVMA-accredited colleges of veterinary medicine in the US and Canada. We surveyed teaching faculty and librarians at these institutions to determine what EBVM skills are currently included in curricula, how they are taught, and to what extent librarians are involved in this process. Librarians appear to be an underused resource, as 59% of respondents did not use librarians/library resources in teaching EBVM. We discovered that there is no standard teaching methodology nor are there common learning activities for EBVM among our survey respondents, who represent 22 institutions. Respondents reported major barriers to inclusion such as a perceived shortage of time in an already-crowded course of study, and a lack of high-quality evidence and point-of-care tools. Suggestions for overcoming these barriers include collaborating with librarians and using new EBVM online teaching resources.

  15. Evidence of a possible turning point in solar UV-B over Canada, Europe and Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerefos, C. S.; Tourpali, K.; Eleftheratos, K.; Kazadzis, S.; Meleti, C.; Feister, U.; Koskela, T.; Heikkilä, A.

    2012-03-01

    This study examines the long-term variability of UV solar irradiances at 305 nm and 325 nm over selected sites in Canada, Europe and Japan. Site selection was restricted to the availability of the most complete UV spectroradiometric datasets during the period 1990-2011. The analysis includes the long-term variability of total ozone, aerosol optical depth and cloud fraction at the sites studied. The results, based on observations and modeling, suggest that over Canada, Europe and Japan the period under study can be divided into three sub-periods of scientific merit: the first period (1991-1994) is the period perturbed by the Pinatubo volcanic eruption, during which excess volcanic aerosol has enhanced the "conventional" amplification factor of UV-B at ground level by an additional factor that depends on solar elevation. The increase of the UV-B amplification factor is the result of enhanced scattering processes caused by the injection of huge amounts of volcanic aerosols during the perturbed period. The second period (1995-2006) is characterized by a 0.14% yr-1 increase in total ozone and an increasing trend in spectral irradiance by 0.94% yr-1 at 305 nm and 0.88% yr-1 at 325 nm. That paradox was caused by the significant decline of the aerosol optical depth by more than 1% yr-1 (the "brightening" effect) and the absence of any statistically significant trend in the cloud fraction. The third period (2007-2011) shows statistically significant evidence of a slowdown or even a turning point in the previously reported upward UV-B trends over Canada, Europe and Japan.

  16. Cultural immersion alters emotion perception: Neurophysiological evidence from Chinese immigrants to Canada.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pan; Rigoulot, Simon; Pell, Marc D

    2017-12-01

    To explore how cultural immersion modulates emotion processing, this study examined how Chinese immigrants to Canada process multisensory emotional expressions, which were compared to existing data from two groups, Chinese and North Americans. Stroop and Oddball paradigms were employed to examine different stages of emotion processing. The Stroop task presented face-voice pairs expressing congruent/incongruent emotions and participants actively judged the emotion of one modality while ignoring the other. A significant effect of cultural immersion was observed in the immigrants' behavioral performance, which showed greater interference from to-be-ignored faces, comparable with what was observed in North Americans. However, this effect was absent in their N400 data, which retained the same pattern as the Chinese. In the Oddball task, where immigrants passively viewed facial expressions with/without simultaneous vocal emotions, they exhibited a larger visual MMN for faces accompanied by voices, again mirroring patterns observed in Chinese. Correlation analyses indicated that the immigrants' living duration in Canada was associated with neural patterns (N400 and visual mismatch negativity) more closely resembling North Americans. Our data suggest that in multisensory emotion processing, adopting to a new culture first leads to behavioral accommodation followed by alterations in brain activities, providing new evidence on human's neurocognitive plasticity in communication.

  17. Marketing Your Day Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, George

    1997-01-01

    Marketing strategies for day camps include encouraging camp staff to get involved in organizations involving children, families, and communities; holding camp fairs; offering the use of camp facilities to outside groups; hosting sport leagues and local youth outings; planning community fairs; and otherwise involving the camp in the community. (LP)

  18. Public health systems under attack in Canada: Evidence on public health system performance challenges arbitrary reform.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Ak'ingabe; Perreault, Robert

    2016-10-20

    Public health is currently being weakened in several Canadian jurisdictions. Unprecedented and arbitrary cuts to the public health budget in Quebec in 2015 were a striking example of this. In order to support public health leaders and citizens in their capacity to advocate for evidence-informed public health reforms, we propose a knowledge synthesis of elements of public health systems that are significantly associated with improved performance. Research consistently and significantly associates four elements of public health systems with improved productivity: 1) increased financial resources, 2) increased staffing per capita, 3) population size between 50,000 and 500,000, and 4) specific evidence-based organizational and administrative features. Furthermore, increased financial resources and increased staffing per capita are significantly associated with improved population health outcomes. We contend that any effort at optimization of public health systems should at least be guided by these four evidence-informed factors. Canada already has existing capacity in carrying out public health systems and services research. Further advancement of our academic and professional expertise on public health systems will allow Canadian public health jurisdictions to be inspired by the best public health models and become stronger advocates for public health's resources, interventions and outcomes when they need to be celebrated or defended.

  19. An evaluation of evidence-based paediatric injury prevention policies across Canada.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Alison K; Brussoni, Mariana; Fuselli, Pamela; Middaugh-Bonney, Tara; Piedt, Shannon; Pike, Ian

    2015-07-25

    Policies to reduce injury among Canadians can be controversial and there is variability in the enactment of injury prevention laws across the country. In general, laws are most effective when they are based on good research evidence, supported by widespread public awareness and education, and maintained by consistent enforcement strategies. The purpose of this study was to document and compare key informants' perceptions of the quality, awareness, and enforcement of three evidence-based paediatric injury prevention policies (bicycle helmet legislation, child booster seat legislation, graduated driver licensing) among Canadian provinces and territories. We identified best practices related to each policy, then developed an online survey to ascertain the extent to which each jurisdiction's policy aligned with best practices, whether experts believed that the public was aware of the policy and whether it was enforced. The survey was distributed using a snowball sampling strategy to key informants across Canada. Thirty-eight key informants responded to the bicycle helmet survey, with 73 and 35 key informants for the booster seat and graduated driver licensing surveys, respectively. Respondent's perceptions of the policies varied substantially. Key informants indicated that residents are not always aware of legislation, and legislation is not consistently enforced. These results suggest that child health policy is not always guided by evidence. There was variation between evidence and the policies related to paediatric injury prevention among Canadian provinces and territories. Experts generally rate their policies more highly when they align with evidence and best practice. There is room for improvement and harmonization of injury prevention policies.

  20. A Review of e-Learning in Canada: A Rough Sketch of the Evidence, Gaps and Promising Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrami, Philip C.; Bernard, Robert M.; Wade, Anne; Schmid, Richard F.; Borokhovski, Eugene; Tamim, Rana; Surkes, Michael; Lowerison, Gretchen; Zhang, Dai; Nicolaidou, Iolie; Newman, Sherry; Wozney, Lori; Peretiatkowicz, Anna

    2006-01-01

    This review provides a rough sketch of the evidence, gaps and promising directions in e-learning from 2000 onwards, with a particular focus on Canada. The authors searched a wide range of sources and document types to ensure that we represented, comprehensively, the arguments surrounding e-learning. Overall, there were 2,042 entries in their…

  1. A Review of E-Learning in Canada: A Rough Sketch of the Evidence, Gaps and Promising Directions: A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanuka, Heather

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the "Review of E-Learning in Canada", conducted by Abrami and associates (which is referred to as "the team"), was to provide evidence and gaps on the topic of e-learning, and based on this data provide promising directions for e-learning. Funded by the Canadian Council on Learning, the stated objectives of the…

  2. Effects of Sunday sales restrictions on overall and day-specific alcohol consumption: evidence from Canada.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Christopher S; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of Sunday alcohol-sales policies on day-specific and overall alcohol consumption. Individual-level data on overall and day-specific alcohol consumption from Canada's National Population Health Surveys, 1994-1999, were linked to province-level policy variation in whether a Sunday sales restriction was present. We compared individuals in provinces with sales restrictions with those in provinces without such restrictions, and we estimated models of day-specific and overall alcohol consumption. We used a standard cross-section model as well as a quasi-experimental approach that relied on Ontario's liberalization of Sunday sales in 1997. Sunday sales were associated with a significant increase in drinking on Sundays of 7% to 15%. We found evidence of substitution away from drinking on Saturdays and no evidence for increases in overall drinking. Our results suggest that repealing Sunday sales prohibitions is unlikely to result in increased overall alcohol consumption, although such liberalization may change the within-week distribution.

  3. Is religiosity positively associated with school connectedness: evidence from high school students in Atlantic Canada?

    PubMed

    Azagba, Sunday; Asbridge, Mark; Langille, Donald B

    2014-12-01

    School connectedness (SC) is associated with decreased student risk behavior and better health and social outcomes. While a considerable body of research has examined the factors associated with SC, there is limited evidence about the particular role of religiosity in shaping levels of SC. Employing data reported by junior and senior high school students from Atlantic Canada, this study examines whether religiosity is positively associated with SC and whether such associations differ by gender. We tested the association between SC and religiosity using a random intercept multilevel logistic regression. The between-school variability in SC was first determined by our estimating a null or empty model; three different model specifications that included covariates were estimated: in Model 1 we adjusted for gender, age, academic performance, parental education, and living arrangement; in Model 2 for sensation seeking and subjective social status in addition to Model 1 variables; and in Model 3 we added substance use to the analysis. Our multilevel regression analyses showed that religiosity was protectively associated with lower SC across the three model specifications when both genders were examined together. In gender-stratified analyses we found similar protective associations of religiosity, with lower SC for both males and females in all three models. Given the overwhelming positive impact of SC on a range of health, social and school outcomes, it is important to understand the role of religiosity, among other factors, that may be modified to enhance student's connectedness to school.

  4. Astro Camp Plus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Stennis Space Center's new Astro Camp Plus camp kicked off June 19 for teens ages 13-15. The new camp delves more deeply into the science, math and technology concepts introduced in the center's popular Astro Camp series. Campers including Jasmyne White (left) and Dana Yingst, both of Slidell, La., learn how NASA uses 'podcasting' to broadcast video, and made their own podcasts.

  5. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  6. Astro Camp Plus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-19

    Stennis Space Center's new Astro Camp Plus camp kicked off June 19 for teens ages 13-15. The new camp delves more deeply into the science, math and technology concepts introduced in the center's popular Astro Camp series. Campers including Jasmyne White (left) and Dana Yingst, both of Slidell, La., learn how NASA uses 'podcasting' to broadcast video, and made their own podcasts.

  7. Camp through the Decades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicodemus, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    Camp pioneers relate how camping has grown to become more diverse, environmentally aware, safe, and conscious of its responsibility to promote healthy development of children. Changing trends in clothing, transportation, and food preparation at camp are described. The joys, discoveries, and teachable moments that camp offers children have endured.…

  8. Astro Camp Plus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Stennis Space Center's new Astro Camp Plus camp kicked off June 19 for teens ages 13-15. The new camp delves more deeply into the science, math and technology concepts introduced in the center's popular Astro Camp series. Campers including Jasmyne White (left) and Dana Yingst, both of Slidell, La., learn how NASA uses 'podcasting' to broadcast video, and made their own podcasts.

  9. The Tectonic Evolution of SE Canada: Seismic Evidence from the QM-III Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastow, I. D.; Boyce, A.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Levin, V. L.; Menke, W. H.; Ellwood, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the geological record can be interpreted in the context of processes operating today at plate boundaries. This works well to explain processes and products during the Phanerozoic era; during Precambrian times when the oldest rocks were forming, however, conditions on the younger, hotter, more ductile Earth were likely very different, making analogies with modern day tectonics less certain. Gathering evidence preserved deep within the plates in the shields is thus essential to improve our understanding of the early Earth. Shields are usually underlain by thick, seismically fast roots that are absent beneath younger portions of Earth's surface. The thermochemically distinct nature of cratonic roots is often associated with Archean processes such as the extraction of komatiitic magmas. However, the cratonic core of North America does not fit easily into this Archean formation paradigm: part of the Canadian shield extends beneath the Archean Superior craton, but much of it persists beneath younger Proterozoic crust as well. We present here a relative arrival-time tomographic study of mantle seismic structure using data from a new seismograph network operating in SE Canada. Our stations extend from the Archean Superior craton around the southern tip of Hudson Bay, through Proterozoic Grenville terranes, and into Paleozoic coastal Maine and Nova Scotia. Tomographic images display three broad zones of mantle wavespeed: slow in the Appalachian terranes; fast in the Grenville Province; very fast within the Superior craton. Archean lithosphere has been modified by the Great Meteor hotspot, but we find no evidence for major plate-scale underthrusting during the Grenville orogeny. The abrupt wavespeed transition from Archean to Proterozoic mantle is thus consistent with the emerging consensus that keels form in two stages: a chemically depleted layer in Archean times followed by the thermal development of a less-depleted lithosphere during Proterozoic times.

  10. Molecular cloning of rat homologues of the Drosophila melanogaster dunce cAMP phosphodiesterase: evidence for a family of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Swinnen, J V; Joseph, D R; Conti, M

    1989-01-01

    To study the structure and function of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) involved in mammalian gametogenesis, a rat testis cDNA library was screened at low stringency with a cDNA clone coding for the Drosophila melanogaster dunce-encoded PDE as a probe. This screening resulted in the isolation of two groups of cDNA clones, differing in their nucleotide sequences (ratPDE1 and ratPDE2). In the rat testis, RNA transcripts corresponding to both groups of clones were expressed predominantly in germ cells. Additional screenings of a Sertoli cell cDNA library with a ratPDE2 clone as a probe led to the isolation of two more groups of clones (rat-PDE3 and ratPDE4). Unlike ratPDE1 and ratPDE2, these clones hybridized to transcripts present predominantly in the Sertoli cell. In the middle of the coding region, all four groups of clones were homologous to each other. The deduced amino acid sequences of part of this region were also homologous to the D. melanogaster dunce PDE and to PDEs from bovine and yeast. These data indicate that a family of genes homologous to the D. melanogaster dunce-encoded PDE is present in the rat and that these genes are differentially expressed in somatic and germ cells of the seminiferous tubule. These findings provide a molecular basis for the observed heterogeneity of cAMP PDEs. Images PMID:2546153

  11. Evidence for CB2 receptor involvement in LPS-induced reduction of cAMP intracellular levels in uterine explants from pregnant mice: pathophysiological implications.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Ana Inés; Carozzo, Alejandro; Correa, Fernando; Davio, Carlos; Franchi, Ana María

    2017-07-01

    What is the role of the endocannabinoid system (eCS) on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) effects on uterine explants from 7-day pregnant mice in a murine model of endotoxin-induced miscarriage? We found evidence for cannabinoid receptor type2 (CB2) involvement in LPS-induced increased prostaglandin-F2α (PGF2α) synthesis and diminished cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) intracellular content in uterine explants from early pregnant mice. Genital tract infections by Gram-negative bacteria are a common complication of human pregnancy that results in an increased risk of pregnancy loss. LPS, the main component of the Gram-negative bacterial wall, elicits a strong maternal inflammatory response that results in embryotoxicity and embryo resorption in a murine model endotoxin-induced early pregnancy loss. We have previously shown that the eCS mediates the embryotoxic effects of LPS, mainly via CB1 receptor activation. An in vitro study of mice uterine explants was performed to investigate the eCS in mediating the effects of LPS on PGF2α production and cAMP intracellular content. Eight to 12-week-old virgin female BALB/c or CD1 (wild-type [WT] or CB1-knockout [CB1-KO]) mice were paired with 8- to 12-week-old BALB/c or CD1 (WT or CB1-KO) males, respectively. On day 7 of pregnancy, BALB/c, CD1 WT or CD1 CB1-KO mice were euthanized, the uteri were excised, implantation sites were removed and the uterine tissues were separated from decidual and embryo tissues. Uterine explants were cultured and exposed for an appropriate amount of time to different pharmacological treatments. The tissues were then collected for cAMP assay and PGF2α content determination by radioimmunoassay. In vitro treatment of uteri explants from 7-day pregnant BALB/c or CD1 (WT or CB1-KO) mice with LPS induced an increased production of PGF2α (P < 0.05) and a reduction of the tissue content of cAMP (P < 0.05). These effects were mediated by CB2 receptors since exposure to AM630 (a specific CB2 receptor

  12. Immigrant employment and earnings growth in Canada and the USA: evidence from longitudinal data

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Neeraj; Lu, Yao; Denier, Nicole; Wang, Julia Shu-Huah; Trejo, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the short-term trajectories of employment, hours worked, and real wages of immigrants in Canada and the U.S. using nationally representative longitudinal datasets covering 1996–2008. Models with person fixed effects show that on average immigrant men in Canada do not experience any relative growth in these three outcomes compared to men born in Canada. Immigrant men in the U.S., on the other hand, experience positive annual growth in all three domains relative to U.S. born men. This difference is largely on account of low-educated immigrant men, who experience faster or longer periods of relative growth in employment and wages in the U.S. than in Canada. We further compare longitudinal and cross-sectional trajectories and find that the latter over-estimate wage growth of earlier arrivals, presumably reflecting selective return migration. PMID:28138209

  13. Evidence-based guidelines for universal counselling and offering of HIV testing in pregnancy in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Samson, L; King, S

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide Canadian health care workers with evidence-based guidelines for universal counselling about HIV testing and the offering of such testing to all pregnant women. OPTIONS: Universal counselling and offering of HIV testing to all pregnant women versus targeted testing of only pregnant women at high risk for HIV infection. Antiretroviral treatment protocols for HIV-positive mothers and their infants are discussed as the intervention to reduce mother-to-child transmission rates. OUTCOMES: Main outcomes are mother-to-child HIV transmission rates and consequences of HIV testing on the mother and infant. EVIDENCE: Articles published from January 1985 to March 1997 identified through a MEDLINE search; articles published in pertinent medical journals in 1996 and 1997 identified through a manual search; and abstracts presented at international HIV/AIDS conferences. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Early diagnosis of HIV infection in a pregnant woman optimizes her medical and psychosocial care, decreases the incidence of mother-to-child transmission and decreases the risk of horizontal transmission to sexual partners. New, third-generation HIV tests have reduced false-positive rates and thus diminished the harm of screening. RECOMMENDATIONS: A screening strategy consisting of universal counselling and offering of HIV testing is recommended for all pregnant women in Canada (grade B recommendation). Targeted testing of only pregnant women at high risk for HIV infection fails to identify a substantial proportion of HIV-positive pregnant women and is therefore not recommended (grade D recommendation). Women who identify themselves as being at high risk and whose initial HIV test result is negative should be counselled about the reduction of high-risk behaviours and retested in 6 months (grade B recommendation). Treatment of seropositive women and infants with zidovudine to prevent mother-to-child transmission is recommended (grade A or B recommendation depending on

  14. Hospital expenditure as a major driver of nurse labour force participation: evidence from a 10-year period in Canada.

    PubMed

    Vujicic, Marko; Onate, Kanecy; Laporte, Audrey; Deber, Raisa

    2011-05-01

    This paper examines trends in the nursing labour market in Canada over a period of dramatic fluctuations in hospital expenditures. We add to previous analysis that covered the period 1991-1996 and use Census data from 2001 to examine the relationship between hospital expenditure and nurse labour force participation. We find that shifts in labour force participation over the period 1991-2001 had a significant impact on the nursing supply in Canada. Individuals who were trained in nursing but were working outside the profession in 1996 because of budgetary reductions and layoffs in hospitals had largely been reabsorbed back into nursing jobs by 2001. Our analysis provides further empirical evidence that the labour force participation among individuals trained in nursing is driven to a large extent by demand-side factors.

  15. Beyond the 'iron lungs of gerontology': using evidence to shape the future of nursing homes in Canada.

    PubMed

    Hirdes, John P; Mitchell, Lori; Maxwell, Colleen J; White, Nancy

    2011-09-01

    Institutionalization of the Elderly in Canada suggested that efforts to address the underlying causes of age-related declines in health might negate the need for nursing homes. However, the prevalence of chronic disease has increased, and conditions like dementia mean that nursing homes are likely to remain important features of the Canadian health care system. A fundamental problem limiting the ability to understand how nursing homes may change to better meet the needs of an aging population was the lack of person-level clinical information. The introduction of interRAI assessment instruments to most Canadian provinces/territories and the establishment of the national Continuing Care Reporting System represent important steps in our capacity to understand nursing home care in Canada. Evidence from eight provinces and territories shows that the needs of persons in long-term care are highly complex, resource allocations do not always correspond to needs, and quality varies substantially between and within provinces.

  16. Michelle: Growing Through Camping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellet, Annette M.

    1977-01-01

    A mother, whose physically handicapped 7-year-old daughter has prosthetic feet, describes how her child adjusted well first to a summer day camp and then to a week long camping program run by the Girl Scouts. (GW)

  17. Michelle: Growing Through Camping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellet, Annette M.

    1977-01-01

    A mother, whose physically handicapped 7-year-old daughter has prosthetic feet, describes how her child adjusted well first to a summer day camp and then to a week long camping program run by the Girl Scouts. (GW)

  18. A Summer Camp Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratte, Janice L.; DiNardi, Salvatore R.

    1979-01-01

    Reported are the results of a project assessing the impact of a revised Massachusetts sanitary code on 500 summer camps for children. The study compared camp compliances with the proposed regulations to the level of compliance with existing regulations. (BT)

  19. Education and Entrepreneurship in Canada: Evidence from (Repeated) Cross-Sectional Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masakure, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This paper estimates the causal effect of education on entrepreneurship choice in Canada taking into account the endogeneity of education. The data come from the General and Social Surveys (2000-2009). We consider the effect of two extreme education levels: university and some/no education. Regressions are based on fixed effects with two-stage…

  20. Does "Compulsory Volunteering" Affect Subsequent Behavior? Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    This paper estimates the impact of "compulsory volunteerism" for adolescents on subsequent volunteer behavior exploiting the introduction of a mandatory community service program for high school (HS) students in Ontario, Canada. We use difference-in-differences approach with a large longitudinal dataset. Our estimates show that the…

  1. Education and Entrepreneurship in Canada: Evidence from (Repeated) Cross-Sectional Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masakure, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This paper estimates the causal effect of education on entrepreneurship choice in Canada taking into account the endogeneity of education. The data come from the General and Social Surveys (2000-2009). We consider the effect of two extreme education levels: university and some/no education. Regressions are based on fixed effects with two-stage…

  2. Camp is a Celebration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Farmers Union, Jamestown. Dept. of Youth Activities.

    A camping workbook provides materials for use in discussion of 3 important aspects of farm living: rural power, communication, and conservation. It is intended that this material be used in class sessions held during a junior youth camp. A sample of the youth camp schedule reveals 3 forty-five minute time periods during the day designated as class…

  3. Creating healthy camp experiences.

    PubMed

    Walton, Edward A; Tothy, Alison S

    2011-04-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics has created recommendations for health appraisal and preparation of young people before participation in day or resident camps and to guide health and safety practices for children at camp. These recommendations are intended for parents, primary health care providers, and camp administration and health center staff. Although camps have diverse environments, there are general guidelines that apply to all situations and specific recommendations that are appropriate under special conditions. This policy statement has been reviewed and is supported by the American Camp Association.

  4. Do provincial drug benefit initiatives create an effective policy lab? The evidence from Canada.

    PubMed

    Pomey, Marie-Pascale; Morgan, Steve; Church, John; Forest, Pierre-Gerlier; Lavis, John N; McIntosh, Tom; Smith, Neale; Petrela, Jennifer; Martin, Elisabeth; Dobson, Sarah

    2010-10-01

    Although the costs of doctors' visits and hospital stays in Canada are covered by national public health insurance, the cost of outpatient prescription drugs is not. To solve problems of access, Canadian provinces have introduced provincial prescription drug benefit programs. This study analyzes the prescription drug policymaking process in five Canadian provinces between 1992 and 2004 with a view to (1) determining the federal government's role in the area of prescription drugs; (2) describing the policymaking process; (3) identifying factors in each province's choice of a policy; (4) identifying patterns in those factors across the five provinces; and (5) assessing the federal government's influence on the policies chosen. Analysis shows that despite significant differences in policy choices, the ideological motivations of the provinces were unexpectedly similar. The findings also highlight the importance of institutional factors, for example, in provinces' decision to compete rather than to collaborate. We conclude that, to date, Canada's federalism laboratory has only partly benefited the Canadian public. Cost pressures may, however, eventually overcome barriers to cooperation between the provincial and the federal governments, enabling them to capitalize on Canada's federal structure to improve the accessibility and affordability of drugs.

  5. Probiotic products in Canada with clinical evidence: What can gastroenterologists recommend?

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Gregor; Anukam, Kingsley; Koyama, Tara

    2008-01-01

    Probiotics, defined as ‘live microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host’, are finally becoming an option for gastroenterologists in Canada, after being available for many years in Japan, Europe and the United States of America. Unfortunately, Health Canada and the US Food and Drug Administration have not controlled the use of the term ‘probiotic’ or put into place United Nations and World Health Organization guidelines. The net result is that a host of products called ‘probiotics’ are available but are not truly probiotic. The aim of the present review was to discuss the rationale for probiotics in gastroenterology, and specifically examine which products are options for physicians in Canada, and which ones patients might be using. It is hoped that by clarifying what probiotics are, and the strengths and limitations of their use, specialists will be better placed to make recommendations on the role of these products in patient care. In due course, more clinically documented probiotics will emerge, some with therapeutic effects based on a better understanding of disease processes. PMID:18299736

  6. A Call For Evidence-Based Medical Treatment Of Opioid Dependence In The United States And Canada

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of experience treating heroin or prescription opioid dependence with methadone or buprenorphine— two forms of opioid substitution therapy—gaps remain between current practices and evidence-based standards in both Canada and the United States. This is largely because of regulatory constraints and pervasive suboptimal clinical practices. Less than 10 percent of all people dependent on opioids in the United States are receiving substitution treatment, although the proportion may increase with expanded health insurance coverage as a result of the Affordable Care Act. In light of the accumulated evidence, we recommend eliminating restrictions on office-based methadone prescribing in the United States; reducing financial barriers to treatment, such as varying levels of copayment in Canada and the United States; reducing reliance on less effective and potentially unsafe opioid detoxification; and evaluating and creating mechanisms to integrate emerging treatments. Taking these steps can greatly reduce the consequent harms of opioid dependence by maximizing the individual and public health benefits of treatment. PMID:23918492

  7. Lesbian camp: An unearthing.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Elly-Jean

    2016-01-01

    Camp-a sensibility, a style, and a form of artistic self-expression-is an elusive concept said to be in the eye of the beholder. To refute Susan Sontag's ( 1966 ) claims that camp is apolitical and not especially homosexual, a number of recent scholarly works have been geared toward revealing camp's fundamental gayness. With the odd footnote aside, lesbian camp has been collapsed into the category of gay male camp, if not eclipsed entirely. Despite the negligible efforts made to legitimize lesbian camp, there are numerous salient cultural examples one might draw on to illustrate, typify, and substantiate a lesbian camp sensibility. I lay the ground work for this scholarly exercise by outlining various definitions and critiques of camp, and by discussing its history and application to queer theory. Then, to unveil lesbian camp, three non-mutually exclusive categories are discussed: classic, erotic, and radical. By gathering various strands of inquiry, and various textual examples (e.g., photography, artistic performances, and literary tropes), this article attempts to reach a more inclusive and nuanced understanding of lesbian camp.

  8. Adapting and retesting evidence-based child maltreatment prevention programs: a case study in Canada.

    PubMed

    Mikton, C

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention in Canada is timely, as child maltreatment is a significant public health problem; globally, the number affected is at least in the hundreds of millions. One-quarter of adults report having been physically abused and over one-third emotionally abused as children; one in 5 women and one in 13 men report having been sexually abused. Recent national surveys of violence against children conducted in Africa and in other low- and middle-income countries reveal rates of childhood physical, sexual and emotional abuse even higher than the global rates.

  9. Alternative Level of Care: Canada's Hospital Beds, the Evidence and Options

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jason M.; Crump, R. Trafford

    2013-01-01

    Patients designated as alternative level of care (ALC) are an ongoing concern for healthcare policy makers across Canada. These patients occupy valuable hospital beds and limit access to acute care services. The objective of this paper is to present policy alternatives to address underlying factors associated with ALC bed use. Three alternatives, and their respective limitations and structural challenges, are discussed. Potential solutions may require a mix of policy options proposed here. Inadequate policy jeopardizes new acute care activity-based funding schemes in British Columbia and Ontario. Failure to address this issue could exacerbate pressures on the existing bottlenecks in the community care system in these and other provinces. PMID:23968671

  10. Developing Social Skills of Summer Campers with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Case Study of Camps on TRACKS Implementation in an Inclusive Day-Camp Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maich, Kimberly; Hall, Carmen L.; van Rhijn, Tricia Marie; Quinlan, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    This research provides preliminary results of an exploratory case study conducted of the Camps on TRACKS program in an inclusive, municipal day-camp program in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Positive changes are demonstrated in the social skills of nine day campers with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who participated in the program. In this…

  11. Developing Social Skills of Summer Campers with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Case Study of Camps on TRACKS Implementation in an Inclusive Day-Camp Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maich, Kimberly; Hall, Carmen L.; van Rhijn, Tricia Marie; Quinlan, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    This research provides preliminary results of an exploratory case study conducted of the Camps on TRACKS program in an inclusive, municipal day-camp program in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Positive changes are demonstrated in the social skills of nine day campers with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who participated in the program. In this…

  12. Keesler Astro Camp

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-29

    Young people prepare model rockets during an Astro Camp activity at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi. Stennis hosted the camp June 28 - July 1 in support of the White House Military Families Initiative. The camp also marked the beginning of a partnership between Stennis and Keesler to provide NASA education experiences to military children and to train children and youth care-providers. It is hoped that this activity can be expanded to other military bases next summer.

  13. 1978 national camping market survey

    Treesearch

    Wilbur F. LaPage; Gerald L. Cole

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes the major findings of a 1978 nationwide camping market survey, and compares them with those of similar surveys conducted in 1971 and 1973. It documents recent trends in camping and in the composition of the camping market, and compares camping demand with the available supply of developed campsites. The active camping market in 1978 included 17.5...

  14. Fish consumption by children in Canada: Review of evidence, challenges and future goals.

    PubMed

    Wine, Osnat; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro R; Buka, Irena S

    2012-05-01

    Fish consumption is of great importance to children's health and is essential for neurodevelopment, which begins in pregnancy and continues throughout early childhood and into adolescence. However, fish consumption presents conflicting health outcomes associated with its nutritional benefits and its adverse contaminant risks, because both avoiding fish as well as the consumption of contaminated fish can potentially harm children. This may be challenging to communicate. The present review was performed to assess the current knowledge and recommendations around 'smart' fish-consumption decisions. Health Canada advises, as well as other advisories and guides, that fish should be consumed for its health benefits, while also informing consumers, especially women and children, to limit certain fish consumption. The current literature must attempt to handle the challenges inherent in communicating the dilemmas of children's fish consumption. Incorporation of new knowledge translation strategies are proposed as a means to raise the level of knowledge about optimal fish consumption practices.

  15. Summer camps for children with burn injuries: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Gary R; Lobato, Debra

    2010-01-01

    The first summer camps for children with burn injuries started over 25 years ago, and as of 2008, there were 60 camps worldwide. This review examines the literature on summer pediatric burn camps. The authors describe common characteristics of burn camp structure, activities, and staffing and then examine the scientific evidence regarding the effect of burn camp programs on campers and camp staff volunteers. A search of Pubmed and Psychinfo databases from 1970 to 2008 for articles related to pediatric burn summer camps identified 17 articles, of which 13 fit the inclusion criteria. Existing literature consists primarily of qualitative studies, suggesting that burn camp can decrease camper isolation, improve self-esteem, and promote coping and social skills. Studies examining volunteer staff at burn camp have consistently found that there are both personal and professional benefits. Quantitative studies of self-esteem have yielded equivocal results. No studies have examined safety or the effect of burn camp on medical or rehabilitation outcomes. For the past 25 years, pediatric summer camps for children with burn injuries have played an important rehabilitation role and provided a strong community that benefits both campers and staff. Future research using more rigorous research methods and examining a broader range of outcomes (eg, safety and medical/rehabilitation outcomes) is recommended.

  16. Internationalize Your Camp Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier, Linda J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides a rationale for using international applicants for American summer camp positions and summarizes the services of organizations that screen, interview, and orient qualified applicants. Discusses contributions that international staff can make to a camp program with a global perspective and points out staff orientation and other practical…

  17. Camp's "Disneyland" Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renville, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the positive mental, physical, and social growth impacts that the camping experience had on the author, and urges camp program evaluation to plan and implement such changes. Sidebar lists steps of effective evaluation: program goals and objectives, goals of evaluation, implementation of evaluation, data analysis, and findings and…

  18. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  19. Marketing for Camp Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Alicia

    1998-01-01

    To effectively market a camp, current trends and issues must be considered: specialty programming, the Americans With Disabilities Act, competing recreational programs, changes in the school year, programming for seniors, and accountability. Camps should have a marketing strategy that includes public relations, a marketing plan, a pricing…

  20. Physical Fitness at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Thomas B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes decline in youth fitness, emphasizing role of camping programs in youth fitness education. Describes Michigan camp's fitness program, consisting of daily workouts, fitness education, and record keeping. Describes fitness consultants' role in program. Discusses program's highlights and problems, suggesting changes for future use. Shows…

  1. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  2. Maximizing Camp Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Provides selected 14-item outdoor-environmental education bibliography and 20-item checklist of factors weekend/summer camp directors should consider when pondering entry into the outdoor education market. Covers issues of camp philosophy, staff, facilities additions/alterations, equipment, food service, competition, environmental impact,…

  3. Camp Joy: Embracing Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krehbiel, Amy

    2001-01-01

    Camp Joy (Ohio) offers a racially integrated program to disadvantaged inner-city foster children. To attract quality minority staff, the camp recruits through former campers, word of mouth, a leader-in-training program, job and internship fairs, and networking with nearby colleges and social agencies. Staff training and the intrinsic rewards of…

  4. Today's Child - Tomorrow's Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditter, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Are camps solely in the business of providing fun, or are they facilitators of crucial life skills? A social worker explores the fun versus character-building debate, concluding that though camp is not group therapy, it contributes to overall personal growth and to the social and emotional development of all children. (JMM)

  5. Orienteering in Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Elston F.

    One of the recent developments in camping is "orienteering", a program using a map and compass. Orienteering can be dovetailed into an overall camping program and used to "point up" the entire program, or it can be confined to a single simple game. The arrangement depends on the situation. The minimum age of the participants should be about 9 or…

  6. Camp Joy: Embracing Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krehbiel, Amy

    2001-01-01

    Camp Joy (Ohio) offers a racially integrated program to disadvantaged inner-city foster children. To attract quality minority staff, the camp recruits through former campers, word of mouth, a leader-in-training program, job and internship fairs, and networking with nearby colleges and social agencies. Staff training and the intrinsic rewards of…

  7. Friends' Discovery Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Seth

    2008-01-01

    This article features Friends' Discovery Camp, a program that allows children with and without autism spectrum disorder to learn and play together. In Friends' Discovery Camp, campers take part in sensory-rich experiences, ranging from hands-on activities and performing arts to science experiments and stories teaching social skills. Now in its 7th…

  8. Camp's "Disneyland" Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renville, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the positive mental, physical, and social growth impacts that the camping experience had on the author, and urges camp program evaluation to plan and implement such changes. Sidebar lists steps of effective evaluation: program goals and objectives, goals of evaluation, implementation of evaluation, data analysis, and findings and…

  9. Building Communities through Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubendall, Robert L.

    Summer camp is a type of laboratory for community living. Society's needs have changed from providing a positive summer challenge for idle youth to experimenting with the demands and rewards of working in community groups. Decentralized camping emphasizes the team decision-making approach to teach self-reliance and awareness of democratic…

  10. Maximizing Camp Property.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Provides selected 14-item outdoor-environmental education bibliography and 20-item checklist of factors weekend/summer camp directors should consider when pondering entry into the outdoor education market. Covers issues of camp philosophy, staff, facilities additions/alterations, equipment, food service, competition, environmental impact,…

  11. Impact of Therapeutic Camping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shniderman, Craig M.

    1974-01-01

    There has been little interest in, and only slight illumination of, the impact of therapeutic camping for emotionally disturbed children. This study seeks to validate the belief that camping is therapeutic. Subjects were 52 boys, 5 to 11 1/2 years of age. Results support the hypothesis. (Author/HMV)

  12. The Easter Seal Directory of Resident Camps for Persons with Special Health Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Chicago, IL.

    The directory describes approximately 260 resident camps in 44 states and Canada for children and adults with physical, mental, social, and/or emotional handicaps which have been compiled by the National Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults. Organized alphabetically by state, each camp listing includes information on impairments…

  13. Medical dominance and neoliberalisation in maternal care provision: The evidence from Canada and Australia

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Cecilia; Zadoroznyj, Maria; Hallgrimsdottir, Helga; Treloar, Adrienne; Taylor, Kara

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1970s, governments in many high-income countries have implemented a series of reforms in their health care systems to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Many of these reforms have been of a market-oriented character, involving the deregulation of key services, the creation of competitive markets, and the privatization of health and social care. Some scholars have argued that these “neoliberal” reforms have unseated the historical structural embeddedness of medicine, and in some cases even resulted in the proletarianisation of physicians. Other scholars have challenged this view, maintaining that medical hegemony continues to shape health care provision in most high-income countries. In this paper we examine how policy reforms may have altered medical dominance over maternity care in two comparatively similar countries – Canada and Australia. Our findings indicate that neoliberal reforms in these two countries have not substantially changed the historically hegemonic role medicine has played in maternity care provision. We discuss the implications of this outcome for the increased medicalisation of human reproduction. PMID:20570030

  14. Learning Through New Approaches to Forest Governance: Evidence from Harrop-Procter Community Forest, Canada.

    PubMed

    Egunyu, Felicitas; Reed, Maureen G; Sinclair, John A

    2016-04-01

    Collaborative forest governance arrangements have been viewed as promising for sustainable forestry because they allow local communities to participate directly in management and benefit from resource use or protection. Such arrangements are strengthened through social learning during management activities that can enhance capacity to solve complex problems. Despite significant research on social learning in collaborative environmental governance, it is not clear how social learning evolves over time, who influences social learning, and whether learning influences management effectiveness. This study investigates how social learning outcomes change over time, using an in-depth study of a community forest in Canada. Personal interviews, focus group meetings, and participant observation revealed that most participants started engaging in community forestry with limited knowledge and learned as they participated in management activities. However, as the community forest organization became effective at complying with forestry legislation, learning opportunities and outcomes became more restricted. Our results run contrary to the prevalent view that opportunities for and outcomes of social learning become enlarged over time. In our case, learning how to meet governmental requirements increased professionalism and reduced opportunities for involvement and learning to a smaller group. Our findings suggest the need to further test propositions about social learning and collaborative governance, particularly to determine how relationships evolve over time.

  15. Learning Through New Approaches to Forest Governance: Evidence from Harrop-Procter Community Forest, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egunyu, Felicitas; Reed, Maureen G.; Sinclair, John A.

    2016-04-01

    Collaborative forest governance arrangements have been viewed as promising for sustainable forestry because they allow local communities to participate directly in management and benefit from resource use or protection. Such arrangements are strengthened through social learning during management activities that can enhance capacity to solve complex problems. Despite significant research on social learning in collaborative environmental governance, it is not clear how social learning evolves over time, who influences social learning, and whether learning influences management effectiveness. This study investigates how social learning outcomes change over time, using an in-depth study of a community forest in Canada. Personal interviews, focus group meetings, and participant observation revealed that most participants started engaging in community forestry with limited knowledge and learned as they participated in management activities. However, as the community forest organization became effective at complying with forestry legislation, learning opportunities and outcomes became more restricted. Our results run contrary to the prevalent view that opportunities for and outcomes of social learning become enlarged over time. In our case, learning how to meet governmental requirements increased professionalism and reduced opportunities for involvement and learning to a smaller group. Our findings suggest the need to further test propositions about social learning and collaborative governance, particularly to determine how relationships evolve over time.

  16. Is Accessing Dental Care Becoming More Difficult? Evidence from Canada's Middle-Income Population

    PubMed Central

    Ramraj, Chantel; Sadeghi, Laleh; Lawrence, Herenia P.; Dempster, Laura; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore trends in access to dental care among middle-income Canadians. Methods A secondary data analysis of six Canadian surveys that collected information on dental insurance coverage, cost-barriers to dental care, and out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care was conducted for select years from 1978 to 2009. Descriptive analyses were used to outline and compare trends among middle-income Canadians with other levels of income as well as national averages. Results By 2009, middle-income Canadians had the lowest levels of dental insurance coverage (48.7%) compared to all other income groups. They reported the greatest increase in cost-barriers to dental care, from 12.6% in 1996 to 34.1% by 2009. Middle-income Canadians had the largest rise in out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care since 1978. Conclusions This study suggests that affordability issues in accessing dental care are no longer just a problem for the lowest income groups in Canada, but are now impacting middle-income earners as a consequence of their lack of, or decreased access to, comprehensive dental insurance. PMID:23437378

  17. Evidence for large-scale effects of competition: niche displacement in Canada lynx and bobcat.

    PubMed

    Peers, Michael J L; Thornton, Daniel H; Murray, Dennis L

    2013-12-22

    Determining the patterns, causes and consequences of character displacement is central to our understanding of competition in ecological communities. However, the majority of competition research has occurred over small spatial extents or focused on fine-scale differences in morphology or behaviour. The effects of competition on broad-scale distribution and niche characteristics of species remain poorly understood but critically important. Using range-wide species distribution models, we evaluated whether Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) or bobcat (Lynx rufus) were displaced in regions of sympatry. Consistent with our prediction, we found that lynx niches were less similar to those of bobcat in areas of sympatry versus allopatry, with a stronger reliance on snow cover driving lynx niche divergence in the sympatric zone. By contrast, bobcat increased niche breadth in zones of sympatry, and bobcat niches were equally similar to those of lynx in zones of sympatry and allopatry. These findings suggest that competitively disadvantaged species avoid competition at large scales by restricting their niche to highly suitable conditions, while superior competitors expand the diversity of environments used. Our results indicate that competition can manifest within climatic niche space across species' ranges, highlighting the importance of biotic interactions occurring at large spatial scales on niche dynamics.

  18. Source field effects in the auroral zone: Evidence from the Slave craton (NW Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezaeta, Pamela; Chave, Alan; Jones, Alan G.; Evans, Rob

    2007-09-01

    We present an investigation of source field effects on the magnetic fields from multiple long period magnetotelluric (MT) data collected on the floors of lakes throughout the Slave craton (NW Canada) from 1998 to 2000. Monthly and daily power spectra of the magnetic fields suggest a dynamic and seasonally varying source, with atypical geomagnetic activity in year 2000. Bounded influence MT and GDS responses were obtained for periods ranging between 80 and 25,000 s over selected monthly time segments. The responses at periods over 4000 s vary, suggesting source field effects. A frequency domain principal component (PC) method was applied to the array to investigate the spatial form of the source field variations. The PC analysis was tested with synthetic data from a regional 3D model with a uniform external source to study the sensitivity of the eigenvectors to conductivity structure, demonstrating a negligible influence with increasing penetration depth. We conclude that magnetic fields at periods near one half day are subject to a 1D polarized source of relatively homogeneous morphology over the survey area during any month recorded, except for the summer month of July 2000 that had particularly high geomagnetic activity. In general, the source space approaches two polarizations at periods below one half day, with the dominant NS component seen quasi-homogeneous over the survey area at periods over 1000 s.

  19. Evidence for large-scale effects of competition: niche displacement in Canada lynx and bobcat

    PubMed Central

    Peers, Michael J. L.; Thornton, Daniel H.; Murray, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the patterns, causes and consequences of character displacement is central to our understanding of competition in ecological communities. However, the majority of competition research has occurred over small spatial extents or focused on fine-scale differences in morphology or behaviour. The effects of competition on broad-scale distribution and niche characteristics of species remain poorly understood but critically important. Using range-wide species distribution models, we evaluated whether Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) or bobcat (Lynx rufus) were displaced in regions of sympatry. Consistent with our prediction, we found that lynx niches were less similar to those of bobcat in areas of sympatry versus allopatry, with a stronger reliance on snow cover driving lynx niche divergence in the sympatric zone. By contrast, bobcat increased niche breadth in zones of sympatry, and bobcat niches were equally similar to those of lynx in zones of sympatry and allopatry. These findings suggest that competitively disadvantaged species avoid competition at large scales by restricting their niche to highly suitable conditions, while superior competitors expand the diversity of environments used. Our results indicate that competition can manifest within climatic niche space across species’ ranges, highlighting the importance of biotic interactions occurring at large spatial scales on niche dynamics. PMID:24174116

  20. Medical dominance and neoliberalisation in maternal care provision: the evidence from Canada and Australia.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Cecilia; Zadoroznyj, Maria; Hallgrimsdottir, Helga; Treloar, Adrienne; Taylor, Kara

    2010-08-01

    Since the 1970s, governments in many high-income countries have implemented a series of reforms in their health care systems to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Many of these reforms have been of a market-oriented character, involving the deregulation of key services, the creation of competitive markets, and the privatization of health and social care. Some scholars have argued that these "neoliberal" reforms have unseated the historical structural embeddedness of medicine, and in some cases even resulted in the proletarianisation of physicians. Other scholars have challenged this view, maintaining that medical hegemony continues to shape health care provision in most high-income countries. In this paper we examine how policy reforms may have altered medical dominance over maternity care in two comparatively similar countries - Canada and Australia. Our findings indicate that neoliberal reforms in these two countries have not substantially changed the historically hegemonic role medicine has played in maternity care provision. We discuss the implications of this outcome for the increased medicalisation of human reproduction. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Serological evidence of increased Coccidioides immitis infections in western Canada in 1996

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Errol; Diediw, Patricia; Fernandes, Donna; Hodge, Lorreen; Ower, Katherine; Rennie, Robert

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the epidemiology of Coccidioides immitis infection in persons returning to western Canada from C immitis endemic zones in southwestern United States. DESIGN: Review of C immitis serology requests from 1996. METHODS: Data were based on review of enzyme immunoassay and immunodiffusion results from 1993 to 1996 inclusive. Detailed information on clinical presentation, treatment and outcome of disease process was obtained through questionnaires and interviews with physicians who submitted Coccidioides serology requests in 1996. RESULTS: Positive serology for C immitis increased from 4.7% to 5.2% (between 1993 and 1995 inclusive) to 10.7% in 1996. Enzyme immunoassay for immunoglobulin G and/or immunoglobulin M or immunodiffusion was positive in 25 patients in 1996. The mean age of these patients was 62 years, and the predominant clinical presentation was pulmonary infiltrate with fever. All patients with positive serology were known to have travelled to central or southwestern Arizona or southern California. CONCLUSIONS: Travel to a defined coccidioidomycosis endemic zone presents a risk for the older traveller. Serology for C immitis supported the clinical, histological and microbiological diagnoses in patients who had travelled to this defined endemic zone. PMID:22346557

  2. A systematic review of the evidence for Canada's Physical Activity Guidelines for Adults

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review examines critically the scientific basis for Canada's Physical Activity Guide for Healthy Active Living for adults. Particular reference is given to the dose-response relationship between physical activity and premature all-cause mortality and seven chronic diseases (cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon cancer, breast cancer, type 2 diabetes (diabetes mellitus) and osteoporosis). The strength of the relationship between physical activity and specific health outcomes is evaluated critically. Literature was obtained through searching electronic databases (e.g., MEDLINE, EMBASE), cross-referencing, and through the authors' knowledge of the area. For inclusion in our systematic review articles must have at least 3 levels of physical activity and the concomitant risk for each chronic disease. The quality of included studies was appraised using a modified Downs and Black tool. Through this search we identified a total of 254 articles that met the eligibility criteria related to premature all-cause mortality (N = 70), cardiovascular disease (N = 49), stroke (N = 25), hypertension (N = 12), colon cancer (N = 33), breast cancer (N = 43), type 2 diabetes (N = 20), and osteoporosis (N = 2). Overall, the current literature supports clearly the dose-response relationship between physical activity and the seven chronic conditions identified. Moreover, higher levels of physical activity reduce the risk for premature all-cause mortality. The current Canadian guidelines appear to be appropriate to reduce the risk for the seven chronic conditions identified above and all-cause mortality. PMID:20459783

  3. The relationship between diet quality and adult obesity: evidence from Canada.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Kala; Campbell, M Karen; Choi, Yun-Hee; Sarma, Sisira

    2014-01-01

    To assess the relationship between diet quality and body mass index (BMI) in Canadian adults. We used confidential, individual-level data on 6325 adult men and 7211 nonpregnant adult women from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey to construct 2 diet quality indices (the Diet Quality Index [DQI] and and the Healthy Eating Index [HEI]) and BMI. After adjusting for known observable confounders, a latent class modeling analysis was conducted to account for unobservable confounders. We found that there were 2 latent classes (low-BMI and high-BMI components), and that DQI and HEI indices were negatively associated with BMI in the high-BMI component. In the high-BMI component, a one-unit increase in DQI score is associated with a 0.053 kg/m(2) decrease in BMI, whereas a one-unit increase in HEI score is associated with a 0.095 kg/m(2) decrease in BMI. Subgroup analyses revealed that the association between diet quality and obesity was stronger in women. Diet quality is associated with lower BMI in high-BMI individuals in Canada. Diet quality exhibits a distinct association in each latent class; this association is stronger in women. Latent class analysis offers a superior methodological framework in understanding the modifiable risk factors for obesity.

  4. Serologic evidence of influenza A infection in marine mammals of arctic Canada.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, O; Clavijo, A; Boughen, J A

    2001-10-01

    A serologic survey of influenza A antibodies was undertaken on 1,611 blood samples from five species of marine mammals collected from Arctic Canada from 1984-98. Sampling was done in 24 locations throughout the Canadian Arctic encompassing Sachs Harbor (72 degrees N, 125 degrees W), Northwest Territories in the west to Loks Land (63 degrees N, 64 degrees W), Nunavut in the east, to Eureka (80 degrees N, 86 degrees W), Nunavut in the north to Sanikiluaq (56 degrees N, 79 degrees W), Nunavut in the south. A competitive ELISA using a monoclonal antibody (Mab) against influenza A nucleoprotein (NP) was used. Five of 418 (1.2%) belugas (Delphinapterus leucas) and 23 of 903 (2.5%) ringed seals (Phoca hispida) were serologically positive. None of the 210 walruses (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus), 76 narwhals (Monodon monoceros) and four bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) had detectable antibodies to influenza A. Positive belugas were identified from communities on southeast Baffin Island while positive ringed seals came from communities in the eastern, western and high Arctic. Virus isolation attempts on lung tissue from a seropositive beluga were unsuccessful. We believe that influenza A infection in marine mammals is sporadic, the infection is probably self-limiting, and it may not be able to be maintained in these animals. Although the predominant hemagglutinin (H) type was not determined and therefore the pathogenicity of the strains to humans is unknown, the hunting and consumption of marine mammals by the Inuit, may put them at risk for influenza A infection.

  5. Evidence for Early Pleistocene Glaciation obtained from borecores collected in East-Central Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barendregt, R. W.; Andriashek, L. D.; Jackson, L. E.

    2014-12-01

    Borecores collected from the east-central region of Alberta, Canada have recently been sub-sampled and studied for paleomagnetic remanence characteristics. A preliminary magnetostratigraphy has been established for sediments previously assumed to represent multiple continental (Laurentide) glaciations, but for which no geochronology was available for the pre-late Wisconsin units. Comprised primarily of tills and lesser thicknesses of interbedded glacio-lacustrine and outwash sediments, the record is extensive, reaching to thicknesses of 300 metres within buried valleys. Most of the sampled units are not accessible from outcrop, and their sedimentology and stratigraphy is derived from core data only. The lowermost tills are reversely magnetized in the majority of borecores sampled to date. These tills are underlain by Empress Formation sediments and/or Colorado Group shales, and overlain by normally magnetized sediments. Both tills contain substantial weathering horizons at their surface, suggesting that interglacial or nonglacial conditions persisted for some time after each period of till deposition. Whether these tills represent a single Early Pleistocene glaciation, or perhaps two, will require additional borecore measurements. This new record of Early Pleistocene glaciation(s) in east-central Alberta places the westernmost extent of earliest Laurentide ice some 300 km farther westward from its previously established limit in the Saskatoon to Regina region of the western Canadian prairies, but still well short of the all-time limit and elevation reached during the Late Wisconsin (Late Pleistocene) in the foothills of the Alberta and Montana Rocky Mountains. Key Words: East-Central Alberta glacial history, Early Pleistocene (Laurentide) glaciation, till magnetostratigraphy, Quaternary history of Western Canadian Prairies, continental glaciations of North America.

  6. Age of Sexual Consent Law in Canada: Population-Based Evidence for Law and Policy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bonnie B.; Cox, David N.; Saewyc, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the implications of the 2008 increase in age for sexual consent in Canada using a population health survey of Canadian adolescents. Government rationales for the increase asserted younger adolescents were more likely to experience sexual exploitation and engage in risky sexual behaviour than adolescents 16 and older. Using data from sexually experienced adolescents in the 2008 British Columbia Adolescent Health Survey (BC AHS, N=6,262; age range 12 – 19; 52% female), analyses documented the scope of first intercourse partners who were not within the ‘close in age’ exemptions, then compared sexual behaviours of younger teens (14 and 15 years) with older teens (16 and 17) navigating their first year of sexual activity. Comparisons included: forced sex, sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs, multiple partners, condom use, effective contraception use, self-reported sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy involvement. Results showed very few 14- and 15-year-olds had first intercourse partners who were not within the ‘close in age’ exemptions based on age (boys: <2%, girls: 3–5%). In contrast, among 12- and 13-year-olds (a group unaffected by the law’s change) between 25% and 50% had first intercourse partners who were not within the ‘close in age’ exemptions, and almost 40% of teens who first had sex before age 12 reported a first partner age 20 years or more. In their first year of intercourse, 14- and 15-year-olds were slightly more likely to report forced sex and 3 or more partners than older teens, but otherwise made similarly healthy decisions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of evaluating policy using population health data and shows that better strategies are needed to protect children 13 and under from sexual abuse. PMID:27087775

  7. Variability and origin of seismic anisotropy across eastern Canada: Evidence from shear wave splitting measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Bastow, I. D.; Forte, A. M.; Hobbs, T. E.; Calvel, A.; Gonzalez-Monteza, A.; Schow, B.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of seismic anisotropy in continental regions are frequently interpreted with respect to past tectonic processes, preserved in the lithosphere as "fossil" fabrics. Models of the present-day sublithospheric flow (often using absolute plate motion as a proxy) are also used to explain the observations. Discriminating between these different sources of seismic anisotropy is particularly challenging beneath shields, whose thick (≥200 km) lithospheric roots may record a protracted history of deformation and strongly influence underlying mantle flow. Eastern Canada, where the geological record spans ˜3 Ga of Earth history, is an ideal region to address this issue. We use shear wave splitting measurements of core phases such as SKS to define upper mantle anisotropy using the orientation of the fast-polarization direction ϕ and delay time δt between fast and slow shear wave arrivals. Comparison with structural trends in surface geology and aeromagnetic data helps to determine the contribution of fossil lithospheric fabrics to the anisotropy. We also assess the influence of sublithospheric mantle flow via flow directions derived from global geodynamic models. Fast-polarization orientations are generally ENE-WSW to ESE-WNW across the region, but significant lateral variability in splitting parameters on a ≤100 km scale implies a lithospheric contribution to the results. Correlations with structural geologic and magnetic trends are not ubiquitous, however, nor are correlations with geodynamically predicted mantle flow directions. We therefore consider that the splitting parameters likely record a combination of the present-day mantle flow and older lithospheric fabrics. Consideration of both sources of anisotropy is critical in shield regions when interpreting splitting observations.

  8. Hf isotope evidence for effective impact melt homogenisation at the Sudbury impact crater, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Gavin G.; Petrus, Joseph A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Daly, J. Stephen; Kamber, Balz S.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the first zircon hafnium-oxygen isotope and trace element study of a transect through one of the largest terrestrial impact melt sheets. The differentiated melt sheet at the 1.85 Ga, originally ca. 200 km in diameter Sudbury impact crater, Ontario, Canada, yields a tight range of uniform zircon Hf isotope compositions (εHf(1850) of ca. -9 to -12). This is consistent with its well-established crustal origin and indicates differentiation from a single melt that was initially efficiently homogenised. We propose that the heterogeneity in other isotopic systems, such as Pb, in early-emplaced impact melt at Sudbury is associated with volatility-related depletion during the impact cratering process. This depletion leaves the isotopic systems of more volatile elements more susceptible to contamination during post-impact assimilation of country rock, whereas the systems of more refractory elements preserve initial homogeneities. Zircon oxygen isotope compositions in the melt sheet are also restricted in range relative to those in the impacted target rocks. However, they display a marked offset approximately one-third up the melt sheet stratigraphy that is interpreted to be a result of post-impact assimilation of 18O-enirched rocks into the base of the cooling impact melt. Given that impact cratering was a more dominant process in the early history of the inner Solar System than it is today, and the possibility that impact melt sheets were sources of ex situ Hadean zircon grains, these findings may have significance for the interpretation of the early zircon Hf record. We speculate that apparent εHf-time arrays observed in the oldest terrestrial and lunar zircon datasets may be related to impact melting homogenising previously more diverse crust. We also show that spatially restricted partial melting of rocks buried beneath the superheated impact melt at Sudbury provided a zircon crystallising environment distinct to the impact melt sheet itself.

  9. Foreign Language Camps: Camp Waskowitz. Teacher's Guide and Planning Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudin, Phil; And Others

    This guide to running a foreign language camp is intended to cover all aspects of camp administration and program planning. The philosophy of language camps is set forth. The chairperson's responsibilities regarding staff recruitment, staff assignments, and handling finances are outlined. Sample schedules for French, Spanish, and German camps are…

  10. The Submarine 4-km diameter Corossol Crater, Eastern Canada: Evidence for an impact origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Michael D.; Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume; Locat, Jacques; Sanfacon, Richard; Duchesne, Mathieu J.

    2014-05-01

    The newly-discovered Corossol Crater lies in the northwestern Gulf of St. Lawrence (Eastern Canada; 50°3'N, 66°23'W) and was found in 40-185 metres of water using high-resolution multibeam sonar. It is a 4 km in diameter complex circular structure with a central uplift and concentric rings. Glacial resurfacing indicates that it predates the last phase of glaciation in this area. Dredging on the central uplift recovered many angular clasts of hard grey limestone, which forms the bedrock in much of this area. One 4 cm clast of limestone breccia is somewhat different from the other blocks and has characteristics that suggest that it is an impact breccia. The block comprises fragments of calcite limestone up to 2 mm long. In many parts of the block these fragments have thin black rims. At the edges of the block these rims are brown, presumably reflecting aqueous alteration. Mineral grains in the rims are too small to characterize, but the fact that the ensemble can be oxidized suggests that it contains sulfides. In places the block is cut by veins of fine-grained calcite with euhedral dolomite crystals. The most unusual component is rare droplets up to 2 mm long, commonly fragmented. The droplets comprise a glassy matrix with a composition very close to fluorapatite and opaque crystals that have a composition close to pyrite. A few droplets have up to 5% vesicles. Fluorapatite requires fusion temperatures of about 1600 C, which cannot be achieved at the surface of the Earth by endogenous processes. A single fragmented quartz crystal with planar features was found close to one droplet. Universal stage measurements of the orientation of the planar features give an angle of 42 degrees which is close to that of {10-13} planes. This is the most common set of deformation planes produced during shock metamorphism of quartz. Unfortunately no other grains were found with similar planes. The glassy droplets and shocked quartz together suggest that the clast was produced by an

  11. Proterozoic subduction and terrane amalgamation in the southwestern Grenville province, Canada: Evidence from ultrapotassic to shoshonitic plutonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corriveau, Louise

    1990-07-01

    A late Grenvillian (1089-1076 Ma) subduction regime followed by terrane amalgamation is postulated as the paleoenvironment of a 400-km-long belt of potassium-rich alkaline and shoshonitic plutons in the Central metasedimentary belt of the southwestern Grenville province, Canada. Emplacement of the plutons postdates the regional metamorphism in the country rock, but predates major shear zones that form a structural boundary for the plutonic belt. The extent, timing, and magmatic affinities of the suite delineate the Gatineau domain within the current Mont-Laurier terrane of Quebec and are compelling evidence for the allochthonous nature of the Elzevir terrane and its extension eastward to Rideau Lake in Ontario and northward into the Gatineau domain. The belt trends northeast, the emplacement ages are younger to the southeast, and the magmatic affinities are those of island-arc ultrapotassic to shoshonitic rocks. This is interpreted to reflect the existence of a southeast-dipping, northeast-trending subduction zone beneath the combined Elzevir-Gatineau terrane between 1089 and 1076 Ma. Subsequent to subduction, amalgamation of the Elzevir terrane to the other terranes formed the Central metasedimentary belt, which then accreted and collided with the allochthonous polycyclic belt. These events provide evidence that the Ottawan orogeny commenced at ca. 1090 Ma in the Central metasedimentary belt. A modern analogue of this plutonism and its tectonic setting may have been the magmatism and arc-continent collision and subduction setting of the Sunda are, Indonesia.

  12. Better Positioning Those Camp Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses summer camps' difficulties in recruiting college students as staff, suggesting camps have "image problem." Describes study of job descriptions to evaluate whether camps offer useful career experiences. Examines frequency and types of job tasks. Examines how camp directors might use job descriptions to recruit more effectively. (TES)

  13. Camp Invention Connects to Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Danute V.; Clark, Barbara D.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes Camp Invention, a national creativity day camp that integrates science, math, social studies, and the arts. The one week camp for children entering grades 2-6 attracts many academically gifted children because of its hands-on curriculum. The camp's curriculum and activities are discussed. (Contains two references.) (CR)

  14. Organized camping: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Ramsing, Ron

    2007-10-01

    Organized camping has been part of the fabric of American culture for more than 150 years. Today, organized camps serve more than 11 million youth annually, a significant departure from the first camps that were created to address the challenges of urban living during the Industrial Revolution. This article provides a brief historical perspective of organized camp and its evolution.

  15. Camping Skills. Environmental Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topeka Public Schools, KS.

    This unit on camping skills is designed for special education students at the high school level. The objective of the unit is to provide students with an adequate camping knowledge and skill development to allow them to participate in camping activities. There is an emphasis on maintaining environmental quality as a part of good camping practices.…

  16. Evidence review and clinical guidance for the use of ziprasidone in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    While indicated for schizophrenia and acute mania, ziprasidone’s evidence base and use in clinical practice extends beyond these regulatory approvals. We, an invited panel of experts led by a working group of 3, critically examined the evidence and our collective experience regarding the effectiveness, tolerability and safety of ziprasidone across its clinical uses. There was no opportunity for manufacturer input into the content of the review. As anticipated, ziprasidone was found to be effective for its indicated uses, although its utility in mania and mixed states lacked comparative data. Beyond these uses, the available data were either unimpressive or were lacking. An attractive characteristic is its neutral effect on weight thereby providing patients with a non-obesogenic long-term treatment option. Key challenges in practice include the need for dosing on a full stomach and managing its early onset adverse effect of restlessness. Addressing these issues are critical to its long-term success PMID:23347694

  17. Pre-Camp Checklists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camping Magazine, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Provides checklists to prepare for camp opening. Covers such areas as health histories of all campers and staff, staff credentials, condition of facilities and equipment, staff training, horse stables and equipment, and safety of swimming areas. (LP)

  18. Astro Camp Counselors

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-08

    Barbara Marino (left), Stennis Space Center education technology specialist, shows Astro Camp Counselor Beverly Fitzsimmons a LEGO model during a teambuilding exercise May 29 at SSC's North Gate computer lab as a part of the counselors' `new hire' orientation.

  19. Pre-Camp Checklists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camping Magazine, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Provides checklists to prepare for camp opening. Covers such areas as health histories of all campers and staff, staff credentials, condition of facilities and equipment, staff training, horse stables and equipment, and safety of swimming areas. (LP)

  20. Hitler's Death Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieser, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Presents a high school lesson on Hitler's death camps and the widespread policy of brutality and oppression against European Jews. Includes student objectives, instructional procedures, and a chart listing the value of used clothing taken from the Jews. (CFR)

  1. Camping in the Snow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Constance

    1979-01-01

    Describes the experience of winter snow camping. Provides suggestions for shelter, snow kitchens, fires and stoves, cooking, latrines, sleeping warm, dehydration prevention, and clothing. Illustrated with full color photographs. (MA)

  2. Hitler's Death Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieser, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Presents a high school lesson on Hitler's death camps and the widespread policy of brutality and oppression against European Jews. Includes student objectives, instructional procedures, and a chart listing the value of used clothing taken from the Jews. (CFR)

  3. Astro STARS Camp

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-15

    Summer is a time of educational activity at Stennis Space Center. In June 2012, 25 young people age 13-15 attended the annual Astro STARS (Spaceflight, Technology, Astronomy and Robotics at Stennis) camp at the rocket engine test facility. During the five-day camp, participants engaged in hands-on experiences in a variety of areas, including engineering and robotics. On the final day, campers launched model rockets they had assembled.

  4. Astro STARS Camp

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-28

    Tom Nicolaides, an aerospace technologist in the Engineering & Test Directorate at Stennis Space Center, looks on as 2011 Astro STARS participants take turns gazing at the sun through a special telescope. The sun-gazing activity was part of the Astro STARS (Spaceflight, Technology, Astronomy & Robotics at Stennis) camp for 13-to-15-year-olds June 27 - July 1. The weeklong science and technology camp is held each year onsite at the rocket engine test facility.

  5. Cigarette taxes and smoking participation: evidence from recent tax increases in Canada.

    PubMed

    Azagba, Sunday; Sharaf, Mesbah

    2011-05-01

    Using the Canadian National Population Health Survey and the recent tax variation across Canadian provinces, this paper examines the impact of cigarette taxes on smoking participation. Consistent with the literature, we find evidence of a heterogeneous response to cigarette taxes among different groups of smokers. Contrary to most studies, we find that the middle age group-which constitutes the largest fraction of smokers in our sample-is largely unresponsive to taxes. While cigarette taxes remain popular with policy makers as an anti-smoking measure, identifying the socio-demographic characteristics of smokers who respond differentially to tax increase will help in designing appropriate supplementary measures to reduce smoking.

  6. Cigarette Taxes and Smoking Participation: Evidence from Recent Tax Increases in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Azagba, Sunday; Sharaf, Mesbah

    2011-01-01

    Using the Canadian National Population Health Survey and the recent tax variation across Canadian provinces, this paper examines the impact of cigarette taxes on smoking participation. Consistent with the literature, we find evidence of a heterogeneous response to cigarette taxes among different groups of smokers. Contrary to most studies, we find that the middle age group—which constitutes the largest fraction of smokers in our sample—is largely unresponsive to taxes. While cigarette taxes remain popular with policy makers as an anti-smoking measure, identifying the socio-demographic characteristics of smokers who respond differentially to tax increase will help in designing appropriate supplementary measures to reduce smoking. PMID:21655139

  7. A Canadian evidence-based guideline for the first-line treatment of follicular lymphoma: joint consensus of the Lymphoma Canada Scientific Advisory Board.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, John; Assouline, Sarit; Hodgson, David; MacDonald, David; Stewart, Doug; Christofides, Anna; Komolova, Marina; Connors, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most common indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in North America. Because of the heterogeneity of the disease, treatment options vary from observation to aggressive therapies or stem cell transplantation, or both. Although advances in treatment have improved outcomes, the disease remains largely incurable. In Canada, no unified national guideline exists for the front-line treatment of FL; provincial guidelines vary and are largely based on funding. There is therefore a need for evidence-based national treatment guidelines that are supported by Canadian hematologists to ensure that patients with FL have equitable access to the best available care. A group of experts from across Canada developed a national evidence-based treatment guideline to provide health care professionals with clear guidance on the first-line management of FL. Results of a systematic review of the literature are presented with consensus recommendations based on available evidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Collaborating to embrace evidence-informed management practices within Canada's health system.

    PubMed

    Strelioff, Wayne; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Barton, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    In late 2005, 11 major national health organizations decided to work together to build healthier workplaces for healthcare providers. To do so, they created a pan-Canadian collaborative of 45 experts and asked them to develop an action strategy to improve healthcare workplaces. One of the first steps taken by members of the collaborative was to adopt the following shared belief statements to guide their thinking: "We believe it is unacceptable to fund, govern, manage, work in or receive care in an unhealthy health workplace," and, "A fundamental way to better healthcare is through healthier healthcare workplaces." This commentary provides an overview of the Quality Worklife-Quality Healthcare Collaborative action strategy. This strategy embraces the thinking set out by the lead papers (by Shamian and El-Jardali and by Clements, Dault and Priest) and brings to life evidence-informed management practices.

  9. Collaborating to embrace evidence-informed management practices within Canada's health system.

    PubMed

    Strelioff, Wayne; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Barton, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    In late 2005, 11 major national health organizations decided to work together to build healthier workplaces for healthcare providers. To do so, they created a pan-Canadian collaborative of 45 experts and asked them to develop an action strategy to improve healthcare workplaces. One of the first steps taken by members of the collaborative was to adopt the following shared belief statements to guide their thinking: "We believe it is unacceptable to fund, govern, manage, work in or receive care in an unhealthy health workplace," and, "A fundamental way to better healthcare is through healthier healthcare workplaces. This commentary provides an overview of the Quality Worklife-Quality Healthcare Collaborative action strategy. This strategy embraces the thinking set out by the lead papers in a recent Special Issue of Healthcare Papers (www.Longwoods.com/special_issues.php) focused on developing healthy workplaces for healthcare workers, and brings to Life evidence-informed management practices.

  10. Changing healthcare capital-to-labor ratios: evidence and implications for bending the cost curve in Canada and beyond.

    PubMed

    Nauenberg, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare capital-to-labor ratios are examined for the 10 provincial single-payer health care plans across Canada. The data show an increasing trend-particularly during the period 1997-2009 during which the ratio as much as doubled from 3 to 6 %. Multivariate analyses indicate that every percentage point uptick in the rate of increase in this ratio is associated with an uptick in the rate of increase of real per capita provincial government healthcare expenditures by approximately $31 ([Formula: see text] 0.01). While the magnitude of this relationship is not large, it is still substantial enough to warrant notice: every percentage point decrease in the upward trend of the capital-to-labor ratio might be associated with a one percentage point decrease in the upward trend of per capita government healthcare expenditures. An uptick since 1997 in the rate of increase in per capita prescription drug expenditures is also associated with a decline in the trend of increasing per capita healthcare costs. While there has been some recent evidence of a slowing in the rate of health care expenditure increase, it is still unclear whether this reflects just a pause, after which the rate of increase will return to its baseline level, or a long-term shift; therefore, it is important to continue to explore various policy avenues to affect the rate of change going forward.

  11. Evidence of late glacial paleoseismicity from submarine landslide deposits within Lac Dasserat, northwestern Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Gregory R.

    2016-09-01

    An integrated seismo- and chronostratigraphic investigation at Lac Dasserat, northwestern Quebec, identified 74 separate failures within eight event horizons. Horizons E and B, and H and G have strong or moderately-strong multi-landslide signatures, respectively, composed of 11-23 failures, while horizons F, D, C, and A have minor landslide signatures consisting of a single or pair of deposit(s). Cores collected at six sites recovered glacial Lake Ojibway varve deposits that are interbedded with the event horizons. The correlation of the varves to the regional Timiskaming varve series allowed varve ages or ranges of varve ages to be determined for the event horizons. Horizons H, G, E, and B are interpreted to be evidence of paleoearthquakes with differing levels of interpretative confidence, based on the relative strength of the multi-landslide signatures, the correlation to other disturbed deposits of similar age in the region, and the lack or possibility of alternative aseismic mechanisms. The four interpreted paleoearthquakes occurred between 9770 ± 200 and 8470 ± 200 cal yr BP, when glacial Lake Ojibway was impounded behind the Laurentide Ice Sheet during deglaciation. They probably represent an elevated period of seismicity at deglaciation that was driven by crustal unloading.

  12. COST-EFFECTIVENESS IMPACTS CANCER CARE FUNDING DECISIONS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, EVIDENCE FROM 1998 TO 2008.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zahra; Peacock, Stuart J; Kovacic, Laurel; Hoch, Jeffrey S

    2017-09-05

    The Priorities and Evaluation Committee (PEC) funding recommendations for new cancer drugs in British Columbia, Canada have been based on both clinical and economic evidence. The British Columbia Ministry of Health makes funding decisions. We assessed the association between cost-effectiveness of cancer drugs considered from 1998 to 2008 and the subsequent funding decisions. All proposals submitted to the PEC between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed, and the association between cost-effectiveness and funding decisions was examined by (i) using logistic regression to test the hypothesis that interventions with higher incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) have a lower probability of receiving a positive funding decision and (ii) using parametric and nonparametric tests to determine if a statistically significant difference exists between the mean cost-effectiveness of funded versus not funded proposals. A sub-analysis was conducted to determine if the findings varied across different outcome measures. Of the 149 proposals reviewed, 78 reported cost-effectiveness using various outcome measures. In the proposals that used life-years gained as the outcome (n = 22), a statistically significant difference of nearly $115,000 was observed between the mean ICERs for funded proposals ($42,006) and for unfunded proposals ($156,967). An odds ratio indicating higher ICERs have a lower probability of being funded was also found to be statistically significant (p < .05). Economic evidence appears to play a role in British Columbia cancer funding decisions from 1998 to 2008; other decision-making criteria may also have an important role in recommendations and subsequent funding decisions.

  13. Intended and unintended effects of restrictions on the sale of cigarillos to youth: evidence from Canada.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai V; Grootendorst, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Youth consumption of cigarillos (ie, little cigars) has increased markedly in recent years. In July 2010, the Canadian government banned the sale of flavoured cigarillos and required unflavoured cigarillos to be sold in packs of at least 20 units. This paper assesses changes in young persons' use of cigarillos and regular cigars, which are potential substitutes, following the policy. To investigate of the change in cigar smoking following the policy, we constructed a segmented regression model that allowed the policy to change the height and the slope of the trend in the outcome variables. The model was estimated using data from the 2007-2011 Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Surveys. We obtained visual and regression-based evidence that use of cigarillos among youth declined following the policy. We also found a small, gradual increase in their use of regular cigars, possibly due to their compensatory switching from cigarillos to regular cigars. Overall, there was a net reduction in cigar use among youth after the intervention. The policy achieved its goal of reducing youth's consumption of cigarillos, but may have an unintended consequence of increasing their use of regular cigars. Policymakers should address the possibility that youth switch to regular cigars in response to restricted access to cigarillos. Possible ways of discouraging this substituting behaviour include extending the ban to cover all flavoured cigars and mandating a minimum pack size for all cigars, or raising taxes on flavoured cigars. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Early Cretaceous vegetation and climate change at high latitude: palynological evidence from Isachsen Formation, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Jennifer M.; Tullius, Dylan N.; Evenchick, Carol A.; Swindles, Graeme T.; Hadlari, Thomas; Embry, Ashton

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the behaviour of global climate during relatively warm periods in Earth's history, such as the Cretaceous Period, advances our overall understanding of the climate system and provides insight on drivers of climate change over geologic time. While it has been suggested that the Valanginian Age represents the first episode of Cretaceous greenhouse climate conditions with relatively equable warm temperatures, mounting evidence suggests that this time was relatively cool. A paucity of paleoclimate data currently exists for polar regions compared to mid- and low-latitudes and this is particularly true for the Canadian Arctic. There is also a lack of information about the terrestrial realm as most paleoclimate studies have been based on marine material. Here we present quantitative pollen and spore data obtained from the marginal marine and deltaic-fluvial Isachsen Formation of the Sverdrup Basin, Canadian Arctic, to better understand the long-term vegetation and climate history of polar regions during the warm but variable Early Cretaceous (Valanginian to Early Aptian). Detrended correspondence analysis of main pollen and spore taxa is used to derive three ecological groupings influenced by moisture and disturbance based on the botanical affinities of palynomorphs: 1) a mixed coniferous assemblage containing both lowland and upland components; 2) a conifer-filicopsid community that likely grew in dynamic lowland habitats; and, 3) a mature dry lowland community composed of Cheirolepidaceans. Stratigraphic changes in the relative abundance of pollen and spore taxa reflect climate variability in this polar region during the ~20 Mya history of the Isachsen Formation. The late Valanginian was relatively cool and moist and promoted lowland conifer-filicopsid communities. Warming in the Hauterivian resulted in the expansion coniferous communities in well-drained or arid hinterlands. A return to relatively cool and moist conditions in the Barremian resulted in the

  15. The impact of criminalization of HIV non-disclosure on the healthcare engagement of women living with HIV in Canada: a comprehensive review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Sophie E; Milloy, M-J; Ogilvie, Gina; Greene, Saara; Nicholson, Valerie; Vonn, Micheal; Hogg, Robert; Kaida, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that people living with HIV (PLWH) must disclose their HIV status to sexual partners prior to sexual activity that poses a “realistic possibility” of HIV transmission for consent to sex to be valid. The Supreme Court deemed that the duty to disclose could be averted if a person living with HIV both uses a condom and has a low plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load during vaginal sex. This is one of the strictest legal standards criminalizing HIV non-disclosure worldwide and has resulted in a high rate of prosecutions of PLWH in Canada. Public health advocates argue that the overly broad use of the criminal law against PLWH undermines efforts to engage individuals in healthcare and complicates gendered barriers to linkage and retention in care experienced by women living with HIV (WLWH). Methods We conducted a comprehensive review of peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed evidence published between 1998 and 2015 evaluating the impact of the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure on healthcare engagement of WLWH in Canada across key stages of the cascade of HIV care, specifically: HIV testing and diagnosis, linkage and retention in care, and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Where available, evidence pertaining specifically to women was examined. Where these data were lacking, evidence relating to all PLWH in Canada or other international jurisdictions were included. Results and discussion Evidence suggests that criminalization of HIV non-disclosure may create barriers to engagement and retention within the cascade of HIV care for PLWH in Canada, discouraging access to HIV testing for some people due to fears of legal implications following a positive diagnosis, and compromising linkage and retention in healthcare through concerns of exposure of confidential medical information. There is a lack of published empirical evidence focused specifically on women, which is a concern given the growing population of WLWH in

  16. The impact of criminalization of HIV non-disclosure on the healthcare engagement of women living with HIV in Canada: a comprehensive review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Sophie E; Milloy, M-J; Ogilvie, Gina; Greene, Saara; Nicholson, Valerie; Vonn, Micheal; Hogg, Robert; Kaida, Angela

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that people living with HIV (PLWH) must disclose their HIV status to sexual partners prior to sexual activity that poses a "realistic possibility" of HIV transmission for consent to sex to be valid. The Supreme Court deemed that the duty to disclose could be averted if a person living with HIV both uses a condom and has a low plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load during vaginal sex. This is one of the strictest legal standards criminalizing HIV non-disclosure worldwide and has resulted in a high rate of prosecutions of PLWH in Canada. Public health advocates argue that the overly broad use of the criminal law against PLWH undermines efforts to engage individuals in healthcare and complicates gendered barriers to linkage and retention in care experienced by women living with HIV (WLWH). We conducted a comprehensive review of peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed evidence published between 1998 and 2015 evaluating the impact of the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure on healthcare engagement of WLWH in Canada across key stages of the cascade of HIV care, specifically: HIV testing and diagnosis, linkage and retention in care, and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Where available, evidence pertaining specifically to women was examined. Where these data were lacking, evidence relating to all PLWH in Canada or other international jurisdictions were included. Evidence suggests that criminalization of HIV non-disclosure may create barriers to engagement and retention within the cascade of HIV care for PLWH in Canada, discouraging access to HIV testing for some people due to fears of legal implications following a positive diagnosis, and compromising linkage and retention in healthcare through concerns of exposure of confidential medical information. There is a lack of published empirical evidence focused specifically on women, which is a concern given the growing population of WLWH in Canada, among whom marginalized and vulnerable women

  17. Basic Camp Management: An Introduction to Camp Administration. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Armand; Ball, Beverly

    From its perspective of experience in the field, this book offers practical and specific guidance for successfully managing an organized summer camp. It may also serve as a beginning orientation for potential camp directors, a quick reference for experienced directors, or a text for entry level courses in practical camp administration. This second…

  18. Basic Camp Management: An Introduction to Camp Administration. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Armand; Ball, Beverly

    From its perspective of experience in the field, this book offers practical and specific guidance for successfully managing an organized summer camp. It may also serve as a beginning orientation for potential camp directors, a quick reference for experienced directors, or a text for entry level courses in practical camp administration. This second…

  19. How Green Is Camping? Environmental Stewardship in North Carolina Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Roger; Bingham, Cindy

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 47 residential camps in North Carolina revealed that most camps had written environmental objectives, practiced recycling, attempted to reduce water use and energy consumption, practiced low-impact camping, included environmental issues in staff training, and provided environmental education to campers. Includes survey questions. (LP)

  20. How Green Is Camping? Environmental Stewardship in North Carolina Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Roger; Bingham, Cindy

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 47 residential camps in North Carolina revealed that most camps had written environmental objectives, practiced recycling, attempted to reduce water use and energy consumption, practiced low-impact camping, included environmental issues in staff training, and provided environmental education to campers. Includes survey questions. (LP)

  1. 36 CFR 13.1222 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Camp Campground and other designated areas. (b) Camping in Brooks Camp Campground for more than a total... site in the Brooks Camp Campground while in operation as a designated fee area is prohibited....

  2. 36 CFR 13.1222 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Camp Campground and other designated areas. (b) Camping in Brooks Camp Campground for more than a total... site in the Brooks Camp Campground while in operation as a designated fee area is prohibited....

  3. 36 CFR 13.1222 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Camp Campground and other designated areas. (b) Camping in Brooks Camp Campground for more than a total... site in the Brooks Camp Campground while in operation as a designated fee area is prohibited....

  4. 36 CFR 13.1222 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Camp Campground and other designated areas. (b) Camping in Brooks Camp Campground for more than a total... site in the Brooks Camp Campground while in operation as a designated fee area is prohibited....

  5. 36 CFR 13.1222 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Camp Campground and other designated areas. (b) Camping in Brooks Camp Campground for more than a total... site in the Brooks Camp Campground while in operation as a designated fee area is prohibited....

  6. Astro Camp 2000 Rocketry Exercise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-06-23

    Children at Astro Camp at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., launch rockets as one of their activities in the weeklong camp. Each week during the summer, approximately 30 children ages 9-12 from across Mississippi and Louisiana spend a week learning about space flight. Astro Camp Saturday offers a condensed version of Astro Camp on the third Saturday of each month from January through May 2001.

  7. Children's Camps in the Adirondacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Hallie E.

    2003-01-01

    In the late 19th century, camps in the Adirondacks responded to concerns that the American character was softening. Much camping philosophy came from the progressive movement in education. Aspects of Indian culture were adopted because they seemed to fit naturally in the Adirondacks, and children loved them. Adirondack camps have always been…

  8. Saving the Camping Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Jean S.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses developmental encroachment on isolated caves near Pittsford, Vermont. Describes cooperative effort by recreational camps and other agencies to acquire land surrounding cave entrances for conservation. Details successes and hurdles of land acquisition. Describes ongoing work by local campers to maintain and enjoy caves and property. (TES)

  9. Camping and Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucher, Charles A.

    Outdoor education has become an integral part of the curriculum in a number of schools across the nation. Outdoor education activities can be readily integrated into physical education, recreation, and adult education programs, as well as science, mathematics, and related fields. Camping and outdoor education should become a part of each child's…

  10. A Flying Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Frank X.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a five-day summer camp which provided 12 children, ages 9-14, with a complete flying experience. The training consisted of ground school and one hour actual flying time, including the basics of aircraft control and a flight prepared and executed by the students. (MLH)

  11. Recycling at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, William M.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines a Michigan summer camp's efforts to reduce solid waste disposal by recycling cardboard, tin, glass, aluminum, and plastic milk containers. Points out variables affecting the success of such efforts. Discusses Michigan state funding for the development of recycling programs. (SV)

  12. Camp Animal Crackers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Erin; And Others

    This guide contains profiles of 16 activities for young children to participate in while attending camp. Each profile contains the theme of the activity, a list of materials needs, a description of the activity itself, and an explanation of the teacher's role in the activity. The activities focus on: (1) songs and dances; (2) dramatic play; (3)…

  13. Alaska's Logging Camp School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millward, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    A visit to Ketchikan, Alaska, reveals a floating, one-teacher logging-camp school that uses multiage grouping and interdisciplinary teaching. There are 10 students. The school gym and playground, bunkhouse, fuel tanks, mess hall, and students' homes bob up and down and are often moved to other sites. (MLH)

  14. Saving the Camping Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Jean S.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses developmental encroachment on isolated caves near Pittsford, Vermont. Describes cooperative effort by recreational camps and other agencies to acquire land surrounding cave entrances for conservation. Details successes and hurdles of land acquisition. Describes ongoing work by local campers to maintain and enjoy caves and property. (TES)

  15. Recycling at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, William M.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines a Michigan summer camp's efforts to reduce solid waste disposal by recycling cardboard, tin, glass, aluminum, and plastic milk containers. Points out variables affecting the success of such efforts. Discusses Michigan state funding for the development of recycling programs. (SV)

  16. Petrological imaging of the Cordilleran lithosphere beneath Craven Lake, NCVP, BC, Canada: local evidence for a texturally diverse, hydrous lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christine; Edwards, Benjamin R.; Russell, James K.; Peterson, Nils

    2010-05-01

    Peridotite and pyroxenite xenoliths from the glaciovolcanic Craven Lake center (Edwards et al., 2006) provide local evidence for a texturally diverse, hydrous lithosphere beneath the Stikine terrane, in the Canadian Cordilleran lithosphere. Although the xenolith suite is dominated by spinel lherzolite, websterite and Ol websterite xenoliths also occur. Veins of amphibole, with local apatite, have so far been found in one spinel lherzolite and one websterite xenolith. Although interstitial amphibole has been reported from at least two localities in the northern Cordillera, we believe that this is the first documented occurrence of an amphibole vein in lithospheric peridotite and pyroxenite. Textural analysis shows that the xenoliths from Craven Lake are on average finer grained (~2.0 mm) and less equigranular than xenolith suites from localities to the north (e.g. Harder and Russell, 2005) or to the south (e.g. Peslier et al., 2002). Clinopyroxene-orthopyroxene geothermometry of a peridotite sample indicates that the temperatures of equilibration (964-1022C at 0.1 GPa) are well within the established stability limits of amphibole at lithospheric pressures. Observations on the Craven Lake suite have important implications for the petrology of the Cordilleran lithosphere. Textural observations confirm that the lithosphere beneath the accreted terranes in British Columbia is distinctly heterogeneous, which is consistent with at least local lithospheric variation that could be due in part to tectonism during Mesozoic terrane accretion. Documentation of veins of amphibole plus apatite in the Cordilleran lithosphere is consistent with the Francis and Ludden (1995) hypothesis that the veins could be lithospheric sources for volumetrically minor but spatially wide-spread nephelinite throughout the Canadian Cordilleran, which were remelted during Neogene to Recent, extension-related magmatism. The formation of the veins may be linked to Mesozoic subduction zone metasomatism

  17. Biomarker evidence for shallow water marine euxinia through the PTB in the Panthalassic Ocean (Peace River Basin Embayment, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, L. E.; Beatty, T.; Henderson, C. M.; Summons, R. E.; Love, G. D.

    2007-12-01

    Protracted euxinic conditions in the late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic oceans may have been an important paleoenvironmental factor in the Permian-Triassic Boundary (PTB) extinction. Release of hydrogen sulfide during upwelling or transgressive events from such an ocean (Kump et al. 2005; Riccardi et al. 2006) may have been a driver of the extinction in both marine and terrestrial environments. Worldwide marine PTB sections show evidence for a stratified water column and the presence of sulfidic deep water, at least episodically (Isozaki 1997; Grice et al. 2005). Taxa that are particularly characteristic of such an environment are the green sulfur bacteria, or Chlorobiaceae. These anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria utilize sulfide as an electron donor for photosynthesis and live in modern stratified water columns where euxinia extends into the photic zone. Indeed, biomarkers derived from these organisms have been identified at a number of the PTB sections. The Peace River embayment in western Canada has been identified as a section that spans the PTB based on conodont biostratigraphy (Henderson 1997). Samples from five drill cores in this section provide new insight into the state of the Panthalassic Ocean during this time of unprecedented turnover in Earth's biota. Using standard biomarker protocols, we identified aromatic hydrocarbons that are diagentic products of the carotenoids isorenieratene and chlorobactene, which are diagnostic for the brown and green strains, respectively, of the Chlorobiaceae. The occurrence of chlorobactane is especially notable since the green-pigmented varieties of the Chlorobiaceae require higher light intensities than the brown-pigmented forms and, in modern environments where they have been found, occur between 13 and 30 m of the surface. This is the first time that chlorobactane has been reported from a PTB section and it suggests a particularly shallow chemocline periodically at this location. The δ13C values for the aryl

  18. Collaborativeness as the Core of Professional Learning Communities beyond Culture and Context: Evidence from Canada, Finland, and Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jäppinen, Aini-Kristiina; Leclerc, Martine; Tubin, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    Professional learning communities (PLC) have been widely accepted as effective with respect to good atmosphere, adequate leadership practices, and functional working practices. However, the outcomes for school improvement depend on case-specific issues. To identify less culturally and contextually bound issues in 3 PLC settings in Canada, Finland,…

  19. Public Perceptions of Child Care in Alberta, Canada: Evidence for Policies and Practice from a Cross-Sectional Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tough, Suzanne; Rikhy, Shivani; Benzies, Karen; Vekved, Monica; Kehler, Heather; Johnston, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: This study assessed public perceptions of child care and its providers in a Canadian province where government funding for child care includes subsidies and a voluntary accreditation process. In 2007-2008, 1,443 randomly selected adults in Alberta, Canada, completed a telephone survey. Individuals were eligible to participate if…

  20. Public Perceptions of Child Care in Alberta, Canada: Evidence for Policies and Practice from a Cross-Sectional Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tough, Suzanne; Rikhy, Shivani; Benzies, Karen; Vekved, Monica; Kehler, Heather; Johnston, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: This study assessed public perceptions of child care and its providers in a Canadian province where government funding for child care includes subsidies and a voluntary accreditation process. In 2007-2008, 1,443 randomly selected adults in Alberta, Canada, completed a telephone survey. Individuals were eligible to participate if…

  1. Collaborativeness as the Core of Professional Learning Communities beyond Culture and Context: Evidence from Canada, Finland, and Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jäppinen, Aini-Kristiina; Leclerc, Martine; Tubin, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    Professional learning communities (PLC) have been widely accepted as effective with respect to good atmosphere, adequate leadership practices, and functional working practices. However, the outcomes for school improvement depend on case-specific issues. To identify less culturally and contextually bound issues in 3 PLC settings in Canada, Finland,…

  2. Interprofessional Flight Camp.

    PubMed

    Alfes, Celeste M; Rowe, Amanda S

    2016-01-01

    The Dorothy Ebersbach Academic Center for Flight Nursing in Cleveland, OH, holds an annual flight camp designed for master's degree nursing students in the acute care nurse practitioner program, subspecializing in flight nursing at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University. The weeklong interprofessional training is also open to any health care provider working in an acute care setting and focuses on critical care updates, trauma, and emergency care within the critical care transport environment. This year, 29 graduate nursing students enrolled in a master's degree program from Puerto Rico attended. Although the emergency department in Puerto Rico sees and cares for trauma patients, there is no formal trauma training program. Furthermore, the country only has 1 rotor wing air medical transport service located at the Puerto Rico Medical Center in San Juan. Flight faculty and graduate teaching assistants spent approximately 9 months planning for their participation in our 13th annual flight camp. Students from Puerto Rico were extremely pleased with the learning experiences at camp and expressed particular interest in having more training time within the helicopter flight simulator. Copyright © 2016 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Day Camp Manual: A Study of Mandatory Standards and Desirable Camping Practices for Children's Day Camps. Book V. Revised 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, William

    The final book in a 5-book day camp manual is a questionnaire developed by the Ontario Camping Association to help directors of children's summer day camps check camp operations, principles, and procedures, and to help them determine how and where a camp can be improved. The questionnaire, to be completed by the director with the aid of another…

  4. Effects of a Driver Cellphone Ban on Overall, Handheld, and Hands-Free Cellphone Use While Driving: New Evidence from Canada.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Christopher S; Nguyen, Hai V

    2015-11-01

    We provide new evidence on the effects of increasingly common driver cellphone bans on self-reported overall, handheld, and hands-free cellphone use while driving by studying Ontario, Canada, which instituted a 3-month education campaign in November 2009 followed by a binding driver cellphone ban in February 2010. Using residents of Alberta as a control group in a difference-in-differences framework, we find visual and regression-based evidence that Ontario's cellphone ban significantly reduced overall and handheld cellphone use. We also find that the policies significantly increased hands-free cellphone use. The reductions in overall and handheld use are driven exclusively by women, whereas the increases in hands-free use are much larger for men. Our results provide the first direct evidence that cellphone bans have the unintended effect of inducing substitution to hands-free devices.

  5. Temperature and heat flux changes at the base of Laurentide ice sheet inferred from geothermal data (evidence from province of Alberta, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demezhko, Dmitry; Gornostaeva, Anastasia; Majorowicz, Jacek; Šafanda, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Using a previously published temperature log of the 2363-m-deep borehole Hunt well (Alberta, Canada) and the results of its previous interpretation, the new reconstructions of ground surface temperature and surface heat flux histories for the last 30 ka have been obtained. Two ways to adjust the timescale of geothermal reconstructions are discussed, namely the traditional method based on the a priori data on thermal diffusivity value, and the alternative one including the orbital tuning of the surface heat flux and the Earth's insolation changes. It is shown that the second approach provides better agreement between geothermal reconstructions and proxy evidences of deglaciation chronology in the studied region.

  6. Foreign Language Camps at the College Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Jean S.

    Information on Colorado State University's foreign language camps for college students is presented. Advantages of the following two models for camps are identified: a single language camp, and a combination multi-language camp with four languages (Spanish, French, German, and Chinese). Features of the camps include: speaking in the foreign…

  7. Astro Camp Goes to Florida

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-08

    Katie Craig, daughter of former Stennis Space Center Deputy Director Mark Craig, launches a 'balloon rocket' with the help of Rebecca Compretta, Astro Camp coordinator at SSC. SSC took Astro Camp on the road to Florida this week to engage children and their parents during activities surrounding the Aug. 8 launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on NASA's STS-118 mission to the International Space Station. Astro Camp is SSC's popular space camp program designed to inspire and educate students using science and math principles.

  8. Character, paleoenvironment, rate of accumulation, and evidence for seismic triggering of Holocene turbidites, Canada Abyssal Plain, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, A.; Phillips, R.L.; Mullen, M.W.; Starratt, S.W.; Jones, Glenn A.; Naidu, A.S.; Finney, B.P.

    1996-01-01

    Four box cores and one piston core show that Holocene sedimentation on the southern Canada Abyssal Plain for the last 8010??120 yr has consisted of a continuing rain of pelagic organic and ice-rafted elastic sediment with a net accumulation rate during the late Holocene of ???10 mm/1000 yr, and episodically emplaced turbidites 1-5 m thick deposited at intervals of 830 to 3450 yr (average 2000 yr). The average net accumulation rate of the mixed sequence of turbidites and thin pelagite interbeds in the cores is about 1.2 m/1000 yr. Physiography suggests that the turbidites originated on the Mackenzie Delta or its clinoform, and ??13C values of -27 to - 25??? in the turbidites are compatible with a provenance on a delta. Extant displaced neritic and lower slope to basin plain calcareous benthic foraminifers coexist in the turbidite units. Their joint occurence indicates that the turbidites originated on the modern continental shelf and entrained sediment from the slope and rise enroute to their final resting place on the Canada Abyssal Plain. The presence of Middle Pleistocene diatoms in the turbidites suggests, in addition, that the turbidites may have originated in shallow submarine slides beneath the upper slope or outer shelf. Small but consistent differences in organic carbon content and ??13C values between the turbidite units suggest that they did not share an identical provenance, which is at least compatible with an origin in slope failures. The primary provenance of the ice-rafted component of the pelagic beds was the glaciated terrane of northwestern Canada; and the provenance of the turbidite units was Pleistocene and Holocene sedimentary deposits on the outer continental shelf and upper slope of the Mackenzie Delta. Largely local derivation of the sediment of the Canada Abyssal Plain indicates that sediment accumulation rates in the Arctic Ocean are valid only for regions with similar depositional sources and processes, and that these rates cannot be

  9. No ordinary boot camp.

    PubMed

    Tichy, N M

    2001-04-01

    Many companies now run boot camps--comprehensive orientation programs designed to help new hires hit the ground running. They're intense and intimidating, and new employees emerge from them with strong bonds to other recruits and to the organization. But at Trilogy, organizational consultant Noel Tichy discovered one program that's a breed apart. In this article, Tichy gives us a detailed tour of Trilogy's boot camp, Trilogy University, to demonstrate why it's so different--and so effective. Like the best boot camps, it serves as an immersion in both the technical skills new recruits will need for their jobs and Trilogy's corporate culture, which emphasizes risk-taking, teamwork, humility, and a strong customer focus. But this is a new-employee orientation session that's so fundamental to the company as a whole that it's presided over by the CEO and top corporate executives for fully six months of the year. Why? In two three-month sessions, these top executives hone their own strategic thinking about the company as they decide what to teach the new recruits each session. They also find the company's next generation of new products as they judge the innovative ideas the recruits are tasked with developing--making the program Trilogy's main R&D engine. And they pull the company's rising technical stars into mentoring roles for the new recruits, helping to build the next generation of top leadership. After spending months on-site studying Trilogy University, Tichy came away highly impressed by the power of the virtuous teaching cycle the program has set in motion. Leaders of the organization are learning from recruits at the same time that the recruits are learning from the leaders. It's a model, he argues, that other companies would do well to emulate.

  10. Pandemic H1N1 in Canada and the use of evidence in developing public health policies--a policy analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosella, Laura C; Wilson, Kumanan; Crowcroft, Natasha S; Chu, Anna; Upshur, Ross; Willison, Donald; Deeks, Shelley L; Schwartz, Brian; Tustin, Jordan; Sider, Doug; Goel, Vivek

    2013-04-01

    When responding to a novel infectious disease outbreak, policies are set under time constraints and uncertainty which can limit the ability to control the outbreak and result in unintended consequences including lack of public confidence. The H1N1 pandemic highlighted challenges in public health decision-making during a public health emergency. Understanding this process to identify barriers and modifiable influences is important to improve the response to future emergencies. The purpose of this study is to examine the H1N1 pandemic decision-making process in Canada with an emphasis on the use of evidence for public health decisions. Using semi-structured key informant interviews conducted after the pandemic (July-November 2010) and a document analysis, we examined four highly debated pandemic policies: use of adjuvanted vaccine by pregnant women, vaccine priority groups and sequencing, school closures and personal protective equipment. Data were analysed for thematic content guided by Lomas' policy decision-making framework as well as indicative coding using iterative methods. We interviewed 40 public health officials and scientific advisors across Canada and reviewed 76 pandemic policy documents. Our analysis revealed that pandemic pre-planning resulted in strong beliefs, which defined the decision-making process. Existing ideological perspectives of evidence strongly influenced how information was used such that the same evidentiary sources were interpreted differently according to the ideological perspective. Participants recognized that current models for public health decision-making failed to make explicit the roles of scientific evidence in relation to contextual factors. Conflict avoidance theory explained policy decisions that went against the prevailing evidence. Clarification of roles and responsibilities within the public health system would reduce duplication and maintain credibility. A more transparent and iterative approach to incorporating evidence

  11. The Camp Health Manual. An Excellent Reference Written Especially for Organized Camps. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, David; Middelkamp, J. Neal

    This book is a guide to the diagnosis and care of sick children in organized camping situations. This book presents health care information for the management of medical and surgical problems by the camp counselor, camp director, camp nurse, and camp physician. The chapters are: (1) Camp Standards; (2) The Infirmary; (3) Infirmary Supplies; (4)…

  12. The Camp Health Manual. An Excellent Reference Written Especially for Organized Camps. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, David; Middelkamp, J. Neal

    This book is a guide to the diagnosis and care of sick children in organized camping situations. This book presents health care information for the management of medical and surgical problems by the camp counselor, camp director, camp nurse, and camp physician. The chapters are: (1) Camp Standards; (2) The Infirmary; (3) Infirmary Supplies; (4)…

  13. Summer Camp as Therapeutic Context: The Camp Logan Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCammon, Susan; And Others

    These symposium papers describe various aspects of the Camp Logan, South Carolina, program, a therapeutic summer residential program for children, ages 8-14, who have significant behavior problems. The philosophy and advantages of the therapeutic camping model are discussed, e.g., structure during the summer, controlled though informal…

  14. Blending Technology with Camp Tradition: Technology Can Simplify Camp Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzman, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Discusses uses of technology appropriate for camps, which are service organizations based on building relationships. Describes relationship marketing and how it can be enhanced through use of Web sites, interactive brochures, and client databases. Outlines other technology uses at camp: automated dispensing of medications, satellite tracking of…

  15. A JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ORIENTATION CAMP, A COORDINATED CAMPING EXPERIENCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEALE, DANIEL; AND OTHERS

    A 2-WEEK SUMMER CAMPING PROGRAM WAS OFFERED TO 61 DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS ABOUT TO ENTER LINCOLN JUNIOR HIGH IN MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA. THE PROGRAM'S PRIMARY PURPOSE WAS TO EASE THE STUDENT'S TRANSITION INTO JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. THROUGH CAMPING ACTIVITIES AND SCHOOL ORIENTATION CLASSES CONDUCTED BY THE LINCOLN STAFF, CAMPERS WOULD BECOME ACQUAINTED…

  16. Camp Director Education Curriculum Guide. Camp Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Sue, Ed.

    Part of Project STRETCH, a special personnel preparation grant, this guide contains 13 units on the practical and philosophical areas practitioners, educators, and consumers believed should be included in a basic course for administration of an organized camp: growth and development special populations, camp director's role, philosophy and…

  17. Camp Greentop's Adventure Camp: We Ain't No Rudypoo's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Diane; Albright, Brian; Purvis, Katie; Creamer, Justin; Pease, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    A day-by-day account describes Camp Greentop's first 5-day adventure camping trip, which was attended by five individuals with disabilities and their counselors. The first day was spent in games and initiatives designed to develop communication, teamwork, and dependability. Other days were devoted to hiking, rock climbing, and whitewater rafting.…

  18. Living with Cancer at Camp Rainbow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Wayne; Breitenstein, Donna

    1988-01-01

    Describes the camping experience at Camp Rainbow (Arkansas), specifically designed for children with cancer and their siblings. Discusses the emotional impact of childhood cancer on patients, parents, and siblings, and suggests positive outcomes of camp participation. Includes eight references. (SV)

  19. Living with Cancer at Camp Rainbow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Wayne; Breitenstein, Donna

    1988-01-01

    Describes the camping experience at Camp Rainbow (Arkansas), specifically designed for children with cancer and their siblings. Discusses the emotional impact of childhood cancer on patients, parents, and siblings, and suggests positive outcomes of camp participation. Includes eight references. (SV)

  20. Evidence for an important tectonostratigraphic seismic marker across Canada Basin and southern Alpha Ridge of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimeld, J.; Chian, D.; Jackson, R.; Hutchinson, D. R.; Mosher, D. C.; Wade, J.; Chapman, B.

    2010-12-01

    Using a modern ice-strengthened seismic acquisition system, more than 12,000 km of high quality 16-channel, vertical incidence seismic reflection and wide-angle sonobuoy data, along with single- and multibeam bathymetric soundings and gravimetric profiles have been acquired across Canada Basin and the southern flank of Alpha Ridge. These datasets are being used to determine the crustal types, rifting processes, subsidence history, and sedimentary sequences of this poorly known region. More than a dozen regional seismostratigraphic units are identified, exceeding ~6.5 km in total sediment thickness in the south, thinning northward toward Alpha Ridge. The oldest regionally mappable unit is informally named “bisque” and is characterized by high-amplitude, continuous, parallel and subparallel internal reflections. The bisque unit averages ~600 m thick, with significant local variability. Along southern Alpha Ridge, the base of the bisque unit is marked by a prominent angular unconformity which can be traced southwards into Canada Basin before becoming obscured by thick overlying units. Though affected by faulting and compaction drape, the bisque unit appears to be concordant with the topography of the underlying acoustic basement. It is also spatially and temporally associated with large structures that are interpreted to be volcanic edifices. Most of the 129 available sonobuoy records show clear wide-angle refractions/reflections from sedimentary and upper and lower crustal layers, which can be ray-traced and velocity modeled using constraints from coincident reflection profiles. Slight ray angle dependent anisotropy is found to best describe these observed data, and is used for conversion between two-way travel time and vertical depth domains. Two distinct features are identified for the bisque layer: 1) a wide-angle reflection observed on nearly all sonobuoy data; and 2) S waves (named PsP), doubly converted at the bisque layer. P-wave refractors from bisque

  1. Trends in developed forest camping

    Treesearch

    Barry A. Garst; Dan R. Williams; Joseph W. Roggenbuck

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the number of forest campers has grown from 13 million in the 1960s to approximately 56 million in 2000 (table 4.6). Camping is now one of the more common ways that Americans spend time in the outdoors, with over one-fourth of the U.S. population participating in some form of camping.

  2. Encountering Child Abuse at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durall, John K.

    1997-01-01

    Defines child abuse, including the three categories: physical, sexual, and psychological. Presents characteristics and behaviors of each type of abuse, and long-term effects. Discusses how to handle abuse that occurs at camp, and the effects on the camp. Sidebars present abuse statistics, 15 activities that promote psychological wellness, and 8…

  3. Explaining the Value of Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Mary Faeth

    1994-01-01

    Overviews the philosophy and theory of camp experiences and discusses the special benefits of camps, including experiences that can lead to significant life-changing outcomes, sound educational goals, a sense of psychological and physical safety, and helping children to deal with social problems such as the degradation of the environment and human…

  4. Kids Camping Takes the Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Vickie L.; Hohnbaum, Claudia

    2002-01-01

    A Wisconsin Girl Scout camp integrated The Healthy Kids Challenge into its program. The camp evaluated policies related to meals, snacks, physical activities, team building, and self-esteem. Staff inservice training resulted in healthier meals on the same budget and developed ownership of the program. Campers and families had opportunities to…

  5. 36 CFR 13.25 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... impacting park resources. (c) Designated campgrounds. Except at designated campgrounds, camping is... camping in designated campgrounds. Violating restrictions, terms, and conditions is prohibited....

  6. 36 CFR 13.25 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... impacting park resources. (c) Designated campgrounds. Except at designated campgrounds, camping is... camping in designated campgrounds. Violating restrictions, terms, and conditions is prohibited....

  7. 36 CFR 13.25 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... impacting park resources. (c) Designated campgrounds. Except at designated campgrounds, camping is... camping in designated campgrounds. Violating restrictions, terms, and conditions is prohibited....

  8. 36 CFR 13.25 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... impacting park resources. (c) Designated campgrounds. Except at designated campgrounds, camping is... camping in designated campgrounds. Violating restrictions, terms, and conditions is prohibited....

  9. 36 CFR 13.25 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... impacting park resources. (c) Designated campgrounds. Except at designated campgrounds, camping is... camping in designated campgrounds. Violating restrictions, terms, and conditions is prohibited....

  10. The impacts of intergovernmental grants on municipal infrastructure: Evidence from the Canada-Quebec infrastructure works 2000 program.

    PubMed

    Mehiriz, Kaddour

    2016-10-01

    This article reports the results of a study on the outcomes of the Canada-Quebec Infrastructure Works 2000 Program (CQIWP), an infrastructure grant program to Quebec municipalities. The focus of this study is on the effects of the CQIWP on municipal investment and physical conditions of drinking water systems and, as such, it goes beyond the usual emphasis on the fiscal consequences of intergovernmental grants. The study results show that the CQIWP was an efficient tool to induce municipalities to increase investment and to reduce the number of aqueduct breakdowns. In light of these findings, this study suggests that upper levels of governments can rely on infrastructure grants to fill the gap in municipal investment and, therefore, to improve the availability and quality of municipal infrastructure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Facilitatory transmitters and cAMP can modulate accommodation as well as transmitter release in Aplysia sensory neurons: Evidence for parallel processing in a single cell

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marc; Hochner, Binyamin; Kandel, Eric R.

    1986-01-01

    Presynaptic facilitation of transmission from sensory to motor neurons contributes significantly to behavioral sensitization of defensive withdrawal reflexes in Aplysia. Presynaptic facilitation is associated with a decrease in the serotonin-sensitive K+ conductance. This decrease broadens the presynaptic action potential. In addition, the procedures that cause facilitation—stimulation of the connective (the pathway from the tail and head), application of modulatory transmitters, or injection of cAMP—also increase the excitability of the sensory neurons as tested with intracellular depolarizing pulses injected into the cell body. The increased excitability is reflected in a decreased threshold for generating action potentials and a reduction in accommodation to prolonged constant current stimuli. By influencing the excitability of the peripheral processes of the sensory neurons, stimulation of the connectives or serotonin also produces a small enhancement of the response of the sensory neurons to a tactile stimulus applied to the siphon. The excitability changes appear to result, at least in part, from the same cellular mechanisms that lead to broadening of the action potential, a cAMP-mediated closure of K+ channels. Therefore, these findings indicate that the same class of mechanisms can, in principle, have a dual action and provide further evidence for parallel processing in the modulation of transmitter release from a single neuron. PMID:16593772

  12. International Physics Summer Camp for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Damian T.; Korsunsky, B.

    2006-12-01

    Each year for the past three years, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, has staged an annual physics summer camp for high school students worldwide. Known as the International Summer School for Young Physicists (ISSYP), it attracts students from all corners of the globe and this year had attendees from 15 countries and 5 continents. The camp is aimed at motivated students around the age of 16 and is a two-week immersion into the exciting world of cutting-edge physics today. It covers topics such as dark matter, superstring theory and quantum computers, and exposes attendees to some of the very latest research results. It includes lectures, tutorials, laboratory visits and small-group projects and, in addition to teaching new material, strives to give students a deeper appreciation of the true nature of science. Throughout, attendees have a great deal of interaction with the institute's scientists. This presentation will give an overview of the camp including the material taught within it, its impact on students and the goals of the program. More information about the camp can be found at: http://www.youngphysicists.ca

  13. The swing of it: Hammock camping.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Hammock camping is dramatically expanding along the Appalachian Trail and raising both questions and concerns among Trail land managers, club members, and backpackers. This article examines some of the advantages and disadvantages of hammock camping, including resource and social impacts. Some Leave No Trace hammock camping practices are included for those using hammocks at well-established campsites and when "pristine-site" camping.

  14. Camp Courageous of Iowa Staff Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp Courageous of Iowa, Monticello.

    Designed as a useful and practical tool for the staff at Camp Courageous of Iowa, a year-round residential camp serving all handicapped individuals, the manual outlines safety rules for camp activities, characteristics of the mentally and physically handicapped, and a general description of the camp and its objectives. Contents of the manual…

  15. Camp Barnabas! No Limits! No Boundaries!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teas, Cyndy; Robertson, Donna

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles Camp Barnabas, a non-denominational Christian camp for people with special needs located in southwest Missouri. For one week, campers have every opportunity possible to be a participant in the world around them, not just an observer. The camp's goal is to provide a typical camp experience--bugs, chants, cheers and incredible…

  16. Slave Labor Camps of the Third Reich.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Adolf

    1983-01-01

    Describes the ground rules used by Nazi architects in choosing the sites for slave labor camps. While some, like Auschwitz, became extermination camps, others also produced armaments. One camp, Theresienstadt, became a "model" camp to show to reporters and Red Cross representatives. (CS)

  17. Self-Concept Change in Camp Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    The 1981 study ascertained whether the self-concept of 66 camp staff from 2 Wisconsin camps changed more than a control group of 18 college students attending summer school; if differences in self-concept were based on a particular characteristic (age, gender, staff position, years at camp); and in what ways, if any, self-concept of camp staff…

  18. DAY CAMPING FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GINGLEND, DAVID; GOULD, KAY

    EMPHASIS IS PLACED ON MENTAL HEALTH, PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT AND COORDINATION (BOTH MOTOR AND MUSCULAR), SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, AND LANGUAGE AND INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT. SECTIONS ARE DEVOTED TO ORGANIZATION OF A DAY CAMPING PROGRAM, SELECTING THE STAFF AND THE CAMPERS, THE DAY CAMP IN OPERATION, DAY CAMPING AS A TRAINING PERIOD, CAMP RELATIONS WITH THE…

  19. Easter Seal Guide to Special Camping Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Helen B., Ed.

    Intended for organizations having or planning to establish resident resident camping programs for people with special needs, this guide supplements the American Camping Association's Standards. The philosophy, aims, and objectives of specialized camping programs are considered, and the following are discussed: administration, camp site selection,…

  20. Self-Concept Change in Camp Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    The 1981 study ascertained whether the self-concept of 66 camp staff from 2 Wisconsin camps changed more than a control group of 18 college students attending summer school; if differences in self-concept were based on a particular characteristic (age, gender, staff position, years at camp); and in what ways, if any, self-concept of camp staff…

  1. American Camping Association Annual Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    Founded in 1910 as the Camp Directors' Association of America, the American Camping Association (ACA) is the largest organization serving the organized camping industry. Over 5,500 members come from all segments of the camp profession. This annual report for 1999 describes ACA activities in support of organizational commitments. These commitments…

  2. Standards for Day and Resident Camps: The Accreditation Programs of the American Camping Association. 1990 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The purpose of this manual is to educate camp directors and camp personnel regarding government-recognized standard practices and procedures followed within the camp industry. These standards also provide a basis for voluntary accreditation of camps by the American Camping Association (ACA) beyond the minimum requirements of licensing. The manual…

  3. Guide to Camp Nursing: Qualifications, Responsibilities Outlined for the Professional Camp Nurse. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auld, Margaret E.; Ehlke, Graceann

    This guide was developed to help the nurse in any outdoor setting or organized camp program serving children and youth to: (1) understand the responsibilities of camp nursing; (2) be aware of the nurse's relationships with the camp director and other workers; (3) relate the camp health program to the overall objectives of the camping program; (4)…

  4. Basic Camp Management: An Introduction to Camp Administration. Revised 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Armand; Ball, Beverly

    This book is the primary text for the Certified Camp Director Program and the Basic Camp Directors Course sponsored by the American Camping Association (Indiana). It provides an orientation for new and prospective camp directors and a quick reference for experienced camp directors. The book covers the following topics: (1) an historical overview…

  5. Basic Camp Management: An Introduction to Camp Administration. Revised 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Armand; Ball, Beverly

    This book is the primary text for the Certified Camp Director Program and the Basic Camp Directors Course sponsored by the American Camping Association (Indiana). It provides an orientation for new and prospective camp directors and a quick reference for experienced camp directors. The book covers the following topics: (1) an historical overview…

  6. Guide to Camp Nursing: Qualifications, Responsibilities Outlined for the Professional Camp Nurse. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auld, Margaret E.; Ehlke, Graceann

    This guide was developed to help the nurse in any outdoor setting or organized camp program serving children and youth to: (1) understand the responsibilities of camp nursing; (2) be aware of the nurse's relationships with the camp director and other workers; (3) relate the camp health program to the overall objectives of the camping program; (4)…

  7. Half-century evidence from western Canada shows forest dynamics are primarily driven by competition followed by climate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Huang, Shongming; He, Fangliang

    2015-03-31

    Tree mortality, growth, and recruitment are essential components of forest dynamics and resiliency, for which there is great concern as climate change progresses at high latitudes. Tree mortality has been observed to increase over the past decades in many regions, but the causes of this increase are not well understood, and we know even less about long-term changes in growth and recruitment rates. Using a dataset of long-term (1958-2009) observations on 1,680 permanent sample plots from undisturbed natural forests in western Canada, we found that tree demographic rates have changed markedly over the last five decades. We observed a widespread, significant increase in tree mortality, a significant decrease in tree growth, and a similar but weaker trend of decreasing recruitment. However, these changes varied widely across tree size, forest age, ecozones, and species. We found that competition was the primary factor causing the long-term changes in tree mortality, growth, and recruitment. Regional climate had a weaker yet still significant effect on tree mortality, but little effect on tree growth and recruitment. This finding suggests that internal community-level processes-more so than external climatic factors-are driving forest dynamics.

  8. A panel multinomial logit analysis of elderly living arrangements: evidence from Aging In Manitoba longitudinal data, Canada.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Sisira; Simpson, Wayne

    2007-12-01

    Utilizing a unique longitudinal survey linked with home care use data, this paper analyzes the determinants of elderly living arrangements in Manitoba, Canada using a random effects multinomial logit model that accounts for unobserved individual heterogeneity. Because current home ownership is potentially endogenous in a living arrangements choice model, we use prior home ownership as an instrument. We also use prior home care use as an instrument for home care and use a random coefficient framework to account for unobserved health status. After controlling for relevant socio-demographic factors and accounting for unobserved individual heterogeneity, we find that home care and home ownership reduce the probability of living in a nursing home. Consistent with previous studies, we find that age is a strong predictor of nursing home entry. We also find that married people, those who have lived longer in the same community, and those who are healthy are more likely to live independently and less likely to be institutionalized or to cohabit with individuals other than their spouse.

  9. Can the solar cycle and climate synchronize the snowshoe hare cycle in Canada? Evidence from tree rings and ice cores.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A R; Gosline, J M; Holdsworth, G; Krebs, C J; Boutin, S; Smith, J N; Boonstra, R; Dale, M

    1993-02-01

    Dark marks in the rings of white spruce less than 50 yr old in Yukon, Canada, are correlated with the number of stems browsed by snowshoe hares. The frequency of these marks is positively correlated with the density of hares in the same region. The frequency of marks in trees germinating between 1751 and 1983 is positively correlated with the hare fur records of the Hudson Bay Company. Both tree marks and hare numbers are correlated with sunspot numbers, and there is a 10-yr periodicity in the correlograms. Phase analysis shows that tree marks and sunspot numbers have periods of nearly constant phase difference during the years 1751-1787, 1838-1870, and 1948 to the present, and these periods coincide with those of high sunspot maxima. The nearly constant phase relations between the annual net snow accumulation on Mount Logan and (1) tree mark ratios, (2) hare fur records before about 1895, and (3) sunspot number during periods of high amplitude in the cycles suggest there is a solar cycle-climate-hare population and tree mark link. We suggest four ways of testing this hypothesis.

  10. Clay mineralogical evidence of a bioclimatically-affected soil, Rouge River basin, South-Central Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaney, W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Holocene soils in drainage basins of South-Central Ontario, Canada, are generally Fluvisols (Entisols) in floodplains transitioning to Brunisols (Inceptisols), Luvisols (Alfisols) and Podzols (Spodosols) in older terraces and in the glaciated tableland. A single landslide sourced from the highest fluvial terrace in the Rouge basin, with a rubble drop of ~ 12 m emplaced a lobe-shaped mass of reworked stream gravel, glaciolacustrine sediment and till, emplaced approximately 6 m above mean water level at a height roughly equivalent to previously dated mid-Holocene terraces and soils. Clay mineralogy of the soil formed in this transported regolith produced the usual semi-detrital/pedogenic distribution of 1:1 (Si:Al = 1:1), 2:1 and 2:1:1 clay minerals as well as primary minerals consisting of plagioclase feldspar, quartz, mica and calcite. Unexpectedly, the presence of moderate amounts of Ca-smectite in the Bk and Ck horizons, relative to a clay-mineral depleted parent material (Cuk), argues for a soil hydrological change affecting the wetting depth in the deposit. The presence of the uncommon 'maidenhair fern' (Adiantum pedantum) in the mass wasted deposit, a plant capable of high evapotranspiration, is interpreted as producing a bioclimatic disruption limiting soil water penetration to near root depth (wetting depth), thus producing a clay mineral anomaly.

  11. Camping Out On An Asteroid

    NASA Image and Video Library

    An astronaut and a geologist recently spent three days camping out as though they were on an asteroid. They were inside NASA's Space Exploration Vehicle prototype, flying it virtually in a digital ...

  12. Von Braun's Dream: Space Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the "Space Camp" program for boys and girls at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center (Huntsville, Alabama), including typical activities. Includes address for obtaining information on participation in the program. (JN)

  13. Amebae of Dictyostelium discoideum respond to an increasing temporal gradient of the chemoattractant cAMP with a reduced frequency of turning: evidence for a temporal mechanism in ameboid chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Varnum-Finney, B; Edwards, K B; Voss, E; Soll, D R

    1987-01-01

    In an aggregation territory of Dictyostelium discoideum, outwardly moving, nondissipating waves of the chemoattractant cAMP sweep across each ameba. At the front of each wave, an ameba experiences an increasing temporal and a positive spatial gradient of cAMP. At the back of a wave, an ameba experiences a decreasing temporal and a negative spatial gradient of cAMP. Employing a perfusion chamber, we have mimicked the temporal dynamics of these waves in the absence of a spatial gradient and demonstrated that the frequency of lateral pseudopod formation and the frequency of turning are dramatically affected by the direction and dynamics of the temporal gradient. In addition, since an ameba will move in a directed fashion up a shallow, nonpulsatile gradient of cAMP, we also mimicked the increasing temporal gradient generated by an ameba moving up a shallow spatial gradient. The frequency of lateral pseudopod formation and the frequency of turning were depressed. Together, these results demonstrate that amebae can assess the direction of a temporal gradient of chemoattractant in the absence of a spatial gradient and alter both the frequency of pseudopod extension and turning, accordingly. Although these results do not rule out the involvement of a spatial mechanism in assessing a spatial gradient, they strongly suggest that the temporal dynamics of a cAMP wave or the temporal gradient generated by an ameba moving through a spatial gradient may play a major role in chemotaxis.

  14. Brock BaseCamp--Outdoor Orientation Programs Come to Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Tim

    2011-01-01

    What exactly is an "outdoor orientation program?" First offered in the United States in the 1930s by Dartmouth College, outdoor orientation programs (OOPs) use adventure programming to help incoming students adjust to university or college. Typically, these programs are conducted in a wilderness or backcountry setting, are several days…

  15. Children's cancer camps: a sense of community, a sense of family.

    PubMed

    Laing, Catherine M; Moules, Nancy J

    2014-05-01

    Childhood cancer is a family affair, and each year in Canada, approximately 1,400 children and adolescents under the age of 20 are diagnosed with cancer. Innumerable challenges accompany this diagnosis, and in recognition of the stress of childhood cancer, children's cancer camps arose in the 1970s to help children and their families escape the rigidity and severity of cancer treatment. Very little is known about these cancer camps, and to that end, a philosophical hermeneutic study was conducted to understand the meaning of children's cancer camps for the child with cancer and the family. Six families were interviewed to bring understanding to this topic. While the research included findings related to the concept of play, fit and acceptance, storytelling, and grief, this paper will detail the finding related to the solidarity of the community--the "camp family"--as one that creates intense, healing bonds.

  16. 5D imaging approaches reveal the formation of distinct intracellular cAMP spatial gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Trinh, Kenny; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel A.; Griswold, John R.; Deal, Joshua; Hoffman, Chase; West, Savannah; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2017-02-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions. Several lines of evidence suggest that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform. However, to date, no studies have measured the kinetics of 3D cAMP distributions within cells. This is largely due to the low signal-tonoise ratio of FRET-based probes. We previously reported that hyperspectral imaging improves the signal-to-noise ratio of FRET measurements. Here we utilized hyperspectral imaging approaches to measure FRET signals in five dimensions (5D) - three spatial (x, y, z), wavelength (λ), and time (t) - allowing us to visualize cAMP gradients in pulmonary endothelial cells. cAMP levels were measured using a FRET-based sensor (H188) comprised of a cAMP binding domain sandwiched between FRET donor and acceptor - Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. We observed cAMP gradients in response to 0.1 or 1 μM isoproterenol, 0.1 or 1 μM PGE1, or 50 μM forskolin. Forskolin- and isoproterenol-induced cAMP gradients formed from the apical (high cAMP) to basolateral (low cAMP) face of cells. In contrast, PGE1-induced cAMP gradients originated from both the basolateral and apical faces of cells. Data suggest that 2D (x,y) studies of cAMP compartmentalization may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D (x,y,z) studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity. Results demonstrate that 5D imaging technologies are powerful tools for measuring biochemical processes in discrete subcellular domains.

  17. Three-dimensional measurement of cAMP gradients using hyperspectral confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel; Favreau, Peter F.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions over a wide range of timescales. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform, and that cAMP compartmentalization is largely responsible for signaling specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway. However, to date, no studies have experimentally measured three dimensional (3D) cAMP distributions within cells. Here we use both 2D and 3D hyperspectral microscopy to visualize cAMP gradients in endothelial cells from the pulmonary microvasculature (PMVECs). cAMP levels were measured using a FRETbased cAMP sensor comprised of a cAMP binding domain from EPAC sandwiched between FRET donors and acceptors -- Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. Data were acquired using either a Nikon A1R spectral confocal microscope or custom spectral microscopy system. Analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from a single confocal slice or from summed images of all slices (2D analysis) indicated little or no cAMP gradients were formed within PMVECs under basal conditions or following agonist treatment. However, analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from 3D cellular geometries (z stacks) demonstrate marked cAMP gradients from the apical to basolateral membrane of PMVECs. These results strongly suggest that 2D imaging studies of cAMP compartmentalization -- whether epifluorescence or confocal microscopy -- may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity.

  18. Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Nichole; Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Schlegel, Jeff

    2008-09-15

    This article examines the future role of energy efficiency as a resource in the Western United States and Canada, as envisioned in the most recent resource plans issued by 16 utilities, representing about 60percent of the region's load. Utility and third-party administered energy efficiency programs proposed by 15 utilities over a ten-year horizon would save almost 19,000 GWh annually, about 5.2percent of forecast load. There are clear regional trends in the aggressiveness of proposed energy savings. California's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) had the most aggressive savings targets, followed by IOUs in the Pacific Northwest, and the lowest savings were proposed by utilities in Inland West states and by two public utilities on the West coast. The adoption of multiple, aggressive policies targeting energy efficiency and climate change appear to produce sizeable energy efficiency commitments. Certain specific policies, such as mandated energy savings goals for California's IOUs and energy efficiency provisions in Nevada's Renewable Portfolio Standard had a direct impact on the level of energy savings included in the resource plans. Other policies, such as revenue decoupling and shareholder incentives, and voluntary or legislatively mandated greenhouse gas emission reduction policies, may have also impacted utilities' energy efficiency commitments, though the effects of these policies are not easily measured. Despite progress among the utilities in our sample, more aggressive energy efficiency strategies that include high-efficiency standards for additional appliances and equipment, tighter building codes for new construction and renovation, as well as more comprehensive ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs are likely to be necessary to achieve a region-wide goal of meeting 20percent of electricity demand with efficiency in 2020.

  19. Moving through, Moving on: Persistence in Postsecondary Education in Atlantic Canada, Evidence from the PSIS. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M no. 072

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnie, Ross; Qiu, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This report provides new and unique empirical evidence on postsecondary education pathways in Atlantic Canada based on the data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS). This study covers postsecondary students in public institutions at all levels of study--college, bachelor's, master's, Ph.D. and first professional degrees--with…

  20. Moving through, Moving on: Persistence in Postsecondary Education in Atlantic Canada, Evidence from the PSIS. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M no. 072

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnie, Ross; Qiu, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This report provides new and unique empirical evidence on postsecondary education pathways in Atlantic Canada based on the data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS). This study covers postsecondary students in public institutions at all levels of study--college, bachelor's, master's, Ph.D. and first professional degrees--with…

  1. Dawson, Canada

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-09

    NASA Terra spacecraft acquired this image of Dawson, Canada. A boom town in 1898, discovery of gold in the Klondike fueled the massive influx of miners, merchants, and other support professions to this town on the Yukon River.

  2. Significance of first-order faults in folding mechanically isotropic layers: evidence from the Sudbury Basin, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Martin; Riller, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The Sudbury Basin in Canada is a fold basin demarcated by the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC). Folding of the SIC is particularly notable due to its petrographically distinct but mechanically similar layers that are hardly strained when compared to folded strata in other deformed terranes. The Sudbury Basin has three ranges, the North Range, the South Range, and the East Range. The East Range differs from the other ranges by inclosing a remarkably shorter SIC segment with a strong concave curvature. Lacking significant mechanical anisotropy and solid-state strain within the SIC brings to question how the SIC in the East Range acquired its curvature. To address this question, we analyzed the orientation of prominent km-scale faults and their slip vectors. These faults transect the SIC at low angles and mimic its plan view curvature suggesting that the faults were folded along with the SIC. We have developed a G.I.S.-based workflow to address this problem that harnesses high-resolution LiDAR data to generate near surface fault geometries, and combines these geometries with local fault-slip inversions of slickensides to identify slip vectors of prominent curved faults. Analysis of slip vectors along curved faults yields clusters of slip vectors with normal and reverse slip motion in the northern and southern fault segments, respectively. The variation in slip vectors is interpreted to be non-primary and thus shows a temporal relationship between faulting and folding of the SIC. Therefore, prominent curved faults in the East Range must have occurred as a pre-folding brittle response to horizontal shortening. These faults later assumed the role of mechanical anisotropic elements necessary for folding of the SIC layers to occur. This interpretation is corroborated by two sets of principal strain axes inferred from fault-slip inversions. The first set is characterized by its principal axis of shortening oriented NW-SE, comparable in orientation to regional shortening as

  3. Diabetes in pregnancy among indigenous women in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States: a systematic review of the evidence for screening in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Catherine; McNamara, Bridgette; Williams, Emily D; Yore, Daniel; Oldenburg, Brian; Oats, Jeremy; Eades, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Recently proposed international guidelines for screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) recommend additional screening in early pregnancy for sub-populations at a high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), such as indigenous women. However, there are criteria that should be met to ensure the benefits outweigh the risks of population-based screening. This review examines the published evidence for early screening for indigenous women as related to these criteria. Any publications were included that referred to diabetes in pregnancy among indigenous women in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States (n = 145). The risk of bias was appraised. There is sufficient evidence describing the epidemiology of diabetes in pregnancy, demonstrating that it imposes a significant disease burden on indigenous women and their infants at birth and across the lifecourse (n = 120 studies). Women with pre-existing T2DM have a higher risk than women who develop GDM during pregnancy. However, there was insufficient evidence to address the remaining five criteria, including the following: understanding current screening practice and rates (n = 7); acceptability of GDM screening (n = 0); efficacy and cost of screening for GDM (n = 3); availability of effective treatment after diagnosis (n = 6); and effective systems for follow-up after pregnancy (n = 5). Given the impact of diabetes in pregnancy, particularly undiagnosed T2DM, GDM screening in early pregnancy offers potential benefits for indigenous women. However, researchers, policy makers and clinicians must work together with communities to develop effective strategies for implementation and minimizing the potential risks. Evidence of effective strategies for primary prevention, GDM treatment and follow-up after pregnancy are urgently needed. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23315909

  4. Camp Standards with Interpretations for the Accreditation of Organized Camps. Revised Edition. Basic Standards Course Participant Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The American Camping Association's (ACA) Camp Standards Program assists camp administrators in providing a quality camp experience and assists the public in selecting camps that meet standards accepted by the industry and recognized by the government. ACA Camp Standards represent desirable practices basic to quality programs. Accredited camps and…

  5. Risk of lung cancer following nonmalignant respiratory conditions: evidence from two case-control studies in Montreal, Canada.

    PubMed

    Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Parent, Marie-Elise; Menzies, Dick; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2006-07-01

    There has been conflicting evidence concerning possible associations between several nonmalignant respiratory diseases and subsequent risk of lung cancer. In the context of two large population based case-control studies of lung cancer carried out in Montreal, we were able to study the possible relationships between a previous history of lung disease and subsequent risk of lung cancer. Interviews for Study I were conducted in 1979-1986 (755 cases and 512 controls) and included questions on asthma and tuberculosis. Interviews for Study II were conducted in 1996-2001 (1205 cases and 1541 controls) and included questions on asthma, tuberculosis, emphysema, and pneumonia. Lung cancer risk was analysed in relation to each condition, adjusting for several potential confounders, including smoking in a three-variable parametrization. To avoid any possible confusion between the respiratory conditions and early symptoms of lung cancer, conditions occurring in the 3 years before diagnosis of cancer were discounted. For asthma there was no evidence of an association. For TB the evidence was inconsistent between Study I and Study II. For both pneumonia and emphysema, there were significantly elevated odds ratios, with point estimates in the range of 1.6-2.4. Our results support the hypothesis that some nonmalignant respiratory diseases may be independent risk factors for lung cancer.

  6. Hydromania: Summer Science Camp Curriculum.

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, Joan

    1995-07-01

    In 1992, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) began a collaborative pilot project with the Portland Parks and Recreation Community Schools Program and others to provide summer science camps to children in Grades 4--6. Camps run two weeks in duration between late June and mid-August. Sessions are five days per week, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. In addition to hands-on science and math curriculum, at least three field trips are incorporated into the educational learning experience. The purpose of the BPA/DOE summer camps is to make available opportunities for fun, motivating experiences in science to students who otherwise would have difficulty accessing them. This includes inner city, minority, rural and low income students. Public law 101-510, which Congress passed in 1990, authorizes DOE facilities to establish collaborative inner-city and rural partnership programs in science and math. A primary goal of the BPA summer hands on science camps is to bring affordable science camp experiences to students where they live. It uses everyday materials to engage students` minds and to give them a sense that they have succeeded through a fun hands-on learning environment.

  7. Management of diabetes at summer camps.

    PubMed

    Ciambra, Roberta; Locatelli, Chiara; Suprani, Tosca; Pocecco, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience in the organization of diabetic children summer-camps since 1973. Guidelines for organization have been recently reported by the SIEDP (Società Italiana di Endocrinologia e Diabetologia Pediatrica). Our attention is focused on diabetes management at camp, organization and planning, medical staff composition and staff training, treatment of diabetes-related emergencies, written camp management plan, diabetes education and psychological issues at camp, prevention of possible risks, assessment of effectiveness of education in summer camps and research at camp.

  8. Revisiting cAMP signaling in the carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Ana R.; Holmes, Andrew P.; Conde, Sílvia V.; Gauda, Estelle B.; Monteiro, Emília C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic carotid body (CB) activation is now recognized as being essential in the development of hypertension and promoting insulin resistance; thus, it is imperative to characterize the chemotransduction mechanisms of this organ in order to modulate its activity and improve patient outcomes. For several years, and although controversial, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was considered an important player in initiating the activation of the CB. However, its relevance was partially displaced in the 90s by the emerging role of the mitochondria and molecules such as AMP-activated protein kinase and O2-sensitive K+ channels. Neurotransmitters/neuromodulators binding to metabotropic receptors are essential to chemotransmission in the CB, and cAMP is central to this process. cAMP also contributes to raise intracellular Ca2+ levels, and is intimately related to the cellular energetic status (AMP/ATP ratio). Furthermore, cAMP signaling is a target of multiple current pharmacological agents used in clinical practice. This review (1) provides an outline on the classical view of the cAMP-signaling pathway in the CB that originally supported its role in the O2/CO2 sensing mechanism, (2) presents recent evidence on CB cAMP neuromodulation and (3) discusses how CB activity is affected by current clinical therapies that modify cAMP-signaling, namely dopaminergic drugs, caffeine (modulation of A2A/A2B receptors) and roflumilast (PDE4 inhibitors). cAMP is key to any process that involves metabotropic receptors and the intracellular pathways involved in CB disease states are likely to involve this classical second messenger. Research examining the potential modification of cAMP levels and/or interactions with molecules associated with CB hyperactivity is currently in its beginning and this review will open doors for future explorations. PMID:25389406

  9. Group-Integrated Reality Therapy in a Wilderness Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Arthur F.

    1992-01-01

    Abridges Glasser's (1975) theory of United States as identity society to explicate causative characteristics of "identity achievers" versus "failures" in U.S. society. Discusses Reality Therapy and therapeutic treatment programs developed by Hope Center Wilderness Camp. Presents evidence to suggest that group-integrated reality…

  10. Graying America Presents Golden Opportunities for Camp Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosky, Alicia C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses quality-of-life issues for ever-increasing population of American elderly, emphasizing value of recreation. Offers organized camping as way of exposing older adults to enjoyable physical activities. Cites evidence supporting beneficial effects of regular exercise for elderly, beginning at any age. (TES)

  11. Graying America Presents Golden Opportunities for Camp Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosky, Alicia C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses quality-of-life issues for ever-increasing population of American elderly, emphasizing value of recreation. Offers organized camping as way of exposing older adults to enjoyable physical activities. Cites evidence supporting beneficial effects of regular exercise for elderly, beginning at any age. (TES)

  12. Activity Camps for Children with Cancer. Research Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balen, Rachel; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examines the impact of camping on pediatric cancer patients in the United States and Britain. Finds some evidence of increases in physical and social activities and knowledge about cancer and its treatment, and decreases in self-engaged activities. Notes that some studies point to potential deleterious effects from an extensive focus on disease.…

  13. Group-Integrated Reality Therapy in a Wilderness Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Arthur F.

    1992-01-01

    Abridges Glasser's (1975) theory of United States as identity society to explicate causative characteristics of "identity achievers" versus "failures" in U.S. society. Discusses Reality Therapy and therapeutic treatment programs developed by Hope Center Wilderness Camp. Presents evidence to suggest that group-integrated reality…

  14. The evolution of calcite-bearing kimberlites by melt-rock reaction: evidence from polymineralic inclusions within clinopyroxene and garnet megacrysts from Lac de Gras kimberlites, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussweiler, Y.; Stone, R. S.; Pearson, D. G.; Luth, R. W.; Stachel, T.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.; Menzies, A.

    2016-07-01

    Megacrystic (>1 cm) clinopyroxene (Cr-diopside) and garnet (Cr-pyrope) xenocrysts within kimberlites from Lac de Gras (Northwest Territories, Canada) contain fully crystallized melt inclusions. These `polymineralic inclusions' have previously been interpreted to form by necking down of melts at mantle depths. We present a detailed petrographical and geochemical investigation of polymineralic inclusions and their host crystals to better understand how they form and what they reveal about the evolution of kimberlite melt. Genetically, the megacrysts are mantle xenocrysts with peridotitic chemical signatures indicating an origin within the lithospheric mantle (for the Cr-diopsides studied here ~4.6 GPa, 1015 °C). Textural evidence for disequilibrium between the host crystals and their polymineralic inclusions (spongy rims in Cr-diopside, kelyphite in Cr-pyrope) is consistent with measured Sr isotopic disequilibrium. The preservation of disequilibrium establishes a temporal link to kimberlite eruption. In Cr-diopsides, polymineralic inclusions contain phlogopite, olivine, chromite, serpentine, and calcite. Abundant fluid inclusion trails surround the inclusions. In Cr-pyropes, the inclusions additionally contain Al-spinel, clinopyroxene, and dolomite. The major and trace element compositions of the inclusion phases are generally consistent with the early stages of kimberlite differentiation trends. Extensive chemical exchange between the host phases and the inclusions is indicated by enrichment of the inclusions in major components of the host crystals, such as Cr2O3 and Al2O3. This chemical evidence, along with phase equilibria constraints, supports the proposal that the inclusions within Cr-diopside record the decarbonation reaction: dolomitic melt + diopside → forsterite + calcite + CO2, yielding the observed inclusion mineralogy and producing associated (CO2-rich) fluid inclusions. Our study of polymineralic inclusions in megacrysts provides clear mineralogical

  15. Astro Camp is a blast!

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-08

    An Astro Camp counselor and her campers perform a science experiment to learn what types of `fuel' will best propel their 'rockets.' Stennis Space Center's popular series of day camps have campers design, build and test model rockets based on the principles that would be used to build different types of rockets suitable for a mission to the moon or Mars. They learn details like how far they would travel, how long it would take, what supplies they would need and how to survive in that environment.

  16. Astro Camp is a blast!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    An Astro Camp counselor and her campers perform a science experiment to learn what types of `fuel' will best propel their 'rockets.' Stennis Space Center's popular series of day camps have campers design, build and test model rockets based on the principles that would be used to build different types of rockets suitable for a mission to the moon or Mars. They learn details like how far they would travel, how long it would take, what supplies they would need and how to survive in that environment.

  17. Making Camp Environmentally Friendly: How Two Camps Did It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerman, Martin; Griner-Johnson, Russ

    1991-01-01

    Describes the efforts of two camps administered by the Brandeis-Bardin Institute (Brandeis, California) in implementing water and energy conservation programs, involving recycling, composting, and landfill savings. Programs were successful in eliminating excess waste and teaching campers to care more about their environments at home and at work.…

  18. Going Camping? A Basic Guide to Camping with Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1977

    Beginning with the "often overlooked areas", this guide to camping trips for secondary students presents initial planning procedures such as: site selection; number of leaders per number of students (2 leaders for each group of 10-12); parental permission forms; transportation arrangements; public school announcements; medical aid expertise and…

  19. Making Camp Environmentally Friendly: How Two Camps Did It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerman, Martin; Griner-Johnson, Russ

    1991-01-01

    Describes the efforts of two camps administered by the Brandeis-Bardin Institute (Brandeis, California) in implementing water and energy conservation programs, involving recycling, composting, and landfill savings. Programs were successful in eliminating excess waste and teaching campers to care more about their environments at home and at work.…

  20. North to Alaska: Evidence for conveyor belt transport of Dungeness crab larvae along the west coast of the United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, W.; Douglas, D.C.; Shirley, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    We propose and evaluate the hypothesis that Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) larvae from the northwestern coast of the United States and Canada can be transported northward to southeastern Alaska. Larvae collected in southeastern Alaska during May and June 1997–2004 had abundances and stages that varied seasonally, interannually, and spatially. An unexpected presence of late-stage larvae in spring raises a question regarding their origin, and the most plausible explanation is that they hatched off the northern Washington and British Columbia coasts and were transported to southeastern Alaska. Buoy drift tracks support the hypothesis that larvae released off the northern Washington and British Columbia coasts during the peak hatching season can be physically transported to southeastern Alaska, arriving as late-stage larvae in May and June, when local larvae are only beginning to hatch. A northward spring progression of monthly mean 7°C SST isotherms and phytoplankton blooms provide further evidence that environmental conditions are conducive for larval growth and metabolism during the transport period. The proposed larval transport suggests possible unidirectional gene flow between southern and northern populations of Dungeness crabs in southeastern Alaska.

  1. Trends and structural shifts in health tourism: evidence from seasonal time-series data on health-related travel spending by Canada during 1970-2010.

    PubMed

    Loh, Chung-Ping A

    2015-05-01

    There has been a growing interest in better understanding the trends and determinants of health tourism activities. While much of the expanding literature on health tourism offers theoretical or qualitative discussion, empirical evidences has been lacking. This study employs Canada's outbound health tourism activities as an example to examine the trends in health tourism and its association with changing domestic health care market characteristics. A time-series model that accounts for potential structural changes in the trend is employed to analyze the quarterly health-related travel spending series reported in the Balance of Payments Statistics (BOPS) during 1970-2010 (n = 156). We identified a structural shift point which marks the start of an accelerated growth of health tourism and a flattened seasonality in such activities. We found that the health tourism activities of Canadian consumers increase when the private investment in medical facilities declines or when the private MPI increases during the years following the structural-change. We discussed the possible linkage of the structural shift to the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), which went into effect in January, 1995.

  2. Camp Counseling: A Great Resume Builder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fass, Jack R.

    1993-01-01

    Advocates camp counseling as an excellent preparation for human services careers. Camp counseling offers (1) leisure services preparation; (2) leadership training; (3) collaborative skills; and (4) life experience. (KS)

  3. Diatom, Pollen, and Chemical Evidence of Postglacial Climatic Change at Big Lake, South-Central British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Joseph R.; Cumming, Brian F.; Leavitt, Peter R.; Chiu, Marian; Smol, John P.; Szeicz, Julian

    2001-05-01

    Postglacial climatic conditions were inferred from cores taken from Big Lake in southern British Columbia. Low concentrations of nonarboreal pollen and pigments near the base of the core suggest that initial conditions were cool. Increases in both aquatic and terrestrial production suggest warmer and moister conditions until ∼8500 cal yr B.P. Hyposaline diatom assemblages, increases in nonarboreal pollen, and increased concentrations of pigments suggest the onset of arid conditions from ∼8500 to ∼7500 cal yr B.P. Slightly less arid conditions are inferred from ∼7500 until ∼6660 cal yr B.P. based on the diatoms, small increases and greater variability in biogenic silica and pigments, and higher percentages of arboreal pollen. At ∼6600 cal yr B.P., changes in diatoms, pigments, biogenic silica, and organic matter suggest that Big Lake became fresh, deep, and eutrophic until ∼3600 cal yr B.P., when water levels and nutrients decreased slightly. Our paleoclimatic inferences are similar to pollen-based studies until ∼6600 cal yr B.P. However, unlike these studies, our multiple lines of evidence from Big Lake imply large changes in effective moisture since 6000 cal yr B.P.

  4. Including People with Disabilities in Camp Programs: A Resource for Camp Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roswal, Glenn M., Ed.; Dowd, Karen J., Ed.; Bynum, Jerry W., Ed.

    Written primarily by camp administrators affiliated with the National Easter Seal Society, this publication is designed to help camp directors meet the challenges of including campers of all abilities in their camp programs. The first section provides an overview of the inclusion concept in general and at camp, and discusses legal and medical…

  5. Including People with Disabilities in Camp Programs: A Resource for Camp Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roswal, Glenn M., Ed.; Dowd, Karen J., Ed.; Bynum, Jerry W., Ed.

    Written primarily by camp administrators affiliated with the National Easter Seal Society, this publication is designed to help camp directors meet the challenges of including campers of all abilities in their camp programs. The first section provides an overview of the inclusion concept in general and at camp, and discusses legal and medical…

  6. Multielement statistical evidence for uraniferous hydrothermal activity in sandstones overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shishi; Hattori, Keiko; Grunsky, Eric C.

    2017-07-01

    The Phoenix U deposit, with indicated resources of 70.2 M lb U3O8, occurs along the unconformity between the Proterozoic Athabasca Group sandstones and the crystalline basement rocks. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to the compositions of sandstones overlying the deposit. Among PCs, PC1 accounts for the largest variability of U and shows a positive association of U with rare earth elements (REEs) + Y + Cu + B + Na + Mg + Ni + Be. The evidence suggests that U was dispersed into sandstones together with these elements during the uraniferous hydrothermal activity. Uranium shows an inverse association with Zr, Hf, Th, Fe, and Ti. Since they are common in detrital heavy minerals, such heavy minerals are not the major host of U. The elements positively associated with U are high in concentrations above the deposit, forming a "chimney-like" or "hump-like" distribution in a vertical section. Their enrichment patterns are explained by the ascent of basement fluids through faults to sandstones and the circulation of basinal fluids around the deposit. The Pb isotope compositions of whole rocks are similar to expected values calculated from the concentrations of U, Th, and Pb except for sandstones close to the deposit. The data suggest that in situ decay of U and Th is responsible for the Pb isotope compositions of most sandstones and that highly radiogenic Pb dispersed from the deposit to the proximal sandstones long after the mineralization. This secondary dispersion is captured in PC8, which has low eigenvalue. The data suggests that the secondary dispersion has minor effect on the overall lithogeochemistry of sandstones.

  7. Thermochemical Structure and Stratification of the Hudson Bay Lithosphere, Northern Canada: Evidence from Multi-Observable Probabilistic Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Afonso, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogeny (THO) was a Himalayan-style collision that marked an important stage of assembly of the Canadian Shield. Today, the THO is largely concealed beneath the Hudson Bay intracratonic basin. Regional seismic tomography shows a thick, high-wavespeed cratonic keel beneath the region, but also includes significant local heterogeneity that may be associated with the imprint of the THO, providing clues to Precambrian plate-tectonic processes. In this study, we use multi-observable probabilistic inversions to investigate the thermal and compositional state of the Hudson Bay lithosphere, to explain the seismic wavespeed variations and to constrain in more detail potential signatures of the oldest cratonic cores and the THO collision. Rayleigh wave dispersion curves, surface heatflow, geoid anomalies and topography are jointly inverted to give a pseudo-3D model of the upper mantle beneath the region. Low temperatures are pervasive across the region, leading to a thick thermal lithosphere whose base lies at depths of 250 km or greater. The data are best explained by stratification of the lithosphere into (at least) two layers, with the top layer extremely depleted and the bottom layer generally more fertile, though still depleted with respect to the sublithospheric mantle. Across the Bay and Hudson Strait, a narrow zone of lowered depletion is observed in the top layer. The position of this anomaly coincides geographically with the THO and with the wavespeed reduction noted in previous seismic studies. It is likely that this feature represents juvenile material trapped between the cratonic cores in the final stages of the THO. We also find evidence for anomalous mid-lithospheric compositions in certain areas, notably west of Hudson Bay. Additionally, some of the long-period surface wave data requires lower than average seismic wavespeeds below the lithosphere, suggesting localised regions of higher temperature/attenuation in the upper

  8. Increasing atmospheric antimony contamination in the northern hemisphere: snow and ice evidence from Devon Island, Arctic Canada.

    PubMed

    Krachler, Michael; Zheng, James; Koerner, Roy; Zdanowicz, Christian; Fisher, David; Shotyk, William

    2005-12-01

    Adopting recently developed clean laboratory techniques, antimony (Sb) and scandium (Sc) deposition were measured in a 63.72 m-long ice core (1842-1996) and a 5 m deep snow pit (1994-2004) collected on Devon Island, Canadian High Arctic. Antimony concentrations ranged from 0.07 to 108 pg g(-1) with a median of 0.98 pg g(-1)(N= 510). Scandium, used as a conservative reference element, revealed that dust inputs were effectively constant during the last 160 years. The atmospheric Sb signal preserved in the ice core reflects contamination from industrialisation, the economic boom which followed WWII, as well as the comparatively recent introduction of flue gas filter technologies and emission reduction efforts. Natural contributions to the total Sb inventory are negligible, meaning that anthropogenic emissions have dominated atmospheric Sb deposition throughout the entire period. The seasonal resolution of the snow pit showed that aerosols deposited during the Arctic winter, when air masses are derived mainly from Eurasia, show the greatest Sb concentrations. Deposition during summer, when air masses come mainly from North America, is still enriched in Sb, but less so. Snow and ice provide unambiguous evidence that enrichments of Sb in Arctic air have increased 50% during the past three decades, with two-thirds being deposited during winter. Most Sb is produced in Asia, primarily from Sb sulfides such as stibnite (Sb2S3), but also as a by-product of lead and copper smelting. In addition there is a growing worldwide use of Sb in automobile brake pads, plastics and flame retardants. In contrast to Pb which has gone into decline during the same interval because of the gradual elimination of gasoline lead additives, the enrichments of Sb have been increasing and today clearly exceed those of Pb. Given that the toxicity of Sb is comparable to that of Pb, Sb has now replaced Pb in the rank of potentially toxic trace metals in the Arctic atmosphere.

  9. Testing the environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis with bird populations as habitat-specific environmental indicators: evidence from Canada.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Van; Martínez-Espiñeira, Roberto

    2008-04-01

    The traditional environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis postulates that environmental degradation follows an inverted U-shaped relationship with gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. We tested the EKC hypothesis with bird populations in 5 different habitats as environmental quality indicators. Because birds are considered environmental goods, for them the EKC hypothesis would instead be associated with a U-shaped relationship between bird populations and GDP per capita. In keeping with the literature, we included other variables in the analysis-namely, human population density and time index variables (the latter variable captured the impact of persistent and exogenous climate and/or policy changes on bird populations over time). Using data from 9 Canadian provinces gathered over 37 years, we used a generalized least-squares regression for each bird habitat type, which accounted for the panel structure of the data, the cross-sectional dependence across provinces in the residuals, heteroskedasticity, and fixed- or random-effect specifications of the models. We found evidence that supports the EKC hypothesis for 3 of the 5 bird population habitat types. In addition, the relationship between human population density and the different bird populations varied, which emphasizes the complex nature of the impact that human populations have on the environment. The relationship between the time-index variable and the different bird populations also varied, which indicates there are other persistent and significant influences on bird populations over time. Overall our EKC results were consistent with those found for threatened bird species, indicating that economic prosperity does indeed act to benefit some bird populations.

  10. Antarctic Camps Snow Drift Management Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Glacier camp (upper right, courtesy of Douglas Lewis, Raytheon Polar Services Company, Centennial, CO). Approved for public release; distribution...4 Case Study: Pine Island Glacier Camp............................................................................................ 30 4.1 Determining...B: Summary of Wind Data at the Pine Island Glacier Camp ............................................ 83 Appendix C: Summary of Estimated Transport

  11. Camping & the Whirl of Insurance Cycles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgrim, Darrow

    1988-01-01

    Suggests possible responses for summer camp operators facing insurance rate increases and other insurance industry changes. Examines areas of risk in summer camping and suggests general ways that camps can become more desirable to the insurance industry as "insurable groups." (TES)

  12. Growth potential of the family camping market

    Treesearch

    W.F. LaPage; W.F. LaPage

    1973-01-01

    A study of the camping market's short-term growth potential, based upon interviews with the heads of 2,003 representative American households. The study estimates the size of the potential camping market and divides it into three segments: those families with a high, medium and low propensity to become campers. The developed camping market is also divided into an...

  13. Day Camp Manual: Program. Book IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, William

    Book IV in a 5-book day camp manual discusses the camp program. Section I describes the organization, definition, and elements essential to successful day camp programs. Section II, which addresses the benefits and special considerations of mass programs, includes rainy day contingencies, materials to have on hand, and activity suggestions.…

  14. Evaluation of Florida's Eckerd Wilderness Camp Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Health and Rehabilitative Services, Tallahassee.

    This report evaluates year-long wilderness camping rehabilitation program for juvenile delinquents believed "emotionally problemed." The remote camps teach through an experience curriculum encompassing daily camping style tasks, with integration of experience via three-day home visits every six weeks followed by written reports by…

  15. Resident camp directors, spirituality, and wilderness

    Treesearch

    Michael Rule; Edward Udd

    2002-01-01

    A vast majority of resident camp directors in this study perceived wilderness to hold spiritual qualities. In addition, resident camp directors also valued educational components for campers and staff as important before they ventured into wilderness areas. Resident camp directors influence the lives of millions of youth and they are an important provider of wilderness...

  16. The Elementary Camp Experience: An ARC Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krzemien, Marta; Krotzer, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language Elementary Summer Camp is a fantastic way to spend part of the summer. For the past ten years in Glastonbury, Connecticut, the authors have offered a variety of foreign language elementary camps that meet daily for three hours for three to four weeks during July. Currently, they offer camps for Chinese, English Language Learners…

  17. American Camping Association Annual Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The American Camping Association (ACA) is a community of camp professionals dedicated to enriching the lives of children and adults through the camp experience. This annual report describes ACA activities during 2000, grouped in five areas: (1) expansion of services and other development of ACA's 24 regional sections and partnerships with other…

  18. Language Camps: Thirteen Years of Minor Miracles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jean

    A language camp program that began with a small group of 10- to 12-year-olds whose faculty parents wanted them to retain the German learned on sabbaticals abroad has developed into a program of annual week-long day and resident camps for 150 children, aged 9 to 14 years, learning German, French, Spanish, and Norwegian. The camp was originally…

  19. Extension Sustainability Camp: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brain, Roslynn; Upton, Sally; Tingey, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability Camps provide an opportunity for Extension educators to be in the forefront of sustainability outreach and to meet the growing demand for sustainability education. This article shares development, implementation, and evaluation of an Extension Sustainability Camp for youth, grades 4-6. Camp impact was measured via daily pre-and…

  20. Day Camp Manual: Program. Book IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, William

    Book IV in a 5-book day camp manual discusses the camp program. Section I describes the organization, definition, and elements essential to successful day camp programs. Section II, which addresses the benefits and special considerations of mass programs, includes rainy day contingencies, materials to have on hand, and activity suggestions.…

  1. Camping for Youth with Chronic Illnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Joanna L.; Keller, M. Jean

    1994-01-01

    Camp Fortnight brought 25 British children with cystic fibrosis to experience a 2-week camping program in Texas. Campers (ages 11-15) participated in wilderness experiences, a challenge course, fishing, horseback riding, creative arts, cooking, hiking, outdoor camping, and field trips. Profiles campers and their experiences. (LP)

  2. Camping for Youth with Chronic Illnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Joanna L.; Keller, M. Jean

    1994-01-01

    Camp Fortnight brought 25 British children with cystic fibrosis to experience a 2-week camping program in Texas. Campers (ages 11-15) participated in wilderness experiences, a challenge course, fishing, horseback riding, creative arts, cooking, hiking, outdoor camping, and field trips. Profiles campers and their experiences. (LP)

  3. 36 CFR 13.1208 - Lake Camp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Camp. 13.1208 Section 13... § 13.1208 Lake Camp. Leaving a boat, trailer, or vehicle unattended for more than 72 hours at the facilities associated with the Lake Camp launching ramp is prohibited without authorization from the...

  4. 36 CFR 13.1208 - Lake Camp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Camp. 13.1208 Section 13... § 13.1208 Lake Camp. Leaving a boat, trailer, or vehicle unattended for more than 72 hours at the facilities associated with the Lake Camp launching ramp is prohibited without authorization from the...

  5. 36 CFR 13.1208 - Lake Camp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Camp. 13.1208 Section 13... § 13.1208 Lake Camp. Leaving a boat, trailer, or vehicle unattended for more than 72 hours at the facilities associated with the Lake Camp launching ramp is prohibited without authorization from the...

  6. 36 CFR 13.1208 - Lake Camp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Camp. 13.1208 Section 13... § 13.1208 Lake Camp. Leaving a boat, trailer, or vehicle unattended for more than 72 hours at the facilities associated with the Lake Camp launching ramp is prohibited without authorization from the...

  7. 36 CFR 13.1208 - Lake Camp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Camp. 13.1208 Section 13... § 13.1208 Lake Camp. Leaving a boat, trailer, or vehicle unattended for more than 72 hours at the facilities associated with the Lake Camp launching ramp is prohibited without authorization from the...

  8. Extension Sustainability Camp: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brain, Roslynn; Upton, Sally; Tingey, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability Camps provide an opportunity for Extension educators to be in the forefront of sustainability outreach and to meet the growing demand for sustainability education. This article shares development, implementation, and evaluation of an Extension Sustainability Camp for youth, grades 4-6. Camp impact was measured via daily pre-and…

  9. American Camping Association Annual Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The American Camping Association (ACA) is a community of camp professionals dedicated to enriching the lives of children and adults through the camp experience. This annual report describes ACA activities during 2000, grouped in five areas: (1) expansion of services and other development of ACA's 24 regional sections and partnerships with other…

  10. Winter Wilderness Travel and Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilchrest, Norman

    Knowledge and skill are needed for safe and enjoyable travel and camping in the wilderness in winter. The beauty of snow and ice, reduced human use, and higher tolerance of animals toward humans make the wilderness attractive during winter. The uniqueness of winter travel presents several challenges that are not present in other seasons. Safety is…

  11. Lyme Disease Comes to Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Describes one summer camp's plan for dealing with Lyme disease. Describes the disease and the deer tick. Recommends avoiding tick exposure through clothing, frequent examination, showers, and avoiding high grass and brushy areas, and using chemical insect repellents and chemicals to kill ticks in deer mouse nests. (DHP)

  12. Lyme Disease Comes to Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Describes one summer camp's plan for dealing with Lyme disease. Describes the disease and the deer tick. Recommends avoiding tick exposure through clothing, frequent examination, showers, and avoiding high grass and brushy areas, and using chemical insect repellents and chemicals to kill ticks in deer mouse nests. (DHP)

  13. Sleep At Camp: A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pravda, Myra

    1997-01-01

    Among 40 camp directors surveyed, the majority believed that campers get enough sleep, but that staff members and directors do not get enough sleep. Addresses how sleep deprivation can affect job performance and offers strategies for helping staff understand the importance of sleep to keep them alert and functioning in their job. Includes…

  14. Camping and RV travel trends

    Treesearch

    Gerald L. Cole; Wilbur F. LaPage

    1980-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from industry sources and several regional and national camping market surveys conducted between 1960 and 1979. Growth of the industry, together with pricing practices, energy impacts and occupancy data was also examined. By 1978, the number of inactive campers outnumbered active campers nationwide with persons less than 30 showing the...

  15. AVTC Hosts TechnoCamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    The Area Vo-Tech Center (AVTC) in Russellville, Arkansas, recently hosted its first TechnoCamp to encourage enrollment based on the aptitude and interest level of the students enrolling in the various programs. The center currently offers student enrollment in auto technology, computer engineering, cosmetology, construction technology, drafting…

  16. Sleep At Camp: A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pravda, Myra

    1997-01-01

    Among 40 camp directors surveyed, the majority believed that campers get enough sleep, but that staff members and directors do not get enough sleep. Addresses how sleep deprivation can affect job performance and offers strategies for helping staff understand the importance of sleep to keep them alert and functioning in their job. Includes…

  17. The Emotional Benefits of Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Rebecca Cowan

    1991-01-01

    Regardless of participant background, age, or ethnic origin, camp can aid in the following key components of emotional maturity: open, positive and appropriate expression of feelings; self-acceptance; a sense of self; an awareness and acceptance of others and their feelings; the ability to develop relationships; and emotional stability. (LP)

  18. AVTC Hosts TechnoCamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    The Area Vo-Tech Center (AVTC) in Russellville, Arkansas, recently hosted its first TechnoCamp to encourage enrollment based on the aptitude and interest level of the students enrolling in the various programs. The center currently offers student enrollment in auto technology, computer engineering, cosmetology, construction technology, drafting…

  19. Boot Camp Prisons in 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Doris Layton

    1993-01-01

    Describes the boot-camp prison program, its goals, and its drug-treatment and drug-education activities, and its development and change. The article presents the results of a multisite study from eight states that examined the variations in the shock-incarceration concept and its effect. (GLR)

  20. Pediatric surgical camps as one model of global surgical partnership: a way forward.

    PubMed

    Blair, Geoffrey K; Duffy, Damian; Birabwa-Male, Doreen; Sekabira, John; Reimer, Eleanor; Koyle, Martin; Hudson, Guy R; Stanger, Jennifer; Langer, Monica; Eeson, Gareth; Gan, Heng; McLean, Sean; Kanaroglou, Nikki; Kisa, Phyllis; Kakembo, Nasser; Lidstone, Katherine

    2014-05-01

    A uniquely Ugandan method of holding surgical "camps" has been one means to deal with the volume of patients needing surgery and provides opportunities for global partnership. We describe an evolved partnership between pediatric surgeons in Uganda and Canada wherein Pediatric Surgical Camps were organized by the Ugandans with team participation from Canadians. The camp goals were to provide pediatric surgical and anesthetic service and education and to foster collaboration as a way forward to assist Ugandan health delivery. Three camps were held in Uganda in 2008, 2011, and 2013. A total of 677 children were served through a range of operations from hernia repair to more complex surgery. The educational mandate was achieved through the involvement of 10 Canadian trainees, 20 Ugandan trainees in surgery and anesthesia, and numerous medical students. Formal educational sessions were held. The collaborative mandate was manifest in relationship building, an understanding of Ugandan health care, research projects completed, agreement on future camps, and a proposal for a Canadian-Ugandan pediatric surgery teaching alliance. Pediatric Surgical Camps founded on global partnerships with goals of service, education, and collaboration can be one way forward to improve pediatric surgery access and expertise globally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Camp Wanna-Read: Program Guide for the Texas Reading Club 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, Robin Works

    Camp Wanna-Read is the theme for the 1991 program for the Texas Reading Club, which centers around the experiences and types of things that happen at summer camp. Each chapter is a type of camp a child might attend such as cooking camp, art camp, music camp, science camp, Indian camp, nature camp, and regular summer camp. The chapters are divided…

  2. Cryofacies evidences of a Yedoma (?) development during the last glacial maximum in Yukon (Canada) along the current Alaska border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, E.; Fortier, D.; Shur, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In some areas that remained unglaciated during the Late Pleistocene, inorganic and organic sedimentation supported syngenetic upward permafrost development and the creation of so-called yedoma deposits (Ice Complex). This type of periglacial deposit is usually very ice-rich and is highly unstable upon thawing. As this deposit thaws, the landscape goes from a carbon sink to a carbon and inorganic sediment source. This carbon can be released into the environment or transformed to CH4. Yedoma deposits have been extensively studied in Russia and more recently in Alaska. However, very few studies have focused on yedomas of Yukon. With the objective to provide regional information on yedoma distribution in North America, we present here preliminary field evidences of a yedoma deposit near Beaver Creek, close to current Alaska border. 28 boreholes were core-drilled, and cores were described and analyzed in the laboratory. Well-developed microlenticular cryostructures in silt and numerous small rootlets are typical of yedoma deposit. Tiny ice lenses are formed in fine-grained sediment by cryosuction and rootlets gets incorporated into the permafrost as the table rises syngenetically in response to surface sedimentation. During sedimentary accumulation, when sedimentation slows down, peat layers can be formed at the surface. This change in material properties often lead to the development of belt-like cryostructures (thick ice lenses separated by reticulate ice veins). At Beaver Creek, the microlenticular and belt-like cryofacies with rootlets (typical of syngenetic ice-rich yedoma) were abundant in Units 2A and 2C. The average ice content of Units 2A and 2C was respectively 91 % and 109 %, and the organic matter content (loss on ignition) was 6 % and 8 %. Significant thaw strain was measured in Units 2A (50%) and 2C (35%). Interestingly Unit 2B was very ice-poor (gravimetric ice content: 47 %, thaw strain: 9 %) and showed only porous cryostructure (interstitial ice) in

  3. Mantle derivation of Archean amphibole-bearing granitoid and associated mafic rocks: evidence from the southern Superior Province, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutcliffe, Richard H.; Smith, Alan R.; Doherty, William; Barnett, Robert L.

    1990-08-01

    O/ (MgO+0.9 FeOTOTAL) from 0.60 to 0.70 and CT >150 ppm) are comagmatic with the evolved granitoids and indicate that the suites are mantle-derived. Isotopic studies of Archean monzodioritic rocks have shown LREE enrichment and initial 143Nd/144Nd ratios indicating derivation from mantle sources enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) shortly before melting. Mineral assemblages record lower PH2O with increased alkali contents of the suites. This evidence, in conjunction with experimental studies, suggests that increased alkali contents may reflect decreased PH2O during mantle melting. These features indicate that ˜2.73 Ga tonalitic rocks are derived from more hydrous mantle sources than ˜2.68 Ga syenitic rocks, and that the spectrum of late Archean juvenile granitoid rocks is broader than previously recognized. Comparison with Phanerozoic and recent plutonic suites suggests that these Archean suites are subduction related.

  4. The ACA Standards Organizer. A Tool for the Preparation of Camps for Visitation for American Camping Association Camp Accreditation and Site Approval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Mary Faeth

    This comprehensive guide helps camp administrators prepare for camp accreditation and site approval visits by the American Camping Association (ACA). The introductory sections outline the purpose and administration of the standards program and provide definitions of camping terms. Standards are organized under one section for camp accreditation…

  5. The ACA Standards Organizer. A Tool for the Preparation of Camps for Visitation for American Camping Association Camp Accreditation and Site Approval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Mary Faeth

    This comprehensive guide helps camp administrators prepare for camp accreditation and site approval visits by the American Camping Association (ACA). The introductory sections outline the purpose and administration of the standards program and provide definitions of camping terms. Standards are organized under one section for camp accreditation…

  6. Canadian Shield brine from the Con Mine, Yellowknife, NT, Canada: Noble gas evidence for an evaporated Palaeozoic seawater origin mixed with glacial meltwater and Holocene recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Shane; Battye, Nick; Clark, Ian; Kotzer, Tom; Bottomley, Dennis

    2008-08-01

    Dissolved noble gas concentrations were measured in high salinity (270 g/L) Ca(Na)-Cl groundwaters from the Con Mine, Yellowknife, Canada in an effort to discriminate between two possible origins, as either a brine generated by evaporative enrichment in a Paleozoic inland sea, or marine water concentrated by freezing during glacial times. Major ion and isotope geochemistry indicate that brines from the deepest level remain relatively undisturbed by mixing with modern water introduced by mining. Mixing calculations are used to quantify fractions of brine, glacial meltwater and modern water. From this, noble gas concentrations were corrected for excess air with Ne and normalized to 100% brine solution. Over-pressuring of helium and argon in the brine provide age constraints based on the accumulation of geogenic 4He and 40Ar. Radiogenic age calculations together with the local geological history suggest brine emplacement during early Palaeozoic time, likely during the Devonian when evaporitic inland seas existed in this region. The concentrations of the atmospherically derived noble gases in the brine fraction (Kr = 1.4E-8, Xe = 8.5E-10 cc/ccO) are close to atmospheric equilibrium for brine at 25 °C (Kr = 7.3E-9, Xe = 8.0E-10 cc/ccO), but are far lower than would be expected for closed-system concentration of seawater by freezing (Kr = 2.8E-6, Xe = 4.2E-7 cc/ccO). Thus, despite the complicated mixing history of the brine, the atmospheric and geogenic noble gases provide strong evidence for an origin as air-equilibrated brine from evaporated Paleozoic seawater, which infiltrated via density displacement through existing fractures and faults into the Canadian Shield.

  7. Experimental evidence of site specific preferential processing of either ice algae or phytoplankton by benthic macroinfauna in Lancaster Sound and North Water Polynyas, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, Anni; Witte, Ursula; Archambault, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Rapid warming is dramatically reducing the extent and thickness of summer sea ice of the Arctic Ocean, changing both the quantity and type of marine primary production as the longer open water period favours phytoplankton growth and reduces ice algal production. The benthic ecosystem is dependent on this sinking organic matter for source of energy, and ice algae is thought to be a superior quality food source due to higher essential fatty acid content. The resilience of the benthos to changing quality and quantity of food was investigated through sediment incubation experiments in the summer 2013 in two highly productive Arctic polynyas in the North Water and Lancaster Sound, Canada. The pathways of organic matter processing and contribution of different organisms to these processes was assessed through 13C and 15N isotope assimilation into macroinfaunal tissues. In North Water Polynya, the total and biomass specific uptake of ice algal derived C and N was higher than the uptake of phytoplankton, whereas an opposite trend was observed in Lancaster Sound. Polychaetes, especially individuals of families Sabellidae and Spionidae, unselectively ingested both algal types and were significant in the overall organic matter processing at both sites. Feeding preference was observed in crustaceans, which preferentially fed on ice algae at Lancaster Sound, but preferred phytoplankton in North Water Polynya. Bivalves also had a significant role in the organic matter processing overall, but only showed preferential feeding on phytoplankton at Lancaster Sound polynya. Overall the filter feeders and surface deposit feeders occupying lowest trophic levels were responsible for majority of the processing of both algal types. The results provide direct evidence of preferential resource utilisation by benthic macrofauna and highlight spatial differences in the processes. This helps to predict future patterns of nutrient cycling in Arctic sediments, with implications to benthic

  8. Evidence for Field-Evolved Resistance of Striacosta albicosta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to Cry1F Bacillus thuringiensis Protein and Transgenic Corn Hybrids in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Lepping, M D; Rule, D M; Farhan, Y; Schaafsma, A W

    2017-09-01

    Western bean cutworm, Striacosta albicosta (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a pest of corn (Zea mays L.) that has recently expanded its range into Ontario, Canada. Control of S. albicosta damage to corn hybrids containing event TC1507-expressing Cry1F Bacillus thuringiensis protein alone or pyramided with event MON 89034 expressing Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab2 Bt proteins was tested in 2011-2015 in Ontario in small- and large-scale field plots with natural infestation. In 2011, significantly lower incidence and severity of kernel damage was sustained by Cry1F × Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab2 corn compared with a non-Bt near-isogenic hybrid. However, from 2012 to 2015, there was no difference in incidence or severity of damage comparing non-Bt hybrids with Cry1F hybrids alone or pyramided with Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab2 planted as a pure stand or with an integrated refuge (95% Bt: 5% non-Bt seeds). In 2015, neonate larvae derived from Ontario field-collections were tested in concentration-response diet-overlay bioassays with lyophilized Cry1F protein at concentrations up to 75 µg cm-2. The concentrations at which mortality of 50% (LC50) of the collections occurred ranged from approximately 10 µg cm-2 (F0) to >28 µg cm-2 (F1) in a 7-d bioassay, indicating relative insensitivity to Cry1F. Results from field experiments, laboratory bioassays, and the history of exposure to Cry1F in corn show that S. albicosta in Ontario are not controlled by Cry1F-expressing corn hybrids and provide evidence for the conclusion that the evolution of resistance to Cry1F has occurred. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Base Camp Design Simulation Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    28 Location 2D Map View (note you are to select a location within the NW region of Yousel Khel) 29 3D Camera View...Figure 3: 2D Representation of Yousel Khel The scenario forces the student to conduct trade-off analysis as competing interests (proximity to a...reason, we designed a 600-man base camp on VBS2TM from an AutoCAD diagram found on the Theater Construction Management System (version 3.2). Known

  10. δD and δ18O evidence for inputs to groundwater at a wetland coastal boundary in the southern Great Lakes region of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddart, P. A.; Longstaffe, F. J.; Crowe, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    The stable isotope compositions ( δ18O and δD) of water have been used to determine the relative contributions of different water sources to the groundwater in a barrier sand-bar that separates a coastal freshwater marsh from Lake Erie, Canada. An extensive groundwater study was initiated by Environment Canada at Point Pelee National Park after elevated nutrient concentrations were measured in the park's marsh, located on a spit of land that extends 15 km south into Lake Erie. As part of this larger study, which includes groundwater and nutrient modelling, the stable isotope compositions ( δ18O and δD) of water have been used to independently determine the nature and extent of groundwater flow within sand deposits that separate the marsh from Lake Erie. One of the two study sites chosen for this investigation is located near a large septic-system tile-bed that receives human waste from a public toilet facility within the park, and could potentially release nutrients to the marsh via the groundwater. Both transects studied are well suited to isotopic investigation because they are located between two potentially recharging surface water bodies with temporally variable isotopic compositions, and because the transects are subject to recharge by local precipitation, which exhibits large seasonal isotopic variations. These differing isotopic compositions, when considered spatially and temporally, make it possible to establish the source and movement of groundwater within the transects. The oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of surface waters from the Point Pelee marsh and Lake Erie lie on an evaporation line with a slope of 5.7. The isotopic composition of Lake Erie remained relatively stable for over 21 months ( δ18O=-7.5‰ to -6.7‰) whereas the marsh exhibited considerable spatial and temporal variability ( δ18O=-8.4‰ to -0.1‰). The δD and δ18O values of precipitation samples vary seasonally with local surface temperatures, and constitute a local

  11. Gold in the Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, Bathurst Mining Camp, Canada: Evidence from bulk ore analysis and laser ablation ICP-MS data on sulfide phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClenaghan, Sean H.; Lentz, David R.; Martin, Jillian; Diegor, Wilfredo G.

    2009-07-01

    The 329-Mt Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit (total resource of 163 Mt at 10.4% Zn, 4.2% Pb, 0.34% Cu, and 115 g/t Ag) is hosted within a Middle Ordovician bimodal volcanic and sedimentary sequence. Massive sulfides are for the most part syngenetic, and the bulk of the sulfide ore occurs as a Zn-Pb-rich banded sulfide facies that forms an intimate relationship with a laterally extensive Algoma-type iron formation and defines the Brunswick Horizon. Zone refining of stratiform sulfides is considered to have resulted in the development of a large replacement-style Cu-rich basal sulfide facies, which is generally confined between the banded sulfide facies and an underlying stringer sulfide zone. Complex polyphase deformation and associated lower- to upper-greenschist facies regional metamorphism is responsible for the present geometry of the deposit. Textural modification has resulted in a general increase in grain size through the development of pyrite and arsenopyrite porphyroblasts, which tend to overprint primary mineral assemblages. Despite the heterogeneous ductile deformation, primary features have locally been preserved, such as fine-grained colloform pyrite and base and precious metal zonation within the Main Zone. Base metal and trace element abundances in massive sulfides from the Brunswick No. 12 deposit indicate two distinct geochemical associations. The basal sulfide facies, characterized by a proximal high-temperature hydrothermal signature (Cu-Co-Bi-Se), contains generally low Au contents averaging 0.39 ppm ( n = 34). Conversely, Au is enriched in the banded sulfide facies, averaging 1.1 ppm Au ( n = 21), and is associated with an exhalative suite of elements (Zn-Pb-As-Sb-Ag-Sn). Finely laminated sulfide lenses hosted by iron formation at the north end of the Main Zone are further enriched in Au, averaging 1.7 ppm ( n = 41) and ranging up to 8.2 ppm. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analyses of pyrite ( n = 97) from the north end of the Main Zone average 2.6 ppm Au and range from the detection limit (0.015 ppm) to 21 ppm. Overall, these analyses reveal a distinct Au-Sb-As-Ag-Hg-Mn association within pyrite grains. Gold is strongly enriched in large pseudo-primary masses of pyrite that exhibit relict banding and fine-grained cores; smaller euhedral pyrite porphyroblasts, and euhedral rims of metamorphic origin surrounding the pyrite masses, contain much less Au, Sb, Ag, As, and Sn. Arsenopyrite, occurring chiefly as late porphyroblasts, contains less Au, averaging 1.0 ppm and ranging from the detection limit (0.027 ppm) to 6.9 ppm. Depth profiles for single-spot laser ablation ICP-MS analyses of pyrite and arsenopyrite display uniform values of Au and an absence of discrete microscopic inclusions of Au-bearing minerals, which is consistent with chemically bonded Au in the sulfide structure. The pervasive correlation of Au with Sn in the Zn-Pb-rich banded sulfide facies suggests similar hydrothermal behavior during the waxing stages of deposition on the seafloor. Under high temperature (>350ºC) and moderate- to low-pH conditions, Au and Sn in hydrothermal fluids would be transported as chlorocomplexes. An abrupt decrease in temperature and aH2S, accompanied by an increase in fO2 and pH during mixing with seawater, would lead to the simultaneous destabilization of both Au and Sn chlorocomplexes. The enrichment of Au in fine-grained laminated sulfides on the periphery of the deposit, accompanied by sporadic occurrences of barite and Fe-poor sphalerite, supports lower hydrothermal fluid temperatures analogous to white smoker activity on the flanks of a large volcanogenic massive sulfide system. In lower temperature (<350ºC) and mildly acidic hydrothermal fluids, Au would be transported by thiocomplexes, which exhibit multifunctional (retrograde-prograde) solubility and a capacity to mobilize Au to the outer parts of the sulfide mound. The sluggish nature of this low-temperature venting together with larger variations in ambient fO2 could lead to a sharp enrichment of Au towards the stratigraphic hanging wall of massive sulfide deposits.

  12. Strategies Targeting cAMP Signaling in the Treatment of Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a leading cause of ESRD worldwide. In PKD, excessive cell proliferation and fluid secretion, pathogenic interactions of mutated epithelial cells with an abnormal extracellular matrix and alternatively activated interstitial macrophages, and the disruption of mechanisms controlling tubular diameter contribute to cyst formation. Studies with animal models suggest that several diverse pathophysiologic mechanisms, including dysregulation of intracellular calcium levels and cAMP signaling, mediate these cystogenic mechanisms. This article reviews the evidence implicating calcium and cAMP as central players in a network of signaling pathways underlying the pathogenesis of PKD and considers the therapeutic relevance of treatment strategies targeting cAMP signaling. PMID:24335972

  13. Base camp personnel exposure to particulate matter during wildland fire suppression activities.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Marcy L; Semmens, Erin O; Gaskill, Steven; Palmer, Charles; Noonan, Curtis W; Ward, Tony J

    2012-01-01

    Wildland fire base camps commonly house thousands of support personnel for weeks at a time. The selection of the location of these base camps is largely a strategic decision that incorporates many factors, one of which is the potential impact of biomass smoke from the nearby fire event. Biomass smoke has many documented adverse health effects due, primarily, to high levels of fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)). Minimizing particulate matter exposure to potentially susceptible individuals working as support personnel in the base camp is vital. In addition to smoke from nearby wildland fires, base camp operations have the potential to generate particulate matter via vehicle emissions, dust, and generator use. We monitored particulate matter at three base camps during the fire season of 2009 in Washington, Oregon, and California. During the sampling events, 1-min time-weighted averages of PM(2.5) and particle counts from three size fractions (0.3-0.5 microns, 0.5-1.0 microns, and 1.0-2.5 microns) were measured. Results showed that all PM size fractions (as well as overall PM(2.5) concentrations) were higher during the overnight hours, a trend that was consistent at all camps. Our results provide evidence of camp-based, site-specific sources of PM(2.5) that could potentially exceed the contributions from the nearby wildfire. These exposures could adversely impact wildland firefighters who sleep in the camp, as well as the camp support personnel, who could include susceptible individuals. A better understanding of the sources and patterns of poor air quality within base camps would help to inform prevention strategies to reduce personnel exposures. Copyright © 2012 JOEH, LLC

  14. US SPACE CAMP CALIFORNIA - DAY CAMP GRAND OPENING WITH KEVIN JONES (WHISMAN SCHOOL) AND LUCRETIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    US SPACE CAMP CALIFORNIA - DAY CAMP GRAND OPENING WITH KEVIN JONES (WHISMAN SCHOOL) AND LUCRETIA SUTHERLIN (MCNAIR SCHOOL). AMES SPONSORED STUDENTS AND RACHAEL QUIRING (STAFF) - AUTOGRAPH SIGNING BY Astronaut Wally Schirra

  15. Characteristics of evidence-based medicine training in Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada emergency medicine residencies - a national survey of program directors.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Joseph; Pauls, Merril; Fridfinnson, Jason; Weldon, Erin

    2014-03-21

    Recent surveys suggest few emergency medicine (EM) training programs have formal evidence-based medicine (EBM) or journal club curricula. Our primary objective was to describe the methods of EBM training in Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) EM residencies. Secondary objectives were to explore attitudes regarding current educational practices including e-learning, investigate barriers to journal club and EBM education, and assess the desire for national collaboration. A 16-question survey containing binary, open-ended, and 5-pt Likert scale questions was distributed to the 14 RCPSC-EM program directors. Proportions of respondents (%), median, and IQR are reported. The response rate was 93% (13/14). Most programs (85%) had established EBM curricula. Curricula content was delivered most frequently via journal club, with 62% of programs having 10 or more sessions annually. Less than half of journal clubs (46%) were led consistently by EBM experts. Four programs did not use a critical appraisal tool in their sessions (31%). Additional teaching formats included didactic and small group sessions, self-directed e-learning, EBM workshops, and library tutorials. 54% of programs operated educational websites with EBM resources. Program directors attributed highest importance to two core goals in EBM training curricula: critical appraisal of medical literature, and application of literature to patient care (85% rating 5 - "most importance", respectively). Podcasts, blogs, and online journal clubs were valued for EBM teaching roles including creating exposure to literature (4, IQR 1.5) and linking literature to clinical practice experience (4, IQR 1.5) (1-no merit, 5-strong merit). Five of thirteen respondents rated lack of expert leadership and trained faculty educators as potential limitations to EBM education. The majority of respondents supported the creation of a national unified EBM educational resource (4, IQR 1) (1-no support, 5- strongly

  16. Group Experience: The Essence of Camping. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Robert; Brower, Mary

    1980-01-01

    Five propositions related to the values of the group experience in camping are argued: (1) the group experience is the essence of camping; (2) groups influence behavior and enhance mental health; (3) camps serve a variety of purposes; (4) knowledge of group dynamics can influence camp outcomes; and (5) good camps benefit society. An elaboration on…

  17. A Day in the Life of Three Special Needs Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winbaum, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about three special needs camps--Camp Kirk, Camp Talisman and Camp Caglewood. Camp Kirk's philosophy is to encourage their children to take risks in a structured setting, like high ropes courses, rock climbing wall, martial arts, and traditional activities like swimming, arts and craft, drama, and others. Once…

  18. A Day in the Life of Three Special Needs Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winbaum, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about three special needs camps--Camp Kirk, Camp Talisman and Camp Caglewood. Camp Kirk's philosophy is to encourage their children to take risks in a structured setting, like high ropes courses, rock climbing wall, martial arts, and traditional activities like swimming, arts and craft, drama, and others. Once…

  19. Common Ada Missile Packages. Phase 2. (CAMP-2). Volume 1. CAMP Parts and Parts Composition System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    FILE COPY . ... ^voi AFATL-TR-88-62, VOL I Common Ada Missile Packages—Phase 2 (CAMP-2) ^ Volume I. CAMP Parts and Parts Composition...s«cürttyC>a««cat/ofl) Common Ada Missile Packages-Phase 2 (CAMP-2). Volur.ie I: CAMP Parts and Parts Composition System 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...Reusable Software, Missile Software, Software Generators, Ada parts , Composition, Systems, Software Parts 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if

  20. Program evaluation of Protovation Camp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Laurel Lynell Martin

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to determine the extent to which Protovation Camp utilized the combined resources of multiple institutions to impact student learning in science, technology, engineering, and math. The partnership consisted of multiple institutions: the university, providing graduate students to facilitate inquiry-based lessons; the science center, allowing the use of their facilities and resources; and the elementary school, contributing rising third through fifth grade campers. All of these components were examined. The mixed-methods approach used post hoc quantitative data for campers, which consisted of pre-test and post-test scores on the Test of Science-Related Attitudes (TOSRA), the Draw-A-Scientist Test, and content tests based on the camp activities. Additionally, TOSRA scores and current survey results for the graduate students were used along with qualitative data collected from plusdelta charts to determine the impact of participation in Protovation Camp on teachers and students. Results of the program evaluation indicated that when students were taught inquiry-based lessons that ignite wonder, both their attitudes toward science and their knowledge about science improved. An implication for teacher preparation programs was that practicing inquiry-based lessons on actual students (campers) was an important component for teachers (graduate students) as they prepare to positively impact student learning in their own classrooms. Immediate feedback from the campers in the form of pre-test and post-test scores and from peers on plusdelta charts allowed the graduate students the opportunity to make needed adjustments to improve effectiveness before using the lesson with a new set of campers or later in their own classrooms. Keywords. Teacher preparation, Inquiry-based instruction, STEM instructions, University and museum partnerships

  1. Themes from a Camp Maintenance Network: Camp Maintenance and Property Personnel Share Their Insights and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyman, Wynne

    2003-01-01

    A camp maintenance survey was completed by maintenance personnel from 99 camps. Results highlighted several important considerations: ensuring sufficient maintenance funds for aging infrastructure, including camp/property personnel in decision making, publicizing completed maintenance projects, examining long-term needs of the land, and adopting…

  2. Themes from a Camp Maintenance Network: Camp Maintenance and Property Personnel Share Their Insights and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyman, Wynne

    2003-01-01

    A camp maintenance survey was completed by maintenance personnel from 99 camps. Results highlighted several important considerations: ensuring sufficient maintenance funds for aging infrastructure, including camp/property personnel in decision making, publicizing completed maintenance projects, examining long-term needs of the land, and adopting…

  3. AKAP-mediated feedback control of cAMP gradients in developing hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Kirill; Mehta, Sohum; Ramamurthy, Santosh; Ronnett, Gabriele V; Zhou, Feng-Quan; Zhang, Jin

    2017-04-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA), classical examples of spatially compartmentalized signaling molecules, are critical axon determinants that regulate neuronal polarity and axon formation, yet little is known about micro-compartmentalization of cAMP and PKA signaling and its role in developing neurons. Here, we revealed that cAMP forms a gradient in developing hippocampal neurons, with higher cAMP levels in more distal regions of the axon compared to other regions of the cell. Interestingly, this cAMP gradient changed according to the developmental stage and depended on proper anchoring of PKA by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAPs increased the cAMP gradient in early-stage neurons and led to enhanced axon elongation. Our results provide new evidence for a local negative-feedback loop, assembled by AKAPs, for the precise control of a growth-stage-dependent cAMP gradient to ensure proper axon growth.

  4. AKAP-mediated feedback control of cAMP gradients in developing hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gorshkov, Kirill; Mehta, Sohum; Ramamurthy, Santosh; Ronnett, Gabriele V.; Zhou, Feng-Quan; Zhang, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA), classical examples of spatially compartmentalized signaling molecules, are critical axon determinants that regulate neuronal polarity and axon formation, yet little is known about micro-compartmentalization of cAMP and PKA signaling and its role in developing neurons. Here, we revealed that cAMP forms a gradient in developing hippocampal neurons, with higher cAMP levels in more distal regions of the axon compared to other regions of the cell. Interestingly, this cAMP gradient changed according to the developmental stage and depended on proper anchoring of PKA by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAPs increased the cAMP gradient in early-stage neurons and led to enhanced axon elongation. Our results provide new evidence for a local negative feedback loop, assembled by AKAPs, for the precise control of a growth-stage-dependent cAMP gradient to ensure proper axon growth. PMID:28192412

  5. Lead poisoning in Canada geese in Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagley, George E.; Locke, Louis N.; Nightingale, Gordon T.

    1967-01-01

    Trainer and Hunt (9) stated that lead poisoning of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) had been reported from three states: North Carolina, Indiana, and Wisconsin. More recently, the Mississippi Flyway Council (8) cited suspected cases of lead poisoning of Canada geese in Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, and Maryland. Hanson and Smith (6) also cited cases in widely separated areas of the country, including Texas and Michigan. this paper reports lead poisoning among Canada geese in Delaware, and presents evidence that it is a recurring problem among wintering flocks of Canada geese along the Middle Atlantic Coast.

  6. Different cAMP sources are critically involved in G protein–coupled receptor CRHR1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Claro, Paula A.; Senin, Sergio A.; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates G protein–dependent and internalization-dependent signaling mechanisms. Here, we report that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response of CRHR1 in physiologically relevant scenarios engages separate cAMP sources, involving the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). cAMP produced by tmACs and sAC is required for the acute phase of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 activation triggered by CRH-stimulated CRHR1, but only sAC activity is essential for the sustained internalization-dependent phase. Thus, different cAMP sources are involved in different signaling mechanisms. Examination of the cAMP response revealed that CRH-activated CRHR1 generates cAMP after endocytosis. Characterizing CRHR1 signaling uncovered a specific link between CRH-activated CRHR1, sAC, and endosome-based signaling. We provide evidence of sAC being involved in an endocytosis-dependent cAMP response, strengthening the emerging model of GPCR signaling in which the cAMP response does not occur exclusively at the plasma membrane and introducing the notion of sAC as an alternative source of cAMP. PMID:27402953

  7. Different cAMP sources are critically involved in G protein-coupled receptor CRHR1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Inda, Carolina; Dos Santos Claro, Paula A; Bonfiglio, Juan J; Senin, Sergio A; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W; Silberstein, Susana

    2016-07-18

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates G protein-dependent and internalization-dependent signaling mechanisms. Here, we report that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response of CRHR1 in physiologically relevant scenarios engages separate cAMP sources, involving the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). cAMP produced by tmACs and sAC is required for the acute phase of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 activation triggered by CRH-stimulated CRHR1, but only sAC activity is essential for the sustained internalization-dependent phase. Thus, different cAMP sources are involved in different signaling mechanisms. Examination of the cAMP response revealed that CRH-activated CRHR1 generates cAMP after endocytosis. Characterizing CRHR1 signaling uncovered a specific link between CRH-activated CRHR1, sAC, and endosome-based signaling. We provide evidence of sAC being involved in an endocytosis-dependent cAMP response, strengthening the emerging model of GPCR signaling in which the cAMP response does not occur exclusively at the plasma membrane and introducing the notion of sAC as an alternative source of cAMP.

  8. 32 CFR 552.170 - Camp Bonneville Area Access Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville § 552.170 Camp Bonneville Area Access Office. Camp...

  9. 32 CFR 552.170 - Camp Bonneville Area Access Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville § 552.170 Camp Bonneville Area Access Office. Camp...

  10. Cis-Lunar Base Camp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Raymond G.; Goodliff, Kandyce E.; Mazanek, Daniel D.; Reeves, John D., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, when mounting expeditions into uncharted territories, explorers have established strategically positioned base camps to pre-position required equipment and consumables. These base camps are secure, safe positions from which expeditions can depart when conditions are favorable, at which technology and operations can be tested and validated, and facilitate timely access to more robust facilities in the event of an emergency. For human exploration missions into deep space, cis-lunar space is well suited to serve as such a base camp. The outer regions of cis-lunar space, such as the Earth-Moon Lagrange points, lie near the edge of Earth s gravity well, allowing equipment and consumables to be aggregated with easy access to deep space and to the lunar surface, as well as more distant destinations, such as near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and Mars and its moons. Several approaches to utilizing a cis-lunar base camp for sustainable human exploration, as well as some possible future applications are identified. The primary objective of the analysis presented in this paper is to identify options, show the macro trends, and provide information that can be used as a basis for more detailed mission development. Compared within are the high-level performance and cost of 15 preliminary cis-lunar exploration campaigns that establish the capability to conduct crewed missions of up to one year in duration, and then aggregate mass in cis-lunar space to facilitate an expedition from Cis-Lunar Base Camp. Launch vehicles, chemical propulsion stages, and electric propulsion stages are discussed and parametric sizing values are used to create architectures of in-space transportation elements that extend the existing in-space supply chain to cis-lunar space. The transportation options to cis-lunar space assessed vary in efficiency by almost 50%; from 0.16 to 0.68 kg of cargo in cis-lunar space for every kilogram of mass in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). For the 15 cases, 5-year campaign

  11. Suicides in the Nazi Concentration Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryn, Zdzislaw

    1986-01-01

    On the basis of psychiatric interviews with 69 former prisoners of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, this paper describes the circumstances, motives, and ways of committing suicide in the camp. The interviews made it clear that thousands of prisoners perished by suicide. The number of committed suicides was larger than that of attempted…

  12. High-Level Wellness at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardell, Donald B.

    1979-01-01

    Describes features of the Frost Valley YMCA Wellness Camp for Young People. Self-responsibility, nutritional awareness, physical fitness, stress management, and environmental sensitivity are stressed. Settings such as school camps and nature trips provide opportunities for the counselor to interrupt, intervene, and influence, essential in…

  13. Passenger Vans: A Transportation Concern for Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentle, Don; Gordon, Harold; Schainman, Steve

    2002-01-01

    In April 2002, the National Transportation Safety Board reissued a cautionary warning about the high accident potential of 15-passenger vans; some states have prohibited their use for transporting children. Three camp directors discuss legal and cost considerations for camps, possible alternative transportation, additional staff training needs,…

  14. Science Camp: Just for the Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Research shows that girls tend to lose interest in science and math as they move through the education pipeline--a retreat that often begins during middle school. Summer science camps can be part of reversing that trend, some say. Academic camps are on the rise across the country, including ones to get adolescent girls excited about the…

  15. Science Camp: Just for the Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Research shows that girls tend to lose interest in science and math as they move through the education pipeline--a retreat that often begins during middle school. Summer science camps can be part of reversing that trend, some say. Academic camps are on the rise across the country, including ones to get adolescent girls excited about the…

  16. Tech Camp Unleashes Creativity and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardin, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Each August, teachers from around the state gather for the Arizona K-12 Center's Tech Camp, a week-long immersion in technology for the classroom. The Arizona K-12 Center's mission is to improve teaching and learning in Arizona's schools through high-quality professional development and teacher leadership. The formula Tech Camp follows is a simple…

  17. Smart Kids at CAMP-US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinatra, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the summer literacy, athletic, and computer program know as CAMP-US. Each year, CAMP-US serves approximately 500 children in 10-day sessions. The first half of each day is devoted to literacy and computer instruction, while the second half is spent engaging in recreational activities such as swimming, soccer, softball,…

  18. Accounting Boot Camp for College Juniors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myring, Mark; Wrege, William; Van Alst, Lucinda

    2008-01-01

    We describe a day-long introduction to new accounting majors, which we call a boot camp. Boot camp it is an effort to make juniors more aware of their identity, career purposes and learning resources that are now parts of their world, much of which is not covered explicitly in the accounting curriculum. This paper provides an overview of the…

  19. Smart Kids at CAMP-US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinatra, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the summer literacy, athletic, and computer program know as CAMP-US. Each year, CAMP-US serves approximately 500 children in 10-day sessions. The first half of each day is devoted to literacy and computer instruction, while the second half is spent engaging in recreational activities such as swimming, soccer, softball,…

  20. Camping Safety--Bring 'Em Back Alive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Ernest F.

    1980-01-01

    A "prioritized" list of dangers of the woods is discussed and suggestions for safety in organized camping are listed. Available from: Center for Environmental, Camping and Outdoor Education; University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Pine Lake Field Campus; 4016 Blumenthal Road; Greensboro, NC, 27406. (AN)

  1. A Kid's Guide to Family Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regimbal, Celia; Kasakow, Nancy

    Fifth and sixth grade students of the University School at the University of Wyoming participated in a successful week's overnight outdoor experience in September 1983. Because results of a pre-camp questionnaire indicated that most students had minimal knowledge of the planning necessary for camping, activities and classes were organized to…

  2. 1940s: Camping in the War Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camping Magazine, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Camps continued to operate during World War II, but young male counselors, food, and supplies were difficult to obtain. An illustrative article from 1943, "Meal Planning for Summer Camps in Wartime" (Agnes B. Peterson), presents a guide to planning nutritious meals for campers despite shortages caused by wartime rationing, increased food…

  3. Outdoor Education Project Report, Camp Alpine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, N. J.

    A report is given of Project Alpine, two summer pilot programs in outdoor education sponsored by the Mesa Public Schools of Arizona. The report outlines the duties of camp personnel and includes an instruction sheet used by camp counselors. Various activities held for the campers (boys and girls from both upper elementary and secondary grades) are…

  4. Forest Fire: A Crisis Reality for Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Don; Mickelson, Rhonda

    2002-01-01

    Two camp directors were interviewed about evacuations from their camps due to forest fires. Topics covered include descriptions of the events; actions taken; aspects of advance planning that proved helpful; unexpected portions of the experience and resultant changes made in plans; relations with outside agencies, the media, and parents; working…

  5. The Top 10 Classics of Organized Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Dennis; Kauffman, Robert B.

    1989-01-01

    Describes and reviews 10 books determined to have had most influence on organized camping. Selection represents conscientious, systematic effort to include practitioners, educators, and other segments such as private, public, religiously affiliated camps. Ten "classics" offered as starting point for further discussion on valuable camping…

  6. Teen Moms and Babies Benefit from Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goode, Marsha; Broesamle, Barbara

    1987-01-01

    Describes nine-day residential camp for Michigan teenage mothers/babies to enhance personal growth and develop responsible social skills. Outlines goals, pre-camp planning, staff, activities, evaluation. Reports 31 teen moms (ages 13-21) and 35 babies attended in 1986. Indicates participants were in therapy, experienced abuse, had low self-esteem,…

  7. Camping Safety--Bring 'Em Back Alive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Ernest F.

    1980-01-01

    A "prioritized" list of dangers of the woods is discussed and suggestions for safety in organized camping are listed. Available from: Center for Environmental, Camping and Outdoor Education; University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Pine Lake Field Campus; 4016 Blumenthal Road; Greensboro, NC, 27406. (AN)

  8. Forest Fire: A Crisis Reality for Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Don; Mickelson, Rhonda

    2002-01-01

    Two camp directors were interviewed about evacuations from their camps due to forest fires. Topics covered include descriptions of the events; actions taken; aspects of advance planning that proved helpful; unexpected portions of the experience and resultant changes made in plans; relations with outside agencies, the media, and parents; working…

  9. Youth Development and the Camp Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garst, Barry A.; Browne, Laurie P.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    2011-01-01

    The organized camp experience has been an important part of the lives of children, youth, and adults for over 150 years and is a social institution that touches more lives than any other except for schools. Camp is more than a location or a program; it encompasses the affective, cognitive, behavioral, physical, social, and spiritual benefits that…

  10. Tim Horton Camps: Spotlight on Onondaga Farms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evanson, Jason

    2003-01-01

    Tim Horton Children's Foundation operates camps for disadvantaged children that build their self-confidence. The newest camp, Onondaga Farms in Ontario, is also a year-round outdoor education center. Its five program streams--environmental education, creative arts, agriculture, adventure, and recreation--all have direct links to Ontario's…

  11. Creating a Sun-Safe Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrey, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Strategies for minimizing sun exposure of campers and staff include educating campers about the sun's effect on their skin, scheduling activities when the sun is less intense, creating shade at the camp site, incorporating sun protection into camp dress code, and training staff regarding sun protection. Addresses OSHA and liability issues. (LP)

  12. Teen Moms and Babies Benefit from Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goode, Marsha; Broesamle, Barbara

    1987-01-01

    Describes nine-day residential camp for Michigan teenage mothers/babies to enhance personal growth and develop responsible social skills. Outlines goals, pre-camp planning, staff, activities, evaluation. Reports 31 teen moms (ages 13-21) and 35 babies attended in 1986. Indicates participants were in therapy, experienced abuse, had low self-esteem,…

  13. American Camping Association. Annual Report, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The 1985 American Camping Association (ACA) annual report reviews trends and successes of the year. The document is in the format of a calendar covering the period October 1985 through September 1986. Calendar pages, on which relevant camping events are noted, alternate with pages of text. An introductory message from ACA President Jean McMullan…

  14. Why It's Good to Go to Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    In the author's fourth year of undergraduate studies at the University of Waterloo he had the opportunity to explore the benefits attained by children attending a summer camp by way of an academic literature review. The author worked with Dr. Troy Glover who has been commissioned by a group of camping associations to perform a study on the…

  15. Summer Camp of Mathematical Modeling in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Xiaoxi; Xie, Jinxing

    2013-01-01

    The Summer Camp of Mathematical Modeling in China is a recently created experience designed to further Chinese students' academic pursuits in mathematical modeling. Students are given more than three months to research on a mathematical modeling project. Researchers and teams with outstanding projects are invited to the Summer Camp to present…

  16. Celebrations: American Camping Association Annual Report 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The 1986 American Camping Association (ACA) annual report reviews the year's achievements and outlines goals for the future. An introductory message from ACA President Jean McMullan notes successful fund raising to improve the association's national headquarters, passage of federal legislation exempting camps from paying federal unemployment…

  17. Summer Camp of Mathematical Modeling in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Xiaoxi; Xie, Jinxing

    2013-01-01

    The Summer Camp of Mathematical Modeling in China is a recently created experience designed to further Chinese students' academic pursuits in mathematical modeling. Students are given more than three months to research on a mathematical modeling project. Researchers and teams with outstanding projects are invited to the Summer Camp to present…

  18. What Happens to Campers at Camp?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.

    2003-01-01

    A study of 66 children with cancer and 43 siblings attending the Ronald McDonald Camp found that disease-specific camps allow children membership in a community of peers, which enhances self-esteem and social acceptance. A separate, longitudinal study of 38 beginning and experienced campers found that campers' intrapersonal and interpersonal…

  19. Children with Cancer: Positive Benefits of Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfree, Christy; Williams, Richard; Powell, Gwynn M.

    2002-01-01

    A relatively new method of helping pediatric cancer patients cope with their illness is specially designed summer camps. Camp helps children with cancer address psychological effects of the disease, bodily changes, and self-concept, and helps parents and siblings cope. Sidebars present resources and tips on incorporating children with cancer into…

  20. American Camping Association. Annual Report, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The 1985 American Camping Association (ACA) annual report reviews trends and successes of the year. The document is in the format of a calendar covering the period October 1985 through September 1986. Calendar pages, on which relevant camping events are noted, alternate with pages of text. An introductory message from ACA President Jean McMullan…

  1. Cedar Ridge Camp: Using the Local Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Grayson

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 Cedar Ridge Camp opened for its first season as a traditional co-ed summer camp and year-round outdoor education and recreation centre. The mission would centre on creating a program that would encourage personal development and growth through a shared outdoor experience. Cedar Ridge's main goals were to promote the formation of close…

  2. Foreign Language Camps: A Success Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrum, Judith

    The foreign language camps, operated by Virginia Tech since 1981, offer high school students a one-week foreign language experience in French, German, or Spanish. The camps bring together native speakers, high school students and teachers, and university students and faculty to experience learning situations similar to those encountered in a…

  3. Is ROEE Good for Your Camp?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Jim

    1998-01-01

    Resident outdoor environmental education (ROEE) is a camp-based extension of the classroom for two to five days, promoting student independence, interpersonal skills, and ecological awareness. Advantages and disadvantages of the "camp as innkeeper" and full program-provider models are given. Program development guidelines cover expenses,…

  4. Cuban Refugee Camp Newspapers in Microform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danky, James P.

    This paper presents bibliographic information on ten newspapers that were published during 1980 in Cuban refugee camps in order to acquaint Cuban exiles with life in the camps and in the United States and later were collected and reproduced on microfilm by the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. The newspapers are described as a more accurate…

  5. [Medicine in the Soviet labor camps].

    PubMed

    Supady, J

    1998-01-01

    The existence of medical attention in Soviet labour camps was dictated not by humane reasons but by economical motives. It was just a wish to regenerate physical strength of some labour camp's slaves in order to exploit them to work out definite production as well as ideological plans. However, despite the lack of medicines, equipment, proper housing conditions and qualified staff, employed in labour camp's medical service people--doctors, hospital attendants, nurses, etc.--that were mostly recruited from amongst prisoners, showed a great deal of kindness and did their best to come to unwell and ill patients' assistance. Prisoners' lives were not uncommonly saved through exemption from work by a doctor's decision sending to hospital or transfer to another health category. In comparison with gehenna of labour camp's slave everyday life a sojourn in camp hospital seemed a paradise and a rescue from death to prisoners.

  6. In vivo, cAMP stimulates growth and morphogenesis of mouse mammary ducts.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, G B; Strickland, P; Trumpbour, V; Coleman, S; Daniel, C W

    1984-08-01

    In culture, cAMP is known to be mitogenic for mammary cells and several other epithelia, but evidence for a similar role in vivo has been only correlative. We have used plastic implants to cause slow release of cholera toxin and other cAMP-active agents to local areas of mammary glands in ovariectomized mice. Elevated levels of intracellular cAMP around the implants promoted vigorous growth and normal ductal morphogenesis, while distant sites were unaffected. Local effects of cAMP included restoration of normal ductal caliber, formation of new end buds, and reinitiation of DNA synthesis in both epithelium and surrounding stroma. Thus, cAMP is both a mitogenic and a morphogenetic factor in this tissue.

  7. The Mackenzie River magnetic anomaly, Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada-Evidence for Early Proterozoic magmatic arc crust at the edge of the North American craton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilkington, M.; Saltus, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    We characterize the nature of the source of the high-amplitude, long-wavelength, Mackenzie River magnetic anomaly (MRA), Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada, based on magnetic field data collected at three different altitudes: 300??m, 3.5??km and 400??km. The MRA is the largest amplitude (13??nT) satellite magnetic anomaly over Canada. Within the extent of the MRA, source depth estimates (8-12??km) from Euler deconvolution of low-altitude aeromagnetic data show coincidence with basement depths interpreted from reflection seismic data. Inversion of high-altitude (3.5??km) aeromagnetic data produces an average magnetization of 2.5??A/m within a 15- to 35-km deep layer, a value typical of magmatic arc complexes. Early Proterozoic magmatic arc rocks have been sampled to the southeast of the MRA, within the Fort Simpson magnetic anomaly. The MRA is one of several broad-scale magnetic highs that occur along the inboard margin of the Cordillera in Canada and Alaska, which are coincident with geometric changes in the thrust front transition from the mobile belt to stable cratonic North America. The inferred early Proterozoic magmatic arc complex along the western edge of the North American craton likely influenced later tectonic evolution, by acting as a buttress along the inboard margin of the Cordilleran fold-and-thrust belt. Crown Copyright ?? 2008.

  8. Camp Blanding Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee,Richard; Christian, Hugh; Bailey, Jeffrey; Hall, John; Uman, Martin; Jordan, Doug; Krehbiel, Paul; Rison, William; Edens, Harald

    2011-01-01

    A seven station, short base-line Lightning Mapping Array was installed at the Camp Blanding International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) during April 2011. This network will support science investigations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) and lightning initiation using rocket triggered lightning at the ICLRT. The network operations and data processing will be carried out through a close collaboration between several organizations, including the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, University of Florida, and New Mexico Tech. The deployment was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The network does not have real-time data dissemination. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

  9. Therapeutic camping for children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Warady, B A

    1994-06-01

    Therapeutic camping experiences for children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have proliferated in the United States and abroad. This report is based on the results of a survey designed to accumulate data on the development and implementation of 20 such camps. Children attending camp ranged in age from 1 year to 19 years. Single disease-specific camps were most common, while camps for children with a variety of chronic illnesses, including ESRD, and mainstream camps were also conducted. Facilities were available for hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, but not automated peritoneal dialysis, in the majority of surveyed camps. Dialysis nurses, pediatric nephrologists, dietitians and social workers were the medical personnel that most frequently participated in the camps. On average, 32 dialysis/transplant patient campers (range 6-100) attended camp for a 1-week session. Therapeutic camping experiences for children with ESRD are extremely successful and attempts to increase the availability of similar camps should be encouraged.

  10. Creating a Successful Summer Physics Camp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Amanda

    2009-10-01

    The summer physics camp hosted by the Texas State University San Marcos Society of Physics Students chapter is geared toward middle school children aged 9 to 12 years. Camp administrators aim to create an environment that is both conducive to learning and fun. Our overarching goal is to provide local youth a basic knowledge of physical concepts as well as encourage their continued interest in physics. Physical concepts are taught through a combination of short lectures, group activities, and entertaining demonstrations. This presentation will discuss the basic curriculum, activities and demonstrations that have been performed in past camps, as well as plans for future curricula and expansions.

  11. "It's not Just Camp!": Understanding the Meaning of Children's Cancer Camps for Children and Families.

    PubMed

    Laing, Catherine M; Moules, Nancy J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this philosophical hermeneutic inquiry was to understand the meaning of children's cancer camps for the child with cancer and the family. Six childhood cancer families and 5 cancer camp counselors were interviewed, in order to bring understanding to this topic. Findings from this research revealed that camp means different things for different families, and that much is at play in the cancer camp experience: the healing and developmental power of play, finding acceptance and fit, grief as something to live with versus "get over," storytelling as a means of reshaping and understanding traumatic experiences, and the solidarity of the community as one that creates intense, healing bonds. Children's cancer camps, we conclude, should be considered a necessity, versus a luxury, and could even be thought of as a psychosocial intervention for some children and families. Barriers such as structure of funding and access to resources are present and likely due to the separateness of camps from hospital programs.

  12. Discrimination and the health of immigrants and refugees: exploring Canada's evidence base and directions for future research in newcomer receiving countries.

    PubMed

    Edge, Sara; Newbold, Bruce

    2013-02-01

    Research and practice increasingly suggests discrimination compromises health. Yet the unique experiences and effects facing immigrant and refugee populations remain poorly understood in Canada and abroad. We review current knowledge on discrimination against newcomers in Canada, emphasizing impacts upon health status and service access to identify gaps and research needs. Existing knowledge centers around experiences within health-care settings, differences in perception and coping, mental health impacts, and debates about "non-discriminatory" health-care. There is need for comparative analyses within and across ethno-cultural groups and newcomer classes to better understand factors shaping how discrimination and its health effects are differentially experienced. Women receive greater attention in the literature given their compounded vulnerability. While this must continue, little is known about the experiences of youth and men. Governance and policy discourse analyses would elucidate how norms, institutions and practices shape discriminatory attitudes and responses. Finally, "non-discriminatory health-care" interventions require critical evaluation to determine their effectiveness.

  13. Exploring Wait List Prioritization and Management Strategies for Publicly Funded Ambulatory Rehabilitation Services in Ontario, Canada: Further Evidence of Barriers to Access for People with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Passalent, Laura A.; Landry, Michel D.; Cott, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Timely access to publicly funded health services is a priority issue across the healthcare continuum in Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine wait list management strategies for publicly funded ambulatory rehabilitation services in Ontario, Canada. Methods: Ambulatory rehabilitation services were defined as community occupational therapy (OT) and physiotherapy (PT) services. A mailed self-administered questionnaire was sent to all 374 Ontario publicly funded sites. Descriptive statistics were used to explore management strategies. Results: The response rate was 57.2%. Client acuity was the most common method used to prioritize access across all settings. The most frequently reported methods to manage wait lists included teaching self-management strategies (85.0%), implementing attendance policies (69.5%) and conducting wait list audits (67.3%). Conclusion: Ambulatory rehabilitation settings have implemented a number of strategies for wait list management. The results of this study suggest that an increasing number of Ontarians encounter barriers when accessing publicly funded ambulatory rehabilitation services. PMID:21532763

  14. Site and Facilities: A Resource Book for Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Armand, Ed.; Ball, Beverly, Ed.

    This resource book draws together articles on the development and maintenance of camp sites and facilities. The articles, previously published by "Camping Magazine" and "Journal of Christian Camping," cover (1) site planning and long-range development, including redesigning multiple camp facilities for year-round programs, remodeling and…

  15. Why Do Counselors Return to Work at Camp?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William A.

    The reasons that counselors in resident summer camps return to work are explored, taking into account the differences between private and agency camps, and differing attitudes of male and female camp counselors. A random sample of returning counselors at 15 private and 15 agency camps in the Northeast were selected for the study. Six attitudinal…

  16. Institutionalized Adolescents' Perceptions of a Summer Camp Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herr, David E.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of the facilities of Camp Easter Seal, Virginia, for institutionalized adolescents from different hospitals in Virginia. Also includes the attitudes of the patients toward their camping experience, their camp counselors, and what they learned from their camping experience. (Author/RK)

  17. Day Camping for the 80's--An Administrative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umstead, Elizabeth C.

    1980-01-01

    Previews the 1980 National Day Camp Symposium and discusses influences of the 1980s on day camps. Also discusses precamp planning, the camp season, and postcamp activities. Available from: Center for Environmental, Camping and Outdoor Education; University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Pine Lake Field Campus; 4016 Blumenthal Road; Greensboro,…

  18. (Compendium of State Laws and Regulations for Youth Camps).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhiser, Judy, Comp.; van der Smissen, Betty, Comp.

    State laws and regulations applicable to youth camp operations provided by state agencies are organized in this Compendium under ten major headings; personnel; program safety; personal health, first aid, and medical services; site and facilities; sanitation; food service; transportation; primitive camping and out-of-camp trips; day camping; and…

  19. Day Camping for the 80's--An Administrative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umstead, Elizabeth C.

    1980-01-01

    Previews the 1980 National Day Camp Symposium and discusses influences of the 1980s on day camps. Also discusses precamp planning, the camp season, and postcamp activities. Available from: Center for Environmental, Camping and Outdoor Education; University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Pine Lake Field Campus; 4016 Blumenthal Road; Greensboro,…

  20. 32 CFR 552.170 - Camp Bonneville Area Access Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Camp Bonneville Area Access Office. 552.170 Section 552.170 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY..., Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville § 552.170 Camp Bonneville Area Access Office. Camp...

  1. 32 CFR 552.170 - Camp Bonneville Area Access Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Camp Bonneville Area Access Office. 552.170 Section 552.170 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY..., Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville § 552.170 Camp Bonneville Area Access Office. Camp...

  2. 32 CFR 552.170 - Camp Bonneville Area Access Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Camp Bonneville Area Access Office. 552.170 Section 552.170 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY..., Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville § 552.170 Camp Bonneville Area Access Office. Camp...

  3. Accreditation Standards for Camp Programs and Services. Revised 1998 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The American Camping Association (ACA) accreditation program aims to educate camp owners and directors in the administration of key aspects of camp operation, particularly those related to program quality and the health and safety of campers and staff, and to assist the public in selecting camps that meet industry-accepted and…

  4. Summer Camps: A Fun Way to Reinforce Math Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tichenor, Mercedes; Plavchan, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Faculty members from a university teacher education department partnered with a local school district to develop a summer camp program for children at-risk. This four week summer camp for elementary students provides reading and math intervention to rising first graders. This article discusses the math aspects of the camp, including camp lessons,…

  5. Design and Development Issues for Educational Robotics Training Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucgul, Memet; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore critical design issues for educational robotics training camps and to describe how these factors should be implemented in the development of such camps. For this purpose, two robotics training camps were organized for elementary school students. The first camp had 30 children attendees, and the second had 22. As…

  6. Site and Facilities: A Resource Book for Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Armand, Ed.; Ball, Beverly, Ed.

    This resource book draws together articles on the development and maintenance of camp sites and facilities. The articles, previously published by "Camping Magazine" and "Journal of Christian Camping," cover (1) site planning and long-range development, including redesigning multiple camp facilities for year-round programs, remodeling and…

  7. Design and Development Issues for Educational Robotics Training Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucgul, Memet; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore critical design issues for educational robotics training camps and to describe how these factors should be implemented in the development of such camps. For this purpose, two robotics training camps were organized for elementary school students. The first camp had 30 children attendees, and the second had 22. As…

  8. Heterogeneous malaria transmission in long-term Afghan refugee populations: a cross-sectional study in five refugee camps in northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Sobia; Stresman, Gillian H; Kamal, Syed Sajid; Sepulveda, Nuno; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Bousema, Teun; Drakeley, Chris

    2016-04-27

    Afghan refugees in northern Pakistan have been resident for over 30 years and current information on malaria in this population is sparse. Understanding malaria risk and distribution in refugee camps is important for effective management both in camps and on return to Afghanistan. Cross-sectional malariometric surveys were conducted in five Afghan refugee camps to determine infection and exposure to both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Factors associated with malaria infection and exposure were analysed using logistic regression, and spatial heterogeneity within camps was investigated with SatScan. In this low-transmission setting, prevalence of infection in the five camps ranged from 0-0.2 to 0.4-9 % by rapid diagnostic test and 0-1.39 and 5-15 % by polymerase chain reaction for P. falciparum and P. vivax, respectively. Prevalence of anti-malarial antibodies to P. falciparum antigens was 3-11 and 17-45 % for P. vivax antigens. Significant foci of P. vivax infection and exposure were detected in three of the five camps. Hotspots of P. falciparum were also detected in three camps, only one of which also showed evidence of P. vivax hotspots. There is low and spatially heterogeneous malaria transmission in the refugee camps in northern Pakistan. Understanding malaria risk in refugee camps is important so the malaria risk faced by these populations in the camps and upon their return to Afghanistan can be effectively managed.

  9. Camp Minden Fact Sheet November 2014

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On October 28, 2014, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) signed a Settlement Agreement for the destruction of more than 15 million pounds of military propellants at the Explo Systems, Inc., Camp Minden, Louisiana site.

  10. Retarded Children at Camp with Normal Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flax, Norman; Peters, Edward N.

    1969-01-01

    Statistical analysis of data from written forms and scales (designed to measure children's behavior in groups), observations, and interviews indicated that many educalble mentally retarded children can participate successfully in camp activities with normal children. (DR)

  11. A Lightning Safety Primer for Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attarian, Aram

    1992-01-01

    Provides the following information about lightning, which is necessary for camp administrators and staff: (1) warning signs of lightning; (2) dangers of lightning; (3) types of lightning injuries; (4) prevention of lightning injury; and (5) helpful training tips. (KS)

  12. A Lightning Safety Primer for Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attarian, Aram

    1992-01-01

    Provides the following information about lightning, which is necessary for camp administrators and staff: (1) warning signs of lightning; (2) dangers of lightning; (3) types of lightning injuries; (4) prevention of lightning injury; and (5) helpful training tips. (KS)

  13. Deterministic mathematical models of the cAMP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Thomas; Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Kell, Douglas B; Stateva, Lubomira

    2009-07-16

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has a key signaling role in all eukaryotic organisms. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it is the second messenger in the Ras/PKA pathway which regulates nutrient sensing, stress responses, growth, cell cycle progression, morphogenesis, and cell wall biosynthesis. A stochastic model of the pathway has been reported. We have created deterministic mathematical models of the PKA module of the pathway, as well as the complete cAMP pathway. First, a simplified conceptual model was created which reproduced the dynamics of changes in cAMP levels in response to glucose addition in wild-type as well as cAMP phosphodiesterase deletion mutants. This model was used to investigate the role of the regulatory Krh proteins that had not been included previously. The Krh-containing conceptual model reproduced very well the experimental evidence supporting the role of Krh as a direct inhibitor of PKA. These results were used to develop the Complete cAMP Model. Upon simulation it illustrated several important features of the yeast cAMP pathway: Pde1p is more important than is Pde2p for controlling the cAMP levels following glucose pulses; the proportion of active PKA is not directly proportional to the cAMP level, allowing PKA to exert negative feedback; negative feedback mechanisms include activating Pde1p and deactivating Ras2 via phosphorylation of Cdc25. The Complete cAMP model is easier to simulate, and although significantly simpler than the existing stochastic one, it recreates cAMP levels and patterns of changes in cAMP levels observed experimentally in vivo in response to glucose addition in wild-type as well as representative mutant strains such as pde1Delta, pde2Delta, cyr1Delta, and others. The complete model is made available in SBML format. We suggest that the lower number of reactions and parameters makes these models suitable for integrating them with models of metabolism or of the cell cycle in S. cerevisiae. Similar models could be

  14. Canada Basin revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosher, David C.; Shimeld, John; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Chian, D; Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Jackson, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    More than 15,000 line-km of new regional seismic reflection and refraction data in the western Arctic Ocean provide insights into the tectonic and sedimentologic history of Canada Basin, permitting development of new geologic understanding in one of Earth's last frontiers. These new data support a rotational opening model for southern Canada Basin. There is a central basement ridge possibly representing an extinct spreading center with oceanic crustal velocities and blocky basement morphology characteristic of spreading centre crust surrounding this ridge. Basement elevation is lower in the south, mostly due to sediment loading subsidence. The sedimentary succession is thickest in the southern Beaufort Sea region, reaching more than 15 km, and generally thins to the north and west. In the north, grabens and half-grabens are indicative of extension. Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge is a large igneous province in northern Amerasia Basin, presumably emplaced synchronously with basin formation. It overprints most of northern Canada Basin structure. The seafloor and sedimentary succession of Canada Basin is remarkably flat-lying in its central region, with little bathymetric change over most of its extent. Reflections that correlate over 100s of kms comprise most of the succession and on-lap bathymetric and basement highs. They are interpreted as representing deposits from unconfined turbidity current flows. Sediment distribution patterns reflect changing source directions during the basin’s history. Initially, probably late Cretaceous to Paleocene synrift sediments sourced from the Alaska and Mackenzie-Beaufort margins. This unit shows a progressive series of onlap unconformities with a younging trend towards Alpha and Northwind ridges, likely a response to contemporaneous subsidence. Sediment source direction appeared to shift to the Canadian Arctic Archipelago margin for the Eocene and Oligocene, likely due to uplift of Arctic islands during the Eurekan Orogeny. The final

  15. Contingency Base Camp Solid Waste Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    4. Table 3-2, p. 3-14: This table presents planning factors for components of solid waste assuming none is being reused or recycled. Table 2 lists...combatants. Table 3 lists the comprehensive base camp waste characterization that was developed based on the evaluations of this study. The Wastewater ...Treat- ment Plant (WWTP) sludge production was based on studies at wastewater treatment plants at three base camps. Note that the most sig- nificant

  16. An offsite activity policy for asthma camp.

    PubMed

    Clack, Gail

    2010-03-01

    This article outlines the activities undertaken during asthma camps and highlights the benefits for children and young people. These include: improved understanding of asthma, increased concordance with medication, greater participation in physical activity and enhanced self-confidence. In the absence of a nationally agreed offsite activity policy, the author demonstrates the use of a clinical governance framework to develop a local offsite activity policy for asthma camps to ensure the safety of children and young people as well as staff.

  17. Military Housing Inspection-Camp Buehring, Kuwait

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-30

    E M B E R 3 0 , 2 0 1 6 Report No. DODIG-2016-139 Military Housing Inspection - Camp Buehring, Kuwait I N T E G R I T Y  E F F I C I E N C Y......www.dodig.mil Objective Our objective was to inspect U.S. military -occupied facilities at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, to verify compliance with DoD health and

  18. Standards for Day and Resident Camps: The Accreditation Programs of the American Camping Association. 1990 Edition, Revised 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    This book outlines standards that provide a basis for camp accreditation and site approval by the American Camping Association (ACA), Inc. The purpose of the ACA accreditation programs is to educate camp owners and directors in the administration of key aspects of camp operation, particularly those related to program quality and the health and…

  19. ASA24-Canada

    Cancer.gov

    A Canadian adaptation of the Automated Self-Administered 24-hour Dietary Assessment Tool (ASA24-Canada), developed by the Food Directorate at Health Canada in collaboration with NCI, has been freely available since April 2014.

  20. Information and Communication Technology: Design, Delivery, and Outcomes from a Nursing Informatics Boot Camp

    PubMed

    Kleib, Manal; Simpson, Nicole; Rhodes, Beverly

    2016-05-31

    Information and communication technology (ICT) is integral in today’s healthcare as a critical piece of support to both track and improve patient and organizational outcomes. Facilitating nurses’ informatics competency development through continuing education is paramount to enhance their readiness to practice safely and accurately in technologically enabled work environments. In this article, we briefly describe progress in nursing informatics (NI) and share a project exemplar that describes our experience in the design, implementation, and evaluation of a NI educational event, a one-day boot camp format that was used to provide foundational knowledge in NI targeted primarily at frontline nurses in Alberta, Canada. We also discuss the project outcomes, including lessons learned and future implications. Overall, the boot camp was successful to raise nurses’ awareness about the importance of informatics in nursing practice.

  1. Asthma camp. Quality of life questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Martín Iglesias, M A; Díaz Jara, M; Zapatero Remón, L; Martínez Molero, M I

    2003-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic chilhood disease. Asthmatic children need a self-management educational program, besides the medical treatment and clinical control. Camps are the ideal place to complete the educational program, to get the right control of the disease and to build the child confidence. Madrid Castilla la Mancha Allergy Society organizes every year a summer camp in a town, near Madrid. Fifty-four children stay for one week with certified allergists, fellows-in-training, nurses and cheer-leaders.Fifty-four children from 8 to 14 years old, with moderate to severe asthma participate in the camp. The camp includes educational, athletic and social activities. Campers participate daily in instructive and didactic teaching sessions. We evaluate quality of life with a questionaire filled in the camp and two months later. Results are analysed into two age groups, one between 8-10 years old and the other from 11 to 14 years old. The first group get a good management and improve their vision of the disease, quite the contrary, adolescents face up to a chronic disease with daily treatment, feeling asthma as a restriction of their autonomy. Even so, they identify crisis and learn to control them in an special risky life period. Asthma camps is a good experience for both groups and also for sanitary equipment.

  2. Newly synthesized cAMP is integrated at a membrane protein complex signalosome to ensure receptor response specificity.

    PubMed

    Guinzberg, Raquel; Díaz-Cruz, Antonio; Acosta-Trujillo, Carlos; Vilchis-Landeros, María Magdalena; Vázquez-Meza, Héctor; Lozano-Flores, Carlos; Chiquete-Felix, Natalia; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Piña, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP within the cell is required to achieve receptor-specific responses. The mechanism through which the cell selects a specific response to newly synthesized cAMP is not fully understood. In hepatocyte plasma membranes, we identified two functional and independent cAMP-responsive signaling protein macrocomplexes that produce, use, degrade, and regulate their own nondiffusible (sequestered) cAMP pool to achieve their specific responses. Each complex responds to the stimulation of an adenosine G protein-coupled receptor (Ado-GPCR), bound to either A2A or A2B , but not simultaneously to both. Each isoprotein involved in each signaling cascade was identified by measuring changes in cAMP levels after receptor activation, and its participation was confirmed by antibody-mediated inactivation. A2A -Ado-GPCR selective stimulation activates adenylyl cyclase 6 (AC6), which is bound to AKAP79/150, to synthesize cAMP which is used by two other AKAP79/150-tethered proteins: protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3A). In contrast, A2B -Ado-GPCR stimulation activates D-AKAP2-attached AC5 to generate cAMP, which is channeled to two other D-AKAP2-tethered proteins: guanine-nucleotide exchange factor 2 (Epac2) and PDE3B. In both cases, prior activation of PKA or Epac2 with selective cAMP analogs prevents de novo cAMP synthesis. In addition, we show that cAMP does not diffuse between these protein macrocomplexes or 'signalosomes'. Evidence of coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization of some proteins belonging to each signalosome is presented. Each signalosome constitutes a minimal functional signaling unit with its own machinery to synthesize and regulate a sequestered cAMP pool. Thus, each signalosome is devoted to ensure the transmission of a unique and unequivocal message through the cell.

  3. Cellular mechanisms underlying prostaglandin-induced transient cAMP signals near the plasma membrane of HEK-293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Thomas; Xin, Wenkuan; Mehats, Céline; Hassell, Kathryn; Piggott, Leslie; Le, Xuan; Karpen, Jeffrey; Conti, Marco

    2007-01-01

    We have previously used cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels as sensors to measure cAMP signals in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells. We found that prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) triggered transient increases in cAMP concentration near the plasma membrane, whereas total cAMP levels rose to a steady plateau over the same time course. In addition, we presented evidence that the decline in the near-membrane cAMP levels was due primarily to a PGE1-induced stimulation of phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, and that the differences between near-membrane and total cAMP levels were largely due to diffusional barriers and differential PDE activity. Here, we examine the mechanisms regulating transient, near-membrane cAMP signals. We observed that 5-min stimulation of HEK-293 cells with prostaglandins triggered a two- to threefold increase in PDE4 activity. Extracellular application of H89 (a PKA inhibitor) inhibited stimulation of PDE4 activity. Similarly, when we used CNG channels to monitor cAMP signals we found that both extracellular and intracellular (via the whole-cell patch pipette) application of H89, or the highly selective PKA inhibitor, PKI, prevented the decline in prostaglandin-induced responses. Following pretreatment with rolipram (a PDE4 inhibitor), H89 had little or no effect on near-membrane or total cAMP levels. Furthermore, disrupting the subcellular localization of PKA with the A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) disruptor Ht31 prevented the decline in the transient response. Based on these data we developed a plausible kinetic model that describes prostaglandin-induced cAMP signals. This model has allowed us to quantitatively demonstrate the importance of PKA-mediated stimulation of PDE4 activity in shaping near-membrane cAMP signals. PMID:16899551

  4. A Summer Like No Other: Israeli Teens Experience American Camping at Tamarack Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bice, Wendy Rose

    2003-01-01

    A Jewish camp in Michigan hosted more than 300 Israeli teens during its 2002 camping season. American and Israeli campers lived in the same cabins so they could learn about each other's culture and develop friendships. To make the visitors welcome, informational brochures sent to Israeli families were translated into Hebrew, and area families…

  5. Summary of the American Camping Association Camp Ecological Training Project, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluchel, Robert W.; Gregory, Charles A.

    Briefly summarized is the American Camping Association's Camp Ecological Training Project, its goals, accomplishments, problems, and future potential as seen by the first two Itinerant Ecologists who participated in the project. Creation of an ecological awareness and conservation consciousness were the major goals of the project. To accomplish…

  6. Allegheny National Forest, CCC Camp ANF1 , The camp’s main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Allegheny National Forest, CCC Camp ANF-1 , The camp’s main entrance is located at the intersection of Duhring Road (ANF 131) and ANF 124, Pennsylvania, with the interior site road known as Trail Ride Drive., Marienville, Forest County, PA

  7. Project REACH: Camp Goldenrod: Prototype Staff Manual. Appendix R. Camp Staff Training Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinton, Dennis A., Ed.; Farley, Elizabeth M., Ed.

    Resulting from a 3 year project to develop and test competency based programs for camp personnel, the document contains a staff manual for personnel of a residential camp for physically handicapped campers (6 to 18 years old). An introductory section gives an explanation of competency based instruction, describes a module, and provides an overview…

  8. Catch the Dream of Camping: Albuquerque Keynoters Share Insight into the Future of Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marla

    2000-01-01

    Highlights the views of three keynote speakers who will share their insights into the future of the camp experience at the next American Camping Association National Conference. Environmentalist Bill McKibben, educator Cynthia Tobias, and futurist Ira Blumenthal focus, respectively, on connecting children to the natural world, understanding…

  9. Camping in the Disciplines: Assessing the Effect of Writing Camps on Graduate Student Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busl, Gretchen; Donnelly, Kara Lee; Capdevielle, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In the past ten years, an increasing number of universities have begun organizing writing "camps," or full-week immersion experiences, in an effort to address the increased need to support graduate student writing. Outside of anecdotes and testimonials, we have previously had very little data about these camps' success. This study,…

  10. A Summer Like No Other: Israeli Teens Experience American Camping at Tamarack Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bice, Wendy Rose

    2003-01-01

    A Jewish camp in Michigan hosted more than 300 Israeli teens during its 2002 camping season. American and Israeli campers lived in the same cabins so they could learn about each other's culture and develop friendships. To make the visitors welcome, informational brochures sent to Israeli families were translated into Hebrew, and area families…

  11. Camp Teaches Life Lessons: A Director's Commentary on Camp's Lasting Educational Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gucker, Peter L.

    2001-01-01

    At camp, children learn values and skills that are seldom included in school curricula. The community-based environment of camps is conducive to learning self-assurance, community respect, and healthy competition, and to understanding diversity. Exposure to Nature promotes an infectious enthusiasm for the wilderness and for learning outdoor…

  12. Business and Finance: A Resource Book for Camps. Camp Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Armand, Ed.; Ball, Beverly, Ed.

    this resource book contains 35 articles designed to present general information concerning camp business and financial management to directors or administrators. Typically a specialist is employed to supervise camp business and finance, but the administrator needs to have a broad understanding of five specific business topics: (1) liability and…

  13. Seismic velocities within the sedimentary succession of the Canada Basin and southern Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge, Arctic Ocean: evidence for accelerated porosity reduction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimeld, John; Li, Qingmou; Chian, Deping; Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Jackson, Ruth; Mosher, David; Hutchinson, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The Canada Basin and the southern Alpha-Mendeleev ridge complex underlie a significant proportion of the Arctic Ocean, but the geology of this undrilled and mostly ice-covered frontier is poorly known. New information is encoded in seismic wide-angle reflections and refractions recorded with expendable sonobuoys between 2007 and 2011. Velocity-depth samples within the sedimentary succession are extracted from published analyses for 142 of these records obtained at irregularly spaced stations across an area of 1.9E + 06 km2. The samples are modelled at regional, subregional and station-specific scales using an exponential function of inverse velocity versus depth with regionally representative parameters determined through numerical regression. With this approach, smooth, non-oscillatory velocity-depth profiles can be generated for any desired location in the study area, even where the measurement density is low. Practical application is demonstrated with a map of sedimentary thickness, derived from seismic reflection horizons interpreted in the time domain and depth converted using the velocity-depth profiles for each seismic trace. A thickness of 12-13 km is present beneath both the upper Mackenzie fan and the middle slope off of Alaska, but the sedimentary prism thins more gradually outboard of the latter region. Mapping of the observed-to-predicted velocities reveals coherent geospatial trends associated with five subregions: the Mackenzie fan; the continental slopes beyond the Mackenzie fan; the abyssal plain; the southwestern Canada Basin; and, the Alpha-Mendeleev magnetic domain. Comparison of the subregional velocity-depth models with published borehole data, and interpretation of the station-specific best-fitting model parameters, suggests that sandstone is not a predominant lithology in any of the five subregions. However, the bulk sand-to-shale ratio likely increases towards the Mackenzie fan, and the model for this subregion compares favourably with

  14. Seismic velocities within the sedimentary succession of the Canada Basin and southern Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge, Arctic Ocean: evidence for accelerated porosity reduction?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shimeld, John; Li, Qingmou; Chian, Deping; Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Jackson, Ruth; Mosher, David; Hutchinson, Deborah R.

    2016-01-01

    The Canada Basin and the southern Alpha-Mendeleev ridge complex underlie a significant proportion of the Arctic Ocean, but the geology of this undrilled and mostly ice-covered frontier is poorly known. New information is encoded in seismic wide-angle reflections and refractions recorded with expendable sonobuoys between 2007 and 2011. Velocity–depth samples within the sedimentary succession are extracted from published analyses for 142 of these records obtained at irregularly spaced stations across an area of 1.9E + 06 km2. The samples are modelled at regional, subregional and station-specific scales using an exponential function of inverse velocity versus depth with regionally representative parameters determined through numerical regression. With this approach, smooth, non-oscillatory velocity–depth profiles can be generated for any desired location in the study area, even where the measurement density is low. Practical application is demonstrated with a map of sedimentary thickness, derived from seismic reflection horizons interpreted in the time domain and depth converted using the velocity–depth profiles for each seismic trace. A thickness of 12–13 km is present beneath both the upper Mackenzie fan and the middle slope off of Alaska, but the sedimentary prism thins more gradually outboard of the latter region. Mapping of the observed-to-predicted velocities reveals coherent geospatial trends associated with five subregions: the Mackenzie fan; the continental slopes beyond the Mackenzie fan; the abyssal plain; the southwestern Canada Basin; and, the Alpha-Mendeleev magnetic domain. Comparison of the subregional velocity–depth models with published borehole data, and interpretation of the station-specific best-fitting model parameters, suggests that sandstone is not a predominant lithology in any of the five subregions. However, the bulk sand-to-shale ratio likely increases towards the Mackenzie fan, and the model for this subregion compares

  15. gidakiimanaaniwiagamig, an informal science camp for mixed age American Indian students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Kowalczak, C.; Dalbotten, D. M.; Pellerin, H.; Greensky, L.

    2016-12-01

    Gidakiimanaaniwiagamig('Our Earth Lodge' in Ojibwe; gidaa, for short) camp program at Fond du Lac Reservation was started in 1989 by Pellerin and Greensky to help reservation students stay in school and graduate from middle school. As more students successfully completed middle school, the purpose of the program evolved to help students graduate from high school and go to college. Starting in 2003, various NSF awards funded the camps and STEM focus became explicit. The current gidaa camps are funded by NASA (Kowalczak) and NSF (Ito & Dalbotten) funds and focus on learning about the effect of climate change on the reservation and treaty lands. From its inception, the gidaa camps served a mixed age group of students (K through 12) who were mentored by elders, local school teachers and college students (camp alumni). A few university scientists provided support and acted as resources. The inclusion of students of all ages and their families is a deliberate one, based on the American Indian learning practice that "everyone teaches and everyone learns". This approach supports the development of the whole person and not just increased climate or general STEM literacy. Evidence for the success of this approach can be seen in 100% high school graduation rate of students who have been with the camp for more than a few years even if they did not attend every camp. Currently, weekend gidaa camps meet 6 times during the academic year with an additional week-long summer camp. Reservation Natural Resource managers share their concerns about the effect of climate change and what they already see and how they try to mitigate or adjust to these effects. Students thus immediately grasp the relevance of climate change to their lives while simultaneously being introduced to the work being done to help protect their land. Students are divided into small color groups (each group is of mixed ages) and group members help each other learn new concepts and vocabulary assisted by 1 or 2

  16. Prevalence of texting while driving and other risky driving behaviors among young people in Ontario, Canada: Evidence from 2012 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sean; Pek, Simon; Morrish, Jayne; Ruf, Megan

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports on the prevalence of texting while driving and other risky driving behaviors by age and gender in two large samples of youth aged 16-19 years in Ontario, Canada. In Study 1 (N=6133), we found that males reported more frequent texting while driving and speeding than females and, in terms of age, sixteen year olds reported frequent texting while driving than older participants. In Study 2 (N=4450), which was conducted two years later, males again reported more frequent texting while driving, however there was no difference in the rate of talking on the phone while driving among males and females. Participants also reported on experiences that led to a significant reduction in their texting while driving. The most common reasons were the perceived danger of texting while driving, laws and fines against texting while driving, and observing close-calls and accidents experienced by other people. The results of both studies suggest that driving-related risk-taking behaviors co-occur and that young passengers in vehicles, including 14 and 15 year olds, are bystanders to texting while driving. Finally, there was a substantial decline in the prevalence of texting while driving across the studies. In Study 1, 27% of participants reported "sometimes" to "almost always" texting while driving compared to 6% of participants in Study 2. Limitations and implications for public campaigns targeted youth distracted driving are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagenesis and evolution of microporosity of Middle-Upper Devonian Kee Scarp reefs, Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada: Petrographic and chemical evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Aasm, I.S.; Azmy, K.K.

    1996-01-01

    The Middle-Upper Devonian Kee Scarp reef complexes of Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada, are oil-producing, stromatoporoid-dominated carbonates. Episodic increases in the rate of sea level rise produced multiple cycles of reef growth that exhibit backstepping characteristics. These carbonates, composed of invariably altered limestones, have original interskeletal, intraskeletal, and intergranular porosity, mostly occluded by nonferroan, dull luminescent cements. Secondary porosity, represented by micropores of various types, developed during diagenesis by aggrading neomorphism and dissolution. The micropores represent the main reservoir porosity in the Kee Scarp limestone. Petrographic, chemical, and isotopic studies of Kee Scarp reef components reveal a complex diagenetic history involving marine fluids modified by increasing water/rock interaction and burial. Neomorphic stabilization of skeletal components caused further depletion in {gamma}{sup 18}O but very little change in {gamma}{sup 13}C, an argument for modification of the original marine fluids with increasing burial. Variations in magnitude of water/rock interaction with depth, facies changes, and porosity modifications probably exerted some control on fractionation and distribution of stable isotopes and trace elements in reef components.

  18. Mitochondrial population structure and post-glacial dispersal of longnose sucker Catostomus catostomus in Labrador, Canada: evidence for multiple refugial origins and limited ongoing gene flow.

    PubMed

    Langille, B L; Perry, R; Keefe, D; Barker, O; Marshall, H D

    2016-08-01

    Two hundred and eighty-seven longnose sucker Catostomus catostomus were collected from 14 lakes in Labrador, 52 from three lakes in Ontario, 43 from two lakes in British Columbia and 32 from a lake in Yukon; a total of 414 in all. The resulting 34 haplotypes (20 in Labrador) contained moderate haplotypic diversity (h = 0·657) and relatively low nucleotide diversity (π = 3·730 × 10(-3) . Mean ϕST (0·453, P < 0·05) over all populations revealed distinct genetic structuring among C. catostomus populations across Canada, based on province, which was validated by the analysis and spatial analysis of molecular variance (c. 80% variation between provinces). These results probably reflect the historical imprint of recolonization from different refugia and possibly indicate limited ongoing gene flow within provinces. A haplotype network revealed one major and two minor clades within Labrador that were assigned to the Atlantic, Beringian and Mississippian refugia, respectively, with tests of neutrality and mismatch distribution indicative of a recent population expansion in Labrador, dated between c. 3500 and 8300 years ago.

  19. Analysis of 44 Cases before the Landlord and Tenant Board Involving Bed Bug Infestations in Ontario, Canada: Focus on Adjudicator Decisions Based on Entomological/Pest Management Evidence and Accountability under the Residential Tenancy Act and Other Applicable Legislation

    PubMed Central

    Bryks, Sam

    2011-01-01

    The resurgence of bed bugs in major urban centres in North America has resulted in conflict between landlords and tenants. This is commonly focused on attribution of blame for source of infestation, on responsibility, on costs for preparation, treatment and losses, and for compensation as rent abatement and/or alternative temporary housing. In Ontario, Canada, these issues are often decided by adjudicators at the Landlord and Tenant Board hearing claims, counter-claims and defense by legal representation (lawyers and paralegals) as well as through mediation. Evidence in these hearings may include photographs, invoices for costs as well as testimony by tenants, landlords and “expert witnesses” who are most often pest control firms representing their landlord clients. A total of 44 Landlord and Tenant Board adjudicated cases available online were analyzed. The analysis included elements of the decisions such as adjudicator, claimant (landlord or tenant), basis of claim, review of evidence, amount of claim, amount awarded, and evaluation of the quality of the evidence. The results of the analysis of these findings are discussed. Recommendations for improvement of adjudicator decisions on the basis of knowledge of bed bug biology and Integrated Pest Management best practices are presented as well as the importance of education of tenants and landlords to a process of mutual trust, support and accountability. PMID:26467732

  20. Halting the Summer Achievement Slide: A Randomized Field Trial of the KindergARTen Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Geoffrey D.; Goetz, Michael E.; Dowling, N. Maritza

    2009-01-01

    In this randomized field trial of KindergARTen Camp, a 6-week summer enrichment program in literacy and the fine arts, we analyzed the summer learning outcomes of 93 treatment and 35 control students from high-poverty schools in Baltimore, Maryland. This experiment offers evidence concerning the causal effect of the program on 5 measures of…

  1. [Odontological contribution to the identification of concentration camp physician Josef Mengele].

    PubMed

    Endris, R

    1985-01-01

    The body which had been exhumed from a graveyard in Embú (Brazil) on June 6th was investigated by forensic experts. The comparison of the post-mortem dental findings and jaw bones with ante-mortem data of Josef Mengele, physician of the concentration camp of Auschwitz, makes evident, that there is positive identity by high probability.

  2. Late Holocene paleoceanographic evidence of the influence of the Aleutian Low and North Pacific High on circulation in the Seymour-Belize Inlet Complex, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez Riveiros, Natalia; Patterson, R. Timothy

    2009-12-01

    Foraminiferal and thecamoebian faunas from the Seymour-Belize Inlet Complex (SBIC), a fjord network situated on the mainland coast of British Columbia, were studied to assess climatic cycles and trends impacting the area through the ˜ AD 850-AD 2002 interval. Ocean circulation patterns prevalent in the SBIC are strongly linked to precipitation, which is closely linked to the relative strength and position (center of action; COA) of the seasonally developed Aleutian Low (AL) and North Pacific High (NPH) atmospheric circulation gyres. Through interpretation of cluster analysis and ordination methods, a period of weak estuarine circulation was recognized to have impacted the SBIC area between ˜ AD 850 and AD 1500. During this time waters in the SBIC were dysoxic to anoxic and the sediment-water interface was comprised of a depauperate foraminiferal fauna consisting of low diversity agglutinated forms. These reduced oxygen conditions came about as a result of diminished precipitation in the SBIC catchment as the COA of the AL progressively migrated westward over time, resulting in greatly reduced estuarine circulation and only infrequent and feeble incursions of well oxygenated open ocean water into the SBIC basin. By ˜AD 1575, following a gradual transition period of ˜75 years when circulation patterns in the inlet were unstable, very strong estuarine circulation developed in the SBIC, concomitant with the onset of the Little Ice Age (LIA) in western Canada. In the SBIC this interval was characterized by higher levels of precipitation, which greatly enhanced estuarine circulation resulting in frequent incursions of cold, well oxygenated ocean currents into the bottom waters of the SBIC and the development of a diverse calcareous foraminiferal fauna. This circulation pattern began to break down in the late 19th century AD and by ˜AD 1940 conditions similar to those that existed in the inlet prior to ˜AD 1500 had redeveloped, a process that continues at present.

  3. Dietary habits of polar bears in Foxe Basin, Canada: possible evidence of a trophic regime shift mediated by a new top predator.

    PubMed

    Galicia, Melissa P; Thiemann, Gregory W; Dyck, Markus G; Ferguson, Steven H; Higdon, Jeff W

    2016-08-01

    Polar bear (Ursus maritimus) subpopulations in several areas with seasonal sea ice regimes have shown declines in body condition, reproductive rates, or abundance as a result of declining sea ice habitat. In the Foxe Basin region of Nunavut, Canada, the size of the polar bear subpopulation has remained largely stable over the past 20 years, despite concurrent declines in sea ice habitat. We used fatty acid analysis to examine polar bear feeding habits in Foxe Basin and thus potentially identify ecological factors contributing to population stability. Adipose tissue samples were collected from 103 polar bears harvested during 2010-2012. Polar bear diet composition varied spatially within the region with ringed seal (Pusa hispida) comprising the primary prey in northern and southern Foxe Basin, whereas polar bears in Hudson Strait consumed equal proportions of ringed seal and harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus). Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) consumption was highest in northern Foxe Basin, a trend driven by the ability of adult male bears to capture large-bodied prey. Importantly, bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) contributed to polar bear diets in all areas and all age and sex classes. Bowhead carcasses resulting from killer whale (Orcinus orca) predation and subsistence harvest potentially provide an important supplementary food source for polar bears during the ice-free period. Our results suggest that the increasing abundance of killer whales and bowhead whales in the region could be indirectly contributing to improved polar bear foraging success despite declining sea ice habitat. However, this indirect interaction between top predators may be temporary if continued sea ice declines eventually severely limit on-ice feeding opportunities for polar bears.

  4. Camp for all connection: a community health information outreach project.

    PubMed

    Huber, Jeffrey T; Walsh, Teresa J; Varman, Beatriz

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of the Camp For All Connection project is to facilitate access to electronic health information resources at the Camp For All facility. Camp For All is a barrier-free camp working in partnership with organizations to enrich the lives of children and adults with chronic illnesses and disabilities and their families by providing camping and retreat experiences. The camp facility is located on 206 acres in Burton, Texas. The project partners are Texas Woman's University, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, and Camp For All. The Camp For All Connection project placed Internet-connected workstations at the camp's health center in the main lodge and provided training in the use of electronic health information resources. A train-the-trainer approach was used to provide training to Camp For All staff. Project workstations are being used by health care providers and camp staff for communication purposes and to make better informed health care decisions for Camp For All campers. A post-training evaluation was administered at the end of the train-the-trainer session. In addition, a series of site visits and interviews was conducted with camp staff members involved in the project. The site visits and interviews allowed for ongoing dialog between project staff and project participants.

  5. Visitor evaluations of management actions at a highly impacted Appalachian Trail camping area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, M.L.; Marion, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Protected area management involves balancing environmental and social objectives. This is particularly difficult at high-use/high-impact recreation sites, because resource protection objectives may require substantial site management or visitor regulation. This study examined visitors? reactions to both of these types of actions at Annapolis Rocks, Maryland, a popular Appalachian Trail camping area. We surveyed visitors before and after implementation of camping policies that included shifting camping to designated newly constructed campsites and prohibiting campfires. Survey results reveal that visitors were more satisfied with all social and environmental indicators after the changes were enacted. An Importance-Performance analysis also determined that management actions improved conditions for factors of greatest concern to campers prior to the changes. Posttreatment visitors were least satisfied with factors related to reduced freedom and to some characteristics of the constructed campsites. Although there was evidence of visitor displacement, the camping changes met management goals by protecting the camping area?s natural resources and improving social conditions.

  6. Visitor Evaluations of Management Actions at a Highly Impacted Appalachian Trail Camping Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Melissa L.; Marion, Jeffrey L.

    2006-12-01

    Protected area management involves balancing environmental and social objectives. This is particularly difficult at high-use/high-impact recreation sites, because resource protection objectives may require substantial site management or visitor regulation. This study examined visitors’ reactions to both of these types of actions at Annapolis Rocks, Maryland, a popular Appalachian Trail camping area. We surveyed visitors before and after implementation of camping policies that included shifting camping to designated newly constructed campsites and prohibiting campfires. Survey results reveal that visitors were more satisfied with all social and environmental indicators after the changes were enacted. An Importance-Performance analysis also determined that management actions improved conditions for factors of greatest concern to campers prior to the changes. Posttreatment visitors were least satisfied with factors related to reduced freedom and to some characteristics of the constructed campsites. Although there was evidence of visitor displacement, the camping changes met management goals by protecting the camping area’s natural resources and improving social conditions.

  7. Modulation of cAMP metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its effect on host infection.

    PubMed

    Barba, Jeannette; Alvarez, Angel H; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2010-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the single most relevant bacterial infectious agent as Tuberculosis is estimated to affect one-third of the world population. Like other microorganisms, M. tuberculosis needs to sense and adapt to changes in the several niches where it is found, ranging from the environment to a number of host-adapted programs, including infection of cell types such as macrophages, dendritic cells, epithelial cells and adipocytes. A strategy commonly used by cells to respond to such changes consists of producing small molecules known as second messengers. 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is one of the best-studied second messengers in many organisms, and in recent years its participation during the M. tuberculosis infection cycle has just begun to be thoroughly considered. In this work, we aimed to provide a perspective of how cAMP metabolism proceeds in M. tuberculosis, which genes are activated in response to cAMP signaling in this organism, and discuss the evidence for bacterially produced cAMP use during infection. Furthermore, key issues needing to be addressed for better understanding cAMP physiology in slow-growing pathogenic mycobacteria are presented.

  8. Integrating CAM into nursing curricula: CAM camp as an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Cornman, B Jane; Carr, Catherine A; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2006-05-01

    In 2002, the University of Washington School of Nursing (SON) partnered with Bastyr University on a five-year plan to offer a four-week intensive "CAM Camp" (CAMp) for SON faculty members and medical students from across the country. The four-week educational program introduced attendees to various complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities through didactic and experiential learning. To enhance complementary and alternative medicine content in a SON curriculum and to increase SON faculty knowledge and understanding about (1) the range of CAM therapies, (2) the theoretic and cultural backgrounds of these therapies, and (3) their potential contributions to the health of diverse populations. A descriptive pretest, posttest design was used to compare pre-CAMp CAM knowledge and CAM course content with post-CAMp knowledge levels of faculty and course CAM content. On post-CAMp surveys, familiarity with CAM modalities was rated with mixed results as compared with positive reports on the qualitative interviews. Interview results were more positive about CAM in general and were less specific about individual CAM topics. Statistically significant increases in competences were evident in each of 13 competencies rated with four competencies at P < .01. The number of required and elective courses containing CAM content increased as did the CAM content in continuing education conferences offered by the SON.

  9. Camp Hope: Integrating Tai Chi and Humanbecoming in a Camp for Children.

    PubMed

    Delis, Pamela Coombs; Leger, Robin R; Longton, Fran; Chandler, David Lynn

    2015-10-01

    This article is about Camp Hope, a two-week summer day program for children age 6-12 from low income families and violent neighborhoods and for children who are struggling academically or identified as having behavioral health issues. The camp is operated by House of Peace and Education (HOPE) a 501(c)(3) nonprofit company that began in 1996. The program is designed to offer enrichment activities in a caring community for young children. The theoretical framework behind the vision and policies is Parse's humanbecoming paradigm. In particular, the camp administrators and staff try to see all persons as co-creating of their everchanging humanuniverse process.

  10. Canada Country Analysis Brief

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    Canada is a net exporter of most energy commodities and a significant producer of crude oil and other liquids from oil sands, natural gas, and hydroelectricity. Energy exports to the United States account for the vast majority of Canada's total energy exports. However, because of economic and other considerations, Canada is developing ways to diversify its trading partners, especially by expanding ties with emerging markets in Asia.

  11. 25 CFR 248.9 - Camping and use restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-LIEU FISHING SITES § 248.9 Camping and use restrictions. All camping, picnicking, use of alcoholic beverages, setting or use of fires, use of the sites for cleaning of fish, the deposit of any garbage, paper...

  12. 25 CFR 248.9 - Camping and use restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-LIEU FISHING SITES § 248.9 Camping and use restrictions. All camping, picnicking, use of alcoholic beverages, setting or use of fires, use of the sites for cleaning of fish, the deposit of any garbage, paper...

  13. 25 CFR 248.9 - Camping and use restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-LIEU FISHING SITES § 248.9 Camping and use restrictions. All camping, picnicking, use of alcoholic beverages, setting or use of fires, use of the sites for cleaning of fish, the deposit of any garbage, paper...

  14. 25 CFR 248.9 - Camping and use restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-LIEU FISHING SITES § 248.9 Camping and use restrictions. All camping, picnicking, use of alcoholic beverages, setting or use of fires, use of the sites for cleaning of fish, the deposit of any garbage, paper...

  15. 25 CFR 248.9 - Camping and use restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-LIEU FISHING SITES § 248.9 Camping and use restrictions. All camping, picnicking, use of alcoholic beverages, setting or use of fires, use of the sites for cleaning of fish, the deposit of any garbage, paper...

  16. CPSC Warns of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning with Camping Equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Warns of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Hazard with Camping Equipment The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) warns ... about the carbon monoxide (CO) hazard with camping equipment. CO can kill you! From 2002–2006, CPSC ...

  17. 8. VIEW EAST, CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP PARSONS GARAGE, MODERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW EAST, CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP PARSONS GARAGE, MODERN SHED, CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP PARSONS BLACKSMITH SHOP, AND MODERN SHED. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  18. Fluoride-silicate melt immiscibility and its role in REE ore formation: Evidence from the Strange Lake rare metal deposit, Québec-Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyukova, Olga; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.

    2014-08-01

    Pegmatites and adjacent subsolvus granites (two alkali feldspars) of the Mid-Proterozoic Strange Lake pluton (Québec-Labrador, Canada) host potentially economic concentrations of high field strength elements (HFSE), including the rare earth elements (REE), zirconium and niobium. Previous studies have proposed that these concentrations were the result of a combination of extreme fractionation of a peralkaline granitic magma and later hydrothermal remobilization. However, the recent discovery of melt inclusions which, after heating to 900 or 950 °C, quench to immiscible fluoride and silicate glasses, suggests an additional mechanism of HFSE concentration. Crystallized melt inclusions are common in quartz phenocrysts of the early hypersolvus and transsolvus granite. After heating, four types of inclusions were discerned. Type 1 inclusions quench to a single silicate glass containing a high concentration of Zr, Nb and Ti. Quenching of Type 2 inclusions produces a Zr, Nb, Ti-rich silicate glass containing a globule of calcium-rich fluoride glass with a high concentration of the REE. The third inclusion type is similar to Type 2, except that the calcium-rich fluoride glass contains a globule of REE-fluoride glass (up to 50 wt.% total REE). Type 4 inclusions contain calcium-fluoride glass with multiple silicate globules. We propose that during or soon after emplacement, the early granitic magma exsolved a calcium fluoride melt into which rare earth elements (REE) partitioned preferentially. The conjugate silicate melt was consequently depleted in Ca and the REE, and enriched in Zr, Nb and Ti. Crystallization of the fluoride melt occurred late in the crystallization history of the silicate magma allowing it to accumulate in the volatile-rich residual magma that formed the pegmatites. This played a major role in the extreme enrichment of the pegmatites in Ca, F and REE. Crystallization of the pegmatites proceeded inwards from an outer zone in which feldspars, quartz

  19. Macrocrystal phlogopite Rb-Sr dates for the Ekati property kimberlites, Slave Province, Canada: evidence for multiple intrusive episodes in the Paleocene and Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creaser, Robert A.; Grütter, Herman; Carlson, Jon; Crawford, Barbara

    2004-09-01

    New Rb-Sr age determinations using macrocrystal phlogopite are presented for 27 kimberlites from the Ekati property of the Lac de Gras region, Slave Province, Canada. These new data show that kimberlite magmatism at Ekati ranges in age from at least Late Paleocene (˜61 Ma) to Middle Eocene time (˜45 Ma). Older, perovskite-bearing kimberlites from Ekati extend this age range to Late Cretaceous time (˜74 Ma). Within this age range, emplacement episodes at ˜48, 51-53, 55-56 and 59-61 Ma can be recognized. Middle Eocene kimberlite magmatism of the previously dated Mark kimberlite (˜47.5 Ma) is shown to include four other pipes from the east-central Ekati property. A single kimberlite (Aaron) may be younger than the 47.5 Ma Mark kimberlite. The economically important Panda kimberlite is precisely dated in this study to be 53.3±0.6 Ma using the phlogopite isochron method, and up to six additional kimberlites from the central Ekati property have Early Eocene ages indistinguishable from that of Panda, including the Koala and Koala North occurrences. Late Paleocene 55-56 Ma kimberlite magmatism, represented by the Diavik kimberlite pipes adjacent to the southeastern Ekati property, is shown to extend onto the southeastern Ekati property and includes three, and possibly four, kimberlites. A precise eight-point phlogopite isochron for the Cobra South kimberlite yields an emplacement age of 59.7±0.4 Ma; eight other kimberlites from across the Ekati property have similar Late Paleocene Rb-Sr model ages. The addition of 27 new emplacement ages for kimberlites from the Ekati property confirms that kimberlite magmatism from the central Slave Province is geologically young, despite ages ranging back to Cambrian time from elsewhere in the Slave Province. With the available geochronologic database, Lac de Gras kimberlites with the highest diamond potential are currently restricted to the 51-53 and 55-56 Ma periods of kimberlite magmatism.

  20. Enhanced recycling of organic matter and Os-isotopic evidence for multiple magmatic or meteoritic inputs to the Late Permian Panthalassic Ocean, Opal Creek, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Svetoslav V.; Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.; Henderson, Charles M.; Algeo, Thomas J.

    2015-02-01

    The geochemical record for the Permian-Triassic boundary in northern latitudes is essential to evaluation of global changes associated with the most profound extinction of life on Earth. We present inorganic and organic geochemical data, and Re-Os isotope systematics in a critical stratigraphic interval of pre- and post-extinction Upper Permian-Lower Triassic sediments from Opal Creek, western Canada (paleolatitude of ∼30°N). We document significant and long-lived changes in Panthalassa seawater chemistry that were initiated during the first of four magmatic or meteoritic inputs to Late Permian seawater, evidenced by notable decreases of Os isotopic ratios upsection. Geochemical signals indicate establishment of anoxic bottom waters shortly after regional transgression reinitiated sedimentation in the Late Permian. Euxinic signals are most prominent in the Upper Permian sediments with low organic carbon and high sulfur contents, and gradually wane in the Lower Triassic. The observed features may have been generated in a strongly euxinic ocean in which high bacterioplankton productivity sustained prolific microbial sulfate reduction in the sediment and/or water column, providing hydrogen sulfide to form pyrite. This scenario requires nearly complete anaerobic decomposition of predominantly labile marine organic matter (OM) without the necessity for a complete collapse of primary marine productivity. Similar geochemical variations could have been achieved by widespread oxidation of methane by sulfate reducers after a methanogenic burst in the Late Permian. Both scenarios could have provided similar kill mechanisms for the latest Permian mass extinction. Despite the moderate thermal maturity of the section, OM in all studied samples is dominantly terrestrial and/or continentally derived, recycled and refractory ancient OM. We argue that, as such, the quantity of the OM in the section mainly reflects changes in terrestrial vegetation and/or weathering, and not in

  1. Evidence for Crystal Settling, In-Situ Magma Differentiation and Crustal Contamination in a Proterozoic Mafic Sill, Victoria Island, NWT, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, J. R.; Naslund, H. R.; Bedard, J. H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Seventy-one samples from a 26 m long drill core through a Proterozoic tholeiitic sill on Victoria Island, NWT, Canada have been analyzed for major and trace element composition. The high resolution of this study provides new insights into the complicated nature of even small sills. The base of the sill is a fine-grained, phenocryst-free, chilled margin overlain by a 10 m thick layer of olivine cumulates and a meter thick layer of augite cumulates. The upper 14 meters are composed of diabase with a sandwich zone at 18 meters above the basal contact. Crystallization of the sill was modeled using Pearce Element Ratios (PER), Parent-Daughter Modeling (P-D), and MELTS (Ghiorso & Sack 1995, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 119: 197-212). Parent-Daughter Modeling was done using the average mineral compositions from MELTS at the temperature when olivine crystallization ended, Fo89, En49Fs13Wo38, and An86. It would be necessary to remove 45% crystals from the bulk magma in order to reach the sandwich horizon composition. Viscosity considerations indicate that it would be nearly impossible to move a magma slurry with such a high phenocryst content, and thus, in-situ fractionation is required. P-D Modeling shows the best explanation is the emplacement of a magma carrying 10% olivine, 11% augite and 1% plagioclase phenocrysts, followed by crystal settling and in-situ fractionation of an additional 8.5% olivine, 5.5% augite and 9% plagioclase. The bulk sill = the chilled margin + 22% phenocrysts, and the sandwich zone = the chilled margin - 23% fractionation. The composition of the sandwich zone is similar to the residual liquid composition predicted by MELTS at 23% crystallization of the chilled margin. Results of P-D Modeling and MELTS are in good agreement with PER analysis. Seven samples from the interval 14 to 15.6 meters above the base of the sill with compositions distinctly different from the neighboring diabase, are inconsistent with the normal evolution of a tholeiitic

  2. Evidence of disruption in estrogen-associated signaling in the liver transcriptome of in-migrating sockeye salmon of British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Ikonomou, Michael G; Rehaume, Vicki; Dubetz, Cory; Patterson, David A; Helbing, Caren C

    2013-03-01

    The health of sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) salmon stocks is of increasing concern; reflecting both a sentinel of human-impacted aquatic environments and as a key fishery for British Columbia, Canada. The spawning migration of Pacific sockeye salmon represents a critical life stage where significant demands are made on animal biology and important BC fisheries are linked to this migration in the Skeena and Fraser River watersheds. These watersheds present very different environments; the former being sparsely populated with little industrial impact, while the latter flows through highly-populated areas. The present study used quantitative real-time PCR analysis of adult sockeye salmon from four 2008 stocks [Fulton River and Pinkut Creek (Skeena) and Weaver Creek and Harrison River (Fraser)] to evaluate ten hepatic gene transcripts associated with reproduction, stress, energy metabolism, and exposure to environmental contaminants. Dynamic changes in mRNA abundance were observed in Fulton River stock animals from the Skeena River mouth to the spawning ground which reflect the physiological demands of in-river migration and reproductive maturation. Inter-stock comparisons of migrants at spawning grounds demonstrated a marked difference in the sex-specific gene hepatic gene expression profiles. Our original hypothesis was that a greater diversity in mRNA profiles is associated with watersheds with higher human impact. However, our observations contradict this posit. Skeena males and females displayed poor definition in their molecular profiles between sexes while the Fraser River fish had very distinctive sex differences that were consistent with the previous year's migration. The genetic sex distribution and ratio of milt versus roe production did not differ between the Skeena and Fraser River spawning site fish. However, a significant percentage of Skeena animals displayed marked discordance of these characteristics with gender-specific hepatic mRNA profiles implying

  3. Recent Advances in the Discovery of Small Molecules Targeting Exchange Proteins Directly Activated by cAMP (EPAC)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Wild, Christopher; Zhou, Xiaobin; Ye, Na; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    cAMP is a pivotal second messenger that regulates numerous biological processes under physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, diabetes, heart failure, inflammation and neurological disorders. In the past, all effects of cAMP were initially believed to be mediated by PKA and cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels. Since the discovery of EPAC proteins in 1998, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that the net cellular effects of cAMP are also regulated by EPAC. The pursuit of the biological functions of EPAC has benefited from the development and applications of a growing number of pharmacological probes targeting EPAC proteins. In this Perspective, we seek to provide a concise update on recent advances in the development of chemical entities including various membrane-permeable analogues of cAMP and newly discovered EPAC-specific ligands from high throughput assays and hit-to-lead optimizations. PMID:24256330

  4. Medical Record Keeping in the Summer Camp Setting.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Laura; Holland, Jaycelyn; Weinberg, Stuart; Rosenbloom, S Trent

    2016-12-14

    Approximately one fifth of school-aged children spend a significant portion of their year at residential summer camp, and a growing number have chronic medical conditions. Camp health records are essential for safe, efficient care and for transitions between camp and home providers, yet little research exists regarding these systems. To survey residential summer camps for children to determine how camps create, store, and use camper health records. To raise awareness in the informatics community of the issues experienced by health providers working in a special pediatric care setting. We designed a web-based electronic survey concerning medical recordkeeping and healthcare practices at summer camps. 953 camps accredited by the American Camp Association received the survey. Responses were consolidated and evaluated for trends and conclusions. Of 953 camps contacted, 298 (31%) responded to the survey. Among respondents, 49.3% stated that there was no computer available at the health center, and 14.8% of camps stated that there was not any computer available to health staff at all. 41.1% of camps stated that internet access was not available. The most common complaints concerning recordkeeping practices were time burden, adequate completion, and consistency. Summer camps in the United States make efforts to appropriately document healthcare given to campers, but inconsistency and inefficiency may be barriers to staff productivity, staff satisfaction, and quality of care. Survey responses suggest that the current methods used by camps to document healthcare cause limitations in consistency, efficiency, and communications between providers, camp staff, and parents. As of 2012, survey respondents articulated need for a standard software to document summer camp healthcare practices that accounts for camp-specific needs. Improvement may be achieved if documentation software offers the networking capability, simplicity, pediatrics-specific features, and avoidance of

  5. Contingency Base Camp Operations and Management: Staffing and Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-17

    in a low-intensity conflict such as peacekeeping. The military devel- oped a number of enduring base camps such as Camp Bondsteel in Kosovo and Camp...works and engineering support All base camps require provision of potable water, waste water collection and treatment, solid waste collection and...IBCT (TF Red Bulls). Because the BCT also had responsibility for their International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) mission outside the wire

  6. Trends and Issues in Not for Profit Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bialeschki, Deborah; Henderson, Karla; Dahowski, Kate

    A study explored current issues affecting camps run by nonprofit agencies. A literature review revealed areas of concern related to social trends and management practices. A survey of 85 camping professionals and agency executives involved with nonprofit camps examined organizational mission, strategic management issues, and perceived critical…

  7. The Traditional Camp: Out of Touch, Out of Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how camps can survive by changing their marketing approach, organizational structure, and programming to meet the needs of the community. Profiles Wyman Center, a residential camp near Saint Louis, Missouri, that has prospered as a result of breaking with tradition and redefining the terms "camp" and "customer." (LP)

  8. Leadership Skills in Three Chords: Guitars at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ticknor, Susie

    1992-01-01

    Describes how the guitar can be used to enrich a camp experience. The guitar has an attention-drawing quality, a group-bonding potential, and a mood-setting ability that make it effective in a variety of camp situations. Discusses some common problems with guitar use at camp, and offers recommendations for effective use. (KS)

  9. Youth Camp Safety & Health. Suggested State Statute & Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Disease Control (DHEW/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    To assist state regulatory agencies in development of comprehensive youth camp safety programs, this publication contains a brief suggested statute that could be used for initiation or modification of any state's youth camp safety programs and it outlines minimal regulations. Various categories of camps are covered--day, primitive, residential,…

  10. Foreign Language Camps: Jefferson County Public Schools R-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Lorenzo A.; And Others

    The planning and operation of Jefferson County (Colorado) Public Schools' foreign language camps are described. The weekend-long camps attempt to duplicate an authentic cultural experience in a foreign village through cultural activities and language immersion. French, Spanish, Russian, and German camps are conducted for county high school foreign…

  11. Minimum-Impact Camping in the Front Woods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Curt

    1994-01-01

    Minimum-impact camping techniques that can be applied to resident camp programs include controlling group size and behavior, designing camp sites, moving groups frequently, proper use of fires, proper disposal of food and human wastes, use of biodegradable soaps, and encouraging staff and camper awareness of impacts on the environment. (LP)

  12. Camp and Year-Round School: Opportunity or Challenge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Paul E.

    2000-01-01

    Camps perceive year-round school as a threat, but since less than 4 percent of students are affected, the impact is minimal. Camps that are affected can make schools and communities aware of camps' strengths in outdoor and environmental education, self-esteem building, and meeting youth's developmental needs; become a partner in year-round…

  13. Summer Camp and Positive Youth Development: Program with Romanian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feenstra, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of activities are used in camps to help promote positive youth development, improving social skills and self-esteem in campers. I expanded on previous camp research in this study to address the influence camps have on trust, belief in the honesty of others, empowerment, and care for others in youth in Eastern Europe. Since 1999, New…

  14. Camping with a Purpose...A 4-H Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, John H.; And Others

    The 4-H handbook focuses on factors to consider and things to be done when developing a camping program. Since the emphasis, structure, and administration of 4-H camping varies, the booklet is flexible enough to be adapted to different state, district, and county situations. Major topics are camping's importance to extension education,…

  15. Camp selection and the role of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Christopher A

    2007-10-01

    The selection of a summer camp that best matches a child's interests, abilities, and developmental level is essential. This article provides information to assist families in their consideration of camp type, location, length of stay, gender composition, and structure. It also outlines the way that health care providers can assist families in selecting the most appropriate camp for their child.

  16. The Traditional Camp: Out of Touch, Out of Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how camps can survive by changing their marketing approach, organizational structure, and programming to meet the needs of the community. Profiles Wyman Center, a residential camp near Saint Louis, Missouri, that has prospered as a result of breaking with tradition and redefining the terms "camp" and "customer." (LP)

  17. Whatever Happened to School Camping? An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, George W.; Donaldson, Louise E.

    1982-01-01

    School camping began with three movements in American society: children's camping, which has been traced back as far as 1823; the Nature Study Movement, which is thought to have begun as early as 1839; and the holistic "new education." In 1940, L. B. Sharp opened National Camp in New Jersey and Julian W. Smith initiated the Clear Lake…

  18. Camp Health Aide Manual = Manual para trabajadores de salud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, June Grube; And Others

    This bilingual manual serves as a textbook for migrant Camp Health Aides. Camp Health Aides are members of migrant labor camps enlisted to provide information about health and social services to migrant workers and their families. The manual is divided into 12 tabbed sections representing lessons. Teaching notes printed on contrasting paper…

  19. Hands-On Optics in an Informal Setting: Science Camps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruta, C.; Walker, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Dokter, E.

    2008-06-01

    To expose young children to optical phenomena that build scientific literacy, Hands-On Optics camps provide an ideal way to encourage interest in optics before career choices are developed. Here, we provide an outline of our pedagogical approach for the camps, specific optics activities, strategies for cooperative learning and what worked best in the camp setting.

  20. Trainer Guide: Business and Finance Managerial. Camp Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Suggested ideas on conducting a managerial workshop for camp directors are offered in this trainer's guide. Workshops must be at least one full day of training (6 hours) on each topic to be counted toward the American Camping Association (ACA) Camp Director Certification Program. Suggested topics to be addressed are: (1) basic principles and…

  1. Minimum-Impact Camping in the Front Woods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Curt

    1994-01-01

    Minimum-impact camping techniques that can be applied to resident camp programs include controlling group size and behavior, designing camp sites, moving groups frequently, proper use of fires, proper disposal of food and human wastes, use of biodegradable soaps, and encouraging staff and camper awareness of impacts on the environment. (LP)

  2. Guidebook: In-Camp Education for Migrant Farmworkers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Robert; Smith, Mona

    An In-Camp Learning Program focuses on the specific needs of the out-of-school youth and adult migrant farmworker. Although its primary intent is that of education, the program addresses other areas such as health and social services. In 1976, New York's In-Camp Learning Program served 400 migrant farmworkers in 15 camps in the counties of…

  3. Whatever Happened to School Camping? An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, George W.; Donaldson, Louise E.

    1982-01-01

    School camping began with three movements in American society: children's camping, which has been traced back as far as 1823; the Nature Study Movement, which is thought to have begun as early as 1839; and the holistic "new education." In 1940, L. B. Sharp opened National Camp in New Jersey and Julian W. Smith initiated the Clear Lake…

  4. 7 CFR 502.6 - Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding. 502.6..., MARYLAND § 502.6 Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding. The use of BARC grounds for any form of hunting, fishing, camping, or horseback riding is prohibited. Further, the use of these grounds for...

  5. 7 CFR 503.6 - Camping, boating, and fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Camping, boating, and fishing. 503.6 Section 503.6... OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.6 Camping, boating, and fishing. The use of PIADC as a recreational area for camping, boating, fishing, and picnicking is prohibited...

  6. 7 CFR 502.6 - Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding. 502.6..., MARYLAND § 502.6 Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding. The use of BARC grounds for any form of hunting, fishing, camping, or horseback riding is prohibited. Further, the use of these grounds for...

  7. 7 CFR 503.6 - Camping, boating, and fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Camping, boating, and fishing. 503.6 Section 503.6... OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.6 Camping, boating, and fishing. The use of PIADC as a recreational area for camping, boating, fishing, and picnicking is prohibited...

  8. 7 CFR 502.6 - Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding. 502.6..., MARYLAND § 502.6 Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding. The use of BARC grounds for any form of hunting, fishing, camping, or horseback riding is prohibited. Further, the use of these grounds for...

  9. 7 CFR 503.6 - Camping, boating, and fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Camping, boating, and fishing. 503.6 Section 503.6... OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.6 Camping, boating, and fishing. The use of PIADC as a recreational area for camping, boating, fishing, and picnicking is prohibited...

  10. 7 CFR 502.6 - Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding. 502.6..., MARYLAND § 502.6 Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding. The use of BARC grounds for any form of hunting, fishing, camping, or horseback riding is prohibited. Further, the use of these grounds for...

  11. 7 CFR 502.6 - Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding. 502.6..., MARYLAND § 502.6 Hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding. The use of BARC grounds for any form of hunting, fishing, camping, or horseback riding is prohibited. Further, the use of these grounds for...

  12. 7 CFR 503.6 - Camping, boating, and fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Camping, boating, and fishing. 503.6 Section 503.6... OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.6 Camping, boating, and fishing. The use of PIADC as a recreational area for camping, boating, fishing, and picnicking is prohibited...

  13. 7 CFR 503.6 - Camping, boating, and fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Camping, boating, and fishing. 503.6 Section 503.6... OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.6 Camping, boating, and fishing. The use of PIADC as a recreational area for camping, boating, fishing, and picnicking is prohibited...

  14. The Effect of a Camp Experience on Self Esteem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorian, Alexia Eve

    Two groups of American adolescents of Greek descent (12-15 year olds N=90 and 16-18 year olds N=166) at an Orthodox Christian Camp in Greece responded to the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (1965). Campers took the test on the first day of camp (pretest) and then two weeks later at the camp's conclusion (posttest). All subjects showed a significant…

  15. Camp Health Aide Manual = Manual para trabajadores de salud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, June Grube; And Others

    This bilingual manual serves as a textbook for migrant Camp Health Aides. Camp Health Aides are members of migrant labor camps enlisted to provide information about health and social services to migrant workers and their families. The manual is divided into 12 tabbed sections representing lessons. Teaching notes printed on contrasting paper…

  16. 49 CFR 218.80 - Movement of occupied camp cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Movement of occupied camp cars. 218.80 Section 218... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Protection of Occupied Camp Cars § 218.80 Movement of occupied camp cars. Occupied cars may not be humped or flat switched unless coupled...

  17. 49 CFR 218.80 - Movement of occupied camp cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Movement of occupied camp cars. 218.80 Section 218... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Protection of Occupied Camp Cars § 218.80 Movement of occupied camp cars. Occupied cars may not be humped or flat switched unless coupled...

  18. 49 CFR 218.80 - Movement of occupied camp cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Movement of occupied camp cars. 218.80 Section 218... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Protection of Occupied Camp Cars § 218.80 Movement of occupied camp cars. Occupied cars may not be humped or flat switched unless coupled...

  19. 49 CFR 218.80 - Movement of occupied camp cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Movement of occupied camp cars. 218.80 Section 218... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES Protection of Occupied Camp Cars § 218.80 Movement of occupied camp cars. Occupied cars may not be humped or flat switched unless coupled...

  20. 28 CFR 523.15 - Camp or farm good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Camp or farm good time. 523.15 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.15 Camp or farm good time. An inmate assigned to a farm or camp is automatically awarded extra good time, beginning on the date of commitment...

  1. 28 CFR 523.15 - Camp or farm good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Camp or farm good time. 523.15 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.15 Camp or farm good time. An inmate assigned to a farm or camp is automatically awarded extra good time, beginning on the date of commitment...

  2. 28 CFR 523.15 - Camp or farm good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Camp or farm good time. 523.15 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.15 Camp or farm good time. An inmate assigned to a farm or camp is automatically awarded extra good time, beginning on the date of commitment...

  3. 28 CFR 523.15 - Camp or farm good time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Camp or farm good time. 523.15 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.15 Camp or farm good time. An inmate assigned to a farm or camp is automatically awarded extra good time, beginning on the date of commitment...

  4. Bringing politics and evidence together: policy entrepreneurship and the conception of the At Home/Chez Soi Housing First Initiative for addressing homelessness and mental illness in Canada.

    PubMed

    Macnaughton, Eric; Nelson, Geoffrey; Goering, Paula

    2013-04-01

    An interesting question concerns how large-scale (mental) health services policy initiatives come into being, and the role of evidence within the decision-making process behind their origins. This paper illustrates the process by which motivation to address homelessness, in the context of the upcoming 2010 Vancouver Olympics, was leveraged into a pan-Canadian project including sites in Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montreal and Moncton, New Brunswick. The aim of the initiative was to implement and evaluate an intervention, Housing First, to provide housing and support to previously homeless people with mental illness. This qualitative case study was conducted between December 2009 and December 2010, employing grounded theory, and drawing on archival documents and interviews with 19 key informants involved in the conception of the project. Overall, the findings affirm that policy-making does not follow a rational, linear process of knowledge translation/exchange (KTE) and implementation, whereby evidence-based "products" are brought forward to address objectively determined needs and then "placed into decision-making events" (Lomas, 2007, p. 130). Instead, evidence-based policy making should be understood within the much more complex context of "policy entrepreneurship" (Kingdon, 2003; Mintrom & Norman, 2009) which entails taking advantage of windows of opportunity, and helping to bring together the "streams" of problems, politics, and policy ideas (Kingdon, 2003). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Managing food allergies in schools and camps.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Kim; Wood, Robert A

    2011-04-01

    Managing food allergy in school and camp environments involves creating an individualized plan that addresses safety, and supports growth and development of the food-allergic child. The result is a dynamic strategy that meets the needs of a food-allergic child and promotes the development of a food-allergic adolescent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. CAMP LEJEUNE ENERGY FROM WOOD (CLEW) PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses EPA's Camp Lejeune Energy from Wood (CLEW) project, a demonstration project that converts wood energy to electric power, and provides waste utilization and pollution alleviation. The 1-MWe plant operates a reciprocating engine-generator set on synthetic gas f...

  7. Camp Minden Fact Sheet April 2014

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Two groups of PRPs which include GD/ATK and Hercules Inc. signed Administrative Orders on Consent with the EPA that will remove and dispose approximately 3.7 million pounds of explosive material at the Explo Systems, Inc Camp Minden, Louisiana site.

  8. CAMP LEJEUNE ENERGY FROM WOOD (CLEW) PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses EPA's Camp Lejeune Energy from Wood (CLEW) project, a demonstration project that converts wood energy to electric power, and provides waste utilization and pollution alleviation. The 1-MWe plant operates a reciprocating engine-generator set on synthetic gas f...

  9. Astronomy Camp: Adventures in Scientific Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Eric J.; McCarthy, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    Explains the nature of the Advanced Astronomy Camp (AAC), which is held at an observatory at the University of Arizona. For one week, students are immersed in doing science and engineering, using modern astronomical equipment under the guidance of scientists and graduate students. (DDR)

  10. 36 CFR 331.9 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Camping. 331.9 Section 331.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION, USE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AREA, KENTUCKY AND...

  11. 36 CFR 331.9 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Camping. 331.9 Section 331.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION, USE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AREA, KENTUCKY AND...

  12. 36 CFR 331.9 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Camping. 331.9 Section 331.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION, USE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AREA, KENTUCKY AND...

  13. 36 CFR § 331.9 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Camping. § 331.9 Section § 331.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION, USE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AREA...

  14. A Camp Director Remembers World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Helen Herz

    2003-01-01

    A girl's camp in Maine during World War II had to deal with food rationing and black-market food dealers. Campers picked beans to raise money for refugees, sewed clothes for refugees, and spotted for enemy planes from Mt. Pleasant. An attempt to use a horse-drawn cart for transportation failed, and good help was hard to find. (TD)

  15. The Camp Community and the World Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweinhart, Tom

    2002-01-01

    A month-long residential program for adolescents in Michigan teaches arts and sciences through active learning workshops in an experiential, cooperative camp environment. Appreciation for diversity, supporting the developmental needs of adolescents, and building a sense of community are prime foci of the program. These are accomplished through…

  16. Homosexual inmates in the Buchenwald Concentration Camp.

    PubMed

    Röll, W

    1996-01-01

    The treatment of homosexual inmates in Nazi concentration camps is a subject which was largely ignored by historians in both West and East Germany after the war. Not until the 1980s, when research began to focus on some of the lesser-known victims of Nazi terror, did attention shift to the fate of homosexuals. This process can be seen clearly at the Buchenwald Memorial in the former GDR, the site of the persecution and also the death of considerable numbers of prisoners identified by the pink triangle on their clothing. The persecution of homosexuals in Nazi Germany began in 1933, even before Buchenwald was built in 1937. The Nazis aimed to eradicate homosexuality, which they saw as a threat to the survival of the German people. Incarceration in concentration camps like Buchenwald marked a stage in the radicalization of Nazi policy against homosexuals. There they were subjected to the harshest conditions and treated as the lowest of the low in the camp hierarchy. They were continually exposed to the terror of the SS but also the latent prejudices of the rest of the camp population. The culminating points of their maltreatment in Buchenwald were the use of homosexuals in experiments to develop immunization against typhus fever and the attempt by an SS doctor to "cure" homosexuality through the implantation of sexual hormones.

  17. Riflery: A Specialty Opportunity for Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliam, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Campers at the Virginia 4-H Shooting Education Camp receive intensive training from certified range coaches in shotgun, rifle, air rifle, air pistol, and archery. Such programs teach campers responsibility; develop character and self-concept; and promote safety, sportsmanship, and ethical behavior. Includes resources for developing a shooting…

  18. Riflery: A Specialty Opportunity for Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliam, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Campers at the Virginia 4-H Shooting Education Camp receive intensive training from certified range coaches in shotgun, rifle, air rifle, air pistol, and archery. Such programs teach campers responsibility; develop character and self-concept; and promote safety, sportsmanship, and ethical behavior. Includes resources for developing a shooting…

  19. 36 CFR 13.904 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Camping. 13.904 Section 13.904 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General...

  20. 36 CFR 13.904 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Camping. 13.904 Section 13.904 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General...

  1. 36 CFR 13.904 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Camping. 13.904 Section 13.904 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park and Preserve General...

  2. Fostering Creativity in the Camp Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Like other organizations, camps need creativity, which breeds originality, improvement, inspiration, and renewal. Explains three broad types of creativity, describes characteristics of organizations that encourage creativity, lists barriers to creativity, and discusses ways that administrators can foster creativity in staff. A sidebar lists…

  3. The Gold Mining Camp: A Simulation Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoltman, Joseph P.; Keach, Everett T., Jr.

    This economics simulation game complements the third grade Gold Mining Unit developed by Project Social Studies at the University of Minnesota. The simulation is designed for three purposes: 1) to reinforce the prior learning which occurs in the gold mining camp unit; 2) to involve eight-year-olds in the process of solving simulated economic…

  4. E. Coli: Preventing Outbreaks at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Mary D.

    1996-01-01

    One strain of E. coli is not usually found in foods, but has been related to consumption of undercooked ground beef. Symptoms are stomach cramps and diarrhea, and 2-7% of infections lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is life threatening. Camps can prevent outbreaks by avoiding uncooked meat on overnight campouts and requiring appropriate…

  5. A Forensic Camp for Talented Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levins, Lesley; Levins, Martin

    1995-01-01

    In the North West Region of New South Wales, a project was initiated in 1993 to address the lack of resources allocated to the talented science student. A four-day residential camp resulted, which was held in Armidale. The foci for the program were the scientific procedures and concepts involved in the practice of forensic science. (Author)

  6. 1980s: Camp in a Computer Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camping Magazine, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Important issues for camps in the 1980s included soaring land values, high insurance rates, the spread of computers, and growing demand for specialized services. An illustrative article from 1985, "Yuppies Are Coming" (Tim Duffield), discusses the willingness of baby-boomer parents to pay for high-quality enrichment experiences at camp…

  7. Astronomy Camp: Adventures in Scientific Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Eric J.; McCarthy, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    Explains the nature of the Advanced Astronomy Camp (AAC), which is held at an observatory at the University of Arizona. For one week, students are immersed in doing science and engineering, using modern astronomical equipment under the guidance of scientists and graduate students. (DDR)

  8. Urban Schools: Day Camps or Custodial Centers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberman, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Many urban schools should be called cafeterias, recreation centers, or community centers, because more time is spent eating, playing, and socializing than on teaching and learning. "Schools" are day camps with compliant attendees or custodial centers with involuntarily managed inmates. Teacher effectiveness turns solely on classroom-management…

  9. 36 CFR 13.1320 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Camping. 13.1320 Section 13.1320 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Kenai Fjords National Park Exit Glacier Developed...

  10. 36 CFR 13.1320 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Camping. 13.1320 Section 13.1320 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Kenai Fjords National Park Exit Glacier Developed...

  11. 36 CFR 13.1320 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Camping. 13.1320 Section 13.1320 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Kenai Fjords National Park Exit Glacier Developed...

  12. 36 CFR 13.1320 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Camping. 13.1320 Section 13.1320 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Kenai Fjords National Park Exit Glacier Developed...

  13. 36 CFR 13.1320 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Camping. 13.1320 Section 13.1320 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Kenai Fjords National Park Exit Glacier Developed...

  14. 36 CFR 327.7 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Camping. 327.7 Section 327.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING PUBLIC USE OF WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ADMINISTERED BY THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.7...

  15. 36 CFR 327.7 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Camping. 327.7 Section 327.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING PUBLIC USE OF WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ADMINISTERED BY THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.7...

  16. 36 CFR 327.7 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Camping. 327.7 Section 327.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING PUBLIC USE OF WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ADMINISTERED BY THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.7...

  17. 36 CFR 327.7 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Camping. 327.7 Section 327.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING PUBLIC USE OF WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ADMINISTERED BY THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.7...

  18. 36 CFR 327.7 - Camping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Camping. 327.7 Section 327.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING PUBLIC USE OF WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ADMINISTERED BY THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.7...

  19. Camping Out: An Outdoor Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenks, Mark

    Camping Out is an outdoor education program designed to meet the needs of hearing-impaired, mentally retarded children. The program aims to help children overcome language deficits and restrictions of their limited environments while learning recreation skills which can enhance their motor, cognitive, and affective skills. The program covers seven…

  20. Let's Camp (To Be Better Teachers)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrough, Sandy

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author states that becoming a better physical education teacher can be challenging since it is the time for attending conferences, reading journals, and collaborating with colleagues. She added, that working at a summer camp for children provides a valuable way for physical education teachers not only to earn extra money…