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Sample records for campestris pv vesicatoria

  1. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN...

  2. Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Secretes Proteases and Xylanases via the Xps Type II Secretion System and Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Magali; Scheibner, Felix; Hoffmeister, Anne-Katrin; Hartmann, Nadine; Hause, Gerd; Rother, Annekatrin; Jordan, Michael; Lautier, Martine; Arlat, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many plant-pathogenic bacteria utilize type II secretion (T2S) systems to secrete degradative enzymes into the extracellular milieu. T2S substrates presumably mediate the degradation of plant cell wall components during the host-pathogen interaction and thus promote bacterial virulence. Previously, the Xps-T2S system from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria was shown to contribute to extracellular protease activity and the secretion of a virulence-associated xylanase. The identities and functions of additional T2S substrates from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, however, are still unknown. In the present study, the analysis of 25 candidate proteins from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria led to the identification of two type II secreted predicted xylanases, a putative protease and a lipase which was previously identified as a virulence factor of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. Studies with mutant strains revealed that the identified xylanases and the protease contribute to virulence and in planta growth of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. When analyzed in the related pathogen X. campestris pv. campestris, several T2S substrates from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria were secreted independently of the T2S systems, presumably because of differences in the T2S substrate specificities of the two pathogens. Furthermore, in X. campestris pv. vesicatoria T2S mutants, secretion of T2S substrates was not completely absent, suggesting the contribution of additional transport systems to protein secretion. In line with this hypothesis, T2S substrates were detected in outer membrane vesicles, which were frequently observed for X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. We, therefore, propose that extracellular virulence-associated enzymes from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria are targeted to the Xps-T2S system and to outer membrane vesicles. IMPORTANCE The virulence of plant-pathogenic bacteria often depends on TS2 systems, which secrete degradative enzymes into the extracellular milieu. T2S

  3. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  4. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  5. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  6. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato....

  7. Characterization of the fimA gene encoding bundle-forming fimbriae of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed Central

    Ojanen-Reuhs, T; Kalkkinen, N; Westerlund-Wikström, B; van Doorn, J; Haahtela, K; Nurmiaho-Lassila, E L; Wengelnik, K; Bonas, U; Korhonen, T K

    1997-01-01

    The fimA gene of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria was identified and characterized. A 20-mer degenerate oligonucleotide complementary to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified 15.5-kDa fimbrillin was used to locate fimA on a 2.6-kb SalI fragment of the X. campestris pv. vesicatoria 3240 genome. The nucleotide sequence of a 1.4-kb fragment containing the fimA region revealed two open reading frames predicting highly homologous proteins FimA and FimB. FimA, which was composed of 136 amino acids and had a calculated molecular weight of 14,302, showed high sequence identity to the type IV fimbrillin precursors. fimB predicted a protein product of 135 amino acids and a molecular weight of 13,854. The open reading frame for fimB contained near the 5' end a palindromic sequence with a terminator loop potential, and the expression level of fimB in vitro and in Xanthomonas was considerably lower than that of fimA. We detected an efficiently transcribed fimA-specific mRNA of 600 bases as well as two weakly expressed, longer mRNA species that reacted with both fimA and fimB. A homolog of fimA but not of fimB was detected by Southern hybridization in strains of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, campestris, begoniae, translucens, and graminis. A fimA::omega mutant of strain 3240 was not significantly reduced in virulence or adhesiveness to tomato leaves. However, the fimA mutant was dramatically reduced in cell aggregation in laboratory cultures and on infected tomato leaves. The fimA mutant strain also exhibited decreased tolerance to UV light. PMID:9023213

  8. Inducible Expression of the De-Novo Designed Antimicrobial Peptide SP1-1 in Tomato Confers Resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Diaz, Areli; Kovacs, Izabella; Lindermayr, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small peptides with less than 50 amino acids and are part of the innate immune response in almost all organisms, including bacteria, vertebrates, invertebrates and plants. AMPs are active against a broad-spectrum of pathogens. The inducible expression of AMPs in plants is a promising approach to combat plant pathogens with minimal negative side effects, such as phytotoxicity or infertility. In this study, inducible expression of the de-novo designed AMP SP1-1 in Micro Tom tomato protected tomato fruits against bacterial spot disease caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. The peptide SP1-1 was targeted to the apoplast which is the primary infection site for plant pathogens, by fusing SP1-1 peptide to the signal peptide RsAFP1 of radish (Raphanus sativus). The pathogen inducibility of the expression was enabled by using an optimized inducible 4XW2/4XS promoter. As a result, the tomato fruits of independently generated SP1-1 transgenic lines were significantly more resistant to X. campestris pv. vesicatoria than WT tomato fruits. In transgenic lines, bacterial infection was reduced up to 65% in comparison to the infection of WT plants. Our study demonstrates that the combination of the 4XW2/4XS cis-element from parsley with the synthetic antimicrobial peptide SP1-1 is a good alternative to protect tomato fruits against infections with X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. PMID:27706237

  9. Membrane topology of conserved components of the type III secretion system from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Berger, Carolin; Robin, Guillaume P; Bonas, Ulla; Koebnik, Ralf

    2010-07-01

    Type III secretion (T3S) systems play key roles in the assembly of flagella and the translocation of bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. Eleven proteins which are conserved among gram-negative plant and animal pathogenic bacteria have been proposed to build up the basal structure of the T3S system, which spans both inner and outer bacterial membranes. We studied six conserved proteins, termed Hrc, predicted to reside in the inner membrane of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. The membrane topology of HrcD, HrcR, HrcS, HrcT, HrcU and HrcV was studied by translational fusions to a dual alkaline phosphatase-beta-galactosidase reporter protein. Two proteins, HrcU and HrcV, were found to have the same membrane topology as the Yersinia homologues YscU and YscV. For HrcR, the membrane topology differed from the model for the homologue from Yersinia, YscR. For our data on three other protein families, exemplified by HrcD, HrcS and HrcT, we derived the first topology models. Our results provide what is believed to be the first complete model of the inner membrane topology of any bacterial T3S system and will aid in elucidating the architecture of T3S systems by ultrastructural analysis. PMID:20378646

  10. Characterization of Citrus sinensis transcription factors closely associated with the non-host response to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Daurelio, Lucas D; Romero, María S; Petrocelli, Silvana; Merelo, Paz; Cortadi, Adriana A; Talón, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R; Orellano, Elena G

    2013-07-01

    Plants, when exposed to certain pathogens, may display a form of genotype-independent resistance, known as non-host response. In this study, the response of Citrus sinensis (sweet orange) leaves to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv), a pepper and tomato pathogenic bacterium, was analyzed through biochemical assays and cDNA microarray hybridization and compared with Asiatic citrus canker infection caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. Citrus leaves exposed to the non-host bacterium Xcv showed hypersensitive response (HR) symptoms (cell death), a defense mechanism common in plants but poorly understood in citrus. The HR response was accompanied by differentially expressed genes that are associated with biotic stress and cell death. Moreover, 58 transcription factors (TFs) were differentially regulated by Xcv in citrus leaves, including 26 TFs from the stress-associated families AP2-EREBP, bZip, Myb and WRKY. Remarkably, in silico analysis of the distribution of expressed sequence tags revealed that 10 of the 58 TFs, belonging to C2C2-GATA, C2H2, CCAAT, HSF, NAC and WRKY gene families, were specifically over-represented in citrus stress cDNA libraries. This study identified candidate TF genes for the regulation of key steps during the citrus non-host HR. Furthermore, these TFs might be useful in future strategies of molecular breeding for citrus disease resistance.

  11. The Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Type-3 Effector XopB Inhibits Plant Defence Responses by Interfering with ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Priller, Johannes Peter Roman; Reid, Stephen; Konein, Patrick; Dietrich, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria 85–10 (Xcv) translocates about 30 type-3 effector proteins (T3Es) into pepper plants (Capsicum annuum) to suppress plant immune responses. Among them is XopB which interferes with PTI, ETI and sugar-mediated defence responses, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and direct targets are unknown so far. Here, we examined the XopB-mediated suppression of plant defence responses in more detail. Infection of susceptible pepper plants with Xcv lacking xopB resulted in delayed symptom development compared to Xcv wild type infection concomitant with an increased formation of salicylic acid (SA) and expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Expression of xopB in Arabidopsis thaliana promoted the growth of the virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 strain. This was paralleled by a decreased SA-pool and a lower induction of SA-dependent PR gene expression. The expression pattern of early flg22-responsive marker genes indicated that MAPK signalling was not altered in the presence of XopB. However, XopB inhibited the flg22-triggered burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Consequently, the transcript accumulation of AtOXI1, a ROS-dependent marker gene, was reduced in xopB-expressing Arabidopsis plants as well as callose deposition. The lower ROS production correlated with a low level of basal and flg22-triggered expression of apoplastic peroxidases and the NADPH oxidase RBOHD. Conversely, deletion of xopB in Xcv caused a higher production of ROS in leaves of susceptible pepper plants. Together our results demonstrate that XopB modulates ROS responses and might thereby compromise plant defence. PMID:27398933

  12. The Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Type-3 Effector XopB Inhibits Plant Defence Responses by Interfering with ROS Production.

    PubMed

    Priller, Johannes Peter Roman; Reid, Stephen; Konein, Patrick; Dietrich, Petra; Sonnewald, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria 85-10 (Xcv) translocates about 30 type-3 effector proteins (T3Es) into pepper plants (Capsicum annuum) to suppress plant immune responses. Among them is XopB which interferes with PTI, ETI and sugar-mediated defence responses, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and direct targets are unknown so far. Here, we examined the XopB-mediated suppression of plant defence responses in more detail. Infection of susceptible pepper plants with Xcv lacking xopB resulted in delayed symptom development compared to Xcv wild type infection concomitant with an increased formation of salicylic acid (SA) and expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Expression of xopB in Arabidopsis thaliana promoted the growth of the virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 strain. This was paralleled by a decreased SA-pool and a lower induction of SA-dependent PR gene expression. The expression pattern of early flg22-responsive marker genes indicated that MAPK signalling was not altered in the presence of XopB. However, XopB inhibited the flg22-triggered burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Consequently, the transcript accumulation of AtOXI1, a ROS-dependent marker gene, was reduced in xopB-expressing Arabidopsis plants as well as callose deposition. The lower ROS production correlated with a low level of basal and flg22-triggered expression of apoplastic peroxidases and the NADPH oxidase RBOHD. Conversely, deletion of xopB in Xcv caused a higher production of ROS in leaves of susceptible pepper plants. Together our results demonstrate that XopB modulates ROS responses and might thereby compromise plant defence. PMID:27398933

  13. Development of a Model to Predict the Primary Infection Date of Bacterial Spot (Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria) on Hot Pepper

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kang, Wee-Soo; Yun, Sung-Chul

    2014-01-01

    A population model of bacterial spot caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria on hot pepper was developed to predict the primary disease infection date. The model estimated the pathogen population on the surface and within the leaf of the host based on the wetness period and temperature. For successful infection, at least 5,000 cells/ml of the bacterial population were required. Also, wind and rain were necessary according to regression analyses of the monitored data. Bacterial spot on the model is initiated when the pathogen population exceeds 1015 cells/g within the leaf. The developed model was validated using 94 assessed samples from 2000 to 2007 obtained from monitored fields. Based on the validation study, the predicted initial infection dates varied based on the year rather than the location. Differences in initial infection dates between the model predictions and the monitored data in the field were minimal. For example, predicted infection dates for 7 locations were within the same month as the actual infection dates, 11 locations were within 1 month of the actual infection, and only 3 locations were more than 2 months apart from the actual infection. The predicted infection dates were mapped from 2009 to 2012; 2011 was the most severe year. Although the model was not sensitive enough to predict disease severity of less than 0.1% in the field, our model predicted bacterial spot severity of 1% or more. Therefore, this model can be applied in the field to determine when bacterial spot control is required. PMID:25288995

  14. Detection and identification of phytopathogenic Xanthomonas strains by amplification of DNA sequences related to the hrp genes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed Central

    Leite, R P; Minsavage, G V; Bonas, U; Stall, R E

    1994-01-01

    Three pairs of oligonucleotide primers specific for different regions of the hrp gene (hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity) cluster of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria were designed and tested for amplification of DNA isolated from a large number of different bacteria. DNA sequences related to the hrp genes were successfully amplified from X. fragariae and from 28 pathovars of X. campestris. No DNA amplification occurred with genomic DNA from phytopathogenic strains of X. campestris pv. secalis, X. campestris pv. translucens, and X. albilineans or from nonpathogenic opportunistic xanthomonads and phytopathogenic strains of the genera Acidovorax, Agrobacterium, Clavibacter, Erwinia, Pseudomonas, and Xylella. The DNA from those bacteria also failed to hybridize to hrp-specific fragments in Southern blot analysis. DNA fragments amplified with a particular primer pair were of identical size from each of the different phytopathogenic xanthomonads. However, restriction analysis of these fragments by using frequently cutting endonucleases revealed variation in the pattern for these hrp-related fragments amplified from the different Xanthomonas strains. The restriction patterns generated for the different fragments allowed distinction of the strains representing a pathovar or species of phytopathogenic xanthomonads. We believe that DNA amplification with hrp-specific oligonucleotide primers is a highly sensitive and specific method that can be applied for detection and identification of phytopathogenic xanthomonads. Images PMID:8017904

  15. Regulation of Cell Wall-Bound Invertase in Pepper Leaves by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Type Three Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Sonnewald, Sophia; Priller, Johannes P. R.; Schuster, Julia; Glickmann, Eric; Hajirezaei, Mohammed-Reza; Siebig, Stefan; Mudgett, Mary Beth; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) possess a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into its Solanaceous host plants. These proteins are involved in suppression of plant defense and in reprogramming of plant metabolism to favour bacterial propagation. There is increasing evidence that hexoses contribute to defense responses. They act as substrates for metabolic processes and as metabolic semaphores to regulate gene expression. Especially an increase in the apoplastic hexose-to-sucrose ratio has been suggested to strengthen plant defense. This shift is brought about by the activity of cell wall-bound invertase (cw-Inv). We examined the possibility that Xcv may employ type 3 effector (T3E) proteins to suppress cw-Inv activity during infection. Indeed, pepper leaves infected with a T3SS-deficient Xcv strain showed a higher level of cw-Inv mRNA and enzyme activity relative to Xcv wild type infected leaves. Higher cw-Inv activity was paralleled by an increase in hexoses and mRNA abundance for the pathogenesis-related gene PRQ. These results suggest that Xcv suppresses cw-Inv activity in a T3SS-dependent manner, most likely to prevent sugar-mediated defense signals. To identify Xcv T3Es that regulate cw-Inv activity, a screen was performed with eighteen Xcv strains, each deficient in an individual T3E. Seven Xcv T3E deletion strains caused a significant change in cw-Inv activity compared to Xcv wild type. Among them, Xcv lacking the xopB gene (Xcv ΔxopB) caused the most prominent increase in cw-Inv activity. Deletion of xopB increased the mRNA abundance of PRQ in Xcv ΔxopB-infected pepper leaves, but not of Pti5 and Acre31, two PAMP-triggered immunity markers. Inducible expression of XopB in transgenic tobacco inhibited Xcv-mediated induction of cw-Inv activity observed in wild type plants and resulted in severe developmental phenotypes. Together, these data suggest that XopB interferes with cw-Inv activity in planta to suppress sugar

  16. Functional and proteomic analyses reveal that wxcB is involved in virulence, motility, detergent tolerance, and biofilm formation in Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jee; Jung, Ho Won; Han, Sang-Wook

    2014-09-26

    The bacterial envelope possesses diverse functions, including protection against environmental stress and virulence factors for host infection. Here, we report the function of wxcB in Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv), a causal agent of bacterial leaf spot disease in tomato and pepper. To characterize roles of wxcB, we generated a knockout mutant (XcvΔwxcB) and found that the virulence of the mutant was weaker than that of the wild type in tomato plants. To predict the mechanism affected by wxcB, we compared protein expressions between the wild type and the mutant. Expression of 152 proteins showed a greater than 2-fold difference. Proteins involved in motility and cell wall/membrane were the most abundant. Through phenotypic assays, we further demonstrated that the mutant displayed reduced motility and tolerance to treatment, but it showed increased biofilm formation. Interestingly, the LPS profile was unchanged. These results lead to new insights into the functions of wxcB that is associated with cell wall/membrane functions, which contributes to pathogen virulence.

  17. Reduced genetic variation occurs among genes of the highly clonal plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, including the effector gene avrBs2.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Gale; Ritchie, David; Kousik, C S; Bergelson, Joy

    2005-05-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, also known as Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria group A, is the causal agent of bacterial spot in pepper and tomato. In order to test different models that may explain the coevolution of avrBs2 with its host plants, we sequenced avrBs2 and six chromosomal loci (total of 5.5 kb per strain) from a global sample of 55 X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria strains collected from diseased peppers. We found an extreme lack of genetic variation among all X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria genomic loci (average nucleotide diversity, pi = 9.1 x 10(-5)), including avrBs2. This lack of diversity is consistent with X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria having undergone a recent population bottleneck and/or selective sweep followed by population expansion. Coalescent analysis determined that approximately 1.4 x 10(4) to 7.16 x 10(4) bacterial generations have passed since the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the current X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria population. Assuming a range of 50 to 500 bacterial generations per year, only 28 to 1,432 years have passed since the MRCA. This time frame coincides with human intervention with the pathogen's host plants, from domestication to modern agricultural practices. Examination of 19 mutated (loss-of-function) avrBs2 alleles detected nine classes of mutations. All mutations affected protein coding, while no synonymous changes were found. The nature of at least one of the avrBs2 mutations suggests that it may be possible to observe one stage of an evolutionary arms race as X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria responds to selection pressure to alter avrBs2 to escape host plant resistance. PMID:15870329

  18. The N-Glycan Cluster from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Dupoiron, Stéphanie; Zischek, Claudine; Ligat, Laetitia; Carbonne, Julien; Boulanger, Alice; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Lautier, Martine; Rival, Pauline; Arlat, Matthieu; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Albenne, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycans are widely distributed in living organisms but represent only a small fraction of the carbohydrates found in plants. This probably explains why they have not previously been considered as substrates exploited by phytopathogenic bacteria during plant infection. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the causal agent of black rot disease of Brassica plants, possesses a specific system for GlcNAc utilization expressed during host plant infection. This system encompasses a cluster of eight genes (nixE to nixL) encoding glycoside hydrolases (GHs). In this paper, we have characterized the enzymatic activities of these GHs and demonstrated their involvement in sequential degradation of a plant N-glycan using a N-glycopeptide containing two GlcNAcs, three mannoses, one fucose, and one xylose (N2M3FX) as a substrate. The removal of the α-1,3-mannose by the α-mannosidase NixK (GH92) is a prerequisite for the subsequent action of the β-xylosidase NixI (GH3), which is involved in the cleavage of the β-1,2-xylose, followed by the α-mannosidase NixJ (GH125), which removes the α-1,6-mannose. These data, combined to the subcellular localization of the enzymes, allowed us to propose a model of N-glycopeptide processing by X. campestris pv. campestris. This study constitutes the first evidence suggesting N-glycan degradation by a plant pathogen, a feature shared with human pathogenic bacteria. Plant N-glycans should therefore be included in the repertoire of molecules putatively metabolized by phytopathogenic bacteria during their life cycle. PMID:25586188

  19. The Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris Exploits N-Acetylglucosamine during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Alice; Zischek, Claudine; Lautier, Martine; Jamet, Stevie; Rival, Pauline; Carrère, Sébastien; Arlat, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT N-Acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), the main component of chitin and a major constituent of bacterial peptidoglycan, is present only in trace amounts in plants, in contrast to the huge amount of various sugars that compose the polysaccharides of the plant cell wall. Thus, GlcNAc has not previously been considered a substrate exploited by phytopathogenic bacteria during plant infection. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the causal agent of black rot disease of Brassica plants, expresses a carbohydrate utilization system devoted to GlcNAc exploitation. In addition to genes involved in GlcNAc catabolism, this system codes for four TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters (TBDTs) and eight glycoside hydrolases. Expression of all these genes is under the control of GlcNAc. In vitro experiments showed that X. campestris pv. campestris exploits chitooligosaccharides, and there is indirect evidence that during the early stationary phase, X. campestris pv. campestris recycles bacterium-derived peptidoglycan/muropeptides. Results obtained also suggest that during plant infection and during growth in cabbage xylem sap, X. campestris pv. campestris encounters and metabolizes plant-derived GlcNAc-containing molecules. Specific TBDTs seem to be preferentially involved in the consumption of all these plant-, fungus- and bacterium-derived GlcNAc-containing molecules. This is the first evidence of GlcNAc consumption during infection by a phytopathogenic bacterium. Interestingly, N-glycans from plant N-glycosylated proteins are proposed to be substrates for glycoside hydrolases belonging to the X. campestris pv. campestris GlcNAc exploitation system. This observation extends the range of sources of GlcNAc metabolized by phytopathogenic bacteria during their life cycle. PMID:25205095

  20. Genetic Diversity and Pathogenic Variation of Common Blight Bacteria (Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans) Suggests Pathogen Coevolution with the Common Bean.

    PubMed

    Mkandawire, Alexander B C; Mabagala, Robert B; Guzmán, Pablo; Gepts, Paul; Gilbertson, Robert L

    2004-06-01

    ABSTRACT Common bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans, is one of the most important diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in East Africa and other bean-growing regions. Xanthomonad-like bacteria associated with CBB in Malawi and Tanzania, East Africa, and in Wisconsin, U.S., were characterized based on brown pigment production, pathogenicity on common bean, detection with an X. campestris pv. phaseoli- or X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans-specific PCR primer pair, and repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses. The common bean gene pool (Andean or Middle American) from which each strain was isolated also was determined. In Malawi, X. campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans were isolated predominantly from Andean or Middle American beans, respectively. In Tanzania, X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans was most commonly isolated, irrespective of gene pool; whereas, in Wisconsin, only X. campestris pv. phaseoli was isolated from Andean red kidney beans. Three rep-PCR fingerprints were obtained for X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains; two were unique to East African strains, whereas the other was associated with strains collected from all other (mostly New World) locations. RFLP analyses with repetitive DNA probes revealed the same genetic diversity among X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains as did rep-PCR. These probes hybridized with only one or two fragments in the East African strains, but with multiple fragments in the other X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains. East African X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains were highly pathogenic on Andean beans, but were significantly less pathogenic on Middle American beans. In contrast, X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains from New World locations were highly pathogenic on beans of both gene pools. Together, these results indicate the

  1. Genetic Diversity and Pathogenic Variation of Common Blight Bacteria (Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans) Suggests Pathogen Coevolution with the Common Bean.

    PubMed

    Mkandawire, Alexander B C; Mabagala, Robert B; Guzmán, Pablo; Gepts, Paul; Gilbertson, Robert L

    2004-06-01

    ABSTRACT Common bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans, is one of the most important diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in East Africa and other bean-growing regions. Xanthomonad-like bacteria associated with CBB in Malawi and Tanzania, East Africa, and in Wisconsin, U.S., were characterized based on brown pigment production, pathogenicity on common bean, detection with an X. campestris pv. phaseoli- or X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans-specific PCR primer pair, and repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses. The common bean gene pool (Andean or Middle American) from which each strain was isolated also was determined. In Malawi, X. campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans were isolated predominantly from Andean or Middle American beans, respectively. In Tanzania, X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans was most commonly isolated, irrespective of gene pool; whereas, in Wisconsin, only X. campestris pv. phaseoli was isolated from Andean red kidney beans. Three rep-PCR fingerprints were obtained for X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains; two were unique to East African strains, whereas the other was associated with strains collected from all other (mostly New World) locations. RFLP analyses with repetitive DNA probes revealed the same genetic diversity among X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains as did rep-PCR. These probes hybridized with only one or two fragments in the East African strains, but with multiple fragments in the other X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains. East African X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains were highly pathogenic on Andean beans, but were significantly less pathogenic on Middle American beans. In contrast, X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains from New World locations were highly pathogenic on beans of both gene pools. Together, these results indicate the

  2. Inheritance of Race-Specific Resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in Brassica Genomes.

    PubMed

    Vicente, J G; Taylor, J D; Sharpe, A G; Parkin, I A P; Lydiate, D J; King, G J

    2002-10-01

    ABSTRACT The inheritance of resistance to three Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris races was studied in crosses between resistant and susceptible lines of Brassica oleracea (C genome), B. carinata (BC genome), and B. napus (AC genome). Resistance to race 3 in the B. oleracea doubled haploid line BOH 85c and in PI 436606 was controlled by a single dominant locus (Xca3). Resistance to races 1 and 3 in the B. oleracea line Badger Inbred-16 was quantitative and recessive. Strong resistance to races 1 and 4 was controlled by a single dominant locus (Xca1) in the B. carinata line PI 199947. This resistance probably originates from the B genome. Resistance to race 4 in three B. napus lines, cv. Cobra, the rapid cycling line CrGC5, and the doubled haploid line N-o-1, was controlled by a single dominant locus (Xca4). A set of doubled haploid lines, selected from a population used previously to develop a restriction fragment length polymorphism map, was used to map this locus. Xca4 was positioned on linkage group N5 of the B. napus A genome, indicating that this resistance originated from B. rapa. Xca4 is the first major locus to be mapped that controls race-specific resistance to X. campestris pv. campestris in Brassica spp.

  3. Inheritance of Race-Specific Resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in Brassica Genomes.

    PubMed

    Vicente, J G; Taylor, J D; Sharpe, A G; Parkin, I A P; Lydiate, D J; King, G J

    2002-10-01

    ABSTRACT The inheritance of resistance to three Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris races was studied in crosses between resistant and susceptible lines of Brassica oleracea (C genome), B. carinata (BC genome), and B. napus (AC genome). Resistance to race 3 in the B. oleracea doubled haploid line BOH 85c and in PI 436606 was controlled by a single dominant locus (Xca3). Resistance to races 1 and 3 in the B. oleracea line Badger Inbred-16 was quantitative and recessive. Strong resistance to races 1 and 4 was controlled by a single dominant locus (Xca1) in the B. carinata line PI 199947. This resistance probably originates from the B genome. Resistance to race 4 in three B. napus lines, cv. Cobra, the rapid cycling line CrGC5, and the doubled haploid line N-o-1, was controlled by a single dominant locus (Xca4). A set of doubled haploid lines, selected from a population used previously to develop a restriction fragment length polymorphism map, was used to map this locus. Xca4 was positioned on linkage group N5 of the B. napus A genome, indicating that this resistance originated from B. rapa. Xca4 is the first major locus to be mapped that controls race-specific resistance to X. campestris pv. campestris in Brassica spp. PMID:18944224

  4. The roles of peroxide protective regulons in protecting Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris from sodium hypochlorite stress.

    PubMed

    Charoenlap, Nisanart; Sornchuer, Phornphan; Piwkam, Anong; Srijaruskul, Kriangsuk; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon

    2015-05-01

    The exposure of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris to sublethal concentrations of a sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution induced the expression of genes that encode peroxide scavenging enzymes within the OxyR and OhrR regulons. Sensitivity testing in various X. campestris mutants indicated that oxyR, katA, katG, ahpC, and ohr contributed to protection against NaOCl killing. The pretreatment of X. campestris cultures with oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), t-butyl hydroperoxide, and the superoxide generator menadione, protected the bacteria from lethal concentrations of NaOCl in an OxyR-dependent manner. Treating the bacteria with a low concentration of NaOCl resulted in the adaptive protection from NaOCl killing and also provided cross-protection from H2O2 killing. Taken together, the results suggest that the toxicity of NaOCl is partially mediated by the generation of peroxides and other reactive oxygen species that are removed by primary peroxide scavenging enzymes, such as catalases and AhpC, as a part of an overall strategy that protects the bacteria from the lethal effects of NaOCl.

  5. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris gum Mutants: Effects on Xanthan Biosynthesis and Plant Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Katzen, Federico; Ferreiro, Diego U.; Oddo, Cristian G.; Ielmini, M. Verónica; Becker, Anke; Pühler, Alfred; Ielpi, Luis

    1998-01-01

    Xanthan is an industrially important exopolysaccharide produced by the phytopathogenic, gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. It is composed of polymerized pentasaccharide repeating units which are assembled by the sequential addition of glucose-1-phosphate, glucose, mannose, glucuronic acid, and mannose on a polyprenol phosphate carrier (L. Ielpi, R. O. Couso, and M. A. Dankert, J. Bacteriol. 175:2490–2500, 1993). A cluster of 12 genes in a region designated xpsI or gum has been suggested to encode proteins involved in the synthesis and polymerization of the lipid intermediate. However, no experimental evidence supporting this suggestion has been published. In this work, from the biochemical analysis of a defined set of X. campestris gum mutants, we report experimental data for assigning functions to the products of the gum genes. We also show that the first step in the assembly of the lipid-linked intermediate is severely affected by the combination of certain gum and non-gum mutations. In addition, we provide evidence that the C-terminal domain of the gumD gene product is sufficient for its glucosyl-1-phosphate transferase activity. Finally, we found that alterations in the later stages of xanthan biosynthesis reduce the aggressiveness of X. campestris against the plant. PMID:9537354

  6. Mutations of ferric uptake regulator (fur) impair iron homeostasis, growth, oxidative stress survival, and virulence of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Jittawuttipoka, Thichakorn; Sallabhan, Ratiboot; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Fuangthong, Mayuree; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2010-05-01

    Iron is essential in numerous cellular functions. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron's toxic effects. Here, we characterize the roles of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) fur, which encodes an iron sensor and a transcriptional regulator that acts in iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and virulence. Herein, we isolated spontaneous Xcc fur mutants that had high intracellular iron concentrations due to constitutively high siderophore levels and increased expression of iron transport genes. These mutants also had reduced aerobic plating efficiency and resistance to peroxide killing. Moreover, one fur mutant was attenuated on a host plant, thus indicating that fur has important roles in the virulence of X. campestris pv. campestris.

  7. Molecular cloning, chromosomal mapping, and sequence analysis of copper resistance genes from Xanthomonas campestris pv. juglandis: homology with small blue copper proteins and multicopper oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y A; Hendson, M; Panopoulos, N J; Schroth, M N

    1994-01-01

    Copper-resistant strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. juglandis occur in walnut orchards throughout northern California. The copper resistance genes from a copper-resistant strain C5 of X. campestris pv. juglandis were cloned and located on a 4.9-kb ClaI fragment, which hybridized only to DNA of copper-resistant strains of X. campestris pv. juglandis, and was part of an approximately 20-kb region which was conserved among such strains of X. campestris pv. juglandis. Hybridization analysis indicated that the copper resistance genes were located on the chromosome. Plasmids conferring copper resistance were not detected in copper-resistant strains, nor did mating with copper-sensitive strains result in copper-resistant transconjugants. Copper resistance genes from X. campestris pv. juglandis shared nucleotide sequence similarity with copper resistance genes from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, P. syringae, and X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. DNA sequence analysis of the 4.9-kb fragment from strain C5 revealed that the sequence had an overall G+C content of 58.7%, and four open reading frames (ORF1 to ORF4), oriented in the same direction. All four ORFs were required for full expression of copper resistance, on the basis of Tn3-spice insertional inactivation and deletion analysis. The predicted amino acid sequences of ORF1 to ORF4 showed 65, 45, 47, and 40% identity with CopA, CopB, CopC, and CopD, respectively, from P. syringae pv. tomato. The most conserved regions are ORF1 and CopA and the C-terminal region (166 amino acids from the C terminus) of ORF2 and CopB. The hydrophobicity profiles of each pair of predicted polypeptides are similar except for the N terminus of ORF2 and CopB. Four histidine-rich polypeptide regions in ORF1 and CopA strongly resembled the copper-binding motifs of small blue copper proteins and multicopper oxidases, such as fungal laccases, plant ascorbate oxidase, and human ceruloplasmin. Putative copper ligands of the ORF1 polypeptide

  8. In vivo and in vitro effects of secondary metabolites against Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Pablo; Lema, Margarita; Francisco, Marta; Soengas, Pilar; Cartea, María Elena

    2013-01-01

    Brassica rapa is a crucifer that is grown worldwide, mainly as a vegetable. The quality of B. rapa crops is highly affected by the disease caused by the bacteria Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). Glucosinolates and phenolic compounds can confer resistance to Brassica crops against pests and diseases, but few works have been done to evaluate their role in Xcc resistance. The objectives of this work were: (1) to evaluate the in vivo and in vitro antibacterial effect of gluconapin, its isothiocyanate and the methanolic extracts of B. rapa against the type 4 of Xcc, and (2) to test if there is induced resistance mediated by glucosinolates or phenolic compounds in two varieties of B. rapa. Gluconapin and its ITC varieties had an antibacterial effect on the development of Xanthomonas and this effect was strongly dependent on the concentration applied. Methanolic extracts from B. rapa, containing glucosinolates and phenolic compounds, inhibited the growth of these bacteria. Concentration of gluconapin is higher in resistant plants than in the susceptible ones and there is an induction of gluconapin, some flavonoids and sinapic acid 48 to 72 h after inoculation. Gluconapin plays a role in the constitutive resistance to Xcc, while gluconapin, some flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acids are induced by a Xcc infection but it is not clear if this induction confers resistance to this disease.

  9. Sources and Origin of Resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in Brassica Genomes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J D; Conway, J; Roberts, S J; Astley, D; Vicente, J G

    2002-01-01

    ABSTRACT Two hundred and seventy-six accessions of mainly Brassica spp. were screened for resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris races. In Brassica oleracea (C genome), the majority of accessions were susceptible to all races, but 43% showed resistance to one or more of the rare races (2, 3, 5, and 6) and a single accession showed partial resistance to races 1, 3, 5, and 6. Further searches for resistance to races 1 and 4, currently the most important races worldwide, and race 6, the race with the widest host range, were made in accessions representing the A and B genomes. Strong resistance to race 4 was frequent in B. rapa (A genome) and B. napus (AC genome), indicating an A genome origin. Resistance to races 1 and 4 was present in a high proportion of B. nigra (B genome) and B. carinata (BC genome) accessions, indicating a B genome origin. B. juncea (AB genome) was the most resistant species, showing either strong resistance to races 1 and 4 or quantitative resistance to all races. Potentially race-nonspecific resistance was also found, but at a lower frequency, in B. rapa, B. nigra, and B. carinata. The combination of race-specific and race-nonspecific resistance could provide durable control of black rot of crucifers.

  10. Identification of quantitative trait loci for resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Soengas, P; Hand, P; Vicente, J G; Pole, J M; Pink, D A C

    2007-02-01

    Resistance to six known races of black rot in crucifers caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Pammel) Dowson is absent or very rare in Brassica oleracea (C genome). However, race specific and broad-spectrum resistance (to type strains of all six races) does appear to occur frequently in other brassica genomes including B. rapa (A genome). Here, we report the genetics of broad spectrum resistance in the B. rapa Chinese cabbage accession B162, using QTL analysis of resistance to races 1 and 4 of the pathogen. A B. rapa linkage map comprising ten linkage groups (A01-A10) with a total map distance of 664 cM was produced, based on 223 AFLP bands and 23 microsatellites from a F(2) population of 114 plants derived from a cross between the B. rapa susceptible inbred line R-o-18 and B162. Interaction phenotypes of 125 F(2) plants were assessed using two criteria: the percentage of inoculation sites in which symptoms developed, and the severity of symptoms per plant. Resistance to both races was correlated and a cluster of highly significant QTL that explained 24-64% of the phenotypic variance was located on A06. Two additional QTLs for resistance to race 4 were found on A02 and A09. Markers closely linked to these QTL could assist in the transference of the resistance into different B. rapa cultivars or into B. oleracea.

  11. Crystal structure of the YajQ-family protein XC_3703 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhixin; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As an important bacterial second messenger, bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylate (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in numerous biological activities, including biofilm formation, motility, survival and virulence. These processes are manipulated by the binding of c-di-GMP to its receptors. XC_3703 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which belongs to the YajQ family of proteins, has recently been identified as a potential c-di-GMP receptor. XC_3703, together with XC_2801, functions as a transcription factor activating virulence-related genes, which can be reversed by the binding of c-di-GMP to XC_3703. However, the structural basis of how c-di-GMP regulates XC_3703 remains elusive. In this study, the structure of XC_3703 was determined to 2.1 Å resolution using the molecular-replacement method. The structure of XC_3703 consists of two domains adopting the same topology, which is similar to that of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM). Arg65, which is conserved among the c-di-GMP-binding subfamily of the YajQ family of proteins, together with Phe80 in domain II, forms a putative c-di-GMP binding site. PMID:27599864

  12. Crystal structure of the YajQ-family protein XC_3703 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhixin; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As an important bacterial second messenger, bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylate (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in numerous biological activities, including biofilm formation, motility, survival and virulence. These processes are manipulated by the binding of c-di-GMP to its receptors. XC_3703 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which belongs to the YajQ family of proteins, has recently been identified as a potential c-di-GMP receptor. XC_3703, together with XC_2801, functions as a transcription factor activating virulence-related genes, which can be reversed by the binding of c-di-GMP to XC_3703. However, the structural basis of how c-di-GMP regulates XC_3703 remains elusive. In this study, the structure of XC_3703 was determined to 2.1 Å resolution using the molecular-replacement method. The structure of XC_3703 consists of two domains adopting the same topology, which is similar to that of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM). Arg65, which is conserved among the c-di-GMP-binding subfamily of the YajQ family of proteins, together with Phe80 in domain II, forms a putative c-di-GMP binding site.

  13. Chromosome Map of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris 17 with Locations of Genes Involved in Xanthan Gum Synthesis and Yellow Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yi-Hsiung; Choy, Ka-Tim; Hung, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Liu, Jane-Yu; Lou, Chih-Hong; Yang, Bih-Ying; Wen, Fu-Shyan; Weng, Shu-Fen; Wu, Jung-Rung

    1999-01-01

    No plasmid was detected in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris 17, a strain of the causative agent of black rot in cruciferous plants isolated in Taiwan. Its chromosome was cut by PacI, PmeI, and SwaI into five, two, and six fragments, respectively, and a size of 4.8 Mb was estimated by summing the fragment lengths in these digests. Based on the data obtained from partial digestion and Southern hybridization using probes common to pairs of the overlapping fragments or prepared from linking fragments, a circular physical map bearing the PacI, PmeI, and SwaI sites was constructed for the X. campestris pv. campestris 17 chromosome. Locations of eight eps loci involved in exopolysaccharide (xanthan gum) synthesis, two rrn operons each possessing an unique I-CeuI site, one pig cluster required for yellow pigmentation, and nine auxotrophic markers were determined, using mutants isolated by mutagenesis with Tn5(pfm)CmKm. This transposon contains a polylinker with sites for several rare-cutting restriction endonucleases located between the chloramphenicol resistance and kanamycin resistance (Kmr) genes, which upon insertion introduced additional sites into the chromosome. The recA and tdh genes, with known sequences, were mapped by tagging with the polylinker-Kmr segment from Tn5(pfm)CmKm. This is the first map for X. campestris and would be useful for genetic studies of this and related Xanthomonas species. PMID:9864320

  14. Detection of Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri by the polymerase chain reaction method.

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, J S; Daniel, J F; Pruvost, O P

    1993-01-01

    pFL1 is a pUC9 derivative that contains a 572-bp EcoRI insert cloned from plasmid DNA of Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri XC62. The nucleotide sequence of pFL1 was determined, and the sequence information was used to design primers for application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to the detection of X. campestris pv. citri, the causal agent of citrus bacterial canker disease. Seven 18-bp oligonucleotide primers were designed and tested with DNA from X. campestris pv. citri strains and other strains of X. campestris associated with Citrus spp. as templates in the PCR. Four primer pairs directed the amplification of target DNA from X. campestris pv. citri strains but not from strains of X. campestris associated with a different disease, citrus bacterial spot. Primer pair 2-3 directed the specific amplification of target DNA from pathotype A but not other pathotypes of X. campestris pv. citri. A pH 9.0 buffer that contained 1% Triton X-100 and 0.1% gelatin was absolutely required for the successful amplification of the target DNA, which was 61% G+C. Limits of detection after amplification and gel electrophoresis were 25 pg of purified target DNA and about 10 cells when Southern blots were made after gel electrophoresis and probed with biotinylated pFL1. This level of detection represents an increase in sensitivity of about 100-fold over that of dot blotting with the same hybridization probe. PCR products of the expected sizes were amplified from DNA extracted from 7-month-old lesions from which viable bacteria could not be isolated. These products were confirmed to be specific for X. campestris pv. citri by Southern blotting. This PCR-based detection protocol will be a useful addition to current methods of detection of this pathogen, which is currently the target of international quarantine measures. Images PMID:8476288

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a new xyloglucanase from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Evandro Ares; Tomazini, Atílio; Kadowaki, Marco Antonio Seiki; Murakami, Mário Tyago; Polikarpov, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Xyloglucanases (Xghs) are important enzymes involved in xyloglucan modification and degradation. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is a phytopathogenic bacterium which produces a large number of glycosyl hydrolases (GH), but has only one family 74 GH (Xcc-Xgh). This enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data sets were collected for the native enzyme and its complex with glucose to maximum resolutions of 2.0 and 2.1 Å, respectively. The data were indexed in a hexagonal crystal system with unit-cell parameters a = b = 153.4, c = 84.9 Å. As indicated by molecular-replacement solution, the crystals belonged to space group P61. PMID:23722852

  16. AmpG is required for BlaXc beta-lactamase expression in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. 17.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Chen, Tzu-Fan; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Hu, Rouh-Mei

    2013-03-01

    The chromosomal ampR(Xc) -bla(Xc) module is essential for the β-lactam resistance of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Bla(Xc) β-lactamase is expressed at a high basal level in the absence of an inducer and its expression can be further induced by β-lactam. In enterobacteria, ampG encodes an inner membrane facilitator involved in the recycling of murein degradation compounds. An isogenic ampG mutant (XcampG) of X. campestris pv. campestris str. 17 (Xc17) was constructed to investigate the link between murein recycling and bla(Xc) expression. Our data demonstrate that (1) XcampG is susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics; (2) AmpG(Xc) is essential for expression of bla(Xc) ; (3) AmpGs of Xc17, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia KJ (SmKJ) and Escherichia coli DH5α can complement the defect of XcampG; (4) overexpression of AmpG(X) (c) significantly increased bla(Xc) expression; and (5) AmpG(Xc) from Xc17 is able to restore β-lactamase induction of the ampN(Xc) -ampG(Xc) double mutant of SmKJ. In Xc17, ampG(Xc) can be expressed from the promoter residing in the intergenic region of ampN(Xc) -ampG(Xc) and the expression is independent of β-lactam induction. AmpN, which is required for β-lactamases induction in SmKJ, is not required for the β-lactam antibiotic resistance of Xc17.

  17. Genetic and pathogenic variability of Indian strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris causing black rot disease in crucifers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh; Dhar, Shri; Yadava, D K

    2011-12-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Pammel) Dowson (Xcc) causing black rot of crucifers is a serious disease in India and causes >50% crop losses in favorable environmental conditions. Pathogenic variability of Xcc, X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), and X. axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) were tested on 19 cultivars of cruciferae including seven Brassica spp. viz., B. campestris, B. carinata, B. juncea, B. napus, B. nigra, B. oleracea and B. rapa, and Raphanus sativus for two consecutive years viz., 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 under field conditions at Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi. Xcc (22 strains) and other species of Xanthomonas (2 strains), they formed three distinct groups of pathogenic variability i.e., Group 1, 2, and 3 under 50% minimum similarity coefficient. All strains of Xcc clustered under Groupl except Xcc-C20. The strains of Xcc further clustered in 6 subgroups viz., A, B, C, D, E, and F based on diseases reaction on host. Genetic variability of 22 strains of Xcc was studied by using Rep-PCR (REP-, BOX- and ERIC-PCR) and 10 strains for hrp (hypersensitive reaction and pathogenecity) gene sequence analysis. Xcc strains comprised in cluster 1, Xac under cluster 2, while Xoo formed separate cluster 3 based on >50% similarity coefficient. Cluster 1 was further divided into 8 subgroups viz., A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H at 75% similarity coefficient. The hrpF gene sequence analysis also showed distinctness of Xcc strains from other Xanthomonads. In this study, genetic and pathogenic variability in Indian strains of Xcc were established, which will be of immense use in the development of resistant genotypes against this bacterial pathogen.

  18. Host genotype and hypersensitive reaction influence population levels of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians in lettuce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Population dynamics of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians spray inoculated on or infiltrated into lettuce leaves were monitored on cultivars that were well characterized for resistance or susceptibility to the pathogen. In general, population growth was greater for susceptible (Clemente, Salinas 88,...

  19. Transcriptome profiling of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris grown in minimal medium MMX and rich medium NYG.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yu, Yan-Hua; Cao, Shi-Yuan; Niu, Xiang-Na; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Guo-Fang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Dong-Jie; Lu, Guang-Tao; He, Yong-Qiang; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2013-06-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of black rot disease in cruciferous plants worldwide. Although the complete genomes of several Xcc strains have been determined, the gene expression and regulation mechanisms in this pathogen are far from clear. In this work, transcriptome profiling of Xcc 8004 grown in MMX medium (minimal medium for Xanthomonas campestris) and NYG medium (peptone yeast glycerol medium) were investigated by RNA-Seq. Using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, a total of 26,514,630 reads (90 nt in average) were generated, of which 15,708,478 reads mapped uniquely to coding regions of Xcc 8004 genome. Of the 4273 annotated protein-coding genes of Xcc 8004, 629 were found differentially expressed in Xcc grown in MMX and NYG. Of the differentially expressed genes, 495 were up-regulated and 134 were down-regulated in MMX. The MMX-induced genes are mainly involved in amino acid metabolism, transport systems, atypical condition adaptation and pathogenicity, especially the type III secretion system, while the MMX-repressed genes are mainly involved in chemotaxis and degradation of small molecules. The global transcriptome analyzes of Xcc 8004 grown in MMX and NYG might facilitate the gene functional characterization of this phytopathogenic bacterium.

  20. Promoter analysis of the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris gum operon directing biosynthesis of the xanthan polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Katzen, F; Becker, A; Zorreguieta, A; Pühler, A; Ielpi, L

    1996-01-01

    The Xanthomonas campestris gum gene cluster is composed of 12 genes designated gumB, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, -H, -I, -J, -K, -L, and -M. The transcriptional organization of this gene cluster was analyzed by the construction of gum-lacZ transcriptional fusions in association with plasmid integration mutagenesis. This analysis, coupled with primer extension assays, indicated that the gum region was mainly expressed as an operon from a promoter located upstream of the first gene, gumB. PMID:8763965

  1. Characterization of the pyrophosphate-dependent 6-phosphofructokinase from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Frese, Marcel; Schatschneider, Sarah; Voss, Julia; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Niehaus, Karsten

    2014-03-15

    Xanthomonads are plant pathogenic proteobacteria that produce the polysaccharide xanthan. They are assumed to catabolize glucose mainly via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Whereas previous studies have demonstrated no phosphofructokinase (PFK) activity in xanthomonads, detailed genome analysis revealed in Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc) genes for all Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway (glycolysis) enzymes, including a conserved pfkA gene similar to 6-phosphofructokinase genes. To address this discrepancy between genetic and physiological properties, the pfkA gene of Xcc strain B100 was cloned into the expression vector pET28a+. The 45-kDa pfkA gene product exhibited no conventional PFK activity. Bioinformatic analysis of the Xcc PfkA amino acid sequence suggested utilization of pyrophosphate as an alternative cosubstrate. Pyrophosphate-dependent PFK activity was shown in an in vitro enzyme assay for purified Xcc PfkA, as well as in the Xcc B100 crude protein extract. Kinetic constants were determined for the forward and reverse reactions. Primary structure conservation indicates the global presence of similar enzymes among Xanthomonadaceae.

  2. Comparative and functional genomic analyses of the pathogenicity of phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei; Jia, Yantao; Ren, Shuang-Xi; He, Yong-Qiang; Feng, Jia-Xun; Lu, Ling-Feng; Sun, Qihong; Ying, Ge; Tang, Dong-Jie; Tang, Hua; Wu, Wei; Hao, Pei; Wang, Lifeng; Jiang, Bo-Le; Zeng, Shenyan; Gu, Wen-Yi; Lu, Gang; Rong, Li; Tian, Yingchuan; Yao, Zhijian; Fu, Gang; Chen, Baoshan; Fang, Rongxiang; Qiang, Boqin; Chen, Zhu; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Chaozu

    2005-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc) is the causative agent of crucifer black rot disease, which causes severe losses in agricultural yield world-wide. This bacterium is a model organism for studying plant-bacteria interactions. We sequenced the complete genome of Xcc 8004 (5,148,708 bp), which is highly conserved relative to that of Xcc ATCC 33913. Comparative genomics analysis indicated that, in addition to a significant genomic-scale rearrangement cross the replication axis between two IS1478 elements, loss and acquisition of blocks of genes, rather than point mutations, constitute the main genetic variation between the two Xcc strains. Screening of a high-density transposon insertional mutant library (16,512 clones) of Xcc 8004 against a host plant (Brassica oleraceae) identified 75 nonredundant, single-copy insertions in protein-coding sequences (CDSs) and intergenic regions. In addition to known virulence factors, full virulence was found to require several additional metabolic pathways and regulatory systems, such as fatty acid degradation, type IV secretion system, cell signaling, and amino acids and nucleotide metabolism. Among the identified pathogenicity-related genes, three of unknown function were found in Xcc 8004-specific chromosomal segments, revealing a direct correlation between genomic dynamics and Xcc virulence. The present combination of comparative and functional genomic analyses provides valuable information about the genetic basis of Xcc pathogenicity, which may offer novel insight toward the development of efficient methods for prevention of this important plant disease. PMID:15899963

  3. Diffusible signal factor family signals provide a fitness advantage to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in interspecies competition.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yinyue; Wu, Jien; Yin, Wenfang; Li, Peng; Zhou, Jianuan; Chen, Shaohua; He, Fei; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Diffusible signal factor (DSF) represents a new class of widely conserved quorum sensing signals, which regulates various biological functions through intra- or interspecies signaling. The previous studies identified that there is an antagonistic interaction between Xanthomonas and Bacillus species bacteria in natural ecosystem, but the detailed molecular mechanism of interspecies competition is not clear. This study showed that Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) interfered with morphological transition and sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis in mixed cultures, whereas abrogation of the DSF synthase RpfF reduced the interference. DSF inhibited B. thuringiensis cell division and sporulation through modulation of ftsZ, which encodes an important cell division protein in bacterial cells. In addition, RpfF is essential for production of six DSF-family signals in Xcc, which employ the same signaling pathways to regulate biological functions in Xcc and play similar effects on reduction of cell division, sporulation and antibiotic resistance of B. thuringiensis. Furthermore, abrogation of RpfF decreased the competitive capability of Xcc against B. thuringiensis on the surface of Chinese cabbage leaves. Our findings provide new insights into the role of DSF-family signals in interspecies competition and depict molecular mechanisms with which Xcc competes with B. thuringiensis. PMID:26913592

  4. An Oxidoreductase Is Involved in Cercosporin Degradation by the Bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. zinniae

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Tanya V.; Mitchell, Thomas K.; Daub, Margaret E.

    2006-01-01

    The polyketide toxin cercosporin plays a key role in pathogenesis by fungal species of the genus Cercospora. The bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. zinniae is able to rapidly degrade this toxin. Growth of X. campestris pv. zinniae strains in cercosporin-containing medium leads to the breakdown of cercosporin and to the formation of xanosporic acid, a nontoxic breakdown product. Five non-cercosporin-degrading mutants of a strain that rapidly degrades cercosporin (XCZ-3) were generated by ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis and were then transformed with a genomic library from the wild-type strain. All five mutants were complemented with the same genomic clone, which encoded a putative transcriptional regulator and an oxidoreductase. Simultaneous expression of these two genes was necessary to complement the mutant phenotype. Sequence analysis of the mutants showed that all five mutants had point mutations in the oxidoreductase gene and no mutations in the regulator. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) showed that the expression of both of these genes in the wild-type strain is upregulated after exposure to cercosporin. Both the oxidoreductase and transcriptional regulator genes were transformed into three non-cercosporin-degrading bacteria to determine if they are sufficient for cercosporin degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the oxidoreductase was expressed in all transconjugants. However, none of the transconjugants were able to degrade cercosporin, suggesting that additional factors are required for cercosporin degradation. Further study of cercosporin degradation in X. campestris pv. zinniae may allow for the engineering of Cercospora-resistant plants by using a suite of genes. PMID:16957231

  5. [RAPD-markers linked to the locus for resistance to the race 4 pathogen for black rot, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Pamm.) Dow., in Brassica rapa L].

    PubMed

    Ignatov, A N; Kuginuki, Y; Suprunova, T P; Pozmogova, G E; Seitova, A M; Dorokhov, D B; Hirai, M

    2000-03-01

    Association between the RAPD markers and the resistance to race 4 of the black rot causative agent was studied in Brassica rapa L. Experiments were carried out using doubled haploid lines, obtained via crosses between the race 4-susceptible fodder turnip and resistant pak-choi, and the F2 progeny of the crosses between the doubled haploid lines with contrasting resistance. The WE(22)980 RAPD marker inherited from the pak-choi and associated with the clubroot susceptibility was also linked to the locus responsible for the resistance to race 4 of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. The two other RAPD markers were linked to susceptibility to black rot. Simultaneous association of the same DNA markers with the resistance/susceptibility to two different obligate pathogens favored the hypothesis on cluster organization of the resistance genes in plants. The markers described can be used in plant breeding and in further investigation of the genetic bases of resistance in plants.

  6. Evaluation of the Biolog Substrate Utilization System To Identify and Assess Metabolic Variation among Strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. Citri

    PubMed Central

    Verniere, C.; Pruvost, O.; Civerolo, E. L.; Gambin, O.; Jacquemoud-Collet, J. P.; Luisetti, J.

    1993-01-01

    Metabolic fingerprints of 148 strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri originating from 24 countries and associated with various forms of citrus bacterial canker disease (CBCD) were obtained by using the Biolog substrate utilization system. Metabolic profiles were used to attempt strain identification. Only 6.8% of the studied strains were correctly identified when the commercial Microlog 2N data base was used alone. When the data base was supplemented with data from 54 strains of X. campestris pv. citri (40 CBCD-A strains, 8 CBCD-B strains, and 6 CBCD-C strains) and data from 43 strains of X. campestris associated with citrus bacterial spot disease, the percentage of correct identifications was 70%. Thus, it is recommended that users supplement the commercial data base with additional data prior to using the program for identification purposes. The utilization of Tween 40 in conjunction with other tests can help to differentiate strains associated with CBCD and citrus bacterial spot disease. These results confirmed the separation of X. campestris pv. citri into different subgroups (strains associated with Asiatic citrus canker [CBCD-A], cancrosis B [CBCD-B], and Mexican lime canker [CBCD-C]). The utilization of l-fucose, d-galactose, and alaninamide can be used as markers to differentiate strains associated with these groups. A single strain associated with bacteriosis of Mexican lime in Mexico (CBCD-D) was closely similar to CBCD-B strains. PMID:16348849

  7. Unusual structure of the tonB-exb DNA region of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris: tonB, exbB, and exbD1 are essential for ferric iron uptake, but exbD2 is not.

    PubMed Central

    Wiggerich, H G; Klauke, B; Köplin, R; Priefer, U B; Pühler, A

    1997-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 3.6-kb HindIII-SmaI DNA fragment of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris revealed four open reading frames which, based on sequence homologies, were designated tonB, exbB, exbD1, and exbD2. Analysis of translational fusions to alkaline phosphatase and beta-galactosidase confirmed that the TonB, ExbB, ExbD1, and ExbD2 proteins are anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane. The TonB protein of X. campestris pv. campestris lacks the conserved (Glu-Pro)n and (Lys-Pro)m repeats but harbors a 13-fold repeat of proline residues. By mutational analysis, the tonB, exbB, and exbD1 genes were shown to be essential for ferric iron import in X. campestris pv. campestris. In contrast, the exbD2 gene is not involved in the uptake of ferric iron. PMID:9371459

  8. Structure of proline iminopeptidase from Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri: a prototype for the prolyl oligopeptidase family.

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, F J; Alonso, J; García, J L; Romero, A; Bode, W; Gomis-Rüth, F X

    1998-01-01

    The proline iminopeptidase from Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri is a serine peptidase that catalyses the removal of N-terminal proline residues from peptides with high specificity. We have solved its three-dimensional structure by multiple isomorphous replacement and refined it to a crystallographic R-factor of 19.2% using X-ray data to 2.7 A resolution. The protein is folded into two contiguous domains. The larger domain shows the general topology of the alpha/beta hydrolase fold, with a central eight-stranded beta-sheet flanked by two helices and the 11 N-terminal residues on one side, and by four helices on the other side. The smaller domain is placed on top of the larger domain and essentially consists of six helices. The active site, located at the end of a deep pocket at the interface between both domains, includes a catalytic triad of Ser110, Asp266 and His294. Cys269, located at the bottom of the active site very close to the catalytic triad, presumably accounts for the inhibition by thiol-specific reagents. The overall topology of this iminopeptidase is very similar to that of yeast serine carboxypeptidase. The striking secondary structure similarity to human lymphocytic prolyl oligopeptidase and dipeptidyl peptidase IV makes this proline iminopeptidase structure a suitable model for the three-dimensional structure of other peptidases of this family. PMID:9427736

  9. Dynamic protein phosphorylation during the growth of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris B100 revealed by a gel-based proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Musa, Yaarub Raji; Bäsell, Katrin; Schatschneider, Sarah; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Becher, Dörte; Niehaus, Karsten

    2013-08-20

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) synthesizes huge amounts of the exopolysaccharide xanthan and is a plant pathogen affecting Brassicaceae, among them the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Xanthan is produced as a thickening agent at industrial scale by fermentation of Xcc. In an approach based on 2D gel electrophoresis, protein samples from different growth phases were characterized to initialize analysis of the Xanthomonas phosphoproteome. The 2D gels were stained with Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein stain to identify putatively phosphorylated proteins. Spots of putatively phosphorylated proteins were excised from the gel and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Three proteins were confirmed to be phosphorylated, the phosphoglucomutase/phosphomannomutase XanA that is important for xanthan and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, the phosphoenolpyruvate synthase PspA that is involved in gluconeogenesis, and an anti-sigma factor antagonist RsbR that was so far uncharacterized in xanthomonads. The growth phase in which the samples were collected had an influence on protein phosphorylation in Xcc, particular distinct in case of RsbR, which was phosphorylated during the transition from the late exponential growth phase to the stationary phase. PMID:23792782

  10. Establishment, in silico analysis, and experimental verification of a large-scale metabolic network of the xanthan producing Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris strain B100.

    PubMed

    Schatschneider, Sarah; Persicke, Marcus; Watt, Steven Alexander; Hublik, Gerd; Pühler, Alfred; Niehaus, Karsten; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg

    2013-08-20

    The γ-proteobacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) B100 synthesizes the polysaccharide xanthan, a commercially important viscosifier. Since the complete genome of Xcc B100 is available, systems biology tools were applied to obtain a deeper understanding of the metabolism involved in xanthan biosynthesis. A large-scale metabolic network was reconstructed and manually curated. The reconstructed network included 352 genes, 437 biochemical reactions, 10 transport reactions, and 338 internal metabolites. To use this network for flux balance analysis, the biomass composition of Xcc B100 was determined. The comprehensive model obtained was applied for in silico analyses to predict biomass generation and gene essentiality. Predictions were extensively validated by analyzing batch culture performance and by carbon balancing including xanthan production. Single gene deletion mutants causing deficiencies in the central carbohydrate metabolism were constructed to enforce major flux redistributions. The impact of xanthan production was studied in vivo and in silico, comparing the physiology of a gumD mutant, negative in xanthan production, with the original strain. The results indicate a redistribution of resources from xanthan to biomass, rather than a reduction in carbon uptake. With this high quality metabolic model, both systems biology analyses and synthetic biology reengineering of Xcc gained an important tool.

  11. The xylan utilization system of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris controls epiphytic life and reveals common features with oligotrophic bacteria and animal gut symbionts.

    PubMed

    Déjean, Guillaume; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Boulanger, Alice; Darrasse, Armelle; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Girard, Anne-Laure; Carrére, Sébastien; Jamet, Stevie; Zischek, Claudine; Lautier, Martine; Solé, Magali; Büttner, Daniela; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Arlat, Matthieu

    2013-05-01

    Xylan is a major structural component of plant cell wall and the second most abundant plant polysaccharide in nature. Here, by combining genomic and functional analyses, we provide a comprehensive picture of xylan utilization by Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) and highlight its role in the adaptation of this epiphytic phytopathogen to the phyllosphere. The xylanolytic activity of Xcc depends on xylan-deconstruction enzymes but also on transporters, including two TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters (TBDTs) which belong to operons necessary for efficient growth in the presence of xylo-oligosaccharides and for optimal survival on plant leaves. Genes of this xylan utilization system are specifically induced by xylo-oligosaccharides and repressed by a LacI-family regulator named XylR. Part of the xylanolytic machinery of Xcc, including TBDT genes, displays a high degree of conservation with the xylose-regulon of the oligotrophic aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Moreover, it shares common features, including the presence of TBDTs, with the xylan utilization systems of Bacteroides ovatus and Prevotella bryantii, two gut symbionts. These similarities and our results support an important role for TBDTs and xylan utilization systems for bacterial adaptation in the phyllosphere, oligotrophic environments and animal guts.

  12. Establishment, in silico analysis, and experimental verification of a large-scale metabolic network of the xanthan producing Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris strain B100.

    PubMed

    Schatschneider, Sarah; Persicke, Marcus; Watt, Steven Alexander; Hublik, Gerd; Pühler, Alfred; Niehaus, Karsten; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg

    2013-08-20

    The γ-proteobacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) B100 synthesizes the polysaccharide xanthan, a commercially important viscosifier. Since the complete genome of Xcc B100 is available, systems biology tools were applied to obtain a deeper understanding of the metabolism involved in xanthan biosynthesis. A large-scale metabolic network was reconstructed and manually curated. The reconstructed network included 352 genes, 437 biochemical reactions, 10 transport reactions, and 338 internal metabolites. To use this network for flux balance analysis, the biomass composition of Xcc B100 was determined. The comprehensive model obtained was applied for in silico analyses to predict biomass generation and gene essentiality. Predictions were extensively validated by analyzing batch culture performance and by carbon balancing including xanthan production. Single gene deletion mutants causing deficiencies in the central carbohydrate metabolism were constructed to enforce major flux redistributions. The impact of xanthan production was studied in vivo and in silico, comparing the physiology of a gumD mutant, negative in xanthan production, with the original strain. The results indicate a redistribution of resources from xanthan to biomass, rather than a reduction in carbon uptake. With this high quality metabolic model, both systems biology analyses and synthetic biology reengineering of Xcc gained an important tool. PMID:23395674

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the full-length bacteriophytochrome from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Klinke, Sebastián; Otero, Lisandro H; Rinaldi, Jimena; Sosa, Santiago; Guimarães, Beatriz G; Shepard, William E; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Bonomi, Hernán R

    2014-12-01

    Phytochromes give rise to the largest photosensor family known to date. However, they are underrepresented in the Protein Data Bank. Plant, cyanobacterial, fungal and bacterial phytochromes share a canonical architecture consisting of an N-terminal photosensory module (PAS2-GAF-PHY domains) and a C-terminal variable output module. The bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, a worldwide agricultural pathogen, codes for a single bacteriophytochrome (XccBphP) that has this canonical architecture, bearing a C-terminal PAS9 domain as the output module. Full-length XccBphP was cloned, expressed and purified to homogeneity by nickel-NTA affinity and size-exclusion chromatography and was then crystallized at room temperature bound to its cofactor biliverdin. A complete native X-ray diffraction data set was collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 Å. The crystals belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.94, c = 344.57 Å and a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Refinement is underway after solving the structure by molecular replacement. PMID:25484215

  14. Clp and RpfF up-regulate transcription of pelA1 gene encoding the major pectate lyase in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Min; Fang, Mei-Chiung; Sun, Pei-Fang; Tseng, Yi-Hsiung

    2009-07-22

    Exopolysaccharide and several extracellular enzymes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), the causative agent of black rot in crucifers, are virulence determinants. In this study, two Xcc annotated extracellular pectate lyase genes, pelA1 and pelA2, belonging to family 1 of the polysaccharide lyase, were characterized. Sequence and mutational analyses have demonstrated that pelA1 encodes the major pectate lyase, whereas pelA2 is not transcribed. Using the 5' RACE method, the pelA1 transcription initiation site was mapped at nucleotide G, 103 nt upstream of the pelA1 start codon. Promoter analysis demonstrated that polygalacturonic acid and CaCl(2) induce the expression of pelA1. Transcriptional fusion assays also indicated that Clp (cAMP receptor protein-like protein) and RpfF (an enoyl-CoA hydratase homologue that is required for the synthesis of cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid, a low molecular weight diffusible signal factor, DSF) positively regulate pelA1 transcription. Gel retardation assays showed that Clp exerts a positive control over expression of pelA1 by direct binding to the upstream Clp-binding site. In conclusion, the present research demonstrated that pelA1 codes for the major pectate lyase in Xcc strain Xc17 and that its expression is up-regulated by Clp and RpfF. This is the first study to characterize pectate lyase gene expression in Xcc.

  15. Development of a New Semiselective Medium for Isolating Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis from Plant Material and Soil.

    PubMed

    Fessehaie, A; Wydra, K; Rudolph, K

    1999-07-01

    ABSTRACT An effective control for bacterial blight of cassava (Manihot esculenta), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis, requires the use of non-contaminated cuttings and seeds. Using classical agar plating techniques for screening planting material for contamination has not been very successful because of the lack of a reliable semiselective agar medium. The pathogen grows slowly on general plating media and is easily overgrown by saprophytic bacteria during isolation from diseased plants. In an effort to develop a semiselective medium, the utilization of several carbon and nitrogen sources was studied. Results of these tests provided information used to design a basal medium allowing good growth of the target organism while suppressing growth of several common saprophytes. Additional selectivity was achieved by incorporating three antibiotics into the basal medium. The new semiselective agar medium, designated cefazolin trehalose agar (CTA) medium, contained (per liter) 3.0 g of K(2)HPO(4), 1.0 g of NaH(2)PO(4), 0.3 g of MgSO(4).7H(2)O, 1.0 g of NH(4)Cl, 9.0 g of D(+)-trehalose, 1.0 D(+)-glucose, 1.0 g of yeast extract, 0.025 g of cefazolin, 0.0012 g of lincomycin, 0.0025 g of phosphomycin, 0.25 g of cycloheximide, and 14.0 g of agar. In comparison to a starch-based semiselective medium (SXM), plating efficiencies using pure cultures of 10 strains of X. campestris pv. manihotis were significantly higher on CTA, with an average of 85 and 50%, respectively. Likewise, isolation and recovery of X. campestris pv. manihotis from infected cassava leaves and contaminated soil were much higher on CTA than on SXM agar. When X. campestris pv. manihotis occurs in high concentrations in diseased tissue, the standard yeast trehalose glucose agar medium supplemented with 250 mug of cycloheximide per ml appears to be satisfactory. The newly developed CTA medium should prove useful for control strategies to identify and remove infected planting material of cassava, as

  16. A plant-inducible gene of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris encodes an exocellular component required for growth in the host and hypersensitivity on nonhosts.

    PubMed Central

    Kamoun, S; Kado, C I

    1990-01-01

    Using Tn4431, a transposon that allows transcriptional fusions to a promoterless luciferase (lux) operon, we have isolated a nonpathogenic mutant of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, i.e., JS111, that does not incite any of the black rot symptoms on all tested cruciferous host plants (J. J. Shaw, L. G. Settles, and C. I. Kado, Mol. Plant Microbe Interact. 1:39-45, 1988). In the study reported here, we determined that in contrast to the wild-type strain, JS111 is unable to induce a hypersensitive necrotic response on nonhost plants such as datura, tomato, and cucumber, suggesting that JS111 is a nonpathogenic, nonhypersensitive Hrp mutant. JS111 displayed culture growth rates, exopolysaccharide production, and protease, pectate lysase, cellulase, amylase, and phosphatase activities comparable to those of the wild-type strain. However, the growth of JS111 in host leaves was markedly attenuated. Coinoculation of JS111 with the wild-type strain in cauliflower or radish leaves rescued the growth deficiency of the mutant to normal levels. The locus mutated in JS111 was cloned and named hrpXc, and transcriptional and genetic complementation analyses of the hrpXc locus were conducted. The regulation of hrpXc expression was also investigated in vitro and in planta, using fusions to a lux or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. The hrpXc gene was found to be strongly induced in radish leaves. This is the first report and analysis of a hrp locus from a Xanthomonas species. Images PMID:2168373

  17. XerR, a negative regulator of XccR in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, relieves its repressor function in planta

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Lili; Geng, Yunfeng; Xi, Wei; Fang, Rongxiang; Jia, Yantao

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that XccR, a LuxR-type regulator of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), activates the downstream proline iminopeptidase virulence gene (pip) in response to certain host plant factor(s). In this report, we further show that the expression of the xccR gene was repressed in the culture medium by an NtrC-type response regulator, which we named XerR (XccR expression-related, repressor), and that this repression was relieved when the bacteria were grown in planta. Such a regulatory mechanism is reinforced by the observations that XerR directly bound to the xccR promoter in vitro, and that mutations at the phosphorylation-related residues of XerR resulted in the loss of its repressor function. Furthermore, the expression level of xccR increased even in XerR-overexpressing Xcc cells when they were vacuum infiltrated into cabbage plants. We also preliminarily characterized the host factor(s) involved in the above mentioned interactions between Xcc and the host plant, showing that a plant material(s) with molecular weight(s) less than 1 kDa abolished the binding of XerR to the xccR promoter, while the same material enhanced the binding of XccR to the luxXc box in the pip promoter. Taken together, our results implicate XerR in a new layer of the regulatory mechanism controlling the expression of the virulence-related xccR/pip locus and provide clues to the identification of plant signal molecules that interact with XerR and XccR to enhance the virulence of Xcc. PMID:21483448

  18. Cell-associated glucans of Burkholderia solanacearum and Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri: a new family of periplasmic glucans.

    PubMed Central

    Talaga, P; Stahl, B; Wieruszeski, J M; Hillenkamp, F; Tsuyumu, S; Lippens, G; Bohin, J P

    1996-01-01

    The cell-associated glucans produced by Burkholderia solanacearum and Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri were isolated by trichloroacetic acid treatment and gel permeation chromatography. The compounds obtained were characterized by compositional analysis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. B. solanacearum synthesizes only a neutral cyclic glucan containing 13 glucose residues, and X. campestris pv. citri synthesizes a neutral cyclic glucan containing 16 glucose residues. The two glucans were further purified by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Methylation analysis revealed that these glucans are linked by 1,2-glycosidic bonds and one 1,6-glycosidic bond. Our 600-MHz homonuclear and 1H-13C heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance experiments revealed the presence of a single alpha-1,6-glycosidic linkage, whereas all other glucose residues are beta-1,2 linked. The presence of this single alpha-1,6 linkage, however, induces such structural constraints in these cyclic glucans that all individual glucose residues could be distinguished. The different anomeric proton signals allowed complete sequence-specific assignment of both glucans. The structural characteristics of these glucans contrast with those of the previously described osmoregulated periplasmic glucans. PMID:8636027

  19. Variation among strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vasculorum from Mauritius and other countries based on fatty acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Dookun, A; Stead, D E; Autrey, L J

    2000-04-01

    Fatty acid profiling was used to study variation amongst strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vasculorum (Xcv). They could be divided into five groups using cellular fatty acid profiles. Group A strains represent a new and little known taxon and all came from plants of broom bamboo (Thysanolaena maxima) from Mauritius. Group B strains included the Xcv pathotype reference strain and were from palms, broom bamboo and sugarcane from Mauritius, Reunion and Australia. Group C contained southern African and Malagasy strains from sugarcane and maize, together with X. campestris pv. holcicola strain. No Mascarene strains fell into this group. Group D strains isolated from sugarcane, maize and royal palm (Roystonea regia) were from Mauritius and Reunion, the earliest known strains coming from Réunion. These groups represented in the Mascarene Islands possibly belong to three different Xanthomonas species. A further Group E comprised one Xcv strain (NCPPB 182) from Puerto Rico, one X. vasicola pv. holcicola strain plus 6 other unclassified Xanthomonas strains causing red stripe disease symptoms in sugarcane. Three of these groups occur on Mauritius and two occur on Réunion. Group B strains originally caused serious problems in noble canes. As resistant interspecific hybrids were introduced, group D strains appeared in Mauritius possibly being introduced from Reunion but having similar host ranges within the Gramineae and Palmae. The findings that 3 of these groups (A, B, D) can cause gumming disease in a grass species (T. maxima) and that 2 of them (B, D) also cause gumming disease in sugar cane (Gramineae) and palms (Palmae) is unusual.

  20. Metabolic flux pattern of glucose utilization by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris: prevalent role of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and minor fluxes through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Schatschneider, Sarah; Huber, Claudia; Neuweger, Heiko; Watt, Tony Francis; Pühler, Alfred; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Christoph; Niehaus, Karsten; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg

    2014-10-01

    The well-studied plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) synthesizes the biotechnologically important polysaccharide xanthan gum, which is also regarded as a virulence factor in plant interactions. In Xcc, sugars like glucose are utilized as a source to generate energy and biomass for growth and pathogenicity. In this study, we used [1-(13)C]glucose as a tracer to analyze the fluxes in the central metabolism of the bacterium growing in a minimal medium. (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmed the prevalent catabolic role of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Comparative nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based isotopologue profiling of a mutant deficient in glycolysis gave evidence for a moderate flux via glycolysis in the wild-type. In addition to reconfirming the Entner-Doudoroff pathway as a catabolic main route, this approach affirmed a numerically minor but important flux via the pentose phosphate pathway.

  1. Reclassification of Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri (ex Hasse 1915) Dye 1978 forms A, B/C/D, and E as X. smithii subsp. citri (ex Hasse) sp. nov. nom. rev. comb. nov., X. fuscans subsp. aurantifolii (ex Gabriel 1989) sp. nov. nom. rev. comb. nov., and X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelo (ex Riker and Jones) Gabriel et al., 1989 sp. nov. nom. rev. comb. nov.; X. campestris pv malvacearum (ex smith 1901) Dye 1978 as X. smithii subsp. smithii nov. comb. nov. nom. nov.; X. campestris pv. alfalfae (ex Riker and Jones, 1935) dye 1978 as X. alfalfae subsp. alfalfae (ex Riker et al., 1935) sp. nov. nom. rev.; and "var. fuscans" of X. campestris pv. phaseoli (ex Smith, 1987) Dye 1978 as X. fuscans subsp. fuscans sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Schaad, Norman W; Postnikova, Elena; Lacy, George H; Sechler, Aaron; Agarkova, Irina; Stromberg, Paul E; Stromberg, Verlyn K; Vidaver, Anne K

    2005-08-01

    Bacterial canker of citrus is a serious disease of citrus worldwide. Five forms of the disease have been described, cankers "A", "B", "C", "D", and "E". Although considerable genetic diversity has been described among the causal agents of the five forms of citrus canker and supports multiple taxons, the causal agents currently are classified as pathovars citri ("A"), aurantifolii ("B/C/D") and citrumelo ("E") of a single species, Xanthomonas campestris pv. citri (or X. axonopodis pv. citri). To determine the taxonomic relatedness among strains of X. campestris pv. citri, we conducted DNA-DNA relatedness assays, sequenced the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) regions, and performed amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, using 44 strains representative of the five recognized forms of citrus canker. Under stringent DNA reassociation conditions (Tm - 15 degrees C), three distinct genotypes of citrus pathogens were revealed: taxon I included all "A" strains; taxon II contained all "B", "C", and "D" strains; and taxon III contained all "E" strains. The three citrus taxa showed less than 50% (mean) DNA-DNA relatedness to each other and less than 30% (mean) to X. campestris pv. campestris and X. axonopodis pv. axonopodis. Taxa I and II strains share over 70% DNA relatedness to X. campestris pv. malvacearum and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans, respectively (at Tm - 15 degrees C). Taxon III strains share 70% relatedness to X. campestris pv. alfalfae. Previous and present phenotypic data support these DNA reassociation data. Taxon II strains grow more slowly on agar media than taxa I and III strains. Taxa I and III strains utilize maltose, and liquefy gelatin whereas taxon II strains do not. Taxon I strains hydrolyze pectate (pH 7.0) whereas Taxon II strains do not. Taxon III strains utilize raffinose whereas Taxon I strains do not. Each taxon can be differentiated by serology and pathogenicity. We propose taxa I, II, and III citrus strains be named

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citrumelo F1, which causes citrus bacterial spot disease, and related strains provides insights into virulence and host specificity.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Neha; Aritua, Valente; Kumar, Dibyendu; Yu, Fahong; Jones, Jeffrey B; Graham, James H; Setubal, João C; Wang, Nian

    2011-11-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citrumelo is a citrus pathogen causing citrus bacterial spot disease that is geographically restricted within the state of Florida. Illumina, 454 sequencing, and optical mapping were used to obtain a complete genome sequence of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo strain F1, 4.9 Mb in size. The strain lacks plasmids, in contrast to other citrus Xanthomonas pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this pathogen is very close to the tomato bacterial spot pathogen X. campestris pv. vesicatoria 85-10, with a completely different host range. We also compared X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo to the genome of citrus canker pathogen X. axonopodis pv. citri 306. Comparative genomic analysis showed differences in several gene clusters, like those for type III effectors, the type IV secretion system, lipopolysaccharide synthesis, and others. In addition to pthA, effectors such as xopE3, xopAI, and hrpW were absent from X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo while present in X. axonopodis pv. citri. These effectors might be responsible for survival and the low virulence of this pathogen on citrus compared to that of X. axonopodis pv. citri. We also identified unique effectors in X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo that may be related to the different host range as compared to that of X. axonopodis pv. citri. X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo also lacks various genes, such as syrE1, syrE2, and RTX toxin family genes, which were present in X. axonopodis pv. citri. These may be associated with the distinct virulences of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo and X. axonopodis pv. citri. Comparison of the complete genome sequence of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo to those of X. axonopodis pv. citri and X. campestris pv. vesicatoria provides valuable insights into the mechanism of bacterial virulence and host specificity.

  3. Comparative genomic analysis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citrumelo F1, which causes citrus bacterial spot disease, and related strains provides insights into virulence and host specificity.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Neha; Aritua, Valente; Kumar, Dibyendu; Yu, Fahong; Jones, Jeffrey B; Graham, James H; Setubal, João C; Wang, Nian

    2011-11-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citrumelo is a citrus pathogen causing citrus bacterial spot disease that is geographically restricted within the state of Florida. Illumina, 454 sequencing, and optical mapping were used to obtain a complete genome sequence of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo strain F1, 4.9 Mb in size. The strain lacks plasmids, in contrast to other citrus Xanthomonas pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this pathogen is very close to the tomato bacterial spot pathogen X. campestris pv. vesicatoria 85-10, with a completely different host range. We also compared X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo to the genome of citrus canker pathogen X. axonopodis pv. citri 306. Comparative genomic analysis showed differences in several gene clusters, like those for type III effectors, the type IV secretion system, lipopolysaccharide synthesis, and others. In addition to pthA, effectors such as xopE3, xopAI, and hrpW were absent from X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo while present in X. axonopodis pv. citri. These effectors might be responsible for survival and the low virulence of this pathogen on citrus compared to that of X. axonopodis pv. citri. We also identified unique effectors in X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo that may be related to the different host range as compared to that of X. axonopodis pv. citri. X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo also lacks various genes, such as syrE1, syrE2, and RTX toxin family genes, which were present in X. axonopodis pv. citri. These may be associated with the distinct virulences of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo and X. axonopodis pv. citri. Comparison of the complete genome sequence of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo to those of X. axonopodis pv. citri and X. campestris pv. vesicatoria provides valuable insights into the mechanism of bacterial virulence and host specificity. PMID:21908674

  4. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citrumelo F1, Which Causes Citrus Bacterial Spot Disease, and Related Strains Provides Insights into Virulence and Host Specificity ▿ #

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Neha; Aritua, Valente; Kumar, Dibyendu; Yu, Fahong; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Graham, James H.; Setubal, João C.; Wang, Nian

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citrumelo is a citrus pathogen causing citrus bacterial spot disease that is geographically restricted within the state of Florida. Illumina, 454 sequencing, and optical mapping were used to obtain a complete genome sequence of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo strain F1, 4.9 Mb in size. The strain lacks plasmids, in contrast to other citrus Xanthomonas pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this pathogen is very close to the tomato bacterial spot pathogen X. campestris pv. vesicatoria 85-10, with a completely different host range. We also compared X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo to the genome of citrus canker pathogen X. axonopodis pv. citri 306. Comparative genomic analysis showed differences in several gene clusters, like those for type III effectors, the type IV secretion system, lipopolysaccharide synthesis, and others. In addition to pthA, effectors such as xopE3, xopAI, and hrpW were absent from X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo while present in X. axonopodis pv. citri. These effectors might be responsible for survival and the low virulence of this pathogen on citrus compared to that of X. axonopodis pv. citri. We also identified unique effectors in X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo that may be related to the different host range as compared to that of X. axonopodis pv. citri. X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo also lacks various genes, such as syrE1, syrE2, and RTX toxin family genes, which were present in X. axonopodis pv. citri. These may be associated with the distinct virulences of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo and X. axonopodis pv. citri. Comparison of the complete genome sequence of X. axonopodis pv. citrumelo to those of X. axonopodis pv. citri and X. campestris pv. vesicatoria provides valuable insights into the mechanism of bacterial virulence and host specificity. PMID:21908674

  5. Transgenic expression of the rice Xa21 pattern-recognition receptor in banana (Musa sp.) confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Jaindra N; Lorenzen, Jim; Bahar, Ofir; Ronald, Pamela; Tripathi, Leena

    2014-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), is the most devastating disease of banana in east and central Africa. The spread of BXW threatens the livelihood of millions of African farmers who depend on banana for food security and income. There are no commercial chemicals, biocontrol agents or resistant cultivars available to control BXW. Here, we take advantage of the robust resistance conferred by the rice pattern-recognition receptor (PRR), XA21, to the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We identified a set of genes required for activation of Xa21-mediated immunity (rax) that were conserved in both Xoo and Xcm. Based on the conservation, we hypothesized that intergeneric transfer of Xa21 would confer resistance to Xcm. We evaluated 25 transgenic lines of the banana cultivar 'Gonja manjaya' (AAB) using a rapid bioassay and 12 transgenic lines in the glasshouse for resistance against Xcm. About 50% of the transgenic lines showed complete resistance to Xcm in both assays. In contrast, all of the nontransgenic control plants showed severe symptoms that progressed to complete wilting. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of the rice Xa21 gene in banana results in enhanced resistance against Xcm. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the feasibility of PRR gene transfer between monocotyledonous species and provides a valuable new tool for controlling the BXW pandemic of banana, a staple food for 100 million people in east Africa.

  6. Transgenic expression of the rice Xa21 pattern recognition receptor in banana (Musa sp.) confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Jaindra Nath; Lorenzen, Jim; Bahar, Ofir; Ronald, Pamela; Tripathi, Leena

    2014-01-01

    Summary Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm), is the most devastating disease of banana in east and central Africa. The spread of BXW threatens the livelihood of millions of African farmers who depend on banana for food security and income. There are no commercial chemicals, bio-control agents or resistant cultivars available to control BXW. Here we take advantage of the robust resistance conferred by the rice pattern recognition receptor (PRR), XA21, to the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). We identified a set of genes required for activation of Xa21 mediated immunity (rax) that were conserved in both Xoo and Xcm. Based on the conservation, we hypothesized that intergeneric transfer of Xa21 would confer resistance to Xcm. We evaluated 25 transgenic lines of the banana cultivar ‘Gonja manjaya’ (AAB) using a rapid bioassay and 12 transgenic plants in the glass house for resistance against Xcm. About fifty percent of the transgenic lines showed complete resistance to Xcm in both assays. In contrast, all of the non-transgenic control plants showed severe symptoms that progressed to complete wilting. These results indicate that the constitutive expression of the rice Xa21 gene in banana results in enhanced resistance against Xcm. Furthermore this work demonstrates the feasibility of PRR gene transfer between monocotyledonous species and provides a valuable new tool for controlling the BXW pandemic of banana, a staple food for 100 million people in east Africa. PMID:24612254

  7. Relationship between Symptom Development and Actual Sites of Infection in Leaves of Anthurium Inoculated with a Bioluminescent Strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. dieffenbachiae

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, R.; Fukui, H.; McElhaney, R.; Nelson, S. C.; Alvarez, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    The infection process of bacterial blight of anthurium was monitored with a bioluminescent strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. dieffenbachiae. The relationship between symptom expression on infected leaves (assessed visually) and the extent of bacterial movement within tissues (evaluated by bioluminescence emission) varied among anthurium cultivars. In several cultivars previously considered susceptible on the basis of symptom development alone, bacterial invasion of leaves extended far beyond the visually affected areas. In other cultivars previously considered resistant, bacterial invasion was restricted to areas with visible symptoms. In three cultivars previously considered resistant, leaves were extensively invaded by the bacterium, and yet few or no symptoms were seen on infected leaves. The pathogen was consistently recovered from leaf sections emitting bioluminescence but not from sections emitting no light. At an early stage of infection, no significant differences in the percentages of infected areas as determined by visual assessment were observed in any of the cultivars. However, differences among cultivars were detected by bioluminescence as the disease progressed, because bacterial invasion was not always accompanied by symptom expression. In susceptible cultivars, the advancing border of infection was 5 to 10 cm inward from the margins of the visible symptoms and often reached to the leaf petiole even when symptoms were visible in <10% of the total leaf area. Comparisons of anthurium cultivars in which a nondestructive method was used to quantify the severity of leaf infection by a bioluminescent pathogen have enabled us to evaluate susceptibility and resistance to bacterial blight accurately. Such evaluations will be of importance in breeding resistant cultivars for disease control. PMID:16535253

  8. Genomic Relatedness of Xanthomonas campestris Strains Causing Diseases of Citrus †

    PubMed Central

    Egel, D. S.; Graham, J. H.; Stall, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris strains that cause disease in citrus were compared by restriction endonuclease analysis of DNA fragments separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and by DNA reassociation. Strains of X. campestris pv. citrumelo, which cause citrus bacterial spot, were, on average, 88% related to each other by DNA reassociation, although these strains exhibited diverse restriction digest patterns. In contrast, strains of X. campestris pv. citri groups A and B, which cause canker A and canker B, respectively, had relatively homogeneous restriction digest patterns. The groups of strains causing these three different citrus diseases were examined by DNA reassociation and were found to be from 55 to 63% related to one another. Several pathovars of X. campestris, previously shown to cause weakly aggressive symptoms on citrus, ranged from 83 to 90% similar to X. campestris pv. citrumelo by DNA reassociation. The type strain of X. campestris pv. campestris ranged from 30 to 40% similar in DNA reassociation experiments to strains of X. campestris pv. citrumelo and X. campestris pv. citri groups A and B. Whereas DNA reassociation quantified the difference between relatively unrelated groups of bacterial strains, restriction endonuclease analysis distinguished between closely related strains. Images PMID:16348555

  9. Unconventional membrane lipid biosynthesis in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Narberhaus, Franz

    2015-09-01

    All bacteria are surrounded by at least one bilayer membrane mainly composed of phospholipids (PLs). Biosynthesis of the most abundant PLs phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipin (CL) is well understood in model bacteria such as Escherichia coli. It recently emerged, however, that the diversity of bacterial membrane lipids is huge and that not yet explored biosynthesis pathways exist, even for the common PLs. A good example is the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. It contains PE, PG and CL as major lipids and small amounts of the N-methylated PE derivatives monomethyl PE and phosphatidylcholine (PC = trimethylated PE). Xanthomonas campestris uses a repertoire of canonical and non-canonical enzymes for the synthesis of its membrane lipids. In this minireview, we briefly recapitulate standard pathways and integrate three recently discovered pathways into the overall picture of bacterial membrane biosynthesis.

  10. The Xanthomonas campestris Type III Effector XopJ Proteolytically Degrades Proteasome Subunit RPT61[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many animal and plant pathogenic bacteria inject type III effector (T3E) proteins into their eukaryotic host cells to suppress immunity. The Yersinia outer protein J (YopJ) family of T3Es is a widely distributed family of effector proteins found in both animal and plant pathogens, and its members are highly diversified in virulence functions. Some members have been shown to possess acetyltransferase activity; however, whether this is a general feature of YopJ family T3Es is currently unknown. The T3E Xanthomonas outer protein J (XopJ), a YopJ family effector from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria, interacts with the proteasomal subunit Regulatory Particle AAA-ATPase6 (RPT6) in planta to suppress proteasome activity, resulting in the inhibition of salicylic acid-related immune responses. Here, we show that XopJ has protease activity to specifically degrade RPT6, leading to reduced proteasome activity in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. Proteolytic degradation of RPT6 was dependent on the localization of XopJ to the plasma membrane as well as on its catalytic triad. Mutation of the Walker B motif of RPT6 prevented XopJ-mediated degradation of the protein but not XopJ interaction. This indicates that the interaction of RPT6 with XopJ is dependent on the ATP-binding activity of RPT6, but proteolytic cleavage additionally requires its ATPase activity. Inhibition of the proteasome impairs the proteasomal turnover of Nonexpressor of Pathogenesis-Related1 (NPR1), the master regulator of salicylic acid responses, leading to the accumulation of ubiquitinated NPR1, which likely interferes with the full induction of NPR1 target genes. Our results show that YopJ family T3Es are not only highly diversified in virulence function but also appear to possess different biochemical activities. PMID:25739698

  11. The host plant metabolite glucose is the precursor of diffusible signal factor (DSF) family signals in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yinyue; Liu, Xiaoling; Wu, Ji'en; Lee, Jasmine; Chen, Shaohua; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid (diffusible signal factor [DSF]) as a cell-cell communication signal to regulate biofilm dispersal and virulence factor production. Previous studies have demonstrated that DSF biosynthesis is dependent on the presence of RpfF, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase, but the DSF synthetic mechanism and the influence of the host plant on DSF biosynthesis are still not clear. We show here that exogenous addition of host plant juice or ethanol extract to the growth medium of X. campestris pv. campestris could significantly boost DSF family signal production. It was subsequently revealed that X. campestris pv. campestris produces not only DSF but also BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) and another novel DSF family signal, which was designated DSF-II. BDSF was originally identified in Burkholderia cenocepacia to be involved in regulation of motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Functional analysis suggested that DSF-II plays a role equal to that of DSF in regulation of biofilm dispersion and virulence factor production in X. campestris pv. campestris. Furthermore, chromatographic separation led to identification of glucose as a specific molecule stimulating DSF family signal biosynthesis in X. campestris pv. campestris. (13)C-labeling experiments demonstrated that glucose acts as a substrate to provide a carbon element for DSF biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that X. campestris pv. campestris could utilize a common metabolite of the host plant to enhance DSF family signal synthesis and therefore promote virulence.

  12. The host plant metabolite glucose is the precursor of diffusible signal factor (DSF) family signals in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yinyue; Liu, Xiaoling; Wu, Ji'en; Lee, Jasmine; Chen, Shaohua; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid (diffusible signal factor [DSF]) as a cell-cell communication signal to regulate biofilm dispersal and virulence factor production. Previous studies have demonstrated that DSF biosynthesis is dependent on the presence of RpfF, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase, but the DSF synthetic mechanism and the influence of the host plant on DSF biosynthesis are still not clear. We show here that exogenous addition of host plant juice or ethanol extract to the growth medium of X. campestris pv. campestris could significantly boost DSF family signal production. It was subsequently revealed that X. campestris pv. campestris produces not only DSF but also BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) and another novel DSF family signal, which was designated DSF-II. BDSF was originally identified in Burkholderia cenocepacia to be involved in regulation of motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Functional analysis suggested that DSF-II plays a role equal to that of DSF in regulation of biofilm dispersion and virulence factor production in X. campestris pv. campestris. Furthermore, chromatographic separation led to identification of glucose as a specific molecule stimulating DSF family signal biosynthesis in X. campestris pv. campestris. (13)C-labeling experiments demonstrated that glucose acts as a substrate to provide a carbon element for DSF biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that X. campestris pv. campestris could utilize a common metabolite of the host plant to enhance DSF family signal synthesis and therefore promote virulence. PMID:25681189

  13. The Host Plant Metabolite Glucose Is the Precursor of Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) Family Signals in Xanthomonas campestris

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoling; Wu, Ji'en; Lee, Jasmine; Chen, Shaohua; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid (diffusible signal factor [DSF]) as a cell-cell communication signal to regulate biofilm dispersal and virulence factor production. Previous studies have demonstrated that DSF biosynthesis is dependent on the presence of RpfF, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase, but the DSF synthetic mechanism and the influence of the host plant on DSF biosynthesis are still not clear. We show here that exogenous addition of host plant juice or ethanol extract to the growth medium of X. campestris pv. campestris could significantly boost DSF family signal production. It was subsequently revealed that X. campestris pv. campestris produces not only DSF but also BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) and another novel DSF family signal, which was designated DSF-II. BDSF was originally identified in Burkholderia cenocepacia to be involved in regulation of motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Functional analysis suggested that DSF-II plays a role equal to that of DSF in regulation of biofilm dispersion and virulence factor production in X. campestris pv. campestris. Furthermore, chromatographic separation led to identification of glucose as a specific molecule stimulating DSF family signal biosynthesis in X. campestris pv. campestris. 13C-labeling experiments demonstrated that glucose acts as a substrate to provide a carbon element for DSF biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that X. campestris pv. campestris could utilize a common metabolite of the host plant to enhance DSF family signal synthesis and therefore promote virulence. PMID:25681189

  14. Molecular signals required for type III secretion and translocation of the Xanthomonas campestris AvrBs2 protein to pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Mudgett, M B; Chesnokova, O; Dahlbeck, D; Clark, E T; Rossier, O; Bonas, U; Staskawicz, B J

    2000-11-21

    Strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) carrying avrBs2 are specifically recognized by Bs2 pepper plants, resulting in localized cell death and plant resistance. Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of the Xcv avrBs2 gene in plant cells results in Bs2-dependent cell death, indicating that the AvrBs2 protein alone is sufficient for the activation of disease resistance-mediated cell death in planta. We now provide evidence that AvrBs2 is secreted from Xcv and that secretion is type III (hrp) dependent. N- and C-terminal deletion analysis of AvrBs2 has identified the effector domain of AvrBs2 recognized by Bs2 pepper plants. By using a truncated Pseudomonas syringae AvrRpt2 effector reporter devoid of type III signal sequences, we have localized the minimal region of AvrBs2 required for type III secretion in Xcv. Furthermore, we have identified the region of AvrBs2 required for both type III secretion and translocation to host plants. The mapping of AvrBs2 sequences sufficient for type III delivery also revealed the presence of a potential mRNA secretion signal. PMID:11078519

  15. The Xanthomonas campestris Type III Effector XopJ Targets the Host Cell Proteasome to Suppress Salicylic-Acid Mediated Plant Defence

    PubMed Central

    Börnke, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) requires type III effector proteins (T3Es) for virulence. After translocation into the host cell, T3Es are thought to interact with components of host immunity to suppress defence responses. XopJ is a T3E protein from Xcv that interferes with plant immune responses; however, its host cellular target is unknown. Here we show that XopJ interacts with the proteasomal subunit RPT6 in yeast and in planta to inhibit proteasome activity. A C235A mutation within the catalytic triad of XopJ as well as a G2A exchange within the N-terminal myristoylation motif abolishes the ability of XopJ to inhibit the proteasome. Xcv ΔxopJ mutants are impaired in growth and display accelerated symptom development including tissue necrosis on susceptible pepper leaves. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 restored the ability of the Xcv ΔxopJ to attenuate the development of leaf necrosis. The XopJ dependent delay of tissue degeneration correlates with reduced levels of salicylic acid (SA) and changes in defence- and senescence-associated gene expression. Necrosis upon infection with Xcv ΔxopJ was greatly reduced in pepper plants with reduced expression of NPR1, a central regulator of SA responses, demonstrating the involvement of SA-signalling in the development of XopJ dependent phenotypes. Our results suggest that XopJ-mediated inhibition of the proteasome interferes with SA-dependent defence response to attenuate onset of necrosis and to alter host transcription. A central role of the proteasome in plant defence is discussed. PMID:23785289

  16. Characterization of Xanthomonas campestris Pathovars by rRNA Gene Restriction Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Yvette; Verdier, Valérie; Guesdon, Jean-Luc; Chevrier, Danièle; Denis, Jean-Baptiste; Decoux, Guy; Lemattre, Monique

    1993-01-01

    Genomic DNA of 191 strains of the family Pseudomonadaceae, including 187 strains of the genus Xanthomonas, was cleaved by EcoRI endonuclease. After hybridization of Southern transfer blots with 2-acetylamino-fluorene-labelled Escherichia coli 16+23S rRNA probe, 27 different patterns were obtained. The strains are clearly distinguishable at the genus, species, and pathovar levels. The variability of the rRNA gene restriction patterns was determined for four pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris species. The 16 strains of X. campestris pv. begoniae analyzed gave only one pattern. The variability of rRNA gene restriction patterns of X. campestris pv. manihotis strains could be related to ecotypes. In contrast, the variability of patterns observed for X. campestris pv. malvacearum was not correlated with pathogenicity or with the geographical origins of the strains. The highest degree of variability of DNA fingerprints was observed within X. campestris pv. dieffenbachiae, which is pathogenic to several hosts of the Araceae family. In this case, variability was related to both host plant and pathogenicity. Images PMID:16348894

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Xanthomonas vesicatoria Strains from the Balkan Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Vancheva, Taca; Bogatzevska, Nevena; Moncheva, Penka; Lefeuvre, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas vesicatoria causes bacterial spot disease of pepper and tomato plants. We report here the first genome sequences of X. vesicatoria strains that have been isolated from pepper plants. These data will be used for comparative genomics and will allow the development of new detection and typing tools for epidemiological surveillance. PMID:25676765

  18. Use of bioluminescence for detection of genetically engineered microorganisms released into the environment. [Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.J.; Dane, F.; Geiger, D.; Kloepper, J.W. )

    1992-01-01

    The persistence and movement of strain JS414 of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which was genetically engineered to bioluminesce, were monitored during a limited field introduction. Bioluminescence and traditional dilution plate counts were determined. Strain JS414 was applied to cabbage plants and surrounding soil by mist inoculation, by wound inoculation, by scattering infested debris among plants, and by incorporating bacteria into the soil. Bioluminescent X. campestris pv. campestris was detected in plant samples and in the rhizosphere up to 6 weeks after inoculation. Movement to uninoculated plants was detected on one occasion, but movement from the immediate release area was not detected. Strain JS414 was detected in soil samples beneath mist- and wound-inoculated plants only at intentionally infested locations and in aerial samples only on the day of inoculation. The authors bioluminescence methods proved to be as sensitive as plating methods for detecting the genetically engineered microorganisms in environmental samples. Their results demonstrate that transgenic incorporation of the luxCDABE operon provides a non-labor-intensive, sensitive detection method for monitoring genetically engineered microorganisms in nature.

  19. [Xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris in a non-conventional culture medium].

    PubMed

    Azuaje, R A; Sánchez, J A

    1999-01-01

    Among 3 varieties of Xanthomonas campestris, the variety ocumo (X. campestris pv. ocumo), showed the greatest capacity for producing xanthan. This bacteria grows appropriately and produces this polysaccharide in a wide diversity of carbohydrate sources. However, this strain does not produce xanthan when the carbohydrate comes from lignocellulosic materials. The glucose syrup FAVEPRO was the carbon source that showed the best yield (23 g/l) with the greatest viscosity (7000 cps) of xanthan. The optimum production conditions in 1 L erlenmeyer flasks, with a working volume of 0.2 L and in a 14 L (stirred tank type bioreactor) with a working volume of 10 L, were the following: total sugar 5%, urea 0.05%, di-potassium hydrogen phosphate 0.5%, pH 7.5, inoculum 10%, temperature 30 degrees C, agitation 250-1000 rpm and aereation 0.3-1.0 vvm. This strain of X. campestris pv. ocumo was able to produce xanthan (10 g/l) in a culture medium based on a previously treated agricultural waste, called soluble acid extract of cassava bark. The viscosity of this medium increased up to 1500 cps.

  20. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a putative multiple antibiotic resistance repressor protein (MarR) from Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Zhi-Le; Li, Juo-Ning; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Shr, Hui-Lin; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Gao, Fei Philip; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2005-07-01

    A putative repressor for the multiple antibiotic resistance operon from a plant pathogen X. campestris pv. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.3 Å with good quality. The multiple antibiotic resistance operon (marRAB) is a member of the multidrug-resistance system. When induced, this operon enhances resistance of bacteria to a variety of medically important antibiotics, causing a serious global health problem. MarR is a marR-encoded protein that represses the transcription of the marRAB operon. Through binding with salicylate and certain antibiotics, however, MarR can derepress and activate the marRAB operon. In this report, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC1739, a putative MarR repressor protein present in the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, a Gram-negative bacterium causing major worldwide disease of cruciferous crops, are described. The XC1739 crystals diffracted to a resolution of at least 1.8 Å. They are orthorhombic and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 39.5, b = 54.2 and c = 139.5 Å, respectively. They contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit from calculation of the self-rotation function.

  1. Functional Analysis of the Ferric Uptake Regulator Gene fur in Xanthomonas vesicatoria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiqin; Dong, Chunling; Zhao, Tingchang; Han, Jucai; Wang, Tieling; Wen, Xiangzhen; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the function of the fur gene in Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Xv), we generated a fur mutant strain, fur-m, by site-directed mutagenesis. Whereas siderophore production increased in the Xv fur mutant, extracellular polysaccharide production, biofilm formation, swimming ability and quorum sensing signals were all significantly decreased. The fur mutant also had significantly reduced virulence in tomato leaves. The above-mentioned phenotypes significantly recovered when the Xv fur mutation allele was complemented with a wild-type fur gene. Thus, Fur either negatively or positively regulates multiple important physiological functions in Xv. PMID:26910324

  2. Functional Analysis of the Ferric Uptake Regulator Gene fur in Xanthomonas vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiqin; Dong, Chunling; Zhao, Tingchang; Han, Jucai; Wang, Tieling; Wen, Xiangzhen; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the function of the fur gene in Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Xv), we generated a fur mutant strain, fur-m, by site-directed mutagenesis. Whereas siderophore production increased in the Xv fur mutant, extracellular polysaccharide production, biofilm formation, swimming ability and quorum sensing signals were all significantly decreased. The fur mutant also had significantly reduced virulence in tomato leaves. The above-mentioned phenotypes significantly recovered when the Xv fur mutation allele was complemented with a wild-type fur gene. Thus, Fur either negatively or positively regulates multiple important physiological functions in Xv.

  3. Functional Analysis of the Ferric Uptake Regulator Gene fur in Xanthomonas vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiqin; Dong, Chunling; Zhao, Tingchang; Han, Jucai; Wang, Tieling; Wen, Xiangzhen; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the function of the fur gene in Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Xv), we generated a fur mutant strain, fur-m, by site-directed mutagenesis. Whereas siderophore production increased in the Xv fur mutant, extracellular polysaccharide production, biofilm formation, swimming ability and quorum sensing signals were all significantly decreased. The fur mutant also had significantly reduced virulence in tomato leaves. The above-mentioned phenotypes significantly recovered when the Xv fur mutation allele was complemented with a wild-type fur gene. Thus, Fur either negatively or positively regulates multiple important physiological functions in Xv. PMID:26910324

  4. Characterization of the GntR family regulator HpaR1 of the crucifer black rot pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hui-Zhao; Wu, Liu; Qi, Yan-Hua; Liu, Guo-Fang; Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The GntR family transcription regulator HpaR1 identified from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris has been previously shown to positively regulate the genes responsible for hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity and to autorepress its own expression. Here, we demonstrated that HpaR1 is a global regulator that positively regulates diverse biological processes, including xanthan polysaccharide production, extracellular enzyme activity, cell motility and tolerance to various stresses. To investigate the regulatory mechanisms of HpaR1, we began with xanthan polysaccharide production, which is governed by a cluster of gum genes. These are directed by the gumB promoter. Disruption of HpaR1 significantly reduced gumB transcription and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that HpaR1 interacts directly with gumB promoter. DNase I footprint analysis revealed that HpaR1 and RNA polymerase were bound to the sequences extending from −21 to +10 and −41 to +29 relative to the transcription initiation site of gumB, respectively. Furthermore, in vitro transcription assays showed that HpaR1 facilitated the binding of RNA polymerase to gumB promoter, leading to an enhancement of its transcription. These results suggest that HpaR1 regulates gumB transcription via a mechanism similar but different to what was found, until now, to only be used by some MerR family transcription activators. PMID:26818230

  5. A SNP Haplotype Associated with a gene resistant to Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. malvacearum in Upland Cotton (Gossyium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An F5 population of 285 families with each tracing back to a different F2 plant , derived from a cotton bacterial blight resistant line ‘DeltaOpal’ and a susceptible line ‘DP388’, was artificially inoculated with bacterial blight race 18 (Xanthomonas campestris pv. Malvacearum) to assay their resist...

  6. A functional 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathway in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris is required for full pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Yuan; Zhou, Lian; Chen, Bo; Sun, Shuang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ming; Tang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Plants contain significant levels of natural phenolic compounds essential for reproduction and growth, as well as defense mechanisms against pathogens. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of crucifers black rot. Here we showed that genes required for the synthesis, utilization, transportation, and degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) are present in Xcc. Xcc rapidly degrades 4-HBA, but has no effect on 2-hydroxybenzoate and 3-hydroxybenzoate when grown in XOLN medium. The genes for 4-HBA degradation are organized in a superoperonic cluster. Bioinformatics, biochemical, and genetic data showed that 4-HBA is hydroxylated by 4-HBA 3-hydroxylase (PobA), which is encoded by Xcc0356, to yield PCA. The resulting PCA is further metabolized via the PCA branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway, including Xcc0364, Xcc0365, and PcaFHGBDCR. Xcc0364 and Xcc0365 encode a new form of β-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase that is required for 4-HBA degradation. pobA expression was induced by 4-HBA via the transcriptional activator, PobR. Radish and cabbage hydrolysates contain 2-HBA, 3-HBA, 4-HBA, and other phenolic compounds. Addition of radish and cabbage hydrolysates to Xcc culture significantly induced the expression of pobA via PobR. The 4-HBA degradation pathway is required for full pathogenicity of Xcc in radish. PMID:26672484

  7. [Flavonoids of Artemisia campestris, ssp. glutinosa].

    PubMed

    Hurabielle, M; Eberle, J; Paris, M

    1982-10-01

    Four flavanones (pinostrobin, pinocembrin, sakuranetin and naringenin), one dihydroflavonol (7-methyl aromadendrin) and one flavone (hispidulin) have been isolated from Artemisia campestris L. ssp. glutinosa Gay and identified by spectroscopic methods. Artemisia campestris L. sous-espèce glutinosa Gay est une Composée Anthémidée largement répandue sur les sables du littoral méditerranéean et abondante dans certaines régions d'Espagne et d'Italie. Dans le cadre d'une étude chimiotaxonomique du genre Artemisia Tourn., nous nous sommes intéressés à l'analyse des flavonoïdes, composés jamais décrits, à notre connaissance, dans cette espèce d' Artemisia. Les sommités fleuries d' Artemisia campestris sous-espèce glutinosa, séchées et pulvérisées, sont dégraissées à l'ether de pétrole et épuisées par le chloroforme. Le fractionnement de l'extrait chloroformique, par chromatographie sur colonne de silice, et la purification de certaines fractions conduisent à l'isolement de six génines flavoniques, à l'etat pur. L' étude des spectres UV, des spectres de masse et des spectres de RMN [1,2] et la comparaison avec des échantillons authentiques permettent de proposer, pour ces flavonoïdes, les structures de la pinostrobine [3], de la pinocembrine [4], de la sakuranétine, de la naringénine [5] (flavanones), de la méthyl-7-aromadendrine, [6, 7] (dihydroflavonol) et de l'hispiduline [8, 9] (flavone); quatre de ces génines sont méthylées. Parmi ces flavonoïdes, la pinostrobine n'a jamais été décrite, à notre connaissance, dans la famille des Composées; la pinocembrine, la sakuranétine et la naringénine ont déjà été signalées chez quelques Astéracées et Eupatoriées [10], et l'hispiduline dans la tribu des Anthémidées ( Santolina chamaecyparissus L.) [8]. Seule, la méthyl-7-aromadendrine semble décrite, à ce jour, dans le genre Artemisia Tourn. [7].

  8. Construction of a genetic linkage map for identification of molecular markers associated with resistance to Xanthomonas arboriciola pv. pruni in peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial spot, caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni, is a serious disease that can affect peach fruit quality and production. The molecular basis of its tolerance and susceptibility is yet to be understood. To study the genetics of the peach in response to bacterial spot, an F2 population of ...

  9. Supported PV module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Mascolo, Gianluigi; Taggart, David F.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Edgett, Christopher S.

    2013-10-15

    A supported PV assembly may include a PV module comprising a PV panel and PV module supports including module supports having a support surface supporting the module, a module registration member engaging the PV module to properly position the PV module on the module support, and a mounting element. In some embodiments the PV module registration members engage only the external surfaces of the PV modules at the corners. In some embodiments the assembly includes a wind deflector with ballast secured to a least one of the PV module supports and the wind deflector. An array of the assemblies can be secured to one another at their corners to prevent horizontal separation of the adjacent corners while permitting the PV modules to flex relative to one another so to permit the array of PV modules to follow a contour of the support surface.

  10. Detection of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni by PCR using primers based on DNA sequences related to the hrp genes.

    PubMed

    Park, So Yeon; Lee, Young Sun; Koh, Young Jin; Hur, Jae-Sun; Jung, Jae Sung

    2010-10-01

    Efficient control of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni, the causal agent of bacterial spot on stone fruit, requires a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool. A PCR detection method that utilizes primers to target the hrp gene cluster region was developed in this study. The nucleotide sequence of the PCR product amplified with primers specific for the hrp region of the xanthomonads and genomic DNA of X. arboricola pv. pruni was determined, and the sequence was aligned with that of X. campestris pv. campestris, which was obtained from the GenBank database. On the basis of the sequence of the amplified hrp region, a PCR primer set of XapF/R specific to X. arboricola pv. pruni was designed. This primer set yielded a 243-bp product from the genomic DNA of X. aboricola pv. pruni strains, but no products from other 21 strains of Xanthomonas or from two epiphytic bacterial species. Southern blot hybridization with the probe derived from the PCR product with the primer set and X. aboricola pv. pruni DNA confirmed the PCR results. The Xap primer system was successfully applied to detect the pathogen from infected peach fruits. When it was applied in field samples, the primer set was proved as a reliable diagnostic tool for specific detection of X. aboricola pv. pruni from peach orchards. PMID:21046331

  11. Induced polyploidization in Brassica campestris L. (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Kumar, G; Dwivedi, K

    2014-01-01

    Present experimental design has been made up to obtain crop with higher ploidy level via synthetic polyploidization. Since ploidy manipulation is generally associated with the obtainment of some increased enviable traits of the crop and also provides them greater adaptability to unfavorable or harsh circumstances as compared to its diploids counterparts. Thus, herein present research autotetraploids of Brassica campestris L. have been lucratively achieved by the application of colchicine. Two methods of treatment were utilized i.e. seed treatment and seedling treatment. No polyploidy could be obtained through seed treatment while seedling treatment responded well towards polyploidy. However, the status of autotetraploidy has been confirmed by cytomorphological investigations of treated plants as against its diploids counterparts. For the purpose, morphological parameters such as increased stomata size, pollen diameter, flower size, reproductive organs whereas reduction in plant height, leaf length, leaf breadth, stomata frequency, number of flowers/inflorescence etc. were appraised. Further, cytological observations were made that had clearly revealed the doubling of genome in the autotetraploids as compared to diploids. Meanwhile, pollen fertility and size of pollen grains were evaluated as well. PMID:24818510

  12. Quantitative disease resistance to the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris involves an Arabidopsis immune receptor pair and a gene of unknown function.

    PubMed

    Debieu, Marilyne; Huard-Chauveau, Carine; Genissel, Anne; Roux, Fabrice; Roby, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    Although quantitative disease resistance (QDR) is a durable and broad-spectrum form of resistance in plants, the identification of the genes underlying QDR is still in its infancy. RKS1 (Resistance related KinaSe1) has been reported recently to confer QDR in Arabidopsis thaliana to most but not all races of the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). We therefore explored the genetic bases of QDR in A. thaliana to diverse races of X. campestris (Xc). A nested genome-wide association mapping approach was used to finely map the genomic regions associated with QDR to Xcc12824 (race 2) and XccCFBP6943 (race 6). To identify the gene(s) implicated in QDR, insertional mutants (T-DNA) were selected for the candidate genes and phenotyped in response to Xc. We identified two major QTLs that confer resistance specifically to Xcc12824 and XccCFBP6943. Although QDR to Xcc12824 is conferred by At5g22540 encoding for a protein of unknown function, QDR to XccCFBP6943 involves the well-known immune receptor pair RRS1/RPS4. In addition to RKS1, this study reveals that three genes are involved in resistance to Xc with strikingly different ranges of specificity, suggesting that QDR to Xc involves a complex network integrating multiple response pathways triggered by distinct pathogen molecular determinants.

  13. Controlled synthesis of the DSF cell-cell signal is required for biofilm formation and virulence in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Torres, Pablo S; Malamud, Florencia; Rigano, Luciano A; Russo, Daniela M; Marano, María Rosa; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Bouarab, Kamal; Dow, John Maxwell; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2007-08-01

    Virulence of the black rot pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is regulated by cell-cell signalling involving the diffusible signal factor DSF. Synthesis and perception of DSF require products of genes within the rpf cluster (for regulation of pathogenicity factors). RpfF directs DSF synthesis whereas RpfC and RpfG are involved in DSF perception. Here we have examined the role of the rpf/DSF system in biofilm formation in minimal medium using confocal laser-scanning microscopy of GFP-labelled bacteria. Wild-type Xcc formed microcolonies that developed into a structured biofilm. In contrast, an rpfF mutant (DSF-minus) and an rpfC mutant (DSF overproducer) formed only unstructured arrangements of bacteria. A gumB mutant, defective in xanthan biosynthesis, was also unable to develop the typical wild-type biofilm. Mixed cultures of gumB and rpfF mutants formed a typical biofilm in vitro. In contrast, in mixed cultures the rpfC mutant prevented the formation of the structured biofilm by the wild-type and did not restore wild-type biofilm phenotypes to gumB or rpfF mutants. These effects on structured biofilm formation were correlated with growth and disease development by Xcc strains in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These findings suggest that DSF signalling is finely balanced during both biofilm formation and virulence. PMID:17635553

  14. Controlled synthesis of the DSF cell–cell signal is required for biofilm formation and virulence in Xanthomonas campestris

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Pablo S; Malamud, Florencia; Rigano, Luciano A; Russo, Daniela M; Marano, María Rosa; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Bouarab, Kamal; Dow, John Maxwell; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2007-01-01

    Virulence of the black rot pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is regulated by cell–cell signalling involving the diffusible signal factor DSF. Synthesis and perception of DSF require products of genes within the rpf cluster (for regulation of pathogenicity factors). RpfF directs DSF synthesis whereas RpfC and RpfG are involved in DSF perception. Here we have examined the role of the rpf/DSF system in biofilm formation in minimal medium using confocal laser-scanning microscopy of GFP-labelled bacteria. Wild-type Xcc formed microcolonies that developed into a structured biofilm. In contrast, an rpfF mutant (DSF-minus) and an rpfC mutant (DSF overproducer) formed only unstructured arrangements of bacteria. A gumB mutant, defective in xanthan biosynthesis, was also unable to develop the typical wild-type biofilm. Mixed cultures of gumB and rpfF mutants formed a typical biofilm in vitro. In contrast, in mixed cultures the rpfC mutant prevented the formation of the structured biofilm by the wild-type and did not restore wild-type biofilm phenotypes to gumB or rpfF mutants. These effects on structured biofilm formation were correlated with growth and disease development by Xcc strains in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These findings suggest that DSF signalling is finely balanced during both biofilm formation and virulence. PMID:17635553

  15. Applying DNA affinity chromatography to specifically screen for sucrose-related DNA-binding transcriptional regulators of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Leßmeier, Lennart; Alkhateeb, Rabeaa S; Schulte, Fabian; Steffens, Tim; Loka, Tobias Pascal; Pühler, Alfred; Niehaus, Karsten; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg

    2016-08-20

    At a molecular level, the regulation of many important cellular processes is still obscure in xanthomonads, a bacterial group of outstanding relevance as world-wide plant pathogens and important for biotechnology as producers of the polysaccharide xanthan. Transcriptome analysis indicated a sucrose-dependent regulation of 18 genes in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) B100. The expression of 12 of these genes was clearly increased in the presence of sucrose. Only part of these genes was obviously involved in sucrose utilization. To identify regulatory proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, a DNA fragment-specific pull-down approach was established for Xcc. Putative promoter regions were identified and used to isolate DNA-binding proteins, which were separated by SDS PAGE and identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. This led to the identification of four transcriptional regulators, among them the global transcriptional regulator Clp and a previously identified regulator of sucrose utilization, SuxR, plus a third DNA-binding transcriptional regulator encoded by xcc-b100_2861 and recently shown to interact with a cyclic di-GMP-binding protein. The fourth regulatory protein was encoded by xcc-b100_2791. These results indicate DNA fragment-specific pull-down experiments as promising approaches to screen for specific DNA-binding regulatory proteins in Xcc. PMID:27060555

  16. The molybdate-binding protein (ModA) of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Balan, Andrea; Santacruz, Carolina P; Moutran, Alexandre; Ferreira, Rita C C; Medrano, Francisco J; Pérez, Carlos A; Ramos, Carlos H I; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2006-12-01

    The modABC operon of phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. citri) encodes a putative ABC transporter involved in the uptake of the molybdate and tungstate anions. Sequence analyses showed high similarity values of ModA orthologs found in X. campestris pv. campestris (X. campestris) and Escherichia coli. The X. citri modA gene was cloned in pET28a and the recombinant protein, expressed in the E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain, purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The purified protein remained soluble and specifically bound molybdate and tungstate with K(d) 0.29+/-0.12 microM and 0.58+/-0.14 microM, respectively. Additionally binding of molybdate drastically enhanced the thermal stability of the recombinant ModA as compared to the apoprotein. This is the first characterization of a ModA ortholog expressed by a phytopathogen and represents an important tool for functional, biochemical and structural analyses of molybdate transport in Xanthomonas species.

  17. Energy 101: Solar PV

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems can generate clean, cost-effective power anywhere the sun shines. This video shows how a PV panel converts the energy of the sun into renewable electricity to power homes and businesses.

  18. Energy 101: Solar PV

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems can generate clean, cost-effective power anywhere the sun shines. This video shows how a PV panel converts the energy of the sun into renewable electricity to power homes and businesses.

  19. Xanthomonas campestris overcomes Arabidopsis stomatal innate immunity through a DSF cell-to-cell signal-regulated virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2009-02-01

    Pathogen-induced stomatal closure is part of the plant innate immune response. Phytopathogens using stomata as a way of entry into the leaf must avoid the stomatal response of the host. In this article, we describe a factor secreted by the bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) capable of interfering with stomatal closure induced by bacteria or abscisic acid (ABA). We found that living Xcc, as well as ethyl acetate extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, are capable of reverting stomatal closure induced by bacteria, lipopolysaccharide, or ABA. Xcc ethyl acetate extracts also complemented the infectivity of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) mutants deficient in the production of the coronatine toxin, which is required to overcome stomatal defense. By contrast, the rpfF and rpfC mutant strains of Xcc, which are unable to respectively synthesize or perceive a diffusible molecule involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling, were incapable of reverting stomatal closure, indicating that suppression of stomatal response by Xcc requires an intact rpf/diffusible signal factor system. In addition, we found that guard cell-specific Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3 (MPK3) antisense mutants were unresponsive to bacteria or lipopolysaccharide in promotion of stomatal closure, and also more sensitive to Pst coronatine-deficient mutants, showing that MPK3 is required for stomatal immune response. Additionally, we found that, unlike in wild-type Arabidopsis, ABA-induced stomatal closure in MPK3 antisense mutants is not affected by Xcc or by extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, suggesting that the Xcc factor might target some signaling component in the same pathway as MPK3. PMID:19091877

  20. Expression and Functional Roles of the Pepper Pathogen-Induced bZIP Transcription Factor CabZIP2 in Enhanced Disease Resistance to Bacterial Pathogen Infection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Baek, Woonhee; Lim, Sohee; Han, Sang-Wook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-07-01

    A pepper bZIP transcription factor gene, CabZIP2, was isolated from pepper leaves infected with a virulent strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. Transient expression analysis of the CabZIP2-GFP fusion protein in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed that the CabZIP2 protein is localized in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus. The acidic domain in the N-terminal region of CabZIP2 that is fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain is required to activate the transcription of reporter genes in yeast. Transcription of CabZIP2 is induced in pepper plants inoculated with virulent or avirulent strains of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. The CabZIP2 gene is also induced by defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethylene. To elucidate the in vivo function of the CabZIP2 gene in plant defense, virus-induced gene silencing in pepper and overexpression in Arabidopsis were used. CabZIP2-silenced pepper plants were susceptible to infection by the virulent strain of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, which was accompanied by reduced expression of defense-related genes such as CaBPR1 and CaAMP1. CabZIP2 overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Together, these results suggest that CabZIP2 is involved in bacterial disease resistance.

  1. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  2. Xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris using whey permeate medium.

    PubMed

    Savvides, A L; Katsifas, E A; Hatzinikolaou, D G; Karagouni, A D

    2012-08-01

    Xanthan gum is a polysaccharide that is widely used as stabilizer and thickener with many industrial applications in food industry. Our aim was to estimate the ability of Xanthomonas campestris ATCC 13951 for the production of xanthan gum by using whey as a growth medium, a by-product of dairy industry. X. campestris ATCC 13951 has been studied in batch cultures using a complex medium for the determination of the optimal concentration of glucose, galactose and lactose. In addition, whey was used under various treatment procedures (de-proteinated, partially hydrolyzed by β-lactamase and partially hydrolyzed and de-proteinated) as culture medium, to study the production of xanthan in a 2 l bioreactor with constant stirring and aeration. A production of 28 g/l was obtained when partially hydrolysed β-lactamase was used, which proved to be one of the highest xanthan gum production reported so far. At the same time, an effort has been made for the control and selection of the most appropriate procedure for the preservation of the strain and its use as inoculant in batch cultures, without loss of its viability and its capability of xanthan gum production. The pre-treatment of whey (whey permeate medium hydrolyzed, WPH) was very important for the production of xanthan by the strain X. campestris ATCC 13951 during batch culture conditions in a 2 l bioreactor. Preservation methods such as lyophilization, cryopreservation at various glycerol solution and temperatures have been examined. The results indicated that the best preservation method for the producing strain X. campestris ATCC 13951 was the lyophilization. Taking into account that whey permeate is a low cost by-product of the dairy industry, the production of xanthan achieved under the studied conditions was considered very promising for industrial application. PMID:22806202

  3. PV Solar Radiometric Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.; Cannon, T.W.

    1997-02-01

    Radiometric measurements performed by the PV Solar Radiometric Measurements Task support NREL{close_quote}s centers for Measurements and Characterization, Performance Engineering and Reliability, and Renewable Energy Resources. The task provides characterization, measurements, testing, designs, and analysis of radiometric instrumentation and data for the performance of PV cells, modules, and systems. We describe recent characterization of the radiometric performance of pyranometers deployed for PV system testing at the NREL Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) and improvements undertaken in NREL broadband radiometer characterization. Typical measurement and calibration issues with diode array spectroradiometers used for absolute spectral measurements applied to PV performance and characterization are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Fuconate Dehydratase from Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Yew,W.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Rakus, J.; Pierce, R.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    Many members of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily have unknown functions. In this report the authors use both genome (operon) context and screening of a library of acid sugars to assign the L-fuconate dehydratase (FucD) function to a member of the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup of the superfamily encoded by the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. ATCC 33913 genome (GI: 21233491). Orthologues of FucD are found in both bacteria and eukaryotes, the latter including the rTS beta protein in Homo sapiens that has been implicated in regulating thymidylate synthase activity. As suggested by sequence alignments and confirmed by high-resolution structures in the presence of active site ligands, FucD and MR share the same active site motif of functional groups: three carboxylate ligands for the essential Mg2+ located at the ends of th third, fourth, and fifth-strands in the (/)7-barrel domain (Asp 248, Glu 274, and Glu 301, respectively), a Lys-x-Lys motif at the end of the second-strand (Lys 218 and Lys 220), a His-Asp dyad at the end of the seventh and sixth-strands (His 351 and Asp 324, respectively), and a Glue at the end of the eighth-strand (Glu 382). The mechanism of the FucD reaction involves initial abstraction of the 2-proton by Lys 220, acid catalysis of the vinylogous-elimination of the 3-OH group by His 351, and stereospecific ketonization of the resulting 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-fuconate product. Screening of the library of acid sugars revealed substrate and functional promiscuity: In addition to L-fuconate, FucD also catalyzes the dehydration of L-galactonate, D-arabinonate, D-altronate, L-talonate, and D-ribonate. The dehydrations of L-fuconate, L-galactonate, and D-arabinonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by Lys 220. The dehydrations of L-talonate and D-ribonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by His 351; however, protonation of the enediolate intermediates by the conjugate acid of Lys 220 yields L

  5. Effect of acidic electrolyzed water on the viability of bacterial and fungal plant pathogens and on bacterial spot disease of tomato.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, P A; Lazarovits, G

    2006-10-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water (AEW), known to have germicidal activity, was obtained after electrolysis of 0.045% aqueous solution of sodium chloride. Freshly prepared AEW (pH 2.3-2.6, oxidation-reduction potential 1007-1025 mV, and free active chlorine concentration 27-35 ppm) was tested in vitro and (or) on tomato foliage and seed surfaces for its effects on the viability of plant pathogen propagules that could be potential seed contaminants. Foliar sprays of AEW were tested against bacterial spot disease of tomato under greenhouse and field conditions. The viability of propagules of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (bacterial spot pathogen), Streptomyces scabies (potato scab pathogen), and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (root rot pathogen) was significantly reduced 4-8 log units within 2 min of exposure to AEW. Immersion of tomato seed from infected fruit in AEW for 1 and 3 min significantly reduced the populations of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria from the surface of the seed without affecting seed germination. Foliar sprays of AEW reduced X. campestris pv. vesicatoria populations and leaf spot severity on tomato foliage in the greenhouse. In the field, multiple sprays of AEW consistently reduced bacterial spot severity on tomato foliage. Disease incidence and severity was also reduced on fruit, but only in 2003. Fruit yield was either enhanced or not affected by the AEW sprays. These results indicate a potential use of AEW as a seed surface disinfectant or contact bactericide. PMID:17110959

  6. Effect of different fertilizers on nitrogen isotope composition and nitrate content of Brassica campestris.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuwei; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Zhiheng; Chen, Tianjin; Yang, Guiling; Wang, Qiang

    2012-02-15

    The effect of different fertilizers on the δ(15)N value, nitrate concentration, and nitrate reductase activity of Brassica campestris and the δ(15)N value of soil has been investigated through a pot experiment. The δ(15)N mean value of B. campestris at the seedling stage observed in the composted chicken treatment (+8.65‰) was higher than that of chemical fertilizer treatment (+5.73‰), compost-chemical fertilizer (+7.53‰), and control check treatment (+7.86‰). There were significantly different δ(15)N values (p < 0.05) between B. campestris cultivated with composted chicken manure treatment and with chemical fertilizer treatment. The similar results were also found at the middle stage and the terminal stage. The variation of δ(15)N value in soil for different treatments was smaller than that of B. campestris, which was +6.71-+8.12‰, +6.83-+8.24‰, and +6.85-8.4‰, respectively, at seedling stage, middle stage, and terminal stage. With the growth of B. campestris, the nitrate content decreased in all treatments, and the nitrate reductase activity in B. campestris increased except for the CK. Results suggested that the δ(15)N values of B. campestris and soil were more effected by the fertilizer than by the dose level, and the δ(15)N value analysis could be used as a tool to discriminate the B. campestris cultivated with composted manure or chemical fertilizer.

  7. PV_LIB Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-11

    While an organized source of reference information on PV performance modeling is certainly valuable, there is nothing to match the availability of actual examples of modeling algorithms being used in practice. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a PV performance modeling toolbox (PV_LIB) for Matlab. It contains a set of well-documented, open source functions and example scripts showing the functions being used in practical examples. This toolbox is meant to help make the multi-step process of modeling a PV system more transparent and provide the means for model users to validate and understand the models they use and or develop. It is fully integrated into Matlab’s help and documentation utilities. The PV_LIB Toolbox provides more than 30 functions that are sorted into four categories

  8. PV_LIB Toolbox

    2012-09-11

    While an organized source of reference information on PV performance modeling is certainly valuable, there is nothing to match the availability of actual examples of modeling algorithms being used in practice. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a PV performance modeling toolbox (PV_LIB) for Matlab. It contains a set of well-documented, open source functions and example scripts showing the functions being used in practical examples. This toolbox is meant to help make the multi-stepmore » process of modeling a PV system more transparent and provide the means for model users to validate and understand the models they use and or develop. It is fully integrated into Matlab’s help and documentation utilities. The PV_LIB Toolbox provides more than 30 functions that are sorted into four categories« less

  9. PV standards overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBlasio, Richard

    1997-02-01

    A brief historical perspective and current status of the on going evolution of photovoltaic standards development and the use of these standards in promulgating accepted practices used in producing, measuring, and deploying Photovoltaic (PV) components and systems in the field. After nearly 20 years of experience in developing and writing domestic and international consensus PV standards the need and importance of standard methods and practices continues, as in the past, to be essential for a maturing PV industry. Part of this maturity has been in establishing and maintaining a common ground through the development of consensus standards and furthering the use of standards for PV commercialization in support of test facility accreditation, product certification, systems deployment, and safety code development to assure PV quality, performance, reliability, and safety.

  10. Atypical regulation of virulence-associated functions by a diffusible signal factor in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rikky; Ranjan, Manish; Pradhan, Binod B; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2012-06-01

    In Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice, a secreted fatty acid signaling molecule known as diffusible signal factor (DSF) is required for virulence and growth on low-iron medium. To identify other virulence-associated traits that are regulated by DSF in this pathogen, we have performed microarray analysis of transcriptional changes between the wild type and DSF-deficient mutants of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Expression of genes that encode secreted hydrolytic enzymes, motility, and chemotaxis functions are negatively regulated by DSF while functions involved in adhesion and biofilm formation are positively regulated. Enzymatic assays for hydrolytic enzymes as well as assays for chemotaxis, motility, attachment, and biofilm formation corroborate these findings. These results demonstrate that, in X. oryzae pv. oryzae, DSF-mediated cell-to-cell signaling coordinates transition from solitary to biofilm lifestyle by promoting expression of attachment functions and negatively regulating expression of motility functions. This is in contrast to X. campestris pv. campestris, a pathogen of crucifers, wherein the DSF system positively regulates motility functions and negatively regulates biofilm formation. These results indicate that virulence-associated functions can be regulated in a completely contrasting fashion by the same signaling system in very closely related bacteria.

  11. GridPV Toolbox

    2014-07-15

    Matlab Toolbox for simulating the impact of solar energy on the distribution grid. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving GridPV Toolbox information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feedermore » on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions.« less

  12. GridPV Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Robert; Quiroz, Jimmy; Grijalva, Santiago; Reno, Matthew; Coogan, Kyle

    2014-07-15

    Matlab Toolbox for simulating the impact of solar energy on the distribution grid. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving GridPV Toolbox information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions.

  13. Composition and functional properties of Lupinus campestris protein isolates.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ambriz, S L; Martínez-Ayala, A L; Millán, F; Dávila-Ortíz, G

    2005-09-01

    Protein isolates from L. campestris and soybean seeds were prepared using isoelectric precipitation (PI) and micellization (MI) procedures. The amount of protein recovered was considerably higher with the isoelectric precipitation than with the micellization procedure (60% and 30%, respectively). Protein contents were higher than 90% in protein isolates. Antinutritional factors content (alkaloids, lectins, and tannins) were reduced to innocuous levels after protein isolate preparation. Minimum protein solubility for the precipitated lupin protein isolate (LPI) was at pH 4.0, and between pH 4 and 6 for the micellized lupin protein isolate (LMI), increasing at both extremes of the pH scale. Water absorption for the LMI was 1.3 ml/g of protein and its oil absorption 2.2 ml/g of protein. The LPI had 1.7 ml/g of protein in both water and oil absorption. Foaming capacity and stability was pH-dependent. Foaming capacity was higher at pH 2 and lower near the protein isoelectric points. Minimum protein concentration for gelation in LMI was 8% w/v at pH 4, while for LPI was 6% at pH 4 and 6. Amino acid composition in L. campestris flour and protein isolates was high in lysine and low in methionine. Most of the essential amino acids in lupin protein isolates were at acceptable levels compared to a reference pattern for infants and adults. The electrophoretic pattern of both protein isolates showed three bands with different mobilities, suggesting that the protein fractions belong to alpha-conglutin (11S-like protein), beta-conglutin (7S-like protein) and gamma-conglutin. It is proven that some of the functional properties of L. campestris protein isolates are similar to those soybean protein isolates recovered under equal conditions. PMID:16187011

  14. Grid integrated distributed PV (GridPV).

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Matthew J.; Coogan, Kyle

    2013-08-01

    This manual provides the documentation of the MATLAB toolbox of functions for using OpenDSS to simulate the impact of solar energy on the distribution system. The majority of the functions are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in the OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions. Each function in the toolbox is documented with the function use syntax, full description, function input list, function output list, example use, and example output.

  15. Genetics of xanthan production in Xanthomonas campestris: the xanA and xanB genes are involved in UDP-glucose and GDP-mannose biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Köplin, R; Arnold, W; Hötte, B; Simon, R; Wang, G; Pühler, A

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 3.4-kb EcoRI-PstI DNA fragment of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris revealed two open reading frames, which were designated xanA and xanB. The genes xanA and xanB encode proteins of 448 amino acids (molecular weight of 48,919) and 466 amino acids (molecular weight of 50,873), respectively. These genes were identified by analyzing insertion mutants which were known to be involved in xanthan production. Specific tests for the activities of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of UDP-glucose and GDP-mannose indicated that the xanA gene product was involved in the biosynthesis of both glucose 1-phosphate and mannose 1-phosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of xanB showed a significant degree of homology (59%) to the phosphomannose isomerase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of alginate. Moreover, biochemical analysis and complementation experiments with the Escherichia coli manA fragment revealed that xanB encoded a bifunctional enzyme, phosphomannose isomerase-GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase. Images PMID:1370280

  16. Xanthomonas campestris FabH is required for branched-chain fatty acid and DSF-family quorum sensing signal biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong-Hong; Hu, Zhe; Dong, Hui-Juan; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), a Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacterium, causes black rot disease of cruciferous vegetables. Although Xcc has a complex fatty acid profile comprised of straight-chain fatty acids and branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs), and encodes a complete set of genes required for fatty acid synthesis, there is still little known about the mechanism of BCFA synthesis. We reported that expression of Xcc fabH restores the growth of Ralstonia solanacearum fabH mutant, and this allows the R. solanacearum fabH mutant to produce BCFAs. Using in vitro assays, we demonstrated that Xcc FabH is able to condense branched-chain acyl-CoAs with malonyl-ACP to initiate BCFA synthesis. Moreover, although the fabH gene is essential for growth of Xcc, it can be replaced with Escherichia coli fabH, and Xcc mutants failed to produce BCFAs. These results suggest that Xcc does not have an obligatory requirement for BCFAs. Furthermore, Xcc mutants lost the ability to produce cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid, a diffusible signal factor (DSF) required for quorum sensing of Xcc, which confirms that the fatty acid synthetic pathway supplies the intermediates for DSF signal biosynthesis. Our study also showed that replacing Xcc fabH with E. coli fabH affected Xcc pathogenesis in host plants. PMID:27595587

  17. Xanthomonas campestris FabH is required for branched-chain fatty acid and DSF-family quorum sensing signal biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong-Hong; Hu, Zhe; Dong, Hui-Juan; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), a Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacterium, causes black rot disease of cruciferous vegetables. Although Xcc has a complex fatty acid profile comprised of straight-chain fatty acids and branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs), and encodes a complete set of genes required for fatty acid synthesis, there is still little known about the mechanism of BCFA synthesis. We reported that expression of Xcc fabH restores the growth of Ralstonia solanacearum fabH mutant, and this allows the R. solanacearum fabH mutant to produce BCFAs. Using in vitro assays, we demonstrated that Xcc FabH is able to condense branched-chain acyl-CoAs with malonyl-ACP to initiate BCFA synthesis. Moreover, although the fabH gene is essential for growth of Xcc, it can be replaced with Escherichia coli fabH, and Xcc mutants failed to produce BCFAs. These results suggest that Xcc does not have an obligatory requirement for BCFAs. Furthermore, Xcc mutants lost the ability to produce cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid, a diffusible signal factor (DSF) required for quorum sensing of Xcc, which confirms that the fatty acid synthetic pathway supplies the intermediates for DSF signal biosynthesis. Our study also showed that replacing Xcc fabH with E. coli fabH affected Xcc pathogenesis in host plants. PMID:27595587

  18. Helping enhances productivity in campo flicker ( Colaptes campestris) cooperative groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Raphael Igor; Webster, Michael S.; Macedo, Regina H.

    2015-06-01

    Reproductive adults in many bird species are assisted by non-breeding auxiliary helpers at the nest, yet the impact of auxiliaries on reproduction is variable and not always obvious. In this study, we tested Hamilton's rule and evaluated the effect of auxiliaries on productivity in the facultative cooperative breeder campo flicker ( Colaptes campestris campestris). Campo flickers have a variable mating system, with some groups having auxiliaries and others lacking them (i.e., unassisted pairs). Most auxiliaries are closely related to the breeding pair (primary auxiliaries), but some auxiliaries (secondary auxiliaries) are unrelated females that joined established groups. We found no effect of breeder quality (body condition) or territory quality (food availability) on group productivity, but the presence of auxiliaries increased the number of fledglings produced relative to unassisted pairs. Nonetheless, the indirect benefit of helping was small and did not outweigh the costs of delayed breeding and so seemed insufficient to explain the evolution of cooperative breeding in campo flickers. We concluded that some ecological constraints must limit dispersal or independent breeding, making staying in the group a "best-of-a-bad-job" situation for auxiliaries.

  19. A proteomic analysis of seed development in Brassica campestri L.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlan; Gao, Yi; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    To gain insights into the protein dynamics during seed development, a proteomic study on the developing Brassica campestri L. seeds with embryos in different embryogenesis stages was carried out. The seed proteins at 10, 16, 20, 25 and 35 DAP (days after pollination), respectively, were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identities of 209 spots with altered abundance were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). These proteins were classified into 16 groups according to their functions. The most abundant proteins were related to primary metabolism, indicating the heavy demand of materials for rapid embryo growth. Besides, the high amount of proteins involved in protein processing and destination indicated importance of protein renewal during seed development. The remaining were those participated in oxidation/detoxification, energy, defense, transcription, protein synthesis, transporter, cell structure, signal transduction, secondary metabolism, transposition, DNA repair, storage and so on. Protein abundance profiles of each functional class were generated and hierarchical cluster analysis established 8 groups of dynamic patterns. Our results revealed novel characters of protein dynamics in seed development in Brassica campestri L. and provided valuable information about the complex process of seed development in plants. PMID:23189193

  20. A Proteomic Analysis of Seed Development in Brassica campestri L

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlan; Gao, Yi; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    To gain insights into the protein dynamics during seed development, a proteomic study on the developing Brassica campestri L. seeds with embryos in different embryogenesis stages was carried out. The seed proteins at 10, 16, 20, 25 and 35 DAP (days after pollination), respectively, were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identities of 209 spots with altered abundance were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). These proteins were classified into 16 groups according to their functions. The most abundant proteins were related to primary metabolism, indicating the heavy demand of materials for rapid embryo growth. Besides, the high amount of proteins involved in protein processing and destination indicated importance of protein renewal during seed development. The remaining were those participated in oxidation/detoxification, energy, defense, transcription, protein synthesis, transporter, cell structure, signal transduction, secondary metabolism, transposition, DNA repair, storage and so on. Protein abundance profiles of each functional class were generated and hierarchical cluster analysis established 8 groups of dynamic patterns. Our results revealed novel characters of protein dynamics in seed development in Brassica campestri L. and provided valuable information about the complex process of seed development in plants. PMID:23189193

  1. Helping enhances productivity in campo flicker (Colaptes campestris) cooperative groups.

    PubMed

    Dias, Raphael Igor; Webster, Michael S; Macedo, Regina H

    2015-06-01

    Reproductive adults in many bird species are assisted by non-breeding auxiliary helpers at the nest, yet the impact of auxiliaries on reproduction is variable and not always obvious. In this study, we tested Hamilton's rule and evaluated the effect of auxiliaries on productivity in the facultative cooperative breeder campo flicker (Colaptes campestris campestris). Campo flickers have a variable mating system, with some groups having auxiliaries and others lacking them (i.e., unassisted pairs). Most auxiliaries are closely related to the breeding pair (primary auxiliaries), but some auxiliaries (secondary auxiliaries) are unrelated females that joined established groups. We found no effect of breeder quality (body condition) or territory quality (food availability) on group productivity, but the presence of auxiliaries increased the number of fledglings produced relative to unassisted pairs. Nonetheless, the indirect benefit of helping was small and did not outweigh the costs of delayed breeding and so seemed insufficient to explain the evolution of cooperative breeding in campo flickers. We concluded that some ecological constraints must limit dispersal or independent breeding, making staying in the group a "best-of-a-bad-job" situation for auxiliaries.

  2. Environmental control in tea fields to reduce infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. theae.

    PubMed

    Tomihama, T; Nonaka, T; Nishi, Y; Arai, K

    2009-02-01

    Bacterial shoot blight (BSB) disease, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. theae, is a major bacterial disease of tea plants in Japan. BSB mainly occurs in the low-temperature season, and lesion formation by P. syringae pv. theae is enhanced by both low temperature and the presence of ice nucleation-active Xanthomonas campestris (INAX), which catalyzes ice formation at -2 to -4 degrees C and is frequently co-isolated with P. syringae pv. theae from tea plants. Low temperature is thus the most important environmental factor influencing the incidence of BSB; however, the effects of low temperature on infection of the host by P. syringae pv. theae and of environmental controls in fields on the occurrence of the disease are poorly understood. In this study, we show that ice formation on tea leaves by INAX enhanced P. syringae pv. theae invasion into leaf tissue. The natural incidence of BSB in the field was closely related to early autumn frost. Frost protection in late autumn, which prevented ice formation on tea plants, significantly decreased the incidence of BSB, and frost protection combined with bactericide application held the incidence under the economic threshold level. Our data indicate that environmental control in the field based on microbial interactions in the host offers a new strategy for plant disease control. PMID:19159313

  3. Xanthomonas campestris Overcomes Arabidopsis Stomatal Innate Immunity through a DSF Cell-to-Cell Signal-Regulated Virulence Factor1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E.; Torres, Pablo S.; Vojnov, Adrián A.

    2009-01-01

    Pathogen-induced stomatal closure is part of the plant innate immune response. Phytopathogens using stomata as a way of entry into the leaf must avoid the stomatal response of the host. In this article, we describe a factor secreted by the bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) capable of interfering with stomatal closure induced by bacteria or abscisic acid (ABA). We found that living Xcc, as well as ethyl acetate extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, are capable of reverting stomatal closure induced by bacteria, lipopolysaccharide, or ABA. Xcc ethyl acetate extracts also complemented the infectivity of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) mutants deficient in the production of the coronatine toxin, which is required to overcome stomatal defense. By contrast, the rpfF and rpfC mutant strains of Xcc, which are unable to respectively synthesize or perceive a diffusible molecule involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling, were incapable of reverting stomatal closure, indicating that suppression of stomatal response by Xcc requires an intact rpf/diffusible signal factor system. In addition, we found that guard cell-specific Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3 (MPK3) antisense mutants were unresponsive to bacteria or lipopolysaccharide in promotion of stomatal closure, and also more sensitive to Pst coronatine-deficient mutants, showing that MPK3 is required for stomatal immune response. Additionally, we found that, unlike in wild-type Arabidopsis, ABA-induced stomatal closure in MPK3 antisense mutants is not affected by Xcc or by extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, suggesting that the Xcc factor might target some signaling component in the same pathway as MPK3. PMID:19091877

  4. Open PV Project: Unlocking PV Installation Data (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    This brochure summarizes the Open PV Project, a collaborative effort of government, industry, and the public to compile a comprehensive database of PV installations in the United States. The brochure outlines the purpose and history of the project as well as the main capabilities and benefits of the online Open PV tool. The brochure also introduces how features of the tool are used, and it describes the sources and characteristics of Open PV's data and data collection processes.

  5. PV System Performance and Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the status and accomplishments during fiscal year (FY) 2005 of the Photovoltaic (PV) System Performance and Standards Subtask, which is part of the PV Systems Engineering Project (a joint NREL-Sandia project).

  6. Testing for PV Reliability (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Bansal, S.

    2014-09-01

    The DOE SUNSHOT workshop is seeking input from the community about PV reliability and how the DOE might address gaps in understanding. This presentation describes the types of testing that are needed for PV reliability and introduces a discussion to identify gaps in our understanding of PV reliability testing.

  7. PV Hourly Simulation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, Jesse; Metzger, Ian

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple general building characteristics and usage information to calculate the energy and cost benefits of solar PV. This tool conducts and complex hourly simulation of solar PV based primarily on the area available on the rooftop. It uses a simplified efficiency calculation method and real panel characteristics. It includes a detailed rate structure to account for time-of-use rates, on-peak and off-peak pricing, and multiple rate seasons. This tool includes the option for advanced system design inputs if they are known. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, incentives and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  8. PV Hourly Simulation Tool

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple general building characteristics and usage information to calculate the energy and cost benefits of solar PV. This tool conducts and complex hourly simulation of solar PV based primarily on the area available on the rooftop. It uses a simplified efficiency calculation method and real panel characteristics. It includes a detailed rate structure to account for time-of-use rates, on-peak and off-peak pricing, and multiple rate seasons. This tool includes themore » option for advanced system design inputs if they are known. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, incentives and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  9. Bioconcentration factors (BCF) of silver in wild Agaricus campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Falandysz, J.; Danisiewicz, D.

    1995-07-01

    Silver is an element naturally occurring in small concentrations in different environmental sites. However, many anthropogenic sources of silver led to contamination of this element in soil surfaces, pastures, and coastal marine areas in different parts of the world. Estimates are that 40% of the 1.15x10{sup 4}t of silver produced annually worldwide, will escape into the environment. Due to municipal waste discharge and/or industrial effluents with high silver concentrations, 100 x above the background level have been reported in invertebrate species from polluted marine areas. The meta-stabile radioisotope, {sup 110m}Ag, is a main component of the liquid effluents from nuclear facilities under normal operating conditions. The presence of {sup 111}Ag and {sup 110m}Ag also has been widely found throughout Europe in the 1986 Chernobyl fallout. Silver ions are environmentally harmful. High toxic effects have been observed at low concentrations, especially in aquatic species. Species of lower fungi as well as the mushroom Agaricus bisporus are know to bioaccumulate high concentrations of silver when grown on an artificially enriched substrate. This study looks at the relationship between the silver content of soil and bioconcentration potential of wild Agaricus campestris from sites under different use and with different concentrations of heavy metals. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Structure of the Full-Length Bacteriophytochrome from the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas campestris Provides Clues to its Long-Range Signaling Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Otero, Lisandro Horacio; Klinke, Sebastián; Rinaldi, Jimena; Velázquez-Escobar, Francisco; Mroginski, María Andrea; Fernández López, María; Malamud, Florencia; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto; Hildebrandt, Peter; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Bonomi, Hernán Ruy

    2016-09-25

    Phytochromes constitute a major superfamily of light-sensing proteins that are reversibly photoconverted between a red-absorbing (Pr) and a far-red-absorbing (Pfr) state. Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are found among photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic bacteria, including pathogens. To date, several BphPs have been biophysically characterized. However, it is still not fully understood how structural changes are propagated from the photosensory module to the output module during the signal transduction event. Most phytochromes share a common architecture consisting of an N-terminal photosensor that includes the PAS2-GAF-PHY domain triad and a C-terminal variable output module. Here we present the crystal structure of the full-length BphP from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (XccBphP) bearing its photosensor and its complete output module, a PAS9 domain. In the crystals, the protein was found to be in the Pr state, whereas diffraction data together with resonance Raman spectroscopic and theoretical results indicate a ZZZssa and a ZZEssa chromophore configuration corresponding to a mixture of Pr and Meta-R state, the precursor of Pfr. The XccBphP quaternary assembly reveals a head-to-head dimer in which the output module contributes to the helical dimer interface. The photosensor, which is shown to be a bathy-like BphP, is influenced in its dark reactions by the output module. Our structural analyses suggest that the photoconversion between the Pr and Pfr states in the full-length XccBphP may involve changes in the relative positioning of the output module. This work contributes to understand the light-induced structural changes propagated from the photosensor to the output modules in phytochrome signaling. PMID:27107635

  11. Structure of the Full-Length Bacteriophytochrome from the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas campestris Provides Clues to its Long-Range Signaling Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Otero, Lisandro Horacio; Klinke, Sebastián; Rinaldi, Jimena; Velázquez-Escobar, Francisco; Mroginski, María Andrea; Fernández López, María; Malamud, Florencia; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto; Hildebrandt, Peter; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Bonomi, Hernán Ruy

    2016-09-25

    Phytochromes constitute a major superfamily of light-sensing proteins that are reversibly photoconverted between a red-absorbing (Pr) and a far-red-absorbing (Pfr) state. Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are found among photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic bacteria, including pathogens. To date, several BphPs have been biophysically characterized. However, it is still not fully understood how structural changes are propagated from the photosensory module to the output module during the signal transduction event. Most phytochromes share a common architecture consisting of an N-terminal photosensor that includes the PAS2-GAF-PHY domain triad and a C-terminal variable output module. Here we present the crystal structure of the full-length BphP from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (XccBphP) bearing its photosensor and its complete output module, a PAS9 domain. In the crystals, the protein was found to be in the Pr state, whereas diffraction data together with resonance Raman spectroscopic and theoretical results indicate a ZZZssa and a ZZEssa chromophore configuration corresponding to a mixture of Pr and Meta-R state, the precursor of Pfr. The XccBphP quaternary assembly reveals a head-to-head dimer in which the output module contributes to the helical dimer interface. The photosensor, which is shown to be a bathy-like BphP, is influenced in its dark reactions by the output module. Our structural analyses suggest that the photoconversion between the Pr and Pfr states in the full-length XccBphP may involve changes in the relative positioning of the output module. This work contributes to understand the light-induced structural changes propagated from the photosensor to the output modules in phytochrome signaling.

  12. BcMF21 is important for pollen development and germination in Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingjing; Yu, Youjian; Dong, Heng; Yao, Lina; Zhang, Zhixian; Cao, Jiashu

    2014-01-01

    Brassica campestris Male Fertility 21 (BcMF21) was previously isolated from the flower buds of Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino, syn. B. rapa ssp. chinensis) and expressed specifically in tapetum and microspores during the meiosis stage and the uninucleate stage of microspore development. Here, we used antisense RNA technology to knock down the expression level of BcMF21 in B. campestris and analyzed the phenotype of the transgenic plants. Alexander staining and scanning electron microscope revealed sterility and exine deformities in the mature pollen grains of BcMF21 antisense RNA transgenic plants. The germination furrow of the BcMF21 antisense RNA transgenic pollen was covered by lipid like materials. The pollen tubes burst and could not grow normally in vitro. Therefore, we presented here BcMF21 might be an important gene for pollen development and germination.

  13. PV at the Pentagon

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, J.

    2000-02-01

    The US Department of Defense joins the battle against global warming with a photovoltaic installation at the Pentagon heating and refrigeration plant. Sitting in a line between the Pentagon and the Oval Office are four concentric arcs of iridescent silicon. In June 1999, the first half of this thirty kilowatt photovoltaic (PV) system was dedicated on the grounds of the heating and refrigeration plant that serves the Pentagon near Washington, DC. This first half of the system (the two center arcs) is the world's largest array composed solely of Ascension Technology's SunSine{reg{underscore}sign}300 AC modules. Each of these photovoltaic panels has its own DC to AC inverter mounted directly on its back side. The second half of the installation, brought on line in October 1999, includes a conventional DC array that powers a pair of newly developed Trace Technologies 10 kW inverters. The AC output of these two unique PV systems is combined at a central collection point and funneled into the electric grid that supplies power to the Pentagon. The project is a collaboration of the US Department of Defense (DoD) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), with cost-sharing support from Virginia Power, Johnson Controls, the Utility Photovoltaic Group (UPVG), and Applied Power Corporation. The systems were designed and installed by Ascension Technology, a division of Applied Power Corporation, with modules supplied by ASE Americas. This installation provides a unique real-world environment for researchers, utility engineers and power plant managers to test and compare the reliability, scalability, noise immunity and power quality of these two distinct approaches to PV energy production.

  14. PV water pumping: NEOS Corporation recent PV water pumping activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, C.

    1995-11-01

    NEOS Corporation has been very active in PV-powered water pumping, particularly with respect to electric utilities. Most of the recent activity has been through the Photovoltaic Services Network (PSN). The PSN is an independent, not-for-profit organization comprised of all types of electric utilities: rural electric coops, public power districts, investor-owned utilities, and power marketing agencies. The PSN`s mission is to work pro-actively to promote utility involvement in PV through education and training. PV information is distributed by the PSN in three primary forms: (1) consultation with PSN technical service representatives: (2) literature generated by the PSN; and (3) literature published by other organizations. The PSN can also provide assistance to members in developing PV customer service programs. The PSN`s product support activities include consolidation of information on existing packaged PV systems and facilitation of the development of new PV product packages that meet utility-defined specifications for cost performance, and reliability. The PSN`s initial product support efforts will be focused on commercially available packaged PV systems for a variety of off-grid applications. In parallel with this effort, if no products exist that meet the PSN`s functional specifications, the PSN will initiate the second phase of product development support process by encouraging the development of new packaged systems. Through these services and product support activities, the PSN anticipates engaging all segments for the PV industry, thus providing benefits to PV systems suppliers as well as local PV service contractors.This paper describes field testing of pv power systems for water pumping.

  15. Outdoor PV Degradation Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D. C.; Smith, R. M.; Osterwald, C. R.; Gelak, E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output; may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined; accurately. At the Performance and Energy Rating Testbed (PERT) at the Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) at the; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) more than 40 modules from more than 10 different manufacturers; were compared for their long-term outdoor stability. Because it can accommodate a large variety of modules in a; limited footprint the PERT system is ideally suited to compare modules side-by-side under the same conditions.

  16. Interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) architecture for PV devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Rui Q.; Tian, Zhaobing; Mishima, Tetsuya D.; Santos, Michael B.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Klem, John F.

    2015-10-20

    A photovoltaic (PV) device, comprising a PV interband cascade (IC) stage, wherein the IC PV stage comprises an absorption region with a band gap, the absorption region configured to absorb photons, an intraband transport region configured to act as a hole barrier, and an interband tunneling region configured to act as an electron barrier. An IC PV architecture for a photovoltaic device, the IC PV architecture comprising an absorption region, an intraband transport region coupled to the absorption region, and an interband tunneling region coupled to the intraband transport region and to the adjacent absorption region, wherein the absorption region, the intraband transport region, and the interband tunneling region are positioned such that electrons will flow from the absorption region to the intraband transport region to the interband tunneling region.

  17. The opsX locus of Xanthomonas campestris affects host range and biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide and extracellular polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, M T; Gabriel, D W; Marlow, G C; Roberts, P D

    1993-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. citrumelo strain 3048 is the causal agent of citrus bacterial leaf spot disease and has a wide host range that includes rutaceous and leguminous plants. A spontaneous prototrophic mutant of strain 3048 (strain M28) that had lost virulence on citrus but retained virulence on bean plants was recovered. Growth studies in planta showed that M28 cells died rapidly in citrus leaves but grew normally in bean leaves. In addition to the loss of citrus-specific virulence, M28 displayed the following mutant phenotypes in culture: decreased growth rate, reduction of the amount of exopolysaccharide (to ca. 25% of the amount in 3048), loss of capsules, and significant alterations of the two 3048 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) bands visualized by silver stain on polyacrylamide gels, consistent with a defect(s) in LPS assembly. A 38-kb DNA fragment from a 3048 total DNA library that complemented the mutant phenotypes of M28 was identified. The 38-kb fragment did not hybridize to two similarly sized fragments carrying different hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes cloned from 3048. Subcloning, DNA sequence analyses, and gene disruption experiments were used to identify a single gene, opsX (for outer-membrane polysaccharide), responsible for the mutant phenotypes of M28. At least one other gene downstream from opsX also affected the same phenotypes and may be part of a gene cluster. We report here the DNA sequence and transcriptional start site of opsX. A search of protein sequence data bases with the predicted 31.3-kDa OpsX sequence found strong similarity to Lsi-1 of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and RfaQ of Escherichia coli (both are involved in LPS core assembly). The host-specific virulence function of opsX appears to involve biosynthesis of the extracellular polysaccharide and a complete LPS. Both may be needed in normal amounts for protection from citrus, but not bean, defense compounds. Images PMID:8376331

  18. Molecular phylogenetic relationships of two extinct potoroid marsupials, Potorous platyops and Caloprymnus campestris (Potoroinae: Marsupialia).

    PubMed

    Westerman, M; Loke, S; Springer, M S

    2004-05-01

    Complete 12S rRNA and partial cytochrome b (cytb) gene sequences have been obtained from museum samples of two recently extinct potoroids-Potorous platyops and Caloprymnus campestris. Phylogenetic analyses based on these mitochondrial DNA sequences suggest that the broad-faced potoroo (P. platyops) was a close relative of the recently discovered Potorous longipes and the recently re-discovered Potorous gilberti. Although the extinct desert rat-kangaroo (C. campestris) was clearly resolved as a member of the subfamily Potoroinae, its precise relationships vis a vis other living potoroines are unclear. We confirmed that the rufous rat-kangaroo (Aepyprymnus rufescens) is sister to all living Bettongia species, but the molecular data provide no support for a sister relationship between A. rufescens and C. campestris as suggested by on the basis of four shared morphological characters. Molecular dating analyses suggest that the initial radiation of potoroinae seems to have occurred soon after its origin in the early Miocene. Within Potoroinae, C. campestris diverged from other taxa approximately 16 million years ago. P. platyops diverged from P. longipes+P. gilberti approximately 14-15 million years ago.

  19. Predation of Indianmeal moth larvae by Lyctocoris campestris(F.) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) in different stored commodities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predation rates for the anthocorid predator Lyctocoris campestris (F.) against varying densities of late-instar Plodia interpunctello (Hubner) were compared in whole corn, whole wheat, or folled oat stored commodities. More prey were attacked in corn and wheat than in oats, and female predators gene...

  20. Protozoa as agents responsible for the decline of Xanthomonas campestris in soil.

    PubMed

    Habte, M; Alexander, M

    1975-02-01

    A streptomycin-resistant mutant of Xanthomonas campestris was used to assess the persistence of the plant pathogen in soil and the changes in populations that might be important for its survival. In soil into which large numbers of the organism were introduced, a marked decline in its abundance occurred, but after about 1 week its population density reached a level of about 105 and did not continue to fall during the test period. No such marked decline was evident in sterile soil inoculated with X. campestris. The bacterium did not lose viability if starved for carbon or inorganic nitrogen. Although abundant in soil, the numbers of propagules capable of producing antibiotics or lytic enzymes active against X. campestris did not increase coincident with the pathogen's decline, and no increase in tartrate-extractable toxins was observed. Neither bdellovibrios nor bacteriophages active against the xanthomonad were found in the soil, but a marked increase in the frequency of protozoa paralleled the phase of rapid diminution in the X. campestris population. In actidione-treated soil, in which protozoan activity was severly limited, the high cell density of the pathogen was maintained. On the basis of these data, it is concluded that predation by protozoa is responsible for the abrupt fall in frequency of the bacterium in natural soil. PMID:1115496

  1. Protozoa as Agents Responsible for the Decline of Xanthomonas campestris in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Habte, Mitiku; Alexander, Martin

    1975-01-01

    A streptomycin-resistant mutant of Xanthomonas campestris was used to assess the persistence of the plant pathogen in soil and the changes in populations that might be important for its survival. In soil into which large numbers of the organism were introduced, a marked decline in its abundance occurred, but after about 1 week its population density reached a level of about 105 and did not continue to fall during the test period. No such marked decline was evident in sterile soil inoculated with X. campestris. The bacterium did not lose viability if starved for carbon or inorganic nitrogen. Although abundant in soil, the numbers of propagules capable of producing antibiotics or lytic enzymes active against X. campestris did not increase coincident with the pathogen's decline, and no increase in tartrate-extractable toxins was observed. Neither bdellovibrios nor bacteriophages active against the xanthomonad were found in the soil, but a marked increase in the frequency of protozoa paralleled the phase of rapid diminution in the X. campestris population. In actidione-treated soil, in which protozoan activity was severely limited, the high cell density of the pathogen was maintained. On the basis of these data, it is concluded that predation by protozoa is responsible for the abrupt fall in frequency of the bacterium in natural soil. PMID:1115496

  2. PV module mounting method and mounting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl J.S.; Johnson, Kurt M.

    2013-04-23

    A method for mounting PV modules to a deck includes selecting PV module layout pattern so that adjacent PV module edges are spaced apart. PV mounting and support assemblies are secured to the deck according to the layout pattern using fasteners extending into the deck. The PV modules are placed on the PV mounting and support assemblies. Retaining elements are located over and secured against the upper peripheral edge surfaces of the PV modules so to secure them to the deck with the peripheral edges of the PV modules spaced apart from the deck. In some examples a PV module mounting assembly, for use on a shingled deck, comprises flashing, a base mountable on the flashing, a deck-penetrating fastener engageable with the base and securable to the deck so to secure the flashing and the base to the shingled deck, and PV module mounting hardware securable to the base.

  3. Pressure-equalizing PV assembly and method

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2004-10-26

    Each PV assembly of an array of PV assemblies comprises a base, a PV module and a support assembly securing the PV module to a position overlying the upper surface of the base. Vents are formed through the base. A pressure equalization path extends from the outer surface of the PV module, past the PV module, to and through at least one of the vents, and to the lower surface of the base to help reduce wind uplift forces on the PV assembly. The PV assemblies may be interengaged, such as by interengaging the bases of adjacent PV assemblies. The base may include a main portion and a cover and the bases of adjacent PV assemblies may be interengaged by securing the covers of adjacent bases together.

  4. New therapeutic approaches in PV

    PubMed Central

    Falchi, Lorenzo; Newberry, Kate J.; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    Polycytemia vera (PV) is one of the three Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. Clinically, PV is an indolent disease but its course can be complicated by arterial and venous vascular accidents, evolution to myelofibrosis or leukemic transformation. Treatment of PV is, therefore, aimed at preventing such acute complications. The cornerstone of therapy of low-risk patients remains strict control of cardiovascular risk factors, the use of phlebotomy and low dose aspirin. Higher risk patients should also receive cytoreductive treatments. Hydroxyurea and interferon-α represent standard first-line options for newly diagnosed high-risk PV patients. Recommendations for patients who fail these therapies are less clearly defined. The discovery of a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 gene (V617F) in almost all cases of PV has prompted the development of molecularly targeted agents for the treatment of these patients. In this review we will discuss key clinical aspects, the current therapeutic armamentarium and data on the use of novel agents in patients with PV. PMID:26297275

  5. PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2013-08-01

    Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

  6. Genetic transformation of Brassica campestris var. rapa protoplasts with an engineered cauliflower mosaic virus genome.

    PubMed

    Paszkowski, J; Pisan, B; Shillito, R D; Hohn, T; Hohn, B; Potrykus, I

    1986-09-01

    A hybrid Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) genome containing a selectable marker gene was constructed by replacing the gene VI coding region with the aminoglycoside (neomycin) phosphotransferase type II [APH(3')II] gene from Tn5. This modified viral genome was tested for its infectivity both in planta and in a protoplast transformation system of Brassica campestris var. rapa. Stable, genetically transformed cell lines of B. campestris var. rapa were obtained after transformation. DNA of the hybrid CaMV genome was found to be integrated into high molecular weight plant genomic DNA. Transformation was achieved only when the hybrid genome was supplied together with wild type viral DNA. A possible complementation of the modified CaMV genome with the wild type viral DNA as a helper molecule in planta and in the protoplast system is discussed.

  7. Low concentrator PV optics optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Leonard; Chang, Ben

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Cost reduction is a major focus of the solar industry. Thin film technologies and concentration systems are viable ways to reducing cost, with unique strengths and weakness for both. Most of the concentrating PV work focuses on high concentration systems for reducing energy cost. Meanwhile, many believe that low concentrators provide significant cost reduction potential while addressing the mainstream PV market with a product that acts as a flat panel replacement. This paper analyzes the relative benefit of asymmetric vs. symmetric optics for low-concentrators in light of specific PV applications. Approach: Symmetric and asymmetric concentrating PV module performance is evaluated using computer simulation to determine potential value across various geographic locations and applications. The selected optic design is modeled against standard cSi flat panels and thin film to determine application fit, system level energy density and economic value. Results: While symmetric designs may seem ideal, asymmetric designs have an advantage in energy density. Both designs are assessed for aperture, optimum concentration ratio, and ideal system array configuration. Analysis of performance across climate specific effects (diffuse, direct and circumsolar) and location specific effects (sunpath) are also presented. The energy density and energy production of low concentrators provide a compelling value proposition. More significantly, the choice of optics for a low concentrating design can affect real world performance. With the goal of maximizing energy density and return on investment, this paper presents the advantages of asymmetric optic concentration and illustrates the value of this design within specific PV applications.

  8. Identification of gene expression profile during fertilization in Brassica campestris subsp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingjing; Jiang, Jianxia; Qiu, Lin; Miao, Ying; Yao, Lina; Cao, Jiashu

    2013-01-01

    Fertilization is controlled by a complex gene regulatory network. To study the fertilization mechanism, we determined time courses of the four developmental stages of fertilization in Chinese cabbage pak-choi (Brassica campestris subsp. chinensis) by cytological observation. We then used the Arabidopsis ATH1 microarray to characterize the gene expression profiles of pollinated and unpollinated pistils in B. campestris subsp. chinensis. The result showed 44 up-regulated genes and 33 down-regulated genes in pollinated pistils compared with unpollinated pistils. Gene ontology analysis identified 20% of the up-regulated genes as belonging to the category of cell wall metabolism. We compared the up-regulated genes in pollinated pistils with previously identified pollen development related genes. Ten genes were found to be in common, which were termed as continuously expressed genes, in the two processes in the present article. Their expression patterns during pollen development and fertilization processes were then verified by RT-PCR. One of the continuously expressed genes, the homologous gene of At3g01270 in B. campestris subsp. chinensis, was confirmed as specifically expressed in microspores and pollinated pistils by using in situ hybridization. The potential biological functions of the other continuously expressed genes were also discussed. PMID:23379337

  9. Small scale production and characterization of xanthan gum synthesized by local isolates of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Barua, Rajesh; Alam, Md Jahangir; Salim, Mohammad; Ashrafee, Tamzida Shamim

    2016-02-01

    Xanthan gum is a commercially important microbial exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by Xanthomonas campestris. X. campestris is a plant pathogen causing various plant diseases such as black rot of crucifers, bacterial leaf blight and citrus canker disease resulting in crop damage. In this study, we isolated efficient local bacterial isolates which are capable to produce xanthan gum utilizing different sources of carbon (maltose, sucrose and glucose). Bacterial isolates from different plant leaves and fruits were identified as Xanthomonas campestris based on their morphological and biochemical characteristics. Among the 23 isolates, 70% were capable of producing gum. Taro plant, considered as new bacterial host, also have the capability to produce xanthan gum. Production conditions of xanthan gum and their relative viscosity by these bacterial isolates were optimized using basal medium containing commercial carbon and nitrogen sources and various temperature and rotation. Highest level of xanthan gum (18.286 g/l) with relative viscosity (7.2) was produced (Host, Citrus macroptera) at 28 degrees C, pH 7.0, 150 rpm using sucrose as a carbon source at orbital shaker. Whereas, in lab fermenter, same conditions gave best result (19.587 g/l gum) with 7.8 relative viscosity. Chilled alcohol (96%) was used to recover the xanthan gum. FTIR studies also carried out for further confirmation of compatibility by detecting the chemical groups. PMID:26934783

  10. Location and cloning of the ketal pyruvate transferase gene of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed Central

    Marzocca, M P; Harding, N E; Petroni, E A; Cleary, J M; Ielpi, L

    1991-01-01

    Genes required for xanthan polysaccharide synthesis (xps) are clustered in a DNA region of 13.5 kb in the chromosome of Xanthomonas campestris. Plasmid pCHC3 containing a 12.4-kb insert of xps genes has been suggested to include a gene involved in the pyruvylation of xanthan gum (N.E. Harding, J.M. Cleary, D.K. Cabañas, I. G. Rosen, and K. S. Kang, J. Bacteriol. 169:2854-2861, 1987). An essential step toward understanding the biosynthesis of xanthan gum and to enable genetic manipulation of xanthan structure is the determination of the biochemical function encoded by the xps genes. On the basis of biochemical characterization of an X. campestris mutant which produces pyruvate-free xanthan gum, complementation studies, and heterologous expression, we have identified the gene coding for the ketal pyruvate transferase (kpt) enzyme. This gene was located on a 1.4-kb BamHI fragment of pCHC3 and cloned in the broad-host-range cloning vector pRK404. An X. campestris kpt mutant was constructed by mini-Mu(Tetr) mutagenesis of the cloned gene and then by recombination of the mutation into the chromosome of the wild-type strain. PMID:1657892

  11. Location and cloning of the ketal pyruvate transferase gene of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Marzocca, M P; Harding, N E; Petroni, E A; Cleary, J M; Ielpi, L

    1991-12-01

    Genes required for xanthan polysaccharide synthesis (xps) are clustered in a DNA region of 13.5 kb in the chromosome of Xanthomonas campestris. Plasmid pCHC3 containing a 12.4-kb insert of xps genes has been suggested to include a gene involved in the pyruvylation of xanthan gum (N.E. Harding, J.M. Cleary, D.K. Cabañas, I. G. Rosen, and K. S. Kang, J. Bacteriol. 169:2854-2861, 1987). An essential step toward understanding the biosynthesis of xanthan gum and to enable genetic manipulation of xanthan structure is the determination of the biochemical function encoded by the xps genes. On the basis of biochemical characterization of an X. campestris mutant which produces pyruvate-free xanthan gum, complementation studies, and heterologous expression, we have identified the gene coding for the ketal pyruvate transferase (kpt) enzyme. This gene was located on a 1.4-kb BamHI fragment of pCHC3 and cloned in the broad-host-range cloning vector pRK404. An X. campestris kpt mutant was constructed by mini-Mu(Tetr) mutagenesis of the cloned gene and then by recombination of the mutation into the chromosome of the wild-type strain. PMID:1657892

  12. Lightweight flexible rooftop PV module

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.; Ovshinsky, H.C.; Whelan, K.

    1994-12-31

    Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) and United Solar Systems Corp. (United Solar) are developing lightweight, flexible photovoltaic modules that can replace conventional roofing materials and be economically and aesthetically integrated into residential and commercial buildings. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency multi-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. These cells are produced on thin, flexible, stainless steel substrates. Two types of products 1 ft by 10 ft overlapping PV shingles and 1.3 ft by 20 ft PV roof panels are being developed by United Solar and ECD, respectively. United Solar`s shingle type design uses a roof mounting procedures similar to those used with conventional asphalt shingles, while ECD`s PV panel uses mounting procedures conforming to metal roof systems. Thus, they can be installed on roof sheathings, replacing ordinary shingles or metal roofing panels, on a standard wood roof construction.

  13. The pepper E3 ubiquitin ligase RING1 gene, CaRING1, is required for cell death and the salicylic acid-dependent defense response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-08-01

    Ubiquitination is essential for ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated protein degradation in plant development and defense. Here, we identified a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase RING1 gene, CaRING1, from pepper (Capsicum annuum). In pepper, CaRING1 expression is induced by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria infection. CaRING1 contains an amino-terminal transmembrane domain and a carboxyl-terminal RING domain. In addition, it displays in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, and the RING domain is essential for E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in CaRING1. CaRING1 also localizes to the plasma membrane. In pepper plants, virus-induced gene silencing of CaRING1 confers enhanced susceptibility to avirulent X. campestris pv vesicatoria infection, which is accompanied by compromised hypersensitive cell death, reduced expression of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1, and lowered salicylic acid levels in leaves. Transient expression of CaRING1 in pepper leaves induces cell death and the defense response that requires the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of CaRING1. By contrast, overexpression of CaRING1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) confers enhanced resistance to hemibiotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and biotrophic Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infections. Taken together, these results suggest that CaRING1 is involved in the induction of cell death and the regulation of ubiquitination during the defense response to microbial pathogens.

  14. Comparison of Pyranometers vs. PV Reference Cells for Evaluation of PV Array Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, L.; Gostein, M.; Emery, K.

    2012-09-01

    As the photovoltaics (PV) industry has grown, the need for accurately monitoring the solar resource of PV power plants has increased. Historically, the PV industry has relied on thermopile pyranometers for irradiance measurements, and a large body of historical irradiance data taken with pyranometers exists. However, interest in PV reference devices is increasing. In this paper, we discuss why PV reference devices are better suited for PV applications, and estimate the typical uncertainties in irradiance measurements made with both pyranometers and PV reference devices. We assert that the quantity of interest in monitoring a PV power plant is the equivalent irradiance under the IEC 60904-3 reference solar spectrum that would produce the same electrical response in the PV array as the incident solar radiation. For PV-plant monitoring applications, we find the uncertainties in irradiance measurements of this type to be on the order of +/-5% for thermopile pyranometers and +/-2.4% for PV reference devices.

  15. Grid Integrated Distributed PV (GridPV) Version 2.

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, Matthew J.; Coogan, Kyle

    2014-12-01

    This manual provides the documentation of the MATLAB toolbox of functions for using OpenDSS to simulate the impact of solar energy on the distribution system. The majority of the functio ns are useful for interfacing OpenDSS and MATLAB, and they are of generic use for commanding OpenDSS from MATLAB and retrieving information from simulations. A set of functions is also included for modeling PV plant output and setting up the PV plant in th e OpenDSS simulation. The toolbox contains functions for modeling the OpenDSS distribution feeder on satellite images with GPS coordinates. Finally, example simulations functions are included to show potential uses of the toolbox functions. Each function i n the toolbox is documented with the function use syntax, full description, function input list, function output list, example use, and example output.

  16. Antiulcerogenic Activity of the Hydroalcoholic Extract of Leaves of Croton campestris A. St.-Hill in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Francisco E. B.; de Oliveira, Dayanne R.; Bento, Elizângela B.; Leite, Laura H. I.; Souza, Daniele O.; Siebra, Ana Luiza A.; Sampaio, Renata S.; Martins, Anita O. P. B.; Ramos, Andreza G. B.; Tintino, Saulo R.; Lacerda-Neto, Luiz J.; Figueiredo, Patricia R. L.; Oliveira, Larissa R.; Rodrigues, Cristina K. S.; Sales, Valterlúcio S.; Figueiredo, Francisco R. S. D. N.; Nascimento, Emmily P.; Monteiro, Alefe B.; Amaro, Érika N.; Costa, José G. M.; Douglas Melo Coutinho, Henrique; de Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Kerntopf, Marta R.

    2013-01-01

    Croton campestris A. St.-Hill., popularly known as “velame do campo,” is a species native to the savannah area of Northeast Brazil, which is used by traditional communities in folk medicine for variety of health problems, especially detoxification, inflammation, and gastritis. The hydroalcoholic extract of C. campestris leaves (HELCC) was assessed for its antiulcerogenic effect in gastric lesion models and effect on intestinal motility in mice, and possible mechanisms of action were examined. HELCC showed significant gastroprotective action in all models of gastric ulcer evaluated; the results suggest that this action probably involves the nitric oxide pathway. HELCC did not show alteration of intestinal motility in mice. It was also found that C. campestris represents a promising natural source with important biological potential, justifying some of its uses in folk medicine. PMID:23864894

  17. Antiulcerogenic Activity of the Hydroalcoholic Extract of Leaves of Croton campestris A. St.-Hill in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Júnior, Francisco E B; de Oliveira, Dayanne R; Bento, Elizângela B; Leite, Laura H I; Souza, Daniele O; Siebra, Ana Luiza A; Sampaio, Renata S; Martins, Anita O P B; Ramos, Andreza G B; Tintino, Saulo R; Lacerda-Neto, Luiz J; Figueiredo, Patricia R L; Oliveira, Larissa R; Rodrigues, Cristina K S; Sales, Valterlúcio S; Figueiredo, Francisco R S D N; Nascimento, Emmily P; Monteiro, Alefe B; Amaro, Erika N; Costa, José G M; Douglas Melo Coutinho, Henrique; de Menezes, Irwin R A; Kerntopf, Marta R

    2013-01-01

    Croton campestris A. St.-Hill., popularly known as "velame do campo," is a species native to the savannah area of Northeast Brazil, which is used by traditional communities in folk medicine for variety of health problems, especially detoxification, inflammation, and gastritis. The hydroalcoholic extract of C. campestris leaves (HELCC) was assessed for its antiulcerogenic effect in gastric lesion models and effect on intestinal motility in mice, and possible mechanisms of action were examined. HELCC showed significant gastroprotective action in all models of gastric ulcer evaluated; the results suggest that this action probably involves the nitric oxide pathway. HELCC did not show alteration of intestinal motility in mice. It was also found that C. campestris represents a promising natural source with important biological potential, justifying some of its uses in folk medicine.

  18. Lightweight IMM PV Flexible Blanket Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Deployable Space Systems (DSS) has developed an inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) photovoltaic (PV) integrated modular blanket assembly (IMBA) that can be rolled or z-folded. This IMM PV IMBA technology enables a revolutionary flexible PV blanket assembly that provides high specific power, exceptional stowed packaging efficiency, and high-voltage operation capability. DSS's technology also accommodates standard third-generation triple junction (ZTJ) PV device technologies to provide significantly improved performance over the current state of the art. This SBIR project demonstrated prototype, flight-like IMM PV IMBA panel assemblies specifically developed, designed, and optimized for NASA's high-voltage solar array missions.

  19. Heritage Park Facilities PV Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hobaica, Mark

    2013-09-26

    Project Objective: To procure a photovoltaic array (PV) system which will generate approximately 256kW of power to be used for the operations of the Aquatic Complex and the adjacent Senior Facility at the Heritage Park. This project complies with the EERE’s work and objectives by promoting the development and deployment of an energy system that will provide current and future generations with clean, efficient, affordable, and reliable energy.

  20. Inhibitory Activity of Podophyllotoxin and Matairesinol-derivative Lignans on the Root Growth of Brassica campestris.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, M; Matsuura, S; Muro, C; Tsujibo, H; Matsumura, E; Yamaguchi, H; Inamori, Y

    1994-01-01

    All the lignans tested in a bioassay with Brassica campestris L. subsp. rapa Hook. fil. et Anders inhibited the root growth of this plant, except for deoxypicropodophyllin. The effects of functional groups in the molecule on the inhibitory activity of these compounds were studied. It is suggested that the methylenedioxyl group and the stereochemical configuration of the lactone junction of podophyllotoxin derivatives were closely related to the inhibitory activity. The O-methyl derivative of two hydroxyl groups of matairesinol greatly enhanced the inhibition of root growth in this plant.

  1. Trichostrongylus auriculatus n. sp. (Nematoda: Trichostrongylidae) from the steenbok, Raphicerus campestris (Thunberg, 1811).

    PubMed

    Boomker, J

    1986-12-01

    During a pilot survey of the parasites of some artiodactylids in the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park a new species of Trichostrongylus Looss, 1905 was recovered from the small intestine of a steenbok, Raphicerus campestris (Thunberg, 1811), a gemsbok, Oryx gazella (Linnaeus, 1758), and a red hartebeest, Alcelaphus buselaphus (Pallas, 1766). The male spicules were 0,120-0,148 mm long and an ear-shaped protuberance was present on the shaft of the left spicule. The presence of only a single protuberance is characteristic of the species.

  2. The Pepper Extracellular Xyloglucan-Specific Endo-β-1,4-Glucanase Inhibitor Protein Gene, CaXEGIP1, Is Required for Plant Cell Death and Defense Responses1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Nak Hyun; Lee, Yeon Kyeong; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce various proteinaceous inhibitors to protect themselves against microbial pathogen attack. A xyloglucan-specific endo-β-1,4-glucanase inhibitor1 gene, CaXEGIP1, was isolated and functionally characterized in pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants. CaXEGIP1 was rapidly and strongly induced in pepper leaves infected with avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria, and purified CaXEGIP1 protein significantly inhibited the hydrolytic activity of the glycoside hydrolase74 family xyloglucan-specific endo-β-1,4-glucanase from Clostridium thermocellum. Soluble-modified green fluorescent protein-tagged CaXEGIP1 proteins were mainly localized to the apoplast of onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated overexpression of CaXEGIP1 triggered pathogen-independent, spontaneous cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. CaXEGIP1 silencing in pepper conferred enhanced susceptibility to virulent and avirulent X. campestris pv vesicatoria, accompanied by a compromised hypersensitive response and lowered expression of defense-related genes. Overexpression of dexamethasone:CaXEGIP1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) enhanced resistance to Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. Comparative histochemical and proteomic analyses revealed that CaXEGIP1 overexpression induced a spontaneous cell death response and also increased the expression of some defense-related proteins in transgenic Arabidopsis leaves. This response was also accompanied by cell wall thickening and darkening. Together, these results suggest that pathogen-inducible CaXEGIP1 positively regulates cell death-mediated defense responses in plants. PMID:23093361

  3. PECTATE LYASE-LIKE10 is associated with pollen wall development in Brassica campestris.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingjing; Yao, Lina; Yu, Youjian; Lv, Meiling; Miao, Ying; Cao, Jiashu

    2014-11-01

    PECTATE LYASE-LIKE10 (PLL10) was previously identified as one of the differentially expressed genes both in microspores during the late pollen developmental stages and in pistils during the fertilization process in Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis). Here, antisense-RNA was used to study the functions of BcPLL10 in Chinese cabbage. Abnormal pollen was identified in the transgenic lines (bcpll10-4, -5, and -6). In fertilization experiments, fewer seeds were harvested when the antisense-RNA lines were used as pollen donor. In vivo and in vitro pollen germination assays less germinated pollen tubes were observed in bcpll10 lines. Scanning electron microscopy observation verified that the tryphine materials were over accumulated around the pollen surface and sticked them together in bcpll10. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy observation revealed that the internal endintine was overdeveloped and predominantly occupied the intine, and disturbed the normal proportional distribution of the two layers in the non-germinal furrow region; and no obvious demarcation existed between them in the germinal furrow region in the bcpll10 pollen. Collectively, this study presented a novel PLL gene that played an important role during the pollen wall development in B. campestris, which may also possess potential importance for male sterility usage in agriculture.

  4. Production of xanthan gum by free and immobilized cells of Xanthomonas campestris and Xanthomonas pelargonii.

    PubMed

    Niknezhad, Seyyed Vahid; Asadollahi, Mohammad Ali; Zamani, Akram; Biria, Davoud

    2016-01-01

    Production of xanthan gum using immobilized cells of Xanthomonas campestris and Xanthomonas pelargonii grown on glucose or hydrolyzed starch as carbon sources was investigated. Calcium alginate (CA) and calcium alginate-polyvinyl alcohol-boric acid (CA-PVA) beads were used for the immobilization of cells. Xanthan titers of 8.2 and 9.2g/L were obtained for X. campestris cells immobilized in CA-PVA beads using glucose and hydrolyzed starch, respectively, whereas those for X. pelargonii were 8 and 7.9 g/L, respectively. Immobilized cells in CA-PVA beads were successfully employed in three consecutive cycles for xanthan production without any noticeable degradation of the beads whereas the CA beads were broken after the first cycle. The results of this study suggested that immobilized cells are advantageous over the free cells for xanthan production. Also it was shown that the cells immobilized in CA-PVA beads are more efficient than cells immobilized in CA beads for xanthan production. PMID:26526173

  5. The polygalacturonase gene BcMF2 from Brassica campestris is associated with intine development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Cao, Jiashu; Zhang, Aihong; Ye, Yiqun; Zhang, Yuchao; Liu, Tingting

    2009-01-01

    Brassica campestris Male Fertility 2 (BcMF2) is a putative polygalacturonase (PG) gene previously isolated from the flower bud of Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino, syn. B. rapa ssp. chinensis). This gene was found to be expressed specifically in tapetum and pollen after the tetrad stage of anther development. Antisense RNA technology was used to study the function of BcMF2 in Chinese cabbage. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that there were deformities in the transgenic mature pollen grains such as abnormal location of germinal furrows. In addition, the homogeneous pectic exintine layer facing the exterior seemed to be overdeveloped and predominantly occupied the intine, thus reversing the normal proportional distribution of the internal endintine layer and the external exintine layer. Since it is a continuation of the intine layer, the pollen tube wall could not grow normally. This resulted in the formation of a balloon-like swelling structure in the pollen tube tip in nearly 80% of the transgenic pollen grains. Premature degradation of tapetum was also found in these transgenic plants, which displayed decreased expression of the BcMF2 gene. BcMF2 might therefore encode a new PG with an important role in pollen wall development, possibly via regulation of pectin's dynamic metabolism.

  6. Ozone affects gas exchange, growth and reproductive development in Brassica campestris (Wisconsin fast plants).

    PubMed

    Black, V J; Stewart, C A; Roberts, J A; Black, C R

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to ozone (O(3)) may affect vegetative and reproductive development, although the consequences for yield depend on the effectiveness of the compensatory processes induced. This study examined the impact on reproductive development of exposing Brassica campestris (Wisconsin Fast Plants) to ozone during vegetative growth. Plants were exposed to 70 ppb ozone for 2 d during late vegetative growth or 10 d spanning most of the vegetative phase. Effects on gas exchange, vegetative growth, reproductive development and seed yield were determined. Impacts on gas exchange and foliar injury were related to pre-exposure stomatal conductance. Exposure for 2 d had no effect on growth or reproductive characteristics, whereas 10-d exposure reduced vegetative growth and reproductive site number on the terminal raceme. Mature seed number and weight per pod and per plant were unaffected because seed abortion was reduced. The observation that mature seed yield per plant was unaffected by exposure during the vegetative phase, despite adverse effects on physiological, vegetative and reproductive processes, shows that indeterminate species such as B. campestris possess sufficient compensatory flexibility to avoid reductions in seed production. PMID:17803646

  7. [Reclamation of the plant regeneration efficiency of Brassica campestris subsp. chinensis var.Parachinensis].

    PubMed

    Yu, X L; Cao, J S; Xu, S Y

    2001-06-01

    This investigation has developed an efficient and fast method for plant regeneration from petiole of cotyledon explants of Brassica campestris L. subsp. chinensis Makino var. parachinensis Tsen et Lee. A medium was designed for B. campestris subsp. chinensis var. parachinensis to obtain the high frequency of shoot regeneration, which contained BAP 2 mg/L, NAA 0.75-1.0 mgL and 7.5 mg/L AgNO3 solution to the half of NH4+ concentration's MS basic medium. 60 mL/L coconut milk were added to all of media. In this method, frequency of shoot regeneration of "youqing caixin" reached as high as 91.2% and the number of shoots per explant reached as high as 4.7 plants. The result showed that there was a positive correlation between frequency of shoot regeneration and number of shoots per explant. The little shoots could be observed five days after inoculation and were formed directly. The inducing rate of roots of the shoots reached as high as 100% and the rate of viability of transferred mature plant reached higher than 95%. The regeneration period from petiole with cotyledon to a seedling was shorten to about 49 days. Factors influencing in vitro explant regeneration were studied. PMID:12549111

  8. PECTATE LYASE-LIKE 9 from Brassica campestris is associated with intine formation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingjing; Yao, Lina; Yu, Youjian; Liang, Ying; Jiang, Jianxia; Ye, Nenghui; Miao, Ying; Cao, Jiashu

    2014-12-01

    Brassica campestris pectate lyase-like 9 (BcPLL9) was previously identified as a differentially expressed gene both in buds during late pollen developmental stage and in pistils during fertilization in Chinese cabbage. To characterize the gene's function, antisense-RNA lines of BcPLL9 (bcpll9) were constructed in Chinese cabbage. Self- and cross-fertilization experiments harvested half seed yields when bcpll9 lines were used as pollen donors. In vivo and in vitro pollen germination assays showed that nearly half of the pollen tubes in bcpll9 were irregular with shorter length and uneven surface. Aniline blue staining identified abnormal accumulation of a specific bright blue unknown material in the bcpll9 pollen portion. Scanning electron microscopy observation verified the abnormal outthrust material to be near the pollen germinal furrows. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed the internal endintine layer was overdeveloped and predominantly occupied the intine. This abnormally formed intine likely induced the wavy structure and growth arrest of the pollen tube in half of the bcpll9 pollen grains, which resulted in less seed yields. Collectively, this study presented a novel PLL gene that has an important function in B. campestris intine formation.

  9. PECTATE LYASE-LIKE10 is associated with pollen wall development in Brassica campestris.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingjing; Yao, Lina; Yu, Youjian; Lv, Meiling; Miao, Ying; Cao, Jiashu

    2014-11-01

    PECTATE LYASE-LIKE10 (PLL10) was previously identified as one of the differentially expressed genes both in microspores during the late pollen developmental stages and in pistils during the fertilization process in Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis). Here, antisense-RNA was used to study the functions of BcPLL10 in Chinese cabbage. Abnormal pollen was identified in the transgenic lines (bcpll10-4, -5, and -6). In fertilization experiments, fewer seeds were harvested when the antisense-RNA lines were used as pollen donor. In vivo and in vitro pollen germination assays less germinated pollen tubes were observed in bcpll10 lines. Scanning electron microscopy observation verified that the tryphine materials were over accumulated around the pollen surface and sticked them together in bcpll10. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy observation revealed that the internal endintine was overdeveloped and predominantly occupied the intine, and disturbed the normal proportional distribution of the two layers in the non-germinal furrow region; and no obvious demarcation existed between them in the germinal furrow region in the bcpll10 pollen. Collectively, this study presented a novel PLL gene that played an important role during the pollen wall development in B. campestris, which may also possess potential importance for male sterility usage in agriculture. PMID:24773757

  10. The polygalacturonase gene BcMF2 from Brassica campestris is associated with intine development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Cao, Jiashu; Zhang, Aihong; Ye, Yiqun; Zhang, Yuchao; Liu, Tingting

    2009-01-01

    Brassica campestris Male Fertility 2 (BcMF2) is a putative polygalacturonase (PG) gene previously isolated from the flower bud of Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino, syn. B. rapa ssp. chinensis). This gene was found to be expressed specifically in tapetum and pollen after the tetrad stage of anther development. Antisense RNA technology was used to study the function of BcMF2 in Chinese cabbage. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that there were deformities in the transgenic mature pollen grains such as abnormal location of germinal furrows. In addition, the homogeneous pectic exintine layer facing the exterior seemed to be overdeveloped and predominantly occupied the intine, thus reversing the normal proportional distribution of the internal endintine layer and the external exintine layer. Since it is a continuation of the intine layer, the pollen tube wall could not grow normally. This resulted in the formation of a balloon-like swelling structure in the pollen tube tip in nearly 80% of the transgenic pollen grains. Premature degradation of tapetum was also found in these transgenic plants, which displayed decreased expression of the BcMF2 gene. BcMF2 might therefore encode a new PG with an important role in pollen wall development, possibly via regulation of pectin's dynamic metabolism. PMID:19039102

  11. Overexpression of a Brassica campestris HSP70 in tobacco confers enhanced tolerance to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaorong; Yan, Bin; Shi, Min; Zhou, Wei; Zekria, David; Wang, Huizhong; Kai, Guoyin

    2016-05-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) exist extensively in eukaryotes and are conserved molecular chaperones with important contribution to plant's survival under environmental stresses. Here, the cloning and characterization of one complementary DNA (cDNA) designated as BcHSP70 from young seedlings of Brassica campestris were reported in the present work. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that BcHSP70 belongs to the plant HSP gene family and had the closest relationship with HSP70-4 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Constitutive overexpression of BcHSP70 in tobacco obviously conferred tolerance to heat stress by affecting different plant physiological parameters. In our study, transgenic tobaccos exhibited higher chlorophyll content than wild-type control when exposed to heat stress. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities, which were helpful to decrease the damage to the membrane system, were significantly higher in transformants compared to wild-type lines. Meanwhile, lower comparative electrical conductivity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content and higher proline and soluble sugar accumulation were found in transgenic tobaccos than in wild-type lines. All these above results indicated that this isolated BcHSP70 cDNA owned the ability to improve the tolerance to heat stress in transgenic tobacco, which provides helpful information and good basement to culture new robust B. campestris variety resistant to high-temperature stress by molecular breeding in the future. PMID:26298102

  12. Ozone affects gas exchange, growth and reproductive development in Brassica campestris (Wisconsin fast plants).

    PubMed

    Black, V J; Stewart, C A; Roberts, J A; Black, C R

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to ozone (O(3)) may affect vegetative and reproductive development, although the consequences for yield depend on the effectiveness of the compensatory processes induced. This study examined the impact on reproductive development of exposing Brassica campestris (Wisconsin Fast Plants) to ozone during vegetative growth. Plants were exposed to 70 ppb ozone for 2 d during late vegetative growth or 10 d spanning most of the vegetative phase. Effects on gas exchange, vegetative growth, reproductive development and seed yield were determined. Impacts on gas exchange and foliar injury were related to pre-exposure stomatal conductance. Exposure for 2 d had no effect on growth or reproductive characteristics, whereas 10-d exposure reduced vegetative growth and reproductive site number on the terminal raceme. Mature seed number and weight per pod and per plant were unaffected because seed abortion was reduced. The observation that mature seed yield per plant was unaffected by exposure during the vegetative phase, despite adverse effects on physiological, vegetative and reproductive processes, shows that indeterminate species such as B. campestris possess sufficient compensatory flexibility to avoid reductions in seed production.

  13. PV output smoothing with energy storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2012-03-01

    This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

  14. Asteraceae Artemisia campestris and Artemisia herba-alba Essential Oils Trigger Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Leishmania infantum Promastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Messaoud, Chokri; Haoues, Meriam; Neffati, Noura; Bassoumi Jamoussi, Imen; Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija; Boussaid, Mohamed; Karoui, Habib

    2016-01-01

    We report the chemical composition and anti-Leishmania and antioxidant activity of Artemisia campestris L. and Artemisia herba-alba Asso. essential oils (EOs). Our results showed that these extracts exhibit different antioxidant activities according to the used assay. The radical scavenging effects determined by DPPH assay were of IC50 = 3.3 mg/mL and IC50 = 9.1 mg/mL for Artemisia campestris and Artemisia herba-alba essential oils, respectively. However, antioxidant effects of both essential oils, determined by ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, were in the same range (2.3 and 2.97 mg eq EDTA/g EO, resp.), while the Artemisia herba-alba essential oil showed highest chelating activity of Fe2+ ions (27.48 mM Fe2+). Interestingly, we showed that both EOs possess dose-dependent activity against Leishmania infantum promastigotes with IC50 values of 68 μg/mL and 44 μg/mL for A. herba-alba and A. campestris, respectively. We reported, for the first time, that antileishmanial activity of both EOs was mediated by cell apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest at the sub-G0/G1 phase. All our results showed that EOs from A. herba-alba and A. campestris plants are promising candidates as anti-Leishmania medicinal products. PMID:27807464

  15. Development of non-destructive quality measurement technique for cabbage seed (Brassica campestris L) using hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cabbage (Brassica campestris L) is an important crop for Asian countries especially in Korea, Japan and China. In order to achieve uniform and high-yield rate of cabbage product, the seed lot quality needs to be controlled. Non-destructive evaluation of seed viability is an important technique for i...

  16. The crystallization of apo-form UMP kinase from Xanthomonas campestris is significantly improved in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Jhe-Le; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2007-05-01

    A bacterial UMP kinase from the plant pathogen X. campestris pathovar campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in a strong magnetic field. The crystals diffracted to 2.35 Å. Bacterial UMP kinases (UMPKs) are crucial enzymes that are responsible for microbial UTP biosynthesis. Interestingly, eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells use different enzymes for UMP-phosphorylation reactions. Prokaryotic UMPKs are thus believed to be potential targets for antimicrobial drug development. Here, the cloning, expression and crystallization of SeMet-substituted XC1936, a bacterial UMPK from Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris, are reported. The crystallization of the apo-form UMPK was found to be significantly improved in a strong magnetic field; the crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.35 Å, a dramatic improvement over the original value of 3.6 Å. Preliminary structural analyses of apo-form XC1936 using crystals grown in a strong magnetic field clearly reveal well defined loop regions involved in substrate-analogue binding that were previously not visible. Crystallization in a strong magnetic field thus was found to be indispensable in determining the flexible region of the XC1936 UMPK structure.

  17. Ensuring Quality of PV Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Hacke, P.; Kempe, M.; Sample, T.; Yamamichi, M.; Kondo, M.; Doi, T.; Otani, K.; Amano, J.

    2011-07-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) customers need to have confidence in the PV modules they purchase. Currently, no test can quantify a module's lifetime with confidence, but stress tests are routinely used to differentiate PV product designs. We suggest that the industry would be strengthened by using the wisdom of the community to develop a single set of tests that will help customers quantify confidence in PV products. This paper evaluates the need for quality assurance (QA) standards and suggests a path for creating these. Two types of standards are needed: 1) QA of the module design and 2) QA of the manufacturing process.

  18. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) of small antelopes: steenbok, Raphicerus campestris and suni, Neotragus moschatus.

    PubMed

    Golezardy, H; Horak, I G

    2006-09-01

    During surveys on the tick burdens of various wildlife species in South Africa, nine small antelopes became available for study. Six of these were steenbok, Raphicerus campestris and three sunis, Neotragus moschatus, and their tick burdens are recorded here. The steenbok were examined in three nature reserves and harboured nine tick species. The sunis were examined in a fourth reserve and were infested with eight species. The steenbok and sunis were generally infested with the immature stages of the same tick species that infest larger animals in the same geographic regions. In addition the sunis harboured Haemaphysalis parmata, which in South Africa is present only in the eastern and north-eastern coastal and adjacent areas of KwaZulu-Natal Province. They were also infested with Rhipicephalus kochi, which in South Africa occurs only in the far north-east of the KwaZulu-Natal and Limpopo Provinces.

  19. Soxhlet-assisted matrix solid phase dispersion to extract flavonoids from rape (Brassica campestris) bee pollen.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuangqin; Tu, Xijuan; Dong, Jiangtao; Long, Peng; Yang, Wenchao; Miao, Xiaoqing; Chen, Wenbin; Wu, Zhenhong

    2015-11-15

    Soxhlet-assisted matrix solid phase dispersion (SA-MSPD) method was developed to extract flavonoids from rape (Brassica campestris) bee pollen. Extraction parameters including the extraction solvent, the extraction time, and the solid support conditions were investigated and optimized. The best extraction yields were obtained using ethanol as the extraction solvent, silica gel as the solid support with 1:2 samples to solid support ratio, and the extraction time of one hour. Comparing with the conventional solvent extraction and Soxhlet method, our results show that SA-MSPD method is a more effective technique with clean-up ability. In the test of six different samples of rape bee pollen, the extracted content of flavonoids was close to 10mg/g. The present work provided a simple and effective method for extracting flavonoids from rape bee pollen, and it could be applied in the studies of other kinds of bee pollen.

  20. Seasonal energy requirements and thermoregulation of growing pouched mice, Saccostomus campestris (Cricetidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, G. T. H.; Skinner, J. D.

    1991-06-01

    Pouched mice ( Saccostomus campestris) were born in captivity during January and March and subsequently maintained under long photoperiod (14 h light: 10 h dark) at 25°C. During their first winter (July) and the following summer (January) the pouched mice were exposed to natural photoperiod in an unheated laboratory for 3 weeks prior to measurement. The pouched mice continued to grow during the study, and were significantly heavier after summer exposure than after winter exposure 6 months earlier. Although this increase in body mass would result in a decline in their surface area to volume ratio there was no significant decline in minimal thermal conductance ( C m) and winter-exposed pouched mice had a relatively lower C m than expected. Meanwhile the smaller, winter-exposed animals displayed a significantly higher capacity for non-shivering thermogenesis, together with higher levels of basal metabolism than summer individuals. These differences were not solely attributable to the contrasting body mass of each group and it is therefore clear that S. campestris can increase thermoregulatory heat production, and modify heat loss following exposure to short photoperiod and cold during their first winter. Despite the significant increase in metabolism, the overall energy requirements of small, winter-exposed animals were significantly lower than those for heavier pouched mice following exposure to summer conditions. These results suggest that growing pouched mice can effectively adapt to lower temperature conditions during their first winter, yet accrue considerable overall savings in total energy requirements as a result of their smaller body mass.

  1. Water Extract from Spent Mushroom Substrate of Hericium erinaceus Suppresses Bacterial Wilt Disease of Tomato.

    PubMed

    Kwak, A Min; Min, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Sang Yeop; Kang, Hee Wan

    2015-09-01

    Culture filtrates of six different edible mushroom species were screened for antimicrobial activity against tomato wilt bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum B3. Hericium erinaceus, Lentinula edodes (Sanjo 701), Grifola frondosa, and Hypsizygus marmoreus showed antibacterial activity against the bacteria. Water, n-butanol, and ethyl acetate extracts of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) of H. erinaceus exhibited high antibacterial activity against different phytopathogenic bacteria: Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, R. solanacearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, X. campestris pv. campestris, X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, X. axonopodis pv. citiri, and X. axonopodis pv. glycine. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that water extracts of SMS (WESMS) of H. erinaceus induced expressions of plant defense genes encoding β-1,3-glucanase (GluA) and pathogenesis-related protein-1a (PR-1a), associated with systemic acquired resistance. Furthermore, WESMS also suppressed tomato wilt disease caused by R. solanacearum by 85% in seedlings and promoted growth (height, leaf number, and fresh weight of the root and shoot) of tomato plants. These findings suggest the WESMS of H. erinaceus has the potential to suppress bacterial wilt disease of tomato through multiple effects including antibacterial activity, plant growth promotion, and defense gene induction. PMID:26539048

  2. Water Extract from Spent Mushroom Substrate of Hericium erinaceus Suppresses Bacterial Wilt Disease of Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, A Min; Min, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Sang Yeop

    2015-01-01

    Culture filtrates of six different edible mushroom species were screened for antimicrobial activity against tomato wilt bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum B3. Hericium erinaceus, Lentinula edodes (Sanjo 701), Grifola frondosa, and Hypsizygus marmoreus showed antibacterial activity against the bacteria. Water, n-butanol, and ethyl acetate extracts of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) of H. erinaceus exhibited high antibacterial activity against different phytopathogenic bacteria: Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, R. solanacearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, X. campestris pv. campestris, X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, X. axonopodis pv. citiri, and X. axonopodis pv. glycine. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that water extracts of SMS (WESMS) of H. erinaceus induced expressions of plant defense genes encoding β-1,3-glucanase (GluA) and pathogenesis-related protein-1a (PR-1a), associated with systemic acquired resistance. Furthermore, WESMS also suppressed tomato wilt disease caused by R. solanacearum by 85% in seedlings and promoted growth (height, leaf number, and fresh weight of the root and shoot) of tomato plants. These findings suggest the WESMS of H. erinaceus has the potential to suppress bacterial wilt disease of tomato through multiple effects including antibacterial activity, plant growth promotion, and defense gene induction. PMID:26539048

  3. Terawatt Challenge for Thin-Film PV

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, K.

    2005-08-01

    The evolution of PV into one of the world's largest industries is not going to happen without major unforeseen problems. However, this study attempts to address the obvious ones, so that we can put aside the mythology of PV (for example, that it is only ''boutique power'' or that one must pave the world with it to be useful) and get on with changing the world's energy infrastructure. With the years of rapid market growth now under way in PV, the author is sure this will not be the last effort to understand the real potential and pitfalls of meeting the Challenge.

  4. Jebel Ali Hotel PV lighting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, M.

    1984-05-01

    A large stand-alone PV lighting project was installed in June 1983 at the Jebel Ali Hotel in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. A high mast lighting system provides illumination for a 130 meter diameter traffic roundabout. The high mast system is powered by a 15 kilowatt peak array of Mobil Solar ribbon PV modules. Along the 700 meter access road leading to the hotel entrance, twenty-one PV powered streetlights provide low-level lighting. Each streetlight consists of a 20 watt fluorescent tube powered by two 35 Wp modules. Operation of both systems is completely automatic. Design, installation, and operating experience to date are reviewed.

  5. Enhancing effect of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetic acid on transcription of the ice nucleation-active gene of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Watanabe, J; Michigami, Y

    1994-12-01

    Cultivation of an ice nucleation-active strain of Xanthomonas campestris in the presence (1 ppm) of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetic acid resulted in enhancement of its ice-nucleation activity. Both the ice-nucleation-active protein, InaX, and its mRNA were effectively expressed in the bacterial cells cultured in the presence of this compound. This indicates that this compound stimulated the biosynthesis of the ice-nucleation-active protein. PMID:7765721

  6. Characterization of a putative pollen-specific arabinogalactan protein gene, BcMF8, from Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Cao, Jia-Shu; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Ye, Yi-Qun

    2008-12-01

    The BcMF8 (Brassica campestris male fertility 8) gene, possessing the features of 'classical' arabinogalactan protein (AGP) was isolated from Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis, Makino syn. B. rapa L. ssp. chinensis. This gene was highly abundant in the fertile flower buds but silenced in the sterile ones of genic male sterile A/B line ('ZUBajh97-01A/B') in B. campestris. Expression patterns analysis suggested BcMF8 was a pollen-specific gene, whose transcript started to be expressed at the uninucleate stage and maintained throughout to the pollen at pollination stage. BcMF8 is highly homologous to the known pollen-specific AGP genes Sta 39-4 and Sta 39-3 from B. napus. Isolation and multiple alignment of the homologs of BcMF8 gene in the family Cruciferae indicated that BcMF8 was highly conserved in this family, which reflect the conservation in biological function and importance of this putative AGP gene in plant development. Similarity analysis also demonstrated Sta 39-4 and Sta 39-3 may originate from different genomes.

  7. Cadmium-Induced Hydrogen Accumulation Is Involved in Cadmium Tolerance in Brassica campestris by Reestablishment of Reduced Glutathione Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin; Shen, Wenbiao; Shen, Zhenguo; Xia, Yan; Cui, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas (H2) was recently proposed as a therapeutic antioxidant and signaling molecule in clinical trials. However, the underlying physiological roles of H2 in plants remain unclear. In the present study, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize the physiological roles of H2 in enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris against cadmium (Cd). The results showed that both 50 μM CdCl2 and 50%-saturated HRW induced an increase of endogenous H2 in Brassica campestris seedlings, and HRW alleviated Cd toxicity related to growth inhibition and oxidative damage. Seedlings supplied with HRW exhibited increased root length and reduced lipid peroxidation, similar to plants receiving GSH post-treatment. Additionally, seedlings post-treated with HRW accumulated higher levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) and showed increased GST and GPX activities in roots. Molecular evidence illustrated that the expression of genes such as GS, GR1 and GR2, which were down-regulated following the addition of Cd, GSH or BSO, could be reversed to varying degrees by the addition of HRW. Based on these results, it could be proposed that H2 might be an important regulator for enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris seedlings against Cd, mainly by governing reduced glutathione homeostasis. PMID:26445361

  8. Cadmium-Induced Hydrogen Accumulation Is Involved in Cadmium Tolerance in Brassica campestris by Reestablishment of Reduced Glutathione Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Su, Nana; Chen, Qin; Shen, Wenbiao; Shen, Zhenguo; Xia, Yan; Cui, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas (H2) was recently proposed as a therapeutic antioxidant and signaling molecule in clinical trials. However, the underlying physiological roles of H2 in plants remain unclear. In the present study, hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize the physiological roles of H2 in enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris against cadmium (Cd). The results showed that both 50 μM CdCl2 and 50%-saturated HRW induced an increase of endogenous H2 in Brassica campestris seedlings, and HRW alleviated Cd toxicity related to growth inhibition and oxidative damage. Seedlings supplied with HRW exhibited increased root length and reduced lipid peroxidation, similar to plants receiving GSH post-treatment. Additionally, seedlings post-treated with HRW accumulated higher levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) and showed increased GST and GPX activities in roots. Molecular evidence illustrated that the expression of genes such as GS, GR1 and GR2, which were down-regulated following the addition of Cd, GSH or BSO, could be reversed to varying degrees by the addition of HRW. Based on these results, it could be proposed that H2 might be an important regulator for enhancing the tolerance of Brassica campestris seedlings against Cd, mainly by governing reduced glutathione homeostasis.

  9. PV Module Reliability Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its PV module reliability research. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed and recent publications are listed.

  10. Distributed PV Adoption in Maine Through 2021

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Pieter; Sigrin, Ben

    2015-11-06

    NREL has used its dSolar (distributed solar) model to generate low-medium-high estimates of distributed PV adoption in Maine through 2021. This presentation gives a high-level overview of the model and modeling results.

  11. PV array simulator development and validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Lucca, Roberto; Deuel, Don

    2010-06-01

    The ability to harvest all available energy from a photovoltaic (PV) array is essential if new system developments are to meet levelized cost of energy targets and achieve grid parity with conventional centralized utility power. Therefore, exercising maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms, dynamic irradiance condition operation and startup and shutdown routines and evaluating inverter performance with various PV module fill-factor characteristics must be performed with a repeatable, reliable PV source. Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with Ametek Programmable Power to develop and demonstrate a multi-port TerraSAS PV array simulator. The simulator will replicate challenging PV module profiles, enabling the evaluation of inverter performance through analyses of the parameters listed above. Energy harvest algorithms have traditionally implemented methods that successfully utilize available energy. However, the quantification of energy capture has always been difficult to conduct, specifically when characterizing the inverter performance under non-reproducible dynamic irradiance conditions. Theoretical models of the MPPT algorithms can simulate capture effectiveness, but full validation requires a DC source with representative field effects. The DC source being developed by Ametek and validated by Sandia is a fully integrated system that can simulate an IV curve from the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) module data base. The PV simulator allows the user to change the fill factor by programming the maximum power point voltage and current parameters and the open circuit voltage and short circuit current. The integrated PV simulator can incorporate captured irradiance and module temperature data files for playback, and scripted profiles can be generated to validate new emerging hardware embedded with existing and evolving MPPT algorithms. Since the simulator has multiple independent outputs, it also has the flexibility to evaluate an inverter with multiple

  12. PV System Energy Evaluation Method (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes a comparison of the "predicted" energy (based on historical weather data) with the "expected" energy (based on the measured weather data) to determine whether a PV system is performing as modeled in order to verify the accuracy of a model. A key factor in defining this energy test is determining the test boundary so that weather variations are not inadvertently included in what is considered to be PV system performance.

  13. Updating Technical Screens for PV Interconnection: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M.; Ellis, A.; Lynn, K.; Razon, A.; Key, T.; Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Hill, R.; Nicole, K.; Smith, J.

    2012-08-01

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) is the dominant type of distributed generation (DG) technology interconnected to electric distribution systems in the United States, and deployment of PV systems continues to increase rapidly. Considering the rapid growth and widespread deployment of PV systems in United States electric distribution grids, it is important that interconnection procedures be as streamlined as possible to avoid unnecessary interconnection studies, costs, and delays. Because many PV interconnection applications involve high penetration scenarios, the process needs to allow for a sufficiently rigorous technical evaluation to identify and address possible system impacts. Existing interconnection procedures are designed to balance the need for efficiency and technical rigor for all DG. However, there is an implicit expectation that those procedures will be updated over time in order to remain relevant with respect to evolving standards, technology, and practical experience. Modifications to interconnection screens and procedures must focus on maintaining or improving safety and reliability, as well as accurately allocating costs and improving expediency of the interconnection process. This paper evaluates the origins and usefulness of the capacity penetration screen, offers potential short-term solutions which could effectively allow fast-track interconnection to many PV system applications, and considers longer-term solutions for increasing PV deployment levels in a safe and reliable manner while reducing or eliminating the emphasis on the penetration screen.

  14. PV Working with Industry, 2nd Quarter, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.; Moon, S.

    2000-06-29

    NREL PV Working With Industry is a quarterly newsletter devoted to the research, development, and deployment performed by NREL staff in concert with their industry and university partners. The Second Quarter, 2000, issue is titled ``Our Shared PV Future''. It contains a review of several important PV-related meetings held in the prior three months: the NCPV Program Review, the 16 European PV Conference, and year-2000 Earth Day activities in Denver, CO. The editorialist is Paul Maycock, Publisher of PV News.

  15. Photosynthetic Carbon Fixation Characteristics of Fruiting Structures of Brassica campestris L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Hari R.; Sheoran, Inder S.; Singh, Randhir

    1987-01-01

    Activities of key enzymes of the Calvin cycle and C4 metabolism, rates of CO2 fixation, and the initial products of photosynthetic 14CO2 fixation were determined in the podwall, seed coat (fruiting structures), and the subtending leaf (leaf below a receme) of Brassica campestris L. cv `Toria.' Compared to activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and other Calvin cycle enzymes, e.g. NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, the activities of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase and other enzymes of C4 metabolism, viz. NADP-malate dehydrogenase, NADP-malic enzyme, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, and glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, were generally much higher in seed than in podwall and leaf. Podwall and leaf were comparable to each other. Pulse-chase experiments showed that in seed the major product of 14CO2 assimilation was malate (in short time), whereas in podwall and leaf, the label initially appeared in 3-PGA. With time, the label moved to sucrose. In contrast to legumes, Brassica pods were able to fix net CO2 during light. However, respiratory losses were very high during the dark period. PMID:16665321

  16. Isolation and characterization of a novel BcMF14 gene from Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Nie, Chuanpeng; Cao, Jiashu

    2011-03-01

    A putative RALF (rapid alkalinization factor)-like gene (GenBank accession number EF523517), named BcMF14, was isolated from Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino, syn. B. rapa ssp. chinensis) by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) based on a cDNA-AFLP differential fragment exclusively expressed in fertile line. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) discovered that BcMF14 was prominently expressed in stage four and five flower buds of fertile line, no expression in vegetative structures or in sterility line. Detailed RT-PCR illuminated its strong expression in stamens. Successful suppression of BcMF14 gene expression greatly reduced the normal pollen grains. The frequency of abnormal pollen grains was 48.95% in the mutant with many shriveled pollen grains with irregular shape and some larger ones with deep hollows along the germination ditch. Pollen germination was stopped because of the severely twisted pollen tubes. These results demonstrate a potential role of the BcMF14 gene in the development of male gametogenesis in Chinese cabbage.

  17. Molecular marker analysis of genes controlling morphological variation in Brassica rapa (syn. campestris).

    PubMed

    Song, K; Slocum, M K; Osborn, T C

    1995-01-01

    Construction of a detailed RFLP linkage map of B. rapa (syn. campestris) made it possible, for the first time, to study individual genes controlling quantitative traits in this species. Ninety-five F2 individuals from a cross of Chinese cabbage cv 'Michihili' by Spring broccoli were analyzed for segregation at 220 RFLP loci and for variation in leaf, stem, and flowering characteristics. The number, location, and magnitude of genes underlying 28 traits were determined by using an interval mapping method. Zero to five putative quantitative trait loci (QTL) were detected for each of the traits examined. There were unequal gene effects on the expression of many traits, and the inheritance patterns of traits ranged from those controlled by a single major gene plus minor genes to those controlled by polygenes with small and similar effects. The effect of marker locus density on detection of QTL was analyzed, and the results showed that the number of QTL detected did not change when the number of marker loci used for QTL mapping was decreased from 220 to 126; however, a further reduction from 126 to 56 caused more than 15% loss of the total QTL detected. The detection of putative minor QTL by removing the masking effects of major QTL was explored.

  18. Identification of non-alkaloid acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from Ferulago campestris (Besser) Grecescu (Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Maggi, Filippo; Minesso, Paola; Salvagno, Marina; Papa, Fabrizio; Vittori, Sauro; Innocenti, Gabbriella

    2010-12-01

    Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is still considered as a strategy for the treatment of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Many plant derived alkaloids (such as galantamine and rivastigmine) are known for their AChE inhibitory activity. Recently, other classes of natural compounds such as terpenoids, sesquiterpene glycosides and coumarins have been studied as new AChE inhibitors, with the aim to discover less toxic compounds compared to alkaloidal ones. The Ferulago campestris roots dichloromethane extract was used for a bioassay-guided fractionation for the search of AChE inhibitors. Three coumarin derivatives (umbelliprenin 1, coladonin 2 and coladin 3), three daucane ester derivatives (siol anisate 4, ferutinin 5 and 1-acetyl-5-angeloyl lapiferol 6), two phenol derivatives (2-epilaserine 7 and epielmanticine 8) and one polyacetylene (9-epoxyfalcarindiol 9) were isolated by the bioassay-guided approach. Their structures were characterized on the basis of spectral methods (1D and 2D NMR, and MS spectroscopy). All the isolated compounds were able to inhibit the AChE (IC(50) 1.2-0.1mM) although at higher doses if compared to galantamine (6.7 μM) measured in the same conditions. The most active compounds were the daucane derivative siol anisate 4 and the epielmanticine 8, with IC(50) of 0.172 and 0.175 mM respectively.

  19. Xanthan production by a native strain of X. campestris and evaluation of application in EOR.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Shaghayegh; Soudi, Mohammad Reza; Haghighi, Manouchehr

    2007-09-01

    In this study, we used a native strain of X. campestris for xanthan production in lab-scale fermentor and the product was recovered with organic solvents and dried. Then we studied the potential usage of our products in different harsh conditions, including heat, pH and salinity treatments. Furthermore, we used 2D-micromodel for microbial oil recovery investigations. According to present experiments, temperature and salt contents did not have a significant influence on rheological behavior of xanthan solutions and these aqueous solutions maintained at least 80% of their primary viscosity. In addition, these solutions were resistant to a broad range of pH variations. Viscosity of the xanthan solution was increased as it was heated over 120 degrees C. Micro-model experiments showed that the most efficient concentration of xanthan for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is 1000 mg L(-1) and 53% of original oil in place was recovered, which showed remarkable increase comparing to original oil in place that was recovered (31%) from sole water flooding. The same or even better results were obtained from native xanthan, when its properties were compared to those of a commercial sample which was gifted by NIOC.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Xaa-Pro dipeptidase from Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwani; Are, Venkata Narayana; Ghosh, Biplab; Agrawal, Utsavi; Jamdar, Sahayog N; Makde, Ravindra D; Sharma, Surinder M

    2014-09-01

    Xaa-Pro dipeptidase (XPD; prolidase; EC 3.4.13.9) specifically hydrolyzes dipeptides with a prolyl residue at the carboxy-terminus. Xanthomonas spp. possess two different isoforms of XPD (48 and 43 kDa) which share ∼24% sequence identity. The XPD of 43 kDa in size (XPD43) from Xanthomonas spp. is unusual as it lacks the strictly conserved tyrosine residue (equivalent to Tyr387 in Escherichia coli aminopeptidase P) that is suggested to be important in the proton-shuttle transfer required for catalysis in the M24B (MEROPS) family. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XPD43 from X. campestris (GenBank accession No. NP_637763) are reported. Recombinant XPD43 was crystallized using the microbatch-under-oil technique. Diffraction data were collected on the recently commissioned protein crystallography beamline (PX-BL21) at the Indian synchrotron (Indus-2, 2.5 GeV) to 1.83 Å resolution with 100% completeness. The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 84.32, b = 105.51, c = 111.35 Å. Two monomers are expected to be present in the asymmetric unit of the crystal, corresponding to a solvent content of 58%. Structural analysis of XPD43 will provide new insights into the role of the conserved residues in catalysis in the M24B family.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Xaa-Pro dipeptidase from Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwani; Are, Venkata Narayana; Ghosh, Biplab; Agrawal, Utsavi; Jamdar, Sahayog N; Makde, Ravindra D; Sharma, Surinder M

    2014-09-01

    Xaa-Pro dipeptidase (XPD; prolidase; EC 3.4.13.9) specifically hydrolyzes dipeptides with a prolyl residue at the carboxy-terminus. Xanthomonas spp. possess two different isoforms of XPD (48 and 43 kDa) which share ∼24% sequence identity. The XPD of 43 kDa in size (XPD43) from Xanthomonas spp. is unusual as it lacks the strictly conserved tyrosine residue (equivalent to Tyr387 in Escherichia coli aminopeptidase P) that is suggested to be important in the proton-shuttle transfer required for catalysis in the M24B (MEROPS) family. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XPD43 from X. campestris (GenBank accession No. NP_637763) are reported. Recombinant XPD43 was crystallized using the microbatch-under-oil technique. Diffraction data were collected on the recently commissioned protein crystallography beamline (PX-BL21) at the Indian synchrotron (Indus-2, 2.5 GeV) to 1.83 Å resolution with 100% completeness. The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 84.32, b = 105.51, c = 111.35 Å. Two monomers are expected to be present in the asymmetric unit of the crystal, corresponding to a solvent content of 58%. Structural analysis of XPD43 will provide new insights into the role of the conserved residues in catalysis in the M24B family. PMID:25195907

  2. Structure of a Novel N-acetyl-L-citrulline Deacetylase from Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Shi,D.; Yu, X.; Roth, L.; Tuchman, M.; Allewell, N.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of a novel acetylcitrulline deacetylase from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris has been solved by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) using crystals grown from selenomethionine-substituted protein and refined at 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. The asymmetric unit of the crystal contains one monomer consisting of two domains, a catalytic domain and a dimerization domain. The catalytic domain is able to bind a single Co(II) ion at the active site with no change in confirmation. the dimerization domain forms an interface between two monomers related by a crystallographic two-fold symmetry axis. The interface is maintained by hydrophobic interactions between helices and hydrogen bonding between two {beta} strands that form a continuous {beta} sheet across the dimer interface. Because the dimers are also related by two-fold crystallographic axes, they pack together across the crystal via the dimerization domain, suggesting that higher order oligomers may form in solution. The polypeptide fold of the monomer is similar to the fold of Pseudomonas sp. carboxypeptidase G2 and Neisseria meningitidis succinyl diaminopimelate desuccinylase. Structural comparison among these enzymes allowed modeling of substrate binding and suggests a possible catalytic mechanism, in which Glu130 functions as a bifunctional general acid-base catalyst and the metal ion polarizes the carbonyl of the acetyl group.

  3. Promotion of Flowering in Brassica campestris L. cv Ceres by Sucrose

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Douglas J. C.; Bodson, Monique; Bernier, Georges

    1984-01-01

    Flower initiation of the quantitative long-day plant Brassica campestris cv Ceres was earlier and at a lower final leaf number when sucrose was added to the medium in which plants were grown in sterile culture. The optimal concentration of sucrose was 40 to 80 millimolar. This flower-promoting effect of sucrose was not osmotic, as mannitol, sodium chloride, and polyethylene glycol were not effective at equal osmotic potentials. Seedlings grown heterotrophically after treatment with 4-chloro-5-(dimethylamino)-2-phenyl-3-(2H)-pyridazinone to prevent chlorophyll accumulation were also induced to form flower primordia earlier as the sucrose concentration in the medium was increased up to 80 millimolar. Inclusion of 4 millimolar sodium nitrate in the culture medium of green plants did not reduce the flower-promoting effects of sucrose but delayed initiation in plants grown without added sucrose. Removal of CO2 during a single main or supplementary light period, or both, greatly reduced flower initiation. It is concluded that sucrose may be an important controlling factor determining floral initiation in Brassica. PMID:16663739

  4. Biosynthesis of a substituted cellulose from a mutant strain of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Vojnov, Adrián A; Bassi, Daniel E; Daniels, Michael J; Dankert, Marcelo A

    2002-02-18

    In Xanthomonas campestris the genes involved in polysaccharide (xanthan) biosynthesis are located in a gene cluster (gum) of 16 kb. A Tn5 insertion mutant with a reduced slimy phenotype has been characterized. This mutant failed to produce the pentasaccharide repeating-unit of xanthan. Only three sugars were transferred to the prenyl phosphate intermediate. Several lines of evidence suggested that the lipid-associated saccharide was the trisaccharide reducing end of the pentasaccharide from the wild-type strain. This trisaccharide was built up from UDP-Glc and GDP-Man, and a glucose residue was at the reducing end, linked to an allylic prenol through a diphosphate bridge. Results from one- or two-stage reactions showed that the trisaccharide-P-P-polyprenol was the precursor of the polymer. This new polymer, a polytrisaccharide, was detected also in vivo. The transposon responsible for the mutation was located within gumK gene. Therefore, this gene encodes for the glycosyltransferase IV, which catalyses the transfer of glucuronic acid to the lipid-linked beta-D-Manp-(1-->3)-beta-D-Glcp-(1-->4)-beta-D-Glcp trisaccharide. A recombinant plasmid with the whole gum cluster restored the wild type phenotype.

  5. Selenium alleviates chromium toxicity by preventing oxidative stress in cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. Pekinensis) leaves.

    PubMed

    Qing, Xuejiao; Zhao, Xiaohu; Hu, Chengxiao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Pengcheng; Shi, Hanzhi; Jia, Fen; Qu, Chanjuan

    2015-04-01

    The beneficial role of selenium (Se) in alleviation of chromium (Cr)-induced oxidative stress is well established. However, little is known about the underlying mechanism. The impacts of exogenous Se (0.1mg/L) on Cr(1mg/L)-induced oxidative stress and antioxidant systems in leaves of cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. Pekinensis) were investigated by using cellular and biochemical approaches. The results showed that supplementation of the medium with Se was effective in reducing Cr-induced increased levels of lipid peroxides and superoxide free radicals (O(-)2(·)), as well as increasing activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD). Meanwhile, 1mg/L Cr induced loss of plasma membrane integrity, growth inhibition, as well as ultrastructural changes of leaves were significantly reversed due to Se supplementation in the medium. In addition, Se application significantly altered the subcellular distribution of Cr which transported from mitochondria, nucleus and the cell-wall material to the soluble fraction and chloroplasts. However, Se application did no significant alteration of Cr effects on osmotic adjustment accumulating products. The study suggested that Se is able to protect leaves of cabbage against Cr toxicity by alleviation of Cr induced oxidative stress, and re-distribution of Cr in the subcellular of the leaf. Furthermore, free radicals, lipid peroxides, activity of SOD and POD, and subcellular distribution of Cr can be considered the efficient biomarkers to indicate the efficiency of Se to detoxification Cr.

  6. Roseomonas soli sp. nov., isolated from an agricultural soil cultivated with Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Uk; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2014-03-01

    A bacterial strain, designated 5N26(T), was isolated from an agricultural soil cultivated with Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris). Cells of this strain were Gram-reaction-negative, strictly aerobic, motile, non-spore-forming rods, and catalase- and urease-negative. The major fatty acids of strain 5N26(T) were C16 : 0 (7.5 %), C18 : 1 2-OH (13.4 %) and summed feature 8 (C18:1ω6c and/or C18:1ω7c; 63.2%). The polar lipid profile contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine and one unidentified aminolipid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain 5N26(T) was 68.3 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain 5N26(T) was phylogenetically related to Roseomonas lacus TH-G33(T) and Roseomonas terrae DS-48(T) (97.0 % and 96.6 % sequence similarity, respectively). The results of genotypic and phenotypic data showed that strain 5N26(T) could be distinguished from phylogenetically related species, and that this strain represented a novel species within the genus Roseomonas, for which the name Roseomonas soli sp. nov. (type strain 5N26(T) = KACC 16376(T) = NBRC 109097(T)) is proposed.

  7. Photosynthetic carbon fixation characteristics of fruiting structures of Brassica campestris L

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, H.R.; Sheoran, I.S.; Singh, R.

    1987-04-01

    Activities of key enzymes of the Calvin cycle and C/sub 4/ metabolism, rates of CO/sub 2/ fixation, and the initial products of photosynthetic /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation were determined in the podwall, seed coat (fruiting structures), and the subtending leaf (leaf below a receme) of Brassica campestris L. cv Toria. Compared to activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and other Calvin cycle enzymes, e.g. NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, the activities of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase and other enzymes of C/sub 4/ metabolism, viz. NADP-malate dehydrogenase, NADP-malic enzyme, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, and glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, were generally much higher in seed than in podwall and leaf. Podwall and leaf were comparable to each other. Pulse-chase experiments showed that in seed the major product of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ assimilation was malate (in short time), whereas in podwall and leaf, the label initially appeared in 3-PGA. With time, the label moved to sucrose. In contrast to legumes, Brassica pods were able to fix net CO/sub 2/ during light. However, respiratory losses were very high during the dark period.

  8. The Biosynthesis of Some Isothiocyanates and Oxazolidinethiones in Rape (Brassica campestris L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, M. D.; Wetter, L. R.

    1967-01-01

    The incorporation of the radioactivity from acetate-1-14C, acetate-2-14C, dl-methionine-1-14C, dl-methionine-2-14C, dl-methionine-3,4-14C, dl-homomethionine-2-14C, dl-allyl-glycine-2-14C, and dl-2-amino-5-hydroxyvalerate-2-14C into the aglycones of progoitrin, gluconapin, and glucobrassicanapin of maturing rape plants (Brassica campestris L.) was investigated. Radioactivity from dl-methionine-2-14C, dl-methionine-3,4-14C, dl-homomethionine-2-14C, and acetate-2-14C were incorporated into the 3 major thioglucosides. The other organic compounds were poorly incorporated except for dl-allylglycine-2-14C into glucobrassicanapin. The results obtained suggest that the rape plant can synthesize amino acids by the condensation of acetate (as acetyl CoA) to α-keto acids to yield a homologue of the original amino acid. These newly formed amino acids are then employed to synthesize the 3 major thioglucosides. PMID:16656711

  9. PV performance modeling workshop summary report.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Tasca, Coryne Adelle; Cameron, Christopher P.

    2011-05-01

    During the development of a solar photovoltaic (PV) energy project, predicting expected energy production from a system is a key part of understanding system value. System energy production is a function of the system design and location, the mounting configuration, the power conversion system, and the module technology, as well as the solar resource. Even if all other variables are held constant, annual energy yield (kWh/kWp) will vary among module technologies because of differences in response to low-light levels and temperature. A number of PV system performance models have been developed and are in use, but little has been published on validation of these models or the accuracy and uncertainty of their output. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program, Sandia National Laboratories organized a PV Performance Modeling Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 22-23, 2010. The workshop was intended to address the current state of PV system models, develop a path forward for establishing best practices on PV system performance modeling, and set the stage for standardization of testing and validation procedures for models and input parameters. This report summarizes discussions and presentations from the workshop, as well as examines opportunities for collaborative efforts to develop objective comparisons between models and across sites and applications.

  10. PV production forecast in La Reunion Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubus, L.; Leboucher, V.; Garo, M.

    2010-09-01

    Photovoltaic power production is developing quickly in La Reunion (Indian Ocean). In order to integrate this fluctuating energy source into the network, reliable production forecasts are necessary from real time to day+3. Weather forecasts from standard models are in general inadequate, in particular due to too coarse resolution in this complex orography area. In this study, we use observations (Météo-France) and reanalysis (ERAinterim) fields to evaluate the potential predictability of PV production, for individual solar power plants and from the island aggregated point of view. This in particular allows to select the best weather predictors for PV production. The forecast quality of the selected fields was then established, in order to use only the interesting ones. Finally, NWPs are used to estimate which part of PV production predictability is accessible with state of the art weather forecasting models. This leads to requirements on temporal and spatial resolution of NWP to improve the forecast quality.

  11. Developing standards for PV packaging materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlgemuth, John; Kempe, Michael; Miller, David; Kurtz, Sarah

    2011-09-01

    The initial qualification standards for photovoltaic modules were designed to help develop a product that is safe, and able to survive reasonably long time periods when deployed in the field. To accomplish this, TC-82 of the International Electro-Technical Commission (IEC), developed and published module qualification standards (IEC 61215 for crystalline Si, IEC 61646 for thin films and IEC 62108 for concentrating modules) and a module safety standard (IEC 61730 -1 and 2). As PV has developed and the technology has become better understood, the properties of materials used in the module package play an increasingly important part in achieving long-term durability and safety. Certain basic properties are required of the materials in order for the modules to be safe and to be able to survive in the field for 25 years or more. Therefore Working Group 2 (Modules) of TC-82 began work to develop new material-level standards for PV that will utilize existing standards, whenever available, but tailored for characterizing the properties that are important for PV modules and modified to take into account the environmental conditions specific to PV applications. The goal is to provide a uniform approach to characterizing candidate materials, providing the necessary information to designers selecting materials for use in their PV products as well as to certification bodies assessing the quality and safety of the products made from these materials. This paper will describe the details of the effort underway to determine what PV material standards are necessary and the progress on developing those standards.

  12. Real time PV manufacturing diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Kochergin, Vladimir; Crawford, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    The main obstacle Photovoltaic (PV) industry is facing at present is the higher cost of PV energy compared to that of fossil energy. While solar cell efficiencies continue to make incremental gains these improvements are so far insufficient to drive PV costs down to match that of fossil energy. Improved in-line diagnostics however, has the potential to significantly increase the productivity and reduce cost by improving the yield of the process. On this Phase I/Phase II SBIR project MicroXact developed and demonstrated at CIGS pilot manufacturing line a high-throughput in-line PV manufacturing diagnostic system, which was verified to provide fast and accurate data on the spatial uniformity of thickness, an composition of the thin films comprising the solar cell as the solar cell is processed reel-to-reel. In Phase II project MicroXact developed a stand-alone system prototype and demonstrated the following technical characteristics: 1) ability of real time defect/composition inconsistency detection over 60cm wide web at web speeds up to 3m/minute; 2) Better than 1mm spatial resolution on 60cm wide web; 3) an average better than 20nm spectral resolution resulting in more than sufficient sensitivity to composition imperfections (copper-rich and copper-poor regions were detected). The system was verified to be high vacuum compatible. Phase II results completely validated both technical and economic feasibility of the proposed concept. MicroXact’s solution is an enabling technique for in-line PV manufacturing diagnostics to increase the productivity of PV manufacturing lines and reduce the cost of solar energy, thus reducing the US dependency on foreign oil while simultaneously reducing emission of greenhouse gasses.

  13. Updating Interconnection Screens for PV System Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M.; Mather, B.; Kroposki, B.; Lynn, K.; Razon, A.; Ellis, A.; Hill, R.; Key, T.; Nicole, K.; Smith, J.

    2012-02-01

    This white paper evaluates the origins and usefulness of the capacity penetration screen, offer short-term solutions which could effectively allow fast-track interconnection to many PV system applications, and considers longer-term solutions for increasing PV deployment levels in a safe and reliable manner while reducing or eliminating the emphasis on the penetration screen. Short-term and longer-term alternatives approaches are offered as examples; however, specific modifications to screening procedures should be discussed with stakeholders and must ultimately be adopted by state and federal regulatory bodies.

  14. Large-Scale PV Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

    2011-07-29

    This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

  15. Molecular diagnosis of a laboratory mouse papillomavirus (MusPV).

    PubMed

    Joh, Joongho; Jenson, A Bennett; Proctor, Mary; Ingle, Arvind; Silva, Kathleen A; Potter, Christopher S; Sundberg, John P; Ghim, Shin-je

    2012-12-01

    MusPV, a novel papillomavirus (PV) that naturally infects laboratory mice, was isolated and characterized from a colony of NMRI-Foxn1(nu)/Foxn1(nu) (nude) mice in India. Because MusPV may have been missed during routine pathogen screening of mice in colonies worldwide, a variety of detection methods are described to detect MusPV. The clinical and histologic lesions of productive MusPV infections fit PV-associated features, including papillomas, koilocytes within the stratum granulosum of the hyperplastic/acanthotic papillomatous epithelium, and the presence of intranuclear virus particles in koilocytotic cells visualized by electron microscopy. Antiserum against disrupted PV virions, isolated from another species (canine), identified conserved viral antigens in productively infected cells by immunohistochemistry. A rolling circle technique was used to amplify viral circular DNAs followed by endonuclease restriction enzyme digestion to determine the correct size of PV DNA. Consensus PV degenerative primers, My09/11, commonly used to detect many different types of PVs by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), particularly mucosotropic HPVs, also identified MusPV and all rodent PVs tested. Since there was one nucleotide mismatch between the My09/11 primer set and the MusPV template, a new primer set, MusPV-My09/11, was designed to specifically detect MusPV in latent infections and spontaneous MusPV-induced papillomas. Southern blot analysis verified the presence of full size PV DNA in infected tissues. Virus-like particles (VLPs), generated from MusPV L1 genes, provided a substrate for serological testing of naturally and experimentally infected mice. In summary, a series of diagnostic assays were developed and validated to detect MusPV infection in skin tumors and serological response in laboratory mice. PMID:22796029

  16. International PV QA Task Force's Proposed Comparative Rating System for PV Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2014-10-01

    The International PV Quality Assurance Task Force is developing a rating system that provides comparative information about the relative durability of PV modules. Development of accelerated stress tests that can provide such comparative information is seen as a major step toward being able to predict PV module service life. This paper will provide details of the ongoing effort to determine the format of such an overall module rating system. The latest proposal is based on using three distinct climate zones as defined in IEC 60721-2-1 for two different mounting systems. Specific stresses beyond those used in the qualification tests are being developed for each of the selected climate zones.

  17. NREL PV System Performance and Standards Technical Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the status and accomplishments during Fiscal Year (FY)2004 of the Photovoltaic (PV) System Performance & Standards Subtask, which is part of PV Systems Engineering Project (a joint NREL-Sandia project).

  18. Characterization of a male sterile related gene BcMF15 from Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Aimei; Cao, Jiashu; Huang, Li; Yu, Xiaolin; Ye, Wanzhi

    2009-02-01

    Data from cDNA-AFLP analysis based on the genome-wide transcriptional profiling on the flower buds of the male meiotic cytokinesis (mmc) mutant and its wild-type of Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino, syn. B. rapa L. ssp. chinensis, indicated that mutation of the MMC gene resulted in changes in expression of a variety of genes. A transcript-derived fragment specifically accumulated in the wild-type flower buds was isolated, and the corresponding full-length cDNA and DNA was subsequently amplified. Bioinformatical analyses of this gene named BcMF15 (GenBank accession number EF600901) showed that it encoded a protein with 103 amino acids. The BcMF15 had a 88% nucleotide similarity to a lipid transfer protein-like gene. Moreover, sequence prediction indicated that BcMF15 might encode a membrane protein with a signal peptide at the N-terminus. Meanwhile, six domains were predicted in the deduced BcMF15 protein, such as the AAI domain existing in some crucial proteins of pollen development-preferential, signal peptide, transmembrane domain, vWF domain, ZnF_C4 domain, and Tryp_alpha_amyl domain. Spatial and temporal expression patterns analysis by RT-PCR indicated that BcMF15 was exclusively expressed in the fertile line, which indicated this gene is male sterile related. Phylogenetic analysis in Cruciferae revealed that the BcMF15 was relative conservative in evolution. We suppose BcMF15 may be a critical molecule in the transmembrane transportation and signal transduction during microspore development.

  19. Combining ability and maternal effects in Brassica campestris L. var. 'yellow sarson'.

    PubMed

    Singh, J N; Murty, B R

    1980-11-01

    A diallel analysis of combining ability, including maternal effects, genotype X environment interaction and the progress under selection, is reported in three selected crosses of Brassica campestris L. var. 'yellow sarson', involving 15 types, including 10 four-valved and 5 two-valved types from different parts of India. Twelve characters, including oil content, were studied in the f1 generation.The investigation has revealed only marginal superiority of f1's over the parents for most of the characters related to yield. There was no relation between heterozygosity and stability of performance over environments for yield or its components or for oil content. Substantial maternal effects were observed which also interacted with environments. Creation of variation for primary and secondary branches would be essential for changing yield level in 'yellow sarson'. The presence of limited additive variation available for selection for yield components should be augmented by biparental mating the early segregating generations to break linkages, and was demonstrated by the recombinants obtained when this method was adopted.The magnitude of genotype - environment interactions in this study, as compared with the total genetic components for yield, oil content, number of siliquae on main axis and presence of large reciprocal variances in relation to general and specific combining ability variances for practically all characters, and the large interaction of [Formula: see text], narrowed down the expected effectiveness of selection.Biparental mating in the three best crosses yielded three new recombinants outyielding the best check T 10 by the margins of 14%, 39% and 15%, respectively, in the yield trial. These recombinants had more primary branches and secondary branches, larger main axes and more siliquae with an increased number of seeds per siliqua, than any of the F1's in this study.

  20. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  1. TRNSYS HYBRID wind diesel PV simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, P.J.A.; Mitchell, J.W.; Klein, S.A.; Beckman, W.A.; Blair, N.J.

    1996-12-31

    The Solar Energy Laboratory (SEL) has developed a wind diesel PV hybrid systems simulator, UW-HYBRID 1.0, an application of the TRNSYS 14.2 time-series simulation environment. An AC/DC bus links up to five diesels and wind turbine models, along with PV modules, a battery bank, and an AC/DC converter. Multiple units can be selected. PV system simulations include solar angle and peak power tracking options. Weather data are Typical Meteorological Year data, parametrically generated synthesized data, or external data files. PV performance simulations rely on long-standing SEL-developed algorithms. Loads data are read as scalable time series. Diesel simulations include estimated fuel-use and waste heat output, and are dispatched using a least-cost of fuel strategy. Wind system simulations include varying air density, wind shear and wake effects. Time step duration is user-selectable. UW-HYBRID 1.0 runs in Windows{reg_sign}, with TRNSED providing a customizable user interface. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  2. National solar technology roadmap: Film-silicon PV

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Brian

    2007-06-01

    Silicon photovoltaic (PV) technologies are addressed in two different technology roadmaps: Film-Silicon PV and Wafer-Silicon PV. This Film-Silicon PV roadmap applies to all silicon-film technologies that rely on a supporting substrate such as glass, polymer, aluminum, stainless steel, or metallurgical-grade silicon. Such devices typically use amorphous, nanocrystalline, fine-grained polycrystalline, or epitaxial silicon layers that are 1–20 μm thick.

  3. Commercialization of PV-powered pumping systems for use in utility PV service programs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The project described in this report was a commercialization effort focused on cost-effective remote water pumping systems for use in utility-based photovoltaic (PV) service programs. The project combined a commercialization strategy tailored specifically for electric utilities with the development of a PV-powered pumping system that operates conventional ac pumps rather than relying on the more expensive and less reliable PV pumps on the market. By combining these two attributes, a project goal was established of creating sustained utility purchases of 250 PV-powered water pumping systems per year. The results of each of these tasks are presented in two parts contained in this Final Summary Report. The first part summarizes the results of the Photovoltaic Services Network (PSN) as a new business venture, while the second part summarizes the results of the Golden Photon system installations. Specifically, results and photographs from each of the system installations are presented in this latter part.

  4. Role of Polycrystalline Thin-Film PV Technologies in Competitive PV Module Markets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    von Roedern, B.; Ullal, H. S.

    2008-05-01

    This paper discusses the developments in thin-film PV technologies and provides an outlook on future commercial module efficiencies achievable based on today's knowledge about champion cell performance.

  5. Determination of Parameters of PV Concentrating System With Heliostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, R.; Norsoyan, A.; Dallakyan, V.

    2010-10-01

    The structure of PV concentrating system with heliostat is analyzed. The mathematical model of system consisting of PV concentrating module and heliostat is developed. With the use of developed mathematical model the optimal parameters of the system are determined. The results of this work can be used during the design of PV concentrating systems with heliostats.

  6. High Resolution PV Power Modeling for Distribution Circuit Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, B. L.; Dise, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    NREL has contracted with Clean Power Research to provide 1-minute simulation datasets of PV systems located at three high penetration distribution feeders in the service territory of Southern California Edison (SCE): Porterville, Palmdale, and Fontana, California. The resulting PV simulations will be used to separately model the electrical circuits to determine the impacts of PV on circuit operations.

  7. Beacons In Brief. P/PV In Brief. Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Susan; Farley, Chelsea

    2004-01-01

    This second issue in P/PV's "In Brief" series focuses on the San Francisco Beacon Initiative and P/PV's recently released evaluation results. The Beacon Initiative established after-school programs in eight public schools in low-income San Francisco neighborhoods. P/PV's 36-month evaluation examined key developmental and academic outcomes.…

  8. In vitro control of plant pathogenic Xanthomonas spp. using Poncirus trifoliata Rafin.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Atiqur; Islam, Rafiquel; Al-Reza, Sharif M; Kang, Sun Chul

    2014-01-01

    The secondary metabolites such as essential oil and pure compounds (limonin and imperatorin) from Poncirus trifoliata Rafin were tested for in vitro control of phytopathogenic bacteria of Xanthomonas spp. In vitro studies showed that the oil had inhibitory effect on Xanthomonas campestris pv. compestris KC94-17-XCC, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria YK93-4-XCV, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae KX019-XCO and Xanthomonas sp. SK12 with their inhibition zones and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 13.1~22.1 mm and 62.5~125 μg/ml, respectively. Limonin and imperatorin also had in vitro antibacterial potential (MIC: 15.62~62.5 μg/ml) against all the tested Xanthomonas spp. Furthermore, the SEM studies demonstrated that limonin and imperatorin caused morphological changes of Xanthomonas sp. SK12 at the minimum inhibitory concentration (15.62 μg/ml). These results of this study support the possible use of essential oil and natural compounds from P. Trifoliata in agriculture and agro-industries to control plant pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26417325

  9. Functional analysis of a novel male fertility CYP86MF gene in Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis makino).

    PubMed

    Cao, J S; Yu, X L; Ye, W Z; Lu, G; Xiang, X

    2006-01-01

    In our earlier work, a cytochrome P450 CYP86MF gene was isolated from floral bud of Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino, syn. B. rapa L.) by mRNA differential display PCR (DD-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). To unravel the biological function of CYP86MF gene, the antisense fragment from the CYP86MF gene was transferred into Chinese cabbage pak-choi (B. campestris ssp. chinensis var. communis Tsen et Lee). Out of 22 plants transformed with the antisense gene constructed from the CYP86MF, 20 reached to flowering stage. Morphological investigations showed that the transgenic plants developed the normal floral organ. However, they remained self-infertile, even when artificial self-pollination was performed in the bud stage. Pollen germination test indicated that the pollen from the transgenic line TB-2 could not germinate normally. Further physiological, biochemical and cytological analyses showed that only significant difference was detectable in contents of the endogenous hormones, and a layer of unknown material adhered to the surface of microspore. The present studies thus provided valuable clues for understanding the biological function of the CYP86C subfamily genes. Furthermore, our studies also demonstrate a novel method for obtaining artificial male sterility line of Chinese cabbage.

  10. Evaluation of in vitro anticancer activity of Ocimum basilicum, Alhagi maurorum, Calendula officinalis and their parasite Cuscuta campestris.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the relationship between presence of cytotoxic compounds in Ocimum basilicum, Alhagi maurorum, Calendula officinalis and their parasite Cuscuta campestris. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds was performed by MTT assay against breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and normal breast cell line (MCF 10A). The induction of apoptosis was measured by the expression levels of p53, bcl-2, bax and caspase-3 genes using quantitative Real Time PCR. Three active fractions were detected by nuclear magnetic resonance as lutein, lupeol and eugenol, respectively, in C. officinalis, A. maurorum and O. basilicum. These compounds and their epoxidized forms were also detected in their parasite C. campestris. The cytotoxic activity of lutein epoxide, lupeol epoxide and eugenol epoxide was significantly more than lutein, lupeol and eugenol. The mRNA expression level of p53, caspase-3 and bax genes were increased in both cancer cells treated with all pure compounds. However, bcl-2 gene expression decreased in treated breast cancer cells. In conclusion, all the data indicated that the epoxide forms of lupeol, lutein and eugenol are potential drug candidates for inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

  11. Cloning, crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Ying-Der; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Shr, Hui-Lin; Gao, Fei Philip; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2006-10-01

    A CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen X. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. CN-hydrolase superfamily proteins are involved in a wide variety of non-peptide carbon–nitrogen hydrolysis reactions, producing some important natural products such as auxin, biotin, precursors of antibiotics etc. These reactions all involve attack on a cyano or carbonyl carbon by a conserved novel catalytic triad Glu-Lys-Cys through a thiol acylenzyme intermediate. However, classification into the CN-hydrolase superfamily based on sequence similarity alone is not straightforward and further structural data are necessary to improve this categorization. Here, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc), are reported. The SeMet-substituted XC1258 crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.73 Å. They are orthorhombic and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 143.8, b = 154.63, c = 51.3 Å, respectively.

  12. Leaching behaviour of pendimethalin causes toxicity towards different cultivars of Brassica juncea and Brassica campestris in sandy loam soil

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Subhendu; Choudhury, Partha P.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was conducted at the farm of Zonal Adaptive Research Station, Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidhyalaya, Pundibari, Cooch Behar, West Bengal to evaluate the effect of pendimethalin on the yield, weed density and phytotoxicity in different varieties of rai (Brassica juncea) and yellow sarson (B. campestris var. yellow sarson) under higher soil moisture regime in Terai region of West Bengal. Pre-emergence application of pendimethalin at higher dose i.e. 1.0 kg/ha recorded higher plant mortality (30.92%) due to the presence of higher concentration of pendimethalin residue (0.292 µg/g) till the tenth day of crop age and consequently had the reduced yield (12.59 q/ha) than the dose of 0.7 kg/ha (13.33 q/ha) where plant mortality was only 12.62% due to comparatively lower level of pendimethalin residue (0.192 µg/g). Although the application of pendimethalin at the rate of 1.0 kg/ha was able to control weed more efficiently (18.96/m2) than the dose of 0.7 kg/ha (30.41/m2) and subsequent lower doses. The herbicide leached down to the root zone resulting in phytotoxicity towards crop. Yellow sarson group (Brassica campestris) showed more susceptibility than rai (Brassica juncea) group against pendimethalin application at higher doses. PMID:21217862

  13. Leaching behaviour of pendimethalin causes toxicity towards different cultivars of Brassica juncea and Brassica campestris in sandy loam soil.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Subhendu; Choudhury, Partha P

    2009-12-01

    An experiment was conducted at the farm of Zonal Adaptive Research Station, Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidhyalaya, Pundibari, Cooch Behar, West Bengal to evaluate the effect of pendimethalin on the yield, weed density and phytotoxicity in different varieties of rai (Brassica juncea) and yellow sarson (B. campestris var. yellow sarson) under higher soil moisture regime in Terai region of West Bengal. Pre-emergence application of pendimethalin at higher dose i.e. 1.0 kg/ha recorded higher plant mortality (30.92%) due to the presence of higher concentration of pendimethalin residue (0.292 µg/g) till the tenth day of crop age and consequently had the reduced yield (12.59 q/ha) than the dose of 0.7 kg/ha (13.33 q/ha) where plant mortality was only 12.62% due to comparatively lower level of pendimethalin residue (0.192 µg/g). Although the application of pendimethalin at the rate of 1.0 kg/ha was able to control weed more efficiently (18.96/m(2)) than the dose of 0.7 kg/ha (30.41/m(2)) and subsequent lower doses. The herbicide leached down to the root zone resulting in phytotoxicity towards crop. Yellow sarson group (Brassica campestris) showed more susceptibility than rai (Brassica juncea) group against pendimethalin application at higher doses. PMID:21217862

  14. Evaluation of in vitro anticancer activity of Ocimum basilicum, Alhagi maurorum, Calendula officinalis and their parasite Cuscuta campestris.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the relationship between presence of cytotoxic compounds in Ocimum basilicum, Alhagi maurorum, Calendula officinalis and their parasite Cuscuta campestris. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds was performed by MTT assay against breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and normal breast cell line (MCF 10A). The induction of apoptosis was measured by the expression levels of p53, bcl-2, bax and caspase-3 genes using quantitative Real Time PCR. Three active fractions were detected by nuclear magnetic resonance as lutein, lupeol and eugenol, respectively, in C. officinalis, A. maurorum and O. basilicum. These compounds and their epoxidized forms were also detected in their parasite C. campestris. The cytotoxic activity of lutein epoxide, lupeol epoxide and eugenol epoxide was significantly more than lutein, lupeol and eugenol. The mRNA expression level of p53, caspase-3 and bax genes were increased in both cancer cells treated with all pure compounds. However, bcl-2 gene expression decreased in treated breast cancer cells. In conclusion, all the data indicated that the epoxide forms of lupeol, lutein and eugenol are potential drug candidates for inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. PMID:25548920

  15. Evaluation of In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Ocimum Basilicum, Alhagi Maurorum, Calendula Officinalis and Their Parasite Cuscuta Campestris

    PubMed Central

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the relationship between presence of cytotoxic compounds in Ocimum basilicum, Alhagi maurorum, Calendula officinalis and their parasite Cuscuta campestris. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds was performed by MTT assay against breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and normal breast cell line (MCF 10A). The induction of apoptosis was measured by the expression levels of p53, bcl-2, bax and caspase-3 genes using quantitative Real Time PCR. Three active fractions were detected by nuclear magnetic resonance as lutein, lupeol and eugenol, respectively, in C. officinalis, A. maurorum and O. basilicum. These compounds and their epoxidized forms were also detected in their parasite C. campestris. The cytotoxic activity of lutein epoxide, lupeol epoxide and eugenol epoxide was significantly more than lutein, lupeol and eugenol. The mRNA expression level of p53, caspase-3 and bax genes were increased in both cancer cells treated with all pure compounds. However, bcl-2 gene expression decreased in treated breast cancer cells. In conclusion, all the data indicated that the epoxide forms of lupeol, lutein and eugenol are potential drug candidates for inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. PMID:25548920

  16. Copper chloride induces antioxidant gene expression but reduces ability to mediate H2O2 toxicity in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Sornchuer, Phornphan; Namchaiw, Poommaree; Kerdwong, Jarunee; Charoenlap, Nisanart; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon

    2014-02-01

    Copper (Cu)-based biocides are currently used as control measures for both fungal and bacterial diseases in agricultural fields. In this communication, we show that exposure of the bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris to nonlethal concentrations of Cu(2+) ions (75 µM) enhanced expression of genes in OxyR, OhrR and IscR regulons. High levels of catalase, Ohr peroxidase and superoxide dismutase diminished Cu(2+)-induced gene expression, suggesting that the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic hydroperoxides is responsible for Cu(2+)-induced gene expression. Despite high expression of antioxidant genes, the CuCl2-treated cells were more susceptible to H2O2 killing treatment than the uninduced cells. This phenotype arose from lowered catalase activity in the CuCl2-pretreated cells. Thus, exposure to a nonlethal dose of Cu(2+) renders X. campestris vulnerable to H2O2, even when various genes for peroxide-metabolizing enzymes are highly expressed. Moreover, CuCl2-pretreated cells are sensitive to treatment with the redox cycling drug, menadione. No physiological cross-protection response was observed in CuCl2-treated cells in a subsequent challenge with killing concentrations of an organic hydroperoxide. As H2O2 production is an important initial plant immune response, defects in H2O2 protection are likely to reduce bacterial survival in plant hosts and enhance the usefulness of copper biocides in controlling bacterial pathogens. PMID:24385479

  17. Sequential assembly and polymerization of the polyprenol-linked pentasaccharide repeating unit of the xanthan polysaccharide in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed Central

    Ielpi, L; Couso, R O; Dankert, M A

    1993-01-01

    Lipid-linked intermediates are involved in the synthesis of the exopolysaccharide xanthan produced by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris (L. Ielpi, R. O. Couso, and M. A. Dankert, FEBS Lett. 130:253-256, 1981). In this study, the stepwise assembly of the repeating pentasaccharide unit of xanthan is described. EDTA-treated X. campestris cells were used as both enzyme preparation and lipid-P acceptor, and UDP-Glc, GDP-Man, and UDP-glucuronic acid were used as sugar donors. A linear pentasaccharide unit is assembled on a polyprenol-P lipid carrier by the sequential addition of glucose-1-P, glucose, mannose, glucuronic acid, and mannose. The in vitro synthesis of pentasaccharide-P-P-polyprenol was also accompanied by the incorporation of radioactivity into a polymeric product, which was characterized as xanthan, on the basis of gel filtration and permethylation studies. Results from two-stage reactions showed that essentially pentasaccharide-P-P-polyprenol is polymerized. In addition, the direction of chain elongation has been studied by in vivo experiments. The polymerization of lipid-linked repeat units occurs by the successive transfer of the growing chain to a new pentasaccharide-P-P-polyprenol. The reaction involves C-1 of glucose at the reducing end of the polyprenol-linked growing chain and C-4 of glucose at the nonreducing position of the newly formed polyprenol-linked pentasaccharide, generating a branched polymer with a trisaccharide side chain. PMID:7683019

  18. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of a novel acetylcitrulline deacetylase from Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Dashuang Yu, Xiaolin; Roth, Lauren; Morizono, Hiroki; Hathout, Yetrib; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2005-07-01

    The expression, purification and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a novel N-acetyl-l-citrulline deacetylase from X. campestris are reported. A novel N-acetyl-l-citrulline deacetylase that is able to catalyze the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-l-citrulline to acetate and citrulline was identified from Xanthomonas campestris. The protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2 and diffract to 1.75 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = 94.13, b = 95.23, c = 43.61 Å, β = 93.76°. Since attempts to use homologous structural models to solve the structure via molecular replacement were unsuccessful, the selenomethionine-substituted protein was prepared using an overnight auto-induction overexpression system. Selenomethionine incorporation into the protein was verified by MALDI–TOF/TOF mass-spectroscopic analysis after trypsin digestion. The crystals of the selenomethionine-substituted protein were prepared using crystallization conditions similar to those for the native protein. Multiple anomalous dispersion (MAD) data were collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Structure determination is under way using the MAD phasing method.

  19. PV_LIB Toolbox v. 1.3

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-09

    PV_LIB comprises a library of Matlab? code for modeling photovoltaic (PV) systems. Included are functions to compute solar position and to estimate irradiance in the PV system’s plane of array, cell temperature, PV module electrical output, and conversion from DC to AC power. Also included are functions that aid in determining parameters for module performance models from module characterization testing. PV_LIB is open source code primarily intended for research and academic purposes. All algorithms are documented in openly available literature with the appropriate references included in comments within the code.

  20. PV_LIB Toolbox v. 1.3

    2015-12-09

    PV_LIB comprises a library of Matlab? code for modeling photovoltaic (PV) systems. Included are functions to compute solar position and to estimate irradiance in the PV system’s plane of array, cell temperature, PV module electrical output, and conversion from DC to AC power. Also included are functions that aid in determining parameters for module performance models from module characterization testing. PV_LIB is open source code primarily intended for research and academic purposes. All algorithms aremore » documented in openly available literature with the appropriate references included in comments within the code.« less

  1. Cascaded Microinverter PV System for Reduced Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Bellus, Daniel R.; Ely, Jeffrey A.

    2013-04-29

    In this project, a team led by Delphi will develop and demonstrate a novel cascaded photovoltaic (PV) inverter architecture using advanced components. This approach will reduce the cost and improve the performance of medium and large-sized PV systems. The overall project objective is to develop, build, and test a modular 11-level cascaded three-phase inverter building block for photovoltaic applications and to develop and analyze the associated commercialization plan. The system will be designed to utilize photovoltaic panels and will supply power to the electric grid at 208 VAC, 60 Hz 3-phase. With the proposed topology, three inverters, each with an embedded controller, will monitor and control each of the cascade sections, reducing costs associated with extra control boards. This report details the final disposition on this project.

  2. Recognition of the bacterial avirulence protein AvrBs3 occurs inside the host plant cell.

    PubMed

    Van den Ackerveken, G; Marois, E; Bonas, U

    1996-12-27

    The molecular mechanism by which bacterial avirulence genes mediate recognition by resistant host plants has been enigmatic for more than a decade. In this paper we provide evidence that the Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria avirulence protein AvrBs3 is recognized inside the plant cell. Transient expression of avrBs3 in pepper leaves, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens for gene delivery, results in hypersensitive cell death, specifically on plants carrying the resistance gene Bs3. In addition, for its intracellular recognition, AvrBs3 requires nuclear localization signals that are present in the C-terminal region of the protein. We propose that AvrBs3 is translocated into plant cells via the Xanthomonas Hrp type III secretion system and that nuclear factors are involved in AvrBs3 perception. PMID:8980236

  3. Periplasmic glucans of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Talaga, P; Fournet, B; Bohin, J P

    1994-01-01

    We report the initial characterization of glucans present in the periplasmic space of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (strain R32). These compounds were found to be neutral, unsubstituted, and composed solely of glucose. Their size ranges from 6 to 13 glucose units/mol. Linkage studies and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses demonstrated that the glucans are linked by beta-1,2 and beta-1,6 glycosidic bonds. In contrast to the periplasmic glucans found in other plant pathogenic bacteria, the glucans of P. syringae pv. syringae are not cyclic but are highly branched structures. Acetolysis studies demonstrated that the backbone consists of beta-1,2-linked glucose units to which the branches are attached by beta-1,6 linkages. These periplasmic glucans were more abundant when the osmolarity of the growth medium was lower. Thus, P. syringae pv. syringae appears to synthesize periplasmic glucans in response to the osmolarity of the medium. The structural characteristics of these glucans are very similar to the membrane-derived oligosaccharides of Escherichia coli, apart from the neutral character, which contrasts with the highly anionic E. coli membrane-derived oligosaccharides. PMID:7961404

  4. PV Manufacturing R&D Project -- Trends in the U.S. PV Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K. E.; Mitchell, R. L.; Bower, W. I.; King, R.

    2005-01-01

    To foster continued growth in the U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the PV Manufacturing R&D (PVMR&D) Project--a partnership with U.S. PV industry participants to perform cost-shared manufacturing research and development. Throughout FY 2004, PVMR&D managed fourteen subcontracts across the industry. The impact of PVMR&D is quantified by reductions in direct module manufacturing costs, scale-up of existing PV production capacity, and accrual of cost savings to the public and industry. An analysis of public and industry investment shows that both recaptured funds by mid-1998 based on estimated manufacturing cost savings from PVMR&D participation. Since project inception, total PV manufacturing capacity has increased from 14 MW to 201 MW at the close of 2003, while direct manufacturing costs declined from $5.55/W to $2.49/W. These results demonstrate continued progress toward the overriding goals of the PVMR&D project.

  5. Energy balance of the global photovoltaic (PV) industry--is the PV industry a net electricity producer?

    PubMed

    Dale, Michael; Benson, Sally M

    2013-04-01

    A combination of declining costs and policy measures motivated by greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction and energy security have driven rapid growth in the global installed capacity of solar photovoltaics (PV). This paper develops a number of unique data sets, namely the following: calculation of distribution of global capacity factor for PV deployment; meta-analysis of energy consumption in PV system manufacture and deployment; and documentation of reduction in energetic costs of PV system production. These data are used as input into a new net energy analysis of the global PV industry, as opposed to device level analysis. In addition, the paper introduces a new concept: a model tracking energetic costs of manufacturing and installing PV systems, including balance of system (BOS) components. The model is used to forecast electrical energy requirements to scale up the PV industry and determine the electricity balance of the global PV industry to 2020. Results suggest that the industry was a net consumer of electricity as recently as 2010. However, there is a >50% that in 2012 the PV industry is a net electricity provider and will "pay back" the electrical energy required for its early growth before 2020. Further reducing energetic costs of PV deployment will enable more rapid growth of the PV industry. There is also great potential to increase the capacity factor of PV deployment. These conclusions have a number of implications for R&D and deployment, including the following: monitoring of the energy embodied within PV systems; designing more efficient and durable systems; and deploying PV systems in locations that will achieve high capacity factors.

  6. Integrating Solar PV in Utility System Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, A.; Botterud, A.; Wu, J.; Zhou, Z.; Hodge, B-M.; Heany, M.

    2013-10-31

    This study develops a systematic framework for estimating the increase in operating costs due to uncertainty and variability in renewable resources, uses the framework to quantify the integration costs associated with sub-hourly solar power variability and uncertainty, and shows how changes in system operations may affect these costs. Toward this end, we present a statistical method for estimating the required balancing reserves to maintain system reliability along with a model for commitment and dispatch of the portfolio of thermal and renewable resources at different stages of system operations. We estimate the costs of sub-hourly solar variability, short-term forecast errors, and day-ahead (DA) forecast errors as the difference in production costs between a case with “realistic” PV (i.e., subhourly solar variability and uncertainty are fully included in the modeling) and a case with “well behaved” PV (i.e., PV is assumed to have no sub-hourly variability and can be perfectly forecasted). In addition, we highlight current practices that allow utilities to compensate for the issues encountered at the sub-hourly time frame with increased levels of PV penetration. In this analysis we use the analytical framework to simulate utility operations with increasing deployment of PV in a case study of Arizona Public Service Company (APS), a utility in the southwestern United States. In our analysis, we focus on three processes that are important in understanding the management of PV variability and uncertainty in power system operations. First, we represent the decisions made the day before the operating day through a DA commitment model that relies on imperfect DA forecasts of load and wind as well as PV generation. Second, we represent the decisions made by schedulers in the operating day through hour-ahead (HA) scheduling. Peaking units can be committed or decommitted in the HA schedules and online units can be redispatched using forecasts that are improved

  7. PV solar electricity: status and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Winfried

    2006-04-01

    Within the four main market segments of PV solar electricity there are already three areas competitive today. These are off-grid industrial and rural as well as consumer applications. The overall growth within the past 8 years was almost 40 % p.a. with a "normal" growth of about 18 % p.a. for the first three market segments whereas the grid connected market increased with an astonishing 63 % p.a. The different growth rates catapulted the contribution of grid connected systems in relation to the total market from about one quarter 6 years ago towards more than three quarters today. The reason for this development is basically due to industry-politically induced market support programs in the aforementioned countries. It is quite important to outline under which boundary conditions grid connected systems will be competitive without support programs like the feed in tariff system in Germany, Spain and some more to come in Europe as well as investment subsidies in Japan, US and some other countries. It will be shown that in a more and more liberalized utility market worldwide electricity produced by PV solar electricity systems will be able to compete with their generating cost against peak power prices from utilities. The point of time for this competitiveness is mainly determined by the following facts: 1. Price decrease for PV solar electricity systems leading to an equivalent decrease in the generated cost for PV produced kWh. 2. Development of a truly liberalized electricity market. 3. Degree of irradiation between times of peak power demand and delivery of PV electricity. The first topic is discussed using price experience curves. Some explanations will be given to correlate the qualitative number of 20 % price decrease for doubling cumulative worldwide sales derived from the historic price experience curve with a more quantitative analysis based on our EPIA-Roadmap (productivity increase and ongoing improvements for existing technologies as well as development

  8. Genome-wide sequencing reveals two major sub-lineages in the genetically monomorphic pathogen xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum.

    PubMed

    Wasukira, Arthur; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Thwaites, Richard; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Aritua, Valente; Kubiriba, Jerome; Smith, Julian; Grant, Murray; Studholme, David J

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum (Xcm) is the causal agent of banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW). This disease has devastated economies based on banana and plantain crops (Musa species) in East Africa. Here we use genome-wide sequencing to discover a set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among East African isolates of Xcm. These SNPs have potential as molecular markers for phylogeographic studies of the epidemiology and spread of the pathogen. Our analysis reveals two major sub-lineages of the pathogen, suggesting that the current outbreaks of BXW on Musa species in the region may have more than one introductory event, perhaps from Ethiopia. Also, based on comparisons of genome-wide sequence data from multiple isolates of Xcm and multiple strains of X. vasicola pathovar vasculorum, we identify genes specific to Xcm that could be used to specifically detect Xcm by PCR-based methods. PMID:24704974

  9. Real Power and Reactive Power Control of a Three-Phase Single-Stage-PV System and PV voltage Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huijuan; Xu, Yan; Adhikari, Sarina; Rizy, D Tom; Li, Fangxing; Irminger, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems with power electronic interfaces can provide both real and reactive power to meet power system needs with appropriate control algorithms. This paper presents the control algorithm design for a three-phase single-stage grid-connected PV inverter to achieve either maximum power point tracking (MPPT) or a certain amount of real power injection, as well as the voltage/var control. The switching between MPPT control mode and a certain amount of real power control mode is automatic and seamless. Without the DC-to-DC booster stage, PV DC voltage stability is an important issue in the control design especially when the PV inverter is operating at maximum power point (MPP) with voltage/var control. The PV DC voltage collapse phenomenon and its reason are discussed. The method based on dynamic correction of the PV inverter output is proposed to ensure PV DC voltage stability. Simulation results of the single-stage PV system during system disturbances and fast solar irradiation changes confirm that the proposed control algorithm for single-stage PV inverters can provide appropriate real and reactive power services and ensure PV DC voltage stability during dynamic system operation and atmospheric conditions.

  10. BcMF9, a novel polygalacturonase gene, is required for both Brassica campestris intine and exine formation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Ye, Yiqun; Zhang, Yuchao; Zhang, Aihong; Liu, Tingting; Cao, Jiashu

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The polygalacturonase (PG) gene family has been found to be enriched in pollen of several species; however, little is currently known about the function of the PG gene in pollen development. To investigate the exact role that the PG gene has played in pollen development and about this family in general, one putative PG gene, Brassica campestris Male Fertility 9 (BcMF9), was isolated from Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis, syn. B. rapa ssp. chinensis) and characterized. Methods RT-PCR, northern blotting and in situ hybridization were used to analyse the expression pattern of BcMF9, and antisense RNA technology was applied to study the function of this gene. Key Results BcMF9 is expressed in particular in the tapetum and microspore during the late stages of pollen development. Antisense RNA transgenic plants that displayed decreased expression of BcMF9 showed pollen morphological defects that resulted in reduced pollen germination efficiency. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the homogeneous pectic exintine layer of pollen facing the exterior was over-developed and predominantly occupied the intine, reversing the normal proportional distribution of the internal endintine layer and the external exintine in transgenic pollen. Inhibition of BcMF9 also resulted in break-up of the previously formed tectum and baculae from the beginning of the binucleate stage, as a result of premature degradation of tapetum. Conclusions Several lines of evidence, including patterns of BcMF9 expression and phenotypic defects, suggest a sporophytic role in exine patterning, and a gametophytic mode of action of BcMF9 in intine formation. BcMF9 might act as a co-ordinator in the late stages of tapetum degeneration, and subsequently in the regulation of wall material secretion and, in turn, exine formation. BcMF9 might also play a role in intine formation, possibly via regulation of the dynamic metabolism of pectin. PMID:19815569

  11. PV technology and success of solar electricity in Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Dung, T.Q.

    1997-12-31

    Since 1990 the PV Technology and the Solar electricity have been strongly developed in Vietnam. The PV experts of Solarlab have studied and set up an appropriate PV Technology responding to local Market needs. It has not only stood well but has been also transferred to Mali Republic and Lao P.D.R. The PV off grid systems of Solarlab demonstrate good efficiency and low prices. Over 60 solar stations and villages have been built to provide solar lighting for about 3000 families along the country in remote, mountainous areas and islands. 400 families are using stand-alone Solar Home Systems. The Solar electricity has been chosen for Rural Electrification and National Telecommunication Network in remote and mountainous regions. Many International projects in cooperation with FONDEM-France, SELF USA and Governmental PV projects have been realized by Solarlab. The experiences of maintenance, management and finance about PV development in Vietnam are also mentioned.

  12. PV-MCT working standard radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppeldauer, George P.; Podobedov, V. B.

    2012-06-01

    Sensitive infrared working-standard detectors with large active area are needed to extend the signal dynamic range of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) pyroelectric transfer-standards used for infrared spectral power responsivity calibrations. Increased sensitivity is especially important for irradiance mode responsivity measurements. The noise equivalent power (NEP) of the NIST used pyroelectric transfer-standards is about 8 nW/Hz1/2, equal to a D*= 5.5 x 107 cm Hz1/2/W. A large-area photovoltaic HgCdTe (PV-MCT) detector was custom made for the 2.5 μm to 11 μm wavelength range using a 4-stage thermoelectric cooler. At least an order of magnitude lower NEP was expected than that of the pyroelectric transfer-standards to measure irradiance. The large detector area was produced with multiple p-n junctions. The periodical, multiple-junction structure produced a spatial non-uniformity in the detector response. The PV-MCT radiometer was characterized for spatial non-uniformity of response using different incident beam sizes to evaluate the uncertainty component caused by the spatial non-uniformity. The output voltage noise and also the current and voltage responsivities were evaluated at different signal gains and frequencies. The output voltage noise was decreased and the voltage responsivity was increased to lower the NEP of the radiometer. The uncertainty of the spectral power responsivity measurements was evaluated. It is recommended to use a bootstrap type trans-impedance amplifier along with a cold field-of-view limiter to improve the NEP of the PV-MCT radiometer.

  13. Long-Term Performance of the SERF PV Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, B.; Adelstein, J.

    2003-05-01

    This paper provides the changes in performance ratings of two photovoltaic (PV) systems located on the roof of the Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF) building at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. For the period of May 1994 to April 2002, the performance rating of the two PV systems decreased at the rate of 1% per year. Most of the changes in performance rating are attributed to changes in the performance of the PV arrays. But about a fifth of the observed changes were from the inverter not tracking the peak-power as effectively as the PV arrays aged.

  14. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a novel bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase from Xanthomonas campestris homologous to vertebrate N-acetylglutamate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Dashuang Caldovic, Ljubica; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Qu, Qiuhao; Roth, Lauren; Morizono, Hiroki; Hathout, Yetrib; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2006-12-01

    Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a novel bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase from X. campestris homologous to vertebrate N-acetylglutamate synthase are reported. A novel N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase bifunctional enzyme of arginine biosynthesis that was homologous to vertebrate N-acetylglutamate synthases was identified in Xanthomonas campestris. The protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 134.60, c = 192.11 Å, and diffract to about 3.0 Å resolution. Selenomethionine-substituted recombinant protein was produced and selenomethionine substitution was verified by mass spectroscopy. Multiple anomalous dispersion (MAD) data were collected at three wavelengths at SER-CAT, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Structure determination is under way using the MAD phasing method.

  15. Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S. H.; delCueto, J. A.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

    2005-11-01

    Dielectric thin-film barrier and adhesion-promoting layers consisting of silicon oxynitride materials (SiOxNy, with various stoichiometry) were investigated. For process development, films were applied to glass (TCO, conductive SnO2:F; or soda-lime), polymer (PET, polyethylene terephthalate), aluminized soda-lime glass, or PV cell (a-Si, CIGS) substrates. Design strategy employed de-minimus hazard criteria to facilitate industrial adoption and reduce implementation costs for PV manufacturers or suppliers. A restricted process window was explored using dilute compressed gases (3% silane, 14% nitrous oxide, 23% oxygen) in nitrogen (or former mixtures, and 11.45% oxygen mix in helium and/or 99.999% helium dilution) with a worst-case flammable and non-corrosive hazard classification. Method employed low radio frequency (RF) power, less than or equal to 3 milliwatts per cm2, and low substrate temperatures, less than or equal to 100 deg C, over deposition areas less than or equal to 1000 cm2. Select material properties for barrier film thickness (profilometer), composition (XPS/FTIR), optical (refractive index, %T and %R), mechanical peel strength and WVTR barrier performance are presented.

  16. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-10-01

    Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

  17. Applications of ``PV Optics`` for solar cell and module design

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Madjdpour, J.; Chen, W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes some applications of a new optics software package, PV Optics, developed for the optical design of solar cells and modules. PV Optics is suitable for the analysis and design of both thick and thin solar cells. It also includes a feature for calculation of metallic losses related to contacts and back reflectors.

  18. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, DWH; Adlakha, S; Low, SH; De Martini, P; Chandy, KM

    2013-11-01

    The price of electricity supplied from home rooftop photo voltaic (PV) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential households have an economic incentive to install rooftop PV systems and reduce their purchases of electricity from the grid. A significant portion of the costs incurred by utility companies are fixed costs which must be recovered even as consumption falls. Electricity rates must increase in order for utility companies to recover fixed costs from shrinking sales bases. Increasing rates will, in turn, result in even more economic incentives for customers to adopt rooftop PV. In this paper, we model this feedback between PV adoption and electricity rates and study its impact on future PV penetration and net-metering costs. We find that the most important parameter that determines whether this feedback has an effect is the fraction of customers who adopt PV in any year based solely on the money saved by doing so in that year, independent of the uncertainties of future years. These uncertainties include possible changes in rate structures such as the introduction of connection charges, the possibility of PV prices dropping significantly in the future, possible changes in tax incentives, and confidence in the reliability and maintainability of PV. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular detection of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Burkholderia glumae in infected rice seeds and leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is particularly useful for plant pathogen detection. In the present study, multiplex PCR and SYBR green real-time PCR were developed to facilitate simultaneous detection of three important rice pathogens, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Bur...

  20. Progress in PV:BONUS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaeth, James J.; Pierce, Lizana K.

    1996-01-01

    The PV:BONUS (Building Opportunities in the U.S. for Photovoltaics) program, to develop photovoltaic products and the associated infrastructure for a sustainable photovoltaic market in the building sector, has attracted a variety of promising projects ranging from integrated modular homes, rooftop integrated photovoltaic systems, dispatchable peak shaving systems, alternating-current module, photovoltaic glazing systems, and curtain wall systems. The mutual commitment by the Department of Energy and the program recipients has inspired diverse partnerships among manufacturers, utilities, construction companies, and universities for the development of niche markets for building-integrated photovoltaics. Many of the photovoltaic systems are currently being demonstrated with market campaigns underway to commercialize these innovative renewable energy, building-integrated products.

  1. LWR-PV damage estimate methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Wagschal, J.J.; Maerker, R.E.; Broadhead, B.L.

    1980-01-01

    A credible estimate of the pressure vessel lifetime due to neutron-induced embrittlement is studied. The first step toward this goal is the accurate prediction of fluence and neutron energy spectrum at the pressure vessel. This, in turn, is obtained from least squares unfolding techniques of dosimetry measurements at a surveillance position, transport calculations, and a translation of information obtained at the surveillance position to the damage position. Including a prototypic neutron field like the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly, in which measurements are performed to serve as benchmarks for the LWR-PV surveillance dosimetry program, involves the use of approximate calculational methods. These approximate methods are supplemented by correction factors also known as calculational bias factors, the proper utilization of which requires estimated uncertainties of these biases as well. The source of a few biases for the PCA and some biases and correlations for the group fluxes at two PCA locations are presented.

  2. Innovations in Wind and Solar PV Financing

    SciTech Connect

    Cory, K.; Coughlin, J.; Jenkin, T.; Pater, J.; Swezey, B.

    2008-02-01

    There is growing national interest in renewable energy development based on the economic, environmental, and security benefits that these resources provide. Historically, greater development of our domestic renewable energy resources has faced a number of hurdles, primarily related to cost, regulation, and financing. With the recent sustained increase in the costs and associated volatility of fossil fuels, the economics of renewable energy technologies have become increasingly attractive to investors, both large and small. As a result, new entrants are investing in renewable energy and new business models are emerging. This study surveys some of the current issues related to wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) energy project financing in the electric power industry, and identifies both barriers to and opportunities for increased investment.

  3. Progress in PV:BONUS project

    SciTech Connect

    Spaeth, J.J.; Pierce, L.K.

    1996-01-01

    The PV:BONUS (Building Opportunities in the U.S. for Photovoltaics) program, to develop photovoltaic products and the associated infrastructure for a sustainable photovoltaic market in the building sector, has attracted a variety of promising projects ranging from integrated modular homes, rooftop integrated photovoltaic systems, dispatchable peak shaving systems, alternating-current module, photovoltaic glazing systems, and curtain wall systems. The mutual commitment by the Department of Energy and the program recipients has inspired diverse partnerships among manufacturers, utilities, construction companies, and universities for the development of niche markets for building-integrated photovoltaics. Many of the photovoltaic systems are currently being demonstrated with market campaigns underway to commercialize these innovative renewable energy, building-integrated products. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Electrochemical Approaches to PV Busbar Application

    SciTech Connect

    Pankow, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    Busbars are an integral component of any thin-film photovoltaic module and must be easy and quick to apply by PV manufacturers, as well as provide long-term reliability in deployed modules. Potential reliability issues include loss of adhesion and delamination, chemical instability under current collection conditions (electromigration or corrosion), compatibility of material and application method with subsequent encapsulation steps. Several new and novel busbar materials and application methods have been explored, including adhering metal busbars with various one- and two-part conductive epoxies or conductive adhesive films, ultrasonic bonding of metal busbar strips, and bonding of busbar strips using low-temperature solders. The most promising approach to date has been the direct application of metal busbars via various electrochemical techniques, which offers a variety of distinct advantages.

  5. Analytical Improvements in PV Degradation Rate Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined accurately. For non-spectrally corrected data several complete seasonal cycles (typically 3-5 years) are required to obtain reasonably accurate degradation rates. In a rapidly evolving industry such a time span is often unacceptable and the need exists to determine degradation rates accurately in a shorter period of time. Occurrence of outliers and data shifts are two examples of analytical problems leading to greater uncertainty and therefore to longer observation times. In this paper we compare three methodologies of data analysis for robustness in the presence of outliers, data shifts and shorter measurement time periods.

  6. Lessons Learned from the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D and Thin Film PV Partnership Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, R.; Mitchell, R.; Zweibel, K.

    2006-09-01

    As the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program initiates new cost-shared solar energy R&D under the Solar America Initiative (SAI), it is useful to analyze the experience gained from cost-shared R&D projects that have been funded through the program to date. This report summarizes lessons learned from two DOE-sponsored photovoltaic (PV) projects: the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D (PVMaT/PVMR&D) project and the Thin-Film PV Partnership project. During the past 10-15 years, these two projects have invested roughly $330 million of government resources in cost-shared R&D and leveraged another $190 million in private-sector PV R&D investments. Following a description of key findings and brief descriptions of the PVMaT/PVMR&D and Thin-Film PV Partnership projects, this report presents lessons learned from the projects.

  7. Interconnecting PV on New York City's Secondary Network Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K; Coddington, M; Burman, K; Hayter, S; Kroposki, B; Watson, and A

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has teamed with cities across the country through the Solar America Cities (SAC) partnership program to help reduce barriers and accelerate implementation of solar energy. The New York City SAC team is a partnership between the City University of New York (CUNY), the New York City Mayor s Office of Long-term Planning and Sustainability, and the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC).The New York City SAC team is working with DOE s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Con Edison, the local utility, to develop a roadmap for photovoltaic (PV) installations in the five boroughs. The city set a goal to increase its installed PV capacity from1.1 MW in 2005 to 8.1 MW by 2015 (the maximum allowed in 2005). A key barrier to reaching this goal, however, is the complexity of the interconnection process with the local utility. Unique challenges are associated with connecting distributed PV systems to secondary network distribution systems (simplified to networks in this report). Although most areas of the country use simpler radial distribution systems to distribute electricity, larger metropolitan areas like New York City typically use networks to increase reliability in large load centers. Unlike the radial distribution system, where each customer receives power through a single line, a network uses a grid of interconnected lines to deliver power to each customer through several parallel circuits and sources. This redundancy improves reliability, but it also requires more complicated coordination and protection schemes that can be disrupted by energy exported from distributed PV systems. Currently, Con Edison studies each potential PV system in New York City to evaluate the system s impact on the network, but this is time consuming for utility engineers and may delay the customer s project or add cost for larger installations. City leaders would like to streamline this process to facilitate faster, simpler, and

  8. Kauai Island Utility Co-op (KIUC) PV integration study.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Abraham; Mousseau, Tom

    2011-08-01

    This report investigates the effects that increased distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation would have on the Kauai Island Utility Co-op (KIUC) system operating requirements. The study focused on determining reserve requirements needed to mitigate the impact of PV variability on system frequency, and the impact on operating costs. Scenarios of 5-MW, 10-MW, and 15-MW nameplate capacity of PV generation plants distributed across the Kauai Island were considered in this study. The analysis required synthesis of the PV solar resource data and modeling of the KIUC system inertia. Based on the results, some findings and conclusions could be drawn, including that the selection of units identified as marginal resources that are used for load following will change; PV penetration will displace energy generated by existing conventional units, thus reducing overall fuel consumption; PV penetration at any deployment level is not likely to reduce system peak load; and increasing PV penetration has little effect on load-following reserves. The study was performed by EnerNex under contract from Sandia National Laboratories with cooperation from KIUC.

  9. The dynamic growth exhibition and accumulation of cadmium of Pak choi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis) grown in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Yu; Chen, Bo-Ching

    2013-10-25

    The accumulation of heavy metals, especially cadmium (Cd), in leafy vegetables was compared with other vegetables. Pak choi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis) is a leafy vegetable consumed in Taiwan and its safety for consumption after growing in contaminated soils is a public concern. A pot experiment (50 days) was conducted to understand the dynamic accumulation of Cd by pak choi grown in artificially contaminated soils. The edible parts of pak choi were sampled and analyzed every 2-3 days. The dry weight (DW) of pak choi was an exponential function of leaf length, leaf width, and chlorophyll content. The accumulation of Cd increased when the soil Cd concentration was raised, but was kept at a constant level during different growth stages. Pak choi had a high bioconcentration factor (BCF = ratio of the concentration in the edible parts to that in the soils), at values of 3.5-4.0. The consumption of pak choi grown in soils contaminated at levels used in this study would result in the ingestion of impermissible amounts of Cd and could possibly have harmful effects on health.

  10. Genetic damage induced by a food coloring dye (sunset yellow) on meristematic cells of Brassica campestris L.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Kshama; Kumar, Girjesh

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the present piece of work to evaluate the effect of synthetic food coloring azo dye (sunset yellow) on actively dividing root tip cells of Brassica campestris L. Three doses of azo dye were administered for the treatment of actively dividing root tip cells, namely, 1%, 3%, and 5%, for 6-hour duration along with control. Mitotic analysis clearly revealed the azo dye induced endpoint deviation like reduction in the frequency of normal divisions in a dose dependent manner. Mitotic divisions in the control sets were found to be perfectly normal while dose based reduction in MI was registered in the treated sets. Azo dye has induced several chromosomal aberrations (genotoxic effect) at various stages of cell cycle such as stickiness of chromosomes, micronuclei formation, precocious migration of chromosome, unorientation, forward movement of chromosome, laggards, and chromatin bridge. Among all, stickiness of chromosomes was present in the highest frequency followed by partial genome elimination as micronuclei. The present study suggests that extensive use of synthetic dye should be forbidden due to genotoxic and cytotoxic impacts on living cells. Thus, there is an urgent need to assess potential hazardous effects of these dyes on other test systems like human and nonhuman biota for better scrutiny.

  11. The effect of hydrodynamic stress on the growth of Xanthomonas campestris cultures in a stirred and sparged tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ochoa, F; Gomez, E; Alcon, A; Santos, V E

    2013-07-01

    The specific growth and the xanthan production rates by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris under different shear levels in shake flasks and in a stirred and sparged tank bioreactor have been studied. The shake flask has been used as a reference for studying the shear effects. An effectiveness factor expressed by the ratio of the observed growth rate and the growth rate without oxygen limitation or cell damage was calculated in both modes of cultures. It was observed that the effectiveness factor was strongly dependent on the operational conditions. A strong oxygen transfer limitation at low stirring rates, indicated by a 54 % decrease in the effectiveness factor was observed. In contrast, at higher stirrer speed, cell damage was caused by hydrodynamic stress in the turbulent bulk of the broth, yielding again a decrease in the effectiveness factor values for stirrer speeds higher than 500 rpm. Cell morphological changes were also observed depending on the agitation conditions, differences in morphology being evident at high shear stress.

  12. A rac-like small G-protein from Brassica campestris activates a PKC-dependent phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoyeon; Nahm, Minyeop; Lim, Chaeoh; Yun, Daejin; Cho, Mooje; Bahk, Jeongdong

    2004-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a rac-like small GTP binding protein was isolated from a cDNA library of Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. pekinensis) flower buds and named Brac1. The Brac1 cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding 198 amino acid residues with an estimated molecular mass of 21,690 Da and this coding region has conserved residues and motifs unique to the Rho subfamily of proteins. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Brac1 protein is closely related to that of Arabidopsis thaliana Arac3 (91%), but it shares relatively little homology with other members of the Ras superfamily (about 30% identity). To further characterize Brac1, a pGBrac1 expression vector consisting of PCR-amplified Brac1 cDNA plus glutathione S-transferase (GST) and pBKS(+)II was used to purify the protein. Using a PEI-cellulose/TLC plate, GTPase activity of this protein was confirmed and competition binding studies, using the guanine nucleotides, ATP, UTP and CTP, revealed that the di- and triphosphate forms of guanine nucleotides strongly bind Brac1. Membrane-bound PLD activity was synergistically enhanced by Brac1 in the presence of protein kinase C, but not in the presence of ARF (ADP-ribosylation factor). Genomic analysis indicated that Brac1 belongs to a multigene family. Brac1 transcripts were expressed in all the organs of Brassica, but were especially prevalent in flower buds.

  13. Genetic Damage Induced by a Food Coloring Dye (Sunset Yellow) on Meristematic Cells of Brassica campestris L.

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Kshama; Kumar, Girjesh

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the present piece of work to evaluate the effect of synthetic food coloring azo dye (sunset yellow) on actively dividing root tip cells of Brassica campestris L. Three doses of azo dye were administered for the treatment of actively dividing root tip cells, namely, 1%, 3%, and 5%, for 6-hour duration along with control. Mitotic analysis clearly revealed the azo dye induced endpoint deviation like reduction in the frequency of normal divisions in a dose dependent manner. Mitotic divisions in the control sets were found to be perfectly normal while dose based reduction in MI was registered in the treated sets. Azo dye has induced several chromosomal aberrations (genotoxic effect) at various stages of cell cycle such as stickiness of chromosomes, micronuclei formation, precocious migration of chromosome, unorientation, forward movement of chromosome, laggards, and chromatin bridge. Among all, stickiness of chromosomes was present in the highest frequency followed by partial genome elimination as micronuclei. The present study suggests that extensive use of synthetic dye should be forbidden due to genotoxic and cytotoxic impacts on living cells. Thus, there is an urgent need to assess potential hazardous effects of these dyes on other test systems like human and nonhuman biota for better scrutiny. PMID:25954313

  14. The Dynamic Growth Exhibition and Accumulation of Cadmium of Pak Choi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis) Grown in Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hung-Yu; Chen, Bo-Ching

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of heavy metals, especially cadmium (Cd), in leafy vegetables was compared with other vegetables. Pak choi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis) is a leafy vegetable consumed in Taiwan and its safety for consumption after growing in contaminated soils is a public concern. A pot experiment (50 days) was conducted to understand the dynamic accumulation of Cd by pak choi grown in artificially contaminated soils. The edible parts of pak choi were sampled and analyzed every 2–3 days. The dry weight (DW) of pak choi was an exponential function of leaf length, leaf width, and chlorophyll content. The accumulation of Cd increased when the soil Cd concentration was raised, but was kept at a constant level during different growth stages. Pak choi had a high bioconcentration factor (BCF = ratio of the concentration in the edible parts to that in the soils), at values of 3.5–4.0. The consumption of pak choi grown in soils contaminated at levels used in this study would result in the ingestion of impermissible amounts of Cd and could possibly have harmful effects on health. PMID:24284350

  15. Analysis of Hydroxy Fatty Acids from the Pollen of Brassica campestris L. var. oleifera DC. by UPLC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nian-Yun; Yang, Yi-Fang; Li, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with negative electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was used to determine 7 hydroxy fatty acids in the pollen of Brassica campestris L. var. oleifera DC. All the investigated hydroxy fatty acids showed strong deprotonated molecular ions [M–H]−, which underwent two major fragment pathways of the allyl scission and the β-fission of the alcoholic hydroxyl group. By comparison of their molecular ions and abundant fragment ions with those of reference compounds, they were tentatively assigned as 15,16-dihydroxy-9Z,12Z-octadecadienoic acid (1), 10,11,12-trihydroxy-(7Z,14Z)-heptadecadienoic acid (2), 7,15,16-trihydroxy-9Z,12Z-octadecadienoic acid (3), 15,16-dihydroxy-9Z,12Z-octadecadienoic acid (4), 15-hydroxy-6Z,9Z,12Z-octadecatrienoic acid (5), 15-hydroxy-9Z,12Z- octadecadienoic acid (6), and 15-hydroxy-12Z-octadecaenoic acid (7), respectively. Compounds 3, 5, and 7 are reported for the first time. PMID:26555998

  16. PV Validation and Bankability Workshop: San Jose, California

    SciTech Connect

    Granata, J.; Howard, J.

    2011-12-01

    This report is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). The report provides feedback from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Program PV Validation and Bankability Workshop in San Jose, California on August 31, 2011. It focuses on the current state of PV in the United States, private funding to fund U.S. PV industry growth, roles and functions of the regional test center program, and ways to improve the current validation and bankability practices.

  17. Photovoltaic (PV) Impact Assessment for Very High Penetration Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Danling; Mather, Barry A.; Seguin, Richard; Hambrick, Joshua; Broadwater, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a granular approach for investigating the impacts of very high photovoltaic (PV) generation penetration. Studies on two real-world distribution feeders connected to PV plants are presented. The studies include both steady-state and time-series power flow analyses, which include the effects of solar variability. The goal of the study is to predict the effects of increasing levels of PV generation as it reaches very high penetration levels. The loss and return of generation with and without regulation is simulated to capture short-term problems such as voltage fluctuations. Impact results from the analyses are described along with potential mitigations.

  18. 3-Port Single-Stage PV & Battery Converter Improves Efficiency and Cost in Combined PV/Battery Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bundschuh, Paul

    2013-03-23

    Due to impressive cost reductions in recent years, photovoltaic (PV) generation is now able to produce electricity at highly competitive prices, but PV’s inherent intermittency reduces the potential value of this energy. The integration of battery storage with PV will be transformational by increasing the value of solar. Utility scale systems will benefit by firming intermittency including PV ramp smoothing, grid support and load shifting, allowing PV to compete directly with conventional generation. For distributed grid-tied PV adding storage will reduce peak demand utility charges, as well as providing backup power during power grid failures. The largest long term impact of combined PV and battery systems may be for delivering reliable off-grid power to the billions of individuals globally without access to conventional power grids, or for billions more that suffer from daily power outages. PV module costs no longer dominate installed PV system costs. Balance-of-System (BOS) costs including the PV inverter and installation now contribute the majority of installed system costs. Battery costs are also dropping faster than installation and battery power converter systems. In each of these separate systems power converters have become a bottleneck for efficiency, cost and reliability. These bottlenecks are compounded in hybrid power conversion systems that combine separate PV and battery converters. Hybrid power conversion systems have required multiple power converters hardware units and multiple power conversion steps adding to efficiency losses, product and installation costs, and reliability issues. Ideal Power Converters has developed and patented a completely new theory of operation for electronic power converters using its indirect EnergyPacket Switching™ topology. It has established successful power converter products for both PV and battery systems, and its 3-Port Hybrid Converter is the first product to exploit the topology’s capability for the

  19. Evaluation of PV Module Field Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, John; Silverman, Timothy; Miller, David C.; McNutt, Peter; Kempe, Michael; Deceglie, Michael

    2015-06-14

    This paper describes an effort to inspect and evaluate PV modules in order to determine what failure or degradation modes are occurring in field installations. This paper will report on the results of six site visits, including the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Hedge Array, Tucson Electric Power (TEP) Springerville, Central Florida Utility, Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), the TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification. TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification. TEP Solar Test Yard, and University of Toledo installations. The effort here makes use of a recently developed field inspection data collection protocol, and the results were input into a corresponding database. The results of this work have also been used to develop a draft of the IEC standard for climate and application specific accelerated stress testing beyond module qualification.

  20. The Ramakrishna Mission economic PV development initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.L.; Ullal, H.S.; Sherring, C.

    1998-09-01

    India is the world`s second most populous country, quickly approaching one billion persons. Although it has a well-developed electricity grid, many of the people have little or no access to electricity and all of the benefits associated with it. There are areas that are isolated from the grid and will not be connected for many years, if ever. One such area is the Sundarbans located in the delta region of the two great rivers, the Ganges and Brahmaputra, partially in India and partially in Bangladesh. It is estimated that 1.5 million people live in this area, crisscrossed by many islands and rivers, who have only marginal supplies of electricity generated primarily from diesel generators and batteries. Working with the regional non-governmental organization (NGO), the Ramakrishna Mission, and the West Bengal Renewable Energy Development Agency, the governments of India and the US initiated a rural electrification initiative to demonstrate the economic and technical feasibility of photovoltaics to provide limited supplies of electricity for such applications as solar home lighting systems (SHS), water pumping, vaccine refrigeration, communications, and economic development activities. This paper details initial results from approximately 30 kilowatts of PV systems installed in the area, including socio-economic impacts and technical performance.

  1. Solar power-desalination PV*ED system

    SciTech Connect

    Kvajic, G.

    1980-12-01

    Photovoltaic-electrodialysis, PV*ED, power-desalination system is studied in which the seawater feed is heated in the PV-cells. Under simplified assumptions of a constancy of thermal PV efficiency and conversion factor of 0.5 for ED brakish water system, it is found that maximum potable water production per unit of insolation depends strongly on the temperature of seawater feed and the concentration factor of the optical collector. By varying these two parameters of the PV*ED system, it seems possible that one could control the ratio of power to water production within a large range so that various potential demands for power and water could be met.

  2. Instrumentation for Evaluating PV System Performance Losses from Snow

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, B.; Rodriguez, J.; Pruett, J.

    2009-01-01

    When designing a photovoltaic (PV) system for northern climates, the prospective installation should be evaluated with respect to the potentially detrimental effects of snow preventing solar radiation from reaching the PV cells. The extent to which snow impacts performance is difficult to determine because snow events also increase the uncertainty of the solar radiation measurement, and the presence of snow needs to be distinguished from other events that can affect performance. This paper describes two instruments useful for evaluating PV system performance losses from the presence of snow: (1) a pyranometer with a heater to prevent buildup of ice and snow, and (2) a digital camera for remote retrieval of images to determine the presence of snow on the PV array.

  3. Market impact of a large-scale PV buildings program

    SciTech Connect

    Rannels, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    This paper explores the rapidly changing solar technologies market and the potential impact of a new Federally sponsored Million Solar Roofs Initiative (MSRI) designed to encourage the domestic market for solar building technologies. Photovoltaic (PV) technology has reached a critical point in its development. Over the course of this decade, the PV industry has experienced tremendous growth through greater technology efficiency, the introduction of new solar technology applications (PV shingles, facades, etc.), and lower production costs. In order to achieve its full commercial potential, significant improvements are still needed along with the removal of existing market barriers. DOE`s analysis of the impact of the MSRI indicates that it could significantly reduce the cost of PV technology and improve efficiencies through manufacturing economies of scale, market experience, and industry competition.

  4. Full Steam Ahead for PV in US Homes?

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark A; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2009-01-15

    In October 2008, the United States Congress extended both the residential and commercial solar investment tax credits (ITCs) for an unprecedented eight years, lifted the $2,000 cap on the residential credit, removed the prohibition on utility use of the commercial credit, and eliminated restrictions on the use of both credits in conjunction with the Alternative Minimum Tax. These significant changes, which apply to systems placed in service on or after January 1, 2009, will increase the value of the solar credits for residential system owners in particular, and are likely--in conjunction with state, local, and utility rebate programs targeting solar--to spur significant growth in residential, commercial, and utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) installations in the years ahead. This article focuses specifically on the residential credit, describing three areas in which removal of the $2,000 cap on the residential ITC will have significant implications for PV rebate program administrators, PV system owners, and the PV industry.

  5. Effect of wind speed on performance of a solar-pv array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thousands of solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays have been installed over the past few years, but the effect of wind speed on the predicted performance of PV arrays is not usually considered by installers. An increase in wind speed will cool the PV array, and the electrical power of the PV modules will ...

  6. Time-dependent first-principles approaches to PV materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2013-12-10

    Computational scheme for designing photovoltaic (PV) materials is presented. First-principles electron dynamics of photo-excitation and subsequent electron-hole splitting is performed based on the time-dependent density functional theory. Photo-induced enhancement of dipole moment was observed in a polar crystal and a donor-acceptor molecular pair. These experiences will pave a way to design PV material from first-principles simulations.

  7. NREL PV working with industry, Third quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, S.; Cook, G.

    1998-12-04

    This quarterly report encourages cooperative R and D by providing the US PV industry with information on activities and capabilities of the laboratories. This issue contains information on the CIS and CdTe R and D teams, an editorial by Richard King on the stand-out accomplishments of the PV Program, and an overview of the NCPV Program Review Meeting highlighting the strength of US photovoltaics.

  8. Microgrid-Ready Solar PV; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Designing new solar projects to be 'microgrid-ready' enables the U.S. DoD, other federal agencies, and the private sector to plan future microgrid initiatives to utilize solar PV as a generating resource. This fact sheet provides background information with suggested language for several up-front considerations that can be added to a solar project procurement or request for proposal (RFP) that will help ensure that PV systems are built for future microgrid connection.

  9. pV3-Gold Visualization Environment for Computer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babrauckas, Theresa L.

    1997-01-01

    A new visualization environment, pV3-Gold, can be used during and after a computer simulation to extract and visualize the physical features in the results. This environment, which is an extension of the pV3 visualization environment developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with guidance and support by researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center, features many tools that allow users to display data in various ways.

  10. Towards a PV-θ view of the general circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, Brian J.

    1991-09-01

    In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in using isentropic coordinates and Rossby-Ertel potential vorticity (PV) for diagnosing the behaviour of middle latitude synoptic systems. Such a PV-θ analysis may also prove important in providing insight into the global circulation of the atmosphere. Apart from the isentropic diagnostic of D. Johnson and collaborators, some quasi-geostrophic studies and recent studies of stratospheric behaviour, there has been little work in this area and our present understanding is very limited. The object of the present paper is to stimulate such studies by presenting some initial results from continuing research. A three-fold division of the atmosphere is discussed. The "Overworld" is the region encompassed by isentropic surfaces that are everywhere above the tropopause. In the "Middleworld", the region with isentropes crossing the tropopause but not striking the Earth's surface, the isentropic zonal and time mean of PV exhibits interesting regions of enhanced and diminished gradients. The isentropic transient eddy advection of PV exhibits a dipolar distribution about the tropopause, suggestive of PV mixing. The marked PV signature of the Asian summer monsoon on one particular Middleworld isentrope is shown and the mean isentropic advection of PV shows interesting features. For the "Underworld", in which isentropic surfaces intercept the surface of the Earth, a PV-θ analysis yields a novel constraint linking low-level drag and diabatic heating. This constraint links "westerlies" and "cooling", and "easterlies" and "heating" in some average sense. The result is discussed in terms of the Southern Hemisphere strong surface westerlies and the circulation associated with the Asian summer and winter monsoons.

  11. Towards a PV-θ view of the general circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, Brian J.

    1991-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in using isentropic coordinates and Rossby-Ertel potential vorticity (PV) for diagnosing the behaviour of middle latitude synoptic systems. Such a PV-θ analysis may also prove important in providing insight into the global circulation of the atmosphere. Apart from the isentropic diagnostic of D. Johnson and collaborators, some quasi-geostrophic studies and recent studies of stratospheric behaviour, there has been little work in this area and our present understanding is very limited. The object of the present paper is to stimulate such studies by presenting some initial results from continuing research. A three-fold division of the atmosphere is discussed. The "Overworld" is the region encompassed by isentropic surfaces that are everywhere above the tropopause. In the "Middleworld", the region with isentropes crossing the tropopause but not striking the Earth's surface, the isentropic zonal and time mean of PV exhibits interesting regions of enhanced and diminished gradients. The isentropic transient eddy advection of PV exhibits a dipolar distribution about the tropopause, suggestive of PV mixing. The marked PV signature of the Asian summer monsoon on one particular Middleworld isentrope is shown and the mean isentropic advection of PV shows interesting features. For the "Underworld", in which isentropic surfaces intercept the surface of the Earth, a PV-θ analysis yields a novel constraint linking lowlevel drag and diabatic heating. This constraint links "westerlies" and "cooling", and "easterlies" and "heating" in some average sense. The result is discussed in terms of the Southern Hemisphere strong surface westerlies and the circulation associated with the Asian summer and winter monsoons.

  12. PV Derived Data for Predicting Performance; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, Bill

    2015-09-14

    A method is described for providing solar irradiance data for modeling PV performance by using measured PV performance data and back-solving for the unknown direct normal irradiance (DNI) and diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI), which can then be used to model the performance of PV systems of any size, PV array tilt, or PV array azimuth orientation. Ideally situated for using the performance data from PV modules with micro-inverters, the PV module operating current is used to determine the global tilted irradiance (GTI), and a separation model is then used to determine the DNI and DHI from the GTI.

  13. Draft genome sequences of three Xanthomonas translucens pathovar reference strains (pv. arrhenatheri, pv. poae and pv. phlei) with different specificities for forage grasses.

    PubMed

    Hersemann, Lena; Wibberg, Daniel; Widmer, Franco; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Kölliker, Roland

    2016-01-01

    As causal agents of bacterial wilt in pastures and meadows, bacteria of the species Xanthomonas translucens are a serious issue in forage grass production. So far, only little is known about host-pathogen interactions at the molecular level and the lack of comprehensive genome data impeded targeted breeding strategies towards resistant forage grass cultivars. Here we announce the draft genome sequences of three grass-pathogenic Xanthomonas translucens pathotype strains, i.e. pv. arrhenatheri LMG 727, pv. poae LMG 728 and pv. phlei LMG 730 isolated from Arrhenatherum elatius (L.) P. Beauv. ex J. Presl & C. Presl (Switzerland), Poa trivialis L. (Switzerland) and Phleum pratense L. (Norway), respectively. The genomes of all three strains revealed a non-canonical type III secretion system and a set of 22 type III effectors as common virulence-related traits. Distinct inter-pathovar differences were observed for the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene cluster and the presence of nonribosomal peptide synthetases. PMID:27536340

  14. Performance evaluation of stand alone hybrid PV-wind generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, M. N. M.; Saharuddin, N. Z.; Sulaima, M. F.; Jali, Mohd Hafiz; Bukhari, W. M.; Bohari, Z. H.; Yahaya, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the performance evaluation of standalone hybrid system on Photovoltaic (PV)-Wind generator at Faculty of Electrical Engineering (FKE), UTeM. The hybrid PV-Wind in UTeM system is combining wind turbine system with the solar system and the energy capacity of this hybrid system can generate up to charge the battery and supply the LED street lighting load. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the performance of PV-Wind hybrid generator. Solar radiation meter has been used to measure the solar radiation and anemometer has been used to measure the wind speed. The effectiveness of the PV-Wind system is based on the various data that has been collected and compared between them. The result shows that hybrid system has greater reliability. Based on the solar result, the correlation coefficient shows strong relationship between the two variables of radiation and current. The reading output current followed by fluctuate of solar radiation. However, the correlation coefficient is shows moderate relationship between the two variables of wind speed and voltage. Hence, the wind turbine system in FKE show does not operate consistently to produce energy source for this hybrid system compare to PV system. When the wind system does not fully operate due to inconsistent energy source, the other system which is PV will operate and supply the load for equilibrate the extra load demand.

  15. How Can We Make PV Modules Safer?: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01

    Safety is a prime concern for the photovoltaics (PV) industry. As a technology deployed on residential and commercial buildings, it is critical that PV not cause damage to the buildings nor harm the occupants. Many of the PV systems on buildings are of sufficiently high voltage (300 to 600 Volts dc) that they may present potential hazards. These PV systems must be safe in terms of mechanical damage (nothing falls on someone), shock hazard (no risk of electrical shock when touching an exposed circuit element), and fire (the modules neither cause nor promote a fire). The present safety standards (IEC 61730 and UL 1703) do a good job of providing for design rules and test requirements for mechanical, shock, and spread of flame dangers. However, neither standard addresses the issue of electrical arcing within a module that can cause a fire. To make PV modules, they must be designed, built, and installed with an emphasis on minimizing the potential for open circuits and ground faults. This paper provides recommendations on redundant connection designs, robust mounting methods, and changes to the safety standards to yield safer PV modules.

  16. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System.

    PubMed

    El-Helw, Hadi M; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system. PMID:27560138

  17. Residential Solar PV Systems in the Carolinas: Opportunities and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Bandar Jubran; Holt, Kyra Moore; Patiño-Echeverri, Dalia; Pratson, Lincoln

    2016-02-16

    This paper presents a first-order analysis of the feasibility and technical, environmental, and economic effects of large levels of solar photovoltaic (PV) penetration within the services areas of the Duke Energy Carolinas (DEC) and Duke Energy Progress (DEP). A PV production model based on household density and a gridded hourly global horizontal irradiance data set simulates hourly PV power output from roof-top installations, while a unit commitment and real-time economic dispatch (UC-ED) model simulates hourly system operations. We find that the large generating capacity of base-load nuclear power plants (NPPs) without ramping capability in the region limits PV integration levels to 5.3% (6510 MW) of 2015 generation. Enabling ramping capability for NPPs would raise the limit of PV penetration to near 9% of electricity generated. If the planned retirement of coal-fired power plants together with new installations and upgrades of natural gas and nuclear plants materialize in 2025, and if NPPs operate flexibly, then the share of coal-fired electricity will be reduced from 37% to 22%. A 9% penetration of electricity from PV would further reduce the share of coal-fired electricity by 4-6% resulting in a system-wide CO2 emissions rate of 0.33 to 0.40 tons/MWh and associated abatement costs of 225-415 (2015$ per ton). PMID:26745347

  18. Review of PV Inverter Technology Cost and Performance Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Navigant Consulting Inc.

    2006-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has a major responsibility in the implementation of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has a major role in supporting inverter development, characterization, standards, certifications, and verifications. The Solar Energy Technologies Program recently published a Multiyear Technical Plan, which establishes a goal of reducing the Levelized Energy Cost (LEC) for photovoltaic (PV) systems to $0.06/kWh by 2020. The Multiyear Technical Plan estimates that, in order to meet the PV system goal, PV inverter prices will need to decline to $0.25-0.30 Wp by 2020. DOE determined the need to conduct a rigorous review of the PV Program's technical and economic targets, including the target set for PV inverters. NREL requested that Navigant Consulting Inc.(NCI) conduct a review of historical and projected cost and performance improvements for PV inverters, including identification of critical barriers identified and the approaches government might use to address them.

  19. Control Strategies for the DAB Based PV Interface System

    PubMed Central

    El-Helw, Hadi M.; Al-Hasheem, Mohamed; Marei, Mostafa I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an interface system based on the Dual Active Bridge (DAB) converter for Photovoltaic (PV) arrays. Two control strategies are proposed for the DAB converter to harvest the maximum power from the PV array. The first strategy is based on a simple PI controller to regulate the terminal PV voltage through the phase shift angle of the DAB converter. The Perturb and Observe (P&O) Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is utilized to set the reference of the PV terminal voltage. The second strategy presented in this paper employs the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to directly set the phase shift angle of the DAB converter that results in harvesting maximum power. This feed-forward strategy overcomes the stability issues of the feedback strategy. The proposed PV interface systems are modeled and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK and the EMTDC/PSCAD software packages. The simulation results reveal accurate and fast response of the proposed systems. The dynamic performance of the proposed feed-forward strategy outdoes that of the feedback strategy in terms of accuracy and response time. Moreover, an experimental prototype is built to test and validate the proposed PV interface system. PMID:27560138

  20. Continuing Developments in PV Risk Management: Strategies, Solutions, and Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, T.; Mendelsohn, M.; Speer, B.; Hill, R.

    2013-02-01

    As the PV industry matures, successful risk management practices will become more imperative to ensure investor confidence, control costs, and facilitate further growth. This report discusses several key aspects of risk management during the commercial- and utility-scale project life cycle, from identification of risks, to the process of mitigating and allocating those risks among project parties, to transferring those risks through insurance. The report also explores novel techniques in PV risk management, options to offload risks onto the capital markets, and innovative insurance policies (namely warranty policies) that address risks unique to the PV sector. One of the major justifications for robust risk management in the PV industry is the cost-reduction opportunities it affords. If the PV industry can demonstrate the capability to successfully manage its risks, thereby inspiring confidence in financiers, it may be able to obtain a lower cost of capital in future transactions. A lower cost of capital translates to a lower cost of energy, which will in turn enhance PV?s competitiveness at a time when it will have to rely less on subsidies to support its market penetration.

  1. Performance evaluation of stand alone hybrid PV-wind generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nasir, M. N. M.; Saharuddin, N. Z.; Sulaima, M. F.; Jali, Mohd Hafiz; Bukhari, W. M.; Bohari, Z. H.; Yahaya, M. S.

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents the performance evaluation of standalone hybrid system on Photovoltaic (PV)-Wind generator at Faculty of Electrical Engineering (FKE), UTeM. The hybrid PV-Wind in UTeM system is combining wind turbine system with the solar system and the energy capacity of this hybrid system can generate up to charge the battery and supply the LED street lighting load. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the performance of PV-Wind hybrid generator. Solar radiation meter has been used to measure the solar radiation and anemometer has been used to measure the wind speed. The effectiveness of the PV-Wind system is based on the various data that has been collected and compared between them. The result shows that hybrid system has greater reliability. Based on the solar result, the correlation coefficient shows strong relationship between the two variables of radiation and current. The reading output current followed by fluctuate of solar radiation. However, the correlation coefficient is shows moderate relationship between the two variables of wind speed and voltage. Hence, the wind turbine system in FKE show does not operate consistently to produce energy source for this hybrid system compare to PV system. When the wind system does not fully operate due to inconsistent energy source, the other system which is PV will operate and supply the load for equilibrate the extra load demand.

  2. Residential Solar PV Systems in the Carolinas: Opportunities and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Bandar Jubran; Holt, Kyra Moore; Patiño-Echeverri, Dalia; Pratson, Lincoln

    2016-02-16

    This paper presents a first-order analysis of the feasibility and technical, environmental, and economic effects of large levels of solar photovoltaic (PV) penetration within the services areas of the Duke Energy Carolinas (DEC) and Duke Energy Progress (DEP). A PV production model based on household density and a gridded hourly global horizontal irradiance data set simulates hourly PV power output from roof-top installations, while a unit commitment and real-time economic dispatch (UC-ED) model simulates hourly system operations. We find that the large generating capacity of base-load nuclear power plants (NPPs) without ramping capability in the region limits PV integration levels to 5.3% (6510 MW) of 2015 generation. Enabling ramping capability for NPPs would raise the limit of PV penetration to near 9% of electricity generated. If the planned retirement of coal-fired power plants together with new installations and upgrades of natural gas and nuclear plants materialize in 2025, and if NPPs operate flexibly, then the share of coal-fired electricity will be reduced from 37% to 22%. A 9% penetration of electricity from PV would further reduce the share of coal-fired electricity by 4-6% resulting in a system-wide CO2 emissions rate of 0.33 to 0.40 tons/MWh and associated abatement costs of 225-415 (2015$ per ton).

  3. Integrating High Penetrations of PV into Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Hasper-Tuttle, J.; Neal, R.; Katiraei, F.; Yazdani, A.; Aguero, J. R.; Hoff, T. E.; Norris, B. L.; Parkins, A.; Seguin, R.; Schauder, C.

    2011-01-01

    California regulators recently approved a plan proposed by Southern California Edison (SCE) to install 500 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) energy in its utility service territory over the next 5 years. The installations will include 250 MW of utility-owned solar and 250 MW of independently owned solar. SCE expects that the majority of these systems will be commercial-scale rooftop PV systems connected at various points in the distribution system. Each of the SCE rooftop PV systems will typically have a rating of 1-3 MW. To understand the impact of high-penetration PV on the distribution grid, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SCE brought together a team of experts in resource assessment, distribution modeling, and planning to help analyze the impacts of adding high penetration of PV into the distribution system. Through modeling and simulation, laboratory testing, and field demonstrations, the team will address the issues identified in the analysis by fully examining the challenges, developing solutions, and transitioning those solutions to the field for large-scale deployment. This paper gives an update on the project and discusses technical results of integrating a large number of distributed PV systems into the grid.

  4. Lightweight PV Inverters: Dual Bi-Directional IGBTs Modules Enables Breakthrough PV Inverter Using Current Modulation Topology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-30

    Solar ADEPT Project: PV inverters convert DC power generated by modules into usable AC power. IPC’s initial 30kW 94lb. PV inverter reduces the weight of comparable 30kW PV inverters by 90%—reducing the cost of materials, manufacturing, shipping, and installation. With ARPA-E support, new bi-directional silicon power switches will be developed, commercialized, and utilized in IPC’s next-generation PV inverter. With these components, IPC will produce 100kW inverters that weight less than 100lb., reducing the weight of conventional 3,000lb. 100kW inverters by more than 95%. The new power switches will cut IPC’s $/W manufacturing cost in half, as well as further reduce indirect shipping and installation costs.

  5. Highly divergent sequences of the pollen self-incompatibility (S) gene in class-I S haplotypes of Brassica campestris (syn. rapa) L.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Ito, A; Takada, Y; Ninomiya, C; Kakizaki, T; Takahata, Y; Hatakeyama, K; Hinata, K; Suzuki, G; Takasaki, T; Satta, Y; Shiba, H; Takayama, S; Isogai, A

    2000-05-12

    Self-incompatibility (SI) enables flowering plants to discriminate between self- and non-self-pollen. In Brassica, SI is controlled by the highly polymorphic S locus. The recently identified male determinant, termed SP11 or SCR, is thought to be the ligand of S receptor kinase, the female determinant. To examine functional and evolutionary properties of SP11, we cloned 14 alleles from class-I S haplotypes of Brassica campestris and carried out sequence analyses. The sequences of mature SP11 proteins are highly divergent, except for the presence of conserved cysteines. The phylogenetic trees suggest possible co-evolution of the genes encoding the male and female determinants.

  6. Proposal of Xanthomonas translucens pv. pistaciae pv. nov., pathogenic to pistachio (Pistacia vera).

    PubMed

    Giblot-Ducray, Danièle; Marefat, Alireza; Gillings, Michael R; Parkinson, Neil M; Bowman, John P; Ophel-Keller, Kathy; Taylor, Cathy; Facelli, Evelina; Scott, Eileen S

    2009-12-01

    Strains of Xanthomonas translucens have caused dieback in the Australian pistachio industry for the last 15 years. Such pathogenicity to a dicotyledonous woody host contrasts with that of other pathovars of X. translucens, which are characterized by their pathogenicity to monocotyledonous plant families. Further investigations, using DNA-DNA hybridization, gyrB gene sequencing and integron screening, were conducted to confirm the taxonomic status of the X. translucens pathogenic to pistachio. DNA-DNA hybridization provided a clear classification, at the species level, of the pistachio pathogen as a X. translucens. In the gyrB-based phylogeny, strains of the pistachio pathogen clustered among the X. translucens pathovars as two distinct lineages. Integron screening revealed that the cassette arrays of strains of the pistachio pathogen were different from those of other Xanthomonas species, and again distinguished two groups. Together with previously reported pathogenicity data, these results confirm that the pistachio pathogen is a new pathovar of X. translucens and allow hypotheses about its origin. The proposed name is Xanthomonas translucens pv. pistaciae pv. nov.

  7. All-AC, building integrated PV system for mass deployment of residential PV systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cammack, Kevin; Augenbraun, Joe; Sun, Dan

    2011-05-17

    Project Objective: Solar Red is developing novel PV installation methods and system designs that lower costs dramatically and allow seamless integration into the structure of any sloped roof using existing construction tools and processes. The overall objective of this project is to address the greatest barriers to massive adoption of residential and small commercial rooftop solar – scalability of installation and total cost of ownership - by moving Solar Red’s snap-in/snap-out PV installation method from the pre-prototype design phase to the development and construction of a deployed prototype system. Financial Summary: Funded through ARRA, DOE and Match Funding Original Project Budget: $229,310 o DOE/ARRA Funding: $150,000 o Match Funding: $79,310 Actual Cost: $216,598 o DOE/ARRA Funding: $150,000 o Match Funding: $120,087 Project Summary: Develop snap-in/snap-out mounting system for low-cost, thin-film solar panels – Lower installation cost – Lower sales costs – Lower training/expertise barriers

  8. Effects of Temperature on Systemic Infection and Symptom Expression of Turnip mosaic virus in Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris)

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Bong Nam; Choi, Kyung San; Ahn, Jeong Joon; Joa, Jae Ho; Do, Ki Seck; Park, Kyo-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Using the Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris) cultivar ‘Chun-goang’ as a host and turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) as a pathogen, we studied the effects of ambient temperature (13°C, 18°C, 23°C, 28°C and 33°C) on disease intensity and the speed of systemic infection. The optimal temperature for symptom expression of TuMV was 18–28°C. However, symptoms of viral infection were initiated at 23–28°C and 6 days post infection (dpi). Plants maintained at 33°C were systemically infected as early as 6 dpi and remained symptomless until 12 or 22 dpi, depending on growth stage at the time of inoculation. It took 45 days for infection of plants grown at 13°C. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) results showed that the accumulation of virus coat protein was greater in plants grown at 23–28°C. The speed of systemic infection increased linearly with rising ambient temperature, up to 23°C. The zero-infection temperature was 10.1°C. To study the effects of abruptly elevated temperatures on systemic infection, plants inoculated with TuMV were maintained at 10°C for 20 d; transferred to a growth chamber at temperatures of 13°C, 18°C, 23°C, 28°C, or 33°C for 1, 2, or 3 d; and then moved back to 10°C. The numbers of plants infected increased as duration of exposure to higher temperatures and dpi increased. PMID:26673094

  9. The construction of a genetic linkage map of non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis Makino).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yan; Geng, Jianfeng; Zhang, Jingyi; Wang, Qian; Ban, Qingyu; Hou, Xilin

    2009-08-01

    Non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis Makino) is one of the most important vegetables in eastern China. A genetic linkage map was constructed using 127 doubled haploid (DH) lines, and the DH population was derived from a commercial hybrid "Hanxiao" (lines SW-13 x L-118). Out of the 614 polymorphic markers, 43.49% were not assigned to any of the linkage groups(LGs). Chi-square tests showed that 42.67% markers were distorted from expected Mendelian segregation ratios, and the direction of distorted segregation was mainly toward the paternal parent L-118. After sequentially removing the markers that had an interval distance smaller than 1 cM from the upper marker, the overall quality of the linkage map was increased. Two hundred and sixty-eight molecular markers were mapped into 10 LGs, which were anchored to the corresponding chromosome of the B. rapa reference map based on common simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The map covers 973.38 cM of the genome and the average interval distance between markers was 3.63 cM. The number of markers on each LG ranged from 18 (R08) to 64 (R07), with an average interval distance within a single LG from 1.70 cM (R07) to 6.71 cM (R06). Among these mapped markers, 169 were sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular markers, 50 were SSR markers and 49 were random amplification polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. With further saturation to the LG, the current map offers a genetic tool for loci analysis for important agronomic traits.

  10. Purification and Characterization of OleA from Xanthomonas campestris and Demonstration of a Non-decarboxylative Claisen Condensation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Frias, JA; Richman, JE; Erickson, JS; Wackett, LP

    2011-03-25

    OleA catalyzes the condensation of fatty acyl groups in the first step of bacterial long-chain olefin biosynthesis, but the mechanism of the condensation reaction is controversial. In this study, OleA from Xanthomonas campestris was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein was shown to be active with fatty acyl-CoA substrates that ranged from C(8) to C(16) in length. With limiting myristoyl-CoA (C(14)), 1 mol of the free coenzyme A was released/mol of myristoyl-CoA consumed. Using [(14)C] myristoyl-CoA, the other products were identified as myristic acid, 2-myristoylmyristic acid, and 14-heptacosanone. 2-Myristoylmyristic acid was indicated to be the physiologically relevant product of OleA in several ways. First, 2-myristoylmyristic acid was the major condensed product in short incubations, but over time, it decreased with the concomitant increase of 14-heptacosanone. Second, synthetic 2-myristoylmyristic acid showed similar decarboxylation kinetics in the absence of OleA. Third, 2-myristoylmyristic acid was shown to be reactive with purified OleC and OleD to generate the olefin 14-heptacosene, a product seen in previous in vivo studies. The decarboxylation product, 14-heptacosanone, did not react with OleC and OleD to produce any demonstrable product. Substantial hydrolysis of fatty acyl-CoA substrates to the corresponding fatty acids was observed, but it is currently unclear if this occurs in vivo. In total, these data are consistent with OleA catalyzing a non-decarboxylative Claisen condensation reaction in the first step of the olefin biosynthetic pathway previously found to be present in at least 70 different bacterial strains.

  11. Effects of Temperature on Systemic Infection and Symptom Expression of Turnip mosaic virus in Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris).

    PubMed

    Chung, Bong Nam; Choi, Kyung San; Ahn, Jeong Joon; Joa, Jae Ho; Do, Ki Seck; Park, Kyo-Sun

    2015-12-01

    Using the Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris) cultivar 'Chun-goang' as a host and turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) as a pathogen, we studied the effects of ambient temperature (13°C, 18°C, 23°C, 28°C and 33°C) on disease intensity and the speed of systemic infection. The optimal temperature for symptom expression of TuMV was 18-28°C. However, symptoms of viral infection were initiated at 23-28°C and 6 days post infection (dpi). Plants maintained at 33°C were systemically infected as early as 6 dpi and remained symptomless until 12 or 22 dpi, depending on growth stage at the time of inoculation. It took 45 days for infection of plants grown at 13°C. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) results showed that the accumulation of virus coat protein was greater in plants grown at 23-28°C. The speed of systemic infection increased linearly with rising ambient temperature, up to 23°C. The zero-infection temperature was 10.1°C. To study the effects of abruptly elevated temperatures on systemic infection, plants inoculated with TuMV were maintained at 10°C for 20 d; transferred to a growth chamber at temperatures of 13°C, 18°C, 23°C, 28°C, or 33°C for 1, 2, or 3 d; and then moved back to 10°C. The numbers of plants infected increased as duration of exposure to higher temperatures and dpi increased. PMID:26673094

  12. Genotypic differences in nitrate uptake, translocation and assimilation of two Chinese cabbage cultivars [Brassica campestris L. ssp. Chinensis (L.)].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yafang; Sun, Xuecheng; Hu, Chengxiao; Tan, Qiling; Zhao, Xiaohu

    2013-09-01

    A hydroponic trial was conducted to investigate genotypic differences in nitrate uptake, translocation and assimilation between low nitrate accumulator L18 and high accumulator H96 of Chinese cabbage [Brassica campestris L. ssp. Chinensis (L.)]. The results suggested that H96 could uptake more nitrate than L18 in the root but lower transport inside leaf cells and assimilation in the leaf. It was showed that root morphology parameters - length, surface area and volume of H96 were 18.0%, 31.6% and 46.5% higher than L18. Nitrate transporters NRT1.1 and NRT2.1 transcription levels were 41.6% and 269.6% higher than those of L18 respectively. NRT1.1 and NRT2.1 expression amount in leaf blade of two cultivars were opposite to in the root, L18 NRT1.1 and NRT2.1 expressions were 279.2% and 80.0% higher than H96. In addition, nitrate assimilation capacity of L18 was significantly higher than H96 in leaf. It was showed that Nitrate Reductase (NR; EC 1.7.1.1) activity and NIA expression level of L18 leaf were 234 0.4% and 105.4% higher than those of H96, Glutamine Synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) activity, Gln1 and Gln2 expression levels in the leaf blade of L18 were 43.9%, 331.5% and 124.8% higher than those of H96 respectively. Nitrate assimilation products-Glu, total amino acid, soluble protein content in the leaf of L18 were all significantly higher than those of H96. The results above suggested that nitrate accumulation differences were due to differential capacities to uptake, mechanisms for nitrate transport in leaves and assimilate nitrate. Comparing contribution of three aspects in nitrate accumulation, translocation and assimilation were contributed more in low nitrate concentration in the leaf blade.

  13. Effects of Temperature on Systemic Infection and Symptom Expression of Turnip mosaic virus in Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris).

    PubMed

    Chung, Bong Nam; Choi, Kyung San; Ahn, Jeong Joon; Joa, Jae Ho; Do, Ki Seck; Park, Kyo-Sun

    2015-12-01

    Using the Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris) cultivar 'Chun-goang' as a host and turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) as a pathogen, we studied the effects of ambient temperature (13°C, 18°C, 23°C, 28°C and 33°C) on disease intensity and the speed of systemic infection. The optimal temperature for symptom expression of TuMV was 18-28°C. However, symptoms of viral infection were initiated at 23-28°C and 6 days post infection (dpi). Plants maintained at 33°C were systemically infected as early as 6 dpi and remained symptomless until 12 or 22 dpi, depending on growth stage at the time of inoculation. It took 45 days for infection of plants grown at 13°C. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) results showed that the accumulation of virus coat protein was greater in plants grown at 23-28°C. The speed of systemic infection increased linearly with rising ambient temperature, up to 23°C. The zero-infection temperature was 10.1°C. To study the effects of abruptly elevated temperatures on systemic infection, plants inoculated with TuMV were maintained at 10°C for 20 d; transferred to a growth chamber at temperatures of 13°C, 18°C, 23°C, 28°C, or 33°C for 1, 2, or 3 d; and then moved back to 10°C. The numbers of plants infected increased as duration of exposure to higher temperatures and dpi increased.

  14. A new phenanthrene derivative and two diarylheptanoids from the roots of Brassica rapa ssp. campestris inhibit the growth of cancer cell lines and LDL-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Cho, Jin-Gyeong; Yoo, Ki-Hyun; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Park, Ji-Hae; Kim, Su-Yeon; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Chung, In-Sik; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Chung, Hae-Gon; Bang, Myun-Ho; Baek, Nam-In

    2013-04-01

    Brassica rapa ssp. campestris (Brassicaceae) is a conical, deep purple, edible root vegetable commonly known as a turnip. We initiated phytochemical and pharmacological studies to search for biological active compounds from the roots of B. rapa ssp. campestris. We isolated a novel phenanthrene derivative, 6-methoxy-1-[10-methoxy-7-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)phenanthren-3-yl]undecane-2,4-dione, named brassicaphenanthrene A (3) along with two known diarylheptanoid compounds, 6-paradol (1) and trans-6-shogaol (2), through the repeated silica gel (SiO2), octadecyl silica gel, and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. The chemical structures of the compounds were determined by spectroscopic data analyses including nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and infra-red spectroscopy. All compounds exhibited high inhibitory activity against the growth of human cancer lines, HCT-116, MCF-7, and HeLa, with IC50 values ranging from 15.0 to 35.0 μM and against LDL-oxidation with IC50 values ranging from 2.9 to 7.1 μM.

  15. Transcriptional differences between the male-sterile mutant bcms and wild-type Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis reveal genes related to pollen development.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Cao, J; Ye, W; Liu, T; Jiang, L; Ye, Y

    2008-05-01

    A novel male-sterile mutant which lacks mature pollen, Brassisa campestris male sterile (bcms), was identified in Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino (syn. B. rapa ssp. chinensis). Genetic analysis revealed that bcms was controlled by a single recessive mutation locus. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling was performed on the flower buds of both the bcms mutant and the wild-type from which it originated, and profiling analysis indicated that there were numerous changes in gene expression attributable to the gene mutation. This mutation resulted in down-regulation of a variety of genes and up-regulated expression of a few other genes. A total of 51 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were isolated: 32 specifically and 12 predominantly accumulated in wild-type flower buds, and two specifically and five predominantly accumulated in bcms flower buds. Sequence analysis showed that some of these TDFs share significant similarities with genes involved in different aspects of cellular development, such as signal transduction, cell wall biosynthesis and regulation. Most other TDFs showed no or very poor sequence similarities to entries in any database and might represent new candidate proteins involved in pollen development. Furthermore, spatial and temporal expression pattern analysis of 20 genes derived from cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism in different tissues of both the bcms and wild-type plants revealed their complex and dynamic expression patterns. The bcms mutant and the genes isolated in this paper provide excellent material for future studies on the molecular mechanism of male sterility.

  16. Morphological and functional characterization of BcMF13 in the antisense-silenced plants of Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis var. parachinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Cao, Jiashu

    2009-05-01

    The gene Brassica campestris male fertility 13 (BcMF13, GenBank accession number EF158459) was isolated as a reproductive organ-specific gene from Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino, syn. B. rapa ssp. chinensis). It is exclusively expressed in stage four and five flower buds of fertile lines and is most strongly expressed in stamens. Here, we report a functional characterization of this BcMF13 gene in the antisense-silenced plants. The inflorescence of the BcMF13 mutant was compacted with anthers curved outside. The fertility of this mutant was greatly reduced with less than 5 seeds per silique. Under scanning electron microscopy, the mutant demonstrated numerous shriveled pollen grains with deep invaginations. The frequency of normal pollen grains was just 45.34%. The pollen mother cell, the tetrad, and the mature pollen of the BcMF13 mutant were abnormal resulting in the poor pollen vitality. Germination test in vivo suggested BcMF13 delayed the pollen tubes' extension in the style. All these indicated BcMF13 had a vital role in pollen development of Chinese cabbage.

  17. Cloning, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of XC2981 from Xanthomonas campestris, a putative CutA1 protein involved in copper-ion homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chien-Hung; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Gao, Fei Philip; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Shr, Hui-Lin; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2006-11-01

    A probable copper-ion tolerance protein from the plant pathogen X. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Divalent metal ions play key roles in all living organisms, serving as cofactors for many proteins involved in a variety of electron-transfer activities. However, copper ions are highly toxic when an excessive amount is accumulated in a cell. CutA1 is a protein found in all kingdoms of life that is believed to participate in copper-ion tolerance in Escherichia coli, although its specific function remains unknown. Several crystal structures of multimeric CutA1 with different rotation angles and degrees of interaction between trimer interfaces have been reported. Here, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC2981, a possible CutA1 protein present in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris, are reported. The XC2981 crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.6 Å. They are cubic and belong to space group I23, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 130.73 Å.

  18. Residue analysis of acephate and its metabolite methamidophos in open field and greenhouse pakchoi (Brassica campestris L.) by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chuanjiang, Tao; Dahui, Li; Xinzhong, Zhang; Shanshan, Chen; Lijuan, Fu; Xiuying, Piao; Jie, Shi; Hui, Jiang; Chongjiu, Li; Jianzhong, Li

    2010-06-01

    To analyze the dynamic degradation and final residues of acephate and its metabolite methamidophos, field-experiments with pakchoi (Brassica campestris L.) in open field and greenhouse were carried out in Beijing, China in 2004 and 2005. The degradation dynamics and final residues were determined by gas chromatography (GC) equipped with a pulsed flame photometric detector and GC coupled to mass spectrometry (MS)/MS after acephate was applied on open field and green house pakchoi (B. campestris L.). The dynamic degradation results showed that the half-lives of acephate and methamidophos in open field pakchoi were 1.36 days with dynamic degradation equation C( t ) = 133.01e( - 0.5107t ), and 2.86 days with C( t ) = 6.5753e( - 0.2422t ), respectively. While the half-lives of acephate and methamidophos in the greenhouse were 1.07 days with C( t ) = 59.134e( - 0.4353t ) and 0.79 days with C( t ) = 0.2703e( - 0.2595t ), respectively. The final residue analysis demonstrated that >50% of total methamidophos were resulted from the degradation of acephate 7 and 18 days after it was applied on the greenhouse pakchoi, respectively. While in the open-field pakchoi, >90% of total methamidophos was found to be the metabolite of acephate.

  19. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a Cu/Zn SOD gene (BcCSD1) from Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lijie; Huang, Qiang; Yan, Bin; Wang, Yao; Qian, Zhongyin; Pan, Jingxian; Kai, Guoyin

    2015-11-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are a family of metalloproteins extensively exists in eukaryote, which plays an essential role in stress-tolerance of higher plants. A full-length cDNA encoding Cu/Zn SOD (BcCSD1) was isolated from young seedlings of non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis) by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Bioinformatics analysis revealed that BcCSD1 belonged to the plant SOD super family and had the closest relationship with SOD from Brassica napus. Tissue expression pattern analysis revealed that the BcCSD1 was constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues, and strongest in leaf, moderate in stem, lowest in root. The expression profiles under different stress treatments such as drought, NaCl, high temperature and ABA were also investigated, and the results revealed that BcCSD1 was a stress-responsive gene, especially to ABA. These results provide useful information for further understanding the role of BcCSD1 resistant to abiotic stress in Brassica campestris in the future.

  20. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a Cu/Zn SOD gene (BcCSD1) from Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lijie; Huang, Qiang; Yan, Bin; Wang, Yao; Qian, Zhongyin; Pan, Jingxian; Kai, Guoyin

    2015-11-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are a family of metalloproteins extensively exists in eukaryote, which plays an essential role in stress-tolerance of higher plants. A full-length cDNA encoding Cu/Zn SOD (BcCSD1) was isolated from young seedlings of non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis) by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Bioinformatics analysis revealed that BcCSD1 belonged to the plant SOD super family and had the closest relationship with SOD from Brassica napus. Tissue expression pattern analysis revealed that the BcCSD1 was constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues, and strongest in leaf, moderate in stem, lowest in root. The expression profiles under different stress treatments such as drought, NaCl, high temperature and ABA were also investigated, and the results revealed that BcCSD1 was a stress-responsive gene, especially to ABA. These results provide useful information for further understanding the role of BcCSD1 resistant to abiotic stress in Brassica campestris in the future. PMID:25976826

  1. Geographic smoothing of solar PV: Results from Gujarat

    DOE PAGES

    Klima, Kelly; Apt, Jay

    2015-09-24

    We examine the potential for geographic smoothing of solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation using 13 months of observed power production from utility-scale plants in Gujarat, India. To our knowledge, this is the first published analysis of geographic smoothing of solar PV using actual generation data at high time resolution from utility-scale solar PV plants. We use geographic correlation and Fourier transform estimates of the power spectral density (PSD) to characterize the observed variability of operating solar PV plants as a function of time scale. Most plants show a spectrum that is linear in the log–log domain at high frequencies f,more » ranging from f-1.23 to f-1.56 (slopes of -1.23 and -1.56), thus exhibiting more relative variability at high frequencies than exhibited by wind plants. PSDs for large PV plants have a steeper slope than those for small plants, hence more smoothing at short time scales. Interconnecting 20 Gujarat plants yields a f-1.66 spectrum, reducing fluctuations at frequencies corresponding to 6 h and 1 h by 23% and 45%, respectively. Half of this smoothing can be obtained through connecting 4-5 plants; reaching marginal improvement of 1% per added plant occurs at 12-14 plants. The largest plant (322 MW) showed an f-1.76 spectrum. Furthermore, this suggests that in Gujarat the potential for smoothing is limited to that obtained by one large plant.« less

  2. Planar holographic spectrum-splitting PV module design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael; Zhang, Deming; Vorndran, Shelby; Russo, Juan M.; Luscombe, Christine K.; Shaheen, Sean E.; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    2012-10-01

    A design is presented for a planar spectrum-splitting photovoltaic (PV) module using Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs). A repeating array of HOEs diffracts portions of the solar spectrum onto different PV materials arranged in alternating strips. Several combinations of candidate PV materials are explored, and theoretical power conversion efficiency is quantified and compared for each case. The holograms are recorded in dichromated gelatin (DCG) film, an inexpensive material which is easily encapsulated directly into the panel. If desired, the holograms can focus the light to achieve concentration. The side-by-side split spectrum layout has advantages compared to a stacked tandem cell approach: since the cells are electrically isolated, current matching constraints are eliminated. Combinations of dissimilar types of cells are also possible: including crystalline, thin film, and organic PV cells. Configurations which yield significant efficiency gain using relatively inexpensive PV materials are of particular interest. A method used to optimize HOE design to work with a different candidate cells and different package aspect ratios is developed and presented. (Aspect ratio is width of the cell strips vs. the thickness of the panel) The relationship between aspect ratio and HOE performance properties is demonstrated. These properties include diffraction efficiency, spectral selectivity, tracking alignment sensitivity, and uniformity of cell illumination.

  3. Economic analysis of PV hybrid power system: Pinnacles National Monument

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Durand, S.; Thomas, M.; Post, H.

    1997-11-01

    PV hybrid electric power systems can offer an economically competitive alternative to engine generator (genset) systems in many off-grid applications. Besides the obvious `green` advantages of producing less noise and emissions, the PV hybrid can, in some cases, offer a lower life-cycle cost (LCC) then the genset. This paper evaluates the LCC of the 9.6 kWp PV hybrid power system installed by the National Park Services (NPS) at Pinnacles National Monument, CA. NPS motivation for installation of this hybrid was not based on economics, but rather the need to replace two aging diesel gensets with an alternative that would be quieter, fuel efficient, and more in keeping with new NPS emphasis on sustainable design and operations. In fact, economic analysis shows a lower 20-year LCC for the installed PV hybrid than for simple replacement of the two gensets. The analysis projects are net savings by the PV hybrid system of $83,561 and over 162,000 gallons of propane when compared with the genset-only system. This net savings is independent of the costs associated with environmental emissions. The effects of including emissions costs, according to NPS guidelines, is also discussed. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Estimation of PV energy production based on satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, G.

    2015-09-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) technology is an attractive source of power for systems without connection to power grid. Because of seasonal variations of solar radiation, design of such a power system requires careful analysis in order to provide required reliability. In this paper we present results of three-year measurements of experimental PV system located in Poland and based on polycrystalline silicon module. Irradiation values calculated from results of ground measurements have been compared with data from solar radiation databases employ calculations from of satellite observations. Good convergence level of both data sources has been shown, especially during summer. When satellite data from the same time period is available, yearly and monthly production of PV energy can be calculated with 2% and 5% accuracy, respectively. However, monthly production during winter seems to be overestimated, especially in January. Results of this work may be helpful in forecasting performance of similar PV systems in Central Europe and allow to make more precise forecasts of PV system performance than based only on tables with long time averaged values.

  5. Pepper mitochondrial FORMATE DEHYDROGENASE1 regulates cell death and defense responses against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2014-11-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH; EC 1.2.1.2) is an NAD-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide. Here, we report the identification and characterization of pepper (Capsicum annuum) mitochondrial FDH1 as a positive regulator of cell death and defense responses. Transient expression of FDH1 caused hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The D-isomer -: specific 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase signatures of FDH1 were required for the induction of HR-like cell death and FDH activity. FDH1 contained a mitochondrial targeting sequence at the N-terminal region; however, mitochondrial localization of FDH1 was not essential for the induction of HR-like cell death and FDH activity. FDH1 silencing in pepper significantly attenuated the cell death response and salicylic acid levels but stimulated growth of Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria. By contrast, transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) overexpressing FDH1 exhibited greater resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato in a salicylic acid-dependent manner. Arabidopsis transfer DNA insertion mutant analysis indicated that AtFDH1 expression is required for basal defense and resistance gene-mediated resistance to P. syringae pv tomato infection. Taken together, these data suggest that FDH1 has an important role in HR-like cell death and defense responses to bacterial pathogens.

  6. Photovoltaic Module Simulink Model for a Stand-alone PV System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chen; Ming, Zhu

    Photovoltaic(PV) Module is indispensable of a stand-alone PV system. In this paper, a one-diode equivalent circuit-based versatile simulation model in the form of masked block PV module is proposed. By the model, it is allowed to estimate behavior of PV module with respect changes on irradiance intensity, ambient temperature and parameters of the PV module. In addition, the model is capable of function of Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) which can be used in the dynamic simulation of stand-alone PV systems.

  7. Budgeting for Solar PV Plant Operations & Maintenance: Practices and Pricing.

    SciTech Connect

    Enbar, Nadav; Weng, Dean; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2016-01-01

    With rising grid interconnections of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, greater attention is being trained on lifecycle performance, reliability, and project economics. Expected to meet production thresholds over a 20-30 year timeframe, PV plants require a steady diet of operations and maintenance (O&M) oversight to meet contractual terms. However, industry best practices are only just beginning to emerge, and O&M budgets—given the arrangement of the solar project value chain—appear to vary widely. Based on insights from in-depth interviews and survey research, this paper presents an overview of the utility-scale PV O&M budgeting process along with guiding rationales, before detailing perspectives on current plant upkeep activities and price points largely in the U.S. It concludes by pondering potential opportunities for improving upon existing O&M budgeting approaches in ways that can benefit the industry at-large.

  8. Budgeting for Solar PV Plant Operations & Maintenance: Practices and Pricing.

    SciTech Connect

    Enbar, Nadav; Weng, Dean; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2015-12-01

    With rising grid interconnections of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, greater attention is being trained on lifecycle performance, reliability, and project economics. Expected to meet production thresholds over a 20-30 year timeframe, PV plants require a steady diet of operations and maintenance (O&M) oversight to meet contractual terms. However, industry best practices are only just beginning to emerge, and O&M budgets—given the arrangement of the solar project value chain—appear to vary widely. Based on insights from in-depth interviews and survey research, this paper presents an overview of the utility-scale PV O&M budgeting process along with guiding rationales, before detailing perspectives on current plant upkeep activities and price points largely in the U.S. It concludes by pondering potential opportunities for improving upon existing O&M budgeting approaches in ways that can benefi t the industry at-large.

  9. Time series power flow analysis for distribution connected PV generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Ellis, Abraham; Reno, Matthew J.; Smith, Jeff; Dugan, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Distributed photovoltaic (PV) projects must go through an interconnection study process before connecting to the distribution grid. These studies are intended to identify the likely impacts and mitigation alternatives. In the majority of the cases, system impacts can be ruled out or mitigation can be identified without an involved study, through a screening process or a simple supplemental review study. For some proposed projects, expensive and time-consuming interconnection studies are required. The challenges to performing the studies are twofold. First, every study scenario is potentially unique, as the studies are often highly specific to the amount of PV generation capacity that varies greatly from feeder to feeder and is often unevenly distributed along the same feeder. This can cause location-specific impacts and mitigations. The second challenge is the inherent variability in PV power output which can interact with feeder operation in complex ways, by affecting the operation of voltage regulation and protection devices. The typical simulation tools and methods in use today for distribution system planning are often not adequate to accurately assess these potential impacts. This report demonstrates how quasi-static time series (QSTS) simulation and high time-resolution data can be used to assess the potential impacts in a more comprehensive manner. The QSTS simulations are applied to a set of sample feeders with high PV deployment to illustrate the usefulness of the approach. The report describes methods that can help determine how PV affects distribution system operations. The simulation results are focused on enhancing the understanding of the underlying technical issues. The examples also highlight the steps needed to perform QSTS simulation and describe the data needed to drive the simulations. The goal of this report is to make the methodology of time series power flow analysis readily accessible to utilities and others responsible for evaluating

  10. Design, Fabrication and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minyard, Glen E.; Lambarski, Timothy J.

    1997-02-01

    The Design, Fabrication and Certification of Advanced Modular PV Power Systems contract is a Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) cost-shared contract under Phase 4A1 for Product Driven Systems and Component Technologies. Phase 4A1 has the goals to improve the cost-effectiveness and manufacturing efficiency of PV end-products, optimize manufacturing and packaging methods, and generally improve balance-of-system performance, integration and manufacturing. This contract has the specific goal to reduce the installed PV system life cycle costs to the customer with the ultimate goal of increasing PV system marketability and customer acceptance. The specific objectives of the project are to develop certified, standardized, modular, pre-engineered products lines of our main stand-alone systems, the Modular Autonomous PV Power Supply (MAPPS) and PV-Generator Hybrid System (Photogenset). To date, we have designed a 200 W MAPPS and a 1 kW Photogenset and are in the process of having the MAPPS certified by Underwriters Laboratories (UL Listed) and approved for hazardous locations by Factory Mutual (FM). We have also developed a manufacturing plan for product line expansion for the MAPPS. The Photogenset will be fabricated in February 1997 and will also be UL Listed. Functionality testing will be performed at NREL and Sandia with the intentions of providing verification of performance and reliability and of developing test-based performance specifications. In addition to an expansion on the goals, objectives and status of the project, specific accomplishments and benefits are also presented in this paper.

  11. Modular Power Converters for PV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ozpineci, Burak; Tolbert, Leon M

    2012-05-01

    This report describes technical opportunities to serve as parts of a technological roadmap for Shoals Technologies Group in power electronics for PV applications. There are many different power converter circuits that can be used for solar inverter applications. The present applications do not take advantage of the potential for using common modules. We envision that the development of a power electronics module could enable higher reliability by being durable and flexible. Modules would have fault current limiting features and detection circuits such that they can limit the current through the module from external faults and can identify and isolate internal faults such that the remaining modules can continue to operate with only minimal disturbance to the utility or customer. Development of a reliable, efficient, low-cost, power electronics module will be a key enabling technology for harnessing more power from solar panels and enable plug and play operation. Power electronics for computer power supplies, communication equipment, and transportation have all targeted reliability and modularity as key requirements and have begun concerted efforts to replace monolithic components with collections of common smart modules. This is happening on several levels including (1) device level with intelligent control, (2) functional module level, and (3) system module. This same effort is needed in power electronics for solar applications. Development of modular units will result in standard power electronic converters that will have a lower installed and operating cost for the overall system. These units will lead to increased adaptability and flexibility of solar inverters. Incorporating autonomous fault current limiting and reconfiguration capabilities into the modules and having redundant modules will lead to a durable converter that can withstand the rigors of solar power generation for more than 30 years. Our vision for the technology roadmap is that there is no need

  12. Toward integrated PV panels and power electronics using printing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ababei, Cristinel; Yuvarajan, Subbaraya; Schulz, Douglas L.

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, we review the latest developments in the area of printing technologies with an emphasis on the fabrication of control-embedded photovoltaics (PV) with on-board active and passive devices. We also review the use of power converters and maximum power point tracking (MPPT) circuits with PV panels. Our focus is on the investigation of the simplest implementations of such circuits in view of their integration with solar cells using printing technologies. We see this concept as potentially enabling toward further cost reduction. Besides a discussion as to feasibility, we shall also present some projections and guidelines toward possible integration. (author)

  13. Amp-hour counting control for PV hybrid power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hund, T.D.; Thompson, B.

    1997-06-01

    The performance of an amp-hour (Ah) counting battery charge control algorithm has been defined and tested using the Digital Solar Technologies MPR-9400 microprocessor based PV hybrid charge controller. This work included extensive field testing of the charge algorithm on flooded lead-antimony and valve regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. The test results after one-year have demonstrated that PV charge utilization, battery charge control, and battery state of charge (SOC) has been significantly improved by providing maximum charge to the batteries while limiting battery overcharge to manufacturers specifications during variable solar resource and load periods.

  14. Selecting Solar: Insights into Residential Photovoltaic (PV) Quote Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Carolyn; Margolis, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Before investing in a system, a prospective PV customer must not only have initial concept 'buy in,' but also be able to evaluate the tradeoffs associated with different system parameters. Prospective customers might need to evaluate disparate costs for each system attribute by comparing multiple bids. The difficulty of making such an evaluation with limited information can create a cognitive barrier to proceeding with the investment. This analysis leverages recently available data from EnergySage, an online solar marketplace, to offer the first data-driven characterization of quote variation faced by prospective PV customers, lending early insight into the decisions customers face once they have initial buy-in.

  15. Progress Toward Sequestering Carbon Nanotubes in PmPV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Sequestration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in molecules of poly(m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-diocty-loxy-p-phenylenevinylene) [PmPV] is a candidate means of promoting dissolution of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into epoxies for making strong, lightweight epoxy-matrix/carbon-fiber composite materials. Bare SWNTs cannot be incorporated because they are not soluble in epoxies. In the present approach, one exploits the tendency of PmPV molecules to wrap themselves around SWNTs without chemically bonding to them.

  16. Outdoor PV Module Degradation of Current-Voltage Parameters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. M.; Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) module degradation rate analysis quantifies the loss of PV power output over time and is useful for estimating the impact of degradation on the cost of energy. An understanding of the degradation of all current-voltage (I-V) parameters helps to determine the cause of the degradation and also gives useful information for the design of the system. This study reports on data collected from 12 distinct mono- and poly-crystalline modules deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Most modules investigated showed < 0.5%/year decrease in maximum power due to short-circuit current decline.

  17. PV cell and module performance measurement capabilities at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Rummel, S.; Emery, K.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T.; Anderberg, A.; Dunlavy, D.; Ottoson, L.

    1998-09-01

    The Photovoltaic (PV) Cell and Module Performance Characterization team at NREL supports the entire photovoltaic community by providing: secondary calibrations of photovoltaic cells and modules; efficiency measurements with respect to a given set of standard reporting conditions; verification of contract efficiency milestones; and current versus voltage (I-V) measurements under various conditions of temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Support is also provided to in-house programs in device fabrication, module stability, module reliability, PV systems evaluations, and alternative rating methods by performing baseline testing, specialized measurements and other assistance when required. The I-V and spectral responsivity equipment used to accomplish these tasks are described in this paper.

  18. Quantifying PV module microclimates and translation into accelerated weathering protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nancy H.; Scott, Kurt P.

    2014-10-01

    Long term reliability is not well addressed by current standards for PV modules or components, and developing accelerated weathering stress protocols to test the resistance of key components to wear-out is an active area of research. A first step is to understand and quantify the range of actual stresses modules will encounter in the various mounting configurations and in-service environments. In this paper, we use real-world data to benchmark PV module service environments in hot/dry, hot/wet, and temperate environments, with subsequent analysis to translate the microclimate data into a portfolio of practical weathering instrument settings.

  19. [Production and cytogenetics of hybrids of Ogura CMS Brassica campestris var. purpuraria x Raphanus sativus x Brassica napus].

    PubMed

    Huang, Bang-Quan; Liu, You-Qi; Wu, Wen-Hua; Xue, Xiao-Qiao

    2002-05-01

    Crosses of Ogura CMS Brassica campestris var. purpuraria x Raphanus sativus x Brassica napus were made and four hybrids were produced. One plant (PRN-1) was mosaic with yellow and milk white flowers and some flowers had both yellow and white petals. The others (PRN-2, -3, -4) had white flowers. PRN-4 had degenerated anthers, the other three had three to six anthers and could produce some pollens, but the pollens of PRN-2 were unstainable by I2-KI solution. PRN-2 had four normal honey glands, PRN-1 and PRN-3 had two, and PRN-4 had none. PRN-2 had normal leaf color and the other three showed different degrees of chlorophyll deficiency at low temperature. The chromosome number of PRN-1 was 2n = 38 and had the mean chromosome paring configuration of 14.67 I + 10.07 II + 1.06 III, and its chromosome set constitution might be AACR. This chromosome constitution may be due to the fertilization of female gamete of n = 19 (AR) with male gamete of n = 19 (AC) from B. napus. The occurrence of mosaic flower color in this plant may be attributed to the chromosome abnormalities caused by wide hybridization, such as chromosome deficiency and the formation of chromosome fragments and chromosome bridges. The chromosome number of PRN-2 was 2n = 35 and the mean chromosome paring configuration was 13.89 I + 8.33 II + 1.33 III + 0.11 IV. The chromosome number of PRN-3 was 2n = 33 and the mean chromosome paring configuration was 14.00 I + 7.82 II + 1.00 III + 0.09 IV. The chromosome number of PRN-4 was not determined as there was no pollen mother cell formation. Chromosome bridges and laggards were observed in PRN-1-3. Some seeds were harvested from PRN-1-3 but none was harvested from PRN-4 when backcrossed with B. napus. It seems possible for us to overcome the chlorophyll deficiency and honey gland abnormality and restore the male fertility in Ogura CMS by introduction of the nucleus of R. sativus into this cytoplasmic male sterile line. PMID:12043578

  20. Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2008-07-06

    Readily accessible credit has often been cited as a necessary ingredient to open up the market for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing does not reduce the high up-front cost of PV, by spreading that cost over some portion of the system's life, financing can certainly make PV systems more affordable. As a result, a number of states have, in the past, set up special residential loan programs targeting the installation of renewable energy systems and/or energy-efficiency improvements and often featuring low interest rates, longer terms and no-hassle application requirements. Historically, these loan programs have had mixed success (particularly for PV), for a variety of reasons, including a historical lack of homeowner interest in PV, a lack of program awareness, a reduced appeal in a low-interest-rate environment, and a tendency for early PV adopters to be wealthy and not in need of financing. Some of these barriers have begun to fade. Most notably, homeowner interest in PV has grown in some states, particularly those that offer solar rebates. The passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), however, introduced one additional roadblock to the success of low-interest PV loan programs: a residential solar investment tax credit (ITC), subject to the Federal government's 'anti-double-dipping' rules. Specifically, the residential solar ITC--equal to 30% of the system's tax basis, capped at $2000--will be reduced or offset if the system also benefits from what is known as 'subsidized energy financing', which is likely to include most government-sponsored low-interest loan programs. Within this context, it has been interesting to note the recent flurry of announcements from a number of U.S cities concerning a new type of PV financing program. Led by the city of Berkeley, Calif., these cities propose to offer their residents the ability to finance the installation of a PV system using increased property tax assessments, rather than a more

  1. Comparison of three different methods of perturbing the potential vorticity field in mesoscale forecasts of Mediterranean heavy precipitation events: PV-gradient, PV-adjoint and PV-satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vich, M.; Romero, R.; Richard, E.; Arbogast, P.; Maynard, K.

    2010-09-01

    Heavy precipitation events occur regularly in the western Mediterranean region. These events often have a high impact on the society due to economic and personal losses. The improvement of the mesoscale numerical forecasts of these events can be used to prevent or minimize their impact on the society. In previous studies, two ensemble prediction systems (EPSs) based on perturbing the model initial and boundary conditions were developed and tested for a collection of high-impact MEDEX cyclonic episodes. These EPSs perturb the initial and boundary potential vorticity (PV) field through a PV inversion algorithm. This technique ensures modifications of all the meteorological fields without compromising the mass-wind balance. One EPS introduces the perturbations along the zones of the three-dimensional PV structure presenting the local most intense values and gradients of the field (a semi-objective choice, PV-gradient), while the other perturbs the PV field over the MM5 adjoint model calculated sensitivity zones (an objective method, PV-adjoint). The PV perturbations are set from a PV error climatology (PVEC) that characterizes typical PV errors in the ECMWF forecasts, both in intensity and displacement. This intensity and displacement perturbation of the PV field is chosen randomly, while its location is given by the perturbation zones defined in each ensemble generation method. Encouraged by the good results obtained by these two EPSs that perturb the PV field, a new approach based on a manual perturbation of the PV field has been tested and compared with the previous results. This technique uses the satellite water vapor (WV) observations to guide the correction of initial PV structures. The correction of the PV field intents to improve the match between the PV distribution and the WV image, taking advantage of the relation between dark and bright features of WV images and PV anomalies, under some assumptions. Afterwards, the PV inversion algorithm is applied to run

  2. Dynamic Model Validation of PV Inverters Under Short-Circuit Conditions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Bravo, R.; Gevorgian, V.

    2013-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) modules have dramatically decreased in price in the past few years, spurring the expansion of photovoltaic deployment. Residential and commercial rooftop installations are connected to the distribution network; large-scale installation PV power plants (PVPs) have benefited from tax incentives and the low cost of PV modules. As the level penetration of PV generation increases, the impact on power system reliability will also be greater. Utility power system planners must consider the role of PV generation in power systems more realistically by representing PV generation in dynamic stability analyses. Dynamic models of PV inverters have been developed in the positive sequence representation. NREL has developed a PV inverter dynamic model in PSCAD/EMTDC. This paper validates the dynamic model with an actual hardware bench test conducted by Southern California Edison's Distributed Energy Resources laboratory. All the fault combinations -- symmetrical and unsymmetrical -- were performed in the laboratory. We compare the simulation results with the bench test results.

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis Strains Associated with Walnut Blight in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Higuera, Gastón; González-Escalona, Narjol; Véliz, Camila; Vera, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis is an important pathogen responsible for walnut blight outbreaks globally. Here, we report four draft genome sequences of X. arboricola pv. juglandis strains isolated from Chilean walnut trees. PMID:26450732

  4. Draft genome sequences of five Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidifoliorum strains isolated in France.

    PubMed

    Cunty, Amandine; Cesbron, Sophie; Briand, Martial; Carrère, Sébastien; Poliakoff, Françoise; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Manceau, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidifoliorum causes necrotic spots on the leaves of Actinidia deliciosa and Actinidia chinensis. P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum has been detected in New Zealand, Australia, France and Spain. Four lineages were previously identified within the P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum species group. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of five strains of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum representative of lineages 1, 2 and 4, isolated in France. The whole genomes of strains isolated in New Zealand, representative of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum lineages 1 and 3, were previously sequenced. The availability of supplementary P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum genome sequences will be useful for developing molecular tools for pathogen detection and for performing comparative genomic analyses to study the relationship between P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum and other kiwifruit pathogens, such as P. syringae pv. actinidiae. PMID:27237113

  5. Climatically Diverse Data Set for Flat-Plate PV Module Model Validations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, B.

    2013-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) module I-V curves were measured at Florida, Colorado, and Oregon locations to provide data for the validation and development of models used for predicting the performance of PV modules.

  6. PV Systems Reliability Final Technical Report: Ground Fault Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrova, Olga; Flicker, Jack David; Johnson, Jay

    2016-01-01

    We have examined ground faults in PhotoVoltaic (PV) arrays and the efficacy of fuse, current detection (RCD), current sense monitoring/relays (CSM), isolation/insulation (Riso) monitoring, and Ground Fault Detection and Isolation (GFID) using simulations based on a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis SPICE ground fault circuit model, experimental ground faults installed on real arrays, and theoretical equations.

  7. Silicon Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    del Cueto, J. A.; Glick, S. H.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

    2006-10-03

    Dielectric, adhesion-promoting, moisture barriers comprised of silicon oxynitride thin film materials (SiOxNy with various material stoichiometric compositions x,y) were applied to: 1) bare and pre-coated soda-lime silicate glass (coated with transparent conductive oxide SnO2:F and/or aluminum), and polymer substrates (polyethylene terephthalate, PET, or polyethylene napthalate, PEN); plus 2) pre- deposited photovoltaic (PV) cells and mini-modules consisting of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film PV technologies. We used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process with dilute silane, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide/oxygen gas mixtures in a low-power (< or = 10 milliW per cm2) RF discharge at ~ 0.2 Torr pressure, and low substrate temperatures < or = 100(degrees)C, over deposition areas ~ 1000 cm2. Barrier properties of the resulting PV cells and coated-glass packaging structures were studied with subsequent stressing in damp-heat exposure at 85(degrees)C/85% RH. Preliminary results on PV cells and coated glass indicate the palpable benefits of the barriers in mitigating moisture intrusion and degradation of the underlying structures using SiOxNy coatings with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm.

  8. Genome sequence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. punicae strain LMG 859.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Midha, Samriti; Ranjan, Manish; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar; Patil, Prabhu B

    2012-05-01

    We report the 4.94-Mb genome sequence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. punicae strain LMG 859, the causal agent of bacterial leaf blight disease in pomegranate. The draft genome will aid in comparative genomics, epidemiological studies, and quarantine of this devastating phytopathogen. PMID:22493202

  9. Selecting Solar. Insights into Residential Photovoltaic (PV) Quote Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Carolyn; Margolis, Robert

    2015-10-01

    This analysis leverages available data from EnergySage, an online solar marketplace, to offer the first data-driven characterization of quote variation faced by prospective PV customers, lending early insight into the decisions customers face once they have initial buy-in.

  10. Recent advances in PV systems technology development in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, M.; Grottke, M.; Weiss, I.

    1995-11-01

    The objectives of the photovoltaics (PV) systems technology development were to study several aspects of plant design, monitoring, control, operation, and management of different types of photovoltaic plants. Unsolved problems were to be identified and analysed, and guidelines to improve the monitoring system were to be developed. Principal studies are summarized.

  11. Opportunities and Challenges for Power Electronics in PV Modules (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Deline, C.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Marion, B.; Granata, J.

    2011-02-01

    The presentation describes the value of adding DC converters and other power electronics to modules to improve their output even when shading or bad cells would otherwise decrease the module output. The presentation was part of a workshop sponsored by ARPA-E exploring the opportunities for power electronics to support PV applications.

  12. National solar technology roadmap: Wafer-silicon PV

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan

    2007-06-01

    This report applies to all bulk-silicon-based PV technologies, including those based on Czochralski, multicrystalline, float-zone wafers, and melt-grown crystals that are 100 μm or thicker, such as ribbons, sheet, or spheral silicon.

  13. PV industry growth and module reliability in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenvidhya, Dhirayut; Seapan, Manit; Sangpongsanont, Yaowanee; Chenvidhya, Tanokkorn; Limsakul, Chamnan; Songprakorp, Roongrojana

    2015-09-01

    The PV applications in Thailand are now installed more than 1.2 GWp cumulatively. It is due to the National Renewable Energy Program and its targets. In the latest Alternative Energy Development Plan (AEDP), the PV electricity production target has increased from 2 GWp to 3 GWp. With this rapid growth, customers and manufacturers seek for module standard testing. So far over one thousands of PV modules per annum have been tested since 2012. The normal tests include type approval test according to TIS standard, acceptance test and testing for local standard development. For type test, the most module failure was found during damp heat test. For annual evaluation test, the power degradation and delamination of power was found between 0 to 6 percent from its nameplate after deployment of 0 to 5 years in the field. For thin-film module, the degradation and delamination was found in range of 0 to 13 percent (about 5 percent on average) from its nameplate for the modules in operation with less than 5 years. However, for the PV modules at the reference site on campus operated for 12 years, the power degradation was ranging from 10 to 15 percent. Therefore, a long term performance assessment needs to be considered to ensure the system reliability.

  14. Rooftop PV system. PV:BONUS Phase 3B, final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    Under the PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar developed, demonstrated and commercialized two new lightweight, flexible BIPV modules specifically designed as replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and can be used to address the even larger roofing-replacement market. An important design feature of these modules, which minimizes the installation and balance-of-system costs, is their ability to be installed by conventional roofing contractors without special training. The modules are fabricated from high-efficiency, triple-junction spectrum-splitting a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. These cells are produced on thin, flexible stainless steel substrates and encapsulated with polymer materials. The Phase 3 program began in August 1995. The principal tasks and goals of this program, which have all been successfully completed by ECD and United Solar, are described in the body and appendices of this report.

  15. Solar PV Manufacturing Cost Model Group: Installed Solar PV System Prices (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrich, A. C.; Woodhouse, M.; James, T.

    2011-02-01

    EERE's Solar Energy Technologies Program is charged with leading the Secretary's SunShot Initiative to reduce the cost of electricity from solar by 75% to be cost competitive with conventional energy sources without subsidy by the end of the decade. As part of this Initiative, the program has funded the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop module manufacturing and solar PV system installation cost models to ensure that the program's cost reduction targets are carefully aligned with current and near term industry costs. The NREL cost analysis team has leveraged the laboratories' extensive experience in the areas of project finance and deployment, as well as industry partnerships, to develop cost models that mirror the project cost analysis tools used by project managers at leading U.S. installers. The cost models are constructed through a "bottoms-up" assessment of each major cost element, beginning with the system's bill of materials, labor requirements (type and hours) by component, site-specific charges, and soft costs. In addition to the relevant engineering, procurement, and construction costs, the models also consider all relevant costs to an installer, including labor burdens and overhead rates, supply chain costs, and overhead and materials inventory costs, and assume market-specific profits.

  16. Insights into xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri biofilm through proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. a. pv. citri) causes citrus canker that can result in defoliation and premature fruit drop with significant production losses worldwide. Biofilm formation is an important process in bacterial pathogens and several lines of evidence suggest that in X. a. pv. citri this process is a requirement to achieve maximal virulence since it has a major role in host interactions. In this study, proteomics was used to gain further insights into the functions of biofilms. Results In order to identify differentially expressed proteins, a comparative proteomic study using 2D difference gel electrophoresis was carried out on X. a. pv. citri mature biofilm and planktonic cells. The biofilm proteome showed major variations in the composition of outer membrane proteins and receptor or transport proteins. Among them, several porins and TonB-dependent receptor were differentially regulated in the biofilm compared to the planktonic cells, indicating that these proteins may serve in maintaining specific membrane-associated functions including signaling and cellular homeostasis. In biofilms, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase with a major role in exopolysaccharide production and the non-fimbrial adhesin YapH involved in adherence were over-expressed, while a polynucleotide phosphorylase that was demonstrated to negatively control biofilm formation in E. coli was down-regulated. In addition, several proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and stabilization were up-regulated in biofilms. Interestingly, some proteins related to energy production, such as ATP-synthase were down-regulated in biofilms. Moreover, a number of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were differentially expressed. In addition, X. a. pv. citri biofilms also showed down-regulation of several antioxidant enzymes. The respective gene expression patterns of several identified proteins in both X. a. pv. citri mature biofilm and planktonic cells were evaluated by quantitative

  17. DOE Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA-0000153 PV Manufacturing Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-02-01

    This draft report summarizes the results of the U.S. Department of Energy PV Manufacturing Request for Information (RFI), DE-FOA-0000153, that was released in September 2009. The PV Manufacturing Initiative is intended to help facilitate the development of a strong PV manufacturing industry in the United States.

  18. Distributed Solar PV for Electricity System Resiliency: Policy and Regulatory Considerations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    Distributed Solar PV systems have the potential of increasing the grid's resiliency to unforeseen events, such as extreme weather events and attacks. This paper presents the role that distributed PV can play in electric grid resiliency, introduces basic system design requirements and options, and discusses the regulatory and policy options for supporting the use of distributed PV for the purpose of increased electricity resiliency.

  19. Characterizing PvARP, a novel Plasmodium vivax antigen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax continues to be the most widely distributed malarial parasite species in tropical and sub-tropical areas, causing high morbidity indices around the world. Better understanding of the proteins used by the parasite during the invasion of red blood cells is required to obtain an effective vaccine against this disease. This study describes characterizing the P. vivax asparagine-rich protein (PvARP) and examines its antigenicity in natural infection. Methods The target gene in the study was selected according to a previous in silico analysis using profile hidden Markov models which identified P. vivax proteins that play a possible role in invasion. Transcription of the arp gene in the P. vivax VCG-1 strain was here evaluated by RT-PCR. Specific human antibodies against PvARP were used to confirm protein expression by Western blot as well as its subcellular localization by immunofluorescence. Recognition of recombinant PvARP by sera from P. vivax-infected individuals was evaluated by ELISA. Results VCG-1 strain PvARP is a 281-residue-long molecule, which is encoded by a single exon and has an N-terminal secretion signal, as well as a tandem repeat region. This protein is expressed in mature schizonts and is located on the surface of merozoites, having an apparent accumulation towards their apical pole. Sera from P. vivax-infected patients recognized the recombinant, thereby suggesting that this protein is targeted by the immune response during infection. Conclusions This study showed the characterization of PvARP and its antigenicity. Further assays orientated towards evaluating this antigen’s functional importance during parasite invasion are being carried out. PMID:23688042

  20. Experimental comparison of PV-smoothing controllers using distributed generators

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Ellis, Abraham; Denda, Atsushi; Morino, Kimio; Hawkins, John N.; Arellano, Brian; Shinji, Takao; Ogata, Takao; Tadokoro, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    The power output variability of photovoltaic systems can affect local electrical grids in locations with high renewable energy penetrations or weak distribution or transmission systems. In those rare cases, quick controllable generators (e.g., energy storage systems) or loads can counteract the destabilizing effects by compensating for the power fluctuations. Previously, control algorithms for coordinated and uncoordinated operation of a small natural gas engine-generator (genset) and a battery for smoothing PV plant output were optimized using MATLAB/Simulink simulations. The simulations demonstrated that a traditional generation resource such as a natural gas genset in combination with a battery would smooth the photovoltaic output while using a smaller battery state of charge (SOC) range and extending the life of the battery. This paper reports on the experimental implementation of the coordinated and uncoordinated controllers to verify the simulations and determine the differences in the controllers. The experiments were performed with the PNM PV and energy storage Prosperity site and a gas engine-generator located at the Aperture Center at Mesa Del Sol in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two field demonstrations were performed to compare the different PV smoothing control algorithms: (1) implementing the coordinated and uncoordinated controls while switching off a subsection of the PV array at precise times on successive clear days, and (2) comparing the results of the battery and genset outputs for the coordinated control on a high variability day with simulations of the coordinated and uncoordinated controls. It was found that for certain PV power profiles the SOC range of the battery may be larger with the coordinated control, but the total amp-hours through the battery-which approximates battery wear-will always be smaller with the coordinated control.

  1. Geographic smoothing of solar PV: Results from Gujarat

    SciTech Connect

    Klima, Kelly; Apt, Jay

    2015-09-24

    We examine the potential for geographic smoothing of solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation using 13 months of observed power production from utility-scale plants in Gujarat, India. To our knowledge, this is the first published analysis of geographic smoothing of solar PV using actual generation data at high time resolution from utility-scale solar PV plants. We use geographic correlation and Fourier transform estimates of the power spectral density (PSD) to characterize the observed variability of operating solar PV plants as a function of time scale. Most plants show a spectrum that is linear in the log–log domain at high frequencies f, ranging from f-1.23 to f-1.56 (slopes of -1.23 and -1.56), thus exhibiting more relative variability at high frequencies than exhibited by wind plants. PSDs for large PV plants have a steeper slope than those for small plants, hence more smoothing at short time scales. Interconnecting 20 Gujarat plants yields a f-1.66 spectrum, reducing fluctuations at frequencies corresponding to 6 h and 1 h by 23% and 45%, respectively. Half of this smoothing can be obtained through connecting 4-5 plants; reaching marginal improvement of 1% per added plant occurs at 12-14 plants. The largest plant (322 MW) showed an f-1.76 spectrum. Furthermore, this suggests that in Gujarat the potential for smoothing is limited to that obtained by one large plant.

  2. Field Demonstration of Using Advanced PV Inverter Functionality to Mitigate the Impacts of High-Penetration PV Grid Integration on the Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, Barry; Gebeyehu, Araya

    2015-06-14

    This paper describes a field demonstration that was completed to show the ability of currently installed PV inverters to implement advanced PV inverter functionality and that such functionality was effective at reducing the voltage-related PV impacts of high-penetration PV integration. A distribution circuit was instrumented and then tested for a two week period using off-unity power factor operation. Specifically, an inductive power factor of -0.95 was demonstrated. The results show that the PV inverters were capable of such operation and that the use of off-unity power factor operation was highly effective at reducing the voltage-related impacts of the PV systems interconnected to the circuits used in the demonstration. The impacts of using off-unity power factor operation - resulting in additional reactive current flow on the distribution circuit - are also presented and analyzed.

  3. Evaluation of physiological, growth and yield responses of a tropical oil crop (Brassica campestris L. var. Kranti) under ambient ozone pollution at varying NPK levels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Poonam; Agrawal, Madhoolika; Agrawal, Shashi Bhushan

    2009-03-01

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the impact of ambient ozone on mustard (Brassica campestris L. var. Kranti) plants grown under recommended and 1.5 times recommended NPK doses at a rural site of India using filtered (FCs) and non-filtered open top chambers (NFCs). Ambient mean O(3) concentration varied from 41.65 to 54.2ppb during the experiment. Plants growing in FCs showed higher photosynthetic rate at both NPK levels, but higher stomatal conductance only at recommended NPK. There were improvements in growth parameters and biomass of plants in FCs as compared to NFCs at both NPK levels with higher increments at 1.5 times recommended. Seed yield and harvest index decreased significantly only at recommended NPK in NFCs. Seed quality in terms of nutrients, protein and oil contents reduced in NFCs at recommended NPK. The application of 1.5 times recommended NPK provided protection against yield loss due to ambient O(3).

  4. Integrating High Penetrations of PV into Southern California: Year 2 Project Update; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, B.; Neal, R.

    2012-08-01

    Southern California Edison (SCE) is well into a five-year project to install a total of 500 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) energy within its utility service territory. Typical installations to date are 1-3 MW peak rooftop PV systems that interconnect to medium-voltage urban distribution circuits or larger (5 MW peak) ground-mounted systems that connect to medium-voltage rural distribution circuits. Some of the PV system interconnections have resulted in distribution circuits that have a significant amount of PV generation compared to customer load, resulting in high-penetration PV integration scenarios. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SCE have assembled a team of distribution modeling, resource assessment, and PV inverter technology experts in order to investigate a few of the high-penetration PV distribution circuits. Currently, the distribution circuits being studied include an urban circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 46% and a rural circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 60%. In both cases, power flow on the circuit reverses direction, compared to traditional circuit operation, during periods of high PV power production and low circuit loading. Research efforts during year two of the five-year project were focused on modeling the distribution system level impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, the development and installation of distribution circuit data acquisition equipment appropriate for quantifying the impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, and investigating high-penetration PV impact mitigation strategies. This paper outlines these research efforts and discusses the following activities in more detail: the development of a quasi-static time-series test feeder for evaluating high-penetration PV integration modeling tools; the advanced inverter functions being investigated for deployment in the project's field demonstration and a power hardware-in-loop test of a 500-kW PV inverter implementing a

  5. Uptake of human pharmaceuticals and personal care products by cabbage (Brassica campestris) from fortified and biosolids-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Holling, Cheryl S; Bailey, Jonathon L; Vanden Heuvel, Brian; Kinney, Chad A

    2012-11-01

    Human pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are routinely found in biosolids from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Once land applied, the PPCPs in biosolids are potentially available for plant uptake and bioaccumulation. This study used a greenhouse model to investigate uptake of PPCPs commonly detected in biosolids by the agricultural plant Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris). Two series of greenhouse experiments were conducted as part of this project. In the first set of experiments, four pharmaceuticals were added to an organic matter-rich soil in environmentally relevant concentrations based on typical biosolids application rates, resulting in final soil concentrations of 2.6 ng g(-1) carbamazepine, 3.1 ng g(-1) sulfamethoxazole, 5.4 ng g(-1) salbutamol, and 0.5 ng g(-1) trimethoprim. In the second set of experiments, the cabbage was grown in soil amended with an agronomic rate of biosolids from a local WWTP. The ambient concentration of PPCPs in the biosolids resulted in final soil concentrations of 93.1 ng g(-1) carbamazepine, 67.4 ng g(-1) sulfamethoxazole, 30.3 ng g(-1) salbutamol, 433.7 ng g(-1) triclosan, and 24.7 ng g(-1) trimethoprim. After growing to maturity, the aerials of the plants were separated from roots and the two tissue types were analyzed separately. All four human pharmaceuticals were detected in both tissues in the cabbage grown in the soil fortified with the four pharmaceuticals with median concentrations of 255.4 ng g(-1) aerials and 272.9 ng g(-1) roots carbamazepine; 222.8 ng g(-1) aerials and 260.3 ng g(-1) roots sulfamethoxazole; 108.3 ng g(-1) aerials and 140.6 ng g(-1) roots salbutamol; and 20.6 ng g(-1) aerials and 53.7 ng g(-1) roots trimethoprim. Although all study compounds were present in the biosolids-amended planting soil, only carbamazepine (317.6 ng g(-1) aerials and 416.2 ng g(-1) roots), salbutamol (21.2 ng g(-1) aerials and 187.6 ng g(-1) roots), and triclosan (22.9 ng g(-1) aerials and 1220.1 ng g(-1

  6. Sensitivity of Rooftop PV Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market Assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2013-01-01

    The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The SolarDS model was used to simulate rooftop PV demand for this study, based on several PV market assumptions--future electricity rates, customer access to financing, and others--in addition to the SunShot PV price projections. This paper finds that modeled PV demand is highly sensitive to several non-price market assumptions, particularly PV financing parameters.

  7. Solar Photovoltaic Economic Development: Building and Growing a Local PV Industry, August 2011 (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry is forecast to grow, and it represents an opportunity for economic development and job creation in communities throughout the United States. This report helps U.S. cities evaluate economic opportunities in the PV industry. It serves as a guide for local economic development offices in evaluating their community?s competitiveness in the solar PV industry, assessing the viability of solar PV development goals, and developing strategies for recruiting and retaining PV companies to their areas.

  8. Caveolae, fenestrae and transendothelial channels retain PV1 on the surface of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Eugene; Tse, Dan; Sideleva, Olga; Deharvengt, Sophie J; Luciano, Marcus R; Xu, Yan; McGarry, Caitlin L; Chidlow, John; Pilch, Paul F; Sessa, William C; Toomre, Derek K; Stan, Radu V

    2012-01-01

    PV1 protein is an essential component of stomatal and fenestral diaphragms, which are formed at the plasma membrane of endothelial cells (ECs), on structures such as caveolae, fenestrae and transendothelial channels. Knockout of PV1 in mice results in in utero and perinatal mortality. To be able to interpret the complex PV1 knockout phenotype, it is critical to determine whether the formation of diaphragms is the only cellular role of PV1. We addressed this question by measuring the effect of complete and partial removal of structures capable of forming diaphragms on PV1 protein level. Removal of caveolae in mice by knocking out caveolin-1 or cavin-1 resulted in a dramatic reduction of PV1 protein level in lungs but not kidneys. The magnitude of PV1 reduction correlated with the abundance of structures capable of forming diaphragms in the microvasculature of these organs. The absence of caveolae in the lung ECs did not affect the transcription or translation of PV1, but it caused a sharp increase in PV1 protein internalization rate via a clathrin- and dynamin-independent pathway followed by degradation in lysosomes. Thus, PV1 is retained on the cell surface of ECs by structures capable of forming diaphragms, but undergoes rapid internalization and degradation in the absence of these structures, suggesting that formation of diaphragms is the only role of PV1.

  9. How PV system ownership can impact the market value of residential homes

    SciTech Connect

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Johnson, Jamie L.

    2014-01-01

    There are multiple ways for a homeowner to obtain the electricity generating and savings benefits offered by a photovoltaic (PV) system. These include purchasing a PV system through various financing mechanisms, or by leasing the PV system from a third party with multiple options that may include purchase, lease renewal or PV system removal. The different ownership options available to homeowners presents a challenge to appraisal and real estate professionals during a home sale or refinance in terms of how to develop a value that is reflective of the PV systems operational characteristics, local market conditions, and lender and underwriter requirements. This paper presents these many PV system ownership options with a discussion of what considerations an appraiser must make when developing the contributory value of a PV system to a residential property.

  10. PV modules, using color solar cells, designed for building

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, N.; Yamashita, H.; Goda, S.

    1994-12-31

    The designs and structures of a photovoltaic module to be installed in a curtain wall were examined with the object of sharply reducing PV power generation costs. As for the design, solar cells of different colors were produced and an opinion survey of designers and other construction-related persons was conducted. Renderings based on color solar cells were prepared using computer graphics. In general, the output of cells decreases for colors other than shades of dark blue. However, there is a good possibility that greater importance will be put on design, including color and surface condition, than on output. In this case, the market share may expand and as a result, the cost may drop. As for the structure, various materials that can be used for a building-material-integrated-module were investigated and methods to install PV modules into building materials were examined. Moreover, experimental module samples fitted with stainless steel sheets and aluminum-sash frames were made.

  11. Best practices for PV solar home system projects

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove-Davies, M.; Cabraal, A.

    1994-12-31

    PV solar home systems (SHS) are increasingly employed as an energy supply option for rural populations. The past 20 years` experience with small-scale SHS programs in developing countries has had mixed results. However, efforts in recent years have been more successful. In support of World Bank lending operations, the Banks Asia Alternative Energy Unit (ASTAE) has undertaken a series of case studies of currently operating SHS programs in Indonesia, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, and the Dominican Republic. These programs have varying degrees of government, NGO, and private sector involvement. This paper summarizes ASTAE`s draft Solar Photovoltaics: Best Practices for Household Electrification report which identifies the institutional, financial, and technical factors fundamental to the success of a PV solar home system project. The final version of the ASTAE report will incorporate comments from an international group of peer reviewers.

  12. Maximizing Solar Energy Capture Through Multi-Azimuth PV Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    By orienting photovoltaic (PV) arrays in multiple directions, significantly greater energy capture can be realized in high latitude locations. Conventional wisdom dictates orienting PV panels south (in the northern hemisphere), but multi-azimuth arrays can confer several advantages during the summer months: - Nearly even power production over a large part of the day (20+ hours) - Reduced issues with power quality in grid interactive systems - Support higher loads in independent, off-grid systems - Reduced energy storage (battery) requirements in off-grid systems This poster will present two multi-azimuth systems, one a grid-interactive system deployed at Summit Station, Greenland; the second an independent, off-grid system supporting a science project near Toolik Field Station, Alaska.

  13. High-Penetration PV Integration Handbook for Distribution Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Seguin, Rich; Woyak, Jeremy; Costyk, David; Hambrick, Josh; Mather, Barry

    2016-01-01

    This handbook has been developed as part of a five-year research project which began in 2010. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Southern California Edison (SCE), Quanta Technology, Satcon Technology Corporation, Electrical Distribution Design (EDD), and Clean Power Research (CPR) teamed together to analyze the impacts of high-penetration levels of photovoltaic (PV) systems interconnected onto the SCE distribution system. This project was designed specifically to leverage the experience that SCE and the project team would gain during the significant installation of 500 MW of commercial scale PV systems (1-5 MW typically) starting in 2010 and completing in 2015 within SCE’s service territory through a program approved by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC).

  14. More efficiency for PV thin film production with laser manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayerhofer, Roland; Haase, Michael; Geiger, Stephan; Finck, Claudia

    The worldwide growth of photo-voltaic is closely tied to a reduction of production costs per Wp (peak power by maximum of sun radiation). The laser machining of thin film solar cells is a key technology for innovations in this field of solar cell production. On one hand it is possible to replace older, conventional production technologies to realise more efficiency for the solar cell products. On the other hand new and modern laser technologies open the door for more cost reduction potentials for the industrial thin film solar cell production. The following contribution offers a representative survey of the actual state of the art in PV thin film production using lasers and introduce a modern and innovative laser separation process for PV thin film modules.

  15. A decade of PV lighting in the Colorado Rockies

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, L.

    1996-11-01

    In the mountains between Aspen and Vail there are twenty-two ski huts that all use solar photovoltaic power for their lighting needs. The huts are managed by a non-profit corporation called the Tenth Mountain Division Hut Association (TMDHA). The systems were installed in the early 1980s and have all been or are in the process of being upgraded as the technology improves over the years. The huts have been a test in the design and maintenance of remote PV systems, due to their location, the users and their time of use. Yet, the past ten years have shown that remote PV systems can be made safe, reliable, understandable, educational and economical.

  16. PV Manufacturing R&D Project (Trifold Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-02-01

    This trifold brochure is especially for visitors to the SERF who are viewing the PV Manufacturing R&D project display cases. Information includes the company names, their projects, and the technologies they are pursuing. In addition is a description of the overall project, as well as several graphs that show the results of the project (e.g., cost/capacity curves and investment recapture plots).

  17. High Penetration PV: How High Can We Go?

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Brochure highlighting NREL's partnership with SolarCity and Hawaiian Electric (HECO) to increase the penetration of solar photovoltaics on the electricity grid. To better understand the potential impact of transient overvoltages due to load rejection, NREL collaborated with SolarCity and HECO to run a series of tests measuring the magnitude and duration of load rejection overvoltage events and demonstrating the ability of advanced PV inverters to mitigate their impacts.

  18. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  19. Comparative Study Between Wind and Photovoltaic (PV) Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Wesam

    This paper reviews two renewable energy systems; wind and photovoltaic (PV) systems. The common debate between the two of them is to conclude which one is better, in terms of cost and efficiency. Therefore, comparative study, in terms of cost and efficiency, is attempted. Regarding total cost of both, wind and PV systems, many parameters must be taken into consideration such as availability of energy (either wind or solar), operation and maintenance, availability of costumers, political influence, and the components used in building the system. The main components and parameters that play major role in determining the overall efficiency of wind systems are the wind turbine generator (WTG), gearbox and control technologies such as power, and speed control. On the other hand, in grid-connected PV systems (GCPVS), converter architecture along with maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm and inverter topologies are the issues that affects the efficiency significantly. Cost and efficiency analyses of both systems have been carried out based on the statistics available till today and would be useful in the progress of renewable energy penetration throughout the world.

  20. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment's final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  1. Predicatbility of windstorm Klaus; sensitivity to PV perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbogast, P.; Maynard, K.

    2010-09-01

    It appears that some short-range weather forecast failures may be attributed to initial conditions errors. In some cases it is possible to anticipate the behavior of the model by comparison between observations and model analyses. In the case of extratropical cyclone development one may qualify the representation of the upper-level precursors described in terms of PV in the initial conditions by comparison with either satellite ozone or water-vapor. A step forward has been made in developing a tool based upon manual modifications of dynamical tropopause (i.e. height of 1.5 PV units) and PV inversion. After five years of experimentations it turns out that the forecasters eventually succeed in improving the forecast of some strong cyclone development. However the present approach is subjective per se. To measure the subjectivity of the procedure a set of 15 experiments has been performed provided by 7 different people (senior forecasters and scientists involved in dynamical meteorology) in order to improve an initial state of the global model ARPEGE leading to a poor forecast of the wind storm Klaus (24 January 2009). This experiment reveals that the manually defined corrections present common features but also a large spread.

  2. Stochastic PV performance/reliability model : preview of alpha version.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Miller, Steven P.

    2010-03-01

    Problem Statement: (1) Uncertainties in PV system performance and reliability impact business decisions - Project cost and financing estimates, Pricing service contracts and guarantees, Developing deployment and O&M strategies; (2) Understanding and reducing these uncertainties will help make the PV industry more competitive (3) Performance has typically been estimated without much attention to reliability of components; and (4) Tools are needed to assess all inputs to the value proposition (e.g., LCOE, cash flow, reputation, etc.). Goals and objectives are: (1) Develop a stochastic simulation model (in GoldSim) that can represent PV system performance as a function of system design, weather, reliability, and O&M policies; (2) Evaluate performance for an example system to quantify sources of uncertainty and identify dominant parameters via a sensitivity study; and (3) Example System - 1 inverter, 225 kW DC Array latitude tilt (90 strings of 12 modules {l_brace}1080 modules{r_brace}), Weather from Tucumcari, NM (TMY2 with annual uncertainty).

  3. Pepper aldehyde dehydrogenase CaALDH1 interacts with Xanthomonas effector AvrBsT and promotes effector-triggered cell death and defence responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas type III effector AvrBsT induces hypersensitive cell death and defence responses in pepper (Capsicum annuum) and Nicotiana benthamiana. Little is known about the host factors that interact with AvrBsT. Here, we identified pepper aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (CaALDH1) as an AvrBsT-interacting protein. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction between CaALDH1 and AvrBsT in planta. CaALDH1:smGFP fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. CaALDH1 expression in pepper was rapidly and strongly induced by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) Ds1 (avrBsT) infection. Transient co-expression of CaALDH1 with avrBsT significantly enhanced avrBsT-triggered cell death in N. benthamiana leaves. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity was higher in leaves transiently expressing CaALDH1, suggesting that CaALDH1 acts as a cell death enhancer, independently of AvrBsT. CaALDH1 silencing disrupted phenolic compound accumulation, H2O2 production, defence response gene expression, and cell death during avirulent Xcv Ds1 (avrBsT) infection. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing CaALDH1 exhibited enhanced defence response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. These results indicate that cytoplasmic CaALDH1 interacts with AvrBsT and promotes plant cell death and defence responses. PMID:25873668

  4. HrpI of Erwinia amylovora functions in secretion of harpin and is a member of a new protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Z M; Beer, S V

    1993-01-01

    HrpI, a 78-kDa protein, functions in the secretion of harpin, a proteinaceous elicitor of the hypersensitive response from Erwinia amylovora. The predicted amino acid sequence of HrpI is remarkably similar to that of LcrD of Yersinia species, the first member of a recently described protein family. Other proteins of the family are MixA from Shigella flexneri, InvA from Salmonella typhimurium, FlhA from Caulobacter crescentus, HrpI from Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, HrpO from Pseudomonas solanacearum, and HrpC2 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. Cells of E. amylovora containing mutated hrpI genes or cells of Escherichia coli containing the cloned hrp gene cluster with mutated hrpI produce but do not export harpin. When similar cells with functional hrpI genes were grown at 25 degrees C, but not at 37 degrees C, harpin was exported to the culture supernatant. Direct evidence that HrpI is involved in the secretion of a virulence protein has been offered. Two other loci of the hrp gene cluster are involved in the regulation of harpin, and four other loci also are involved in the secretion of harpin. Since harpin and other proteins likely to be secreted by the LcrD family of proteins lack typical signal peptides, their secretion mechanism is distinct from the general protein export pathway. Images PMID:8253684

  5. Draft genome sequence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovar vasculorum NCPPB 900.

    PubMed

    Harrison, James; Studholme, David J

    2014-11-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovar vasculorum strain NCPPB 900 was isolated from sugarcane on Reunion island in 1960. Consistent with its belonging to fatty-acid type D, multi-locus sequence analysis confirmed that NCPPB 900 falls within the species X. axonopodis. This genome harbours sequences similar to plasmids pXCV183 from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria 85-10 and pPHB194 from Burkholderia pseudomallei. Its repertoire of predicted effectors includes homologues of XopAA, XopAD, XopAE, XopB, XopD, XopV, XopZ, XopC and XopI and transcriptional activator-like effectors and it is predicted to encode a novel phosphonate natural product also encoded by the genome of the phylogenetically distant X. vasicola pv. vasculorum. Availability of this novel genome sequence may facilitate the study of interactions between xanthomonads and sugarcane, a host-pathogen system that appears to have evolved several times independently within the genus Xanthomonas and may also provide a source of target sequences for molecular detection and diagnostics PMID:25263632

  6. Proteomics and functional analyses of pepper abscisic acid-responsive 1 (ABR1), which is involved in cell death and defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key regulator of plant growth and development, as well as plant defense responses. A high-throughput in planta proteome screen identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) GRAM (for glucosyltransferases, Rab-like GTPase activators, and myotubularins) domain-containing ABA-RESPONSIVE1 (ABR1), which is highly induced by infection with avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria and also by treatment with ABA. The GRAM domain is essential for the cell death response and for the nuclear localization of ABR1. ABR1 is required for priming cell death and reactive oxygen species production, as well as ABA-salicylic acid (SA) antagonism. Silencing of ABR1 significantly compromised the hypersensitive response but enhanced bacterial pathogen growth and ABA levels in pepper. High levels of ABA in ABR1-silenced plants antagonized the SA levels induced by pathogen infection. Heterologous transgenic expression of ABR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. The susceptibility of the Arabidopsis ABR1 putative ortholog mutant, abr1, to these pathogens also supports the involvement of ABR1 in disease resistance. Together, these results reveal ABR1 as a novel negative regulator of ABA signaling and suggest that the nuclear ABR1 pool is essential for the cell death induction associated with ABA-SA antagonism.

  7. Effects of pesticides on the reduction of plant and human pathogenic bacteria in application water.

    PubMed

    Mahovic, Michael; Gu, Ganyu; Rideout, Steven

    2013-04-01

    Overhead spray applications of in-field tomato treatments dissolved in aqueous solutions have specific pest targets (fungal, bacterial, insect, or other). Any organism present in the solution or on treated plant surfaces that is not a specific target of the application is unlikely inactivated and can instead be spread through the phyllosphere. In this laboratory study, commercially labeled pesticides (including Actigard 50WG, Bravo Weather Stik 6F, Cabrio 20EG, Kasumin, Kocide 3000 46WG, Oxidate 27L, Penncozeb 75DF, ProPhyt 54.5L, Stimplex 100L, Firewall, 22.4WP, and Tanos 50DF) in common use in commercial tomato production fields of the Eastern Shore of Virginia were investigated for activity against in vitro bacterial contamination of pesticide application waters. Pesticides of interest were tank mixed individually with one of the plant pathogens Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, or one of two serovars (Newport and Montevideo) of the human pathogen Salmonella enterica to assess reduction values during the average time between mixing and initial application. Observations suggested that while some treatments had a noticeable effect on population levels, only the oxidizer, peroxyacetic acid, showed significant and consistent levels of suppression against all bacteria investigated, at levels that could have practical implications. PMID:23575141

  8. Effect of clove oil on plant pathogenic bacteria and bacterial wilt of tomato and geranium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined the antibacterial activity of clove oil against seven different genera of plant pathogenic bacteria including Gram-negative Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia carotovora pv. carotovora, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Xanthomonas campestris pv. pelargonii...

  9. Exploring the Economic Value of EPAct 2005's PV Tax Credits

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark A; Wiser, Ryan; Ing, Edwin

    2009-08-01

    This CESA - LBNL Case Study examines how much economic value do new and expanded federal tax credits really provide to PV system purchasers, and what implications might they hold for state/utility PV grant programs. The report begins with a discussion of the taxability of PV grants and their interaction with federal credits, as this issue significantly affects the analysis that follows. We then calculate the incremental value of EPAct's new and expanded credits for PV systems of different sizes, and owned by different types of entities. The report concludes with a discussion of potential implications for purchasers of PV systems, as well as for administrators of state/utility PV programs. The market for grid-connected photovoltaics (PV) in the US has grown dramatically in recent years, driven in large part by PV grant or 'buy-down' programs in California, New Jersey, and many other states. The recent announcement of a new 11-year, $3.2 billion PV program in California suggests that state policy will continue to drive even faster growth over the next decade. Federal policy has also played a role, primarily by providing commercial PV systems access to tax benefits, including accelerated depreciation (5-year MACRS schedule) and a business energy investment tax credit (ITC). Since the signing of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) on August 8, the federal government has begun to play a much more significant role in supporting both commercial and residential PV systems. Specifically, EPAct increased the federal ITC for commercial PV systems from 10% to 30% of system costs, and also created a new 30% ITC (capped at $2000) for residential solar systems. Both changes went into effect on January 1, 2006, for an initial period of two years, and in late 2006 were extended for an additional year. Unless extended further, the new residential ITC will expire, and the 30% commercial ITC will revert back to 10%, on January 1, 2009. How much economic value do these new and

  10. An aquaporin PvTIP4;1 from Pteris vittata may mediate arsenite uptake.

    PubMed

    He, Zhenyan; Yan, Huili; Chen, Yanshan; Shen, Hongling; Xu, Wenxiu; Zhang, Haiyan; Shi, Lei; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Ma, Mi

    2016-01-01

    The fern Pteris vittata is an arsenic hyperaccumulator. The genes involved in arsenite (As(III)) transport are not yet clear. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of a new P. vittata aquaporin gene, PvTIP4;1, which may mediate As(III) uptake. PvTIP4;1 was identified from yeast functional complement cDNA library of P. vittata. Arsenic toxicity and accumulating activities of PvTIP4;1 were analyzed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis. Subcellular localization of PvTIP4;1-GFP fusion protein in P. vittata protoplast and callus was conducted. The tissue expression of PvTIP4;1 was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. Site-directed mutagenesis of the PvTIP4;1 aromatic/arginine (Ar/R) domain was studied. Heterologous expression in yeast demonstrates that PvTIP4;1 was able to facilitate As(III) diffusion. Transgenic Arabidopsis showed that PvTIP4;1 increases arsenic accumulation and induces arsenic sensitivity. Images and FM4-64 staining suggest that PvTIP4;1 localizes to the plasma membrane in P. vittata cells. A tissue location study shows that PvTIP4;1 transcripts are mainly expressed in roots. Site-directed mutation in yeast further proved that the cysteine at the LE1 position of PvTIP4;1 Ar/R domain is a functional site. PvTIP4;1 is a new represented tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) aquaporin from P. vittata and the function and location results imply that PvTIP4;1 may be involved in As(III) uptake.

  11. EcPV2 DNA in equine genital squamous cell carcinomas and normal genital mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Lies; Willemsen, Anouk; Vanderstraeten, Eva; Bracho, Maria A; De Baere, Cindy; Bravo, Ignacio G; Martens, Ann

    2012-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) represents the most common genital malignant tumor in horses. Similar to humans, papillomaviruses (PVs) have been proposed as etiological agents and recently Equine papillomavirus type 2 (EcPV2) has been identified in a subset of genital SCCs. The goals of this study were (1) to determine the prevalence of EcPV2 DNA in tissue samples from equine genital SCCs, penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and penile papillomas, using EcPV2-specific PCR, (2) to examine the prevalence of latent EcPV2 infection in healthy genital mucosa and (3) to determine genetic variability within EcPV2 and to disentangle phylogenetic relationships of EcPV2 among PVs. EcPV2 DNA was detected in all but one penile SCC (15/16), in all PIN lesions (8/8) and penile papillomas (4/4). Additionally, EcPV2 DNA was demonstrated in one of two metastasized lymph nodes, one contact metastasis in the mouth, two vaginal and one anal lesion. In healthy horses, EcPV2 DNA was detected in 10% (4/39) of penile swabs but in none of vulvovaginal swabs (0/20). This study confirms the presence of EcPV2 DNA in equine genital SCCs and shows its involvement in anal lesions, a lymph node and contact metastases. Latent EcPV2 presence was also shown in normal male genital mucosa. We found that different EcPV2 variants cocirculate among horses and that EcPV2 is related to the Delta+Zeta PVs and is only a very distant relative of high-risk human PVs causing genital cancer. Thus, similar viral tropism and similar malignant outcome of the infection do not imply close evolutionary relationship.

  12. Analysis of the Type IV Fimbrial-Subunit Gene fimA of Xanthomonas hyacinthi: Application in PCR-Mediated Detection of Yellow Disease in Hyacinths

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, J.; Hollinger, T. C.; Oudega, B.

    2001-01-01

    A sensitive and specific detection method was developed for Xanthomonas hyacinthi; this method was based on amplification of a subsequence of the type IV fimbrial-subunit gene fimA from strain S148. The fimA gene was amplified by PCR with degenerate DNA primers designed by using the N-terminal and C-terminal amino acid sequences of trypsin fragments of FimA. The nucleotide sequence of fimA was determined and compared with the nucleotide sequences coding for the fimbrial subunits in other type IV fimbria-producing bacteria, such as Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Moraxella bovis. In a PCR internal primers JAAN and JARA, designed by using the nucleotide sequences of the variable central and C-terminal region of fimA, amplified a 226-bp DNA fragment in all X. hyacinthi isolates. This PCR was shown to be pathovar specific, as assessed by testing 71 Xanthomonas pathovars and bacterial isolates belonging to other genera, such as Erwinia and Pseudomonas. Southern hybridization experiments performed with the labelled 226-bp DNA amplicon as a probe suggested that there is only one structural type IV fimbrial-gene cluster in X. hyacinthi. Only two Xanthomonas translucens pathovars cross-reacted weakly in PCR. Primers amplifying a subsequence of the fimA gene of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria (T. Ojanen-Reuhs, N. Kalkkinen, B. Westerlund-Wikström, J. van Doorn, K. Haahtela, E.-L. Nurmiaho-Lassila, K. Wengelink, U. Bonas, and T. K. Korhonen, J. Bacteriol. 179: 1280–1290, 1997) were shown to be pathovar specific, indicating that the fimbrial-subunit sequences are more generally applicable in xanthomonads for detection purposes. Under laboratory conditions, approximately 1,000 CFU of X. hyacinthi per ml could be detected. In inoculated leaves of hyacinths the threshold was 5,000 CFU/ml. The results indicated that infected hyacinths with early symptoms could be successfully screened for X. hyacinthi with PCR. PMID:11157222

  13. Photovoltaics (PV) as an Eligible Measure in Residential PACE Programs: Benefits and Challenges (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J.

    2010-06-01

    Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing the barrier of initial capital cost. The majority of the PACE programs in the market today include PV as an eligible measure. PV appeals to homeowners as a way to reduce utility bills, self-generate sustainable power, increase energy independence and demonstrate a commitment to the environment. If substantial state incentives for PV exist, PV projects can be economic under PACE, especially when partnered with good net metering policies. At the same time, PV is expensive relative to other eligible measures with a return on investment horizon that might exceed program targets. This fact sheet reviews the benefits and potential challenges of including PV in PACE programs.

  14. Optimal Planning Strategy for Large PV/Battery System Based on Long-Term Insolation Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yona, Atsushi; Uchida, Kosuke; Senjyu, Tomonobu; Funabashi, Toshihisa

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems are rapidly gaining acceptance as some of the best alternative energy sources. Usually the power output of PV system fluctuates depending on weather conditions. In order to control the fluctuating power output for PV system, it requires control method of energy storage system. This paper proposes an optimization approach to determine the operational planning of power output for PV system with battery energy storage system (BESS). This approach aims to obtain more benefit for electrical power selling and to smooth the fluctuating power output for PV system. The optimization method applies genetic algorithm (GA) considering PV power output forecast error. The forecast error is based on our previous works with the insolation forecasting at one day ahead by using weather reported data, fuzzy theory and neural network(NN). The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by the computer simulations.

  15. Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote Performance: A Reviewof Current Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-06-01

    Increasing levels of financial support for customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, provided through publicly-funded incentive programs, has heightened concerns about the long-term performance of these systems. Given the barriers that customers face to ensuring that their PV systems perform well, and the responsibility that PV incentive programs bear to ensure that public funds are prudently spent, these programs should, and often do, play a critical role in ensuring that PV systems receiving incentives perform well. To provide a point of reference for assessing the current state of the art, and to inform program design efforts going forward, we examine the approaches to encouraging PV system performance used by 32 prominent PV incentive programs in the U.S. We identify eight general strategies or groups of related strategies that these programs have used to address performance issues, and highlight important differences in the implementation of these strategies among programs.

  16. Characterization of Pv92, a Novel Merozoite Surface Protein of Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Kyun; Wang, Bo; Han, Jin-Hee; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Muh, Fauzi; Chootong, Patchanee; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Park, Won Sun; Hong, Seok-Ho; Park, Jeong-Hyun; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-01-01

    The discovery and understanding of antigenic proteins are essential for development of a vaccine against malaria. In Plasmodium falciparum, Pf92 have been characterized as a merozoite surface protein, and this protein is expressed at the late schizont stage, but no study of Pv92, the orthologue of Pf92 in P. vivax, has been reported. Thus, the protein structure of Pv92 was analyzed, and the gene sequence was aligned with that of other Plasmodium spp. using bioinformatics tools. The recombinant Pv92 protein was expressed and purified using bacterial expression system and used for immunization of mice to gain the polyclonal antibody and for evaluation of antigenicity by protein array. Also, the antibody against Pv92 was used for subcellular analysis by immunofluorescence assay. The Pv92 protein has a signal peptide and a sexual stage s48/45 domain, and the cysteine residues at the N-terminal of Pv92 were completely conserved. The N-terminal of Pv92 was successfully expressed as soluble form using a bacterial expression system. The antibody raised against Pv92 recognized the parasites and completely merged with PvMSP1-19, indicating that Pv92 was localized on the merozoite surface. Evaluation of the human humoral immune response to Pv92 indicated moderate antigenicity, with 65% sensitivity and 95% specificity by protein array. Taken together, the merozoite surface localization and antigenicity of Pv92 implicate that it might be involved in attachment and invasion of a merozoite to a new host cell or immune evasion during invasion process. PMID:27658588

  17. Characterization of Pv92, a Novel Merozoite Surface Protein of Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Kyun; Wang, Bo; Han, Jin-Hee; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Muh, Fauzi; Chootong, Patchanee; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Park, Won Sun; Hong, Seok-Ho; Park, Jeong-Hyun; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-08-01

    The discovery and understanding of antigenic proteins are essential for development of a vaccine against malaria. In Plasmodium falciparum, Pf92 have been characterized as a merozoite surface protein, and this protein is expressed at the late schizont stage, but no study of Pv92, the orthologue of Pf92 in P. vivax, has been reported. Thus, the protein structure of Pv92 was analyzed, and the gene sequence was aligned with that of other Plasmodium spp. using bioinformatics tools. The recombinant Pv92 protein was expressed and purified using bacterial expression system and used for immunization of mice to gain the polyclonal antibody and for evaluation of antigenicity by protein array. Also, the antibody against Pv92 was used for subcellular analysis by immunofluorescence assay. The Pv92 protein has a signal peptide and a sexual stage s48/45 domain, and the cysteine residues at the N-terminal of Pv92 were completely conserved. The N-terminal of Pv92 was successfully expressed as soluble form using a bacterial expression system. The antibody raised against Pv92 recognized the parasites and completely merged with PvMSP1-19, indicating that Pv92 was localized on the merozoite surface. Evaluation of the human humoral immune response to Pv92 indicated moderate antigenicity, with 65% sensitivity and 95% specificity by protein array. Taken together, the merozoite surface localization and antigenicity of Pv92 implicate that it might be involved in attachment and invasion of a merozoite to a new host cell or immune evasion during invasion process. PMID:27658588

  18. Results from Undergraduate PV Projects at Seven Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R. D.

    1999-03-03

    In 1995, the NREL/Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program funded seven Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in its HBCU Photovoltaic Research Associates Program for a period of three years. The program's purpose is to advance HBCU undergraduate knowledge of photovoltaics, primarily as a result of research investigations performed, and to encourage students to pursue careers in photovoltaics. This paper presents results from PV projects ranging from fundamental materials research on PV materials to field projects of PV systems.

  19. Final Technical Report: Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Burton, Patrick D.; Hansen, Clifford; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors project focuses on improving the accuracy and reducing the uncertainty of PV performance model predictions by addressing a common element of all PV performance models referred to as “derates”. Widespread use of “rules of thumb”, combined with significant uncertainty regarding appropriate values for these factors contribute to uncertainty in projected energy production.

  20. A modeling framework for potential induced degradation in PV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermel, Peter; Asadpour, Reza; Zhou, Chao; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2015-09-01

    Major sources of performance degradation and failure in glass-encapsulated PV modules include moisture-induced gridline corrosion, potential-induced degradation (PID) of the cell, and stress-induced busbar delamination. Recent studies have shown that PV modules operating in damp heat at -600 V are vulnerable to large amounts of degradation, potentially up to 90% of the original power output within 200 hours. To improve module reliability and restore power production in the presence of PID and other failure mechanisms, a fundamental rethinking of accelerated testing is needed. This in turn will require an improved understanding of technology choices made early in development that impact failures later. In this work, we present an integrated approach of modeling, characterization, and validation to address these problems. A hierarchical modeling framework will allows us to clarify the mechanisms of corrosion, PID, and delamination. We will employ a physics-based compact model of the cell, topology of the electrode interconnection, geometry of the packaging stack, and environmental operating conditions to predict the current, voltage, temperature, and stress distributions in PV modules correlated with the acceleration of specific degradation modes. A self-consistent solution will capture the essential complexity of the technology-specific acceleration of PID and other degradation mechanisms as a function of illumination, ambient temperature, and relative humidity. Initial results from our model include specific lifetime predictions suitable for direct comparison with indoor and outdoor experiments, which are qualitatively validated by prior work. This approach could play a significant role in developing novel accelerated lifetime tests.

  1. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis? It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment`s final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis? A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  2. Enhanced symbiotic nitrogen fixation with P. syringae pv tabaci

    SciTech Connect

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J. New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces ); Sengupta-Gopalan, C. )

    1989-04-01

    Infestation of legumes such as alfalfa and soybeans with the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci is accompanied by increased plant growth, nodulation, overall nitrogen fixation, and total assimilated nitrogen. These effects are observed only in plants infested with Tox{sup +} pathogen; the toxin is tabtoxinine-{beta}-lactam, an active site-directed irreversible inhibitor of glutamine synthetase. The key to the legumes survival of this treatment is the insensitivity of the nodule-specific form of glutamine synthetase to the toxin. As expected, significant changes are observed in ammonia assimilation in these plants. The biochemical and molecular biological consequences of this treatment are being investigated.

  3. Space shuttle Production Verification Motor 1 (PV-1) static fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    All inspection and instrumentation data indicate that the PV-1 static test firing conducted 18 Aug. 1988 was successful. With the exception of the intentionally flawed joints and static test modifications, PV-1 was flight configuration. Fail-safe flaws guaranteeing pressure to test the sealing capability of primary O-rings were included in the aft field joint, case-to-nozzle joint, and nozzle internal Joint 5. The test was conducted at ambient conditions, with the exception of the field joints and case/nozzle joints which were maintained at a minimum of 75 F. Ballistics performance values were within specification requirements. The PV-1 motor exhibited chamber pressure oscillations similar to previously tested Space Shuttle redesigned solid rocket motors, particularly QM-7. The first longitudinal mode oscillations experienced by PV-1 were the strongest ever measured in a Space Shuttle motor. Investigation into this observation is being conducted. Joint insulation performed as designed with no evidence of gas flow within unflawed forward field joints. The intentionally flawed center and aft case field joint insulation performance was excellent. There was no evidence of hot gas past the center field joint capture feature O-ring, the case-to-nozzle joint primary O-ring, or the aft field joint primary O-ring. O-ring seals and barriers with assured pressure at the flaws showed erosion and heat effect, but all sealed against passage of hot gases with the exception of the aft field joint capture feature O-ring. There was no evidence of erosion, heat effect, or blowby on any O-ring seals or barriers at the unflawed joints. Nozzle performance was nominal with typical erosion. Post-test examination revealed that the forward nose ring was of the old high performance motor design configuration with the 150-deg ply angle. All nozzle components remained intact for post-test evaluation. The thrust vector control system operated correctly. The water deluge system, CO2 quench, and

  4. Kauai, Hawaii: Solar Resource Analysis and High Penetration PV Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, C.; Burman, K.

    2010-04-01

    Overview of the solar resource assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in cooperation with Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) in Hawaii to determine the technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of solar renewable energy generation on the island of Kauaii through the use of photovoltaic (PV) arrays. The analysis, which was performed using a custom version of NREL's In My Back Yard (IMBY) software tool, showed that there is potential to generate enough energy to cover the peak load as reported for Kauai in 2007.

  5. New Barrier Coating Materials for PV Module Backsheets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, G. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S. H.; Pern, J.; McMahon, T. J.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the high moisture barrier high resistivity coatings on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) have been fabricated and characterized for use in PV module back sheet applications. These thin film barriers exhibit water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) as low as 0.1 g/m2-day at 37.8 C and have shown excellent adhesion (> 10 N/mm) to both ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and PET even after filtered xenon arc lamp UV exposure. The WVTR and adhesion values for this construction are compared to and shown to be superior to candidate polymeric backsheet materials.

  6. Intelligent control of PV system on the basis of the fuzzy recurrent neuronet*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E. A.; Kovalev, I. V.; Engel, N. E.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the fuzzy recurrent neuronet for PV system’s control. Based on the PV system’s state, the fuzzy recurrent neural net tracks the maximum power point under random perturbations. The validity and advantages of the proposed intelligent control of PV system are demonstrated by numerical simulations. The simulation results show that the proposed intelligent control of PV system achieves real-time control speed and competitive performance, as compared to a classical control scheme on the basis of the perturbation & observation algorithm.

  7. A Current Sensorless MPPT Control Method for a Stand-Alone-Type PV Generation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itako, Kazutaka; Mori, Takeaki

    In this paper, a current sensorless MPPT control method for a stand-alone-type PV generation system is proposed. This control method offers advantages of the simplified hardware configuration and the low cost, by using only one sensor to measure the PV output voltage. In the application to stand-alone-type with a battery load, the experimental results show that the estimated values of PV output current are accurate, and the use of the proposed MPPT control increases the PV generated energy by 16.3% compared to the conventional system. Furthermore, it is clarified that the proposed method has extremely high UUF (Useful utilization factor) of 98.7%.

  8. Precursor Report of Data Needs and Recommended Practices for PV Plant Availability Operations and Maintenance Reporting.

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Roger R.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Balfour, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the factors that affect reliability of a photovoltaic (PV) power plant is an important aspect of optimal asset management. This document describes the many factors that affect operation and maintenance (O&M) of a PV plant, identifies the data necessary to quantify those factors, and describes how data might be used by O&M service providers and others in the PV industry. This document lays out data needs from perspectives of reliability, availability, and key performance indicators and is intended to be a precursor for standardizing terminology and data reporting, which will improve data sharing, analysis, and ultimately PV plant performance.

  9. Pyranometers and Reference Cells: Part 2: What Makes the Most Sense for PV Power Plants?; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Meydbray, J.; Riley, E.; Dunn, L.; Emery, K.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-10-01

    As described in Part 1 of this two-part series, thermopile pyranometers and photovoltaic (PV) reference cells can both be used to measure irradiance; however, there are subtle differences between the data that are obtained. This two-part article explores some implications of uncertainty and subtleties of accurately measuring PV efficiency in the field. Part 2 of the series shows how reference cells can be used to more confidently predict PV performance, but how this could best be accomplished if historic irradiance data could be available in PV-technology-specific formats.

  10. Genomic organization of the S locus: Identification and characterization of genes in SLG/SRK region of S(9) haplotype of Brassica campestris (syn. rapa).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, G; Kai, N; Hirose, T; Fukui, K; Nishio, T; Takayama, S; Isogai, A; Watanabe, M; Hinata, K

    1999-09-01

    In Brassica, two self-incompatibility genes, encoding SLG (S locus glycoprotein) and SRK (S-receptor kinase), are located at the S locus and expressed in the stigma. Recent molecular analysis has revealed that the S locus is highly polymorphic and contains several genes, i.e., SLG, SRK, the as-yet-unidentified pollen S gene(s), and other linked genes. In the present study, we searched for expressed sequences in a 76-kb SLG/SRK region of the S(9) haplotype of Brassica campestris (syn. rapa) and identified 10 genes in addition to the four previously identified (SLG(9), SRK(9), SAE1, and SLL2) in this haplotype. This gene density (1 gene/5.4 kb) suggests that the S locus is embedded in a gene-rich region of the genome. The average G + C content in this region is 32.6%. An En/Spm-type transposon-like element was found downstream of SLG(9). Among the genes we identified that had not previously been found to be linked to the S locus were genes encoding a small cysteine-rich protein, a J-domain protein, and an antisilencing protein (ASF1) homologue. The small cysteine-rich protein was similar to a pollen coat protein, named PCP-A1, which had previously been shown to bind SLG.

  11. Ethanolic extracts of Brassica campestris spp. rapa roots prevent high-fat diet-induced obesity via beta(3)-adrenergic regulation of white adipocyte lipolytic activity.

    PubMed

    An, Sojin; Han, Jang-Il; Kim, Min-Jung; Park, Ji-Seon; Han, Jong-Min; Baek, Nam-In; Chung, Hae-Gon; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2010-04-01

    The influence of ethanolic extracts of Brassica campestris spp. rapa roots (EBR) on obesity was examined in imprinting control region (ICR) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The ICR mice used were divided into regular diet, HFD, EBR (50 mg/kg/day EBR administered orally), and orlistat (10 mg/kg/day orlistat administered orally) groups. The molecular mechanism of the anti-obesity effect of EBR was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes as well as in HFD-fed ICR mice. In the obese mouse model, both weight gain and epididymal fat accumulation were highly suppressed by the daily oral administration of 50 mg/kg EBR for 8 weeks, whereas the overall amount of food intake was not affected. EBR treatment induced the expression in white adipocytes of lipolysis-related genes, including beta(3)-adrenergic receptor (beta(3)-AR), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), adipose triglyceride lipase, and uncoupling protein 2. Furthermore, the activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, HSL, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase was induced in EBR-treated 3T3-L1 cells. The lipolytic effect of EBR involved beta(3)-AR modulation, as inferred from the inhibition by the beta(3)-AR antagonist propranolol. These results suggest that EBR may have potential as a safe and effective anti-obesity agent via the inhibition of adipocyte lipid accumulation and the stimulation of beta(3)-AR-dependent lipolysis.

  12. Carbohydrate derivatives from the roots of Brassica rapa ssp. campestris and their effects on ROS production and glutamate-induced cell death in HT-22 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Cho, Jin-Gyeong; Lee, Dong-Sung; Lee, Dae-Young; Song, Na-Young; Kim, Youn-Chul; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Chung, Hae-Gon; Choi, Myung-Sook; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Ahn, Eun-Mi; Kim, Geum-Soog; Baek, Nam-In

    2013-05-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the roots of Brassica rapa ssp. campestris led to the isolation of three new carbohydrate derivatives, namely sucrose 3,3',4'-triisovalerate (2), sucrose 6,3',4'-triisovalerate (3), and ethanone-1-C-β-d-glucopyranoside (3,7-anhydro-1-deoxy-d-glycero-d-gulo-2-octulose, 6), along with four known carbohydrate derivatives, 2,6,3',4'-tetraisovalerate (1), ethyl β-d-glucopyranoside (4), n-butyl β-d-fructofuranoside (5), and n-pentyl β-d-fructofuranoside (7), which were initially isolated from plants of the Brassica genus. Structures of the isolated compounds were established by spectroscopic analyses, including UV, IR, MS, and NMR. All of the isolated carbohydrate derivatives were evaluated to determine their effect on ROS production and glutamate-induced cell death in HT-22 cells. Compound 6 showed the most significant ROS reduction and a protective effect with IC50 values of 69.4 ± 3.8 μM and 4.96 ± 0.32 μM, respectively, which were equivalent to those of the positive control, Trolox.

  13. Identifying the chromosomes of the A- and C-genome diploid Brassica species B. rapa (syn. campestris) and B. oleracea in their amphidiploid B. napus.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, R. J.; Friedrich, T.; Friedt, W.; Köhler, W.

    2002-03-01

    Oilseed rape ( Brassica napus L.) is an amphidiploid species that originated from a spontaneous hybridisation of Brassica rapa L. (syn. campestris) and Brassica oleracea L., and contains the complete diploid chromosome sets of both parental genomes. The metaphase chromosomes of the highly homoeologous A genome of B. rapa and the C genome of B. oleracea cannot be reliably distinguished in B. napus because of their morphological similarity. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with 5S and 25S ribosomal DNA probes to prometaphase chromosomes, in combination with DAPI staining, allows more dependable identification of Brassica chromosomes. By comparing rDNA hybridisation and DAPI staining patterns from B. rapa and B. oleracea prometaphase chromosomes with those from B. napus, we were able to identify the putative homologues of B. napus chromosomes in the diploid chromosome sets of B. rapa and B. oleracea, respectively. In some cases, differences were observed between the rDNA hybridisation patterns of chromosomes in the diploid species and their putative homologue in B. napus, indicating locus losses or alterations in rDNA copy number. The ability to reliably identify A and C genome chromosomes in B. napus is discussed with respect to evolutionary and breeding aspects.

  14. Genomic organization of the S locus: Identification and characterization of genes in SLG/SRK region of S(9) haplotype of Brassica campestris (syn. rapa).

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, G; Kai, N; Hirose, T; Fukui, K; Nishio, T; Takayama, S; Isogai, A; Watanabe, M; Hinata, K

    1999-01-01

    In Brassica, two self-incompatibility genes, encoding SLG (S locus glycoprotein) and SRK (S-receptor kinase), are located at the S locus and expressed in the stigma. Recent molecular analysis has revealed that the S locus is highly polymorphic and contains several genes, i.e., SLG, SRK, the as-yet-unidentified pollen S gene(s), and other linked genes. In the present study, we searched for expressed sequences in a 76-kb SLG/SRK region of the S(9) haplotype of Brassica campestris (syn. rapa) and identified 10 genes in addition to the four previously identified (SLG(9), SRK(9), SAE1, and SLL2) in this haplotype. This gene density (1 gene/5.4 kb) suggests that the S locus is embedded in a gene-rich region of the genome. The average G + C content in this region is 32.6%. An En/Spm-type transposon-like element was found downstream of SLG(9). Among the genes we identified that had not previously been found to be linked to the S locus were genes encoding a small cysteine-rich protein, a J-domain protein, and an antisilencing protein (ASF1) homologue. The small cysteine-rich protein was similar to a pollen coat protein, named PCP-A1, which had previously been shown to bind SLG. PMID:10471721

  15. Impact of combined exposure of chemical, fertilizer, bio-fertilizer and compost on growth, physiology and productivity of Brassica campestries in old alluvial soil.

    PubMed

    Datta, J K; Banerjee, A; Sikdar, M Saha; Gupta, S; Mondal, N K

    2009-09-01

    Field experiment was carried out during November 2006 to February 2007 under old alluvial soil to evaluate the impact of combined dose of chemical fertilizer, biofertilizer in combination with compost for the yellow sarson (Brassica campestries cv. B9) in a randomized block design replicated thrice. Various morpho-physiological parameters viz., plant population, length of shoot and root, leaf area index (LAI), crop growth rate (CGR), net assimilation rate (NAR), yield attributes viz., number of siliquae per plant, number of seeds/siliquae, 1000 seed weight (test weight), seed yield, stover yield and physiological and biochemical parameters viz., pigment content, sugar, amino acid, protein, ascorbic acid content in physiologically active leaf were performed. The treatment T1 i.e., 40% less N fertilizer 25% less P fertilizer K fertilizer constant + 12 kg ha(-1) biofertilizer (Azophos) and organic manure (compost) @ 5Mt ha(-1), showed the maximum chlorophyll accumulation (10. 231 mg g(-1) freshweight), highest seed/siliquae (25.143), test weight of seeds (4. 861g) and highest seed yield (10.661 tha(-1)). A comparison between all the morphological, anatomical, physiological and biochemical parameters due to application of chemical fertilizer; bio-fertilizer and compost alone and in combination and their impact on soil microorganism, flora and fauna will throw a sound environmental information. PMID:20143708

  16. Activation of glycerol metabolism in Xanthomonas campestris by adaptive evolution to produce a high-transparency and low-viscosity xanthan gum from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zichao; Wu, Jianrong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiaobei

    2016-07-01

    Many studies have focused on using crude glycerol from biodiesel to obtain valuable products, but few of these studies have focused on obtaining polysaccharides. A mutant strain of Xanthomonas campestris CCTCC M2015714 that could use glycerol to produce high-transparency and low-viscosity xanthan gum was obtained by adaptive evolution, and the yield of xanthan gum reached 11.0g/L. We found that transcriptional levels of genes related to glycerol metabolism (glpF, glpK, glpD, and fbp) in the mutant strain were all higher than those from the parent strain. Using 5g/L sucrose or glucose as starter substrate, cell growth time decreased from 36h to 24h and xanthan gum yield increased. Moreover, the mutant strain can tolerate high titer glycerol, and its activity was not affected by the impurities in crude glycerol. All these results proved that crude glycerol from biodiesel industries can be used for xanthan gum production. PMID:27030959

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel pollen predominantly membrane protein gene BcMF12 from Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianghua; Zhang, Lixin; Cao, Jiashu

    2009-11-01

    A novel membrane protein gene, BcMF12, was isolated from Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino) using rapid amplification of the cDNA ends based on a pollen-specific cDNA fragment (DN237936). The cDNA was 1,155 bp in length with an open reading frame of 894 bp capable of encoding a putative polypeptide of 297 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 34.6 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point of 9.6. Comparative and bioinformatics analyses revealed that BcMF12 showed high similarities with some membrane protein sequences previously published in the public database and contained six highly conserved transmembrane domains corresponding to six highly hydrophobic regions. This indicates that BcMF12 may be a putative membrane protein. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that the transcripts of BcMF12 were abundant in the flower bud, flower and anther, but not detected in the root, stem, leaf and pistil. Moreover, the BcMF12 transcripts were detectable at the late stages of pollen development. Morphological investigations of pollen from the BcMF12 antisense transgenic plants showed that most of pollen grains of transgenic plants were abnormal. These results strongly suggest that BcMF12 is a novel pollen-preferentially membrane protein which play an important role during the pollen development in Chinese cabbage.

  18. Effect of Mentha spicata L. and Artemisia campestris extracts on the shelf life and quality of vacuum-packed refrigerated sardine (Sardina pilchardus) fillets.

    PubMed

    Houicher, Abderrahmane; Kuley, Esmeray; Bendeddouche, Badis; Ozogul, Fatih

    2013-10-01

    The present study investigated the effects of ethanolic extracts obtained from Mentha spicata and Artemisia campestris on the shelf life and the quality of vacuum-packed sardine fillets stored at 3 ± 1°C for a period of 21 days. The three groups were tested were VC, control group; VM, group treated with 1 % mint extract; and VA, group treated with 1 % artemisia extract. The observed shelf life of sardine fillets was 10 days for control samples, whereas the combination of vacuum packaging with mint and artemisia extracts extended the product's shelf life to 17 days. Among the chemical indices determined, the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances values were significantly lower in VM samples. Total volatile base nitrogen was maintained at low levels in VA samples until 17 days of chilled storage. Results of aerobic plate counts and coliform counts showed the existence of a reduced growth in VA group, whereas lactic acid bacteria did not show a significant difference among groups. Natural extract treatments combined with vacuum packaging showed lower microbiological and chemical indices, indicating that the presence of phenolic compounds in mint and artemisia extracts and the removal of oxygen in the pack retarded lipid oxidation and reduced the growth of microorganisms, which resulted in preventing spoilage and extending the product's shelf life.

  19. Effect of Mentha spicata L. and Artemisia campestris extracts on the shelf life and quality of vacuum-packed refrigerated sardine (Sardina pilchardus) fillets.

    PubMed

    Houicher, Abderrahmane; Kuley, Esmeray; Bendeddouche, Badis; Ozogul, Fatih

    2013-10-01

    The present study investigated the effects of ethanolic extracts obtained from Mentha spicata and Artemisia campestris on the shelf life and the quality of vacuum-packed sardine fillets stored at 3 ± 1°C for a period of 21 days. The three groups were tested were VC, control group; VM, group treated with 1 % mint extract; and VA, group treated with 1 % artemisia extract. The observed shelf life of sardine fillets was 10 days for control samples, whereas the combination of vacuum packaging with mint and artemisia extracts extended the product's shelf life to 17 days. Among the chemical indices determined, the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances values were significantly lower in VM samples. Total volatile base nitrogen was maintained at low levels in VA samples until 17 days of chilled storage. Results of aerobic plate counts and coliform counts showed the existence of a reduced growth in VA group, whereas lactic acid bacteria did not show a significant difference among groups. Natural extract treatments combined with vacuum packaging showed lower microbiological and chemical indices, indicating that the presence of phenolic compounds in mint and artemisia extracts and the removal of oxygen in the pack retarded lipid oxidation and reduced the growth of microorganisms, which resulted in preventing spoilage and extending the product's shelf life. PMID:24112571

  20. Backbone chemical shift assignments for Xanthomonas campestris peroxiredoxin Q in the reduced and oxidized states: a dramatic change in backbone dynamics.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Perkins, Arden; Parsonage, Derek; Poole, Leslie B; Karplus, P Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are ubiquitous enzymes that reduce peroxides as part of antioxidant defenses and redox signaling. While Prx catalytic activity and sensitivity to hyperoxidative inactivation depend on their dynamic properties, there are few examples where their dynamics has been characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Here, we provide a foundation for studies of the solution properties of peroxiredoxin Q from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (XcPrxQ) by assigning the observable (1)H(N), (15)N, (13)C(α), (13)C(β), and (13)C' chemical shifts for both the reduced (dithiol) and oxidized (disulfide) states. In the reduced state, most of the backbone amide resonances (149/152, 98 %) can be assigned in the XcPrxQ (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum. In contrast, a remarkable 51 % (77) of these amide resonances are not visible in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum of the disulfide state of the enzyme, indicating a substantial change in backbone dynamics associated with the formation of an intramolecular C48-C84 disulfide bond. PMID:26438558

  1. Bioaccumulation and translocation of cadmium in cole (Brassica campestris L.) and celery (Apium graveolens) grown in the polluted oasis soil, Northwest of China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiming; Nan, Zhongren; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Wang, Zhaowei; Wang, Shengli; Wang, Xia; Jin, Wangqiang; Zhao, Cuicui

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the bioaccumulation and translocation of cadmium (Cd) in cole (Brassica campestris L.) and celery (Apium graveolens) grown in the Cd-polluted oasis soil, Northwest of China. The results showed that Cd in the unpolluted oasis soil was mainly bound to carbonate fraction (F2) and Fe-Mn oxide fraction (F3). However, marked change of Cd fractions was observed with increasing soil Cd concentrations, in which the concentration of Cd in Fl (exchangeable fraction), F2 and F3 increased significantly (p < 0.001 for Fl, F2 and F3). The growth of cole and celery could be facilitated by low concentrations of Cd, but inhibited by high concentrations. The correlation analysis between the fraction distribution coefficient of Cd in the soil and Cd concentration accumulated in the two vegetables showed that Cd in F1 in the soil made the greatest contribution on the accumulation of Cd in the two vegetables. The high bio-concentration factor and the translocation factor of Cd in both cole and celery were observed, and Cd had higher accumulation in the edible parts of the two vegetables. Therefore, both cole and celery grown in Cd-polluted oasis soil have higher risk to human health. And the two vegetables are not suitable to be cultivated as vegetables consumed by human in the Cd-polluted oasis soil.

  2. Temperature Dependences on Various Types of Photovoltaic (PV) Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audwinto, I. A.; Leong, C. S.; Sopian, K.; Zaidi, S. H.

    2015-09-01

    Temperature is one of the key roles in PV technology performance, since with the increases of temperature the open-circuit voltage will drop accordingly so do the electrical efficiency and power output generation. Different types of Photovoltaic (PV) panels- silicon solar panels and thin film solar panels; mono-crystalline, poly-crystalline, CIS, CIGS, CdTe, back-contact, and bi-facial solar panel under 40°C to 70°C approximately with 5°C interval have been comparatively analyzed their actual performances with uniformly distribution of light illumination from tungsten halogen light source, ±500W/m2. DC-Electronic Load and Data Logger devices with “Lab View” data program interface were used to collect all the necessary parameters in this study. Time needed to achieve a certain degree of temperature was recorded. Generally, each of the panels needed 15 minutes to 20 minutes to reach 70°C. Halogen based light source is not compatible in short wave-length in response to thin-film solar cell. Within this period of times, all the panels are facing a performance loss up to 15%. Other parameters; Pmax, Vmax, Imax, Voc, Isc, Rserries, Rshunt, Fillfactor were collected as study cases. Our study is important in determining Photovoltaic type selection and system design as for study or industrial needed under different temperature condition.

  3. Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.

    2011-04-01

    This paper seeks to understand what temporal and spatial scales of variability in global horizontal radiation are important to a PV plants and what measurements are needed to be able to characterize them. As solar radiation measuring instruments are point receivers it is important to understand how those measurements translate to energy received over a larger spatial extent. Also of importance is the temporal natural of variability over large spatial areas. In this research we use high temporal and spatial resolution measurements from multiple sensors at a site in Hawaii to create solar radiation fields at various spatial and temporal scales. Five interpolation schemes were considered and the high resolution solar fields were converted to power production for a PV power plant. It was found that the interpolation schemes are robust and create ramp distributions close to what would be computed if the average solar radiation field was used. We also investigated the possibility of using time averaged solar data from 1 sensor to recreate the ramp distribution from the 17 sensors. It was found that the ramping distribution from using appropriately time averaged data from 1 sensor can reasonably match the distribution created using the 17 sensor network.

  4. A control strategy for PV stand-alone applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slouma, S.; Baccar, H.

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system study in domestic applications. Because of the decrease in power of photovoltaic module as a consequence of changes in solar radiation and temperature which affect the photovoltaic module performance, the design and control of DC-DC buck converter was proposed for providing power to the load from a photovoltaic source.In fact, the control of this converter is carried out with integrated MPPT (Maximum Power Point Tracking) algorithm which ensures a maximum energy generated by the PV arrays. Moreover, the output stage is composed by a battery energy storage system, dc-ac inverter, LCL filter which enables higher efficiency, low distortion ac waveforms and low leakage currents. The control strategy adopted is cascade control composed by two regulation loops.Simulations performed with PSIM software were able to validate the control system.The realization and testing of the photovoltaic system were achieved in the Photovoltaic laboratory of the Centre for Research and Energy Technologies at the Technopark Borj Cedria. Experimental results verify the effeciency of the proposed system.

  5. Newer Concepts in Mars Exploration; LORPEX and PV Enhanced Aerobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar; Natale, Guy; Marcozzi, Massimiliano; Greene, Jack; Duke, Vanessa

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes two new concepts in Mars Exploration, both of which involve the utilization of in-situ resources. In the first invention, we describe a Locally Refueled Planetary Explorer (LORPEX) which has practically unlimited range and life since it "lives off the land/atmosphere" by extracting fuel and oxidizer from the atmosphere, and possibly water at a later stage, as a source of hydrogen. The robot has been built and demonstrated to the media, including one science show in Pasadena. In the second invention, the concept is to obviate the difficulty of finding a suitable, lightweight substrate to bond the photovoltaic cells to; if we have an aerobot anyway for covering vast terrains, the balloon surface provides an ideal substrate for the PV cells at a minimal additional mass. Because of the truly large areas, and because sun-pointing is no longer a factor, the power availability is constant and represents at least a ten-fold increase over comparable/competing technologies; when this is combined with the minimum mass, the advantages should be apparent. Both of these technologies, LORPEX and PV-Enhanced Aerobots, won NASA NTR awards.

  6. Trimode Power Converter optimizes PV, diesel and battery energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osullivan, George; Bonn, Russell; Bower, Ward

    1994-12-01

    Conservatively, there are 100,000 localities in the world waiting for the benefits that electricity can provide, and many of these are in climates where sunshine is plentiful. With these locations in mind a prototype 30 kW hybrid system has been assembled at Sandia to prove the reliability and economics of photovoltaic, diesel and battery energy sources managed by an autonomous power converter. In the Trimode Power Converter the same power parts, four IGBT's with an isolation transformer and filter components, serve as rectifier and charger to charge the battery from the diesel; as a stand-alone inverter to convert PV and battery energy to AC; and, as a parallel inverter with the diesel-generator to accommodate loads larger than the rating of the diesel. Whenever the diesel is supplying the load, an algorithm assures that the diesel is running at maximum efficiency by regulating the battery charger operating point. Given the profile of anticipated solar energy, the cost of transporting diesel fuel to a remote location and a five year projection of load demand, a method to size the PV array, battery and diesel for least cost is developed.

  7. Optical investigation of a sun simulator for concentrator PV applications.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Christoph; Straub, Volker; van Rooyen, De Wet; Thor, Wei Yi; Siefer, Gerald; Bett, Andreas W

    2015-09-21

    In photovoltaics (PV), sun simulators are used to reproduce outdoor conditions in a lab environment such as irradiance level, light uniformity and spectral distribution. Concentrator (C)PV applications additionally require the sun simulators to provide rays with an angular distribution similar to that of the sun rays. However, different factors in CPV sun simulator setups make it difficult to achieve the perfect sun like angular distribution. This is mainly caused by the unavailability of appropriate light sources. Therefore, we investigated in this work, to which deviations such a non-ideal light source can lead and which impact is expected at the measurement of a CPV module. For this, two ray tracing models are presented - one for the simulation of natural sunrays, another one for the simulation of sun simulator conditions. The models are validated based on measurements and subsequently used to simulate the impact on a typical CPV module with silicone-on-glass Fresnel lenses. Here, significant deviations to outdoor conditions are found. PMID:26406756

  8. Endopathogenic lifestyle of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi in olive knots

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez‐Moreno, Luis; Jiménez, Antonio J.; Ramos, Cayo

    2009-01-01

    Summary The endophytic phase of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi in olive stems and the structural and ultrastructural histogenesis of olive knots have been studied. Construction of a stable plasmid vector expressing the green fluorescent protein, in combination with the use of in vitro olive plants, allowed real‐time monitoring of P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi infection. The infection process was also examined by bright field and epifluorescence microscopy as well as by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Hypertrophy of the stem tissue was concomitant with the formation of bacterial aggregates, microcolonies and multilayer biofilms, over the cell surfaces and the interior of plasmolysed cells facing the air‐tissue interface of internal opened fissures, and was followed by invasion of the outer layers of the hypertrophied tissue. Pathogenic invasion of the internal lumen of newly formed xylem vessels, which were connected with the stem vascular system, was also observed in late stages of infection. Ultrastructural analysis of knot sections showed the release of outer membrane vesicles from the pathogen surface, a phenomenon not described before for bacterial phytopathogens during host infection. This is the first real‐time monitoring of P. savastanoi disease development and the first illustrated description of the ultrastructure of P. savastanoi‐induced knots. PMID:21255279

  9. Surface vertical PV fluxes and subtropical mode water formation in an eddy-resolving numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maze, Guillaume; Deshayes, Julie; Marshall, John; Tréguier, Anne-Marie; Chronis, Alexandre; Vollmer, Lukas

    2013-07-01

    Subtropical mode waters are characterized by low potential vorticity (PV) and so the mechanisms by which PV is extracted from the ocean by air-sea interaction are of great relevance to our understanding of how mode waters are formed. This study analyzes those mechanisms by comparing the magnitude and spatial patterns of surface PV fluxes of diabatic and frictional origin in a high resolution numerical simulation of the North Atlantic. The model resolves mesoscale eddies and exhibits realism in the volume and regional distribution of subtropical mode water, both in the annual-mean and seasonal cycle. It is found that the diabatic and mechanic fluxes of PV through the sea surface are of similar amplitude locally, but their spatial structures are very different. The diabatic PV flux has a large scale pattern that reflects that of air-sea heat fluxes directed from the ocean to the atmosphere along and to the south of the separated Gulf Stream. In contrast the mechanical PV flux, because of its dependence on horizontal surface density gradients, exhibits much smaller scales but embedded within a coherent large scale pattern. When mapped over the North Atlantic subtropical mode water (EDW) outcropping region, the diabatic PV flux pattern is found to be directed out of the ocean everywhere, whereas the mechanical PV fluxes exhibits small-scale patterns of both sign. The amplitude of the diabatic PV fluxes is found to be at least one order of magnitude larger than the mechanical PV fluxes demonstrating the overwhelming importance of diabatic processes in creating mode waters. Finally, we note that the large scale climatological patterns and magnitudes of both diabatic and mechanical PV flux mapped over the EDW outcropping region, are very similar to patterns obtained from coarse-grained ocean state estimates that do not resolve the eddy field.

  10. Future of Grid-Tied PV Business Models: What Will Happen When PV Penetration on the Distribution Grid is Significant? Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, S.; Katofsky, R.; Frantzis, L.; Sawyer, H.; Margolis, R.

    2008-05-01

    Eventually, distributed PV will become a more significant part of the generation mix. When this happens, it is expected that utilities will have to take on a more active role in the placement, operation and control of these systems. There are operational complexities and concerns of revenue erosion that will drive utilities into greater involvement of distributed PV and will create new business models. This report summarizes work done by Navigant Consulting Inc. for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory as part of the Department of Energy's work on Renewable System Integration. The objective of the work was to better understand the structure of these future business models and the research, development and demonstration (RD&D) required to support their deployment. This report describes potential future PV business models in terms of combinations of utility ownership and control of the PV assets, and the various relationships between end-users and third-party owners.

  11. Genomic-associated Markers and comparative Genome Maps of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenjie; Wang, Yi; Huang, Lisha; Feng, Chuanshun; Chu, Zhaohui; Ding, Xinhua; Yang, Long

    2015-09-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) cause two major seed quarantine diseases in rice, bacterial blight and bacterial leaf streak, respectively. Xoo and Xoc share high similarity in genomic sequence, which results in hard differentiation of the two pathogens. Genomic-associated Markers and comparative Genome Maps database (GMGM) is an integrated database providing comprehensive information including compared genome maps and full genomic-coverage molecular makers of Xoo and Xoc. This database was established based on bioinformatic analysis of complete sequenced genomes of several X. oryzae pathovars of which the similarity of the genomes was up to 91.39 %. The program was designed with a series of specific PCR primers, including 286 pairs of Xoo dominant markers, 288 pairs of Xoc dominant markers, and 288 pairs of Xoo and Xoc co-dominant markers, which were predicted to distinguish two pathovars. Test on a total of 40 donor pathogen strains using randomly selected 120 pairs of primers demonstrated that over 52.5 % of the primers were efficacious. The GMGM web portal ( http://biodb.sdau.edu.cn/gmgm/ ) will be a powerful tool that can present highly specific diagnostic markers, and it also provides information about comparative genome maps of the two pathogens for future evolution study.

  12. Solar San Diego: The Impact of Binomial Rate Structures on Real PV Systems; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    VanGeet, O.; Brown, E.; Blair, T.; McAllister, A.

    2008-05-01

    There is confusion in the marketplace regarding the impact of solar photovoltaics (PV) on the user's actual electricity bill under California Net Energy Metering, particularly with binomial tariffs (those that include both demand and energy charges) and time-of-use (TOU) rate structures. The City of San Diego has extensive real-time electrical metering on most of its buildings and PV systems, with interval data for overall consumption and PV electrical production available for multiple years. This paper uses 2007 PV-system data from two city facilities to illustrate the impacts of binomial rate designs. The analysis will determine the energy and demand savings that the PV systems are achieving relative to the absence of systems. A financial analysis of PV-system performance under various rate structures is presented. The data revealed that actual demand and energy use benefits of binomial tariffs increase in summer months, when solar resources allow for maximized electricity production. In a binomial tariff system, varying on- and semi-peak times can result in approximately $1,100 change in demand charges per month over not having a PV system in place, an approximate 30% cost savings. The PV systems are also shown to have a 30%-50% reduction in facility energy charges in 2007.

  13. Stabilization of hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles by axial silyloxy groups.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tamal; Lee, Way-Zen; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli

    2016-05-01

    We report the stabilization of the hexa-coordination environment for P(v) corroles by using alkyl/aryl substituted silyloxy groups as axial ligands. The P(v) corroles are highly fluorescent in a hexa-coordination environment compared to in a penta-coordination environment. However, P(v) corroles generally undergo axial ligand dissociation to form a mixture of penta- and hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles in non-coordinating solvents such as toluene, CH2Cl2, CHCl3. The usage of moderately bulkier and electron-donating silyloxy groups helps to restrict the axial ligand dissociation of silyloxy substituted hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles in non-coordinating solvents. The crystal structure confirmed the hexa-coordination geometry for the P(v) corroles. The P(v) corroles strongly absorb and emit in the visible region, with decent quantum yields and singlet state lifetimes. The hexa-coordinated P(v) corroles are highly stable under electrochemical conditions.

  14. Design and Performance of a Hybrid PV/T Solar Water Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripanagnostopoulos, Y.; Souliotis, M.; Makris, Th.; Georgostathis, P.; Sarris, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present design considerations and experimental results of a thermosyphonic hybrid PV/T solar system that is investigated at the University of Patras. Hybrid PV/T systems can provide electrical and thermal energy, thus achieving a higher energy conversion rate of the absorbed solar radiation. We tested outdoors PV/T prototypes consisted of pc-Si PV modules and heat exchanger of copper sheet with copper pipes, for two system types (PVT/UNGL and PVT/GL). We used commercial PV modules, which give about 12%-15% efficiency, depending on the operating temperature and the use or not of additional glazing. During the experiments the generated electricity was transmitted to a load, simulating real system operation. Steady state tests of the system were performed outdoors to determine collector thermal efficiency. The glazed PV/T collector presents remarkably higher thermal output than the unglazed PV/T collector, but the electrical output of it is reduced due to additional optical losses. The experimental study of the tested thermosyphonic hybrid PV/T solar device showed that it can perform effectively during all year long, achieving at least 40° C of hot water and producing electricity at a satisfactory level.

  15. Seroepidemiology of TmPV1 infection in captive and wild Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Donà, Maria Gabriella; Rehtanz, Manuela; Adimey, Nicole M; Bossart, Gregory D; Jenson, Alfred B; Bonde, Robert K; Ghim, Shin-je

    2011-07-01

    In 1997, cutaneous papillomatosis caused by Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris [Tm]) papillomavirus 1 (TmPV1) was detected in seven captive manatees at the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Florida, USA, and, subsequently, in two wild manatees from the adjacent Homosassa River. Since then, papillomatosis has been reported in captive manatees housed in other locations, but not in wild animals. To determine TmPV1 antibody prevalence in captive and wild manatees sampled at various locations throughout Florida coastal regions, virus-like particles, composed of the L1 capsid protein of TmPV1, were generated with a baculovirus expression system and used to measure anti-TmPV1 antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serologic analysis of 156 manatees revealed a TmPV1 antibody prevalence of 26.3%, with no significant difference between captive (n=39) and wild (n=117) manatees (28.2% and 25.6%, respectively). No antibody-positive wild animal showed PV-induced cutaneous lesions, whereas papillomatosis was observed in 72.7% of antibody-positive captive manatees. Our data indicate that Florida manatees living in the wild are naturally infected by TmPV1 but rarely show TmPV1-induced papillomatosis. Hence, it appears that the wild population would not be harmed in a case of contact with captive animals without visible lesions and productive infections, which could be thus released into the wild.

  16. Draft genome sequences of pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ALF3 isolated from alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the annotated draft genome of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain ALF3, isolated in Wyoming, USA. Comparison of this genome sequence with those of closely related strains of P. syringae pv. syringae adapted to other hosts will facilitate research into interactions between this pathoge...

  17. Seroepidemiology of TmPV1 infection in captive and wild Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dona, Maria Gabriella; Rehtanz, Manuela; Adimey, Nicole M.; Bossart, Gregory D.; Jenson, Alfred B.; Bonde, Robert K.; Ghim, Shin-je

    2011-01-01

    In 1997, cutaneous papillomatosis caused by Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris [Tm]) papillomavirus 1 (TmPV1) was detected in seven captive manatees at the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Florida, USA, and, subsequently, in two wild manatees from the adjacent Homosassa River. Since then, papillomatosis has been reported in captive manatees housed in other locations, but not in wild animals. To determine TmPV1 antibody prevalence in captive and wild manatees sampled at various locations throughout Florida coastal regions, virus-like particles, composed of the L1 capsid protein of TmPV1, were generated with a baculovirus expression system and used to measure anti-TmPV1 antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serologic analysis of 156 manatees revealed a TmPV1 antibody prevalence of 26.3%, with no significant difference between captive (n=39) and wild (n=117) manatees (28.2% and 25.6%, respectively). No antibody-positive wild animal showed PV-induced cutaneous lesions, whereas papillomatosis was observed in 72.7% of antibody-positive captive manatees. Our data indicate that Florida manatees living in the wild are naturally infected by TmPV1 but rarely show TmPV1-induced papillomatosis. Hence, it appears that the wild population would not be harmed in a case of contact with captive animals without visible lesions and productive infections, which could be thus released into the wild.

  18. Effective information channels for reducing costs of environmentally- friendly technologies: evidence from residential PV markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Varun; Robinson, Scott A.

    2013-03-01

    Realizing the environmental benefits of solar photovoltaics (PV) will require reducing costs associated with perception, informational gaps and technological uncertainties. To identify opportunities to decrease costs associated with residential PV adoption, in this letter we use multivariate regression models to analyze a unique, household-level dataset of PV adopters in Texas (USA) to systematically quantify the effect of different information channels on aspiring PV adopters’ decision-making. We find that the length of the decision period depends on the business model, such as whether the system was bought or leased, and on special opportunities to learn, such as the influence of other PV owners in the neighborhood. This influence accrues passively through merely witnessing PV systems in the neighborhood, increasing confidence and motivation, as well as actively through peer-to-peer communications. Using these insights we propose a new framework to provide public information on PV that could drastically reduce barriers to PV adoption, thereby accelerating its market penetration and environmental benefits. This framework could also serve as a model for other distributed generation technologies.

  19. Estimating the environmental and economic effects of widespread residential PV adoption using GIS and NEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, C.; Richey, R.C.; Mahler, S.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes a study of the national effects of widespread adoption of grid-connected residential rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. A Geographic Information System (GIS) model is used to estimate potential PV system adoption and PV electricity generation and the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used to estimate the national effects of PV electricity generation. Adoption is assumed to occur if levelized PV system cost is less than the local average retail electricity rate at the country level. An estimate of the current {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} scenario (defined by a 6.5% real interest rate, 30-year loan life, $6{sub 1994}/W system cost, and $4{sub 1994}/month voluntary premium) results in no adoption. Several scenarios designed to stimulate PV adoption are modeled. As an example, if PV system costs are instead assumed to be $3{sub 1994}/W, rooftop systems are found to be cost effective in 16% of detached single-family households in the U.S. by 2015 (assuming full adoption of 4-kW systems), this results in 82.1 TWh of annual PV electricity generation, 170 TWh of avoided electricity transmission, distribution, and generation losses, 6 Mt/a of avoided carbon emissions, 50 kt/a of avoided NOx emissions, and 27.3 GW of avoided electricity generating capacity in place.

  20. Creating dynamic equivalent PV circuit models with impedance spectroscopy for arc-fault modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Strauch, Jason E.; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2011-06-01

    Article 690.11 in the 2011 National Electrical Code{reg_sign} (NEC{reg_sign}) requires new photovoltaic (PV) systems on or penetrating a building to include a listed arc fault protection device. Currently there is little experimental or empirical research into the behavior of the arcing frequencies through PV components despite the potential for modules and other PV components to filter or attenuate arcing signatures that could render the arc detector ineffective. To model AC arcing signal propagation along PV strings, the well-studied DC diode models were found to inadequately capture the behavior of high frequency arcing signals. Instead dynamic equivalent circuit models of PV modules were required to describe the impedance for alternating currents in modules. The nonlinearities present in PV cells resulting from irradiance, temperature, frequency, and bias voltage variations make modeling these systems challenging. Linearized dynamic equivalent circuits were created for multiple PV module manufacturers and module technologies. The equivalent resistances and capacitances for the modules were determined using impedance spectroscopy with no bias voltage and no irradiance. The equivalent circuit model was employed to evaluate modules having irradiance conditions that could not be measured directly with the instrumentation. Although there was a wide range of circuit component values, the complex impedance model does not predict filtering of arc fault frequencies in PV strings for any irradiance level. Experimental results with no irradiance agree with the model and show nearly no attenuation for 1 Hz to 100 kHz input frequencies.

  1. A fault diagnosis system for PV power station based on global partitioned gradually approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Zhang, X. N.; Gao, D. D.; Liu, H. X.; Ye, J.; Li, L. R.

    2016-08-01

    As the solar photovoltaic (PV) power is applied extensively, more attentions are paid to the maintenance and fault diagnosis of PV power plants. Based on analysis of the structure of PV power station, the global partitioned gradually approximation method is proposed as a fault diagnosis algorithm to determine and locate the fault of PV panels. The PV array is divided into 16x16 blocks and numbered. On the basis of modularly processing of the PV array, the current values of each block are analyzed. The mean current value of each block is used for calculating the fault weigh factor. The fault threshold is defined to determine the fault, and the shade is considered to reduce the probability of misjudgments. A fault diagnosis system is designed and implemented with LabVIEW. And it has some functions including the data realtime display, online check, statistics, real-time prediction and fault diagnosis. Through the data from PV plants, the algorithm is verified. The results show that the fault diagnosis results are accurate, and the system works well. The validity and the possibility of the system are verified by the results as well. The developed system will be benefit for the maintenance and management of large scale PV array.

  2. Seroepidemiology of TmPV1 infection in captive and wild Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Donà, Maria Gabriella; Rehtanz, Manuela; Adimey, Nicole M; Bossart, Gregory D; Jenson, Alfred B; Bonde, Robert K; Ghim, Shin-je

    2011-07-01

    In 1997, cutaneous papillomatosis caused by Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris [Tm]) papillomavirus 1 (TmPV1) was detected in seven captive manatees at the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Florida, USA, and, subsequently, in two wild manatees from the adjacent Homosassa River. Since then, papillomatosis has been reported in captive manatees housed in other locations, but not in wild animals. To determine TmPV1 antibody prevalence in captive and wild manatees sampled at various locations throughout Florida coastal regions, virus-like particles, composed of the L1 capsid protein of TmPV1, were generated with a baculovirus expression system and used to measure anti-TmPV1 antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serologic analysis of 156 manatees revealed a TmPV1 antibody prevalence of 26.3%, with no significant difference between captive (n=39) and wild (n=117) manatees (28.2% and 25.6%, respectively). No antibody-positive wild animal showed PV-induced cutaneous lesions, whereas papillomatosis was observed in 72.7% of antibody-positive captive manatees. Our data indicate that Florida manatees living in the wild are naturally infected by TmPV1 but rarely show TmPV1-induced papillomatosis. Hence, it appears that the wild population would not be harmed in a case of contact with captive animals without visible lesions and productive infections, which could be thus released into the wild. PMID:21719832

  3. Solar PV O&M Standards and Best Practices – Existing Gaps and Improvement Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Balfour, John R.; Keating, T. J.

    2014-11-01

    As greater numbers of photovoltaic (PV) systems are being installed, operations & maintenance (O&M) activities will need to be performed to ensure the PV system is operating as designed over its useful lifetime. To mitigate risks to PV system availability and performance, standardized procedures for O&M activities are needed to ensure high reliability and long-term system bankability. Efforts are just getting underway to address the need for standard O&M procedures as PV gains a larger share of U.S. generation capacity. Due to the existing landscape of how and where PV is installed, including distributed generation from small and medium PV systems, as well as large, centralized utility-scale PV, O&M activities will require different levels of expertise and reporting, making standards even more important. This report summarizes recent efforts made by solar industry stakeholders to identify the existing standards and best practices applied to solar PV O&M activities, and determine the gaps that have yet to be, or are currently being addressed by industry.

  4. Solar PV O&M Standards and Best Practices - Existing Gaps and Improvement Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Balfour, John R.; Keating, T. J.

    2014-11-01

    As greater numbers of photovoltaic (PV) systems are being installed, operations & maintenance (O&M) activities will need to be performed to ensure the PV system is operating as designed over its useful lifetime. To mitigate risks to PV system availability and performance, standardized procedures for O&M activities are needed to ensure high reliability and long-term system bankability. Efforts are just getting underway to address the need for standard O&M procedures as PV gains a larger share of U.S. generation capacity. Due to the existing landscape of how and where PV is installed, including distributed generation from small and medium PV systems, as well as large, centralized utility-scale PV, O&M activities will require different levels of expertise and reporting, making standards even more important. This report summarizes recent efforts made by solar industry stakeholders to identify the existing standards and best practices applied to solar PV O&M activities, and determine the gaps that have yet to be, or are currently being addressed by industry.

  5. Estimating the environmental and economic effects of widespread residential PV adoption using GIS and NEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, C.; Richey, R.C.; Mahler, S.A.; Markel, R.J.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes a study of the national effects of widespread adoption of grid-connected residential roof-top photovoltaic (PV) systems. A Geographic Information System (GIS) model is used to estimate potential PV system adoption and PV electricity generation and the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is used to estimate the national effects of PV electricity generation. Adoption is assumed to occur if levelized PV system cost is less than the local average retail electricity rate at a county-level. The estimate of the current best scenario (defined in 1994 dollars by a 6.5% real interest rate, 30 year loan life, $6/W system cost, and $4/month voluntary premium) results in no adoption. The authors model several scenarios designed to stimulate PV adoption. As an example, if PV system costs are instead assumed to be $3/W, roof-top systems are found to be cost effective in 16% of detached single-family households in the US. By 2015 (assuming full adoption of 4 kW systems), this results in 82.1 TWh of annual PV electricity generation, 1709 TWh of avoided electricity transmission, distribution, and generation (TD and G) losses, 6 Mt/a of avoided carbon emissions, 50 kt/a of avoided NOx emissions, and 27.3 GW of avoided electricity generating capacity in place.

  6. Moving to a Higher Level for PV Reliability through Comprehensive Standards Based on Solid Science (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.

    2014-11-01

    PV reliability is a challenging topic because of the desired long life of PV modules, the diversity of use environments and the pressure on companies to rapidly reduce their costs. This presentation describes the challenges, examples of failure mechanisms that we know or don't know how to test for, and how a scientific approach is being used to establish international standards.

  7. OUT Success Stories: Thin-Film PV: Leadership in Materials R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchford, P.

    2000-08-31

    Photovoltaics (PV) is a modern energy technology that makes use of semiconductor materials to convert sunlight directly to electricity. The idea of thin film technology is to produce truly low-cost PV devices by using pennies worth of active semiconductor materials.

  8. Complete DNA Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, the Causal Agent of Kiwifruit Canker Disease.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Matthew D; Warren, Benjamin A; Andersen, Mark T; Rikkerink, Erik H A; Fineran, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is the causal agent of bacterial canker of kiwifruit, a disease that has rapidly spread worldwide. We have fully sequenced and assembled the chromosomal and plasmid DNA from P. syringae pv. actinidiae ICMP 18884 using the PacBio RS II platform. PMID:26383666

  9. Computer Modelling and Simulation of Solar PV Array Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Nalin Kumar

    2003-02-01

    The main objective of my PhD research work was to study the behaviour of inter-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays. The approach involved the construction of mathematical models to investigate different types of research problems related to the energy yield, fault tolerance, efficiency and optimal sizing of inter-connected solar PV array systems. My research work can be divided into four different types of research problems: 1. Modeling of inter-connected solar PV array systems to investigate their electrical behavior, 2. Modeling of different inter-connected solar PV array networks to predict their expected operational lifetimes, 3. Modeling solar radiation estimation and its variability, and 4. Modeling of a coupled system to estimate the size of PV array and battery-bank in the stand-alone inter-connected solar PV system where the solar PV system depends on a system providing solar radiant energy. The successful application of mathematics to the above-m entioned problems entailed three phases: 1. The formulation of the problem in a mathematical form using numerical, optimization, probabilistic and statistical methods / techniques, 2. The translation of mathematical models using C++ to simulate them on a computer, and 3. The interpretation of the results to see how closely they correlated with the real data. Array is the most cost-intensive component of the solar PV system. Since the electrical performances as well as life properties of an array are highly sensitive to field conditions, different characteristics of the arrays, such as energy yield, operational lifetime, collector orientation, and optimal sizing were investigated in order to improve their efficiency, fault-tolerance and reliability. Three solar cell interconnection configurations in the array - series-parallel, total-cross-tied, and bridge-linked, were considered. The electrical characteristics of these configurations were investigated to find out one that is comparatively less susceptible to

  10. Wind effect on PV module temperature: Analysis of different techniques for an accurate estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingshackl, Clemens; Petitta, Marcello; Ernst Wagner, Jochen; Belluardo, Giorgio; Moser, David; Castelli, Mariapina; Zebisch, Marc; Tetzlaff, Anke

    2013-04-01

    In this abstract a study on the influence of wind to model the PV module temperature is presented. This study is carried out in the framework of the PV-Alps INTERREG project in which the potential of different photovoltaic technologies is analysed for alpine regions. The PV module temperature depends on different parameters, such as ambient temperature, irradiance, wind speed and PV technology [1]. In most models, a very simple approach is used, where the PV module temperature is calculated from NOCT (nominal operating cell temperature), ambient temperature and irradiance alone [2]. In this study the influence of wind speed on the PV module temperature was investigated. First, different approaches suggested by various authors were tested [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]. For our analysis, temperature, irradiance and wind data from a PV test facility at the airport Bolzano (South Tyrol, Italy) from the EURAC Institute of Renewable Energies were used. The PV module temperature was calculated with different models and compared to the measured PV module temperature at the single panels. The best results were achieved with the approach suggested by Skoplaki et al. [1]. Preliminary results indicate that for all PV technologies which were tested (monocrystalline, amorphous, microcrystalline and polycrystalline silicon and cadmium telluride), modelled and measured PV module temperatures show a higher agreement (RMSE about 3-4 K) compared to standard approaches in which wind is not considered. For further investigation the in-situ measured wind velocities were replaced with wind data from numerical weather forecast models (ECMWF, reanalysis fields). Our results show that the PV module temperature calculated with wind data from ECMWF is still in very good agreement with the measured one (R² > 0.9 for all technologies). Compared to the previous analysis, we find comparable mean values and an increasing standard deviation. These results open a promising approach for PV module

  11. Design and Implementation of an Innovative Residential PV System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najm, Elie Michel

    This work focuses on the design and implementation of an innovative residential PV system. In chapter one, after an introduction related to the rapid growth of solar systems' installations, the most commonly used state of the art solar power electronics' configurations are discussed, which leads to introducing the proposed DC/DC parallel configuration. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the power electronics' configurations are deliberated. The scope of work in the power electronics is defined in this chapter to be related to the panel side DC/DC converter. System integration and mechanical proposals are also within the scope of work and are discussed in later chapters. Operation principle of a novel low cost PV converter is proposed in chapter 2. The proposal is based on an innovative, simplified analog implementation of a master/slave methodology resulting in an efficient, soft-switched interleaved variable frequency flybacks, operating in the boundary conduction mode (BCM). The scheme concept and circuit configuration, operation principle and theoretical waveforms, design equations, and design considerations are presented. Furthermore, design examples are also given, illustrating the significance of the newly derived frequency equation for flybacks operating in BCM. In chapters 3, 4, and 5, the design implementation and optimization of the novel DC/DC converter illustrated in chapter 2 are discussed. In chapter 3, a detailed variable frequency BCM flyback design model leading to optimizing the component selections and transformer design, detailed in chapter 4, is presented. Furthermore, in chapter 4, the method enabling the use of lower voltage rating switching devices is also discussed. In chapter 5, circuitry related to Start-UP, drive for the main switching devices, zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) as well as turn OFF soft switching and interleaving control are fully detailed. The experimental results of the proposed DC/DC converter are presented in

  12. Technical evaluation of a USSC integrated/direct mount PV roofing module system at NREL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, T.; Hansen, R.; Mrig, L.

    1996-01-01

    The results of a 16 month technical evaluation performed on a nominal 1 kWac utility-interconnect amorphous silicon PV system deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's PV outdoor test site are given here. The system employs 64 prototype United Solar Systems Corp. Integrated/Direct Mount PV Roofing Molecules mounted on simulated attic/roof structures. In this paper we show that the PV array fill factor has been relatively stable with respect to time and that the seasonal variations in performance can be largely attributed to seasonal variations in current. We also show that in determining the summer and winter ac power output, the summation of the manufacturer-supplied module peak powers at STC for a similarly located and configured a-Si PV array should be derated by factors of approximately of 0.83 and 0.78 for summer and winter operation, respectively.

  13. Technical evaluation of a USSC Integrated/Direct Mount PV Roofing Module system at NREL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Troy; Hansen, Robert; Mrig, Laxmi

    1995-05-01

    The results of a 16 month technical evaluation performed on a nominal 1 kW(sub ac) utility-interconnect amorphous silicon PV system deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's PV outdoor test site are given here. The system employs 64 prototype United Solar Systems Corp. Integrated/Direct Mount PV Roofing Modules mounted on simulated attic/roof structures. In this paper we show that the PV array fill factor has been relatively stable with respect to time and that the seasonal variations in performance can be largely attributed to seasonal variations in current. We also show that in determining the summer and winter ac power output, the summation of the manufacturer-supplied module peak powers at STC for a similarly located and configured a-Si PV array should be derated by factors of approximately of 0.83 and 0.78 for summer and winter operation, respectively.

  14. Simplified Method for Modeling the Impact of Arbitrary Partial Shading Conditions on PV Array Performance

    SciTech Connect

    MacAlpine, Sara; Deline, Chris

    2015-06-14

    It is often difficult to model the effects of partial shading conditions on PV array performance, as shade losses are nonlinear and depend heavily on a system's particular configuration. This work describes and implements a simple method for modeling shade loss: a database of shade impact results (loss percentages), generated using a validated, detailed simulation tool and encompassing a wide variety of shading scenarios. The database is intended to predict shading losses in crystalline silicon PV arrays and is accessed using basic inputs generally available in any PV simulation tool. Performance predictions using the database are within 1-2% of measured data for several partially shaded PV systems, and within 1% of those predicted by the full, detailed simulation tool on an annual basis. The shade loss database shows potential to considerably improve performance prediction for partially shaded PV systems.

  15. The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, R.; Nielsen, K. K.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system is examined using an analytical model for four different types of commercial PVs and a commercial bismuth telluride TEG. The TEG is applied directly on the back of the PV, so that the two devices have the same temperature. The PVs considered are crystalline Si (c-Si), amorphous Si (a-Si), copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) cells. The degradation of PV performance with temperature is shown to dominate the increase in power produced by the TEG, due to the low efficiency of the TEG. For c-Si, CIGS and CdTe PV cells the combined system produces a lower power and has a lower efficiency than the PV alone, whereas for an a-Si cell the total system performance may be slightly increased by the TEG.

  16. Simplified Method for Modeling the Impact of Arbitrary Partial Shading Conditions on PV Array Performance: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    MacAlpine, Sara; Deline, Chris

    2015-09-15

    It is often difficult to model the effects of partial shading conditions on PV array performance, as shade losses are nonlinear and depend heavily on a system's particular configuration. This work describes and implements a simple method for modeling shade loss: a database of shade impact results (loss percentages), generated using a validated, detailed simulation tool and encompassing a wide variety of shading scenarios. The database is intended to predict shading losses in crystalline silicon PV arrays and is accessed using basic inputs generally available in any PV simulation tool. Performance predictions using the database are within 1-2% of measured data for several partially shaded PV systems, and within 1% of those predicted by the full, detailed simulation tool on an annual basis. The shade loss database shows potential to considerably improve performance prediction for partially shaded PV systems.

  17. A Best Practice for Developing Availability Guarantee Language in Photovoltaic (PV) O&M Agreements.

    SciTech Connect

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Balfour, John

    2015-11-01

    This document outlines the foundation for developing language that can be utilized in an Equipment Availability Guarantee, typically included in an O&M services agreement between a PV system or plant owner and an O&M services provider, or operator. Many of the current PV O&M service agreement Availability Guarantees are based on contracts used for traditional power generation, which create challenges for owners and operators due to the variable nature of grid-tied photovoltaic generating technologies. This report documents language used in early PV availability guarantees and presents best practices and equations that can be used to more openly communicate how the reliability of the PV system and plant equipment can be expressed in an availability guarantee. This work will improve the bankability of PV systems by providing greater transparency into the equipment reliability state to all parties involved in an O&M services contract.

  18. Introduction of Break-Out Session 2 of the 2011 International PV Module Quality Assurance Forum(Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.; Sample, T.; Yamamichi, M.

    2011-07-01

    This presentation outlines the goals and specific tasks of break-out session 2 of the 2011 International PV Module Quality Assurance Forum, along with a review of accelerated stress tests used for photovoltaics (PV).

  19. Testing the PV-Theta Mapping Technique in a 3-D CTM Model Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frith, Stacey M.

    2004-01-01

    Mapping lower stratospheric ozone into potential vorticity (PV)- potential temperature (Theta) coordinates is a common technique employed to analyze sparse data sets. Ozone transformed into a flow-following dynamical coordinate system is insensitive to meteorological variations. Therefore data from a wide range of times/locations can be compared, so long as the measurements were made in the same airmass (as defined by PV). Moreover, once a relationship between ozone and PV/Theta is established, a full 3D ozone field can be estimated from this relationship and the 3D analyzed PV field. However, ozone data mapped in this fashion can be hampered by noisy PV fields, or "mis-matches" in the resolution and/or exact location of the ozone and PV measurements. In this study, we investigate the PV-ozone relationship using output from a recent 50-year run of the Goddard 3D chemical transport model (CTM). Model constituents are transported using off-line dynamics from the finite volume general circulation model (FVGCM). By using the internally consistent model PV and ozone fields, we minimize noise due to mis-matching and resolution issues. We calculate correlations between model ozone and PV throughout the stratosphere, and test the sensitivity of the technique to initial data resolution. To do this we degrade the model data to that of various satellite instruments, then compare the mapped fields derived from the sub-sampled data to the full resolution model data. With these studies we can determine appropriate limits for the PV-theta mapping technique in latitude, altitude, and as a function of original data resolution.

  20. EcPV2 DNA in equine squamous cell carcinomas and normal genital and ocular mucosa.

    PubMed

    Vanderstraeten, Eva; Bogaert, Lies; Bravo, Ignacio G; Martens, Ann

    2011-01-27

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) represents the most common malignant tumour of the eye and external genitals in horses. Comparable to humans, papillomaviruses (PV) have been proposed as etiological agents of cancer in horses and recently, Equine papillomavirus type 2 (EcPV2) has been identified in genital SCCs. Hitherto it had never been demonstrated in ocular SCCs. The first goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of EcPV2 DNA in tissue samples from equine genital and ocular SCCs, genital papillomas and penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions, using EcPV2-specific PCR. The second goal was to investigate the possibility of latent EcPV2 infection in the genital and ocular mucosa of healthy horses on swabs obtained from the eye, penis, vulvovaginal region and cervix. EcPV2 DNA was detected in all genital SCCs (17/17), genital papillomas (8/8), PIN lesions (11/11) and ocular SCCs (9/9). In healthy horses, EcPV2 DNA was detected in 43% (17/40) of penile swabs, 53% (9/17) of vulvovaginal swabs, 47% (8/17) of cervical swabs and 57% (32/56) of ocular swabs. This study confirms the presence of EcPV2 DNA in equine genital SCCs. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time its involvement in other genital lesions and in ocular SCCs and latent EcPV2 infections in normal genital (including cervical) and ocular equine mucosa. The close relatives of EcPV2 are associated to cutaneous lesions, and this virus is not related to high-risk human papillomaviruses causing cervical cancer. Thus, similar viral tropism does not imply close evolutionary relationship.

  1. Comparison of four MPPT techniques for PV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atik, L.; Petit, P.; Sawicki, J. P.; Ternifi, Z. T.; Bachir, G.; Aillerie, M.

    2016-07-01

    The working behavior of a module / PV array is non-linear and highly dependent on working conditions. As a given condition, there is only one point at which the level of available power at its output is maximum. This point varies with time, enlightenment and temperature. To ensure optimum operation, the use of MPPT control allows us to extract the maximum power. This paper presents a comparative study of four widely-adopted MPPT algorithms, such as Perturb and Observe, Incremental Conductance, Measurements of the variation of the open circuit voltage or of the short-circuit current. Their performance is evaluated using, for all these techniques. In particular, this study compares the behaviors of each technique in presence of solar irradiation variations and temperature fluctuations. These MPPT techniques will be compared using the Matlab / Simulink tool.

  2. Final Technical Report - Photovoltaics for You (PV4You) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, J. M.; Sherwood, L.; Pulaski, J.; Cook, C.; Kalland, S.; Haynes, J.

    2005-08-14

    In September 2000, the Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) began its 5-year work on contract # DE-FGO3-00SF22116, the Photovoltaics for You (PV4You) Project. The objective was to develop and distribute information on photovoltaics and to educate key stakeholder groups including state government agencies, local government offices, consumer representative agencies, school officials and students, and Million Solar Roofs Partnerships. In addition, the project was to identify barriers to the deployment of photovoltaics and implement strategies to overcome them. Information dissemination and education was accomplished by publishing newsletters; creating a base of information, guides, and models on the www.irecusa.org and the www.millionsolarroofs.org web sites; convening workshops and seminars; engaging multiple stakeholders; and widening the solar network to include new consumers and decision makers. Two major web sites were maintained throughout the project cycle. The www.irecusa.org web site housed dedicated pages for Connecting to the Grid, Schools Going Solar, Community Outreach, and Certification & Training. The www.millionsolarroofs.org web site was created to serve the MSR Partnerships with news, interviews, key documents, and resource material. Through the course of this grant, the Interstate Renewable Energy Council has been supporting the Department of Energy's solar energy program goals by providing the Department with expertise services for their network of city, state, and community stakeholders. IREC has been the leading force at the state and federal levels regarding net metering and interconnection policy for photovoltaic systems. The principal goal and benefit of the interconnection and net metering work is to lower both barriers and cost for the installation of PV. IREC typically plays a leadership role among small generator stakeholders and has come to be relied upon for its expertise by industry and regulators. IREC also took a leadership

  3. A novel ``flat-plate'' PV concentrator package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, J. R.; Cole, E. D.; Berens, T. A.; Szalaj, A.; Keane, J.; Alleman, J.

    1999-03-01

    DayStar Technologies is developing a PV module technology using low-level concentration (2-8 suns) that can package existing industry cell materials into a lower cost/higher value product suitable for both low-power (10W) solar lantern and 1-KW and greater power generation applications. Cell materials incorporated to date include Cu(In, Ga)Se2(CIGS), a-Si, and c-Si. The use of thin-film cell materials in a concentrator application is the first of its kind. The performance and reliability of CIGS and a-Si under concentration has been demonstrated. The efficacy of the proprietary optics developed by DayStar has been demonstrated. Cell integration and subsequent mating to optics has proven to be nearly lossless. A 7.2% active-area CIGS-based mini-module has been measured.

  4. Copper Antimony Chalcogenide Thin Film PV Device Development

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Adam W.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; de Souza Lucas, Francisco Willian; Toberer, Eric S.; Wolden, Colin A.; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2015-06-14

    Emerging ternary chalcogenide thin film solar cell technologies, such as CuSbS2 and CuSbSe2, have recently attracted attention as simpler alternatives to quaternary Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS). Despite suitable photovoltaic properties, the initial energy conversion efficiency of CuSbS2 is rather low (0.3%). Here, we report on our progress towards improving the efficiency of CuSbS2 solar cells using a high throughput approach. The combinatorial methodology quickly results in baseline solar cell prototypes with 0.6% efficiency, and then modification of the back contact architecture leads to 1% PV devices. We then translate the optimal CuSbS2 synthesis parameters to CuSbSe2 devices, which show 3% efficiencies.

  5. The reliability and stability of multijunction amorphous silicon PV modules

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.E.

    1995-11-01

    Solarex is developing a manufacturing process for the commercial production of 8 ft{sup 2} multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV modules starting in 1996. The device structure used in these multijunction modules is: glass/textured tin oxide/p-i-n/p-i-n/ZnO/Al/EVA/Tedlar where the back junction of the tandem structure contains an amorphous silicon germanium alloy. As an interim step, 4 ft{sup 2} multijunction modules have been fabricated in a pilot production mode over the last several months. The distribution of initial conversion efficiencies for an engineering run of 67 modules (4 ft{sup 2}) is shown. Measurements recently performed at NREL indicate that the actual efficiencies are about 5% higher than those shown, and thus exhibit an average initial conversion efficiency of about 9.5%. The data indicates that the process is relatively robust since there were no modules with initial efficiencies less than 7.5%.

  6. Comparative analysis of DG and solar PV water pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharani, Kusum; Dahiya, Ratna

    2016-03-01

    Looking at present day electricity scenario, there is a major electricity crisis in rural areas. The farmers are still dependant on the monsoon rains for their irrigation needs and livestock maintenance. Some of the agrarian population has opted to use Diesel Generators for pumping water in their fields. But taking into consideration the economics and environmental conditions, the above choice is not suitable for longer run. An effort to shift from non-renewable sources such as diesel to renewable energy source such as solar has been highlighted. An approximate comparative analysis showing the life cycle costs of a PV pumping system with Diesel Generator powered water pumping is done using MATLAB/STMULTNK.

  7. Electronic processes in thin-film PV materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.C.; Chen, D.; Chen, S.L.

    1998-07-01

    The electronic and optical processes in an important class of thin-film PV materials, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, have been investigated using several experimental techniques designed for thin-film geometries. The experimental techniques include various magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopies and combinations of these two spectroscopies. Two-step optical excitation processes through the manifold of silicon dangling bond states have been identifies as important at low excitation energies. Local hydrogen motion has been studied using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and found to be much more rapid than long range diffusion as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. A new metastable effect has been found in a-Si:H films alloyed with sulfur. Spin-one optically excited states have been unambiguously identified using optically detected electron spin resonance. Local hydrogen bonding in microcrystalline silicon films has been studied using NMR.

  8. An investigation of the maximum penetration level of a photovoltaic (PV) system into a traditional distribution grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalise, Santosh

    Although solar photovoltaic (PV) systems have remained the fastest growing renewable power generating technology, variability as well as uncertainty in the output of PV plants is a significant issue. This rapid increase in PV grid-connected generation presents not only progress in clean energy but also challenges in integration with traditional electric power grids which were designed for transmission and distribution of power from central stations. Unlike conventional electric generators, PV panels do not have rotating parts and thus have no inertia. This potentially causes a problem when the solar irradiance incident upon a PV plant changes suddenly, for example, when scattered clouds pass quickly overhead. The output power of the PV plant may fluctuate nearly as rapidly as the incident irradiance. These rapid power output fluctuations may then cause voltage fluctuations, frequency fluctuations, and power quality issues. These power quality issues are more severe with increasing PV plant power output. This limits the maximum power output allowed from interconnected PV plants. Voltage regulation of a distribution system, a focus of this research, is a prime limiting factor in PV penetration levels. The IEEE 13-node test feeder, modeled and tested in the MATLAB/Simulink environment, was used as an example distribution feeder to analyze the maximum acceptable penetration of a PV plant. The effect of the PV plant's location was investigated, along with the addition of a VAR compensating device (a D-STATCOM in this case). The results were used to develop simple guidelines for determining an initial estimate of the maximum PV penetration level on a distribution feeder. For example, when no compensating devices are added to the system, a higher level of PV penetration is generally achieved by installing the PV plant close to the substation. The opposite is true when a VAR compensator is installed with the PV plant. In these cases, PV penetration levels over 50% may be

  9. EVA degradation mechanisms simulating those in PV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pern, F. J.; Czanderna, A. W.

    1992-12-01

    Yellow-browning of the ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer encapsulant used in PV modules has resulted in significant power losses of over 50% of the initial power output. The weathering-degraded yellow-brown EVA films have lost the ultraviolet (UV) absorber, Cyasorb UV 531(R), and the degree of cross-linking (gel content) has increased. EVA degradation mechanisms identified thus far are discussed in this work. Upon exposure to UV light at 45°-85 °C, virgin EVA films that are stabilized with Cyasorb UV 531(R) and two antioxidants show an increase in the gel content, a gradual loss of Cyasorb by photooxidation, and the generation of acetic acid. The deacetylation reaction, which leads to the formation of polyenes, also occurs significantly in the films heated in the dark at 130 °C for five days. Acetic acid thermally catalyzes the EVA film discoloration at 85°-130 °C, which increases from a light yellow to a yellow-brown color as the heating temperature increases. The factors can account for the yellow-browning of the EVA in the accelerated testing of mini-modules, and the discoloration is more profound when exposed to UV light at 85 °C than when heated in the dark at the same temperature. In the presence of the EVA-produced acetic acid, oxygen, and sunlight exposure, the Cu buslines that were coated with a thin layer of Pb-Sn alloy showed significant oxidation and metal interdiffusion, which in turn may contribute to the resistance increase and hence the current loss reported for weathered PV modules.

  10. Transparent building-integrated PV modules. Phase 1: Comprehensive report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-28

    This Comprehensive Report encompasses the activities that have been undertaken by Kiss + Cathcart, Architects, in conjunction with Energy Photovoltaics, Incorporated (EPV), to develop a flexible patterning system for thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules for building applications. There are two basic methods for increasing transparency/light transmission by means of patterning the PV film: widening existing scribe lines, or scribing a second series of lines perpendicular to the first. These methods can yield essentially any degree of light transmission, but both result in visible patterns of light and dark on the panel surface. A third proposed method is to burn a grid of dots through the films, independent of the normal cell scribing. This method has the potential to produce a light-transmitting panel with no visible pattern. Ornamental patterns at larger scales can be created using combinations of these techniques. Kiss + Cathcart, Architects, in conjunction with EPV are currently developing a complementary process for the large-scale lamination of thin-film PVs, which enables building integrated (BIPV) modules to be produced in sizes up to 48 in. x 96 in. Flexible laser patterning will be used for three main purposes, all intended to broaden the appeal of the product to the building sector: To create semitransparent thin-film modules for skylights, and in some applications, for vision glazing.; to create patterns for ornamental effects. This application is similar to fritted glass, which is used for shading, visual screening, graphics, and other purposes; and to allow BIPV modules to be fabricated in various sizes and shapes with maximum control over electrical characteristics.

  11. Evaluation of the Performance of the PVUSA Rating Methodology Applied to Dual Junction PV Technology: Preprint (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-07-01

    The PVUSA (Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications) project in the 1990's developed a rating methodology for PV performance evaluation which has become popular, and even incorporated into concentrating PV rating standards This report apply that method to rack-mounted dual-junction PV system, and produces a system rating.

  12. First report of the crucifer pathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis causing bacterial blight on radish (Raphanus sativus) in Germany

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis is a severe pathogen of crucifers across the U.S. We compared a strain isolated from diseased radish (Raphanus sativus) in Germany to pathotypes and additional strains of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis and P. syringae pv. maculicola. We demonstrated that the patho...

  13. High Performance Packaging Solutions for Low Cost, Reliable PV Modules: Final Subcontract Report, 26 May 2005 - 30 November 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Keotla, B. M.; Marinik, B. J.

    2009-06-01

    During this research effort, Dow Corning Corporation has addressed the PV manufacturing goals of: (i) improving PV manufacturing processes and equipment; (ii) accelerating manufacturing cost reductions of PV modules; (iii) increasing commercial product performance and reliability; and (iv) scaling up U.S. manufacturing capacity.

  14. Plug and Play Components for Building Integrated PV Systems, Phase II Final Report, 20 February 2003 - 31 May 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Rowell, D.

    2008-04-01

    Progress by Schott Solar, Inc. under NREL's PV Manufacturing R&D Project. Details progress on meter-interconnect device; free-standing mounting system; dark I-V curves to unearth problems with PV module strings; new 34-V version of ASE-300 PV module; and updated source-circuit protectors.

  15. Identification of novel and conserved miRNAs involved in pollen development in Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis by high-throughput sequencing and degradome analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background microRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding, small RNAs that have essential regulatory functions in plant growth, development, and stress response processes. However, limited information is available about their functions in sexual reproduction of flowering plants. Pollen development is an important process in the life cycle of a flowering plant and is a major factor that affects the yield and quality of crop seeds. Results This study aims to identify miRNAs involved in pollen development. Two independent small RNA libraries were constructed from the flower buds of the male sterile line (Bcajh97-01A) and male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B) of Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis. The libraries were subjected to high-throughput sequencing by using the Illumina Solexa system. Eight novel miRNAs on the other arm of known pre-miRNAs, 54 new conserved miRNAs, and 8 novel miRNA members were identified. Twenty-five pairs of novel miRNA/miRNA* were found. Among all the identified miRNAs, 18 differentially expressed miRNAs with over two-fold change between flower buds of male sterile line (Bcajh97-01A) and male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B) were identified. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that most of the differentially expressed miRNAs were preferentially expressed in flower buds of the male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B). Degradome analysis showed that a total of 15 genes were predicted to be the targets of seven miRNAs. Conclusions Our findings provide an overview of potential miRNAs involved in pollen development and interactions between miRNAs and their corresponding targets, which may provide important clues on the function of miRNAs in pollen development. PMID:24559317

  16. Assessment of the interactive effects of ambient O₃ and NPK levels on two tropical mustard varieties (Brassica campestris L.) using open-top chambers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Poonam; Singh, Shalini; Agrawal, S B; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2012-10-01

    Rising O(3) concentrations in agricultural areas have been identified as a significant threat to crop production in Asia including India. The present work reports the results of a field study conducted to assess the usefulness of higher than recommended NPK dose in modifying the physiological, growth, yield, and seed quality responses of two mustard (Brassica campestris L. var. Vardan and Aashirwad) varieties under ambient ozone level at a rural site of India, using open-top chambers. Twelve hourly mean O(3) concentrations ranged between 27.7 and 59.04 ppb during the growth period. Plants in nonfiltered chambers (NFCs) showed reductions in photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, and growth parameters compared to the plants in filtered chambers (FCs), but reductions were of lower magnitude at 1.5 times recommended dose of NPK (1.5 RNPK) compared to recommended (RNPK). Yield and seed quality reduced significantly in plants of NFCs compared to FCs at RNPK, but no significant differences were recorded at 1.5 RNPK. There were higher N uptake and N uptake efficiency of plants in FCs compared to NFCs. Nitrogen utilization efficiency increased in Vardan, but decreased in Aashirwad in NFCs compared to FCs suggesting higher capability of N acquisition and utilization under ambient O(3), which led to a less pronounced reduction in the yield of the former than the latter variety. The differential nitrogen utilization efficiency in these varieties may be potentially used as measure of sensitivity characteristics in breeding programs for yield improvement in mustard under the present trend of increase in O(3) concentrations. PMID:22072445

  17. Characterization of a novel gene, BcMF7, that is expressed preferentially in pollen of Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Cao, JiaShu; Zhang, YuChao; Ye, YiQun

    2007-08-01

    Pollen formation is important for plant sexual reproduction. To identify the genes that are involved in pollen formation, we performed the genome-wide transcriptional profiling in the flower buds of both male meiotic cytokinesis (mmc) mutant and its wild-type plants of Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis, syn. B. rapa L. ssp. chinensis. cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) analysis showed that the mmc mutation resulted in changes in expression of a variety of genes. BcMF7, a transcript-derived fragment (TDF) accumulated in the wild-type flower buds was further characterized. The BcMF7 gene has 1161 bp in length with two introns. The full-length BcMF7 cDNA has 609 bp in length and encodes a protein of 129 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of BcMF7 protein shares no similarity to any function-known protein in Swiss-Prot database, but has 8 protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, 2 caselin kinase II phosphorylation sites, 2 tyrosine kinase phosphorylation sites, 2 N-glycosylation sites and 2 N-myristolyation sites. Spatial and temporal expression patterns analysis showed that BcMF7 was expressed exclusively in pollen. The expression signal of BcMF7 was first detected at the tetrad stage of microspore development, reached a peak level at the uninucleate stage, and decreased to a slightly low level at the mature pollen stage. All these results show that BcMF7 may play a certain role in the signal transduction during pollen development.

  18. Xanthomonas campestris cell–cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-01-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell–cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell–cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery. PMID:26248667

  19. A low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048 with high activity over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Meng, Kun; Wang, Yaru; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Tu, Tao; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2012-11-01

    Alkaline pectate lyases are favorable for the textile industry. Here, we report the gene cloning and expression of a low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase (PL D) from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048. Deduced PL D consists of a putative 27-residue signal peptide and a catalytic domain of 320 residues belonging to family PF09492. Recombinant PL D (r-PL D) produced in Escherichia coli was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity with a single step of Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography and showed an apparent molecular weight of ~38 kDa. The pH and temperature optima of r-PL D were found to be 9.0 °C and 30 °C, respectively. Compared with its microbial counterparts, r-PL D had higher activity over a wide pH range (>45 % of the maximum activity at pH 3.0-12.0) and at lower temperatures (>35 % of activity even at 0 °C). The K(m) and V(max) values of r-PL D for polygalacturonic acid were 4.9 gl(-1) and 30.1 μmolmin(-1) mg(-1), respectively. Compared with the commercial compound pectinase from Novozymes, r-PL D showed similar efficacy in reducing the intrinsic viscosity of polygalacturonic acid (35.1 % vs. 36.5 %) and in bioscouring of jute (10.25 % vs. 10.82 %). Thus, r-PL D is a valuable additive candidate for the textile industry. PMID:22983714

  20. Molecular cloning and expression of the male sterility-related CtYABBY1 gene in flowering Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp chinensis var. parachinensis).

    PubMed

    Zhang, X L; Zhang, L G

    2014-06-10

    Expression of the YABBY gene family in the abaxial surface of lateral plant organs determines abaxial destiny of cells, enhances growth and expansion of lateral organs, and plays an important role in polar establishment of lateral organs. However, the YABBY gene has not been studied in male sterility and fertility restoration. We homologously cloned the CtYABBY1 gene of male-sterile TC1 in Brassica campestris L. ssp chinensis var. parachinensis; its expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. A 937-bp sequence was cloned from TC1 and named CtYABBY1. The ORF of this gene has 702 bp, contains a "C2C2 zinc finger" motif at the N-terminal end, and a "YABBY" structural domain at the C-terminal end. This gene had the highest homology with DBC43-3-2 gene in B. campetris ssp pekinensis. Expression of CtYABBY1 gene has a wide range of functions. It is involved in growth and development of lateral organs, such as leaves and flowers, enhancing expansion of the area and volume of young organs. CtYABBY1 is a gene that promotes thermo-sensitive fertility restoration. At room temperature, expression level of this gene was found to be lower in the stamens of sterile flowers. After treating TC1 at a low temperature of 2°-6°C for 20 days, expression of this gene was upregulated in the stamen of fertile flowers. We conclude that male sterility in TC1 is negatively regulated by this gene, which facilitates transition from male sterility to fertility.

  1. Xanthomonas campestris cell-cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-11-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell-cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell-cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery.

  2. Molecular cloning and expression of the male sterility-related CtYABBY1 gene in flowering Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp chinensis var. parachinensis).

    PubMed

    Zhang, X L; Zhang, L G

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the YABBY gene family in the abaxial surface of lateral plant organs determines abaxial destiny of cells, enhances growth and expansion of lateral organs, and plays an important role in polar establishment of lateral organs. However, the YABBY gene has not been studied in male sterility and fertility restoration. We homologously cloned the CtYABBY1 gene of male-sterile TC1 in Brassica campestris L. ssp chinensis var. parachinensis; its expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. A 937-bp sequence was cloned from TC1 and named CtYABBY1. The ORF of this gene has 702 bp, contains a "C2C2 zinc finger" motif at the N-terminal end, and a "YABBY" structural domain at the C-terminal end. This gene had the highest homology with DBC43-3-2 gene in B. campetris ssp pekinensis. Expression of CtYABBY1 gene has a wide range of functions. It is involved in growth and development of lateral organs, such as leaves and flowers, enhancing expansion of the area and volume of young organs. CtYABBY1 is a gene that promotes thermo-sensitive fertility restoration. At room temperature, expression level of this gene was found to be lower in the stamens of sterile flowers. After treating TC1 at a low temperature of 2°-6°C for 20 days, expression of this gene was upregulated in the stamen of fertile flowers. We conclude that male sterility in TC1 is negatively regulated by this gene, which facilitates transition from male sterility to fertility. PMID:25036178

  3. Comparison of the complete genome sequences of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a and pv. tomato DC3000

    SciTech Connect

    Feil, Helene; Feil, William; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Larimer, Frank W; DiBartolo, Genevieve; Copeland, A; Lykidis, A; Trong, Stephen; Nolan, Matt; Goltsman, Eugene; Thiel, James; Malfatti, Stephanie; Loper, Joyce E.; Detter, J C; Lapidus, Alla L.; Land, Miriam L; Richardson, P M; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Lindow, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a (Pss B728a) has been determined and is compared with that of A syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). The two pathovars of this economically important species of plant pathogenic bacteria differ in host range and other interactions with plants, with Pss having a more pronounced epiphytic stage of growth and higher abiotic stress tolerance and Pst DC3000 having a more pronounced apoplastic growth habitat. The Pss B728a genome (6.1 Mb) contains a circular chromosome and no plasmid, whereas the Pst DC3000 genome is 6.5 mbp in size, composed of a circular chromosome and two plasmids. Although a high degree of similarity exists between the two sequenced Pseudomonads, 976 protein-encoding genes are unique to Pss B728a when compared with Pst DC3000, including large genomic islands likely to contribute to virulence and host specificity. Over 375 repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences unique to Pss B728a when compared with Pst DC3000 are widely distributed throughout the chromosome except in 14 genomic islands, which generally had lower GC content than the genome as a whole. Content of the genomic islands varies, with one containing a prophage and another the plasmid pKLC102 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Among the 976 genes of Pss B728a with no counterpart in Pst DC3000 are those encoding for syringopeptin, syringomycin, indole acetic acid biosynthesis, arginine degradation, and production of ice nuclei. The genomic comparison suggests that several unique genes for Pss B728a such as ectoine synthase, DNA repair, and antibiotic production may contribute to the epiphytic fitness and stress tolerance of this organism.

  4. PV Ramping in a Distributed Generation Environment: A Study Using Solar Measurements; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Keller, J.

    2012-06-01

    Variability in Photovoltaic (PV) generation resulting from variability in the solar radiation over the PV arrays is a topic of continuing concern for those involved with integrating renewables onto existing electrical grids. The island of Lanai, Hawaii is an extreme example of the challenges that integrators will face due to the fact that it is a small standalone grid. One way to study this problem is to take high-resolution solar measurements in multiple locations and model simultaneous PV production for various sizes at those locations. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected high-resolution solar data at four locations on the island where proposed PV plants will be deployed in the near future. This data set provides unique insight into how the solar radiation may vary between points that are proximal in distance, but diverse in weather, due to the formation of orographic clouds in the center of the island. Using information about each proposed PV plant size, power output was created at high resolution. The team analyzed this output to understand power production ramps at individual locations and the effects of aggregating the production from all four locations. Hawaii is a unique environment, with extremely variable events occurring on a daily basis. This study provided an excellent opportunity for understanding potential worst-case scenarios for PV ramping. This paper provides an introduction to the datasets that NREL collected over a year and a comprehensive analysis of PV variability in a distributed generation scenario.

  5. Moving Toward Quantifying Reliability - The Next Step in a Rapidly Maturing PV Industry: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Sarah; Sample, Tony; Wohlgemuth, John; Zhou, Wei; Bosco, Nick; Althaus, Joerg; Phillips, Nancy; Deceglie, Michael; Flueckiger, Chris; Hacke, Peter; Miller, David; Kempe, Michael; Yamamichi, Masaaki; Kondo, Michio

    2015-12-07

    Some may say that PV modules are moving toward being a simple commodity, but most major PV customers ask: 'How can I minimize chances of a module recall?' Or, 'How can I quantify the added value of a 'premium' module?' Or, 'How can I assess the value of an old PV system that I'm thinking of purchasing?' These are all questions that PVQAT (the International PV Quality Assurance Task Force) and partner organizations are working to answer. Defining standard methods for ensuring minimal acceptable quality of PV modules, differentiating modules that provide added value in the toughest of environments, and creating a process (e.g. through IECRE [1]) that can follow a PV system from design through installation and operation are tough tasks, but having standard approaches for these will increase confidence, reduce costs, and be a critical foundation of a mature PV industry. This paper summarizes current needs for new tests, some challenges for defining those tests, and some of the key efforts toward development of international standards, emphasizing that meaningful quantification of reliability (as in defining a service life prediction) must be done in the context of a specific product with design parameters defined through a quality management system.

  6. Advanced Inverter Technology for High Penetration Levels of PV Generation in Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schauder, C.

    2014-03-01

    This subcontract report was completed under the auspices of the NREL/SCE High-Penetration Photovoltaic (PV) Integration Project, which is co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the California Solar Initiative (CSI) Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD&D) program funded by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and managed by Itron. This project is focused on modeling, quantifying, and mitigating the impacts of large utility-scale PV systems (generally 1-5 MW in size) that are interconnected to the distribution system. This report discusses the concerns utilities have when interconnecting large PV systems that interconnect using PV inverters (a specific application of frequency converters). Additionally, a number of capabilities of PV inverters are described that could be implemented to mitigate the distribution system-level impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Finally, the main issues that need to be addressed to ease the interconnection of large PV systems to the distribution system are presented.

  7. A hybrid life-cycle inventory for multi-crystalline silicon PV module manufacturing in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Chang, Yuan; Masanet, Eric

    2014-11-01

    China is the world’s largest manufacturer of multi-crystalline silicon photovoltaic (mc-Si PV) modules, which is a key enabling technology in the global transition to renewable electric power systems. This study presents a hybrid life-cycle inventory (LCI) of Chinese mc-Si PV modules, which fills a critical knowledge gap on the environmental implications of mc-Si PV module manufacturing in China. The hybrid LCI approach combines process-based LCI data for module and poly-silicon manufacturing plants with a 2007 China IO-LCI model for production of raw material and fuel inputs to estimate ‘cradle to gate’ primary energy use, water consumption, and major air pollutant emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen oxides). Results suggest that mc-Si PV modules from China may come with higher environmental burdens that one might estimate if one were using LCI results for mc-Si PV modules manufactured elsewhere. These higher burdens can be reasonably explained by the efficiency differences in China’s poly-silicon manufacturing processes, the country’s dependence on highly polluting coal-fired electricity, and the expanded system boundaries associated with the hybrid LCI modeling framework. The results should be useful for establishing more conservative ranges on the potential ‘cradle to gate’ impacts of mc-Si PV module manufacturing for more robust LCAs of PV deployment scenarios.

  8. The Economic Value of PV and Net Metering to Residential Customers in California

    SciTech Connect

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2010-05-17

    In this paper, we analyze the bill savings from PV for residential customers of the California's two largest electric utilities, under existing net metering tariffs as well as under several alternative compensation mechanisms. We find that economic value of PV to the customer is dependent on the structure of the underlying retail electricity rate and can vary quite significantly from one customer to another. In addition, we find that the value of the bill savings from PV generally declines with PV penetration level, as increased PV generation tends to offset lower-priced usage. Customers in our sample from both utilities are significantly better off with net metering than with a feed-in tariff where all PV generation is compensated at long-run avoided generation supply costs. Other compensation schemeswhich allow customers to displace their consumption with PV generation within each hour or each month, and are also based on the avoided costs, yield similar value to the customer as net metering.

  9. Integration, Validation, and Application of a PV Snow Coverage Model in SAM

    SciTech Connect

    Ryberg, David; Freeman, Janine

    2015-09-01

    Due to the increasing deployment of PV systems in snowy climates, there is significant interest in a method capable of estimating PV losses resulting from snow coverage that has been verified for a wide variety of system designs and locations. A scattering of independent snow coverage models have been developed over the last 15 years; however, there has been very little effort spent on verifying these models beyond the system design and location on which they were based. Moreover, none of the major PV modeling software products have incorporated any of these models into their workflow. In response to this deficiency, we have integrated the methodology of the snow model developed in the paper by Marion et al. [1] into the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) System Advisor Model (SAM). In this work we describe how the snow model is implemented in SAM and discuss our demonstration of the model's effectiveness at reducing error in annual estimations for two PV arrays. Following this, we use this new functionality in conjunction with a long term historical dataset to estimate average snow losses across the United States for a typical PV system design. The open availability of the snow loss estimation capability in SAM to the PV modeling community, coupled with our results of the nation-wide study, will better equip the industry to accurately estimate PV energy production in areas affected by snowfall.

  10. Moving Toward Quantifying Reliability - The Next Step in a Rapidly Maturing PV Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Sarah; Sample, Tony; Wohlgemuth, John; Zhou, Wei; Bosco, Nick; Althaus, Joerg; Phillips, Nancy; Deceglie, Michael; Flueckiger, Chris; Hacke, Peter; Miller, David; Kempe, Michael; Yamamichi, Masaaki; Kondo, Michio

    2015-06-14

    Some may say that PV modules are moving toward being a simple commodity, but most major PV customers ask: 'How can I minimize chances of a module recall?' Or, 'How can I quantify the added value of a 'premium' module?' Or, 'How can I assess the value of an old PV system that I'm thinking of purchasing?' These are all questions that PVQAT (the International PV Quality Assurance Task Force) and partner organizations are working to answer. Defining standard methods for ensuring minimal acceptable quality of PV modules, differentiating modules that provide added value in the toughest of environments, and creating a process (e.g. through IECRE [1]) that can follow a PV system from design through installation and operation are tough tasks, but having standard approaches for these will increase confidence, reduce costs, and be a critical foundation of a mature PV industry. This paper summarizes current needs for new tests, some challenges for defining those tests, and some of the key efforts toward development of international standards, emphasizing that meaningful quantification of reliability (as in defining a service life prediction) must be done in the context of a specific product with design parameters defined through a quality management system.

  11. Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote Performance: A Reviewof Current Practice in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-10-06

    In the U.S., the increasing financial support for customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems provided through publicly-funded incentive programs has heightened concerns about the long-term performance of these systems. Given the barriers that customers face to ensuring that their PV systems perform well, and the responsibility that PV incentive programs bear to ensure that public funds are prudently spent, these programs should, and often do, play a critical role in addressing PV system performance. To provide a point of reference for assessing the current state of the art, and to inform program design efforts going forward, we examine the approaches to encouraging PV system performance used by 32 prominent PV incentive programs in the U.S. We identify eight general strategies or groups of related strategies that these programs have used to address factors that affect performance, and describe key implementation details. Based on this review, we then offer recommendations for how PV incentive programs can be effectively designed to mitigate potential performance issues.

  12. Experimental Performance Investigation of Photovoltaic/Thermal (PV-T) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgoren, M.; Aksoy, M. H.; Bakir, C.; Dogan, S.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic solar cells convert light energy from the sun into electricity. Photovoltaic cells are produced by semi-conducting materials to convert the energy into electricity and during this process heat is absorbed by the solar radiation. This heat causes a loss of electricity generation efficiencies.In this study, an experimental setup was designed and established to test two separate photovoltaic panel systems with alone PV and with water cooling system PV/T to examine the heat effect on PV systems. The absorbed heat energy behind the photovoltaic cell's surface in insulated ambient was removed by means of a water cooling system and the tests for both systems were simultaneously performed along the July 2011. It is found that without active water cooling, the temperature of the PV module was higher during day time and solar cells could only achieve around 8% conversion efficiency. On the other hand, when the PV module was operated with active water cooling condition, the temperature dropped significantly, leading to an increase in the efficiency of solarcells as much as 13.6%. Gained from absorbed solar heat and maximum thermal conversion efficiencies of the system are determined as 49% and 51% for two different mass flow rates. It is observed that water flow rate is effective on the increasing the conversion efficiency as well as absorption and transitionrates of cover glass in PV/T (PV-Thermal) collector, the insulation material and cell efficiency. As a conclusion, the conversion efficiency of the PV system with water cooling might be improved on average about 10%. Therefore, it is recommended that PV system should be designed with most efficient type cooling system to enhance the efficiency and to decrease the payback period.

  13. Reconciling Consumer and Utility Objectives in the Residential Solar PV Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michael R.

    Today's energy market is facing large-scale changes that will affect all market players. Near the top of that list is the rapid deployment of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Yet that growing trend will be influenced multiple competing interests between various stakeholders, namely the utility, consumers and technology provides. This study provides a series of analyses---utility-side, consumer-side, and combined analyses---to understand and evaluate the effect of increases in residential solar PV market penetration. Three urban regions have been selected as study locations---Chicago, Phoenix, Seattle---with simulated load data and solar insolation data at each locality. Various time-of-use pricing schedules are investigated, and the effect of net metering is evaluated to determine the optimal capacity of solar PV and battery storage in a typical residential home. The net residential load profile is scaled to assess system-wide technical and economic figures of merit for the utility with an emphasis on intraday load profiles, ramp rates and electricity sales with increasing solar PV penetration. The combined analysis evaluates the least-cost solar PV system for the consumer and models the associated system-wide effects on the electric grid. Utility revenue was found to drop by 1.2% for every percent PV penetration increase, net metering on a monthly or annual basis improved the cost-effectiveness of solar PV but not battery storage, the removal of net metering policy and usage of an improved the cost-effectiveness of battery storage and increases in solar PV penetration reduced the system load factor. As expected, Phoenix had the most favorable economic scenario for residential solar PV, primarily due to high solar insolation. The study location---solar insolation and load profile---was also found to affect the time of year at which the largest net negative system load was realized.

  14. Establishment of an in vitro equine papillomavirus type 2 (EcPV2) neutralization assay and a VLP-based vaccine for protection of equids against EcPV2-associated genital tumors.

    PubMed

    Schellenbacher, Christina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Huber, Bettina; Fink, Dieter; Brandt, Sabine; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    The consistent and specific presence of Equus caballus papillomavirus type 2 (EcPV2) DNA and mRNA in equine genital squamous cell carcinoma (gSCC) is suggestive of an etiological role in tumor development. To further validate this concept, EcPV2-neutralizing serum antibody titers were determined by an EcPV2 pseudovirion (PsV) neutralization assay. Furthermore, an EcPV2 L1 virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccine was generated and its prophylactic efficacy evaluated in vivo. All 6/6 gSCC-affected, but only 3/20 tumor-free age-matched animals revealed EcPV2-neutralizing serum antibody titers by PsV assay. Vaccination of NZW rabbits and BalbC mice with EcPV2 L1 VLP using Freund׳s or alum respectively as adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing serum antibodies (1600-12,800). Passive transfer with rabbit EcPV2-VLP immune sera completely protected mice from experimental vaginal EcPV2 PsV infection. These findings support the impact of EcPV2 in equine gSCC development and recommend EcPV2 L1 VLP as prophylactic vaccine against EcPV2 infection and associated disease in equids.

  15. Establishment of an in vitro equine papillomavirus type 2 (EcPV2) neutralization assay and a VLP-based vaccine for protection of equids against EcPV2-associated genital tumors.

    PubMed

    Schellenbacher, Christina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Huber, Bettina; Fink, Dieter; Brandt, Sabine; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    The consistent and specific presence of Equus caballus papillomavirus type 2 (EcPV2) DNA and mRNA in equine genital squamous cell carcinoma (gSCC) is suggestive of an etiological role in tumor development. To further validate this concept, EcPV2-neutralizing serum antibody titers were determined by an EcPV2 pseudovirion (PsV) neutralization assay. Furthermore, an EcPV2 L1 virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccine was generated and its prophylactic efficacy evaluated in vivo. All 6/6 gSCC-affected, but only 3/20 tumor-free age-matched animals revealed EcPV2-neutralizing serum antibody titers by PsV assay. Vaccination of NZW rabbits and BalbC mice with EcPV2 L1 VLP using Freund׳s or alum respectively as adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing serum antibodies (1600-12,800). Passive transfer with rabbit EcPV2-VLP immune sera completely protected mice from experimental vaginal EcPV2 PsV infection. These findings support the impact of EcPV2 in equine gSCC development and recommend EcPV2 L1 VLP as prophylactic vaccine against EcPV2 infection and associated disease in equids. PMID:26519597

  16. Analysis of new type III effectors from Xanthomonas uncovers XopB and XopS as suppressors of plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Sebastian; Kay, Sabine; Büttner, Daniela; Egler, Monique; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Hause, Gerd; Krüger, Antje; Lee, Justin; Müller, Oliver; Scheel, Dierk; Szczesny, Robert; Thieme, Frank; Bonas, Ulla

    2012-09-01

    The pathogenicity of the Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) is dependent on type III effectors (T3Es) that are injected into plant cells by a type III secretion system and interfere with cellular processes to the benefit of the pathogen. In this study, we analyzed eight T3Es from Xcv strain 85-10, six of which were newly identified effectors. Genetic studies and protoplast expression assays revealed that XopB and XopS contribute to disease symptoms and bacterial growth, and suppress pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered plant defense gene expression. In addition, XopB inhibits cell death reactions induced by different T3Es, thus suppressing defense responses related to both PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI). XopB localizes to the Golgi apparatus and cytoplasm of the plant cell and interferes with eukaryotic vesicle trafficking. Interestingly, a XopB point mutant derivative was defective in the suppression of ETI-related responses, but still interfered with vesicle trafficking and was only slightly affected with regard to the suppression of defense gene induction. This suggests that XopB-mediated suppression of PTI and ETI is dependent on different mechanisms that can be functionally separated. PMID:22738163

  17. Molecular and cellular control of cell death and defense signaling in pepper.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) provides a good experimental system for studying the molecular and functional genomics underlying the ability of plants to defend themselves against microbial pathogens. Cell death is a genetically programmed response that requires specific host cellular factors. Hypersensitive response (HR) is defined as rapid cell death in response to a pathogen attack. Pepper plants respond to pathogen attacks by activating genetically controlled HR- or disease-associated cell death. HR cell death, specifically in incompatible interactions between pepper and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, is mediated by the molecular genetics and biochemical machinery that underlie pathogen-induced cell death in plants. Gene expression profiles during the HR-like cell death response, virus-induced gene silencing and transient and transgenic overexpression approaches are used to isolate and identify HR- or disease-associated cell death genes in pepper plants. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, cytosolic calcium ion and defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and abscisic acid are involved in the execution of pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we summarize recent molecular and cellular studies of the pepper cell death-mediated defense response, highlighting the signaling events of cell death in disease-resistant pepper plants. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cellular functions of pepper cell death response genes will aid the development of novel practical approaches to enhance disease resistance in pepper, thereby helping to secure the future supply of safe and nutritious pepper plants worldwide.

  18. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis grown in xylem mimicking medium.

    PubMed

    Hiery, Eva; Adam, Susanne; Reid, Stephen; Hofmann, Jörg; Sonnewald, Sophia; Burkovski, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis with its host, the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum), is poorly understood and only few virulence factors are known. While studying of the bacteria in planta is time-consuming and difficult, the analysis in vitro would facilitate research. Therefore, a xylem mimicking medium (XMM) for C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis was established in this study based on an apoplast medium for Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. In contrast to the apoplast medium, XMM contains no sugars, but amino acids which serve as nitrogen and carbon source. As a result, growth in XMM induced transcriptional changes of genes encoding putative sugar, amino acid and iron uptake systems. In summary, mRNA levels of about 8% of all C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis genes were changed when XMM-grown bacteria were compared to M9 minimal medium-grown cells. Almost no transcriptional changes of genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes were detected, leading to the idea that XMM reflects the situation in the beginning of infection and therefore allows the characterization of virulence factors in this early stage of infection. The addition of the plant wound substance acetosyringone to the XMM medium led to a change in transcript amount, including genes coding for proteins involved in protein transport, iron uptake and regulation processes.

  19. Type III secretion and in planta recognition of the Xanthomonas avirulence proteins AvrBs1 and AvrBsT.

    PubMed

    Escolar, L; Van Den Ackerveken, G; Pieplow, S; Rossier, O; Bonas, U

    2001-09-01

    summary The hrp gene cluster of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) encodes a type III secretion system required for the delivery of virulence and avirulence proteins into the plant. Some of these effector proteins, e.g. AvrBs1 and AvrBsT, are recognized by pepper plants carrying corresponding resistance genes, triggering the hypersensitive reaction (HR). In this study, epitope tagged AvrBs1 and AvrBsT proteins were detected in culture supernatants only in the presence of a functional type III apparatus and not in a hrcV mutant, showing that both proteins are secreted by Xcv in an hrp-dependent manner. Expression of both avirulence genes is constitutive and independent of the hrp gene regulators, hrpG and hrpX. Transient expression of avrBs1 and avrBsT in resistant host plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer resulted in the induction of a specific HR. This indicates that recognition occurs intracellularly, and suggests that during the Xcv infection, AvrBs1 and AvrBsT are translocated from Xcv into the plant cell. We describe a conserved protein motif which is present in the N-terminal region of all known Xcv avirulence proteins and discuss its potential role in translocation into plant cells. PMID:20573017

  20. SseF, a type III effector protein from the mammalian pathogen Salmonella enterica, requires resistance-gene-mediated signalling to activate cell death in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ustün, Suayib; Müller, Petra; Palmisano, Ralf; Hensel, Michael; Börnke, Frederik

    2012-06-01

    Type III effector proteins (T3Es) of many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria manipulate highly conserved cellular processes, indicating conservation in virulence mechanisms during the infection of hosts of divergent evolutionary origin. In order to identify conserved effector functions, we used a cross-kingdom approach in which we expressed selected T3Es from the mammalian pathogen Salmonella enterica in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana and searched for possible virulence or avirulence phenotypes. We show that the T3E SseF of S. enterica triggers hypersensitive response (HR)-like symptoms, a hallmark of effector-triggered immunity in plants, either when transiently expressed in leaves of N. benthamiana by Agrobacterium tumefaciens infiltration or when delivered by Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) through the type III secretion system. The ability of SseF to elicit HR-like symptoms was lost upon silencing of suppressor of G2 allele of skp1 (SGT1), indicating that the S. enterica T3E is probably recognized by an R protein in N. benthamiana. Xcv translocating an AvrRpt2-SseF fusion protein was restricted in multiplication within leaves of N. benthamiana. Bacterial growth was not impaired but symptom development was rather accelerated in a compatible interaction with susceptible pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants. We conclude that the S. enterica T3E SseF is probably recognized by the plant immune system in N. benthamiana, resulting in effector-triggered immunity. PMID:22471508