Science.gov

Sample records for cancer brain metastases

  1. Lung Cancer Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sarah B; Contessa, Joseph N; Omay, Sacit B; Chiang, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are common among patients with lung cancer and have been associated with significant morbidity and limited survival. However, the treatment of brain metastases has evolved as the field has advanced in terms of central nervous system imaging, surgical technique, and radiotherapy technology. This has allowed patients to receive improved treatment with less toxicity and more durable benefit. In addition, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy for lung cancer in recent years, and several treatments including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy exhibit activity in the central nervous system. Utilizing systemic therapy for treating brain metastases can avoid or delay local therapy and often allows patients to receive effective treatment for both intracranial and extracranial disease. Determining the appropriate treatment for patients with lung cancer brain metastases therefore requires a clear understanding of intracranial disease burden, tumor histology, molecular characteristics, and overall cancer prognosis. This review provides updates on the current state of surgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases, as well as an overview of systemic therapy options that may be effective in select patients with intracranial metastases from lung cancer.

  2. Brain metastases of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Smith, Quentin R; Lockman, Paul R; Bronder, Julie; Gril, Brunilde; Chambers, Ann F; Weil, Robert J; Steeg, Patricia S

    Central nervous system or brain metastases traditionally occur in 10-16% of metastatic breast cancer patients and are associated with a dismal prognosis. The development of brain metastases has been associated with young age, and tumors that are estrogen receptor negative, Her-2+ or of the basal phenotype. Treatment typically includes whole brain irradiation, or either stereotactic radiosurgery or surgery with whole brain radiation, resulting in an approximately 20% one year survival. The blood-brain barrier is a formidable obstacle to the delivery of chemotherapeutics to the brain. Mouse experimental metastasis model systems have been developed for brain metastasis using selected sublines of human MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells. Using micron sized iron particles and MRI imaging, the fate of MDA-MB-231BR cells has been mapped: Approximately 2% of injected cells form larger macroscopic metastases, while 5% of cells remain as dormant cells in the brain. New therapies with permeability for the blood-brain barrier are needed to counteract both types of tumor cells. PMID:17473372

  3. Brain metastases from breast cancer during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashish; Nguyen, Ha Son; Lozen, Andrew; Sharma, Abhishiek; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain metastasis during pregnancy is a rare occurrence. In particular, there have only been three prior cases regarding breast cancer metastasis. We report a patient with breast cancer metastasis to the brain during pregnancy and review the literature. Case Description: The patient was a 35-year-old female with a history of breast cancer (estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor negative, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu positive, status post-neoadjuvant docetaxel/carboplatin/trastuzumab/pertuzumab therapy, status post-bilateral mastectomies), and prior right frontal brain metastases (status post-resection, capecitabine/lapatinib/temozolomide therapy, and cyberknife treatment). Patient was found to be pregnant at 9 weeks’ gestation while on chemotherapy; the patient elected to continue with the pregnancy and chemotherapy was discontinued. At 14 weeks’ gestation, she returned with recurrent right frontal disease. She was taken for a craniotomy at 16 weeks’ gestation, which confirmed metastases. Six weeks later, patient returned with worsening headaches and fatigue, with more recurrent right frontal disease. She was started on decadron and chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, adriamycin, and cyclophosphamide). Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated enlarging right frontal lesions. She underwent a craniotomy at 27 weeks’ gestation, and chemotherapy was discontinued promptly. Starting at 30 weeks’ gestation, she received whole brain radiation for 2 weeks. Subsequently, she delivered a baby girl via cesarean section at 32 weeks’ gestation. At 6 weeks follow-up, an MRI brain demonstrated no new intracranial disease, with stable postoperative findings. Conclusion: There is a lack of guidelines and clinical consensus on medical and surgical treatment for breast cancer metastases in pregnant patients. Treatment usually varies based upon underlying tumor burden, location, gestational age of the fetus, and patient's preference and

  4. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Primary Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kased, Norbert; Binder, Devin K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Nakamura, Jean L.; Huang, Kim; Berger, Mitchel S.; Wara, William M.; Sneed, Penny K.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The relative roles of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) vs. whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in the treatment of patients with brain metastases from breast cancer remain undefined. In this study, we reviewed our experience with these patients. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients treated between 1991 and 2005 with Gamma Knife SRS for brain metastases from breast cancer. The actuarial survival and freedom from progression endpoints were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Between 1991 and 2005, 176 patients underwent SRS for brain metastases from breast cancer. The median survival time was 16.0 months for 95 newly diagnosed patients and 11.7 months for 81 patients with recurrent brain metastases. In the newly diagnosed patients, omission of upfront WBRT did not significantly affect the MST (p = .20), brain freedom from progression (p = .75), or freedom from new brain metastases (p = .83). Longer survival was associated with age <50 years, Karnofsky performance score >=70, primary tumor control, estrogen receptor positivity, and Her2/neu overexpression. No association was found between the number of treated brain metastases and the survival time. Conclusion: We have described prognostic factors for breast cancer patients treated with SRS for newly diagnosed or recurrent brain metastases. Most patient subsets had a median survival time of >=11 months. Unexpectedly, upfront WBRT did not appear to improve brain freedom from progression, and a larger number of brain metastases was not associated with a shorter survival time. Breast cancer might be distinct from other primary sites in terms of prognostic factors and the roles of WBRT and SRS for brain metastases.

  5. Brain metastases free survival differs between breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, A; Bago-Horvath, Z; De Vries, C; Dubsky, P; Pluschnig, U; Rudas, M; Rottenfusser, A; Knauer, M; Eiter, H; Fitzal, F; Dieckmann, K; Mader, R M; Gnant, M; Zielinski, C C; Steger, G G; Preusser, M; Bartsch, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases (BM) are frequently diagnosed in patients with HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer; in addition, an increasing incidence was reported for triple-negative tumours. We aimed to compare brain metastases free survival (BMFS) of breast cancer subtypes in patients treated between 1996 until 2010. Methods: Brain metastases free survival was measured as the interval from diagnosis of extracranial breast cancer metastases until diagnosis of BM. HER-2 status was analysed by immunohistochemistry and reanalysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation if a score of 2+ was gained. Oestrogen-receptor (ER) and progesterone-receptor (PgR) status was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Brain metastases free survival curves were estimated with the Kaplan–Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: Data of 213 patients (46 luminal/124 HER-2/43 triple-negative subtype) with BM from breast cancer were available for the analysis. Brain metastases free survival differed significantly between breast cancer subtypes. Median BMFS in triple-negative tumours was 14 months (95% CI: 11.34–16.66) compared with 18 months (95% CI: 14.46–21.54) in HER-2-positive tumours (P=0.001) and 34 months (95% CI: 23.71–44.29) in luminal tumours (P=0.001), respectively. In HER-2-positive patients, co-positivity for ER and HER-2 prolonged BMFS (26 vs 15 m; P=0.033); in luminal tumours, co-expression of ER and PgR was not significantly associated with BMFS. Brain metastases free survival in patients with lung metastases was significantly shorter (17 vs 21 months; P=0.014). Conclusion: Brain metastases free survival in triple-negative breast cancer, as well as in HER-2-positive/ER-negative, is significantly shorter compared with HER-2/ER co-positive or luminal tumours, mirroring the aggressiveness of these breast cancer subtypes. PMID:22233926

  6. Breast cancer brain metastases: new directions in systemic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Nancy U

    2013-01-01

    The management of patients with brain metastases from breast cancer continues to be a major clinical challenge. The standard initial therapeutic approach depends upon the size, location, and number of metastatic lesions and includes consideration of surgical resection, whole-brain radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. As systemic therapies for control of extracranial disease improve, patients are surviving long enough to experience subsequent progression events in the brain. Therefore, there is an increasing need to identify both more effective initial treatments as well as to develop multiple lines of salvage treatments for patients with breast cancer brain metastases. This review summarises the clinical experience to date with respect to cytotoxic and targeted systemic therapies for the treatment of brain metastases, highlights ongoing and planned trials of novel approaches and identifies potential targets for future investigation. PMID:23662165

  7. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Venur, Vyshak Alva; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6) pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%-30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways.

  8. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venur, Vyshak Alva; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6) pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%–30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways. PMID:27649142

  9. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Venur, Vyshak Alva; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6) pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%-30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways. PMID:27649142

  10. [Brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Brennum, Jannick; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Roed, Henrik Michael H

    2002-07-01

    The incidence of symptomatic brain metastases in Denmark is about 3500. In the present review, the aetiology, symptomatology, and diagnostic procedures are described. The main topic is a review of current treatments and the evidence for their efficacy. Treatment of brain metastases rarely cures the patient, the goal is rather to improve the quality of life and prolong survival. Without treatment, the median survival following diagnosis of brain metastases is about one month, with steroid treatment two months, with whole brain irradiation four to six months, and after surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery 10-12 months. A relatively simple treatment scheme based on the number of brain metastases and the overall condition of the patient is provided.

  11. [Advances in Bevacizumab Therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastases].

    PubMed

    Qu, Liyan; Geng, Rui; Song, Xia

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastases are frequently encountered in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Antiangiogenesis therapy plays a major role in the management of brain metastases in lung cancer. Bevacizumab have become the novel method for the treatment of lung cancer with brain metastases beyond the whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and chemotherapy. Recently, more and more studies and trials laid emphasis on the bevacizumab for NSCLC with brain metastases treatment. The key point is the efficacy and safety. In this review, bevacizumab therapy of NSCLC with brain metastases were summarized. PMID:27561800

  12. Breast cancer brain metastases: biology and new clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Witzel, Isabell; Oliveira-Ferrer, Leticia; Pantel, Klaus; Müller, Volkmar; Wikman, Harriet

    2016-01-19

    Because of improvements in the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer, the development of brain metastases (BM) has become a major limitation of life expectancy and quality of life for many breast cancer patients. The improvement of management strategies for BM is thus an important clinical challenge, especially among high-risk patients such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive and triple-negative patients. However, the formation of BM as a multistep process is thus far poorly understood. To grow in the brain, single tumor cells must pass through the tight blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB represents an obstacle for circulating tumor cells entering the brain, but it also plays a protective role against immune cell and toxic agents once metastatic cells have colonized the cerebral compartment. Furthermore, animal studies have shown that, after passing the BBB, the tumor cells not only require close contact with endothelial cells but also interact closely with many different brain residential cells. Thus, in addition to a genetic predisposition of the tumor cells, cellular adaptation processes within the new microenvironment may also determine the ability of a tumor cell to metastasize. In this review, we summarize the biology of breast cancer that has spread into the brain and discuss the implications for current and potential future treatment strategies.

  13. Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ajay; Kano, Hideyuki; Khan, Aftab; Kim, In-Young; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the role of Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery in the multidisciplinary management of brain metastases from an undiagnosed primary cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients who had solitary or multiple brain metastases without a detectable primary site underwent stereotactic radiosurgery between January 1990 and March 2007 at the University of Pittsburgh. The median patient age was 61.7 years (range, 37.9-78.7 years). The median target volume was 1.0 cc (range, 0.02-23.6 cc), and the median margin radiosurgical dose was 16 Gy (range, 20-70 Gy). Results: After radiosurgery, the local tumor control rate was 88.5%. Twenty four patients died and 5 patients were living at the time of this analysis. The overall median survival was 12 months. Actuarial survival rates from stereotactic radiosurgery at 1 and 2 years were 57.2% and 36.8%, respectively. Factors associated with poor progression-free survival included large tumor volume (3 cc or more) and brainstem tumor location. Conclusions: Radiosurgery is an effective and safe minimally invasive option for patients with brain metastases from an unknown primary site.

  14. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC) Registry.

    PubMed

    Laakmann, Elena; Witzel, Isabell; Scriba, Verena; Grzyska, Ulrich; Zu Eulenburg, Christine; Burchardi, Nicole; Hesse, Tobias; Würschmidt, Florian; Fehm, Tanja; Möbus, Volker; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Loibl, Sibylle; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Mueller, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BMs) were collected retrospectively in four centers participating in the Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Registry (BMBC) in Germany. Patients with positive estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) statuses, had a significantly lower number of BMs at diagnosis. Concerning the treatment mode, HER2-positive patients treated with trastuzumab before the diagnosis of BMs showed a lower number of intracranial metastases (p < 0.001). Patients with a HER2-positive tumor-subtype developed cerebellar metastases more often compared with HER2-negative patients (59.8% vs. 44.5%, p = 0.021), whereas patients with triple-negative primary tumors had leptomeningeal disease more often (31.4% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.038). The localization of Brain metastases (BMs) was associated with prognosis: patients with leptomeningeal disease had shorter survival compared with patients without signs of leptomeningeal disease (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.025). A shorter survival could also be observed in the patients with metastases in the occipital lobe (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.012). Our findings suggest a different tumor cell homing to different brain regions depending on subtype and treatment. PMID:27669228

  15. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC) Registry.

    PubMed

    Laakmann, Elena; Witzel, Isabell; Scriba, Verena; Grzyska, Ulrich; Zu Eulenburg, Christine; Burchardi, Nicole; Hesse, Tobias; Würschmidt, Florian; Fehm, Tanja; Möbus, Volker; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Loibl, Sibylle; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Mueller, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BMs) were collected retrospectively in four centers participating in the Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Registry (BMBC) in Germany. Patients with positive estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) statuses, had a significantly lower number of BMs at diagnosis. Concerning the treatment mode, HER2-positive patients treated with trastuzumab before the diagnosis of BMs showed a lower number of intracranial metastases (p < 0.001). Patients with a HER2-positive tumor-subtype developed cerebellar metastases more often compared with HER2-negative patients (59.8% vs. 44.5%, p = 0.021), whereas patients with triple-negative primary tumors had leptomeningeal disease more often (31.4% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.038). The localization of Brain metastases (BMs) was associated with prognosis: patients with leptomeningeal disease had shorter survival compared with patients without signs of leptomeningeal disease (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.025). A shorter survival could also be observed in the patients with metastases in the occipital lobe (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.012). Our findings suggest a different tumor cell homing to different brain regions depending on subtype and treatment.

  16. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC) Registry

    PubMed Central

    Laakmann, Elena; Witzel, Isabell; Scriba, Verena; Grzyska, Ulrich; zu Eulenburg, Christine; Burchardi, Nicole; Hesse, Tobias; Würschmidt, Florian; Fehm, Tanja; Möbus, Volker; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Loibl, Sibylle; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Mueller, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BMs) were collected retrospectively in four centers participating in the Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Registry (BMBC) in Germany. Patients with positive estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) statuses, had a significantly lower number of BMs at diagnosis. Concerning the treatment mode, HER2-positive patients treated with trastuzumab before the diagnosis of BMs showed a lower number of intracranial metastases (p < 0.001). Patients with a HER2-positive tumor-subtype developed cerebellar metastases more often compared with HER2-negative patients (59.8% vs. 44.5%, p = 0.021), whereas patients with triple-negative primary tumors had leptomeningeal disease more often (31.4% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.038). The localization of Brain metastases (BMs) was associated with prognosis: patients with leptomeningeal disease had shorter survival compared with patients without signs of leptomeningeal disease (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.025). A shorter survival could also be observed in the patients with metastases in the occipital lobe (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.012). Our findings suggest a different tumor cell homing to different brain regions depending on subtype and treatment. PMID:27669228

  17. Brain Metastases in Gastrointestinal Cancers: Is there a Role for Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Johannes; Scheele, Jan; Kapapa, Thomas; von Karstedt, Silvia; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Kornmann, Marko

    2014-01-01

    About 10% of all cancer patients will develop brain metastases during advanced disease progression. Interestingly, the vast majority of brain metastases occur in only three types of cancer: Melanoma, lung and breast cancer. In this review, we focus on summarizing the prognosis and impact of surgical resection of brain metastases originating from gastrointestinal cancers such as esophageal, gastric, pancreatic and colorectal cancer. The incidence of brain metastases is <1% in pancreatic and gastric cancer and <4% in esophageal and colorectal cancer. Overall, prognosis of these patients is very poor with a median survival in the range of only months. Interestingly, a substantial number of patients who had received surgical resection of brain metastases showed prolonged survival. However, it should be taken into account that all these studies were not randomized and it is likely that patients selected for surgical treatment presented with other important prognostic factors such as solitary brain metastases and exclusion of extra-cranial disease. Nevertheless, other reports have demonstrated long-term survival of patients upon resection of brain metastases originating from gastrointestinal cancers. Thus, it appears to be justified to consider aggressive surgical approaches for these patients. PMID:25247579

  18. ROS1 rearranged non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases respond to low dose radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Rimas V; Hasan, Yasmin; Nicholas, Martin K; Salgia, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    We present a young woman with ROS1 gene rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with brain metastases. ROS is a proto-oncogene tyrosine protein kinase. The patient received a partial course of whole brain radiation therapy and experienced a sustained partial response in the brain. We hypothesize that ROS1 rearranged NSCLC brain metastases may be particularly sensitive to radiation therapy.

  19. MicroRNAs Linked to Trastuzumab Resistance, Brain Metastases | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have tied increased levels of a microRNA (miRNA) to resistance to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) in women with HER2-positive breast cancer. Another research team has discovered a “signature” of miRNAs in brain metastases in patients with melanoma—a signature that is also present in the primary tumor and could identify melanoma patients at increased risk of brain metastases. |

  20. βIII-Tubulin Regulates Breast Cancer Metastases to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A.; Zhang, Lingjiao; Miska, Jason M.; Qiao, Jian; Kim, Julius W.; Pytel, Peter; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Lesniak, Maciej S.; Ahmed, Atique U.

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases occur in about 10–30% of breast cancer patients, which culminates in a poor prognosis. It is therefore critical to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying brain metastatic processes to identify relevant targets. We hypothesized that breast cancer cells must express brain-associated markers that would enable their invasion and survival in the brain microenvironment. We assessed a panel of brain-predominant markers and found an elevation of several neuronal markers (βIII tubulin, Nestin and AchE) in brain metastatic breast cancer cells. Among these neuronal predominant markers, in silico analysis revealed overexpression of βIII tubulin (TUBB3) in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) and its expression was significantly associated with distant metastases. TUBB3 knockdown studies were conducted in breast cancer models (MDA-Br, GLIM2 and MDA-MB-468) which revealed significant reduction in their invasive capabilities. MDA-Br cells with suppressed TUBB3 also demonstrated loss of key signaling molecules such as β3 integrin, pFAK, and pSrc in vitro. Furthermore, TUBB3 knockdown in a brain metastatic breast cancer cell line compromised its metastatic ability in vivo, and significantly improved survival in a brain metastasis model. These results implicate a critical role of TUBB3 in conferring brain metastatic potential to breast cancer cells. PMID:25724666

  1. βIII-Tubulin Regulates Breast Cancer Metastases to the Brain.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A; Zhang, Lingjiao; Miska, Jason M; Qiao, Jian; Kim, Julius W; Pytel, Peter; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Lesniak, Maciej S; Ahmed, Atique U

    2015-05-01

    Brain metastases occur in about 10% to 30% of breast cancer patients, which culminates in a poor prognosis. It is, therefore, critical to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying brain metastatic processes to identify relevant targets. We hypothesized that breast cancer cells must express brain-associated markers that would enable their invasion and survival in the brain microenvironment. We assessed a panel of brain-predominant markers and found an elevation of several neuronal markers (βIII-tubulin, Nestin, and AchE) in brain metastatic breast cancer cells. Among these neuronal predominant markers, in silico analysis revealed overexpression of βIII-tubulin (TUBB3) in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) and its expression was significantly associated with distant metastases. TUBB3 knockdown studies were conducted in breast cancer models (MDA-Br, GLIM2, and MDA-MB-468), which revealed significant reduction in their invasive capabilities. MDA-Br cells with suppressed TUBB3 also demonstrated loss of key signaling molecules such as β3 integrin, pFAK, and pSrc in vitro. Furthermore, TUBB3 knockdown in a brain metastatic breast cancer cell line compromised its metastatic ability in vivo, and significantly improved survival in a brain metastasis model. These results implicate a critical role of TUBB3 in conferring brain metastatic potential to breast cancer cells.

  2. [Brain metastases in breast cancer. Epidemiology and natural history. The Institut Curie experience].

    PubMed

    Gachet, Julie; Giroux, Julie; Girre, Véronique; Brain, Étienne; Kirova, Youlia; Mignot, Laurent; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Dutertre, Guillaume; Pouit, Bernard; Mosseri, Véronique; Falcou, Marie-Christine; Cottu, Paul H

    2011-04-01

    Breast cancer is the second cause for brain metastases. Their incidence is rising, partly due to the therapeutic improvements which alter the natural history of breast cancer. Predictive factors for brain metastases have been identified: HER2 oncogene overexpression, lack of expression of hormone receptors, young age and triple negative status. Brain metastases prognosis remains poor with a median survival shorter than 1 year, except for solitary lesions treated by surgery or radiosurgery. We have analysed two series of data from Institut Curie (Paris and Saint-Cloud). In women younger than 65 years, with HER2 negative breast carcinoma, median survival was 7.1 months. In women older than 65 years, median survival was 4 months.

  3. Breast cancer brain metastases: evidence for neuronal-like adaptation in a ‘breast-to-brain’ transition?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastases remain a significant challenge in the treatment of breast cancer patients due to the unique environment posed by the central nervous system. A better understanding of the biology of breast cancer cells that have metastasized to the brain is required to develop improved therapies. A recent Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences article demonstrates that breast cancer cells in the brain microenvironment express γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-related genes, enabling them to utilize GABA as an oncometabolite, thus gaining a proliferative advantage. In this viewpoint, we highlight these findings and their potential impact on the treatment of breast cancer brain metastases. PMID:25679873

  4. New Breast Cancer Recursive Partitioning Analysis Prognostic Index in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Niwinska, Anna; Murawska, Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to present a new breast cancer recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) prognostic index for patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases as a guide in clinical decision making. Methods and Materials: A prospectively collected group of 441 consecutive patients with breast cancer and brain metastases treated between the years 2003 and 2009 was assessed. Prognostic factors significant for univariate analysis were included into RPA. Results: Three prognostic classes of a new breast cancer RPA prognostic index were selected. The median survival of patients within prognostic Classes I, II, and III was 29, 9, and 2.4 months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Class I included patients with one or two brain metastases, without extracranial disease or with controlled extracranial disease, and with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) of 100. Class III included patients with multiple brain metastases with KPS of {<=}60. Class II included all other cases. Conclusions: The breast cancer RPA prognostic index is an easy and valuable tool for use in clinical practice. It can select patients who require aggressive treatment and those in whom whole-brain radiotherapy or symptomatic therapy is the most reasonable option. An individual approach is required for patients from prognostic Class II.

  5. Nearly Complete Response of Brain Metastases from HER2 Overexpressing Breast Cancer with Lapatinib and Capecitabine after Whole Brain Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Esin; Yersal, Özlem; Meydan, Nezih; Sağıroğlu, Mehmet; Uyanık, Ömer; Barutca, Sabri

    2013-01-01

    Trastuzumab treatment does not prevent intracranial seeding and is largely ineffective for established central nervous system metastasis in HER2 overexpressing breast cancer patients. Combination therapy of lapatinib and capecitabine may be an effective treatment option for brain metastasis of HER2-positive breast cancer. We report a patient with breast cancer overexpressing HER-2 where brain metastases were successfully treated with radiation and a combination of lapatinib and capecitabine. PMID:24191208

  6. Targeting brain metastases in ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Isabella; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Palmer, Joshua D; Mehra, Ranee; Lu, Bo

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of brain metastases has increased as a result of improved systemic control and advances in imaging. However, development of novel therapeutics with CNS activity has not advanced at the same rate. Research on molecular markers has revealed many potential targets for antineoplastic agents, and a particularly important aberration is translocation in the ALK gene, identified in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK inhibitors have shown systemic efficacy against ALK-rearranged NSCLC in many clinical trials, but the effectiveness of crizotinib in CNS disease is limited by poor blood-brain barrier penetration and acquired drug resistance. In this Review, we discuss potential pathways to target ALK-rearranged brain metastases, including next generation ALK inhibitors with greater CNS penetration and mechanisms to overcome resistance. Other important mechanisms to control CNS disease include targeting pathways downstream of ALK phosphorylation, increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, modifying the tumour microenvironment, and adding concurrent radiotherapy.

  7. Factors Predictive of Improved Survival in Patients With Brain Metastases From Gynecologic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gressel, Gregory M.; Lundsberg, Lisbet S.; Altwerger, Gary; Katchi, Tasleem; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E.; Ratner, Elena S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The reported incidence of brain metastasis from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), endometrial cancer (EC), and cervical cancer (CC) is exceedingly rare. As the long-term survival for patients with gynecologic cancer increases, there has been a corresponding increase in the number of diagnosed intracranial metastases. We seek to report our experience with managing brain metastatic disease (BMD) in patients with gynecologic cancer. Methods A retrospective review of all patients with EOC, EC, and CC at our institution revealed 47 patients with concurrent BMD between 2000 and 2013. Demographic data, risk factors, treatment modalities, progression-free data, and overall survival data were collected. Results Median survival time in patients with brain metastasis from EOC, EC, and CC was 9.0, 4.5, and 3.0 months, respectively. Two-year overall survival rates were 31.6%, 13.6%, and 0%, respectively. Patients received surgery, radiation therapy alone, palliative care, or radiation plus surgery. Radiation combined with surgical resection resulted in a significant hazards ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval, 0.15–0.86), compared with radiation alone. Conclusions Our report provides a large single-institution experience of brain metastases from gynecologic cancer. Patients with BMD have poor prognoses; however, treatment with multimodal therapy including surgical resection and radiation may prolong overall survival. PMID:26332394

  8. [Radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Antoni, D; Gaudaire-Josset, S; Feuvret, L; Tallet-Richard, A; Truc, G; Noël, G

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for brain metastases has become more multifaceted. Indeed, with the improvement of the patient's life expectancy, side effects must be undeniably avoided and the retreatments or multiple treatments are common. The cognitive side effects should be warned and the most modern techniques of radiation therapy are used regularly to reach this goal. The new classifications of patients with brain metastases help guiding treatment more appropriately. Stereotactic radiotherapy has supplanted whole brain radiation therapy both for patients with metastases in place and for those who underwent surgery. Hippocampus protection is possible with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Its relevance in terms of cognitive functioning should be more clearly demonstrated but the requirement, for using it, is increasingly strong. While addressing patients in palliative phase, the treatment of brain metastases is one of the localisations where technical thinking is the most challenging. PMID:27523410

  9. Isolated brain metastases as first site of recurrence in prostate cancer: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J.; Woulfe, J.; Sinclair, J.; Malone, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fewer than 2% of patients with metastatic prostate cancer (pca) develop brain metastases. Autopsy series have confirmed the rarity of brain metastases. When present, brain metastases occur in end stage, once the pca is castrate-resistant and spread to other sites is extensive. Here, we present a rare case of a patient with pca who developed a solitary parenchymal brain metastasis as first site of relapse 9 years after radical therapy. The patient underwent craniotomy and excision of the tumour. A second recurrence was also isolated to the brain. In the literature, pca patients with brain metastases have a poor mean survival of 1–7.6 months. The patient in our case report experienced a relatively favourable outcome, surviving 19 months after his initial brain relapse. PMID:26715888

  10. Impact of Triple-Negative Phenotype on Prognosis of Patients With Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiyuan; Schlesinger, David; Toulmin, Sushila; Rich, Tyvin; Sheehan, Jason

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To elucidate survival times and identify potential prognostic factors in patients with triple-negative (TN) phenotype who harbored brain metastases arising from breast cancer and who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 breast cancer patients with brain metastases were treated with SRS and then studied retrospectively. Twenty-four patients (23.3%) were TN. Survival times were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with a log-rank test computing the survival time difference between groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses to predict potential prognostic factors were performed using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results: The presence of TN phenotype was associated with worse survival times, including overall survival after the diagnosis of primary breast cancer (43 months vs. 82 months), neurologic survival after the diagnosis of intracranial metastases, and radiosurgical survival after SRS, with median survival times being 13 months vs. 25 months and 6 months vs. 16 months, respectively (p < 0.002 in all three comparisons). On multivariate analysis, radiosurgical survival benefit was associated with non-TN status and lower recursive partitioning analysis class at the initial SRS. Conclusion: The TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor with respect to overall survival, neurologic survival, and radiosurgical survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis. Recursive partitioning analysis class also served as an important and independent prognostic factor.

  11. Cytogenomic profiling of breast cancer brain metastases reveals potential for repurposing targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Dyson, Greg; Kruger, Adele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Choi, Lydia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-06-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases remain a significant clinical problem. Chemotherapy is ineffective and a lack of treatment options result in poor patient outcomes. Targeted therapeutics have proven to be highly effective in primary breast cancer, but lack of molecular genomic characterization of metastatic brain tumors is hindering the development of new treatment regimens. Here we contribute to fill this void by reporting on gene copy number variation (CNV) in 10 breast cancer metastatic brain tumors, assayed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Results were compared to a list of cancer genes verified by others to influence cancer. Cancer gene aberrations were identified in all specimens and pathway-level analysis was applied to aggregate data, which identified stem cell pluripotency pathway enrichment and highlighted recurring, significant amplification of SOX2, PIK3CA, NTRK1, GNAS, CTNNB1, and FGFR1. For a subset of the metastatic brain tumor samples (n = 4) we compared patient-matched primary breast cancer specimens. The results of our CGH analysis and validation by alternative methods indicate that oncogenic signals driving growth of metastatic tumors exist in the original cancer. This report contributes support for more rapid development of new treatments of metastatic brain tumors, the use of genomic-based diagnostic tools and repurposed drug treatments.

  12. [Whole Brain Irradiation and Hypo-fractionation Radiotherapy for the Metastases in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingting; Zhao, Yaqin; Xu, Feng

    2016-04-20

    Up to 40% non-small cell lung cancer patients developed brain metastasis during progression. Multiple brain metastases are common in non-small cell lung cancer. The prognosis of brain metastasis is poor with median survival of less than 1 year. Radio therapy for brain metastases has gradually developed from whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to various radiation strategies. WBRT, surgery+WBRT, stereotactic radiotherapy+WBRT or WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), etc. have better overall survival than those untreated patients. The damage of the cognitive function from WBRT has been realized recently, however, options of radiation strategies for long expected survival patients remain controversial. This paper will discuss different WBRT strategies and treatment side effects of non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases. PMID:27118651

  13. Phase II Etirinotecan Pegol in Refractory Brain Metastases & Advanced Lung Cancer / Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  14. Brain metastases as site of first and isolated recurrence of breast cancer: the role of systemic therapy after local treatment.

    PubMed

    Niwińska, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The role of systemic treatment was assessed after local therapy for breast cancer patients who developed central nervous system (CNS) metastases as a first and isolated recurrence. Subjects were 128 breast cancer patients with brain metastases as the first and isolated site of recurrence that were selected from 673 consecutive breast cancer patients with brain metastases treated at the same institution. Median survival from brain metastases in patients with and without systemic treatment after local therapy was respectively 15 and 4 months (p < 0.001). In patients with a Karnofsky Performance Status ≥70 and those <70, survival was respectively 16 and 5.5 months (p < 0.001). The median survival from brain metastasis in patients with solitary brain metastasis, with and without systemic treatment after local therapy, was respectively 22 and 7 months (p = 0.003). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that good performance status, solitary brain metastasis and systemic therapy undertaken after local treatment were factors which prolonged survival. However patient survival was adversely affected by those having leptomeningeal metastasis associated with brain parenchymal lesions. Systemic therapy, undertaken after local treatment improved survival in those patients with breast cancer and brain metastases as the site of first and isolated recurrence. Further study is required in order to fully establish the role of systemic treatment for this patient group.

  15. A Multidisciplinary Breast Cancer Brain Metastases Clinic: The University of North Carolina Experience

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Megan J.; Keith, Kevin; Deal, Allison M.; Garrett, Amy L.; Wheless, Amy A.; Green, Rebecca L.; Benbow, Julie M.; Dees, E. Claire; Carey, Lisa A.; Ewend, Matthew G.; Zagar, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer brain metastasis (BCBM) confers a poor prognosis and is unusual in requiring multidisciplinary care in the metastatic setting. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) has created a BCBM clinic to provide medical and radiation oncology, neurosurgical, and supportive services to this complex patient population. We describe organization and design of the clinic as well as characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of the patients seen in its first 3 years. Methods. Clinical and demographic data were collected from patients in a prospectively maintained database. Descriptive statistics are reported as percentages and means. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate time-to-event outcomes. Results. Sixty-five patients were seen between January 2012 and January 2015. At the time of presentation to the BCBM clinic, most patients (74%) had multiple (≥2) brain metastases and had received prior systemic (77%) and whole-brain radiation therapy and/or central nervous system stereotactic radiosurgery (65%) in the metastatic setting. Seventy-eight percent returned for a follow-up visit; 32% were enrolled in a clinical trial. Median time from diagnosis of brain metastasis to death was 2.11 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–2.47) for all patients, 1.15 years (95% CI 0.4–2.43) for triple-negative breast cancer, 1.31 years (95% CI 0.51–2.52) for hormone receptor-positive/HER2− breast cancer, and 3.03 years (95% CI lower limit 1.94, upper limit not estimable) for HER2+ breast cancer (p = .0037). Conclusion. Patients with BCBM have unique and complex needs that require input from several oncologic disciplines. The development of the UNC-CH multidisciplinary BCBM clinic is a model that can be adapted at other centers to provide coordinated care for patients with a challenging and complex disease. Implications for Practice: Patients with breast cancer brain metastases often require unique multidisciplinary care to meet the

  16. Systemic treatments for brain metastases from breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma and renal cell carcinoma: an overview of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Giuseppe; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Farina, Patrizia; Zagonel, Vittorina; Tabouret, Emeline

    2014-09-01

    The frequency of metastatic brain tumors has increased over recent years; the primary tumors most involved are breast cancer, lung cancer, melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. While radiation therapy and surgery remain the mainstay treatment in selected patients, new molecular drugs have been developed for brain metastases. Studies so far report interesting results. This review focuses on systemic cytotoxic drugs and, in particular, on new targeted therapies and their clinically relevant activities in brain metastases from solid tumors in adults.

  17. Longitudinal MRI Evaluation of Intracranial Development and Vascular Characteristics of Breast Cancer Brain Metastases in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Heling; Chen, Min; Zhao, Dawen

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal MRI was applied to monitor intracranial initiation and development of brain metastases and assess tumor vascular volume and permeability in a mouse model of breast cancer brain metastases. Using a 9.4T system, high resolution anatomic MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI were acquired at different time points after an intracardiac injection of brain-tropic breast cancer MDA-MB231BR-EGFP cells. Three weeks post injection, multifocal brain metastases were first observed with hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, but isointensity on T1-weighted post contrast images, indicating that blood-tumor-barrier (BTB) at early stage of brain metastases was impermeable. Follow-up MRI revealed intracranial tumor growth and increased number of metastases that distributed throughout the whole brain. At the last scan on week 5, T1-weighted post contrast images detected BTB disruption in 160 (34%) of a total of 464 brain metastases. Enhancement in some of the metastases was only seen in partial regions of the tumor, suggesting intratumoral heterogeneity of BTB disruption. DSC MRI measurements of relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) showed that rCBV of brain metastases was significantly lower (mean  = 0.89±0.03) than that of contralateral normal brain (mean  = 1.00±0.03; p<0.005). Intriguingly, longitudinal measurements revealed that rCBV of individual metastases at early stage was similar to, but became significantly lower than that of contralateral normal brain with tumor growth (p<0.05). The rCBV data were concordant with histological analysis of microvascular density (MVD). Moreover, comprehensive analysis suggested no significant correlation among tumor size, rCBV and BTB permeability. In conclusion, longitudinal MRI provides non-invasive in vivo assessments of spatial and temporal development of brain metastases and their vascular volume and permeability. The characteristic rCBV of brain metastases may have a diagnostic value. PMID

  18. Preliminary Results of Whole Brain Radiotherapy With Concurrent Trastuzumab for Treatment of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chargari, Cyrus; Idrissi, Hind Riahi; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Bollet, Marc A.; Dieras, Veronique; Campana, Francois; Cottu, Paul; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the use of trastuzumab concurrently with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2001 and April 2007, 31 patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer were referred for WBRT with concurrent trastuzumab. At brain progression, the median age was 55 years (range, 38-73), and all patients had a performance status of 0-2. The patients received trastuzumab 2 mg/kg weekly (n = 17) or 6 mg/kg repeated every 21 days (n = 14). In 26 patients, concurrent WBRT delivered 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. In 6 patients, other fractionations were chosen because of either poor performance status or patient convenience. Results: After WBRT, radiologic responses were observed in 23 patients (74.2%), including 6 (19.4%) with a complete radiologic response and 17 (54.8%) with a partial radiologic response. Clinical responses were observed in 27 patients (87.1%). The median survival time from the start of WBRT was 18 months (range, 2-65). The median interval to brain progression was 10.5 months (range, 2-27). No Grade 2 or greater acute toxicity was observed. Conclusion: The low toxicity of trastuzumab concurrently with WBRT should probably not justify delays. Although promising, these preliminary data warrant additional validation of trastuzumab as a potential radiosensitizer for WBRT in brain metastases from breast cancer in the setting of a clinical trial.

  19. Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer and Response to Treatment with Eribulin: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex Y; Ying, Xu Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are common in patients with advanced breast cancer (BC), causing considerable morbidity and mortality. Eribulin is a microtubule dynamics inhibitor approved for treating certain patients with metastatic BC, previously treated with an anthracycline and a taxane. In the 301 phase 3 study in 1102 women with advanced BC, eribulin and capecitabine treatments did not differ for co-primary endpoints (overall survival [OS]: 15.9 vs 14.5 months, P = 0.056; progression-free survival [PFS]: 4.1 vs 4.2 months, P = 0.30). Here, we report outcomes for six patients (eribulin, n = 3; capecitabine, n = 3) who had received treatment for brain metastases from BC (BCBM) at baseline. All eribulin-treated patients experienced brain lesion shrinkage at some point during treatment, compared with one capecitabine-treated patient. Fewer patients in study 301 developed new BCBM with eribulin (13/544, 2.4%) compared with capecitabine (25/546, 4.6%). Eribulin does not cross the healthy blood-brain barrier (BBB), but could have the potential to do so after cranial radiation therapy. Capecitabine may cross the BBB and has demonstrated activity in BCBM. Data from these patients and previous cases suggest that further investigation of eribulin for BCBM may be warranted. PMID:26052228

  20. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Patients With Brain Metastases From Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, Rodney E.; Olson, Adam C.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay; Lundsford, L. Dade; Flickinger, John C.

    2011-11-01

    Background: Patients with small-cell lung cancer have a high likelihood of developing brain metastases. Many of these patients will have prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) or eventually undergo whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Despite these treatments, a large number of these patients will have progression of their intracranial disease and require additional local therapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an important treatment option for such patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 44 patients with brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer treated with gamma knife SRS. Multivariate analysis was used to determine significant prognostic factors influencing survival. Results: The median follow-up from SRS in this patient population was 9 months (1-49 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 9 months after SRS. Karnofsky performance status (KPS) and combined treatment involving WBRT and SRS within 4 weeks were the two factors identified as being significant predictors of increased OS (p = 0.033 and 0.040, respectively). When comparing all patients, patients treated with a combined approach had a median OS of 14 months compared to 6 months if SRS was delivered alone. We also compared the OS times from the first definitive radiation: WBRT, WBRT and SRS if combined therapy was used, and SRS if the patient never received WBRT. The median survival for those groups was 12, 14, and 13 months, respectively, p = 0.19. Seventy percent of patients had follow-up magnetic resonance imaging available for review. Actuarial local control at 6 months and 12 months was 90% and 86%, respectively. Only 1 patient (2.2%) had symptomatic intracranial swelling related to treatment, which responded to a short course of steroids. New brain metastases outside of the treated area developed in 61% of patients at a median time of 7 months; 81% of these patients had received previous WBRT. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery for small-cell lung carcinoma

  1. Characterization of passive permeability at the blood-tumor barrier in five preclinical models of brain metastases of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Chris E; Mohammad, Afroz S; Terrell-Hall, Tori B; Dolan, Emma L; Shah, Neal; Sechrest, Emily; Griffith, Jessica; Lockman, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised in brain metastases, allowing for enhanced drug permeation into brain. The extent and heterogeneity of BBB permeability in metastatic lesions is important when considering the administration of chemotherapeutics. Since permeability characteristics have been described in limited experimental models of brain metastases, we sought to define these changes in five brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231BR (triple negative), MDA-MB-231BR-HER2, JIMT-1-BR3, 4T1-BR5 (murine), and SUM190 (inflammatory HER2 expressing). Permeability was assessed using quantitative autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy by co-administration of the tracers (14)C-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and Texas red conjugated dextran prior to euthanasia. Each experimental brain metastases model produced variably increased permeability to both tracers; additionally, the magnitude of heterogeneity was different among each model with the highest ranges observed in the SUM190 (up to 45-fold increase in AIB) and MDA-MB-231BR-HER2 (up to 33-fold in AIB) models while the lowest range was observed in the JIMT-1-BR3 (up to 5.5-fold in AIB) model. There was no strong correlation observed between lesion size and permeability in any of these preclinical models of brain metastases. Interestingly, the experimental models resulting in smaller mean metastases size resulted in shorter median survival while models producing larger lesions had longer median survival. These findings strengthen the evidence of heterogeneity in brain metastases of breast cancer by utilizing five unique experimental models and simultaneously emphasize the challenges of chemotherapeutic approaches to treat brain metastases. PMID:26944053

  2. Characterization of passive permeability at the blood-tumor barrier in five preclinical models of brain metastases of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Chris E; Mohammad, Afroz S; Terrell-Hall, Tori B; Dolan, Emma L; Shah, Neal; Sechrest, Emily; Griffith, Jessica; Lockman, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised in brain metastases, allowing for enhanced drug permeation into brain. The extent and heterogeneity of BBB permeability in metastatic lesions is important when considering the administration of chemotherapeutics. Since permeability characteristics have been described in limited experimental models of brain metastases, we sought to define these changes in five brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231BR (triple negative), MDA-MB-231BR-HER2, JIMT-1-BR3, 4T1-BR5 (murine), and SUM190 (inflammatory HER2 expressing). Permeability was assessed using quantitative autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy by co-administration of the tracers (14)C-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and Texas red conjugated dextran prior to euthanasia. Each experimental brain metastases model produced variably increased permeability to both tracers; additionally, the magnitude of heterogeneity was different among each model with the highest ranges observed in the SUM190 (up to 45-fold increase in AIB) and MDA-MB-231BR-HER2 (up to 33-fold in AIB) models while the lowest range was observed in the JIMT-1-BR3 (up to 5.5-fold in AIB) model. There was no strong correlation observed between lesion size and permeability in any of these preclinical models of brain metastases. Interestingly, the experimental models resulting in smaller mean metastases size resulted in shorter median survival while models producing larger lesions had longer median survival. These findings strengthen the evidence of heterogeneity in brain metastases of breast cancer by utilizing five unique experimental models and simultaneously emphasize the challenges of chemotherapeutic approaches to treat brain metastases.

  3. Unexpected detection of brain metastases by 18F-NaF PET/CT in a patient with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Zhu, Hong; Ji, Hengshan

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, the inconsistent supply of (99m)Tc and the increasingly widespread use of PET/CT have led to a renewed interest in PET/CT bone scans using (18)F-NaF. Recently, a 64-year-old man with biopsy-proven lung cancer underwent an (18)F-NaF PET/CT bone scan due to a shortage of (99m)Tc. Unexpectedly, multiple nodular foci of increased tracer uptake were present in the brain, whereas there were no definitive bone metastases detected. Subsequently, brain MRI confirmed the presence of brain metastases.

  4. Treatment of brain metastases of lung cancer in the era of precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Haughton, Michael E; Chan, Michael D; Watabe, Kounosuke; Bonomi, Marcelo; Debinski, Waldemar; Lesser, Glenn J; Ruiz, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    Common and deadly complications of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are brain metastases (BM). BM portends a poorer prognosis with limited effective treatment options and current management strategies present several challenges from iatrogenic complications of supportive medications, optimal delivery of drug across the blood-brain barrier, and preservation of neurocognitive function. Long term side effects and survivorship issues have become more evident in the era of targeted therapy where a systemic disease is much better controlled. Targeted therapies and immunotherapy are beginning to provide improvements in responses and survival rates. With further advancements and experience, our knowledge in this era of precision medicine will likely lead to strides in improving the quality of life and overall survival of patients with BM from NSCLC. In this review, we present the most recent updates in treatment of BM in NSCLC in regards to targeted and immunotherapy. PMID:26709658

  5. S100B and S100B autoantibody as biomarkers for early detection of brain metastases in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Puvenna, Vikram; Brennan, Chanda; Mahmoud, Shamseldeen; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Phillips, Michael; Janigro, Damir; Mazzone, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background S100B is an astrocytic protein that enters the blood stream when there is disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Over time, antibodies against S100B develop in the sera of patients who experience persistent or repeated BBB disruptions. We explored the use of serum S100B protein and S100B autoantibodies for the detection of brain metastasis in patients with lung cancer. Methods One hundred and twenty eight untreated patients with lung cancer who had brain imaging performed as part of their routine evaluation, participated. Serum S100B protein levels were measured by direct ELISA and S100B autoantibody levels by reverse ELISA. These levels in patients with brain metastases were compared alone and in combination to those without brain metastases. Results Eighteen (14%) patients had brain metastasis at the time of lung cancer diagnosis. An S100B cutoff of 0.058 ng/mL had a sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 43% for brain metastasis. When an autoantibody threshold of <2.00 absorbance units was used in conjunction with S100B, the sensitivity remained at 89%, and the specificity increased to 58%. The overall accuracy was 51% with S100B alone, improving to 62.5% when combined with autoantibodies. Conclusions Serum S100B and S100B autoantibody levels may help to identify which lung cancer patients have brain metastases. PMID:27652205

  6. S100B and S100B autoantibody as biomarkers for early detection of brain metastases in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Puvenna, Vikram; Brennan, Chanda; Mahmoud, Shamseldeen; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Phillips, Michael; Janigro, Damir; Mazzone, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background S100B is an astrocytic protein that enters the blood stream when there is disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Over time, antibodies against S100B develop in the sera of patients who experience persistent or repeated BBB disruptions. We explored the use of serum S100B protein and S100B autoantibodies for the detection of brain metastasis in patients with lung cancer. Methods One hundred and twenty eight untreated patients with lung cancer who had brain imaging performed as part of their routine evaluation, participated. Serum S100B protein levels were measured by direct ELISA and S100B autoantibody levels by reverse ELISA. These levels in patients with brain metastases were compared alone and in combination to those without brain metastases. Results Eighteen (14%) patients had brain metastasis at the time of lung cancer diagnosis. An S100B cutoff of 0.058 ng/mL had a sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 43% for brain metastasis. When an autoantibody threshold of <2.00 absorbance units was used in conjunction with S100B, the sensitivity remained at 89%, and the specificity increased to 58%. The overall accuracy was 51% with S100B alone, improving to 62.5% when combined with autoantibodies. Conclusions Serum S100B and S100B autoantibody levels may help to identify which lung cancer patients have brain metastases.

  7. Delayed leukoencephalopathy of non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases underwent whole brain radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoling; Huang, Biao; Feng, Jieying; Yang, Wanqun; Liu, Hongjun

    2015-10-01

    To explore the incidence, MR imaging findings, dynamic developing process of delayed leukoencephalopathy (DLE) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastases patients who undergone whole brain radiation (WBRT) therapy, we retrospectively reviewed 48 NSCLC patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from January 2010 through June 2015 and had evaluable magnetic resonance imaging after treatment. The DLE were graded using a scale to evaluate T2-FLAIR (fluid attenuated image recovery) images: grade 1 = little or no white matter hyperintensity, grade 2 = limited periventricular hyperintensity and grade 3 = diffuse white matter hyperintensity. 48 NSCLC patients with brain metastases were enrolled. The median age of these patients was 55.7 years (range 33-75 years). The median follow-up was 12 months. The characteristic MR imaging of DLE in those patients was bilaterally diffuse white matter T2 hyperintensity around the periventricular areas without enhancement, sparing from U-fiber, callosum and gray matter structure. The incidence of DLE developed 6.25% (3/48), 30.00% (12/40), 48.39% (15/31), 61.90% (13/21), 85.71% (6/7), 100% (3/3) in those patients who were followed up for 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36 months, respectively. Through increased understanding of it, it may be possible to help clinicians develop further therapeutic strategies to maximize benefit while limiting potential long term toxicities. These data supplement existing reports regarding the late effects of WBRT in NSCLC patients with brain metastasis.

  8. Breast cancer brain metastases responding to lapatinib plus capecitabine as second-line primary systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Elisabeth S; Berghoff, Anna S; Rudas, Margaretha; Preusser, Matthias; Bartsch, Rupert

    2015-06-01

    Brain metastases (BM) are diagnosed in up to 40% of HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Standard treatment includes local approaches such as whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), radiosurgery, and neurosurgery. The landscape trial established primary systemic therapy as an effective and safe alternative to WBRT in selected patients with Her2-positive BM. We aim to further focus on the role of systemic therapy in oligosymptomatic patients by presenting this case report. We report on a 50-year-old patient diagnosed with multiple BM 5 years after early breast cancer diagnosis. As the patient was asymptomatic and had a favorable diagnosis-specific GPA score, she received primary systemic treatment with T-DM1. She achieved partial remission within the brain for eight treatment cycles and then progressed despite stable extracranial disease. As the patient remained asymptomatic and refused WBRT, we decided upon trastuzumab, lapatinib plus capecitabine as second-line therapy. Another partial remission of BM was observed; to date, she has received 11 treatment cycles without any sign of disease progression. In this case, WBRT was delayed by at least 14 months, again indicating the activity of systemic treatment in BM. Apparently, in selected patients, BM can be controlled with multiple lines of systemic therapy similar to extracranial disease. Further investigation of systemic treatment approaches is therefore warranted.

  9. Diagnosis of Brain Metastases from Lung Cancer Using a Modified Electromagnetism like Mechanism Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Huang; Wang, Kung-Jeng; Adrian, Angelia Melani; Wang, Kung-Min; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are commonly found in patients that are diagnosed with primary malignancy on their lung. Lung cancer patients with brain metastasis tend to have a poor survivability, which is less than 6 months in median. Therefore, an early and effective detection system for such disease is needed to help prolong the patients' survivability and improved their quality of life. A modified electromagnetism-like mechanism (EM) algorithm, MEM-SVM, is proposed by combining EM algorithm with support vector machine (SVM) as the classifier and opposite sign test (OST) as the local search technique. The proposed method is applied to 44 UCI and IDA datasets, and 5 cancers microarray datasets as preliminary experiment. In addition, this method is tested on 4 lung cancer microarray public dataset. Further, we tested our method on a nationwide dataset of brain metastasis from lung cancer (BMLC) in Taiwan. Since the nature of real medical dataset to be highly imbalanced, the synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE) is utilized to handle this problem. The proposed method is compared against another 8 popular benchmark classifiers and feature selection methods. The performance evaluation is based on the accuracy and Kappa index. For the 44 UCI and IDA datasets and 5 cancer microarray datasets, a non-parametric statistical test confirmed that MEM-SVM outperformed the other methods. For the 4 lung cancer public microarray datasets, MEM-SVM still achieved the highest mean value for accuracy and Kappa index. Due to the imbalanced property on the real case of BMLC dataset, all methods achieve good accuracy without significance difference among the methods. However, on the balanced BMLC dataset, MEM-SVM appears to be the best method with higher accuracy and Kappa index. We successfully developed MEM-SVM to predict the occurrence of brain metastasis from lung cancer with the combination of SMOTE technique to handle the class imbalance properties. The results confirmed that MEM

  10. Pemetrexed/cisplatin as first-line chemotherapy for advanced lung cancer with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    He, Guangzhao; Xiao, Xiaoguang; Zou, Man; Zhang, Chengliang; Xia, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Brain metastases (BMs) are a common and serious complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), surgery, and molecular targeted therapy are usually used to treat NSCLC with BM. Chemotherapeutic options for BM are limited by tumor resistance, ineffective agents, and the blood–brain barrier. Pemetrexed/cisplatin is the preferred chemotherapy in nonsquamous NSCLC, but the efficacy of this treatment for nonsquamous NSCLC with BM is uncertain. Methods: We present a case of nonsquamous NSCLC with asymptomatic BM presenting with irritating cough and right shoulder back pain (unknown sensitizing epidermal growth factor receptor mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase). Results: He benefited from administration of first-line chemotherapy of pemetrexed/cisplatin. Partial remission was achieved in the primary lesion of the lungs and BM lesion. He was further given 3 cycles of pemetrexed monotherapy and WBRT. Complete remission was further achieved in BM lesion. Conclusion: The findings of clinical trials and theoretical studies about the current pemetrexed/cisplatin in the treatment of nonsquamous NSCLC with BM are also summarized to provide a reference for the application of pemetrexed/cisplatin in nonsquamous NSCLC with BM. Whether or not pemetrexed/cisplatin is definitely effective in nonsquamous NSCLC with BM must be proven by subsequent phase III clinical trials. PMID:27512852

  11. Human neural stem cells expressing carboxyl esterase target and inhibit tumor growth of lung cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Hong, S H; Lee, H J; An, J; Lim, I; Borlongan, C; Aboody, K S; Kim, S U

    2013-12-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) led to the development of a novel strategy for delivering therapeutic genes to brain tumors. Human NSCs expressing rabbit carboxyl esterase (F3.CE), which activates CPT-11, significantly inhibit the growth of A549 human non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma cells in the presence of CPT-11 in vitro and in vivo. F3.CE cells migrated selectively into the brain metastases located in the opposite hemisphere. The treatment also significantly decreased tumor volume in immune-deficient mice bearing lung cancer when F3.CE cells were transplanted into the contralateral hemisphere. The survival of tumor-bearing animals was significantly prolonged by the treatment with F3.CE and CPT-11. This strategy could be considered as an effective treatment regimen for lung cancer brain metastases.

  12. Symptoms and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases Following Palliative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jennifer; Hird, Amanda; Zhang Liying; Tsao, May; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth; Danjoux, Cyril; Chow, Edward

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To examine prospectively patient self-rated symptoms and quality of life (QOL) indicators in patients with brain metastases following whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with brain metastases referred for WBRT were approached for this study. Patients were asked to rate their symptoms and QOL using the Spitzer Quality of Life Index questionnaire. Follow-up was at 1, 2, and 3 months following WBRT. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the change in symptom severity over time. Results: Between August 2005 to October 2007, 129 patients with brain metastases were enrolled. The majority of patients (88%) received 20 Gy in five fractions. Median age was 64 years, and median Karnofsky Performance Status at baseline was 70. The most commonly experienced symptoms at baseline were headaches, weakness, balance problems, and fatigue. Thirty-five percent of patients rated neurological functional (NF) status as 1, indicating moderate neurological symptoms and need for assistance. Forty-three percent of patients had stable or decreased fatigue, and 47% had a stable or improved NF status over time (p = 0.0040). Although certain QOL domains improved over time, all other QOL domains and symptom items did not change significantly following WBRT. Conclusion: WBRT may have contributed to symptom stabilization in our study. An alternative goal of WBRT may be the prevention of symptom progression and QOL deterioration. Further research is required to select the most appropriate group of patients with brain metastases who would benefit most from WBRT.

  13. Importance of Extracranial Disease Status and Tumor Subtype for Patients Undergoing Radiosurgery for Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Michael A.; Kelly, Paul J.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Pinnell, Nancy E.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Arvold, Nils D.; Lin, Nancy U.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: In this retrospective study, we report on outcomes and prognostic factors for patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for breast cancer brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We identified 132 consecutive patients with breast cancer who were treated with SRS for brain metastases from January 2000 through June 2010. We retrospectively reviewed records of the 51 patients with adequate follow-up data who received SRS as part of the initial management of their brain metastases. Overall survival (OS) and time to central nervous system (CNS) progression from the date of SRS were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Triple negative subtype was associated with CNS progression on univariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.0, p = 0.008). On multivariate analysis, triple negative subtype (HR = 8.6, p = 0.001), Luminal B subtype (HR = 4.3, p = 0.03), and omission of whole-brain radiation therapy (HR = 3.7, p = 0.02) were associated with CNS progression. With respect to OS, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) {<=} 80% (HR = 2.0, p = 0.04) and progressive extracranial disease (HR = 3.1, p = 0.002) were significant on univariate analysis; KPS {<=} 80% (HR = 4.1, p = 0.0004), progressive extracranial disease (HR = 6.4, p < 0.0001), and triple negative subtype (HR = 2.9, p = 0.04) were significant on multivariate analysis. Although median survival times were consistent with those predicted by the breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (Breast-GPA) score, the addition of extracranial disease status further separated patient outcomes. Conclusions: Tumor subtype is associated with risk of CNS progression after SRS for breast cancer brain metastases. In addition to tumor subtype and KPS, which are incorporated into the Breast-GPA, progressive extracranial disease may be an important prognostic factor for OS.

  14. The Effect of Early Detection of Occult Brain Metastases in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Patients on Survival and Cause of Death

    SciTech Connect

    Niwinska, Anna; Tacikowska, Malgorzata; Murawska, Magdalena

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate disease-free survival, survival from the detection of brain metastases, overall survival, and cause of death in patients with occult brain metastases (Group I) vs. patients with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II). Methods and Materials: In 80 HER2-positive breast cancer patients, treated with trastuzumab and cytostatic agents for metastatic disease, magnetic resonance imaging screening of the brain was performed, and in 29 patients (36%) occult brain metastasis was detected (Group I). Whole-brain radiotherapy was delivered to Group I. This first group was compared with 52 patients who had symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) and was treated the same way, at the same clinic, during the same time period. Results: Median disease-free survival was 17 months in Group I and 19.9 months in Group II (p = 0.58). The median time interval between the dissemination of the disease and the detection of occult or symptomatic brain metastases was 9 and 15 months, respectively (p = 0.11). When the brain metastases were detected, the median survival was 9 and 8.78 months, respectively (p = 0.80). The median overall survival was 53 and 51 months, respectively (p = 0.94). In the group with occult brain metastases (Group I) 16% of patients died because of progression within the brain. In the group with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) the rate of cerebral death was 48% (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Whole-brain radiotherapy of occult brain metastases in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with visceral dissemination produces a three-fold decrease in cerebral deaths but does not prolong survival.

  15. Relationship Between HER2 Status and Prognosis in Women With Brain Metastases From Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiyuan; Marko, Nicholas F.; Chao, Sam T.; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.; Barnett, Gene H.; Weil, Robert J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze factors affecting outcomes in breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BM) and characterize the role of HER2 status. Methods and Materials: We identified 264 breast cancer patients treated between 1999 and 2008 for BM. HER2 status was known definitively for 172 patients and was used to define cohorts in which survival and risk factors were analyzed. Results: Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated improved mean overall survival (105.7 vs. 74.3 months, p < 0.02), survival after diagnosis of BM (neurologic survival, NS) (32.2 vs. 18.9 months, p < 0.01), and survival after treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery (RS) (31.3 vs. 14.1, p < 0.01) in HER2+ patients relative to those with HER2- breast cancer. HER2+ status was an independent, positive prognostic factor for survival on univariate and multivariate hazard analysis (hazard ratio: overall survival = 0.66, 0.18; NS = 0.50, 0.34). Additionally, subgroup analysis suggests that stereotactic radiosurgery may be of particular benefit in patients with HER2+ tumors. Conclusions: Overall survival, NS, and RS are improved in patients with HER2+ tumors, relative to those with HER2- lesions, and HER2 amplification is independently associated with increased survival in patients with BM from breast cancer. Our findings suggest that the prognosis of HER2+ patients may be better than that of otherwise similar patients who are HER2- and that stereotactic radiosurgery may be beneficial for some patients with HER2+ lesions.

  16. Activity of T-DM1 in Her2-positive breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Rupert; Berghoff, Anna S; Vogl, Ursula; Rudas, Margaretha; Bergen, Elisabeth; Dubsky, Peter; Dieckmann, Karin; Pinker, Katja; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Galid, Arik; Oehler, Leopold; Zielinski, Christoph C; Gnant, Michael; Steger, Guenther G; Preusser, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Brain metastases (BM) are frequently diagnosed in metastatic Her2-positive breast cancer. Local treatment remains the standard of care but lapatinib plus capecitabine was recently established as systemic therapy option. Due to a disruption of the blood-brain/tumour-barrier at metastatic sites, even large molecules may penetrate into the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we report on the activity of T-DM1 in Her2-positive breast cancer BM. T-DM1 was administered at a dose of 3.6 mg once every 3 weeks as primary systemic therapy for BM or upon documented CNS progression after initial local treatment. Thus, this study allowed for the appraisal of T-DM1 activity in BM. Restaging was conducted every 12 weeks with MRI or whenever symptoms of disease progression occurred. Ten patients were included; in two asymptomatic subjects, T-DM1 was administered as primary therapy, while eight had progressive BM. All patients had received prior treatment with trastuzumab, six had already received lapatinib, and three pertuzumab as well. Three patients had partial remission of BM, and two patient had stable disease lasting for ≥6 months; two further patients had stable disease for <6 months while three progressed despite treatment. At 8.5 months median follow-up, intracranial PFS was 5 months, and median OS from initiation of T-DM1 was not reached. Local treatment of BM remains the standard of care; lapatinib plus capecitabine is currently the best established systemic therapy option. Still, T-DM1 apparently offers relevant clinical activity in BM and further investigation is warranted.

  17. Comparison of computed tomography and radionuclide scanning for detection of brain metastases in small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.M.; Nelson, M.J.; Ihde, D.C.; Makuch, R.W.; Glatstein, E.; Zabell, A.; Johnston-Early, A.; Bates, H.R.; Saini, N.; Cohen, M.H.

    1984-09-01

    Neurologic history and examination, radionuclide brain scans (RN), and computed tomographic brain scans (CT) were performed at diagnosis and sequentially in 153 consecutive patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) to assess the sensitivity and accuracy of these screening methods and to determine whether the early detection of brain metastases influences survival. CT scans (sensitivity, 98%; positive predictive accuracy, 98%) were superior to RN scans (sensitivity, 71%; positive predictive accuracy, 86%) in patients with or without neurologic signs or symptoms. However, CT scans were positive in only 6% of asymptomatic patients at diagnosis and 13% of asymptomatic patients after systemic therapy. Brain metastases detected by CT scan were the sole site of extensive-stage disease in 6% of patients at diagnosis. Despite the enhanced ability of CT scans to detect asymptomatic lesions, survival after therapeutic cranial irradiation was similar for asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. The results suggest that CT brain scans should be used routinely in SCLC patients with neurologic signs or symptoms, at diagnosis (when treatment decisions are based on stage), and at six-month intervals in patients with prior brain metastases and in whom erratic follow-up is likely.

  18. Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, Lia M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Neville, Bridget A.; Taback, Nathan; Punglia, Rinaa S.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: The indications for treatment of brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) remain controversial. We studied patterns, predictors, and cost of SRS use in elderly patients with NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we identified patients with NSCLC who were diagnosed with brain metastases between 2000 and 2007. Our cohort included patients treated with radiation therapy and not surgical resection as initial treatment for brain metastases. Results: We identified 7684 patients treated with radiation therapy within 2 months after brain metastases diagnosis, of whom 469 (6.1%) cases had billing codes for SRS. Annual SRS use increased from 3.0% in 2000 to 8.2% in 2005 and varied from 3.4% to 12.5% by specific SEER registry site. After controlling for clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, we found SRS use was significantly associated with increasing year of diagnosis, specific SEER registry, higher socioeconomic status, admission to a teaching hospital, no history of participation in low-income state buy-in programs (a proxy for Medicaid eligibility), no extracranial metastases, and longer intervals from NSCLC diagnosis. The average cost per patient associated with radiation therapy was 2.19 times greater for those who received SRS than for those who did not. Conclusions: The use of SRS in patients with metastatic NSCLC increased almost 3-fold from 2000 to 2005. In addition, we found significant variations in SRS use across SEER registries and socioeconomic quartiles. National practice patterns in this study suggested both a lack of consensus and an overall limited use of the approach among elderly patients before 2008.

  19. Serum Biomarkers Associated with Clinical Outcomes Fail to Predict Brain Metastases in Patients with Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bob T.; Lou, Emil; Hsu, Meier; Yu, Helena A.; Naidoo, Jarushka; Zauderer, Marjorie G.; Sima, Camelia; Johnson, Melissa L.; Daras, Mariza; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Fleisher, Martin; Kris, Mark G.; Azzoli, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancers account for the majority of brain metastases which pose major therapeutic challenges. Biomarkers prognosticating for the development of brain metastases in patients with non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) may improve personalized care. Six serum proteomic biomarkers were previously investigated at Memorial Sloan Kettering but their associations with brain metastases were unknown. Methods Serum NSE, CYFRA 21–1, ProGRP, SCC-Ag, TIMP1, and HE4 by ELISA-based proteomic assays were prospectively collected from consecutive patients with stage IV NSCLC. Pre-treatment serum biomarker levels as well as age, histology, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status were evaluated for association with the baseline presence of brain metastases using logistic regression and multivariable analysis. For patients without brain metastases at baseline, the cumulative incidence of subsequent brain metastases were compared according to baseline biomarkers and clinical factors using Gray’s test. Results A total of 118 patients were enrolled, 31 (26%; 95% CI 0.19–0.35) had brain metastases at baseline and a further 26 (22%; 95% CI 0.15–0.30) developed brain metastases subsequently. Pre-treatment serum biomarker levels were available in 104 patients. There was no significant association between the six serum biomarkers and the baseline presence or subsequent development of brain metastases. Age younger than 65 years was the only clinical factor significantly associated with brain metastasis at baseline (OR 3.00; 95% CI 1.22–7.34, P = 0.02) by multivariable analysis. A trend toward increased cumulative incidence of subsequent brain metastases was observed in patients with EGFR mutation (p = 0.2), but this was not statistically significant possibly due to small sample size. Conclusions Serum NSE, CYFRA 21–1, Pro-GRP, SCC-Ag, TIMP1, and HE4 are not significantly associated with brain metastases. Our methods taking into account follow-up time

  20. Cediranib Maleate and Whole Brain Radiation Therapy in Patients With Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-07

    Male Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  1. Ultrasound Imaging-guided Intracardiac Injection to Develop a Mouse Model of Breast Cancer Brain Metastases Followed by Longitudinal MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Heling; Zhao, Dawen

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer brain metastasis, occurring in 30% of breast cancer patients at stage IV, is associated with high mortality. The median survival is only 6 months. It is critical to have suitable animal models to mimic the hemodynamic spread of the metastatic cells in the clinical scenario. Here, we are introducing the use of small animal ultrasound imaging to guide an accurate injection of brain tropical breast cancer cells into the left ventricle of athymic nude mice. Longitudinal MRI is used to assessing intracranial initiation and growth of brain metastases. Ultrasound-guided intracardiac injection ensures not only an accurate injection and hereby a higher successful rate but also significantly decreased mortality rate, as compared to our previous manual procedure. In vivo high resolution MRI allows the visualization of hyperintense multifocal lesions, as small as 310 µm in diameter on T2-weighted images at 3 weeks post injection. Follow-up MRI reveals intracranial tumor growth and increased number of metastases that distribute throughout the whole brain. PMID:24637963

  2. RO4929097 and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy or Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases From Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-22

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. [A Case of Brain Metastasis from Rectal Cancer with Synchronous Liver and Lung Metastases after Multimodality Treatment--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Masaru; Tominaga, Ben; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Yuuya; Watanabe, Shuuichi; Adikrisna, Rama; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Yabata, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of brain metastasis from rectal cancer a long time after the initial resection. A 62-year-old woman, diagnosed with lower rectal cancer with multiple synchronous liver and lung metastases, underwent abdominoperineal resection after preoperative radiochemotherapy (40 Gy at the pelvis, using the de Gramont regimen FL therapy: 1 kur). The histological diagnosis was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Various regimens of chemotherapy for unresectable and metastatic colorectal cancer were administered, and a partial response was obtained; thereby, the metastatic lesions became resectable. The patient underwent partial resection of the liver and lung metastases. Pathological findings confirmed that both the liver and lung lesions were metastases from the rectal cancer. A disease-free period occurred for several months; however, there were recurrences of the lung metastases, so we started another round of chemotherapy. After 8 months, she complained of vertigo and dizziness. A left cerebellar tumor about 3 cm in diameter was revealed by MRI and neurosurgical excision was performed. Pathological findings confirmed a cerebellar metastasis from the rectal cancer. Twenty months after resection of the brain tumor, the patient complained of a severe headache. A brain MRI showed hydrocephalia, and carcinomatous meningitis from rectal cancer was diagnosed by a spinal fluid cytology test. A ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was inserted, but the cerebrospinal pressure did not decreased and she died 20 months after the first surgery. Although brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, the number of patients with brain metastasis is thought to increase in the near future. Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer is effective enough to prolong the survival period even if multiple metastases have occurred. However, after a long survival period with lung metastases such as in our case, there is a high probability of developing brain metastases.

  4. Erlotinib plus concurrent whole-brain radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancers patients with multiple brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Ulahannan, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene to identify mutations in lung adenocarcinomas is routine in clinical practice. The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has transformed the management of patients with brain metastases harboring EGFR mutations, with improved response rates (RR) and survival. We evaluate the role of concurrent TKI therapy and radiotherapy in this group of patients, considering this data in the context of emerging concepts in this advancing field. PMID:27186518

  5. Effect of Tumor Subtype on Survival and the Graded Prognostic Assessment for Patients With Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Kased, Norbert; Roberge, David; Xu Zhiyuan; Shanley, Ryan; Luo, Xianghua; Sneed, Penny K.; Chao, Samuel T.; Weil, Robert J.; Suh, John; Bhatt, Amit; Jensen, Ashley W.; Brown, Paul D.; Shih, Helen A.; Kirkpatrick, John; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Fiveash, John B.; and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The diagnosis-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) was published to clarify prognosis for patients with brain metastases. This study refines the existing Breast-GPA by analyzing a larger cohort and tumor subtype. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional retrospective database of 400 breast cancer patients treated for newly diagnosed brain metastases was generated. Prognostic factors significant for survival were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). Factors were weighted by the magnitude of their regression coefficients to define the GPA index. Results: Significant prognostic factors by multivariate Cox regression and RPA were Karnofsky performance status (KPS), HER2, ER/PR status, and the interaction between ER/PR and HER2. RPA showed age was significant for patients with KPS 60 to 80. The median survival time (MST) overall was 13.8 months, and for GPA scores of 0 to 1.0, 1.5 to 2.0, 2.5 to 3.0, and 3.5 to 4.0 were 3.4 (n = 23), 7.7 (n = 104), 15.1 (n = 140), and 25.3 (n = 133) months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Among HER2-negative patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 6.4 to 9.7 months, whereas in HER2-positive patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 17.9 to 20.7 months. The log-rank statistic (predictive power) was 110 for the Breast-GPA vs. 55 for tumor subtype. Conclusions: The Breast-GPA documents wide variation in prognosis and shows clear separation between subgroups of patients with breast cancer and brain metastases. This tool will aid clinical decision making and stratification in clinical trials. These data confirm the effect of tumor subtype on survival and show the Breast-GPA offers significantly more predictive power than the tumor subtype alone.

  6. Inhibition of β2-adrenergic receptor reduces triple-negative breast cancer brain metastases: The potential benefit of perioperative β-blockade.

    PubMed

    Choy, Cecilia; Raytis, John L; Smith, David D; Duenas, Matthew; Neman, Josh; Jandial, Rahul; Lew, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    In response to recent studies, we investigated an association between perioperative β-blockade and breast cancer metastases. First, a retrospective study examining perioperative β-blocker use and cancer recurrence and metastases was conducted on 1,029 patients who underwent breast cancer surgery at the City of Hope Cancer Center between 2000 and 2010. We followed the clinical study and examined proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro of primary and brain-metastatic breast cancer cells in response to β2-activation and inhibition. We also investigated in vivo the metastatic potential of propranolol-treated metastatic cells. For stage II breast cancer patients, perioperative β-blockade was associated with decreased cancer recurrence using Cox regression analysis (hazard's ratio =0.51; 95% CI: 0.23-0.97; p=0.041). Triple-negative (TN) brain-metastatic cells were found to have increased β2-adrenergic receptor mRNA and protein expression relative to TN primary cells. In response to β2-adrenergic receptor activation, TN brain-metastatic cells also exhibited increased cell proliferation and migration relative to the control. These effects were abrogated by propranolol. Propranolol decreased β2-adrenergic receptor-activated invasion. In vivo, propranolol treatment of TN brain-metastatic cells decreased establishment of brain metastases. Our results suggest that stress and corresponding β2-activation may promote the establishment of brain metastases of TN breast cancer cells. In addition, our data suggest a benefit to perioperative β-blockade during surgery-induced stress with respect to breast cancer recurrence and metastases.

  7. Predictors of Individual Tumor Local Control After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Badiyan, Shahed N.; DeWees, Todd; Simpson, Joseph R.; Huang, Jiayi; Drzymala, Robert E.; Barani, Igor J.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Rich, Keith M.; Chicoine, Michael R.; Kim, Albert H.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Robinson, Clifford G.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control rates and predictors of individual tumor local control for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Between June 1998 and May 2011, 401 brain metastases in 228 patients were treated with Gamma Knife single-fraction SRS. Local failure was defined as an increase in lesion size after SRS. Local control was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for univariate and multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to identify an optimal cutpoint for conformality index relative to local control. A P value <.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Median age was 60 years (range, 27-84 years). There were 66 cerebellar metastases (16%) and 335 supratentorial metastases (84%). The median prescription dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-24 Gy). Median overall survival from time of SRS was 12.1 months. The estimated local control at 12 months was 74%. On multivariate analysis, cerebellar location (hazard ratio [HR] 1.94, P=.009), larger tumor volume (HR 1.09, P<.001), and lower conformality (HR 0.700, P=.044) were significant independent predictors of local failure. Conformality index cutpoints of 1.4-1.9 were predictive of local control, whereas a cutpoint of 1.75 was the most predictive (P=.001). The adjusted Kaplan-Meier 1-year local control for conformality index ≥1.75 was 84% versus 69% for conformality index <1.75, controlling for tumor volume and location. The 1-year adjusted local control for cerebellar lesions was 60%, compared with 77% for supratentorial lesions, controlling for tumor volume and conformality index. Conclusions: Cerebellar tumor location, lower conformality index, and larger tumor volume were significant independent predictors of local failure after SRS for brain metastases from NSCLC. These results warrant further investigation in a prospective

  8. Inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 sensitizes lung cancer brain metastases to radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Heekyoung; Yoon, Su Jin; Jin, Juyoun; Choi, Seung Ho; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; and others

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. {yields} Radiosensitivity of cancer cells was enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor. {yields} Depletion of Chk1 in cancer cells showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation. {yields} Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. However, resistance to radiation is a possible cause of recurrence or treatment failure. Recently, signal pathways about DNA damage checkpoints after irradiation have been noticed. We investigated the radiosensitivity can be enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor, AZD7762 in lung cancer cell lines and xenograft models of lung cancer brain metastasis. Clonogenic survival assays showed enhancement of radiosensitivity with AZD7762 after irradiation of various doses. AZD7762 increased ATR/ATM-mediated Chk1 phosphorylation and stabilized Cdc25A, suppressed cyclin A expression in lung cancer cell lines. In xenograft models of lung cancer (PC14PE6) brain metastasis, AZD7762 significantly prolonged the median survival time in response to radiation. Depletion of Chk1 using shRNA also showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation in PC14PE6 cells. The results of this study support that Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity.

  9. Management of Brain Metastases in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rusthoven, Chad G; Doebele, Robert C

    2016-08-20

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice.A 54-year-old man with a former 15-pack-year smoking history presents with cough and dyspnea. Initial work-up with imaging demonstrates a right suprahilar mass measuring 4.7 cm as well as several enlarged hilar and ipsilateral mediastinal lymph nodes. Bronchoscopy with biopsy reveals adenocarcinoma consistent with a lung primary. Staging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) reidentifies the primary mass and lymph nodes and shows several PET-avid bone metastases. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrates a 1.6-cm right parietal mass with mild vasogenic edema and four additional brain metastases measuring 4 to 9 mm in size. Molecular testing is positive for an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement using fluorescence in situ hybridization and negative for EGFR, ROS1, RET, BRAF, KRAS, and other oncogenes. The patient denies any neurologic symptoms and has no significant findings on neurologic exam. He is referred to you for management options for newly diagnosed stage IV (T2aN2M1b) lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27298405

  10. Analyses of Resected Human Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer Reveal the Association between Up-regulation of Hexokinase 2 and Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Diane; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Shreeve, S. Martin; Hua, Emily; Bronder, Julie L.; Weil, Robert J.; Davis, Sean; Stark, Andreas M.; Merino, Maria J.; Kurek, Raffael; Mehdorn, H. Maximilian; Davis, Gary; Steinberg, Seth M.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2009-01-01

    Brain metastases of breast cancer appear to be increasing in incidence as systemic therapy improves. Metastatic disease in the brain is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We present the first gene expression analysis of laser captured epithelial cells from resected human brain metastases of breast cancer compared to unlinked primary breast tumors. The tumors were matched for histology, TNM stage and hormone receptor status. Most differentially expressed genes were down-regulated in the brain metastases which included, surprisingly, many genes associated with metastasis. Q-PCR analysis confirmed statistically significant differences or strong trends in the expression of six genes: BMP1, PEDF, LAMγ3, SIAH, STHMN3 and TSPD2. Hexokinase 2 (HK2) was also of interest because of its increased expression in brain metastases. HK2 is important in glucose metabolism and apoptosis. In agreement with our microarray results, HK2 levels (both mRNA and protein) were elevated in a brain metastatic derivative (231-BR) of the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 relative to the parental cell line (231-P), in vitro. Knockdown of HK2 expression in 231-BR cells using shRNA reduced cell proliferation when cultures were maintained in glucose limiting conditions. Finally, HK2 expression was analyzed in a cohort of 123 resected brain metastases of breast cancer. High HK2 expression was significantly associated with poor patient survival post-craniotomy (P=0.028). The data suggest that HK2 overexpression is associated with metastasis to the brain in breast cancer and it may be a therapeutic target. PMID:19723875

  11. Analyses of resected human brain metastases of breast cancer reveal the association between up-regulation of hexokinase 2 and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Shreeve, S Martin; Hua, Emily; Bronder, Julie L; Weil, Robert J; Davis, Sean; Stark, Andreas M; Merino, Maria J; Kurek, Raffael; Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Davis, Gary; Steinberg, Seth M; Meltzer, Paul S; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S

    2009-09-01

    Brain metastases of breast cancer seem to be increasingin incidence as systemic therapy improves. Metastatic disease in the brain is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We present the first gene expression analysis of laser-captured epithelial cells from resected human brain metastases of breast cancer compared with unlinked primary breast tumors. The tumors were matched for histology, tumor-node-metastasis stage, and hormone receptor status. Most differentially expressed genes were down-regulated in the brain metastases, which included, surprisingly, many genes associated with metastasis. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed statistically significant differences or strong trends in the expression of six genes: BMP1, PEDF, LAMgamma3, SIAH, STHMN3, and TSPD2. Hexokinase 2 (HK2) was also of interest because of its increased expression in brain metastases. HK2 is important in glucose metabolism and apoptosis. In agreement with our microarray results, HK2 levels (both mRNA and protein) were elevated in a brain metastatic derivative (231-BR) of the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 relative to the parental cell line (231-P) in vitro. Knockdown of HK2 expression in 231-BR cells using short hairpin RNA reduced cell proliferation when cultures were maintained in glucose-limiting conditions. Finally, HK2 expression was analyzed in a cohort of 123 resected brain metastases of breast cancer. High HK2 expression was significantly associated with poor patient survival after craniotomy (P = 0.028). The data suggest that HK2 overexpression is associated with metastasis to the brain in breast cancer and it may be a therapeutic target. PMID:19723875

  12. Prognostic Value of MR Imaging Texture Analysis in Brain Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Oligo-Metastases Undergoing Stereotactic Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tini, Paolo; Biondi, Michelangelo; Sebaste, Lucio; Vanzi, Eleonora; De Otto, Gianmarco; Rubino, Giovanni; Carfagno, Tommaso; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Cerase, Alfonso; Mazzoni, Lorenzo Nicola; Banci Buonamici, Fabrizio; Pirtoli, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background  Stereotactic irradiation is widely used in brain oligo-metastases treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) of brain metastases (BM) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods  This study included thirty-eight consecutive patients undergoing stereotactic irradiation, that is, stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) or radiosurgery (SRS), from January 2011 to December 2014 for 1-2 brain BM from NSCLC. Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was not delivered. The diagnostic MRI DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) images were collected and analyzed with a homemade ImageJ macro, and typical TA parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and uniformity) were evaluated for: brain progression-free survival; modality of brain metastatic progression (local progression or/and new metastases); and overall survival, after SRT/SRS. Results After SRT/SRS 14 patients (36.8%) experienced recurrence in the brain, with a recurrence in the irradiated site (five patients, 13.2%), new metastases (11 patients, 28.9%), local recurrence and new metastases (two patients, 5.25%). Nineteen patients (50%) died of tumor progression or other causes. Entropy and uniformity were significantly associated with local progression, whereas kurtosis was significantly associated with both local progression and new brain metastases. Conclusions  These results appear promising, since the knowledge of factors correlated with the modality of brain progression after stereotactic irradiation of brain oligo-metastatic foci of NSCLC might help in driving the best treatment in these patients (association of SRT/SRS with WBRT? Increase of SRT/SRS dose?). Our preliminary data needs confirmation in large patient series. PMID:27226944

  13. White matter changes in breast cancer brain metastases patients who undergo radiosurgery alone compared to whole brain radiation therapy plus radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Timothy B; Niranjan, Ajay; Kano, Hideyuki; Choi, Phillip A; Kondziolka, Douglas; Dade Lunsford, L; Monaco, Edward A

    2015-02-01

    Delayed toxicity after whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is of increasing concern in patients who survive more than one year with brain metastases from breast cancer. Radiation-related white matter toxicity is detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has been correlated with neurocognitive dysfunction. This study assessed the risk of developing white matter changes (WMC) in breast cancer patients who underwent either WBRT plus stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or SRS alone. We retrospectively compared 35 patients with breast cancer brain metastases who received WBRT and SRS to 30 patients who only received SRS. All patients had evaluable imaging at a median of one year after their initial management. The development of white matter T2 prolongation as detected by T2 or FLAIR imaging was graded: grade 1 = little or no white matter T2 hyperintensity; grade 2 = limited periventricular hyperintensity; and grade 3 = diffuse white matter hyperintensity. After WBRT plus SRS, patients demonstrated a significantly higher incidence of WMC (p < 0.0001). After one year, 71.5 % of patients whose treatment included WBRT demonstrated WMC (42.9 % grade 2; 28.6 % grade 3). Only one patient receiving only SRS developed WMC. In long-term survivors of breast cancer, the risk of WMC was significantly reduced when SRS alone was used for management. Further prospective studies are necessary to determine how these findings correlate with neurocognitive toxicity. WBRT usage as initial management of limited brain disease should be replaced by SRS alone to reduce the risk of delayed white matter toxicity.

  14. EGFR mutations are associated with favorable intracranial response and progression-free survival following brain irradiation in non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The presence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with increased radiosensitivity in vitro. However, the results from clinical studies regarding the radiosensitivity in NSCLC with mutant EGFR are inconclusive. We retrospectively analyzed our NSCLC patients who had been regularly followed up by imaging studies after irradiation for brain metastases, and investigated the impact of EGFR mutations on radiotherapy (RT). Methods Forty-three patients with brain metastases treated with RT, together with EGFR mutation status, demographics, smoking history, performance status, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, tumor characteristics, and treatment modalities, were included. Radiological images were taken at 1 to 3 months after RT, and 3 to 6 months thereafter. Radiographic response was evaluated by RECIST criteria version 1.1 according to the intracranial images before and after RT. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to correlate EGFR mutation status and other clinical features with intracranial radiological progression-free survival (RPFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The median follow-up duration was 15 months. Patients with mutant EGFR had higher response rates to brain RT than those with wild-type EGFR (80% vs. 46%; p = 0.037). Logistic regression analysis showed that EGFR mutation status is the only predictor for treatment response (p = 0.032). The median intracranial RPFS was 18 months (95% CI = 8.33-27.68 months). In Cox regression analysis, mutant EGFR (p = 0.025) and lower RPA class (p = 0.026) were associated with longer intracranial RPFS. EGFR mutation status (p = 0.061) and performance status (p = 0.076) had a trend to predict OS. Conclusions Mutant EGFR in NSCLC patients is an independent prognostic factor for better treatment response and longer intracranial RPFS following RT for brain metastases. PMID:23110940

  15. Radiosurgery for Large Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Chul-Kee; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy and safety of radiosurgery in patients with large brain metastases treated with radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Eighty patients with large brain metastases (>14 cm{sup 3}) were treated with radiosurgery between 1998 and 2009. The mean age was 59 {+-} 11 years, and 49 (61.3%) were men. Neurologic symptoms were identified in 77 patients (96.3%), and 30 (37.5%) exhibited a dependent functional status. The primary disease was under control in 36 patients (45.0%), and 44 (55.0%) had a single lesion. The mean tumor volume was 22.4 {+-} 8.8 cm{sup 3}, and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 13.8 {+-} 2.2 Gy. Results: The median survival time from radiosurgery was 7.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.343-10.46), and the 1-year survival rate was 39.2%. Functional improvement within 1-4 months or the maintenance of the initial independent status was observed in 48 (60.0%) and 20 (25.0%) patients after radiosurgery, respectively. Control of the primary disease, a marginal dose of {>=}11 Gy, and a tumor volume {>=}26 cm{sup 3} were significantly associated with overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.479; p = .018; 95% CI, 0.261-0.880; hazard ratio, 0.350; p = .004; 95% CI, 0.171-0.718; hazard ratio, 2.307; p = .006; 95% CI, 1.274-4.180, respectively). Unacceptable radiation-related toxicities (Radiation Toxicity Oncology Group central nervous system toxicity Grade 3, 4, and 5 in 7, 6, and 2 patients, respectively) developed in 15 patients (18.8%). Conclusion: Radiosurgery seems to have a comparable efficacy with surgery for large brain metastases. However, the rate of radiation-related toxicities after radiosurgery should be considered when deciding on a treatment modality.

  16. [Tumor Cells and Micro-environment in Brain Metastases].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wen; Hu, Chengping

    2016-09-20

    Improvements in survival and quality of life of patients with lung cancer had been achieved due to the progression of early diagnosis and precision medicine at recent years, however, until now, treatments targeted at lesions in central nervous system are far from satisfying, thus threatening livelihood of patients involved. After all, in the issue of prophylaxis and therapeutics of brain metastases, it is crucial to learn about the biological behavior of tumor cells in brain metastases and its mechanism underlying, and the hypothesis "seed and soil", that is, tumor cells would generate series of adaptive changes to fit in the new environment, is liable to help explain this process well. In this assay, we reviewed documents concerning tumor cells, brain micro-environments and their interactions in brain metastases, aiming to provide novel insight into the treatments of brain metastases. PMID:27666556

  17. Neural Stem Cells Secreting Anti-HER2 Antibody Improve Survival in a Preclinical Model of HER2 Overexpressing Breast Cancer Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Deepak; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Morshed, Ramin A; Frank, Richard T; Yu, Dou; Zhang, Lingjiao; Spencer, Drew A; Kim, Julius W; Han, Yu; Yu, Dihua; Ahmed, Atique U; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer has been revolutionized by trastuzumab. However, longer survival of these patients now predisposes them to forming HER2 positive brain metastases, as the therapeutic antibodies cannot cross the blood brain barrier. The current oncologic repertoire does not offer a rational, nontoxic targeted therapy for brain metastases. In this study, we used an established human neural stem cell line, HB1.F3 NSCs and generated a stable pool of cells secreting a high amount of functional full-length anti-HER2 antibody, equivalent to trastuzumab. Anti-HER2Ab secreted by the NSCs (HER2Ab-NSCs) specifically binds to HER2 overexpressing human breast cancer cells and inhibits PI3K-Akt signaling. This translates to HER2Ab-NSC inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in vitro. Preclinical in vivo experiments using HER2Ab overexpressing NSCs in a breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) mouse model demonstrate that intracranial injection of HER2Ab-NSCs significantly improves survival. In effect, these NSCs provide tumor localized production of HER2Ab, minimizing any potential off-target side effects. Our results establish HER2Ab-NSCs as a novel, nontoxic, and rational therapeutic approach for the successful treatment of HER2 overexpressing BCBM, which now warrants further preclinical and clinical investigation.

  18. Validity of Three Recently Proposed Prognostic Grading Indexes for Breast Cancer Patients With Radiosurgically Treated Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Kawabe, Takuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Sato, Yasunori; Barfod, Bierta E.; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: We tested the validity of 3 recently proposed prognostic indexes for breast cancer patients with brain metastases (METs) treated radiosurgically. The 3 indexes are Diagnosis-Specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (DS-GPA), New Breast Cancer (NBC)-Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA), and our index, sub-classification of RPA class II patients into 3 sub-classes (RPA class II-a, II-b and II-c) based on Karnofsky performance status, tumor number, original tumor status, and non-brain METs. Methods and Materials: This was an institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study using our database of 269 consecutive female breast cancer patients (mean age, 55 years; range, 26-86 years) who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) alone, without whole-brain radiation therapy, for brain METs during the 15-year period between 1996 and 2011. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the absolute risk of each event. Results: Kaplan-Meier plots of our patient series showed statistically significant survival differences among patients stratified into 3, 4, or 5 groups based on the 3 systems (P<.001). However, the mean survival time (MST) differences between some pairs of groups failed to reach statistical significance with all 3 systems. Thus, we attempted to regrade our 269 breast cancer patients into 3 groups by modifying our aforementioned index along with the original RPA class I and III, (ie, RPA I+II-a, II-b, and II-c+III). There were statistically significant MST differences among these 3 groups without overlap of 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between any 2 pairs of groups: 18.4 (95% CI = 14.0-29.5) months in I+II-a, 9.2 in II-b (95% CI = 6.8-12.9, P<.001 vs I+II-a) and 5.0 in II-c+III (95% CI = 4.2-6.8, P<.001 vs II-b). Conclusions: As none of the new grading systems, DS-GPS, BC-RPA and our system, was applicable to our set of radiosurgically treated patients for comparing survivals after GKRS, we slightly modified our system for breast cancer

  19. Improved Treatment of MT-3 Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases in a Mouse Xenograft by LRP-Targeted Oxaliplatin Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Orthmann, Andrea; Peiker, Lisa; Fichtner, Iduna; Hoffmann, Annika; Hilger, Ralf Axel; Zeisig, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    The anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin (OxP) has rarely been used to treat breast carcinoma, as it cannot cross the BBB to treat the frequently subsequent brain metastases. Here, we encapsulated OxP in liposomes prepared to reduce side effects and to simultaneously treat primary tumor and brain metastasis. The angiopep LRP-receptor ligand was bound to the vesicular surface for targeting. Targeted and non-targeted OxP liposomes were tested in vitro (binding, uptake, and transcytosis) and in vivo. Liposomes contained 0.65 mg OxP/mL, their mean diameter was 165 nm, and they released 50% of OxP within 8 days at 4 degrees C and within 22 h at 36 degrees C. MDCK cells were used for uptake and transcytosis quantification. Compared to non-targeted liposomes, targeted liposomes showed 12-fold greater uptake, and 2.25-fold higher transcytosis. In vivo efficacy was tested using human MT-3 breast cancer cells transplanted subcutaneously and intracerebrally into female nude mice, and tumor growth inhibition was measured. OxP was injected (6 mg OxP/kg) four times. The best results were obtained with targeted liposomes (T/C: 21% for subcutaneous and 50% for intracerebral). OxP liposomes with a fluid membrane all inhibited MT-3 tumors significantly better than free OxP, with no significant difference between targeted and non-targeted liposomes. The therapeutic effect was accompanied with strong leukopenia and mild thrombocytopenia with all formulations. The newly developed OxP liposomes significantly improved the treatment of subcutaneously and intracerebrally growing breast cancer, but the targeted angiopep-equipped liposomes showed no superior effect in vivo.

  20. Comparing Postoperative Radiation Therapies for Brain Metastases

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with one to four brain metastases who have had at least one of the metastatic tumors removed surgically will be randomly assigned to undergo whole-brain radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery.

  1. Temporal and spatial discordance of programmed cell death-ligand 1 expression and lymphocyte tumor infiltration between paired primary lesions and brain metastases in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, A. S.; Aubry, M. C.; Moser, J. C.; Harrington, S. M.; Dronca, R. S.; Park, S. S.; Dong, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The dynamics of PD-L1 expression may limit its use as a tissue-based predictive biomarker. We sought to expand our understanding of the dynamics of PD-L1 expression and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in patients with lung cancer-related brain metastases. Experimental design Paired primary lung cancers and brain metastases were identified and assessed for PD-L1 and CD3 expression by immunohistochemistry. Lesions with 5% or greater PD-L1 expression were considered positive. Agreement statistics and the χ2 or Fisher's exact test were used for analysis. Results We analyzed 146 paired lesions from 73 cases. There was disagreement of tumor cell PD-L1 expression in 10 cases (14%, κ = 0.71), and disagreement of TIL PD-L1 expression in 19 cases (26%, κ = 0.38). Most paired lesions with discordant tumor cell expression of PD-L1 were obtained 6 or more months apart. When specimens were categorized using a proposed tumor microenvironment categorization scheme based on PD-L1 expression and TILs, there were significant changes in the classifications because many of the brain metastases lacked either PD-L1 expression, tumor lymphocyte infiltration or both even when they were present in the primary lung cancer specimens (P = 0.009). Conclusions We identified that there are significant differences between the tumor microenvironment of paired primary lung cancers and brain metastases. When physicians decide to treat patients with lung cancer with a PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor, they must do so in the context of the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27502709

  2. A combinational therapy of EGFR-CAR NK cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 for breast cancer brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Charlie; Chen, Luxi; Wang, Youwei; Wang, Hongwei; Yi, Long; Elder, J. Bradley; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are common in patients with metastatic breast cancer and indicate a poor prognosis. These tumors are especially resistant to currently available treatments due to multiple factors. However, the combination of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has not yet been explored in this context. In this study, NK-92 cells and primary NK cells were engineered to express the second generation of EGFR-CAR. The efficacies of anti-BCBMs of EGFR-CAR NK cells, oHSV-1, and their combination were tested in vitro and in a breast cancer intracranial mouse model. In vitro, compared with mock-transduced NK-92 cells or primary NK cells, EGFR-CAR-engineered NK-92 cells and primary NK cells displayed enhanced cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and MCF-7. oHSV-1 alone was also capable of lysing and destroying these cells. However, a higher cytolytic effect of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells was observed when combined with oHSV-1 compared to the monotherapies. In the mice intracranially pre-inoculated with EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells, intratumoral administration of either EGFR-CAR-transduced NK-92 cells or oHSV-1 mitigated tumor growth. Notably, the combination of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells with oHSV-1 resulted in more efficient killing of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells and significantly longer survival of tumor-bearing mice when compared to monotherapies. These results demonstrate that regional administration of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells combined with oHSV-1 therapy is a potentially promising strategy to treat BCBMs. PMID:27050072

  3. A combinational therapy of EGFR-CAR NK cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 for breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xilin; Han, Jianfeng; Chu, Jianhong; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Charlie; Chen, Luxi; Wang, Youwei; Wang, Hongwei; Yi, Long; Elder, J Bradley; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-05-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are common in patients with metastatic breast cancer and indicate a poor prognosis. These tumors are especially resistant to currently available treatments due to multiple factors. However, the combination of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has not yet been explored in this context. In this study, NK-92 cells and primary NK cells were engineered to express the second generation of EGFR-CAR. The efficacies of anti-BCBMs of EGFR-CAR NK cells, oHSV-1, and their combination were tested in vitro and in a breast cancer intracranial mouse model. In vitro, compared with mock-transduced NK-92 cells or primary NK cells, EGFR-CAR-engineered NK-92 cells and primary NK cells displayed enhanced cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and MCF-7. oHSV-1 alone was also capable of lysing and destroying these cells. However, a higher cytolytic effect of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells was observed when combined with oHSV-1 compared to the monotherapies. In the mice intracranially pre-inoculated with EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells, intratumoral administration of either EGFR-CAR-transduced NK-92 cells or oHSV-1 mitigated tumor growth. Notably, the combination of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells with oHSV-1 resulted in more efficient killing of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells and significantly longer survival of tumor-bearing mice when compared to monotherapies. These results demonstrate that regional administration of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells combined with oHSV-1 therapy is a potentially promising strategy to treat BCBMs.

  4. A combinational therapy of EGFR-CAR NK cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 for breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xilin; Han, Jianfeng; Chu, Jianhong; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Charlie; Chen, Luxi; Wang, Youwei; Wang, Hongwei; Yi, Long; Elder, J Bradley; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-05-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are common in patients with metastatic breast cancer and indicate a poor prognosis. These tumors are especially resistant to currently available treatments due to multiple factors. However, the combination of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has not yet been explored in this context. In this study, NK-92 cells and primary NK cells were engineered to express the second generation of EGFR-CAR. The efficacies of anti-BCBMs of EGFR-CAR NK cells, oHSV-1, and their combination were tested in vitro and in a breast cancer intracranial mouse model. In vitro, compared with mock-transduced NK-92 cells or primary NK cells, EGFR-CAR-engineered NK-92 cells and primary NK cells displayed enhanced cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and MCF-7. oHSV-1 alone was also capable of lysing and destroying these cells. However, a higher cytolytic effect of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells was observed when combined with oHSV-1 compared to the monotherapies. In the mice intracranially pre-inoculated with EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells, intratumoral administration of either EGFR-CAR-transduced NK-92 cells or oHSV-1 mitigated tumor growth. Notably, the combination of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells with oHSV-1 resulted in more efficient killing of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells and significantly longer survival of tumor-bearing mice when compared to monotherapies. These results demonstrate that regional administration of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells combined with oHSV-1 therapy is a potentially promising strategy to treat BCBMs. PMID:27050072

  5. The emerging role of advanced neuroimaging techniques for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Nowosielski, Martha; Radbruch, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Brain metastases are an increasingly encountered and frightening manifestation of systemic cancer. More effective therapeutic strategies for the primary tumor are resulting in longer patient survival on the one hand while on the other, better brain tumor detection has resulted from increased availability and development of more precise brain imaging methods. This review focuses on the emerging role of functional neuroimaging techniques; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as positron emission tomography (PET), in establishing diagnosis, for monitoring treatment response with an emphasis on new targeted as well as immunomodulatory therapies and for predicting prognosis in patients with brain metastases.

  6. Development and Preclinical Application of an Immunocompetent Transplant Model of Basal Breast Cancer with Lung, Liver and Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hoenerhoff, Mark; Hixon, Julie A.; Durum, Scott K.; Qiu, Ting-hu; He, Siping; Burkett, Sandra; Liu, Zi-Yao; Swanson, Steven M.; Green, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is associated with a poor prognosis and for which no targeted therapies currently exist. In order to improve preclinical testing for TNBC that relies primarily on using human xenografts in immunodeficient mice, we have developed a novel immunocompetent syngeneic murine tumor transplant model for basal-like triple-negative breast cancer. The C3(1)/SV40-T/t-antigen (C3(1)/Tag) mouse mammary tumor model in the FVB/N background shares important similarities with human basal-like TNBC. However, these tumors or derived cell lines are rejected when transplanted into wt FVB/N mice, likely due to the expression of SV40 T-antigen. We have developed a sub-line of mice (designated REAR mice) that carry only one copy of the C3(1)/Tag-antigen transgene resulting from a spontaneous transgene rearrangement in the original founder line. Unlike the original C3(1)/Tag mice, REAR mice do not develop mammary tumors or other phenotypes observed in the original C3(1)/Tag transgenic mice. REAR mice are more immunologically tolerant to SV40 T-antigen driven tumors and cell lines in an FVB/N background (including prostate tumors from TRAMP mice), but are otherwise immunologically intact. This transplant model system offers the ability to synchronously implant the C3(1)/Tag tumor-derived M6 cell line or individual C3(1)/Tag tumors from various stages of tumor development into the mammary fat pads or tail veins of REAR mice. C3(1)/Tag tumors or M6 cells implanted into the mammary fat pads spontaneously metastasize at a high frequency to the lung and liver. M6 cells injected by tail vein can form brain metastases. We demonstrate that irradiated M6 tumor cells or the same cells expressing GM-CSF can act as a vaccine to retard tumor growth of implanted tumor cells in the REAR model. Preclinical studies performed in animals with an intact immune system should more authentically replicate treatment responses in

  7. [Lymph node and distant metastases of thyroid gland cancer. Metastases in the thyroid glands].

    PubMed

    Schmid, K W

    2015-11-01

    The different biological features of the various major entities of thyroid cancer, e.g. papillary, follicular, poorly differentiated, anaplastic and medullary, depend to a large extent on their different metastatic spread. Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has a propensity for cervical lymphatic spread that occurs in 20-50 % of patients whereas distant metastasis occurs in < 5 % of cases. Cervical lymphadenopathy may be the first symptom particularly of (micro) PTC. In contrast follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) has a marked propensity for vascular but not lymphatic invasion and 10-20 % of FTC develop distant metastases. At the time of diagnosis approximately one third of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cases show lymph node metastases, in 10-15 % distant metastases and 25 % develop metastases during the course of the disease. Poorly differentiated (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) spread via both lymphatic and vascular invasion. Thus distant metastases are relatively uncommon in DTC and when they occur, long-term stable disease is the typical clinical course. The major sites of distant metastases are the lungs and bone. Metastases to the brain, breasts, liver, kidneys, muscle and skin are relatively rare or even rare. The thyroid gland itself can be a site of metastases from a variety of other tumors. In autopsy series of patients with disseminated cancer disease, metastases to the thyroid gland were found in up to 10 % of cases. Metastases from other primary tumors to the thyroid gland have been reported in 1.4-3 % of patients who have surgery for suspected cancer of the thyroid gland. The most common primary cancers that metastasize to the thyroid gland are renal cell (48.1 %), colorectal (10.4 %), lung (8.3 %) and breast cancer (7.8 %) and surprisingly often sarcomas (4.0 %).

  8. Brain Metastases from Lung Cancer Show Increased Expression of DVL1, DVL3 and Beta-Catenin and Down-Regulation of E-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-01-01

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p = 0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p = 0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain. PMID:24933634

  9. Brain metastases from lung cancer show increased expression of DVL1, DVL3 and beta-catenin and down-regulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-06-13

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p=0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p=0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain.

  10. [ANOCEF guidelines for the management of brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Dhermain, F; Noël, G; Reyns, N; Carpentier, A; Mandonnet, E; Taillibert, S; Metellus, P

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of brain metastases is increasing because of the use of new therapeutic agents, which allow an improvement of overall survival, but with only a poor penetration into the central nervous system brain barriers. The management of brain metastases has changed due to a better knowledge of immunohistochemical data and molecular biological data, the development of new surgical, radiotherapeutic approaches and improvement of systemic treatments. Most of the time, the prognosis is still limited to several months, nevertheless, prolonged survival may be now observed in some sub-groups of patients. The main prognostic factors include the type and subtype of the primitive, age, general status of the patient, number and location of brain metastases, extracerebral disease. The multidisciplinary discussion should take into account all of these parameters. We should notice also that treatments including surgery or radiotherapy may be proposed in a symptomatic goal in advanced phases of the disease underlying the multidisciplinary approach until late in the evolution of the disease. This article reports on the ANOCEF (French neuro-oncology association) guidelines. The management of brain metastases of breast cancers and lung cancers are discussed in the same chapter, while the management of melanoma brain metastases is reported in a separate chapter due to different responses to the brain radiotherapy.

  11. Outcomes and Prognostic Factors in Women With 1 to 3 Breast Cancer Brain Metastases Treated With Definitive Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Oh, Jung Hun; Folkert, Michael R.; Gupta, Gaorav; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Morikawa, Aki; Seidman, Andrew; Brennan, Cameron; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy A.; Beal, Kathryn

    2014-11-01

    Background: With the continuing increase in the use of definitive stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with limited brain metastases (BM), clinicians need more specific prognostic tools. We investigated clinical predictors of outcomes in patients with limited breast cancer BM treated with SRS alone. Methods and Materials: We identified 136 patients with breast cancer and 1-3 BM who underwent definitive SRS for 186 BM between 2000 and 2012. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess overall survival (OS), regional failure (RF), and local failure (LF). Associations between clinical factors and outcomes were tested using Cox regression. A point scoring system was used to stratify patients based on OS, and the predictive power was tested with concordance probability estimate (CPE). Results: The median OS was 17.6 months. The 12-month RF and LF rates were 45% and 10%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, >1 lesion (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.6, P=.02), triple-negative (TN) disease (HR=2.0, P=.006), and active extracranial disease (ED) (HR=2.7, P<.0001) were significantly associated with worse OS. The point score system was defined using proportional simplification of the multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression function. The median OS for patients with 3.0-4.0 points (n=37), 4.5-5.5 points (n=28), 6.0-6.5 points (n=37), and 8-8.5 points (n=34) were 9.2, 15.6, 25.1, and 45.1 months, respectively (P<.0001, CPE = 0.72). Active ED (HR=2.4, P=.0007) was significantly associated with RF. Higher risk for LF was significantly associated with larger BM size (HR=3.1, P=.0001). Conclusion: Patients with >1 BM, active ED, and TN had the highest risk of death after SRS. Active ED is an important prognostic factor for OS and intracranial control.

  12. Risk Factors for Brain Metastases in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Definitive Chest Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Zhe; Bi, Nan; Wang, Jingbo; Hui, Zhouguang; Xiao, Zefen; Feng, Qinfu; Zhou, Zongmei; Chen, Dongfu; Lv, Jima; Liang, Jun; Fan, Chengcheng; Liu, Lipin; Wang, Luhua

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We intended to identify risk factors that affect brain metastases (BM) in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) receiving definitive radiation therapy, which may guide the choice of selective prevention strategies. Methods and Materials: The characteristics of 346 patients with stage III NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation therapy from January 2008 to December 2010 in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. BM rates were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for BM. Results: The median follow-up time was 48.3 months in surviving patients. A total of 74 patients (21.4%) experienced BM at the time of analysis, and for 40 (11.7%) of them, the brain was the first site of failure. The 1-year and 3-year brain metastasis rates were 15% and 28.1%, respectively. In univariate analysis, female sex, age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, T3-4, N3, >3 areas of lymph node metastasis, high lactate dehydrogenase and serum levels of tumor markers (CEA, NSE, CA125) before treatment were significantly associated with BM (P<.05). In multivariate analysis, age ≤60 years (P=.004, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.491), non-squamous cell carcinoma (P=.000, HR=3.726), NSE >18 ng/mL (P=.008, HR=1.968) and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL (P=.002, HR=2.129) were independent risk factors for BM. For patients with 0, 1, 2, and 3 to 4 risk factors, the 3-year BM rates were 7.3%, 18.9%, 35.8%, and 70.3%, respectively (P<.001). Conclusions: Age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, serum NSE >18 ng/mL, and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL were independent risk factors for brain metastasis. The possibilities of selectively using prophylactic cranial irradiation in higher-risk patients with LA-NSCLC should be further explored in the future.

  13. Gender, Race, and Survival: A Study in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases Patients Utilizing the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Chao, Samuel T.; Rice, Thomas W.; Adelstein, David J.; Barnett, Gene H.; Mekhail, Tarek M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To explore whether gender and race influence survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with brain metastases, using our large single-institution brain tumor database and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) brain metastases classification. Methods and materials: A retrospective review of a single-institution brain metastasis database for the interval January 1982 to September 2004 yielded 835 NSCLC patients with brain metastases for analysis. Patient subsets based on combinations of gender, race, and RPA class were then analyzed for survival differences. Results: Median follow-up was 5.4 months (range, 0-122.9 months). There were 485 male patients (M) (58.4%) and 346 female patients (F) (41.6%). Of the 828 evaluable patients (99%), 143 (17%) were black/African American (B) and 685 (83%) were white/Caucasian (W). Median survival time (MST) from time of brain metastasis diagnosis for all patients was 5.8 months. Median survival time by gender (F vs. M) and race (W vs. B) was 6.3 months vs. 5.5 months (p = 0.013) and 6.0 months vs. 5.2 months (p = 0.08), respectively. For patients stratified by RPA class, gender, and race, MST significantly favored BFs over BMs in Class II: 11.2 months vs. 4.6 months (p = 0.021). On multivariable analysis, significant variables were gender (p = 0.041, relative risk [RR] 0.83) and RPA class (p < 0.0001, RR 0.28 for I vs. III; p < 0.0001, RR 0.51 for II vs. III) but not race. Conclusions: Gender significantly influences NSCLC brain metastasis survival. Race trended to significance in overall survival but was not significant on multivariable analysis. Multivariable analysis identified gender and RPA classification as significant variables with respect to survival.

  14. A phase I study of lapatinib with whole brain radiotherapy in patients with Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nancy U; Freedman, Rachel A; Ramakrishna, Naren; Younger, Jerry; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Bellon, Jennifer R; Come, Steven E; Gelman, Rebecca S; Harris, Gordon J; Henderson, Mark A; Macdonald, Shannon M; Mahadevan, Anand; Eisenberg, Emily; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Mayer, Erica L; Moy, Beverly; Eichler, April F; Winer, Eric P

    2013-11-01

    Brain metastases are common in patients with advanced, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. We evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and feasibility of lapatinib given concurrently with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Eligible patients had (HER2)-positive breast cancer and ≥1 brain metastasis. Patients received lapatinib 750 mg twice on day one followed by 1000, 1250, or 1500 mg once daily. WBRT (37.5 Gy, 15 fractions) began 1-8 days after starting lapatinib. Lapatinib was continued through WBRT. Following WBRT, patients received trastuzumab 2 mg/kg weekly and lapatinib 1000 mg once daily. The regimen would be considered feasible if <3/27 pts treated at the MTD experienced a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Thirty-five patients were enrolled; 17 % had central nervous disease (CNS) only. During dose escalation, no patients receiving 1,000 or 1,250 mg and two of five patients receiving 1,500 mg experienced DLTs (grade 3 mucositis and rash). Overall, 7/27 patients at 1,250 mg (MTD) had DLTs: grade 3 rash (n = 2), diarrhea (n = 2), hypoxia (n = 1), and grade 4 pulmonary embolus (n = 2). Among 28 evaluable patients, the CNS objective response rate (ORR) was 79 % [95% confidence interval (CI) 59-92 %] by pre-specified volumetric criteria; 46 % remained progression-free (CNS or non-CNS) at 6 months. The study did not meet the pre-defined criteria for feasibility because of toxicity, although the relationship between study treatment and some DLTs was uncertain. Given the high ORR, concurrent lapatinib-WBRT could still be considered for future study with careful safety monitoring.

  15. Dose-dense temozolomide regimen for the treatment of brain metastases from melanoma, breast cancer, or lung cancer not amenable to surgery or radiosurgery: a multicenter phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Siena, S.; Crinò, L.; Danova, M.; Del Prete, S.; Cascinu, S.; Salvagni, S.; Schiavetto, I.; Vitali, M.; Bajetta, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases reduce survival because therapeutic options are limited. This phase II study evaluated the efficacy of single-agent therapy with alternating weekly, dose-dense temozolomide in pretreated patients with brain metastases prospectively stratified by primary tumor type. Methods: Eligible patients had bidimensionally measurable brain metastases from histologically/cytologically confirmed melanoma, breast cancer (BC), or non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Prior chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) were allowed. Patients received temozolomide 150 mg/m2/day (days 1–7 and 15–21 every 28- or 35-day cycle). Results: In the intent-to-treat population (N = 157; 53 melanoma, 51 BC, and 53 NSCLC), one patient had complete response, nine (6%) had partial responses, and 31 (20%) had stable disease in the brain. Median progression-free survival was 56, 58, and 66 days for melanoma, BC, and NSCLC, respectively. Median overall survival was 100 days for melanoma, 172 days for NSCLC, and not evaluable in the BC group. Thrombocytopenia was the most common adverse event causing dose modification or treatment discontinuation. Grade 4 toxic effects were rare. Conclusions: This alternating weekly, dose-dense temozolomide regimen was well tolerated and clinically active in heavily pretreated patients with brain metastases, particularly in patients with melanoma. Combining temozolomide with WBRT or other agents may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:19767314

  16. Strategies for overcoming the blood-brain barrier for the treatment of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jethro; Kesari, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    The era of targeted therapy for cancer has been punctuated by some resounding successes, but with few exceptions, metastases to the brain remain frustratingly difficult to treat. It is increasingly apparent that old concerns regarding the ability of therapeutic agents to penetrate the blood-brain barrier have not been brushed aside by high-affinity small-molecule kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Indeed, illustrative trends, such as the increasing incidence of brain metastases from HER2(+) breast cancer since the advent of trastuzumab therapy, have helped to solidify the concept of the CNS as a sanctuary site for cancer. With 200,000 patients diagnosed with brain metastases in the USA each year, the therapeutic challenge posed by the blood-brain barrier continues to be a big problem.

  17. 18F-NaF PET/CT Imaging of Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Salgarello, Matteo; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Inno, Alessandro; Pasetto, Stefano; Severi, Fabrizia; Gorgoni, Giancarlo; Gori, Stefania

    2016-07-01

    F-NaF is a radiopharmaceutical widely used in PET imaging to detect bone metastases. Several cases of F-NaF uptake from brain metastases have been described, but a specific protocol for the evaluation of brain metastases with F-NaF has not been developed yet. Here we report images of F-NaF PET/CT, standard CT, and MRI of a brain metastasis in a patient with non-small lung cancer. Through a dynamic acquisition procedure, we have identified the first minutes after injection as the preferable time point of imaging acquisition for the study of brain metastases with F-NaF.

  18. Whole brain radiotherapy plus simultaneous in-field boost with image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for brain metastases of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) plus sequential focal radiation boost is a commonly used therapeutic strategy for patients with brain metastases. However, recent reports on WBRT plus simultaneous in-field boost (SIB) also showed promising outcomes. The objective of present study is to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of WBRT plus SIB with image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for inoperable brain metastases of NSCLC. Methods Twenty-nine NSCLC patients with 87 inoperable brain metastases were included in this retrospective study. All patients received WBRT at a dose of 40 Gy/20 f, and SIB boost with IG-IMRT at a dose of 20 Gy/5 f concurrent with WBRT in the fourth week. Prior to each fraction of IG-IMRT boost, on-line positioning verification and correction were used to ensure that the set-up errors were within 2 mm by cone beam computed tomography in all patients. Results The one-year intracranial control rate, local brain failure rate, and distant brain failure rate were 62.9%, 13.8%, and 19.2%, respectively. The two-year intracranial control rate, local brain failure rate, and distant brain failure rate were 42.5%, 30.9%, and 36.4%, respectively. Both median intracranial progression-free survival and median survival were 10 months. Six-month, one-year, and two-year survival rates were 65.5%, 41.4%, and 13.8%, corresponding to 62.1%, 41.4%, and 10.3% of intracranial progression-free survival rates. Patients with Score Index for Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases (SIR) >5, number of intracranial lesions <3, and history of EGFR-TKI treatment had better survival. Three lesions (3.45%) demonstrated radiation necrosis after radiotherapy. Grades 2 and 3 cognitive impairment with grade 2 radiation leukoencephalopathy were observed in 4 (13.8%) and 4 (13.8%) patients. No dosimetric parameters were found to be associated with these late toxicities. Patients received EGFR-TKI treatment had higher incidence of grades 2–3

  19. Brain metastases management paradigm shift: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    REFAAT, TAMER; SACHDEV, SEAN; DESAI, BRIJAL; BACCHUS, IAN; HATOUM, SALEH; LEE, PLATO; BLOCH, ORIN; CHANDLER, JAMES P.; KALAPURAKAL, JOHN; MARYMONT, MARYANNE HOFFMAN

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial tumors in adults, accounting for over half of all lesions. Whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) has been a cornerstone in the management of brain metastases for decades. Recently, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been considered as a definitive or postoperative approach instead of WBRT, to minimize the risk of cognitive impairment that may be associated with WBRT. This is the case report of a 74-year-old female patient who was diagnosed with lung cancer in November, 2002, and histopathologically confirmed brain metastases in January, 2005. The patient received 5 treatments with Gamma Knife SRS for recurring brain metastases between 2005 and 2014. The patient remains highly functional, with stable intracranial disease at 10 years since first developing brain metastases, and with stable lung disease. Therefore, Gamma Knife SRS is a safe and effective treatment modality for patients with recurrent intracranial metastases, with durable local control and minimal cognitive impairment. PMID:27073647

  20. [Systemic treatment of melanoma brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Mateus, C; Mortier, L; Dhermain, F; Guillot, B; Grob, J-J; Lebbe, C; Thomas, M; Jouary, T; Leccia, M-T; Robert, C

    2015-02-01

    Melanomas have a high rate of brain metastases. Both the functional prognosis and the overall survival are poor in these patients. Until now, surgery and radiotherapy represented the two main modalities of treatment. Nevertheless, due to the improvement in the management of the extracerebral melanoma, the systemic treatment may be an option in patients with brain metastases. Immunotherapy with anti-CTLA4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4) - ipilimumab - or BRAF (serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf) inhibitors - vemurafenib, dabrafenib - has shown efficacy in the management of brain metastases in a- or pauci-symptomatic patients. Studies are ongoing with anti-PD1 (programmed cell death 1) and combinations of targeted therapies associating anti-RAF (raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase) and anti-MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase).

  1. Prophylactic cranial irradiation for preventing brain metastases in patients undergoing radical treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer: A Cochrane Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, Jason Francis . E-mail: jason.lester@velindre-tr.wales.nhs.uk; MacBeth, Fergus R.; Coles, Bernadette

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) has a role in the management of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative intent. Methods and Materials: A search strategy was designed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PCI with no PCI in NSCLC patients treated with curative intent. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and Cancerlit were searched, along with relevant journals, books, and review articles to identify potentially eligible trials. Four RCTs were identified and reviewed. A total of 951 patients were randomized in these RCTs, of whom 833 were evaluable and reported. Forty-two patients with small-cell lung cancer were excluded, leaving 791 patients in total. Because of the small patient numbers and trial heterogeneity, no meta-analysis was attempted. Results: Prophylactic cranial irradiation did significantly reduce the incidence of brain metastases in three trials. No trial reported a survival advantage with PCI over observation. Toxicity data were poorly collected and no quality of life assessments were carried out in any trial. Conclusion: Prophylactic cranial irradiation may reduce the incidence of brain metastases, but there is no evidence of a survival benefit. It was not possible to evaluate whether any radiotherapy regimen is superior, and the effect of PCI on quality of life is not known. There is insufficient evidence to support the use of PCI in clinical practice. Where possible, patients should be offered entry into a clinical trial.

  2. Liver metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the liver; Metastatic liver cancer; Liver cancer - metastatic; Colorectal cancer - liver metastases; Colon cancer - liver metastases; Esophageal cancer - liver metastases; Lung cancer - liver metastases; Melanoma - liver metastases

  3. Genomic characterization of brain metastases reveals branched evolution and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Cahill, Daniel P.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Jones, Robert T.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Ligon, Keith L.; Tabernero, Josep; Seoane, Joan; Martinez-Saez, Elena; Curry, William T.; Dunn, Ian F.; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Sung-Hye; McKenna, Aaron; Chevalier, Aaron; Rosenberg, Mara; Barker, Frederick G.; Gill, Corey M.; Van Hummelen, Paul; Thorner, Aaron R.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Hoang, Mai P.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Signoretti, Sabina; Sougnez, Carrie; Rabin, Michael S.; Lin, Nancy U.; Winer, Eric P.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Meyerson, Matthew; Garraway, Levi; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric S.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Baselga, Jose; Louis, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are associated with a dismal prognosis. Whether brain metastases harbor distinct genetic alterations beyond those observed in primary tumors is unknown. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 86 matched brain metastases, primary tumors and normal tissue. In all clonally related cancer samples, we observed branched evolution, where all metastatic and primary sites shared a common ancestor yet continued to evolve independently. In 53% of cases, we found potentially clinically informative alterations in the brain metastases not detected in the matched primary-tumor sample. In contrast, spatially and temporally separated brain metastasis sites were genetically homogenous. Distal extracranial and regional lymph node metastases were highly divergent from brain metastases. We detected alterations associated with sensitivity to PI3K/AKT/mTOR, CDK, and HER2/EGFR inhibitors in the brain metastases. Genomic analysis of brain metastases provides an opportunity to identify potentially clinically informative alterations not detected in clinically sampled primary tumors, regional lymph nodes, or extracranial metastases. PMID:26410082

  4. Motexafin Gadolinium Combined With Prompt Whole Brain Radiotherapy Prolongs Time to Neurologic Progression in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases: Results of a Phase III Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Minesh P. Shapiro, William R.; Phan, See C.; Gervais, Radj; Carrie, Christian; Chabot, Pierre; Patchell, Roy A.; Glantz, Michael J.; Recht, Lawrence; Langer, Corey; Sur, Ranjan K.; Roa, Wilson H.; Mahe, Marc A.; Fortin, Andre; Nieder, Carsten; Meyers, Christina A.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Miller, Richard A.; Renschler, Markus F.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In an international, randomized, Phase III study, patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer were randomized to WBRT with or without MGd. The primary endpoint was the interval to neurologic progression, determined by a centralized Events Review Committee who was unaware of the treatment the patients had received. Results: Of 554 patients, 275 were randomized to WBRT and 279 to WBRT+MGd. Treatment with MGd was well tolerated, and 92% of the intended doses were administered. The most common MGd-related Grade 3+ adverse events included liver function abnormalities (5.5%), asthenia (4.0%), and hypertension (4%). MGd improved the interval to neurologic progression compared with WBRT alone (15 vs. 10 months; p = 0.12, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78) and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.057, HR = 0.78). The WBRT patients required more salvage brain surgery or radiosurgery than did the WBRT+MGd patients (54 vs. 25 salvage procedures, p < 0.001). A statistically significant interaction between the geographic region and MGd treatment effect (which was in the prespecified analysis plan) and between treatment delay and MGd treatment effect was found. In North American patients, where treatment was more prompt, a statistically significant prolongation of the interval to neurologic progression, from 8.8 months for WBRT to 24.2 months for WBRT+MGd (p = 0.004, HR = 0.53), and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.06, HR = 0.73) were observed. Conclusion: In the intent-to-treat analysis, MGd exhibited a favorable trend in neurologic outcomes. MGd significantly prolonged the interval to neurologic progression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases receiving prompt WBRT. The toxicity was acceptable.

  5. Stereotactic Radiosurgical Treatment of Brain Metastases to the Choroid Plexus;Renal cell cancer; Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA); Graded prognostic assessment (GPA); Survival and outcomes; Gamma knife

    SciTech Connect

    Siomin, Vitaly; Lin, Jennifer L.; Marko, Nicholas F.; Barnett, Gene H.; Toms, Steven A.; Chao, Samuel T.; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Navaratne, Kapila; Suh, John H.; Weil, Robert J.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Choroid plexus metastases (CPM) are uncommon lesions. Consequently, optimal management of CPM is uncertain. We summarize our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of CPM. Methods and Materials: Sixteen consecutive patients with presumed CPM treated with SRS between 1997 and 2007 were examined. Twelve were men with a median age at diagnosis of CPM of 61.9 {+-} 9.9 years; 14 had metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). All patients had controlled primary disease at the time of treatment for CPM. Four patients with RCC and 1 with non-small-cell lung cancer had undergone whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) previously and 2 had received SRS to other brain metastases. The disease-free interval from the primary diagnosis to CPM diagnosis averaged 39.3 {+-} 46.2 months (range, 1.0-156.3). Five patients were asymptomatic; of the remaining 11, none had symptoms related to CPM. All presented with a single CPM. Results: Average maximum diameter of the CPMs was 2.0 {+-} 1.0 cm (range, 0.9-4.1 cm); mean volume was 2.4 {+-} 2.6 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-9.3). Median SRS dose was 24 Gy to the 53% isodose line (range, 14-24 Gy). Survival after SRS to the CPM was 25.3 {+-} 23.4 months (range, 3.2-101.6). Patients in Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA) class I (n = 10) had improved survival compared to those in class II (n = 6), as did those with better GPA scores. There were no local failures. After SRS, 1 patient underwent WBRT, 3 patients had one, and another had two subsequent SRS treatments to other brain lesions. Of the 14 patients who have died, 11 succumbed to systemic disease progression, 2 to progressive, multifocal central nervous system disease, and 1 to systemic disease with concurrent, stable central nervous system disease. There were no complications related to SRS. Conclusions: Most CPMs are associated with RCC. SRS represents a safe and viable treatment option as primary modality for these metastases, with excellent outcomes.

  6. A Phase 3 Trial of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone Versus WBRT and SRS With Temozolomide or Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and 1 to 3 Brain Metastases: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0320

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Wang, Meihua; Robins, H. Ian; Schell, Michael C.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Komaki, Ritsuko; Souhami, Luis; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Khuntia, Deepak; Demas, William; Shah, Sunjay A.; Nedzi, Lucien A.; Perry, Gad; Suh, John H.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2013-04-01

    Background: A phase 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study subset analysis demonstrated improved overall survival (OS) with the addition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Because temozolomide (TMZ) and erlotinib (ETN) cross the blood-brain barrier and have documented activity in NSCLC, a phase 3 study was designed to test whether these drugs would improve the OS associated with WBRT + SRS. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive WBRT (2.5 Gy × 15 to 37.5 Gy) and SRS alone, versus WBRT + SRS + TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 21 days) or ETN (150 mg/day). ETN (150 mg/day) or TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 5 days/month) could be continued for as long as 6 months after WBRT + SRS. The primary endpoint was OS. Results: After 126 patients were enrolled, the study closed because of accrual limitations. The median survival times (MST) for WBRT + SRS, WBRT + SRS + TMZ, and WBRT + SRS + ETN were qualitatively different (13.4, 6.3, and 6.1 months, respectively), although the differences were not statistically significant. Time to central nervous system progression and performance status at 6 months were better in the WBRT + SRS arm. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was 11%, 41%, and 49% in arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<.001). Conclusion: The addition of TMZ or ETN to WBRT + SRS in NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases did not improve survival and possibly had a deleterious effect. Because the analysis is underpowered, these data suggest but do not prove that increased toxicity was the cause of inferior survival in the drug arms.

  7. Trial design on prophylaxis and treatment of brain metastases: lessons learned from the EORTC Brain Metastases Strategic Meeting 2012.

    PubMed

    Preusser, Matthias; Winkler, Frank; Collette, Laurence; Haller, Sven; Marreaud, Sandrine; Soffietti, Riccardo; Klein, Martin; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Baumert, Brigitta G; Mulvenna, Paula; Schadendorf, Dirk; Duchnowska, Renata; Berghoff, Anna Sophie; Lin, Nancy; Cameron, David A; Belkacemi, Yazid; Jassem, Jacek; Weber, Damien C

    2012-12-01

    Brain metastases (BM) occur in a significant proportion of cancer patients and are associated with considerable morbidity and poor prognosis. The trial design in BM patients is particularly challenging, as many disease and patient variables, statistical issues, and the selection of appropriate end-points have to be taken into account. During a meeting organised on behalf of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), methodological aspects of trial design in BM were discussed. This paper summarises the issues and potential trial strategies discussed during this meeting and may provide some guidance for the design of trials in BM patients.

  8. Radiation Therapy for the Management of Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Matthew D; Wu, Cheng-Chia; Yanagihara, Ted K; Jani, Ashish; Wang, Tony J C

    2016-08-01

    Brain metastases are the most common malignant intracranial tumors and carry a poor prognosis. The management of brain metastases may include a variety of treatment modalities including surgical resection, radiation therapy, and/or systemic therapy. The traditional treatment for brain metastasis involved whole brain irradiation. However, improved systemic control of primary cancers has led to longer survival for some groups of patients and there is increasing need to consider the late effects of radiation to the entire brain. With advances in imaging and radiation treatment planning and delivery stereotactic radiosurgery has become more frequently utilized and may be delivered through Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery or linear accelerator-based systems. Furthermore, experience in treating thousands of patients on clinical trials has led to diagnosis-specific prognostic assessment systems that help guide our approach to the management of this common clinical scenario. This review provides an overview of the literature supporting radiotherapy for brain metastasis and an update on current radiotherapeutic options that is tailored for the nonradiation oncologist. PMID:27213494

  9. A pathology-based substrate for target definition in radiosurgery of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Baumert, Brigitta G. . E-mail: brigitta.baumert@maastro.nl; Rutten, Isabelle; Dehing-Oberije, Cary M.Sc.; Twijnstra, Albert; Dirx, Miranda J.M.; Debougnoux-Huppertz, Ria M.T.L.; Lambin, Philippe; Kubat, Bela

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the need of a margin other than for accuracy reasons in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases by means of histopathology. Methods and Materials: Evaluation of 45 patients from two pathology departments having had brain metastases and an autopsy of the brain. Growth patterns were reviewed with a focus on infiltration beyond the metastases boundary and made visible with immunohistochemical staining: the metastasis itself with tumor-specific markers, surrounding normal brain tissue with a glial marker, and a possible capsule with a soft tissue marker. Measurements were corrected by a tissue-shrinkage correction factor taken from literature. Outcomes parameters for infiltration were mean and maximum depths of infiltration and number of measured infiltration sites. Results: In 48 of 76 metastases, an infiltration was present. The largest group of metastases was lung cancer. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and melanoma showed a maximum depth of infiltration of {>=}1 mm, and other histologies <1 mm. For non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), melanoma, and sarcoma, the highest number of infiltrative sites were observed (median, 2; range, 1-8). SCLC showed significantly larger infiltrative growth, compared with other diagnostic groups. In NSCLC, the highest percentage of infiltration was present (70%). Conclusions: Infiltrative growth beyond the border of the brain metastasis was demonstrated in 63% of the cases evaluated. Infiltrative growth, therefore, has an impact in defining the clinical target volume for SRS of brain metastases, and a margin of {approx}1 mm should be added to the visible lesion.

  10. Hypofractionated Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Multiple Brain Metastases From Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Meyners, Thekla; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schild, Steven E.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Brain metastases in bladder cancer patients are extremely rare. Most patients with multiple lesions receive longer-course whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with 10 x 3 Gy/2 weeks or 20 x 2 Gy/4 weeks. Because its radiosensitivity is relatively low, metastases from bladder cancer may be treated better with hypofractionated radiotherapy. This study compared short-course hypofractionated WBRT (5 x 4 Gy/1 week) to longer-course WBRT. Methods and Materials: Data for 33 patients receiving WBRT alone for multiple brain metastases from transitional cell bladder carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. Short-course WBRT with 5 x 4 Gy (n = 12 patients) was compared to longer-course WBRT with 10 x 3 Gy/20 x 2 Gy (n = 21 patients) for overall survival (OS) and local (intracerebral) control (LC). Five additional potential prognostic factors were investigated: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), number of brain metastases, and extracranial metastases. The Bonferroni correction for multiple tests was used to adjust the p values derived from the multivariate analysis. p values of <0.025 were considered significant. Results: At 6 months, OS was 42% after 5 x 4 Gy and 24% after 10 x 3/20 x 2 Gy (p = 0.31). On univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with less than four brain metastases (p = 0.021) and almost associated with a lack of extracranial metastases (p = 0.057). On multivariate analysis, both factors were not significant. At 6 months, LC was 83% after 5 x 4 Gy and 27% after 10 x 3/20 x 2 Gy (p = 0.035). Improved LC was almost associated with a KPS of {>=}70 (p = 0.051). On multivariate analysis, WBRT regimen was almost significant (p = 0.036). KPS showed a trend (p = 0.07). Conclusions: Short-course WBRT with 5 x 4 Gy should be seriously considered for most patients with multiple brain metastases from bladder cancer, as it resulted in improved LC.

  11. Shorter-Course Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases in Elderly Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Evers, Jasmin N.; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Lohynska, Radka; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Many patients with brain metastases receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. Using 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy in 2 weeks is the standard regimen in most centers. Regarding the extraordinarily poor survival prognosis of elderly patients with multiple brain metastases, a shorter WBRT regimen would be preferable. This study compared 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy in elderly patients ({>=}65 years). Methods and Materials: Data from 455 elderly patients who received WBRT alone for brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Survival and local (= intracerebral) control of 293 patients receiving 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy were compared with 162 patients receiving 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy. Eight additional potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), primary tumor, number of brain metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: The 6-month overall survival rates were 29% after 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy and 21% after 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy (p = 0.020). The 6-month local control rates were 12% and 10%, respectively (p = 0.32). On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), only one to three brain metastases (p = 0.029), no extracerebral metastasis (p = 0.012), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Improved local control was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), breast cancer (p = 0.029), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter-course WBRT with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy was not inferior to 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with respect to overall survival or local control in elderly patients. 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy appears preferable for the majority of these patients.

  12. Memory Function Before and After Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With and Without Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Welzel, Grit Fleckenstein, Katharina; Schaefer, Joerg; Hermann, Brigitte; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Mai, Sabine K.; Wenz, Frederik

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) on memory function in patients with and without brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with and without brain metastases (n = 44) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before RT (T0), after starting RT (T1), at the end of RT (T2), and 6-8 weeks (T3) after RT completion. Data were obtained from small-cell lung cancer patients treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation, patients with brain metastases treated with therapeutic cranial irradiation (TCI), and breast cancer patients treated with RT to the breast. Results: Before therapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation patients performed worse than TCI patients or than controls on most test scores. During and after WBRT, verbal memory function was influenced by pretreatment cognitive status (p < 0.001) and to a lesser extent by WBRT. Acute (T1) radiation effects on verbal memory function were only observed in TCI patients (p = 0.031). Subacute (T3) radiation effects on verbal memory function were observed in both TCI and prophylactic cranial irradiation patients (p = 0.006). These effects were more pronounced in patients with above-average performance at baseline. Visual memory and attention were not influenced by WBRT. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that WBRT causes cognitive dysfunction immediately after the beginning of RT in patients with brain metastases only. At 6-8 weeks after the end of WBRT, cognitive dysfunction was seen in patients with and without brain metastases. Because cognitive dysfunction after WBRT is restricted to verbal memory, patients should not avoid WBRT because of a fear of neurocognitive side effects.

  13. Brain metastases from gestational trophoblastic neoplasia: review of pertinent literature.

    PubMed

    Piura, E; Piura, B

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastasis from gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is rare with about 222 cases documented in the literature and an incidence of about 11% in living GTN patients. Brain metastasis from GTN was part of a disseminated disease in 90% of patients, single metastases in the brain - 80% and located in the cerebrum - 90%. Brain metastasis was the only manifestation of metastatic GTN in 11.3% of patients, appeared synchronously with metastatic GTN in other sites of the body - 30.6% and was diagnosed from 0.3 to 60 months after diagnosis of metastatic GTN in other sites (most often in the lung) - 58.1%. Overall, 83.9% of patients with brain metastases from GTN had also lung metastases from GTN. Brain metastases from GTN showed a greater tendency to be hemorrhagic compared to brain metastases from other primaries. In patients with brain metastases from GTN, the best outcome was achieved with multimodal therapy including craniotomy, whole brain radiotherapy, and EP-EMA or EMA-CO chemotherapy. Nonetheless, brain metastasis from GTN is a grave disease with a median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastasis of about 12 months.

  14. Brain metastases at the time of presentation of non-small cell lung cancer: a multi-centric AERIO analysis of prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Jacot, W; Quantin, X; Boher, J-M; Andre, F; Moreau, L; Gainet, M; Depierre, A; Quoix, E; Chevalier, T Le; Pujol, J-L

    2001-01-01

    A multi-centre retrospective study involving 4 French university institutions has been conducted in order to identify routine pre-therapeutic prognostic factors of survival in patients with previously untreated non-small cell lung cancer and brain metastases at the time of presentation. A total of 231 patients were recorded regarding their clinical, radiological and biological characteristics at presentation. The accrual period was January 1991 to December 1998. Prognosis was analysed using both univariate and multivariate (Cox model) statistics. The median survival of the whole population was 28 weeks. Univariate analysis (log-rank), showed that patients affected by one of the following characteristics proved to have a shorter survival in comparison with the opposite status of each variable: male gender, age over 63 years, poor performance status, neurological symptoms, serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE) level higher than 12.5 ng ml−1, high serum alkaline phosphatase level, high serum LDH level and serum sodium level below 132 mmol l−1. In the Cox's model, the following variables were independent determinants of a poor outcome: male gender: hazard ratio (95% confidence interval): 2.29 (1.26–4.16), poor performance status: 1.73 (1.15–2.62), age: 1.02 (1.003–1.043), a high serum NSE level: 1.72 (1.11–2.68), neurological symptoms: 1.63 (1.05–2.54), and a low serum sodium level: 2.99 (1.17–7.62). Apart from 4 prognostic factors shared in common with other stage IV NSCLC patients, whatever the metastatic site (namely sex, age, gender, performance status and serum sodium level) this study discloses 2 determinants specifically resulting from brain metastasis: i.e. the presence of neurological symptoms and a high serum NSE level. The latter factor could be in relationship with the extent of normal brain tissue damage caused by the tumour as has been demonstrated after strokes. Additionally, the observation of a high NSE level as a prognostic

  15. Recent advances in radiosurgical management of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Devoid, Hannah-Marie; McTyre, Emory R; Page, Brandi R; Metheny-Barlow, Linda; Ruiz, Jimmy; Chan, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has become a widely available treatment option for patients with brain metastases. Recent clinical trials suggest that SRS can be used without upfront whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), resulting in several clinical dilemmas in the current daily practice of SRS. The proper patient selection for SRS or WBRT continues to evolve. Statistical models to predict when new brain metastases will occur as well as who will experience neurologic death have been developed. The optimization of imaging continues for both detection of brain metastases and response assessment. Larger brain metastases continue to pose a challenge to practitioners to find options to optimize the therapeutic ratio. The current review addresses the current state of the scientific literature for these clinical dilemmas. PMID:26709908

  16. In Vivo Single Scan Detection of Both Iron-Labeled Cells and Breast Cancer Metastases in the Mouse Brain Using Balanced Steady-State Free Precession Imaging at 1.5 T

    PubMed Central

    Ribot, Emeline J.; Martinez-Santiesteban, Francisco M.; Simedrea, Carmen; Steeg, Patricia S.; Chambers, Ann F.; Rutt, Brian K.; Foster, Paula J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To simultaneously detect iron-labeled cancer cells and brain tumors in vivo in one scan, the balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) imaging sequence was optimized at 1.5 T on mice developing brain metastases subsequent to the injection of micron-sized iron oxide particle-labeled human breast cancer cells. Materials and Methods b-SSFP sequence parameters (repetition time, flip angle, and receiver bandwidth) were varied and the signal-to-noise ratio, contrast between the brain and tumors, and the number of detected iron-labeled cells were evaluated. Results Optimal b-SSFP images were acquired with a 26 msec repetition time, 35° flip angle, and bandwidth of ±21 kHz. b-SSFP images were compared with T2-weighted 2D fast spin echo (FSE) and 3D spoiled gradient recalled echo (SPGR) images. The mean tumor-brain contrast-to-noise ratio and the ability to detect iron-labeled cells were the highest in the b-SSFP images. Conclusion A single b-SSFP scan can be used to visualize both iron-labeled cells and brain metastases. PMID:21698713

  17. Multimodality treatment of brain metastases from renal cell carcinoma in the era of targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Bassanelli; Antonella, Viterbo; Michela, Roberto; Silvana, Giacinti; Anita, Staddon; Anna Maria, Aschelter; Chiara, D’Antonio; Paolo, Marchetti

    2016-01-01

    In patients with renal cancer, brain metastasis is associated with poor survival and high morbidity. Poor life expectancy is often associated with widespread extracranial metastases. In such patients, a multidisciplinary approach is paramount. Brain metastases-specific therapies may include surgery, radiosurgery, conventional radiation and targeted therapies (TT) or a combination of these treatments. Some factors are important prognostically when choosing the best strategy: performance status, the number, size and location of brain metastases, the extension of systemic metastases and a well-controlled primary tumour. Failure of chemical therapy has always been attributed to an intact blood–brain barrier and acquired drug resistance by renal cancer cells. Recent studies have demonstrated objective responses with TT in a variety of cancer types, including renal cancer. In most cases, these agents have been used in combination and in conjunction with whole-brain radiation therapy and radiosurgery. Local control appears to be better with the combined method if the patient has a good performance status and may improve overall survival. This review summarizes current literature data on multidisciplinary approach in the management of renal brain metastasis with radiation, surgery and TT with an emphasis on potential better outcomes with a combination of current treatment methods. PMID:27800033

  18. Prognostic factors for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer with EGFR mutation: influence of stable extracranial disease and erlotinib therapy.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Akimasa; Satoh, Hiroaki; Iwasawa, Tae; Tamura, Katsumi; Hayashihara, Kenji; Saito, Takefumi; Kato, Terufumi; Arai, Mito; Okudela, Koji; Ohashi, Kenichi; Ogura, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore prognostic factors for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastases (BM) on the basis of EGFR mutation status. Among 779 consecutive NSCLC patients who underwent EGFR mutation screening, all 197 patients with BM were divided according to the EGFR mutation status. The prognostic factors, including patient characteristics at the time of BM diagnosis, treatment history, and radiologic features, were analyzed. Of 197 patients with BM, 108 had wild-type EGFR and 89 had EGFR mutation. The patients with EGFR mutation presented longer overall survival after BM diagnosis (OS) than those with wild-type EGFR, regardless of whether BM was synchronous or metachronous. For the patients with EGFR mutation, favorable prognostic factors in multivariate analysis were age<65 (p=0.037), good performance status (PS) (p<0.0001), cranial radiotherapy (p=0.020), previous chemotherapy≤1 regimen (p=0.009), stable extracranial disease at BM diagnosis (p=0.022), and erlotinib therapy after BM diagnosis (p=0.0015). On the other hand, favorable prognostic factors for the patients with wild-type EGFR were only good PS (p=0.0037) and cranial radiotherapy (p=0.0005). Among patients treated with erlotinib after BM diagnosis, the patients with exon 19 deletion showed longer OS than those with exon 21 point mutation (p=0.019). The prognostic factors for NSCLC patients with BM were different according to the EGFR mutation status. Particularly in NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation and stable extracranial disease, regular cranial evaluation for detecting asymptomatic BM would lead to good prognosis. In addition, erlotinib therapy would be preferable in NSCLC patients with BM and EGFR mutation, especially those with exon 19 deletion.

  19. Cancer metastases: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiangming

    2015-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality, and accounts for about 90% of cancer deaths. Although cancer survival rate has been significantly improved over the years, the improvement is primarily due to early diagnosis and cancer growth inhibition. Limited progress has been made in the treatment of cancer metastasis due to various factors. Current treatments for cancer metastasis are mainly chemotherapy and radiotherapy, though the new generation anti-cancer drugs (predominantly neutralizing antibodies for growth factors and small molecule kinase inhibitors) do have the effects on cancer metastasis in addition to their effects on cancer growth. Cancer metastasis begins with detachment of metastatic cells from the primary tumor, travel of the cells to different sites through blood/lymphatic vessels, settlement and growth of the cells at a distal site. During the process, metastatic cells go through detachment, migration, invasion and adhesion. These four essential, metastatic steps are inter-related and affected by multi-biochemical events and parameters. Additionally, it is known that tumor microenvironment (such as extracellular matrix structure, growth factors, chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases) plays a significant role in cancer metastasis. The biochemical events and parameters involved in the metastatic process and tumor microenvironment have been targeted or can be potential targets for metastasis prevention and inhibition. This review provides an overview of these metastasis essential steps, related biochemical factors, and targets for intervention. PMID:26579471

  20. Cancer metastases: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangming

    2015-09-01

    Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality, and accounts for about 90% of cancer deaths. Although cancer survival rate has been significantly improved over the years, the improvement is primarily due to early diagnosis and cancer growth inhibition. Limited progress has been made in the treatment of cancer metastasis due to various factors. Current treatments for cancer metastasis are mainly chemotherapy and radiotherapy, though the new generation anti-cancer drugs (predominantly neutralizing antibodies for growth factors and small molecule kinase inhibitors) do have the effects on cancer metastasis in addition to their effects on cancer growth. Cancer metastasis begins with detachment of metastatic cells from the primary tumor, travel of the cells to different sites through blood/lymphatic vessels, settlement and growth of the cells at a distal site. During the process, metastatic cells go through detachment, migration, invasion and adhesion. These four essential, metastatic steps are inter-related and affected by multi-biochemical events and parameters. Additionally, it is known that tumor microenvironment (such as extracellular matrix structure, growth factors, chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases) plays a significant role in cancer metastasis. The biochemical events and parameters involved in the metastatic process and tumor microenvironment have been targeted or can be potential targets for metastasis prevention and inhibition. This review provides an overview of these metastasis essential steps, related biochemical factors, and targets for intervention. PMID:26579471

  1. Triple orbital metastases from prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tun, Kagan; Bulut, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma, when metastatic, typically involves bone and produces both osteoblastic and osteolytic changes. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our department because of unilateral progressive proptosis and visual blurriness for 3 months. The patient had a history of prostate adenocarcinoma diagnosis 5 years ago. We report a case of orbital involvement presented that intraorbital mass (including periocular structures), temporal bone and temporal muscle from prostate cancer. The mass was removed with total excision. Despite the frequency of bone metastasis in prostatic carcinoma, triple orbital metastases are extremely rare. The best of our knowledge, prostate adenocarcinoma and its triple (temporal bone, temporal muscle and intraorbital mass) orbital metastases have not been published previously. Metastatic orbital tumor secondary to prostate cancer should be considered in patients who have varying degrees of eye symptoms. PMID:27591068

  2. It is time to reevaluate the management of patients with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Kondziolka, Douglas; Kalkanis, Steven N; Mehta, Minesh P; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Loeffler, Jay S

    2014-07-01

    There are many elements to the science that drives the clinical care of patients with brain metastases. Although part of an understanding that continues to evolve, a number of key historical misconceptions remain that commonly drive physicians' and researchers' attitudes and approaches. By understanding how these relate to current practice, we can better comprehend our available science to provide both better research and care. These past misconceptions include: Misconception 1: Once a primary cancer spreads to the brain, the histology of that primary tumor does not have much impact on response to chemotherapy, sensitivity to radiation, risk of further brain relapse, development of additional metastatic lesions, or survival. All tumor primary histologies are the same once they spread to the brain. They are the same in terms of the number of tumors, radiosensitivity, chemoresponsiveness, risk of further brain relapse, and survival. Misconception 2: The number of brain metastases matters. This number matters in terms of subsequent brain relapse, survival, and cognitive dysfunction; the precise number of metastases can also be used as a limit in determining which patients might be eligible for a particular treatment option. Misconception 3: Cancer in the brain is always a diffuse problem due to the presence of micrometastases. Misconception 4: Whole-brain radiation therapy invariably causes disabling cognitive dysfunction if a patient lives long enough. Misconception 5: Most brain metastases are symptomatic. Thus, it is not worth screening patients for brain metastases, especially because the impact on survival is minimal. The conduct and findings of past clinical research have led to conceptions that affect clinical care yet appear limiting. PMID:24662510

  3. Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) 022: A Phase II Trial of Neratinib for Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Rebecca S.; Wefel, Jeffrey S.; Melisko, Michelle E.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Connolly, Roisin M.; Van Poznak, Catherine H.; Niravath, Polly A.; Puhalla, Shannon L.; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Moy, Beverly; Herold, Christina; Liu, Minetta C.; Lowe, Alarice; Agar, Nathalie Y.R.; Ryabin, Nicole; Farooq, Sarah; Lawler, Elizabeth; Rimawi, Mothaffar F.; Krop, Ian E.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Winer, Eric P.; Lin, Nancy U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evidence-based treatments for metastatic, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–positive breast cancer in the CNS are limited. Neratinib is an irreversible inhibitor of erbB1, HER2, and erbB4, with promising activity in HER2-positive breast cancer; however, its activity in the CNS is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of treatment with neratinib in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases in a multicenter, phase II open-label trial. Patients and Methods Eligible patients were those with HER2-positive brain metastases (≥ 1 cm in longest dimension) who experienced progression in the CNS after one or more line of CNS-directed therapy, such as whole-brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and/or surgical resection. Patients received neratinib 240 mg orally once per day, and tumors were assessed every two cycles. The primary endpoint was composite CNS objective response rate (ORR), requiring all of the following: ≥50% reduction in volumetric sum of target CNS lesions and no progression of non-target lesions, new lesions, escalating corticosteroids, progressive neurologic signs/symptoms, or non-CNS progression—the threshold for success was five of 40 responders. Results Forty patients were enrolled between February 2012 and June 2013; 78% of patients had previous whole-brain radiotherapy. Three women achieved a partial response (CNS objective response rate, 8%; 95% CI, 2% to 22%). The median number of cycles received was two (range, one to seven cycles), with a median progression-free survival of 1.9 months. Five women received six or more cycles. The most common grade ≥ 3 event was diarrhea (occurring in 21% of patients taking prespecified loperamide prophylaxis and 28% of those without prophylaxis). Patients in the study experienced a decreased quality of life over time. Conclusion Although neratinib had low activity and did not meet our threshold for success, 12.5% of patients received six or more cycles. Studies

  4. [Th17 cells and IL-17 are increased in patients with brain metastases from the primary lung cancer].

    PubMed

    He, Gaiping; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Baowen; Qiao, Liangjie; Tian, Zhonglan; Zhai, Guoyan; Xin, Xianwei; Yang, Chun; Liu, Peigang; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Lingling

    2013-09-01

    背景与目的 Th17细胞是一种重要的辅助性T细胞,其主要分泌IL-17等细胞因子,在感染免疫、自身免疫性疾病和肿瘤免疫中均有重要意义。本研究旨在探讨Th17细胞和IL-17在肺癌脑转移患者外周血中的表达及IL-17在肺癌脑转移患者脑脊液中的表达和意义。 方法 流式细胞术检测22例肺癌脑转移患者和20名正常对照外周血Th17(CD3+CD4+IL-23R+)细胞的百分率,ELISA方法检测22例肺癌脑转移患者和20名正常对照血浆IL-17水平,ELISA方法检测19例肺癌脑转移患者和16例无脑转移肺癌患者脑脊液IL-17水平。结果 肺癌脑转移患者外周血Th17细胞百分率(4.65%±0.72%)明显高于正常对照(2.71%±0.54%, P=0.04);其中非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC)患者和小细胞肺癌(small cell lung cancer, SCLC)患者没有差异。肺癌脑转移患者血浆IL-17水平明显高于正常对照(117.4±16.43 pg/mL和72.55±8.19 pg/mL, P=0.02);其中NSCLC患者和SCLC患者没有差异。肺癌脑转移患者脑脊液IL-17水平明显高于无脑转移的肺癌患者(73.21±7.52 pg/mL和50.25±8.04 pg/mL, P=0.04)。结论 肺癌脑转移患者外周血Th17细胞数量增多,血浆IL-17和脑脊液IL-17水平升高,Th17细胞和IL-17可能参与了肺癌脑转移的发生和发展。

  5. LDA-SVM-based EGFR mutation model for NSCLC brain metastases: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Wang, Ge; Wu, Yu-Hao; Chen, Shi-Feng; Liu, Guo-Dong; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Dong; He, Zhong-Shi; Yang, Xue-Qin; He, Yong; Xiao, Hua-Liang; Huang, Ding-De; Xiong, Kun-Lin; Wu, Yan; Huang, Ming; Yang, Zhen-Zhou

    2015-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations are a predictor of tyrosine kinase inhibitor effectiveness in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The objective of this study is to build a model for predicting the EGFR mutation status of brain metastasis in patients with NSCLC. Observation and model set-up. This study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2011 in 6 medical centers in Southwest China. The study included 31 NSCLC patients with brain metastases. Eligibility requirements were histological proof of NSCLC, as well as sufficient quantity of paraffin-embedded lung and brain metastases specimens for EGFR mutation detection. The linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method was used for analyzing the dimensional reduction of clinical features, and a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was employed to generate an EGFR mutation model for NSCLC brain metastases. Training-testing-validation (3 : 1 : 1) processes were applied to find the best fit in 12 patients (validation test set) with NSCLC and brain metastases treated with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and whole-brain radiotherapy. Primary and secondary outcome measures: EGFR mutation analysis in patients with NSCLC and brain metastases and the development of a LDA-SVM-based EGFR mutation model for NSCLC brain metastases patients. EGFR mutation discordance between the primary lung tumor and brain metastases was found in 5 patients. Using LDA, 13 clinical features were transformed into 9 characteristics, and 3 were selected as primary vectors. The EGFR mutation model constructed with SVM algorithms had an accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for determining the mutation status of brain metastases of 0.879, 0.886, and 0.875, respectively. Furthermore, the replicability of our model was confirmed by testing 100 random combinations of input values. The LDA-SVM-based model developed in this study could predict the EGFR status of brain metastases in this small cohort of

  6. LDA-SVM-Based EGFR Mutation Model for NSCLC Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Nan; Wang, Ge; Wu, Yu-Hao; Chen, Shi-Feng; Liu, Guo-Dong; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Dong; He, Zhong-Shi; Yang, Xue-Qin; He, Yong; Xiao, Hua-Liang; Huang, Ding-De; Xiong, Kun-Lin; Wu, Yan; Huang, Ming; Yang, Zhen-Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations are a predictor of tyrosine kinase inhibitor effectiveness in the treatment of non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The objective of this study is to build a model for predicting the EGFR mutation status of brain metastasis in patients with NSCLC. Observation and model set-up. This study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2011 in 6 medical centers in Southwest China. The study included 31 NSCLC patients with brain metastases. Eligibility requirements were histological proof of NSCLC, as well as sufficient quantity of paraffin-embedded lung and brain metastases specimens for EGFR mutation detection. The linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method was used for analyzing the dimensional reduction of clinical features, and a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was employed to generate an EGFR mutation model for NSCLC brain metastases. Training-testing-validation (3 : 1 : 1) processes were applied to find the best fit in 12 patients (validation test set) with NSCLC and brain metastases treated with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and whole-brain radiotherapy. Primary and secondary outcome measures: EGFR mutation analysis in patients with NSCLC and brain metastases and the development of a LDA-SVM-based EGFR mutation model for NSCLC brain metastases patients. EGFR mutation discordance between the primary lung tumor and brain metastases was found in 5 patients. Using LDA, 13 clinical features were transformed into 9 characteristics, and 3 were selected as primary vectors. The EGFR mutation model constructed with SVM algorithms had an accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for determining the mutation status of brain metastases of 0.879, 0.886, and 0.875, respectively. Furthermore, the replicability of our model was confirmed by testing 100 random combinations of input values. The LDA-SVM-based model developed in this study could predict the EGFR status of brain metastases in this

  7. Unusual Adrenal and Brain Metastases From Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma Revealed by 131I SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen; Shen, Guo-hua; Liu, Bin; Kuang, An-ren

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal metastasis from differentiated thyroid carcinoma is uncommon. Metastatic involvement of both adrenal and brain in the same patient from differentiated thyroid carcinoma is rare. Here, we described an unusual case with iodine-avid lung, bone, adrenal, liver, and brain metastases from follicular thyroid carcinoma confirmed by 131I SPECT/CT. The utilization of SPECT/CT in thyroid cancer patients can detect the presence of metastases and also exclude potential false-positive lesions. Our case demonstrates that SPECT/CT is helpful in localizing and confirming metastatic lesions from differentiated thyroid carcinoma in rare and unusual sites.

  8. Surgical Brain Metastases: Management and Outcome Related to Prognostic Indexes: A Critical Review of a Ten-Year Series

    PubMed Central

    Caroli, Manuela; Di Cristofori, Andrea; Lucarella, Francesca; Raneri, Fabio Angelo; Portaluri, Francesco; Gaini, Sergio Maria

    2011-01-01

    Brain metastasis are the most common neoplastic lesions of the nervous system. Many cancer patients are diagnosed on the basis of a first clinical presentation of cancer on the basis of a single or multiple brain lesions. Brain metastases are manifestations of primary disease progression and often determine a poor prognosis. Not all patients with a brain metastases undergo surgery: many are submitted to alternative or palliative treatments. Management of patients with brain metastases is still controversial, and many studies have been developed to determine which is the best therapy. Furthermore, management of patients operated for a brain metastasis is often difficult. Chemotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, panencephalic radiation therapy, and surgery, in combination or alone, are the means most commonly used. We report our experience in the management of a ten-year series of surgical brain metastasis and discuss our results in the preoperative and postoperative management of this complex condition. PMID:22084749

  9. Diagnosis of Jejunal Metastases from Lung Cancer Using Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Charlotte; Prim, Nathalie; Mennecier, Bertrand; Delvaux, Michel; Gangi, Afshin; Quoix, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal metastases from lung cancer are rare and usually asymptomatic. We report a case of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer revealed by abdominal pain and severe recurrent anaemia. The diagnosis was obtained with capsule endoscopy. This non-invasive procedure thus represents a valuable method contributing to a rapid and detailed diagnosis while reducing underdiagnosis, and it should thus be considered for lung cancer patients complaining of abdominal symptoms, which may indeed be related to gastrointestinal metastases. PMID:27790115

  10. Outcomes After Whole Brain Reirradiation in Patients With Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Christina H.; Jimenez, Rachel; Niemierko, Andrzej; Loeffler, Jay S.; Oh, Kevin S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases are often treated with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for purposes of palliation. The treatment of those who experience subsequent intracranial disease progression can include a second course of WBRT, although there is controversy surrounding its safety and efficacy. This study examines the outcomes in patients at Massachusetts General Hospital who underwent reirradiation. Patients and Methods: We examined the medical records of 17 patients at Massachusetts General Hospital with brain metastases who were initially treated with WBRT between 2002 and 2008 and were subsequently retreated with a second course of WBRT. The median dose for the first course of WBRT was 35 Gy (range, 28-40 Gy), with a fraction size of 2 to 3 Gy (median, 2.5 Gy). The median dose at reirradiation was 21.6 Gy (range, 14-30 Gy), with a fraction size of 1.5 to 2 Gy (median, 1.8 Gy). Results: The second course of WBRT was administered upon radiographic disease progression in all patients. Of 10 patients with complete follow-up data, 8 patients experienced complete or partial symptom resolution, and 2 did not show clinical improvement. The time to radiographic progression was 5.2 months. The median overall survival for all patients after diagnosis of metastases was 24.7 months. The median survival time after initiation of reirradiation was 5.2 months (95% CI, 1.3-8.7). In 6 patients with stable extracranial disease, the median survival time after retreatment was 19.8 months (95% CI, 2.7-{infinity}), compared with 2.5 months (95% CI, 0.8-5.5) for those with extracranial disease progression (p = 0.05). Acute adverse reactions occurred in 70.5% of patients but were mild to moderate in severity. Conclusion: In select patients and especially those with stable extracranial disease, reirradiation may be an appropriate and effective intervention to provide symptomatic relief and slow intracranial disease progression. Side effects were minimal and did not

  11. Urothelial bladder cancer with cavitary lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Anil; Lee, Jason; Born, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder tends to remain superficial; however, in 5% to 20% of cases, it progresses to muscle invasion and, more rarely, can metastasize. TCC of the bladder primarily spreads via regional lymphatics. The most common sites of distant metastases of TCC are the liver, lung, mediastinum and bone. Longterm survival of patients with metastatic bladder cancer is rare. Patterns of pulmonary metastasis include multiple nodules, a solitary mass or interstitial micronodule. When multiple nodules are present, they are round and well-circumscribed, without calcification or cavitation. An unusual case of rapidly metastatic TCC to the lung causing large cavitary masses and nodules is presented. Imaging performed after the patient began chemotherapy revealed widespread necrosis of the metastatic cavitary masses causing moderate volume hemoptysis. PMID:21766082

  12. A Multi-institutional Study of Factors Influencing the Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, David C.; Charpentier, Anne-Marie; Cigsar, Candemir; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Ng, Angela; Bahl, Guarav; Zadeh, Gelareh; San Miguel, John; Menard, Cynthia

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases is a relatively well-studied technology with established guidelines regarding patient selection, although its implementation is technically complex. We evaluated the extent to which local availability of SRS affected the treatment of patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We identified 3030 patients who received whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for brain metastases in 1 of 7 cancer centers in Ontario. Clinical data were abstracted for a random sample of 973 patients. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with the use of SRS as a boost within 4 months following WBRT or at any time following WBRT. Results: Of 898 patients eligible for analysis, SRS was provided to 70 (7.8%) patients at some time during the course of their disease and to 34 (3.8%) patients as a boost following WBRT. In multivariable analyses, factors significantly associated with the use of SRS boost following WBRT were fewer brain metastases (odds ratio [OR] = 6.50), controlled extracranial disease (OR = 3.49), age (OR = 0.97 per year of advancing age), and the presence of an on-site SRS program at the hospital where WBRT was given (OR = 12.34; all P values were <.05). Similarly, availability of on-site SRS was the factor most predictive of the use of SRS at any time following WBRT (OR = 5.98). Among patients with 1-3 brain metastases, good/fair performance status, and no evidence of active extracranial disease, SRS was provided to 40.3% of patients who received WBRT in a hospital that had an on-site SRS program vs 3.0% of patients who received WBRT at a hospital without SRS (P<.01). Conclusions: The availability of on-site SRS is the factor most strongly associated with the provision of this treatment to patients with brain metastases and appears to be more influential than accepted clinical eligibility factors.

  13. Treatment of Five or More Brain Metastases With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Grant K.; Suh, John H.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Weil, Robert J.; Neyman, Gennady; Chao, Samuel T.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with five or more brain metastases treated in a single session with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with brain metastases treated with SRS to five or more lesions in a single session were reviewed. Primary disease type, number of lesions, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) at SRS, and status of primary and systemic disease at SRS were included. Patients were treated using dosing as defined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 90-05, with adjustments for critical structures. We defined prior whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as WBRT completed >1 month before SRS and concurrent WBRT as WBRT completed within 1 month before or after SRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to determine which patient and treatment factors predicted overall survival (OS). Results: The median OS after SRS was 7.5 months. The median KPS was 80 (range, 60-100). A KPS of {>=}80 significantly influenced OS (median OS, 4.8 months for KPS {<=}70 vs. 8.8 months for KPS {>=}80, p = 0.0097). The number of lesions treated did not significantly influence OS (median OS, 6.6 months for eight or fewer lesions vs. 9.9 months for more than eight, p = nonsignificant). Primary site histology did not significantly influence median OS. On multivariate Cox modeling, KPS and prior WBRT significantly predicted for OS. Whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS compared with concurrent WBRT significantly influenced survival, with a risk ratio of 0.423 (95% confidence interval 0.191-0.936, p = 0.0338). No significant differences were observed when no WBRT was compared with concurrent WBRT or when the no WBRT group was compared with prior WBRT. A KPS of {<=}70 predicted for poorer outcomes, with a risk ratio of 2.164 (95% confidence interval 1.157-4.049, p = 0.0157). Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery to five or more brain lesions is an effective treatment option for patients with

  14. Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Ansa Maer; Scherwath, Angela; Ernst, Gundula; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Bremer, Michael; Steinmann, Diana

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in

  15. Novel treatment strategies for brain tumors and metastases

    PubMed Central

    El-Habashy, Salma E.; Nazief, Alaa M.; Adkins, Chris E.; Wen, Ming Ming; El-Kamel, Amal H.; Hamdan, Ahmed M.; Hanafy, Amira S.; Terrell, Tori O.; Mohammad, Afroz S.; Lockman, Paul R.; Nounou, Mohamed Ismail

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes patent applications in the past 5 years for the management of brain tumors and metastases. Most of the recent patents discuss one of the following strategies: the development of new drug entities that specifically target the brain cells, the blood–brain barrier and the tumor cells, tailor-designing a novel carrier system that is able to perform multitasks and multifunction as a drug carrier, targeting vehicle and even as a diagnostic tool, direct conjugation of a US FDA approved drug with a targeting moiety, diagnostic moiety or PK modifying moiety, or the use of innovative nontraditional approaches such as genetic engineering, stem cells and vaccinations. Until now, there has been no optimal strategy to deliver therapeutic agents to the CNS for the treatment of brain tumors and metastases. Intensive research efforts are actively ongoing to take brain tumor targeting, and novel and targeted CNS delivery systems to potential clinical application. PMID:24998288

  16. [Management of bone metastases from breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Naoki; Yamauchi, Hideko; Nakamura, Seigo

    2012-08-01

    Bone is the most common of breast cancer metastasis. Bone metastasis causes skeletal-related events(SREs), including pain, bone fractures, spinal cord compression, and hypercalcemia. SREs significantly impair patients' quality of life. The main purpose of treatment for bone metastasis is to prevent or delay SREs and to improve patients' quality of life. Accurate diagnosis of bone metastases is important in order to choose an appropriate treatment. Treatment of bone metastasis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Analgesic medication with NSAIDs and opioids is the first choice for pain control. In addition to bisphosphonate, the receptor activator of the nuclear factor κB ligand(RANKL)inhibitor, denosumab is a novel bone-targeting agent effective in preventing SREs. Prophylactic stabilization of impending fractures provides several advantages compared with fixation of an acute fracture, in terms of short hospitalization and a quick return to baseline. In general, radiation therapy is indicated for patients for whom surgery is suitable. Radiation therapy to palliate pain from bone metastasis can reduce the intake of analgesic medications. Local radiation therapy is indicated for a limited number of bone metastases, and systemic radionuclide therapy is appropriate for multiple lesions. In summary, treatment using these modalities for bone metastasis from breast cancer should be stratified, considering the symptoms, site of bone metastasis, and patients' life expectancy and performance status.

  17. New therapeutic targets for cancer bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Krzeszinski, Jing Y.; Wan, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastases are dejected consequences of many types of tumors including breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid cancers. This complicated process begins with the successful tumor cell epithelial–mesenchymal transition, escape from the original site, and penetration into circulation. The homing of tumor cells to the bone depends on both tumor-intrinsic traits and various molecules supplied by the bone metastatic niche. The colonization and growth of cancer cells in the osseous environment, which awaken their dormancy to form micro- and macro-metastasis, involve an intricate interaction between the circulating tumor cells and local bone cells including osteoclasts, osteoblasts, adipocytes and macrophages. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in the identification of new molecules and novel mechanisms during each step of bone metastasis that may serve as promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25962679

  18. Unsanctifying the sanctuary: challenges and opportunities with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Puhalla, Shannon; Elmquist, William; Freyer, David; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Adkins, Chris; Lockman, Paul; McGregor, John; Muldoon, Leslie; Nesbit, Gary; Peereboom, David; Smith, Quentin; Walker, Sara; Neuwelt, Edward

    2015-01-01

    While the use of targeted therapies, particularly radiosurgery, has broadened therapeutic options for CNS metastases, patients respond minimally and prognosis remains poor. The inability of many systemic chemotherapeutic agents to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has limited their use and allowed brain metastases to become a burgeoning clinical challenge. Adequate preclinical models that appropriately mimic the metastatic process, the BBB, and blood-tumor barriers (BTB) are needed to better evaluate therapies that have the ability to enhance delivery through or penetrate into these barriers and to understand the mechanisms of resistance to therapy. The heterogeneity among and within different solid tumors and subtypes of solid tumors further adds to the difficulties in determining the most appropriate treatment approaches and methods of laboratory and clinical studies. This review article discusses therapies focused on prevention and treatment of CNS metastases, particularly regarding the BBB, and the challenges and opportunities these therapies present. PMID:25846288

  19. Cancer Metastases: Early Dissemination and Late Recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Sten; Nyström, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metastatic cells from a primary tumor can occur before the primary cancer is detected. Metastatic cells can also remain in the patient for many years after removal of the primary tumor without proliferating. These dormant malignant cells can awaken and cause recurrent disease decades after the primary treatment. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical evidence for early dissemination and late recurrences in human malignant tumors. We used the following definitions: dormancy of cells may be defined as a nonproliferating state or an arrest in the cell cycle that results in a prolonged G0 phase. If one accepts the term “late metastases” to indicate a period exceeding 10 years from the removal of the primary tumor, then the two malignancies in which this occurs most frequently are cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). METHODS PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched with the keywords “metastases,” “early dissemination,” “late recurrences,” “inadvertently transmitted cancer,” “tumor growth rate,” “dormancy,” “circulating tumor cells,” and “transplantation of cancer.” RESULTS Several case reports of early dissemination and late recurrences of various types of malignancies were found. Analyses of the growth rates of several malignant tumors in the original host indicated that the majority of cancers had metastasized years before they were detected. CMM, RCC, and malignant glioblastoma were the three most common malignancies resulting from an organ transplantation. CMM and RCC were also the two most common malignancies that showed dormancy. In several cases of transplanted CMM and RCC, the donor did not have any known malignancy or had had the malignancy removed so long ago that the donor was regarded as cured. CONCLUSION (1) Metastases can frequently exist prior to the detection of the primary tumor. (2) Metastatic cells may reside in organs in the original host that are not

  20. Radiation-induced dementia in patients cured of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, L.M.; Delattre, J.Y.; Posner, J.B.

    1989-06-01

    When a patient with cancer develops a brain metastasis, death is usually imminent, but aggressive treatment in some patients with limited or no systemic disease yields long-term survival. In such patients, delayed deleterious effects of therapy are particularly tragic. We report 12 patients who developed delayed complications of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) given as sole treatment (4 patients) or in combination with surgical resection (8 patients). Within 5 to 36 months (median, 14) all patients developed progressive dementia, ataxia, and urinary incontinence causing severe disability in all and leading to death in 7. No patient had tumor recurrence when neurologic symptoms began. Cortical atrophy and hypodense white matter were identified by CT in all. Contrast-enhancing lesions were seen in 3 patients; 2 of the lesions yielded radionecrosis on biopsy. Autopsies on 2 patients revealed diffuse chronic edema of the hemispheric white matter in the absence of tumor recurrence. Corticosteroids and ventriculoperitoneal shunt offered significant but incomplete improvement in some patients. The total dose of WBRT was only 2,500 to 3,900 cGy, but daily fractions of 300 to 600 cGy were employed. We believe that these fractionation schedules, several of which are used commonly, predispose to delayed neurologic toxicity, and that more protracted schedules should be employed for the safe and efficacious treatment of good-risk patients with brain metastases. The incidence of WBRT-induced dementia was only 1.9 to 5.1% in the 2 populations reviewed here; however, this underestimates the incidence because only severely affected patients could be identified from chart review.

  1. In vivo imaging models of bone and brain metastases and pleural carcinomatosis with a novel human EML4-ALK lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Nanjo, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Kita, Kenji; Fukuda, Koji; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Uehara, Hisanori; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Hara, Eiji; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Yano, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    EML4-ALK lung cancer accounts for approximately 3-7% of non-small-cell lung cancer cases. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying tumor progression and targeted drug sensitivity/resistance in EML4-ALK lung cancer, clinically relevant animal models are indispensable. In this study, we found that the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A925L expresses an EML4-ALK gene fusion (variant 5a, E2:A20) and is sensitive to the ALK inhibitors crizotinib and alectinib. We further established highly tumorigenic A925LPE3 cells, which also have the EML4-ALK gene fusion (variant 5a) and are sensitive to ALK inhibitors. By using A925LPE3 cells with luciferase gene transfection, we established in vivo imaging models for pleural carcinomatosis, bone metastasis, and brain metastasis, all of which are significant clinical concerns of advanced EML4-ALK lung cancer. Interestingly, crizotinib caused tumors to shrink in the pleural carcinomatosis model, but not in bone and brain metastasis models, whereas alectinib showed remarkable efficacy in all three models, indicative of the clinical efficacy of these ALK inhibitors. Our in vivo imaging models of multiple organ sites may provide useful resources to analyze further the pathogenesis of EML4-ALK lung cancer and its response and resistance to ALK inhibitors in various organ microenvironments.

  2. Unusual metastases of thyroid cancer to mediastinal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong Yun; Moadel, Renee; Freeman, Leonard M

    2015-01-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid cancer is a rare thyroid cancer, accounts for approximately 5% of all thyroid cancer cases, and is associated with a poor prognosis. It commonly metastasizes to regional lymph nodes, lung, and bones. We present a patient with poorly differentiated thyroid cancer with unusual extensive spread to mediastinal blood vessels.

  3. Bilateral orbital metastases from breast cancer: a case report of successful palliation using stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Ho; Choi, Sang Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Noh, Woo Chul; Kim, Mi-Sook

    2011-01-01

    Of ophthalmic involvement from metastatic breast cancer, extraocular/intraorbital metastases are extremely rare. External beam radiotherapy has been a mainstay palliation for symptomatic orbital metastases. We present a case of bilateral orbital metastases from breast cancer successfully treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). A 38-year-old woman presented with decreased vision in the right eye for 3 weeks. Eight months previously, she underwent whole-brain radiotherapy for multiple brain metastases from breast cancer. Visual acuity was hand motion, and the eyelid closed incompletely in the affected eye. Computed tomography scans showed a 3-cm extraconal mass in the right orbit. She underwent temporary tarsorrhaphy followed by SRT. A total dose of 39 Gy was delivered to the right orbital mass in three daily fractions. Four months later, her visual function was normal in both eyes and the right orbital mass disappeared. A new lesion was detected in the left orbit. She underwent SRT for the left orbital lesion using the same dose-fractionation schedule. No radiation-related toxicities were observed. She died 19 months after the first SRT. Our case suggests that SRT may be an effective and safe treatment option in patients with orbital metastases from breast cancer. PMID:21999613

  4. Primary pulmonary solitary fibrous tumour with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Naoki; Kawaguchi, Koji; Taniguchi, Tetsuo; Yokoi, Kohei

    2014-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a mesenchymal neoplasm of subendothelial origin that can be found in all anatomical locations, but rarely in the lungs. A 71-year old female was referred to our hospital because of the increase in size of a solitary pulmonary mass. Chest contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography showed a well-circumscribed lobulated mass measuring 3.1×1.6 cm in the posterior segment of the right upper lobe of the lung. Positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) demonstrated that the mass had high FDG uptake. A right upper lobectomy of the lung and mediastinal lymphadenectomy were performed. The tumour was pathologically diagnosed as an SFT. Seven months later, the patient was found to have brain metastases of the tumour, which led to dizziness. A craniotomy and successive radiosurgery with a gamma knife were performed for the metastatic tumours. She is still alive without evidence of disease 12 months after the treatment of the metastases. Pulmonary SFT seldom behaves aggressively, and only two previous cases of primary pulmonary SFT with brain metastases have been reported. Local therapy including surgery and radiotherapy against metastases from SFT could help improve the survival of such patients.

  5. [Supportive care, cognition and quality of life in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Taillibert, S; Blonski, M; Jouniaux Delbez, N; Delgadillo, D; Taillia, H; Auquier, P; Belin, C; Bonnetain, F; Varin, D; Tallet, A; Taillandier, L

    2015-02-01

    Brain metastases impact on the survival of the patients, but on their quality of life as well. The objective of the management of these patients is then double. Currently, due to medical advances, survivals tend to improve, especially for some tumor subtypes. During the course of the disease, different neurological signs and symptoms can be observed according to the location, the number and the volume of the metastase(s). Patients and caregivers are especially worried about the loss of autonomy and cognitive impairments. A permanent dialogue, during the course of the disease, is mandatory, in order to adapt the management to the objectives determined by the patients and the medical team. These objectives may vary according to the objective response rates of the disease to anticancer therapies, according to the impact of the disease and its management in daily living. Anticancer therapies and supportive care must be appreciated according to their impact on the survival, on the preservation of the functional independence and the quality of life of the patient, on their abilities to preserve the neurological status and delay the apparition of new neurological signs and symptoms, and their adverse events. Supportive care, cognition and quality of life should be regularly evaluated and adapted according to the objectives of the management of brain metastases patients. Different approaches are described in this paper.

  6. The Current and Future Treatment of Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hardesty, Douglas A.; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial malignancy, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality in oncology patients. The current treatment paradigm for brain metastasis depends on the patient’s overall health status, the primary tumor pathology, and the number and location of brain lesions. Herein, we review the modern management options for these tumors, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Recent operative advances, such as fluorescence, confocal microscopy, and brachytherapy, are highlighted. With an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of brain metastasis come increased future therapeutic options. Therapy targeted to specific tumor molecular pathways, such as those involved in blood–brain barrier transgression, cell–cell adhesion, and angiogenesis, are also reviewed. A personalized plan for each patient, based on molecular characterizations of the tumor that are used to better target radiotherapy and chemotherapy, is undoubtedly the future of brain metastasis treatment. PMID:27252942

  7. Patterns of Practice of Palliative Radiotherapy in Africa, Part 1: Bone and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Vinay Gaye, Papa Macoumba M.Med.; Wahab, Sherif Abdel; Ndlovu, Ntokozo; Ngoma, Twalib; Vanderpuye, Verna; Sowunmi, Anthonia; Kigula-Mugambe, Joseph; Jeremic, Branislav

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To provide data on the pattern of practice of palliative radiotherapy (RT) on the African continent. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed to participants in a regional training course of the International Atomic Energy Agency in palliative cancer care and sent by e-mail to other institutions in Africa. Requested information included both infrastructure and human resources available and the pattern of RT practice for metastatic and locally advanced cancers. Results: Of 35 centers contacted, 24 (68%) completed the questionnaire. Although RT is used by most centers for most metastatic cancers, liver and lung metastases are treated with chemotherapy. Of 23 centers, 14 (61%) had a single RT regimen as an institutional policy for treating painful bone metastases, but only 5 centers (23%) of 23 used 8 Gy in 1 fraction. Brain metastases were being treated by RT to the whole brain to 30 Gy in 10 fractions, either exclusively (n = 13, 56%) or in addition to the use of 20 Gy in 5 fractions (n = 3, 14%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a major component of treatment of cancer patients in African countries. There is consensus among few centers for treatment schedules for almost all sites regarding time and dose-fractionation characteristics of RT regimens used and/or indications for the use of RT in this setting.

  8. Stereotactic Radiosurgery in the Management of Brain Metastases: An Institutional Retrospective Analysis of Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, James L.; Batra, Sachin; Kapor, Sumit; Vellimana, Ananth; Gandhi, Rahul; Carson, Kathryn A.; Shokek, Ori; Lim, Michael; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to report our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery performed with the Gamma Knife (GK) in the treatment of patients with brain metastases and to compare survival for those treated with radiosurgery alone with survival for those treated with radiosurgery and whole-brain radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Prospectively collected demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment and survival data on 237 patients with intracranial metastases who underwent radiosurgery with the GK between 2003 and 2007 were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to compare survival by demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment. Results: The mean age of the patient population was 56 years. The most common tumor histologies were non-small-cell lung carcinoma (34.2%) and breast cancer (13.9%). The median overall survival time was 8.5 months from the time of treatment. The median survival times for patients with one, two/three, and four or more brain metastases were 8.5, 9.4, and 6.7 months, respectively. Patients aged 65 years or greater and those aged less than 65 years had median survival times of 7.8 and 9 months, respectively (p = 0.008). The Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) at the time of treatment was a significant predictor of survival: those patients with a KPS of 70 or less had a median survival of 2.9 months compared with 10.3 months (p = 0.034) for those with a KPS of 80 or greater. There was no statistically significant difference in survival between patients treated with radiosurgery alone and those treated with radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiosurgery with the GK is an efficacious treatment modality for brain metastases. A KPS greater than 70, histology of breast cancer, smaller tumor volume, and age less than 65 years were associated with a longer median survival in our study.

  9. Radium-223 dichloride therapy in breast cancer with osseous metastases.

    PubMed

    Takalkar, Amol; Paryani, Bhavna; Adams, Scott; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-11-18

    Osseous metastases occur frequently in patients with breast cancer. Few options exist for bone targeted therapy for hormone refractory patients with breast cancer with progressive bone metastases. We present a case of breast cancer with osseous metastases but no visceral metastases. The patient had been treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and hormonal therapy, but still had extensive symptomatic osseous metastases. She received radium-223 dichloride, a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for castration resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases. She tolerated the therapy well with no significant adverse effects. She had an excellent response with significant pain relief obviating need for regular analgaesics. Her tumour markers also dropped significantly. Osseous metastases assessed with F-18 fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) and F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) bone PET/CT) scans at baseline, after two and six cycles, also showed interval improvement in the lesions. Radium-223 dichloride could potentially be a safe and useful therapeutic option in this setting.

  10. Brain Metastases in Patients With Germ Cell Tumors: Prognostic Factors and Treatment Options—An Analysis From the Global Germ Cell Cancer Group

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Darren R.; Lorch, Anja; Kramar, Andrew; Albany, Costantine; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Giannatempo, Patrizia; Necchi, Andrea; Flechon, Aude; Boyle, Helen; Chung, Peter; Huddart, Robert A.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Tryakin, Alexey; Sava, Teodoro; Winquist, Eric William; De Giorgi, Ugo; Aparicio, Jorge; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Cohn Cedermark, Gabriella; Powles, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To define characteristics, treatment response, and outcomes of men with brain metastases (BM) from germ cell tumors (GCT). Patients and Methods Data from 523 men with BM from GCT were collected retrospectively from 46 centers in 13 countries by using standardized questionnaires. Clinical features were correlated with overall survival (OS) as the primary end point. Results BM were present at initial diagnosis in 228 men (group A) and at relapse in 295 men (group B). OS at 3 years (3-year OS) was superior in group A versus group B (48% v 27%; P < .001). Multiple BM and the presence of liver or bone metastasis were independent adverse prognostic factors in both groups; primary mediastinal nonseminoma (group A) and elevations of α-fetoprotein of 100 ng/mL or greater or of human chorionic gonadotropin of 5,000 U/L or greater (group B) were additional independent adverse prognostic factors. Depending on these factors, the 3-year OS ranged from 0% to 70% in group A and from 6% to 52% in group B. In group A, 99% of patients received chemotherapy; multimodality treatment or high-dose chemotherapy was not associated with statistically improved survival in multivariable analysis. In group B, only 54% of patients received chemotherapy; multimodality treatment was associated with improved survival compared with single-modality therapy (hazard ratio, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.73; P < .001), as was high-dose compared with conventional-dose chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.70; P = .001). Conclusion Men with BM from GCT have poor OS, particularly if additional risk factors are present. High-dose chemotherapy and multimodality treatment seemed to improve survival probabilities in men with BM at relapse. PMID:26460295

  11. Role of the neural niche in brain metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Termini, John; Neman, Josh; Jandial, Rahul

    2014-08-01

    Metastasis is the relentless pursuit of cancer to escape its primary site and colonize distant organs. This malignant evolutionary process is biologically heterogeneous, yet one unifying element is the critical role of the microenvironment for arriving metastatic cells. Historically, brain metastases were rarely investigated because patients with advanced cancer were considered terminal. Fortunately, advances in molecular therapies have led to patients living longer with metastatic cancer. However, one site remains recalcitrant to our treatment efforts, the brain. The central nervous system is the most complex biologic system, which poses unique obstacles but also harbors opportunities for discovery. Much of what we know about the brain microenvironment comes from neuroscience. We suggest that the interrelated cellular responses in traumatic brain injury may guide us toward new perspectives in understanding brain metastases. In this view, brain metastases may be conceptualized as progressive oncologic injury to the nervous system. This review discusses our evolving understanding of bidirectional interactions between the brain milieu and metastatic cancer.

  12. [Treatment strategy for advanced prostate cancer with bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mikio; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki

    2006-08-01

    The introduction of PSA screening has led to confirming a shift towards an earlier pathological stage in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Consequently, the proportion of detecting early stage prostate cancer has clearly been increasing. On the other hand, progressive cancers in the form of distant metastases and locally advanced ones that have been confirmed at the initial diagnosis exhibit a constant rate. In addition, there have been a lot of cases where hormonal resistance was acquired during hormonal therapy which resulted in advanced metastases of the prostate. Prostate cancer has a tendency to be metastatic to bones. Combining the fact that the survival period of patients undergoing treatment is prolonged after metastases, the length of suffering caused by complications, such as ostealgia, pathological fracture and myelopathy, becomes an issue in which QOL and ADL of the patient are sacrificed for a long time. As for treatment of prostate cancer with metastases, a palliative treatment is common in the clinical scene. However, we can extend a life prognosis with use of radiotherapy and surgical treatment in addition to the palliative treatment at an appropriate time. It appears that a combination of new chemotherapy and hormonal therapy will be promising. In the future, we believe that the appearance of new anticancer drugs, endocrine therapies, bisphosphonates and strontium treatment could be used as a part of the treatment strategy for prostate cancer with bone metastases. PMID:16912523

  13. A Study Evaluating INIPARIB in Combination With Chemotherapy to Treat Triple Negative Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-Negative) Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Negative (PR-Negative) Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Negative (HER2-Negative) Breast Cancer; Brain Metastases

  14. Prevention and Treatment of Bone Metastases in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carla, Ripamonti; Fabio, Trippa; Gloria, Barone; Ernesto, Maranzano

    2013-01-01

    In breast cancer patients, bone is the most common site of metastases. Medical therapies are the basic therapy to prevent distant metastases and recurrence and to cure them. Radiotherapy has a primary role in pain relief, recalcification and stabilization of the bone, as well as the reduction of the risk of complications (e.g., bone fractures, spinal cord compression). Bisphosphonates, as potent inhibitors of osteoclastic-mediated bone resorption are a well-established, standard-of-care treatment option to reduce the frequency, severity and time of onset of the skeletal related events in breast cancer patients with bone metastases. Moreover bisphosphonates prevent cancer treatment-induced bone loss. Recent data shows the anti-tumor activity of bisphosphonates, in particular, in postmenopausal women and in older premenopausal women with hormone-sensitive disease treated with ovarian suppression. Pain is the most frequent symptom reported in patients with bone metastases, and its prevention and treatment must be considered at any stage of the disease. The prevention and treatment of bone metastases in breast cancer must consider an integrated multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26237068

  15. [Diagnostic imaging techniques for hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Mollerup, Talie Khadem; Lorentzen, Torben; Møller, Jakob M; Nørgaard, Henrik; Achiam, Michael P

    2015-07-27

    Hepatic metastases (HM) are amongst the most important prognostic factors in patient survival from colorectal cancer. The diagnostic imaging techniques for accurate detection and characterization of colorectal metastases are therefore vital. In a review of the literature, MRI showed the highest sensitivity for detection of HM lesions < 1 cm, but the amount of MR scanners is insufficient. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound and computed tomography have similar sensitivity for detection of HM, but each method also have limitation such as operator dependency or enhanced risk of cancer due to ionizing radiation. PMID:26238008

  16. Multidose Stereotactic Radiosurgery (9 Gy × 3) of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Treatment of Large Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Esposito, Vincenzo; Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Salvati, Maurizio; Raco, Antonino; Bozzao, Alessandro; Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes with linear accelerator-based multidose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to large postoperative resection cavities in patients with large brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 to May 2012, 101 patients with a single brain metastasis were treated with surgery and multidose SRS (9 Gy × 3) for large resection cavities (>3 cm). The target volume was the resection cavity with the inclusion of a 2-mm margin. The median cavity volume was 17.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 12.6-35.7 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was local control. Secondary endpoints were survival and distant failure rates, cause of death, performance measurements, and toxicity of treatment. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 6-44 months), the 1-year and 2-year actuarial survival rates were 69% and 34%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 93% and 84%, with respective incidences of new distant brain metastases of 50% and 66%. Local control was similar for radiosensitive (non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer) and radioresistant (melanoma and renal cell cancer) brain metastases. On multivariate Cox analysis stable extracranial disease, breast cancer histology, and Karnofsky performance status >70 were associated with significant survival benefit. Brain radionecrosis occurred in 9 patients (9%), being symptomatic in 5 patients (5%). Conclusions: Adjuvant multidose SRS to resection cavity represents an effective treatment option that achieves excellent local control and defers the use of whole-brain radiation therapy in selected patients with large brain metastases.

  17. Drug-Resistant Brain Metastases: A Role for Pharmacology, Tumor Evolution, and Too-Late Therapy.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Thomas; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-11-01

    Two recent studies report deep molecular profiling of matched brain metastases and primary tumors. In both studies, somatic alterations in the brain metastases were frequently discordant with those in the primary tumor, suggesting divergent evolution at metastatic sites and raising questions about the use of biomarkers in patients in clinical trials with targeted therapies.

  18. Brain-Only Metastases Seen on FDG PET as First Relapse of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Two Years Post-Thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Naddaf, Sleiman Y; Syed, Ghulam Mustafa Shah; Hadb, Abdulrahman; Al-Thaqfi, Saif

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of a 60-year-old man diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer who had a relapse seen only in the brain at FDG PET on standard images. Total thyroidectomy was performed in July 2013 after initial diagnosis. Patient received I ablation in December 2013, followed by external beam radiotherapy to the neck. In September 2015, the patient presented with neurological symptoms. Brain MRI showed multiple brain metastases later confirmed on histopathology. An FDG PET/CT scan was performed to evaluate the whole body in November 2015. Multiple hypermetabolic lesions were identified in the brain with no other lesion up to mid thighs. PMID:27405041

  19. Inferring the origin of metastases from cancer phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Woo Suk; Shpak, Max; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the evolutionary history of metastases is a key problem in cancer biology. Several recent studies have presented inferences regarding the origin of metastases based on phylogenies of cancer lineages. Many of these studies have concluded that the observed monophyly of metastatic subclones favored metastasis-to-metastasis spread (“a metastatic cascade” rather than parallel metastases from the primary tumor). In this article, we argue that identifying a monophyletic clade of metastatic subclones does not provide sufficient evidence to unequivocally establish a history of metastatic cascades. In the absence of a complete phylogeny of the subclones within the primary tumor, a scenario of parallel metastatic events from the primary tumor is an equally plausible interpretation. Future phylogenetic studies on the origin of metastases should obtain a complete phylogeny of subclones within the primary tumor. This complete phylogeny may be obtainable by ultra-deep sequencing and phasing of large sections or by targeted sequencing of many small, spatially heterogeneous sections, followed by phylogenetic reconstruction using well-established molecular evolutionary models. In addition to resolving the evolutionary history of metastases, a complete phylogeny of subclones within the primary tumor facilitates the identification of driver mutations by application of phylogeny-based tests of natural selection. PMID:26260528

  20. Clinical and molecular complexity of breast cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Kimbung, Siker; Loman, Niklas; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2015-12-01

    Clinical oncology is advancing toward a more personalized treatment orientation, making the need to understand the biology of metastasis increasingly acute. Dissecting the complex molecular, genetic and clinical phenotypes underlying the processes involved in the development of metastatic disease, which remains the principal cause of cancer-related deaths, could lead to the identification of more effective prognostication and targeted approaches to prevent and treat metastases. The past decade has witnessed significant progress in the field of cancer metastasis research. Clinical and technological milestones have been reached which have tremendously enriched our understanding of the complex pathways undertaken by primary tumors to progress into lethal metastases and how some of these processes might be amenable to therapy. The aim of this review article is to highlight the recent advances toward unraveling the clinical and molecular complexity of breast cancer metastases. We focus on genes mediating breast cancer metastases and organ-specific tropism, and discuss gene signatures for prediction of metastatic disease. The challenges of translating this information into clinically applicable tools for improving the prognostication of the metastatic potential of a primary breast tumor, as well as for therapeutic interventions against latent and active metastatic disease are addressed.

  1. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Mario; Mosconi, Stefania; Quadri, Antonello; Milesi, Laura; Labianca, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common type of cancer in industrialized countries. Despite improved resection procedures and optimized adjuvant chemotherapy, local or distant recurrences occur in 22-25% of patients with stage II/III colon cancer. Approximately 30% of patients have advanced disease at presentation. The liver is the most common site of colorectal metastases and, interestingly, 20-30% of patients with colorectal cancer have liver-only metastases. The combined modality of chemotherapy and surgery increases overall survival and the chance of cure for metastatic patients, even if there is no agreement in terms of the best schedule and how long the treatment must last. In this paper, we review the role and the rationale of neoadjuvant chemotherapy within a multimodal approach, and discuss remaining questions and future directions.

  2. The treatment of recurrent brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, J.S.; Kooy, H.M.; Wen, P.Y.; Fine, H.A.; Cheng, C.W.; Mannarino, E.G.; Tsai, J.S.; Alexander, E. III )

    1990-04-01

    Between May 1986 and August 1989, we treated 18 patients with 21 recurrent or persistent brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery using a modified linear accelerator. To be eligible for radiosurgery, patients had to have a performance status of greater than or equal to 70% and have no evidence of systemic disease. All but one patient had received prior radiotherapy, and were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the time of recurrence. Polar lesions were treated only if the patient had undergone and failed previous complete surgical resection (10 patients). Single doses of radiation (900 to 2,500 cGy) were delivered to limited volumes (less than 27 cm3) using a modified 6MV linear accelerator. The most common histology of the metastatic lesion was carcinoma of the lung (seven patients), followed by carcinoma of the breast (four patients), and melanoma (four patients). With median follow-up of 9 months (range, 1 to 39), all tumors have been controlled in the radiosurgery field. Two patients failed in the immediate margin of the treated volume and were subsequently treated with surgery and implantation of 125I to control the disease. Radiographic response was dramatic and rapid in the patients with adenocarcinoma, while slight reduction and stabilization occurred in those patients with melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma. The majority of patients improved neurologically following treatment, and were able to be withdrawn from corticosteroid therapy. Complications were limited and transient in nature and no cases of symptomatic radiation necrosis occurred in any patient despite previous exposure to radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective and relatively safe treatment for recurrent solitary metastases and is an appealing technique for the initial management of deep-seated lesions as a boost to whole brain radiotherapy.

  3. [Multiple cavitary pulmonary metastases from ovarian cancer: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, S; Takechi, A; Kashiyama, T

    2001-06-01

    Cavitation in pulmonary metastases is thought to be uncommon. To date, few cases of pulmonary metastases originating from ovarian cancer and showing cavitation have been reported. We report a patient with multiple cavitation in pulmonary metastases from ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. A 28-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital presenting with cough and fever. The patient had undergone right ovariectomy for ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma at the age of 23 years. Her chest radiograph on admission showed multiple cavities associated with infiltration in both lungs. Histological sections obtained by transbronchial lung biopsy revealed mucus-secreting adenocarcinoma, and a diagnosis of metastatic lung cancer from the ovary was made. Computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest demonstrated various findings, including multiple thick-walled cavities, thin-walled cavities, air-space consolidations, ground glass opacities, and centrilobular nodular shadows formed by aspiration of the mucinous secretions. It is important to recognize that cavitation can occur in pulmonary metastases from ovarian cancer. PMID:11530393

  4. Bevacizumab as a treatment for radiation necrosis of brain metastases post stereotactic radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Boothe, Dustin; Young, Robert; Yamada, Yoshiya; Prager, Alisa; Chan, Timothy; Beal, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral radiation necrosis (RN) is a difficult to treat complication of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) that can result in progressive neurologic decline. Currently, steroids are the standard of care treatment for brain RN despite their adverse effect profile and limited efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment efficacy of cerebral RN to bevacizumab in patients with brain metastases previously treated with SRS. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 14 lesions in 11 patients treated with bevacizumab for brain RN secondary to SRS for their brain metastases. Steroid dosing, RN-associated symptoms, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were examined before, during, and after bevacizumab administration. Results Of the 11 patients included, 6 had metastatic non–small cell lung cancer, and 5 had metastatic breast cancer. The mean percentage decrease in RN volume seen on T1 post-Gadolinium and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI at first follow-up, at a mean of 26 days (range, 15–43 days), was 64.4% and 64.3%, respectively. MRI changes were sustained on follow-up MRI scans, obtained at a mean of 33 days (range, 7–58 days) after bevacizumab discontinuation. After bevacizumab treatment, all patients initially receiving steroids had a reduction in steroid requirement, and all but one had an improvement in or stability of RN-associated symptoms. No patients experienced intratumoral bleeds or other adverse effects related to their bevacizumab treatment. Conclusions Bevacizumab is effective and safe for the treatment of RN after SRS for brain metastasis. In this context, bevacizumab offers symptomatic relief, a reduction in steroid requirement, and a dramatic radiographic response. PMID:23814264

  5. Brain Metastases from Different Primary Carcinomas: an Evaluation of DSC MRI Measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Zhang, G; Oudkerk, M

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the roles of different dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic imaging (DSC MRI) measurements in discriminating between brain metastases derived from four common primary carcinomas. Thirty-seven patients with brain metastases were enrolled. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and relative mean transit time (rMTT) in both tumor and peritumoral edema were measured. Metastases were grouped by their primary tumor (lung, gastrointestinal, breast and renal cell carcinoma). DSC MRI measurements were compared between groups. Mean rCBV, rCBF, rMTT in tumor and peritumoral edema of all brain metastases (n=37) were 2.79 ± 1.73, 2.56 ± 2.11, 1.21 ± 0.48 and 1.05 ± 0.53, 0.86 ± 0.40, 1.99 ± 0.41, respectively. The tumoral rCBV (5.26 ± 1.89) and rCBF (5.32 ± 3.28) of renal metastases were greater than those of the other three metastases (P<0.05). The tumoral rMTT (1.58 ± 0.77) of breast metastases was statistically greater than that (0.96 ± 0.31) of gastrointestinal metastases (P=0.013). No statistical difference was found between peritumoral rCBV, rCBF and rMTT (P>0.05). Evaluating various DSC MRI measurements can provide complementary hemodynamic information on brain metastases. The tumoral rCBV, rCBF and likely rMTT can help discriminate between brain metastases originating from different primary carcinomas. The peritumoral DSC MRI measurements had limited value in discriminating between brain metastases.

  6. Rectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases: Do we have a clear direction?

    PubMed

    Pathak, S; Nunes, Q M; Daniels, I R; Smart, N J; Poston, G J; Påhlman, L

    2015-12-01

    Rectal cancer is a common entity and often presents with synchronous liver metastases. There are discrepancies in management guidelines throughout the world regarding the treatment of advanced rectal cancer, which are further compounded when it presents with synchronous liver metastases. The following article examines the evidence regarding treatment options for patients with synchronous rectal liver metastases and suggests potential treatment algorithms.

  7. Brain metastases detectability of routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET and low dose CT scanning in 2502 asymptomatic patients with solid extracranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Bochev, Pavel; Klisarova, Aneliya; Kaprelyan, Ara; Chaushev, Borislav; Dancheva, Zhivka

    2012-01-01

    As fluorine-18-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( (18)F-FDG PET/CT) is gaining wider availability, more and more patients with malignancies undergo whole body PET/CT, mostly to assess tumor spread in the rest of the body, but not in the brain. Brain is a common site of metastatic spread in patients with solid extracranial tumors. Gold standard in the diagnosis of brain metastases remains magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However MRI is not routinely indicated and is not available for all cancer patients. Fluorine-18-FDG PET is considered as having poor sensitivity in detecting brain metastases, but this may not be true for PET/CT. The aim of our study was to assess the value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of brain metastases found by whole body scan including the brain, in patients with solid extracranial neoplasms. A total of 2502 patients with solid extracranial neoplasms were studied. All patients underwent a routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan with the whole brain included in the scanned field. Patients with known or suspected brain metastases were preliminary excluded from the study. Hypermetabolic and ring-like brain lesions on the PET scan were considered as metastases. Lesions with CT characteristics of brain metastases were regarded as such irrespective of their metabolic pattern. Lesions in doubt were verified by MRI during first testing or on follow-up or by operation. Our results showed that brain lesions, indicative of and verified to be metastases were detected in 25 out of the 2502 patients (1%), with lung cancer being the most common primary. Twenty three out of these 25 patients had no neurological symptoms by the time of the scan. The detection rate of brain metastases was relatively low, but information was obtained with a minimum increase of radiation burden. In conclusion, whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT detected brain metastases in 1% of the patients if brain was included in the scanned field. Brain

  8. The Brain Metastases Symptom Checklist as a novel tool for symptom measurement in patients with brain metastases undergoing whole-brain radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, D.; Banihashemi, B.; Wang, L.; Lau, A.; Harris, S.; Levin, W.; Dinniwell, R.; Millar, B.A.; Chung, C.; Laperriere, N.; Bezjak, A.; Wong, R.K.S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Brain Metastases Symptom Checklist (bmsc), a novel self-report measure of common symptoms experienced by patients with brain metastases. Methods Patients with first-presentation symptomatic brain metastases (n = 137) referred for whole-brain radiotherapy (wbrt) completed the bmsc at time points before and after treatment. Their caregivers (n = 48) provided proxy ratings twice on the day of consultation to assess reliability, and at week 4 after wbrt to assess responsiveness to change. Correlations with 4 other validated assessment tools were evaluated. Results The symptoms reported on the bmsc were largely mild to moderate, with tiredness (71%) and difficulties with balance (61%) reported most commonly at baseline. Test–retest reliability for individual symptoms had a median intraclass correlation of 0.59 (range: 0.23–0.85). Caregiver proxy and patient responses had a median intraclass correlation of 0.52. Correlation of absolute scores on the bmsc and other symptom assessment tools was low, but consistency in the direction of symptom change was observed. At week 4, change in symptoms was variable, with improvements in weight gain and sleep of 42% and 41% respectively, and worsening of tiredness and drowsiness of 62% and 59% respectively. Conclusions The bmsc captures a wide range of symptoms experienced by patients with brain metastases, and it is sensitive to change. It demonstrated adequate test–retest reliability and face validity in terms of its responsiveness to change. Future research is needed to determine whether modifications to the bmsc itself or correlation with more symptom-specific measures will enhance validity. PMID:27330360

  9. Sentinel Lymph Node Occult Metastases Have Minimal Survival Effect in Some Breast Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Detailed examination of sentinel lymph node tissue from breast cancer patients revealed previously unidentified metastases in about 16% of the samples, but the difference in 5-year survival between patients with and without these metastases was very small

  10. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  11. Tumor marker analyses in patients with brain metastases: patterns of practice and implications for survival prediction research.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Carsten; Dalhaug, Astrid; Haukland, Ellinor; Mannsåker, Bård; Pawinski, Adam

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to explore patterns of practice of tumor marker analyses and potential prognostic impact of abnormal markers in patients with brain metastases from solid tumors. Previously, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and albumin were identified as relevant biomarkers. We performed a retrospective analysis of 120 patients with known LDH and albumin treated with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in two different situations: (1) brain metastases detected at initial cancer diagnosis (n = 46) and (2) brain metastases at later time points (n = 74, median interval 13 months). Twenty-six patients (57 %) from group 1 had at least one tumor marker analyzed, and 11 patients (24 %) had abnormal results. Twenty-two patients (30 %) from group 2 had at least one tumor marker analyzed, and 16 patients (22 %) had abnormal results. When assuming that LDH and albumin would be standard tests before WBRT, additional potential biomarkers were found in 36 % of patients with normal LDH and albumin. Marker positivity rates were for example 80 % for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in colorectal cancer and 79 % for CA 15-3 in breast cancer. Abnormal markers were associated with presence of liver metastases. CA 15-3 values above median predicted shorter survival in patients with breast cancer (median 1.9 vs. 13.8 months, p = 0.1). Comparable trends were not observed for various markers in other tumor types. In conclusion, only a minority of patients had undergone tumor marker analyses. Final group sizes were too small to perform multivariate analyses or draw definitive conclusions. We hypothesize that CA 15-3 could be a promising biomarker that should be studied further.

  12. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  13. Cytoreductive Surgery plus HIPEC for Peritoneal Metastases from Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Aditi; Goéré, Diane

    2016-06-01

    Occurring either synchronously or metachronously to the primary tumor, peritoneal metastases (PM) are diagnosed in 8 to 20 % of the patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Prognosis of these patients appears to be worse than those with other sites of metastases. While systemic therapy has shown significant prolongation of survival in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer, the outcomes in the subset of patients with PM has been much inferior. Over the last 2 decades, cytoreductive surgery (CRS) followed by hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) have been effective in substantially prolonging survival in patients with colorectal PM and have the potential to cure certain patients as well. This article reviews the current evidence for CRS and HIPEC to treat colorectal PM as well as future research going on in this form of locoregional treatment. PMID:27065708

  14. Prognostic Indexes for Brain Metastases: Which Is the Most Powerful?

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Bernardes da Silva, Lucas Godoi; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to compare the prognostic indexes (PIs) of patients with brain metastases (BMs) treated with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) using an artificial neural network. This analysis is important, because it evaluates the prognostic power of each PI to guide clinical decision-making and outcomes research. Methods and Materials: A retrospective prognostic study was conducted of 412 patients with BMs who underwent WBRT between April 1998 and March 2010. The eligibility criteria for patients included having undergone WBRT or WBRT plus neurosurgery. The data were analyzed using the artificial neural network. The input neural data consisted of all prognostic factors included in the 5 PIs (recursive partitioning analysis, graded prognostic assessment [GPA], basic score for BMs, Rotterdam score, and Germany score). The data set was randomly divided into 300 training and 112 testing examples for survival prediction. All 5 PIs were compared using our database of 412 patients with BMs. The sensibility of the 5 indexes to predict survival according to their input variables was determined statistically using receiver operating characteristic curves. The importance of each variable from each PI was subsequently evaluated. Results: The overall 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rate was 22%, 10.2%, and 5.1%, respectively. All classes of PIs were significantly associated with survival (recursive partitioning analysis, P < .0001; GPA, P < .0001; basic score for BMs, P = .002; Rotterdam score, P = .001; and Germany score, P < .0001). Comparing the areas under the curves, the GPA was statistically most sensitive in predicting survival (GPA, 86%; recursive partitioning analysis, 81%; basic score for BMs, 79%; Rotterdam, 73%; and Germany score, 77%; P < .001). Among the variables included in each PI, the performance status and presence of extracranial metastases were the most important factors. Conclusion: A variety of prognostic models describe the

  15. Abdominal metastases from colorectal cancer: intraperitoneal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guend, Hamza; Patel, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Patients with peritoneal metastasis from colorectal cancer represent a distinct subset with regional disease rather than systemic disease. They often have poorer survival outcomes with systemic chemotherapy. Optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) offers such patients a more directed therapy with improved survival. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis, evaluation and classification, as well as rational for treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) secondary to colorectal cancer. PMID:26697203

  16. Cancer stem cells: a metastasizing menace!

    PubMed

    Bandhavkar, Saurabh

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and is estimated to be a reason of death of more than 18 billion people in the coming 5 years. Progress has been made in diagnosis and treatment of cancer; however, a sound understanding of the underlying cell biology still remains an unsolved mystery. Current treatments include a combination of radiation, surgery, and/or chemotherapy. However, these treatments are not a complete cure, aimed simply at shrinking the tumor and in majority of cases, there is a relapse of tumor. Several evidences suggest the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating stem-like cells, a small population of cells present in the tumor, capable of self-renewal and generation of differentiated progeny. The presence of these CSCs can be attributed to the failure of cancer treatments as these cells are believed to exhibit therapy resistance. As a result, increasing attention has been given to CSC research to resolve the therapeutic problems related to cancer. Progress in this field of research has led to the development of novel strategies to treat several malignancies and has become a hot topic of discussion. In this review, we will briefly focus on the main characteristics, therapeutic implications, and perspectives of CSCs in cancer therapy. PMID:26773710

  17. Whole Brain Irradiation With Hippocampal Sparing and Dose Escalation on Multiple Brain Metastases: A Planning Study on Treatment Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Prokic, Vesna; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Fels, Franziska; Schmucker, Marianne; Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new treatment planning strategy in patients with multiple brain metastases. The goal was to perform whole brain irradiation (WBI) with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Two treatment concepts were investigated: simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and WBI followed by stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy sequential concept (SC). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for both concepts were calculated for 10 patients with 2-8 brain metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy. In the SIB concept, the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain and 51 Gy in 12 fractions to individual brain metastases. In the SC concept, the prescription was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain followed by 18 Gy in 2 fractions to brain metastases. All plans were optimized for dose coverage of whole brain and lesions, simultaneously minimizing dose to the hippocampus. The treatment plans were evaluated on target coverage, homogeneity, and minimal dose to the hippocampus and organs at risk. Results: The SIB concept enabled more successful sparing of the hippocampus; the mean dose to the hippocampus was 7.55 {+-} 0.62 Gy and 6.29 {+-} 0.62 Gy, respectively, when 5-mm and 10-mm avoidance regions around the hippocampus were used, normalized to 2-Gy fractions. In the SC concept, the mean dose to hippocampus was 9.8 {+-} 1.75 Gy. The mean dose to the whole brain (excluding metastases) was 33.2 {+-} 0.7 Gy and 32.7 {+-} 0.96 Gy, respectively, in the SIB concept, for 5-mm and 10-mm hippocampus avoidance regions, and 37.23 {+-} 1.42 Gy in SC. Conclusions: Both concepts, SIB and SC, were able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage and radiosurgery-equivalent dose distributions to individual brain metastases. The SIB technique achieved better sparing of the hippocampus, especially when a10-mm hippocampal avoidance region was used.

  18. Computational systems biology in cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huiming; Tan, Hua; Zhao, Weiling; Jin, Guangxu; Sharma, Sambad; Xing, Fei; Watabe, Kounosuke; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases occur in 20-40% of patients with advanced malignancies. A better understanding of the mechanism of this disease will help us to identify novel therapeutic strategies. In this review, we will discuss the systems biology approaches used in this area, including bioinformatics and mathematical modeling. Bioinformatics has been used for identifying the molecular mechanisms driving brain metastasis and mathematical modeling methods for analyzing dynamics of a system and predicting optimal therapeutic strategies. We will illustrate the strategies, procedures, and computational techniques used for studying systems biology in cancer brain metastases. We will give examples on how to use a systems biology approach to analyze a complex disease. Some of the approaches used to identify relevant networks, pathways, and possibly biomarkers in metastasis will be reviewed into details. Finally, certain challenges and possible future directions in this area will also be discussed.

  19. SPECT and PET serve as molecular imaging techniques and in vivo biomarkers for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Barbara; Buresta, Tommaso; Nuvoli, Susanna; Spanu, Angela; Schillaci, Orazio; Fravolini, Mario Luca; Palumbo, Isabella

    2014-06-03

    Nuclear medicine techniques (single photon emission computerized tomography, SPECT, and positron emission tomography, PET) represent molecular imaging tools, able to provide in vivo biomarkers of different diseases. To investigate brain tumours and metastases many different radiopharmaceuticals imaged by SPECT and PET can be used. In this review the main and most promising radiopharmaceuticals available to detect brain metastases are reported. Furthermore the diagnostic contribution of the combination of SPECT and PET data with radiological findings (magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) is discussed.

  20. SPECT and PET Serve as Molecular Imaging Techniques and in Vivo Biomarkers for Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Barbara; Buresta, Tommaso; Nuvoli, Susanna; Spanu, Angela; Schillaci, Orazio; Fravolini, Mario Luca; Palumbo, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear medicine techniques (single photon emission computerized tomography, SPECT, and positron emission tomography, PET) represent molecular imaging tools, able to provide in vivo biomarkers of different diseases. To investigate brain tumours and metastases many different radiopharmaceuticals imaged by SPECT and PET can be used. In this review the main and most promising radiopharmaceuticals available to detect brain metastases are reported. Furthermore the diagnostic contribution of the combination of SPECT and PET data with radiological findings (magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) is discussed. PMID:24897023

  1. Systemic delivery of HER2-retargeted oncolytic-HSV by mesenchymal stromal cells protects from lung and brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Valerio; Gatta, Valentina; Palladini, Arianna; Nicoletti, Giordano; Ranieri, Dario; Dall'Ora, Massimiliano; Grosso, Valentina; Rossi, Martina; Alviano, Francesco; Bonsi, Laura; Nanni, Patrizia; Lollini, Pier-Luigi; Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella

    2015-10-27

    Fully retargeted oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (o-HSVs) gain cancer-specificity from redirection of tropism to cancer-specific receptors, and are non-attenuated. To overcome the hurdles of systemic delivery, and enable oncolytic viruses (o-viruses) to reach metastatic sites, carrier cells are being exploited. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were never tested as carriers of retargeted o-viruses, given their scarse-null expression of the cancer-specific receptors. We report that MSCs from different sources can be forcedly infected with a HER2-retargeted oncolytic HSV. Progeny virus spread from MSCs to cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We evaluated the organ distribution and therapeutic efficacy in two murine models of metastatic cancers, following a single i.v. injection of infected MSCs. As expected, the highest concentration of carrier-cells and of viral genomes was in the lungs. Viral genomes persisted throughout the body for at least two days. The growth of ovarian cancer lung metastases in nude mice was strongly inhibited, and the majority of treated mice appeared metastasis-free. The treatment significantly inhibited also breast cancer metastases to the brain in NSG mice, and reduced by more than one-half the metastatic burden in the brain.

  2. Incidence of Leukoencephalopathy After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ebi, Junko; Sato, Hisashi; Nakajima, Masaru; Shishido, Fumio

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of leukoencephalopathy after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 111 patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from April 2001 through March 2008 and had evaluable computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 1 month after completion of WBRT. We evaluated the leukoencephalopathy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The patients who had brain tumor recurrence after WBRT were censored at the last follow-up CT or MRI without recurrence. To evaluate the risk factors for leukoencephalopathy, bivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression analysis adjusted for follow-up time. Factors included in the analysis were age, gender, dose fractionation, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, cisplatin, and other chemotherapeutic agents. Results: The median age of the 111 patients was 60.0 years (range, 23-89 years). The median follow-up was 3.8 months (range, 1.0-38.1 months). Leukoencephalopathy developed in 23 of the 111 patients. Grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed in 8, 7, and 8 patients, respectively. The incidence was 34.4% (11 of 32), 42.9% (6 of 14), 66.7% (2 of 3), and 100% (2 of 2) of the patients who were followed up for ≥6, ≥12, ≥24, and ≥36 months, respectively. In the bivariate analysis, older age (≥65 years) was significantly correlated with higher risk of leukoencephalopathy (odds ratio 3.31; 95% confidence interval 1.15-9.50; P=.03). Conclusions: The incidence of leukoencephalopathy after WBRT was 34.4% with ≥6 months follow-up, and increased with longer follow-up. Older age was a significant risk factor. The schedule of WBRT for patients with brain metastases should be carefully determined, especially for favorable patients.

  3. Multiple pulmonary metastases with cavitation from gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Oshikawa, K; Ishii, Y; Hironaka, M; Kitamura, S

    1998-03-01

    We report a rare case of multiple pulmonary metastases with cavitation from gallbladder cancer. A 77-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of productive cough and exertional dyspnea. Chest X-ray film showed multiple nodular shadows with some cavitation. Computed tomography showed multiple cavities, up to 2 cm in diameter, as well as nodules, in bilateral lung fields. Under a survey of primary focus, the ultrasonographic test of the abdomen revealed a hypoechoic mass in the hepatic hilum. The patient died of respiratory failure. Autopsy findings revealed that that multiple lung tumors had metastasized from papillary adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder and that cavitation of the lung was formed by bronchioloectasis. PMID:9617865

  4. 77 FR 11123 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases to the Liver AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research... unresectable colorectal cancer metastases to the liver. The EHC Program is dedicated to identifying as many... manufacturers of unresectable colorectal cancer medical devices. Scientific information is being solicited...

  5. Oligometastatic prostate cancer: Metastases-directed therapy?

    PubMed

    Van Poppel, Hein; De Meerleer, Gert; Joniau, Steven

    2016-09-01

    Since the introduction of anatomical and functional imaging with multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and choline or prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography-computed tomography, we are able to diagnose a previously unknown disease, the oligometastatic prostate cancer after local therapy. Reports on surgical and radiation treatment for low-volume metastatic recurrence have shown promising results, with definitive cure in few but a relevant delay of androgen-deprivation therapy with both treatment methods. Obviously, these results need to be validated with prospective randomised data. PMID:27547457

  6. Hypomethylation and increased expression of the putative oncogene ELMO3 are associated with lung cancer development and metastases formation

    PubMed Central

    Søes, Signe; Daugaard, Iben Lyster; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Carus, Andreas; Mattheisen, Manuel; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens; Hager, Henrik; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Kristensen, Lasse Sommer

    2014-01-01

    Numerous genetic and epigenetic events driving tumorigenesis have been characterized. However, knowledge is lacking on the particular events required for the metastatic spread of cancer cells. The engulfment and cell motility 3 (ELMO3) gene plays an important role for the migratory potential of cells, but have not previously been studied in primary samples from cancer patients. We collected material from primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors and paired brain or adrenal gland metastases from 26 patients and from 26 primary tumor samples from metastasis-free patients matched for age, gender, histology, T-stage, smoking status, and proportion of tumor cells. Using reverse transcriptase–quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) ELMO3 was shown to be overexpressed in primary tumors from patients with distant metastases compared to normal lung tissue (p<0.001), and compared to primary tumors from metastasis-free patients (p<0.001). The increased expression coincided with decreased methylation levels of the ELMO3 promoter region. High expression and hypomethylation of ELMO3 were also observed when studying the paired brain and adrenal gland metastases. In conclusion, the putative oncogene, ELMO3, is overexpressed in NSCLC in combination with hypomethylation of its promoter and these cancer-specific events are associated with the formation of metastases. PMID:25594031

  7. Distribution and prognostic relevance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoints in human brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Harter, Patrick N; Bernatz, Simon; Scholz, Alexander; Zeiner, Pia S; Zinke, Jenny; Kiyose, Makoto; Blasel, Stella; Beschorner, Rudi; Senft, Christian; Bender, Benjamin; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W; Wikman, Harriet; Glatzel, Markus; Meinhardt, Matthias; Juratli, Tareq A; Steinbach, Joachim P; Plate, Karl H; Wischhusen, Jörg; Weide, Benjamin; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2015-12-01

    The activation of immune cells by targeting checkpoint inhibitors showed promising results with increased patient survival in distinct primary cancers. Since only limited data exist for human brain metastases, we aimed at characterizing tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and expression of immune checkpoints in the respective tumors. Two brain metastases cohorts, a mixed entity cohort (n = 252) and a breast carcinoma validation cohort (n = 96) were analyzed for CD3+, CD8+, FOXP3+, PD-1+ lymphocytes and PD-L1+ tumor cells by immunohistochemistry. Analyses for association with clinico-epidemiological and neuroradiological parameters such as patient survival or tumor size were performed. TILs infiltrated brain metastases in three different patterns (stromal, peritumoral, diffuse). While carcinomas often show a strong stromal infiltration, TILs in melanomas often diffusely infiltrate the tumors. Highest levels of CD3+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were seen in renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and strongest PD-1 levels on RCCs and melanomas. High amounts of TILs, high ratios of PD-1+/CD8+ cells and high levels of PD-L1 were negatively correlated with brain metastases size, indicating that in smaller brain metastases CD8+ immune response might get blocked. PD-L1 expression strongly correlated with TILs and FOXP3 expression. No significant association of patient survival with TILs was observed, while high levels of PD-L1 showed a strong trend towards better survival in melanoma brain metastases (Log-Rank p = 0.0537). In summary, melanomas and RCCs seem to be the most immunogenic entities. Differences in immunotherapeutic response between tumor entities regarding brain metastases might be attributable to this finding and need further investigation in larger patient cohorts.

  8. Distribution and prognostic relevance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoints in human brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Harter, Patrick N; Bernatz, Simon; Scholz, Alexander; Zeiner, Pia S; Zinke, Jenny; Kiyose, Makoto; Blasel, Stella; Beschorner, Rudi; Senft, Christian; Bender, Benjamin; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W; Wikman, Harriet; Glatzel, Markus; Meinhardt, Matthias; Juratli, Tareq A; Steinbach, Joachim P; Plate, Karl H; Wischhusen, Jörg; Weide, Benjamin; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2015-12-01

    The activation of immune cells by targeting checkpoint inhibitors showed promising results with increased patient survival in distinct primary cancers. Since only limited data exist for human brain metastases, we aimed at characterizing tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and expression of immune checkpoints in the respective tumors. Two brain metastases cohorts, a mixed entity cohort (n = 252) and a breast carcinoma validation cohort (n = 96) were analyzed for CD3+, CD8+, FOXP3+, PD-1+ lymphocytes and PD-L1+ tumor cells by immunohistochemistry. Analyses for association with clinico-epidemiological and neuroradiological parameters such as patient survival or tumor size were performed. TILs infiltrated brain metastases in three different patterns (stromal, peritumoral, diffuse). While carcinomas often show a strong stromal infiltration, TILs in melanomas often diffusely infiltrate the tumors. Highest levels of CD3+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were seen in renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and strongest PD-1 levels on RCCs and melanomas. High amounts of TILs, high ratios of PD-1+/CD8+ cells and high levels of PD-L1 were negatively correlated with brain metastases size, indicating that in smaller brain metastases CD8+ immune response might get blocked. PD-L1 expression strongly correlated with TILs and FOXP3 expression. No significant association of patient survival with TILs was observed, while high levels of PD-L1 showed a strong trend towards better survival in melanoma brain metastases (Log-Rank p = 0.0537). In summary, melanomas and RCCs seem to be the most immunogenic entities. Differences in immunotherapeutic response between tumor entities regarding brain metastases might be attributable to this finding and need further investigation in larger patient cohorts. PMID:26517811

  9. Photodynamic therapy stimulates anti-tumor immune response in mouse models: the role of regulatory Tcells, anti-tumor antibodies, and immune attacks on brain metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatansever, Fatma; Kawakubo, Masayoshi; Chung, Hoon; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-02-01

    We have previously shown that photodynamic therapy mediated by a vascular regimen of benzoporphyrin derivative and 690nm light is capable of inducing a robust immune response in the mouse CT26.CL25 tumor model that contains a tumor-rejection antigen, beta-galactosidase (β-gal). For the first time we show that PDT can stimulate the production of serum IgG antibodies against the β-gal antigen. It is known that a common cause of death from cancer, particularly lung cancer, is brain metastases; especially the inoperable ones that do not respond to traditional cytotoxic therapies either. We asked whether PDT of a primary tumor could stimulate immune response that could attack the distant brain metastases. We have developed a mouse model of generating brain metastases by injecting CT26.CL25 tumor cells into the brain as well as injecting the same cancer cells under the skin at the same time. When the subcutaneous tumor was treated with PDT, we observed a survival advantage compared to mice that had untreated brain metastases alone.

  10. Whole Brain Radiotherapy With Hippocampal Avoidance and Simultaneously Integrated Brain Metastases Boost: A Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Westerly, David C.; Tome, Wolfgang A. Jaradat, Hazim A..; Mackie, Thomas R.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Khuntia, Deepak; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using tomotherapy to deliver whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal avoidance, hypothesized to reduce the risk of memory function decline, and simultaneously integrated boost to brain metastases to improve intracranial tumor control. Methods and Materials: Ten patients treated with radiosurgery and whole brain radiotherapy underwent repeat planning using tomotherapy with the original computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography fusion-defined target and normal structure contours. The individually contoured hippocampus was used as a dose-limiting structure (<6 Gy); the whole brain dose was prescribed at 32.25 Gy to 95% in 15 fractions, and the simultaneous boost doses to individual brain metastases were 63 Gy to lesions {>=}2.0 cm in the maximal diameter and 70.8 Gy to lesions <2.0 cm. The plans were generated with a field width (FW) of 2.5 cm and, in 5 patients, with a FW of 1.0 cm. The plans were compared regarding conformation number, prescription isodose/target volume ratio, target coverage, homogeneity index, and mean normalized total dose. Results: A 1.0-cm FW compared with a 2.5-cm FW significantly improved the dose distribution. The mean conformation number improved from 0.55 {+-} 0.16 to 0.60 {+-} 0.13. Whole brain homogeneity improved by 32% (p <0.001). The mean normalized total dose to the hippocampus was 5.9 {+-} 1.3 Gy{sub 2} and 5.8 {+-} 1.9 Gy{sub 2} for 2.5- and 1.0-cm FW, respectively. The mean treatment delivery time for the 2.5- and 1.0-cm FW plans was 10.2 {+-} 1.0 and 21.8 {+-} 1.8 min, respectively. Conclusion: Composite tomotherapy plans achieved three objectives: homogeneous whole brain dose distribution equivalent to conventional whole brain radiotherapy; conformal hippocampal avoidance; and radiosurgically equivalent dose distributions to individual metastases.

  11. Non Tumor Perfusion Changes Following Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Sahgal, Arjun; Ruschin, Mark; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Milwid, Rachael; Aviv, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early perfusion changes in normal tissue following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Nineteen patients harboring twenty-two brain metastases treated with SRS were imaged with dynamic susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) at baseline, 1 week and 1 month post SRS. Relative cerebral blood volume and flow (rCBV and rCBF) ratios were evaluated outside of tumor within a combined region of interest (ROI) and separately within gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) ROIs. Three-dimensional dose distribution from each SRS plan was divided into six regions: (1) <2 Gy; (2) 2-5 Gy; (3) 5-10 Gy; (4) 10-12 Gy; (5) 12-16 Gy; and (6) >16 Gy. rCBV and rCBF ratio differences between baseline, 1 week and 1 month were compared. Best linear fit plots quantified normal tissue dose-dependency. Results: Significant rCBV ratio increases were present between baseline and 1 month for all ROIs and dose ranges except for WM ROI receiving <2 Gy. rCBV ratio for all ROIs was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month with the greatest changes occurring within the 5-10 Gy dose range (53.1%). rCBF ratio was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month for all ROIs within the 5-10 Gy dose range (33.9-45.0%). Both rCBV and rCBF ratios were most elevated within GM ROIs. A weak, positive but not significant association between dose, rCBV and rCBF ratio was demonstrated. Progressive rCBV and rCBF ratio increased with dose up to 10 Gy at 1 month. Conclusion: Normal tissue response following SRS can be characterized by dose, tissue, and time specific increases in rCBV and rCBF ratio. PMID:26269612

  12. Treatment of malignant gliomas and brain metastases in adults with a combination of adriamycin, VM 26, and CCNU. Results of a phase II trail.

    PubMed

    Pouillart, P; Mathe, G; Thy, T H; Lheritier, J; Poisson, M; Huguenin, P; Gauthier, H; Morin, P; Parrot, R

    1976-11-01

    Forty-three patients with inoperable or recurring malignant gliomas, and 30 patients with multiple recurring brain metastases were treated with a combination of Adriamycin (45 mg/m2) and 4-dimethyl-epipodophyllotoxin D-thenylidene (VM 26) (60 mg/m2 for 2 days) with 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) (60 mg/m2 for 2 days). These cycles of treatment were repeated as soon as the hematologic restoration was complete. The treatment was well tolerated and the clinical condition of 31 of 43 glioblastoma patients improved during the 2 months after the beginning of the treatment. Six of eight patients with breast cancer metastases, one of 13 with bronchial cancer matastases, and three of nine with other types of cancer metastases also benefitted from the treatment. Examination of the results obtained revealed the following characteristics: 1) This combination had a low degree of efficiency in the treatment of metastases to brain, except for breast cancer metastases; 2) there was no complete correlation between the clinical results observed and the cinegammagraphic developments; 3) the results obtained were similar, independent of the initial localization; and a 6-month median survival period was established, with 10 patients now in a state of apparently complete remission, 180 to 506 days after beginning of the treatment. PMID:1033028

  13. Targeting bone metastases in prostate cancer: improving clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Body, Jean-Jacques; Casimiro, Sandra; Costa, Luís

    2015-06-01

    Bone metastases develop in most patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). They affect the structural integrity of bone, manifesting as pain and skeletal-related events (SREs), and are the primary cause of patient disability, reduced quality of life (QOL) and death. Understanding the pathophysiology of bone metastases resulted in the development of agents that improve clinical outcome, suggesting that managing both the systemic disease and associated bone events is important. Historically, the treatment of CRPC bone metastases with early radiopharmaceuticals and external beam radiation therapy was largely supportive; however, now, zoledronic acid and denosumab are integral to the therapeutic strategy for mCRPC. These agents substantially reduce skeletal morbidity and improve patient QOL. Radium-223 dichloride is the first bone-targeting agent to show improved survival and reduced pain and symptomatic skeletal events in patients with mCRPC without visceral disease. Five other systemic agents are currently approved for use in mCRPC based on their ability to improve survival. These include the cytotoxic drugs docetaxel and cabazitaxel, the hormone-based therapies, abiraterone and enzalutamide, and the immunotherapeutic vaccine sipuleucel-T. Abiraterone and enzalutamide are able to reduce SREs and improve survival in this setting. Novel agents targeting tumour and bone cells are under clinical development. PMID:26119830

  14. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the modern management of patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hany; Das, Sunit; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established non-invasive ablative therapy for brain metastases. Early clinical trials with SRS proved that tumor control rates are superior to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. As a result, WBRT plus SRS was widely adopted for patients with a limited number of brain metastases (“limited number” customarily means 1-4). Subsequent trials focused on answering whether WBRT upfront was necessary at all. Based on current randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses comparing SRS alone to SRS plus WBRT, adjuvant WBRT results in better intracranial control; however, at the expense of neurocognitive functioning and quality of life. These adverse effects of WBRT may also negatively impact on survival in younger patients. Based on the results of these studies, treatment has shifted to SRS alone in patients with a limited number of metastases. Additionally, RCTs are evaluating the role of SRS alone in patients with >4 brain metastases. New developments in SRS include fractionated SRS for large tumors and the integration of SRS with targeted systemic therapies that cross the blood brain barrier and/or stimulate an immune response. We present in this review the current high level evidence and rationale supporting SRS as the standard of care for patients with limited brain metastases, and emerging applications of SRS. PMID:26848525

  15. Locomotor proteins in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondakova, I. V.; Yunusova, N. V.; Spirina, L. V.; Shashova, E. E.; Kolegova, E. S.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Villert, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    The paper discusses the capability for active movement in an extracellular matrix, wherein remodeling of the cytoskeleton by actin binding proteins plays a significant role in metastases formation. We studied the expression of actin binding proteins and β-catenin in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer. Contents of p45 Ser β-catenin and the actin severing protein gelsolin were decreased in metastases of ovarian cancer relative to primary tumors. The level of the cofilin, functionally similar to gelsolin, was significantly higher in metastases compared to primary ovarian and breast tumor tissue. In breast cancer, significant increase in the number of an actin monomer binder protein thymosin-β4 was observed in metastases as compared to primary tumors. The data obtained suggest the involvement of locomotor proteins in metastases formation in ovarian and breast cancer.

  16. A Phase 2 Trial of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Boost After Surgical Resection for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Cameron; Yang, T. Jonathan; Hilden, Patrick; Zhang, Zhigang; Chan, Kelvin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy A.; Lymberis, Stella C.; Narayana, Ashwatha; Tabar, Viviane; Gutin, Philip H.; Ballangrud, Åse; Lis, Eric; Beal, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control after surgical resection and postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients (50 lesions) were enrolled and available for analysis. Eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed malignancy with 1 or 2 intraparenchymal brain metastases, age ≥18 years, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥70. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to test for significant associations between clinical factors and overall survival (OS). Competing risks regression models, as well as cumulative incidence functions, were fit using the method of Fine and Gray to assess the association between clinical factors and both local failure (LF; recurrence within surgical cavity or SRS target), and regional failure (RF; intracranial metastasis outside of treated volume). Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months (range, 1.0-94.1 months). After surgical resection, 39 patients with 40 lesions were treated a median of 31 days (range, 7-56 days) later with SRS to the surgical bed to a median dose of 1800 cGy (range, 1500-2200 cGy). Of the 50 lesions, 15 (30%) demonstrated LF after surgery. The cumulative LF and RF rates were 22% and 44% at 12 months. Patients who went on to receive SRS had a significantly lower incidence of LF (P=.008). Other factors associated with improved local control include non-small cell lung cancer histology (P=.048), tumor diameter <3 cm (P=.010), and deep parenchymal tumors (P=.036). Large tumors (≥3 cm) with superficial dural/pial involvement showed the highest risk for LF (53.3% at 12 months). Large superficial lesions treated with SRS had a 54.5% LF. Infratentorial lesions were associated with a higher risk of developing RF compared to supratentorial lesions (P<.001). Conclusions: Postoperative SRS is associated with high rates of local control, especially for deep brain metastases <3 cm. Tumors ≥3 cm with superficial dural

  17. [The frequency of seizures in patients with primary brain tumors or cerebral metastases. An evaluation from the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Neuro-Oncology and the Department of Neurology, Kaiser Franz Josef Hospital, Vienna].

    PubMed

    Oberndorfer, Stefan; Schmal, Thomas; Lahrmann, Heinz; Urbanits, Sabine; Lindner, Klaus; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2002-11-30

    Epileptic seizures are common in patients with cerebral metastases as well as in patients with primary brain tumors. In cancer patients without primary brain tumors or brain metastasis, epileptic seizures may occur due to metabolic or toxic causes, or due to infections. We performed a retrospective analysis from our neurooncological database concerning the occurrence of seizures in patients with primary brain tumors, patients with cerebral metastases and in cancer patients without brain tumors. Patients with low grade gliomas, such as astrocytoma WHO I + II (69%), oligodendroglioma WHO II (50%), and mixed glioma WHO II-III (56%) were more likely to have seizures than patients with anaplastic glioma WHO III (44%), glioblastoma WHO IV (48%) or meningeoma (45%). In patients with brain metastasis, melanoma (67%), cancer of the lung (29%), and gastrointestinal tumors (21%) were the primaries with the highest frequency of seizures. In cancer patients without brain metastases or primary brain tumors, seizures occurred in 4%. In conclusion, the occurrence of epileptic seizures in patients suffering from primary brain tumors, as well as in patients with cerebral metastases, varied within the tumor entity. Therefore, especially in brain tumors where a higher probability of epileptic seizures is expected, they should be taken into account in the care of cancer patients.

  18. Scoring Systems to Estimate Intracerebral Control and Survival Rates of Patients Irradiated for Brain Metastases;Brain metastases; Radiation therapy; Local control; Survival; Prognostic scores

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Dziggel, Liesa; Haatanen, Tiina; Veninga, Theo; Lohynska, Radka; Dunst, Juergen; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To create and validate scoring systems for intracerebral control (IC) and overall survival (OS) of patients irradiated for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: In this study, 1,797 patients were randomly assigned to the test (n = 1,198) or the validation group (n = 599). Two scoring systems were developed, one for IC and another for OS. The scores included prognostic factors found significant on multivariate analyses. Age, performance status, extracerebral metastases, interval tumor diagnosis to RT, and number of brain metastases were associated with OS. Tumor type, performance status, interval, and number of brain metastases were associated with IC. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the 6-month IC or OS rate (given in percent) by 10. The total score represented the sum of the scores for each factor. The score groups of the test group were compared with the corresponding score groups of the validation group. Results: In the test group, 6-month IC rates were 17% for 14-18 points, 49% for 19-23 points, and 77% for 24-27 points (p < 0.0001). IC rates in the validation group were 19%, 52%, and 77%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In the test group, 6-month OS rates were 9% for 15-19 points, 41% for 20-25 points, and 78% for 26-30 points (p < 0.0001). OS rates in the validation group were 7%, 39%, and 79%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Patients irradiated for brain metastases can be given scores to estimate OS and IC. IC and OS rates of the validation group were similar to the test group demonstrating the validity and reproducibility of both scores.

  19. EGFR mutation status in brain metastases of non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Ambrosetti, Damien; Coutts, Michael; Pedeutour, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastases are a frequent and grave complication of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The prognosis is generally poor, despite standard therapy based on surgery and radiotherapy. A degree of understanding of the molecular basis of tumors has led to the development of targeted agents with promising initial findings for the treatment of NSCLC. EGFR mutations have been identified which are associated with significant sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and correlate with improved outcome in patients with NSCLC who are treated with these agents. The adoption of treatment tailored to the genetic make-up of individual tumors could lead to substantial therapeutic improvements, and such targeted therapy might be considered as a therapeutic option for brain metastases in the future. We review current knowledge about EGFR mutation status in the specific context of brain metastasis: its association with the response of brain metastases to TKI, its prevalence in brain metastases, and the correlation between mutation status in metastases as compared to the corresponding primary lung carcinoma. PMID:23086434

  20. Imaging Bone Metastases in Breast Cancer: Staging and Response Assessment.

    PubMed

    Cook, Gary J R; Azad, Gurdip K; Goh, Vicky

    2016-02-01

    Bone metastases are common in patients with advanced breast cancer. Given the significant associated morbidity, the introduction of new, effective systemic therapies, and the improvement in survival time, early detection and response assessment of skeletal metastases have become even more important. Although planar bone scanning has recognized limitations, in particular, poor specificity in staging and response assessment, it continues to be the main method in current clinical practice for staging of the skeleton in patients at risk of bone metastases. However, the accuracy of bone scanning can be improved with the addition of SPECT/CT. There have been reported improvements in sensitivity and specificity for staging of the skeleton with either bone-specific PET/CT tracers, such as (18)F-NaF, or tumor-specific tracers, such as (18)F-FDG, although these methods are less widely available and more costly. There is a paucity of data on the use of (18)F-NaF PET/CT for response assessment in breast cancer, but there is increasing evidence that (18)F-FDG PET/CT may improve on current methods in this regard. At the same time, interest and experience in using whole-body morphologic MRI augmented with diffusion-weighted imaging for both staging and response assessment in the skeleton have been increasing. However, data on comparisons of these methods with PET methods to determine the best technique for current clinical practice or for clinical trials are insufficient. There are early data supporting the use (18)F-FDG PET/MRI to assess malignant disease in the skeleton, with the possibility of taking advantage of the synergies offered by combining morphologic, physiologic, and metabolic imaging.

  1. Distribution of Brain Metastases in Relation to the Hippocampus: Implications for Neurocognitive Functional Preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghia, Amol; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Thomas, Sayana; Cannon, George; Khuntia, Deepak; Kuo, John S.; Mehta, Minesh P. . E-mail: mehta@humonc.wisc.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: With the advent of intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the ability to limit the radiation dose to normal tissue offers an avenue to limit side effects. This study attempted to delineate the distribution of brain metastases with relation to the hippocampus for the purpose of exploring the viability of tomotherapy-guided hippocampal sparing therapy potentially to reduce neurocognitive deficits from radiation. Methods and Materials: The pre-radiotherapy T1-weighted, postcontrast axial MR images of 100 patients who received whole brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, or a radiosurgical boost following whole brain radiotherapy between 2002 and 2006 were examined. We contoured brain metastases as well as hippocampi with 5-, 10-, and 15-mm expansion envelopes. Results: Of the 272 identified metastases, 3.3% (n = 9) were within 5 mm of the hippocampus, and 86.4% of metastases were greater than 15 mm from the hippocampus (n = 235). The most common location for metastatic disease was the frontal lobe (31.6%, n = 86). This was followed by the cerebellum (24.3%, n = 66), parietal lobe (16.9%, n = 46), temporal lobe (12.9%, n = 35), occipital lobe (7.7%, n = 21), deep brain nuclei (4.0%, n = 11), and brainstem (2.6%, n = 7). Conclusions: Of the 100 patients, 8 had metastases within 5 mm of the hippocampus. Hence, a 5-mm margin around the hippocampus for conformal avoidance whole brain radiotherapy represents an acceptable risk, especially because these patients in the absence of any other intracranial disease could be salvaged using stereotactic radiosurgery. Moreover, we developed a hippocampal sparing tomotherapy plan as proof of principle to verify the feasibility of this therapy in the setting of brain metastases.

  2. Radionuclide therapy for osseous metastases in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Abi-Ghanem, Alain S; McGrath, Mary A; Jacene, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastases are associated with increased morbidity and poor prognosis in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Since 2010, 5 systemic therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration based on an improvement in overall survival, offering alternatives to docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent with modest effect and significant toxicity. These systemic treatments belong to different classes of medication such as immunotherapy, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, and radionuclide therapy. Radium-223 dichloride ((223)RaCl2), approved in May 2013, is a novel α-emitting radiopharmaceutical that targets areas of increased bone turnover in bone metastases, delivering densely ionizing radiation within a short tissue range and causing more severe chromosomal damage than β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. In this article, we review the clinical development of (223)RaCl2, focusing on its effects on pain relief, skeletal events, biochemical markers, overall survival, quality of life, and safety. We also outline the differences between (223)RaCl2 and the previously developed bone-seeking β-emitters and briefly present new trials on the horizon involving (223)RaCl2.

  3. Phase I Trial of Simultaneous In-Field Boost With Helical Tomotherapy for Patients With One to Three Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, George; Yartsev, Slav; Yaremko, Brian; Perera, Francisco; Dar, A. Rashid; Hammond, Alex; Lock, Michael; Yu, Edward; Ash, Robert; Caudrelier, Jean-Michelle; Khuntia, Deepak; Bailey, Laura; Bauman, Glenn

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative to surgical resection for selected intracranial lesions. Integrated image-guided intensity-modulated-capable radiotherapy platforms such as helical tomotherapy (HT) could potentially replace traditional radiosurgery apparatus. The present study's objective was to determine the maximally tolerated dose of a simultaneous in-field boost integrated with whole brain radiotherapy for palliative treatment of patients with one to three brain metastases using HT. Methods and Materials: The inclusion/exclusion criteria and endpoints were consistent with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9508 radiosurgery trial. The cohorts were constructed with a 3 + 3 design; however, additional patients were enrolled in the lower dose tolerable cohorts during the toxicity assessment periods. Whole brain radiotherapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) was delivered with a 5-30-Gy (total lesion dose of 35-60 Gy in 10 fractions) simultaneous in-field boost delivered to the brain metastases. The maximally tolerated dose was determined by the frequency of neurologic Grade 3-5 National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0, dose-limiting toxicity events within each Phase I cohort. Results: A total of 48 patients received treatment in the 35-Gy (n = 3), 40-Gy (n = 16), 50-Gy (n = 15), 55-Gy (n = 8), and 60-Gy (n = 6) cohorts. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity events in any of the trial cohorts. The 3-month RECIST assessments available for 32 of the 48 patients demonstrated a complete response in 2, a partial response in 16, stable disease in 6, and progressive disease in 8 patients. Conclusion: The delivery of 60 Gy in 10 fractions to one to three brain metastases synchronously with 30 Gy whole brain radiotherapy was achieved without dose-limiting central nervous system toxicity as assessed 3 months after treatment. This approach is being tested in a Phase II efficacy trial.

  4. Differential Impact of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy Added to Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Doo-Sik; Lee, Jung-Il; Im, Yong-Seok; Nam, Do-Hyun; Park, Kwan; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated whether the addition of whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) provided any therapeutic benefit according to recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-five patients with 1 to 10 metastases who underwent SRS between January 2002 and December 2007 were included in the study. Of those, 168 patients were treated with SRS alone and 77 patients received SRS followed by WBRT. Actuarial curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method regarding overall survival (OS), distant brain control (DC), and local brain control (LC) stratified by RPA class. Analyses for known prognostic variables were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that control of the primary tumor, small number of brain metastases, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) > 70, and initial treatment modalities were significant predictors for survival. For RPA class 1, SRS plus WBRT was associated with a longer survival time compared with SRS alone (854 days vs. 426 days, p = 0.042). The SRS plus WBRT group also showed better LC rate than did the SRS-alone group (p = 0.021), although they did not show a better DC rate (p = 0.079). By contrast, for RPA class 2 or 3, no significant difference in OS, LC, or DC was found between the two groups. Conclusions: These results suggest that RPA classification should determine whether or not WBRT is added to SRS. WBRT may be recommended to be added to SRS for patients in whom long-term survival is expected on the basis of RPA classification.

  5. Irinotecan and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases From Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-03-15

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Poor Performance Status; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. A planning study of simultaneous integrated boost with forward IMRT for multiple brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Xiaodong; Ni, Lingqin; Hu, Wei; Chen, Weijun; Ying, Shenpeng; Gong, Qiangjun; Liu, Yanmei

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the dose conformity and feasibility of whole-brain radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost by forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were generated for 10 patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases on Pinnacle 6.2 Treatment Planning System. The prescribed dose was 30 Gy to the whole brain (planning target volume [PTV]{sub wbrt}) and 40 Gy to individual brain metastases (PTV{sub boost}) simultaneously, and both doses were given in 10 fractions. The maximum diameters of individual brain metastases ranged from 1.6 to 6 cm, and the summated PTVs per patient ranged from 1.62 to 69.81 cm{sup 3}. Conformity and feasibility were evaluated regarding conformation number and treatment delivery time. One hundred percent volume of the PTV{sub boost} received at least 95% of the prescribed dose in all cases. The maximum doses were less than 110% of the prescribed dose to the PTV{sub boost}, and all of the hot spots were within the PTV{sub boost}. The volume of the PTV{sub wbrt} that received at least 95% of the prescribed dose ranged from 99.2% to 100%. The mean values of conformation number were 0.682. The mean treatment delivery time was 2.79 minutes. Ten beams were used on an average in these plans. Whole-brain radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost by forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy in 1 to 3 brain metastases is feasible, and treatment delivery time is short.

  7. Similar lymphocytic infiltration pattern in primary breast cancer and their corresponding distant metastases.

    PubMed

    Sobottka, Bettina; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Fink, Daniel; Moch, Holger; Varga, Zsuzsanna

    2016-06-01

    Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in primary breast cancer (TIL) are acknowledged measures of disease free survival (DFS) in adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Little is known about the biology of metastasis infiltrating lymphocytes (mTIL) although the local immunity of the metastatic site may critically influence the infiltrate composite. To address this question, we compared mTIL with their matched TIL in 87 breast cancer patients and their corresponding distant metastasis at four different anatomical locations. Sections of surgical specimen were immunohistochemically analyzed for CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD20(+) lymphocytes in three different tumor compartments: intratumoral lymphocytes (iTIL) defined as lymphocytes in direct contact with breast cancer cells, stromal lymphocytes (sTIL) located within the intratumoral stromal tissue and invasive-margin lymphocytes (imTIL). Overall, we found fewer (p < 0.001) mTIL than TIL. Within the tumor compartments, imTIL were more frequent than sTIL and iTIL both within metastases and the matched primary tumors (PT) (p < 0.001). CD4(+) T cells were more numerous than CD8(+) T cells and CD20(+) B cells (p < 0.001). There was a similar pattern in PT and their corresponding metastasis. Only patients with brain metastases differed from the others displaying less CD20(+) B cells at the infiltrative margin of the PT (p < 0.05). In summary, mTIL were significantly reduced within metastases but still mirrored the infiltrate pattern of the PT, interestingly regardless of the metastatic anatomical locations investigated. Our results suggest that the PT assigns the infiltrating lymphocyte pattern resumed at the metastatic site. PMID:27471624

  8. Similar lymphocytic infiltration pattern in primary breast cancer and their corresponding distant metastases

    PubMed Central

    Sobottka, Bettina; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Fink, Daniel; Moch, Holger; Varga, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in primary breast cancer (TIL) are acknowledged measures of disease free survival (DFS) in adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Little is known about the biology of metastasis infiltrating lymphocytes (mTIL) although the local immunity of the metastatic site may critically influence the infiltrate composite. To address this question, we compared mTIL with their matched TIL in 87 breast cancer patients and their corresponding distant metastasis at four different anatomical locations. Sections of surgical specimen were immunohistochemically analyzed for CD4+, CD8+ and CD20+ lymphocytes in three different tumor compartments: intratumoral lymphocytes (iTIL) defined as lymphocytes in direct contact with breast cancer cells, stromal lymphocytes (sTIL) located within the intratumoral stromal tissue and invasive-margin lymphocytes (imTIL). Overall, we found fewer (p < 0.001) mTIL than TIL. Within the tumor compartments, imTIL were more frequent than sTIL and iTIL both within metastases and the matched primary tumors (PT) (p < 0.001). CD4+ T cells were more numerous than CD8+ T cells and CD20+ B cells (p < 0.001). There was a similar pattern in PT and their corresponding metastasis. Only patients with brain metastases differed from the others displaying less CD20+ B cells at the infiltrative margin of the PT (p < 0.05). In summary, mTIL were significantly reduced within metastases but still mirrored the infiltrate pattern of the PT, interestingly regardless of the metastatic anatomical locations investigated. Our results suggest that the PT assigns the infiltrating lymphocyte pattern resumed at the metastatic site. PMID:27471624

  9. Similar lymphocytic infiltration pattern in primary breast cancer and their corresponding distant metastases.

    PubMed

    Sobottka, Bettina; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Fink, Daniel; Moch, Holger; Varga, Zsuzsanna

    2016-06-01

    Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in primary breast cancer (TIL) are acknowledged measures of disease free survival (DFS) in adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Little is known about the biology of metastasis infiltrating lymphocytes (mTIL) although the local immunity of the metastatic site may critically influence the infiltrate composite. To address this question, we compared mTIL with their matched TIL in 87 breast cancer patients and their corresponding distant metastasis at four different anatomical locations. Sections of surgical specimen were immunohistochemically analyzed for CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD20(+) lymphocytes in three different tumor compartments: intratumoral lymphocytes (iTIL) defined as lymphocytes in direct contact with breast cancer cells, stromal lymphocytes (sTIL) located within the intratumoral stromal tissue and invasive-margin lymphocytes (imTIL). Overall, we found fewer (p < 0.001) mTIL than TIL. Within the tumor compartments, imTIL were more frequent than sTIL and iTIL both within metastases and the matched primary tumors (PT) (p < 0.001). CD4(+) T cells were more numerous than CD8(+) T cells and CD20(+) B cells (p < 0.001). There was a similar pattern in PT and their corresponding metastasis. Only patients with brain metastases differed from the others displaying less CD20(+) B cells at the infiltrative margin of the PT (p < 0.05). In summary, mTIL were significantly reduced within metastases but still mirrored the infiltrate pattern of the PT, interestingly regardless of the metastatic anatomical locations investigated. Our results suggest that the PT assigns the infiltrating lymphocyte pattern resumed at the metastatic site.

  10. Treatment of distant metastases from follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlumberger, Martin; Leboulleux, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Distant metastases from thyroid cancer of follicular origin are uncommon. Treatment includes levothyroxine administration at suppressive doses, focal treatment modalities with surgery, external radiation therapy and thermal ablation, and radioiodine in patients with uptake of (131)I in their metastases. Two thirds of distant metastases will become refractory to radioiodine at some point, and when there is a significant tumor burden and documented progression on imaging, a treatment with a kinase inhibitor may provide benefits. PMID:25750740

  11. Treatment of distant metastases from follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leboulleux, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Distant metastases from thyroid cancer of follicular origin are uncommon. Treatment includes levothyroxine administration at suppressive doses, focal treatment modalities with surgery, external radiation therapy and thermal ablation, and radioiodine in patients with uptake of 131I in their metastases. Two thirds of distant metastases will become refractory to radioiodine at some point, and when there is a significant tumor burden and documented progression on imaging, a treatment with a kinase inhibitor may provide benefits. PMID:25750740

  12. Bilateral ovarian metastases from ureteric urothelial cancer: Initial case report and distinguishing role of immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Venkatramani, Vivek; Banerji, John Samuel; Manojkumar, Ramani

    2015-01-01

    Urothelial cancers of the upper tract are aggressive malignancies with a propensity for distant metastases. Transitional cell carcinoma can also develop de novo in the ovaries and differentiation between these lesions requires immunohistochemistry. We report a case of right lower ureteric urothelial carcinoma with metastases to both ovaries. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral ovarian metastases from an upper tract primary, diagnosed with immunohistochemistry. PMID:25624971

  13. DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Genes and Oxidative Damage in Brain Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Lynda; Duchnowska, Renata; Reed, L. Tiffany; Palmieri, Diane; Qian, Yongzhen; Badve, Sunil; Sledge, George; Gril, Brunilde; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Fu, Haiqing; Flores, Natasha M.; Gökmen-Polar, Yesim; Biernat, Wojciech; Szutowicz-Zielińska, Ewa; Mandat, Tomasz; Trojanowski, Tomasz; Och, Waldemar; Czartoryska-Arlukowicz, Bogumiła; Jassem, Jacek; Mitchell, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the brain, colonizing a neuro-inflammatory microenvironment. The molecular pathways facilitating this colonization remain poorly understood. Methods Expression profiling of 23 matched sets of human resected brain metastases and primary breast tumors by two-sided paired t test was performed to identify brain metastasis–specific genes. The implicated DNA repair genes BARD1 and RAD51 were modulated in human (MDA-MB-231-BR) and murine (4T1-BR) brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines by lentiviral transduction of cDNA or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) coding sequences. Their functional contribution to brain metastasis development was evaluated in mouse xenograft models (n = 10 mice per group). Results Human brain metastases overexpressed BARD1 and RAD51 compared with either matched primary tumors (1.74-fold, P < .001; 1.46-fold, P < .001, respectively) or unlinked systemic metastases (1.49-fold, P = .01; 1.44-fold, P = .008, respectively). Overexpression of either gene in MDA-MB-231-BR cells increased brain metastases by threefold to fourfold after intracardiac injections, but not lung metastases upon tail-vein injections. In 4T1-BR cells, shRNA-mediated RAD51 knockdown reduced brain metastases by 2.5-fold without affecting lung metastasis development. In vitro, BARD1- and RAD51-overexpressing cells showed reduced genomic instability but only exhibited growth and colonization phenotypes upon DNA damage induction. Reactive oxygen species were present in tumor cells and elevated in the metastatic neuro-inflammatory microenvironment and could provide an endogenous source of genotoxic stress. Tempol, a brain-permeable oxygen radical scavenger suppressed brain metastasis promotion induced by BARD1 and RAD51 overexpression. Conclusions BARD1 and RAD51 are frequently overexpressed in brain metastases from breast cancer and may constitute a mechanism to overcome reactive oxygen species–mediated genotoxic stress in the metastatic

  14. Vemurafenib resistance selects for highly malignant brain and lung-metastasizing melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zubrilov, Inna; Sagi-Assif, Orit; Izraely, Sivan; Meshel, Tsipi; Ben-Menahem, Shlomit; Ginat, Ravit; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Nahmias, Clara; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hoon, Dave S B; Witz, Isaac P

    2015-05-28

    V600E being the most common mutation in BRAF, leads to constitutive activation of the MAPK signaling pathway. The majority of V600E BRAF positive melanoma patients treated with the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib showed initial good clinical responses but relapsed due to acquired resistance to the drug. The aim of the present study was to identify possible biomarkers associated with the emergence of drug resistant melanoma cells. To this end we analyzed the differential gene expression of vemurafenib-sensitive and vemurafenib resistant brain and lung metastasizing melanoma cells. The major finding of this study is that the in vitro induction of vemurafenib resistance in melanoma cells is associated with an increased malignancy phenotype of these cells. Resistant cells expressed higher levels of genes coding for cancer stem cell markers (JARID1B, CD271 and Fibronectin) as well as genes involved in drug resistance (ABCG2), cell invasion and promotion of metastasis (MMP-1 and MMP-2). We also showed that drug-resistant melanoma cells adhere better to and transmigrate more efficiently through lung endothelial cells than drug-sensitive cells. The former cells also alter their microenvironment in a different manner from that of drug-sensitive cells. Biomarkers and molecular mechanisms associated with drug resistance may serve as targets for therapy of drug-resistant cancer.

  15. Tumor Directed, Scalp Sparing Intensity Modulated Whole Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Kao, Johnny; Darakchiev, Boramir; Conboy, Linda; Ogurek, Sara; Sharma, Neha; Ren, Xuemin; Pettit, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    Despite significant technical advances in radiation delivery, conventional whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) has not materially changed in the past 50 years. We hypothesized that IMRT can selectively spare uninvolved brain and scalp with the goal of reducing acute and late toxicity. MRI/CT simulation image registration was performed. We performed IMRT planning to simultaneously treat the brain tumor(s) on MRI + 5 mm margin to 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions while limiting the uninvolved brain + 2 mm margin to 30 Gy in 15 fractions and the mean scalp dose to #18 Gy. Three field IMRT plans were compared to conventional WBRT plans. Symptomatic patients were started on conventional WBRT for 2 to 3 fractions while IMRT planning was performed. Seventeen consecutive patients with brain metastases with RPA class I and II disease with no leptomeningeal spread were treated with IMRT WBRT. Compared to conventional WBRT, IMRT reduced the mean scalp dose (26.2 Gy vs. 16.4 Gy, p < 0.001) and the mean PTV30 dose (38.4 Gy vs. 32.0 Gy, p < 0.001) while achieving similar mean PTV37.5 doses (38.3 Gy vs. 38.0 Gy, p = 0.26). Using Olsen hair loss score criteria, 4 of 15 assessable patients preserved at least 50% of hair coverage at 1 to 3 months after treatment while 6 patients preserved between 25 and 50% hair coverage. At a median follow-up of 6.8 months (range: 5 to 15 months), the median overall survival was 5.4 months. Four patients relapsed within the brain, one within the PTV37.5 and three outside the PTV37.5. Tumor directed, scalp sparing IMRT is feasible, achieves rational dose distributions and preserves partial hair coverage in the majority of patients. Further studies are warranted to determine whether the increased utilization of resources needed for IMRT are appropriate in this setting.

  16. Dural Metastases in Advanced Prostate Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, A.B.; Cortes-Mateus, S.; De Luis, E.; Durán, I.

    2014-01-01

    Dural metastases from advanced prostate cancer are considered an uncommon diagnosis. However, autopsy studies show a high association between advanced prostate cancer and metastases to the meninges. Because the overall survival of advanced prostate cancer patients is expected to improve with the advent of new therapies, the incidence of clinically relevant dural metastases from prostate cancer will likely increase. We present a case of a heavily pre-treated castration-resistant prostate cancer patient who developed metastases to the duramater. This entity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient with advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer and neurological symptoms. Clinicians should also be aware of the poor prognosis and survival rates associated with the condition. PMID:24917781

  17. A case of leptospirosis simulating colon cancer with liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Granito, Alessandro; Ballardini, Giorgio; Fusconi, Marco; Volta, Umberto; Muratori, Paolo; Sambri, Vittorio; Battista, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Francesco B.

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old man who presented with fatigue, abdominal pain and hepatomegaly. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed hepatomegaly and multiple hepatic lesions highly suggestive of metastatic diseases. Due to the endoscopic finding of colon ulcer, colon cancer with liver metastases was suspected. Biochemically a slight increase of transaminases, alkaline phosphatase and gammaglutamyl transpeptidase were present; α - fetoprotein, carcinoembryogenic antigen and carbohydrate 19-9 antigen serum levels were normal. Laboratory and instrumental investigations, including colon and liver biopsies revealed no signs of malignancy. In the light of spontaneous improvement of symptoms and CT findings, his personal history was revaluated revealing direct contact with pigs and their tissues. Diagnosis of leptospirosis was considered and confirmed by detection of an elevated titer of antibodies to leptospira. After two mo, biochemical data, CT and colonoscopy were totally normal. PMID:15285043

  18. Pertuzumab, trastuzumab and docetaxel reduced the recurrence of brain metastasis from breast cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Senda, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Ayane; Nishimura, Hideaki; Shiozaki, Toshiki; Tsuyuki, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    The CLEOPATRA trial reported the survival benefit of pertuzumab with trastuzumab plus docetaxel in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. However, there are a few case reports concerning the effects of a pertuzumab-containing regimen on brain metastases. A 55-year-old woman, who underwent curative surgery for breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy 5 years previously, developed repeated solitary brain metastasis in her right occipital lobe. Whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and 3 times of surgical resection were performed. Lapatinib and capecitabine plus tamoxifen were administered. The metastasis recurred in the stump of the previous surgery. Pertuzumab with trastuzumab plus docetaxel was initiated as second-line chemotherapy. A complete response of the brain metastasis was achieved, which persisted for 5 months. Pertuzumab with trastuzumab plus docetaxel was effective in reducing the brain metastases from breast cancer. Further studies are warranted to confirm the effect of this regimen on brain metastases.

  19. Radiometabolic treatment of bone-metastasizing cancer: from 186rhenium to 223radium.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Adriano; Rubini, Domenico; Asabella, Artor Niccoli

    2014-02-01

    Skeletal metastases occur in many patients with different kinds of malignant tumors, especially in advance stage of breast cancer (in 47%-85% of patients), prostate cancer (33-85%), and lung cancer (32%-60%). The management of painful skeletal metastases is complicated and should be carried out by a multidisciplinary approach including conventional analgesics, antitumor therapy (chemo- and hormone therapy), osteoclast-inhibitory agents (bisphosphonates), corticosteroids, external-beam radiotherapy, surgery, and nuclear medicine therapy. The nuclear medicine therapy for palliation of pain from bone metastases is a systemic radionuclide therapy based on the use of radiopharmaceuticals. In several studies the efficacy of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals have been demonstrated in terms of pain reduction from diffuse skeletal metastases. In this review, we will summarize the current literature on bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of painful bone metastases (Phosphorus-32, Strontium-89, Rhenium-186, Rhenium-188, Samarium-153, and Radium-223) and the combination therapy with biphosphonates and chemotherapy.

  20. Current treatment options of brain metastases and outcomes in patients with malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Sadzikowska, Jadwiga; Walasek, Tomasz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Blecharz, Paweł; Reinfuss, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with melanoma who have brain metastases is poor, a median survival does not exceed 4-6 months. There are no uniform standards of treatment for patients with melanoma brain metastases (MBMs). The most preferred treatment approaches include local therapy - surgical resection and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The role of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as an adjuvant to local therapy is controversial. WBRT remains a palliative approach for those patients who have multiple MBMs with contraindications for surgery or SRS, or/and poor performance status, or/and very widespread extracranial metastases. Corticosteroids have been used in palliative treatment of MBMs as relief from symptoms related to intracranial pressure and edema. In recent years, the development of new systemic therapeutic strategies has been observed. Various modalities of systemic treatment include chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted therapy. Also, multimodality management in different combinations is a common strategy. Decisions regarding the use of specific treatment modalities are dependent on patient's performance status, and the extent of both intracranial and extracranial disease. This review summarizes current treatment options, indications and outcomes in patients with brain metastases from melanoma. PMID:27601961

  1. Immunohistochemical study of IOT-10 natural killer cells in brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J; Coca, S; Escandón, J; Magallón, R; Martínez, R

    1990-01-01

    The presence of NK-cells in a series of 40 metastatic brain tumours has been studied by means of the monoclonal antibody IOT-10. There appeared IOT-10 NK-cells in all tumours studied, but in most cases these cells represented less than 10% of the tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). In the present series, the obtained data suggest that the number of NK-cells in brain metastases can be influenced by other factors than the mere quantity of TIL.

  2. Gain of glucose-independent growth upon metastasis of breast cancer cells to the brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyu; Lee, Ho-Jeong; Wu, Xuefeng; Huo, Lei; Kim, Sun-Jin; Xu, Lei; Wang, Yan; He, Junqing; Bollu, Lakshmi R; Gao, Guang; Su, Fei; Briggs, James; Liu, Xiaojing; Melman, Tamar; Asara, John M; Fidler, Isaiah J; Cantley, Lewis C; Locasale, Jason W; Weihua, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer brain metastasis is resistant to therapy and a particularly poor prognostic feature in patient survival. Altered metabolism is a common feature of cancer cells, but little is known as to what metabolic changes benefit breast cancer brain metastases. We found that brain metastatic breast cancer cells evolved the ability to survive and proliferate independent of glucose due to enhanced gluconeogenesis and oxidations of glutamine and branched chain amino acids, which together sustain the nonoxidative pentose pathway for purine synthesis. Silencing expression of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases (FBP) in brain metastatic cells reduced their viability and improved the survival of metastasis-bearing immunocompetent hosts. Clinically, we showed that brain metastases from human breast cancer patients expressed higher levels of FBP and glycogen than the corresponding primary tumors. Together, our findings identify a critical metabolic condition required to sustain brain metastasis and suggest that targeting gluconeogenesis may help eradicate this deadly feature in advanced breast cancer patients.

  3. Systemic and CNS activity of the RET inhibitor vandetanib combined with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in KIF5B-RET re-arranged non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Berry, Jenny; Roxas, Michael; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Subbiah, Ishwaria Mohan; Ali, Siraj M; McMahon, Caitlin; Miller, Vincent; Cascone, Tina; Pai, Shobha; Tang, Zhenya; Heymach, John V

    2015-07-01

    In-frame fusion KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene)-RET transcripts have been characterized in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancers and are known oncogenic drivers. The RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, suppresses fusion-induced, anchorage-independent growth activity. In vitro studies have shown that vandetanib is a high-affinity substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) but is not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), limiting its blood-brain barrier penetration. A co-administration strategy to enhance the brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-gp/Abcb1- and Bcrp1/Abcg2-mediated efflux with mTOR inhibitors, specifically everolimus, was shown to increase the blood-brain barrier penetration. We report the first bench-to-bedside evidence that RET inhibitor combined with an mTOR inhibitor is active against brain-metastatic RET-rearranged lung cancer and the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration. A 74-year-old female with progressive adenocarcinoma of the lung (wild-type EGFR and no ALK rearrangement) presented for therapy options. A deletion of 5'RET was revealed by FISH assay, indicating RET-gene rearrangement. Because of progressive disease in the brain, she was enrolled in a clinical trial with vandetanib and everolimus (NCT01582191). Comprehensive genomic profiling revealed fusion of KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene) and RET, in addition to AKT2 gene amplification. After two cycles of therapy a repeat MRI brain showed a decrease in the intracranial disease burden and PET/CT showed systemic response as well. Interestingly, AKT2 amplification seen is a critical component of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, alterations of which has been associated with both de novo and acquired resistance to targeted therapy. The addition of everolimus may have both overcome the AKT2 amplification to produce a response in addition to its direct effects on the RET gene. Our case report forms the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration by

  4. Systemic and CNS activity of the RET inhibitor vandetanib combined with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in KIF5B-RET re-arranged non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Berry, Jenny; Roxas, Michael; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Subbiah, Ishwaria Mohan; Ali, Siraj M; McMahon, Caitlin; Miller, Vincent; Cascone, Tina; Pai, Shobha; Tang, Zhenya; Heymach, John V

    2015-07-01

    In-frame fusion KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene)-RET transcripts have been characterized in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancers and are known oncogenic drivers. The RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, suppresses fusion-induced, anchorage-independent growth activity. In vitro studies have shown that vandetanib is a high-affinity substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) but is not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), limiting its blood-brain barrier penetration. A co-administration strategy to enhance the brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-gp/Abcb1- and Bcrp1/Abcg2-mediated efflux with mTOR inhibitors, specifically everolimus, was shown to increase the blood-brain barrier penetration. We report the first bench-to-bedside evidence that RET inhibitor combined with an mTOR inhibitor is active against brain-metastatic RET-rearranged lung cancer and the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration. A 74-year-old female with progressive adenocarcinoma of the lung (wild-type EGFR and no ALK rearrangement) presented for therapy options. A deletion of 5'RET was revealed by FISH assay, indicating RET-gene rearrangement. Because of progressive disease in the brain, she was enrolled in a clinical trial with vandetanib and everolimus (NCT01582191). Comprehensive genomic profiling revealed fusion of KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene) and RET, in addition to AKT2 gene amplification. After two cycles of therapy a repeat MRI brain showed a decrease in the intracranial disease burden and PET/CT showed systemic response as well. Interestingly, AKT2 amplification seen is a critical component of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, alterations of which has been associated with both de novo and acquired resistance to targeted therapy. The addition of everolimus may have both overcome the AKT2 amplification to produce a response in addition to its direct effects on the RET gene. Our case report forms the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration by

  5. Remission of Unresectable Lung Metastases from Rectal Cancer After Herbal Medicine Treatment: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungsuk; Lee, Sanghun

    2016-01-01

    Lung metastasis is frequent in rectal cancer patients and has a poor prognosis, with an expected three-year survival rate of about 10%. Though western medicine has made great strides in the curative resection of liver metastases, resection of lung metastases has lagged far behind. Many preclinical studies have suggested that herbal treatments block metastasis, but few clinical studies have addressed this topic. We present the case of a 57-year-old Asian male with lung metastases from rectal cancer. He first underwent resection of the primary lesion (stage IIA, T3N0M0) and six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. Unfortunately, lung metastases were confirmed about one year later. Palliative chemotherapy was begun, but his disease continued to progress after three cycles and chemotherapy was halted. The patient was exclusively treated with herbal medicine-standardized allergen-removed Rhus verniciflua stokes extract combined with Dokhwaljihwang-tang (Sasang constitutional medicine in Korea). After seven weeks of herbal medicine treatment, the lung metastases were markedly improved. Regression of lung metastases has continued; also, the patient's rectal cancer has not returned. He has been receiving herbal medicine for over two years and very few side effects have been observed. We suggest that the herbal regimen used in our patient is a promising candidate for the treatment of lung metastases secondary to rectal cancer, and we hope that this case stimulates further investigation into the efficacy of herbal treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

  6. CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation in Patients with Hepatic Metastases from Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobs, Tobias F. Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Schrader, Angelika; Stemmler, Hans Joachim; Trumm, Christoph; Lubienski, Andreas; Murthy, Ravi; Helmberger, Thomas K.; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate technical success, technique effectiveness, and survival following radiofrequency ablation for breast cancer liver metastases and to determine prognostic factors. Forty-three patients with 111 breast cancer liver metastases underwent CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Technical success and technique effectiveness was evaluated by performing serial CT scans. We assessed the prognostic value of hormone receptor status, overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and presence of extrahepatic tumor spread. Survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Technical success was achieved in 107 metastases (96%). Primary technique effectiveness was 96%. During follow-up local tumor progression was observed in 15 metastases, representing a secondary technique effectiveness of 86.5%. The overall time to progression to the liver was 10.5 months. The estimated overall median survival was 58.6 months. There was no significant difference in terms of survival probability with respect to hormone receptor status, HER2 overexpression, and presence of isolated bone metastases. Survival was significantly lower among patients with extrahepatic disease, with the exception of skeletal metastases. We conclude that CT-guided RF ablation of liver metastases from breast cancer can be performed with a high degree of technical success and technique effectiveness, providing promising survival rates in patients with no visceral extrahepatic disease. Solitary bone metastases did not negatively affect survival probability after RF ablation.

  7. Her-2 overexpression increases the metastatic outgrowth of breast cancer cells in the brain.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Bronder, Julie L; Herring, Jeanne M; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Weil, Robert J; Stark, Andreas M; Kurek, Raffael; Vega-Valle, Eleazar; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Halverson, Douglas; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Steinberg, Seth M; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S

    2007-05-01

    Retrospective studies of breast cancer patients suggest that primary tumor Her-2 overexpression or trastuzumab therapy is associated with a devastating complication: the development of central nervous system (brain) metastases. Herein, we present Her-2 expression trends from resected human brain metastases and data from an experimental brain metastasis assay, both indicative of a functional contribution of Her-2 to brain metastatic colonization. Of 124 archival resected brain metastases from breast cancer patients, 36.2% overexpressed Her-2, indicating an enrichment in the frequency of tumor Her-2 overexpression at this metastatic site. Using quantitative real-time PCR of laser capture microdissected epithelial cells, Her-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA levels in a cohort of 12 frozen brain metastases were increased up to 5- and 9-fold, respectively, over those of Her-2-amplified primary tumors. Co-overexpression of Her-2 and EGFR was also observed in a subset of brain metastases. We then tested the hypothesis that overexpression of Her-2 increases the colonization of breast cancer cells in the brain in vivo. A subclone of MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells that selectively metastasizes to brain (231-BR) overexpressed EGFR; 231-BR cells were transfected with low (4- to 8-fold) or high (22- to 28-fold) levels of Her-2. In vivo, in a model of brain metastasis, low or high Her-2-overexpressing 231-BR clones produced comparable numbers of micrometastases in the brain as control transfectants; however, the Her-2 transfectants yielded 3-fold greater large metastases (>50 microm(2); P < 0.001). Our data indicate that Her-2 overexpression increases the outgrowth of metastatic tumor cells in the brain in this model system. PMID:17483330

  8. Cetuximab and/or Dasatinib in Patients With Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  9. Leptomeningeal metastases.

    PubMed

    Demopoulos, Alexis

    2004-05-01

    Leptomeningeal metastasis, also known as neoplastic meningitis, carcinomatous meningitis, and meningeal carcinomatosis, occurs when cancer cells gain access to cerebrospinal fluid pathways, travel to multiple sites within the central nervous system, settle, and grow. This disease has become an increasingly important late complication in oncology as patients survive longer, develop more brain metastases, and newer chemotherapies fail to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. The hallmark of clinical presentation is a cancer patient who complains of focal neurologic dysfunction and is found to have multifocal signs on neurologic examination. The clinical course is relentlessly progressive; treatment is limited and cures are the subject of case reports. This article reviews the clinical course of leptomeningeal metastasis and addresses recent developments in its pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

  10. Defining the Optimal Planning Target Volume in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery of Brain Metastases: Results of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Wang, Zhiheng; Sampson, John H.; McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E.; Allen, Karen J.; Duffy, Eileen; Hoang, Jenny K.; Chang, Zheng; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify an optimal margin about the gross target volume (GTV) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases, minimizing toxicity and local recurrence. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases less than 4 cm in greatest dimension, no previous brain radiation therapy, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) above 70 were eligible for this institutional review board–approved trial. Individual lesions were randomized to 1- or 3- mm uniform expansion of the GTV defined on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting planning target volume (PTV) was treated to 24, 18, or 15 Gy marginal dose for maximum PTV diameters less than 2, 2 to 2.9, and 3 to 3.9 cm, respectively, using a linear accelerator–based image-guided system. The primary endpoint was local recurrence (LR). Secondary endpoints included neurocognition Mini-Mental State Examination, Trail Making Test Parts A and B, quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain), radionecrosis (RN), need for salvage radiation therapy, distant failure (DF) in the brain, and overall survival (OS). Results: Between February 2010 and November 2012, 49 patients with 80 brain metastases were treated. The median age was 61 years, the median KPS was 90, and the predominant histologies were non–small cell lung cancer (25 patients) and melanoma (8). Fifty-five, 19, and 6 lesions were treated to 24, 18, and 15 Gy, respectively. The PTV/GTV ratio, volume receiving 12 Gy or more, and minimum dose to PTV were significantly higher in the 3-mm group (all P<.01), and GTV was similar (P=.76). At a median follow-up time of 32.2 months, 11 patients were alive, with median OS 10.6 months. LR was observed in only 3 lesions (2 in the 1 mm group, P=.51), with 6.7% LR 12 months after SRS. Biopsy-proven RN alone was observed in 6 lesions (5 in the 3-mm group, P=.10). The 12-month DF rate was 45.7%. Three months after SRS, no significant change in

  11. Integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of human brain metastases identifies alterations of potential clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Saunus, Jodi M; Quinn, Michael C J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Pearson, John V; Bailey, Peter J; Nones, Katia; McCart Reed, Amy E; Miller, David; Wilson, Peter J; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Mariasegaram, Mythily; Lau, Queenie; Withers, Teresa; Jeffree, Rosalind L; Reid, Lynne E; Da Silva, Leonard; Matsika, Admire; Niland, Colleen M; Cummings, Margaret C; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Anderson, Matthew J; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Taylor, Darrin; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Kassahn, Karin S; Narayanan, Vairavan; Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Chow, Yock Ping; kConFab; Jat, Parmjit S; Brandner, Sebastian; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Khanna, Kum Kum; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Grimmond, Sean M; Simpson, Peter T; Waddell, Nicola; Lakhani, Sunil R

    2015-11-01

    Treatment options for patients with brain metastases (BMs) have limited efficacy and the mortality rate is virtually 100%. Targeted therapy is critically under-utilized, and our understanding of mechanisms underpinning metastatic outgrowth in the brain is limited. To address these deficiencies, we investigated the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of 36 BMs from breast, lung, melanoma and oesophageal cancers, using DNA copy-number analysis and exome- and RNA-sequencing. The key findings were as follows. (a) Identification of novel candidates with possible roles in BM development, including the significantly mutated genes DSC2, ST7, PIK3R1 and SMC5, and the DNA repair, ERBB-HER signalling, axon guidance and protein kinase-A signalling pathways. (b) Mutational signature analysis was applied to successfully identify the primary cancer type for two BMs with unknown origins. (c) Actionable genomic alterations were identified in 31/36 BMs (86%); in one case we retrospectively identified ERBB2 amplification representing apparent HER2 status conversion, then confirmed progressive enrichment for HER2-positivity across four consecutive metastatic deposits by IHC and SISH, resulting in the deployment of HER2-targeted therapy for the patient. (d) In the ERBB/HER pathway, ERBB2 expression correlated with ERBB3 (r(2)  = 0.496; p < 0.0001) and HER3 and HER4 were frequently activated in an independent cohort of 167 archival BM from seven primary cancer types: 57.6% and 52.6% of cases were phospho-HER3(Y1222) or phospho-HER4(Y1162) membrane-positive, respectively. The HER3 ligands NRG1/2 were barely detectable by RNAseq, with NRG1 (8p12) genomic loss in 63.6% breast cancer-BMs, suggesting a microenvironmental source of ligand. In summary, this is the first study to characterize the genomic landscapes of BM. The data revealed novel candidates, potential clinical applications for genomic profiling of resectable BMs, and highlighted the possibility of therapeutically targeting

  12. The importance of distant metastases in hormone-sensitive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Survival from breast cancer is improving, but distant metastases remain the most common type of breast cancer recurrence, resulting in more than 40,000 deaths per year in the USA alone. Distant metastases are associated with the poorest outcomes when compared with loco-regional or contralateral recurrences and are also associated with greater health care costs and diminished quality of life. The risk of distant metastases increases with larger primary tumor size, lymph node positive cancer, higher tumor grade, and prior loco-regional recurrence. Yet, even patients with minimal risk factors may develop distant metastases. Thus, reducing the development of such relapses is an important goal in adjuvant therapy. As the development of distant metastases has been consistently associated with eventual mortality from breast cancer, a reduction in distant metastases may serve as a better surrogate marker for overall survival and provide earlier results from clinical trials testing new types of adjuvant therapy. PMID:18279764

  13. Development of a Modelling to Correlate Site and Diameter of Brain Metastases with Hippocampal Sparing Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Balducci, Mario; Azario, Luigi; Cellini, Francesco; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Colosimo, Cesare; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To correlate site and diameter of brain metastases with hippocampal sparing in patients treated by RapidArc (RA) technique on whole brain with simultaneously integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials. An RA plan was calculated for brain metastases of 1-2-3 cm of diameter. The whole brain dose was 32.25 Gy (15 fractions), and SIB doses to brain metastases were 63 Gy (2 and 3 cm) or 70.8 Gy (1 cm). Plans were optimized and evaluated for conformity, target coverage, prescription isodose to target volume, homogeneity index, and hippocampal sparing. Results. Fifteen brain lesions and RA plan were generated. Hippocampal volume was 4.09 cm3, and hippocampal avoidance volume was 17.50 cm3. Related to site of metastases, the mean hippocampal dose was 9.68 Gy2 for occipital lobe, 10.56 Gy2 for frontal lobe, 10.56 Gy2 for parietal lobe, 10.94 Gy2 for deep brain structures, and 40.44 Gy2 for temporal lobe. The mean hippocampal dose was 9.45 Gy2, 10.15 Gy2, and 11.70 Gy2 for diameter's metastases of 1.2 and 3 cm, respectively, excluding results relative to temporal brain lesions. Conclusions. Location more than size of metastases can adversely influence the hippocampus sparing. Further investigation is necessary to meet definitive considerations. PMID:24224171

  14. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Pre-Irradiation Evaluation and Management of Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Elizabeth M.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Buatti, John M.; Germano, Isabelle; Ghafoori, A. Paiman; Henderson, Mark A.; Murad, Gregory J.A.; Patchell, Roy A.; Patel, Samir H.; Robbins, Jared R.; Robins, H. Ian; Vassil, Andrew D.; Wippold, Franz J.; Yunes, Michael J.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pretreatment evaluation is performed to determine the number, location, and size of the brain metastases and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the recommended imaging technique, particularly in patients being considered for surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery. A contiguous thin-cut volumetric MRI with gadolinium with newer gadolinium-based agents can improve detection of small brain metastases. A systemic workup and medical evaluation are important, given that subsequent treatment for the brain metastases will also depend on the extent of the extracranial disease and on the age and performance status of the patient. Patients with hydrocephalus or impending brain herniation should be started on high doses of corticosteroids and evaluated for possible neurosurgical intervention. Patients with moderate symptoms should receive approximately 4–8 mg/d of dexamethasone in divided doses. The routine use of corticosteroids in patients without neurologic symptoms is not necessary. There is no proven benefit of anticonvulsants in patient without seizures. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:24971478

  15. Differences Between Colon Cancer Primaries and Metastases Using a Molecular Assay for Tumor Radiation Sensitivity Suggest Implications for Potential Oligometastatic SBRT Patient Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Fulp, William J.; Berglund, Anders E.; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Shridhar, Ravi; Torres-Roca, Javier F.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: We previously developed a multigene expression model of tumor radiation sensitivity index (RSI) with clinical validation in multiple independent cohorts (breast, rectal, esophageal, and head and neck patients). The purpose of this study was to assess differences between RSI scores in primary colon cancer and metastases. Methods and Materials: Patients were identified from our institutional review board–approved prospective observational protocol. A total of 704 metastatic and 1362 primary lesions were obtained from a de-identified metadata pool. RSI was calculated using the previously published rank-based algorithm. An independent cohort of 29 lung or liver colon metastases treated with 60 Gy in 5 fractions stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was used for validation. Results: The most common sites of metastases included liver (n=374; 53%), lung (n=116; 17%), and lymph nodes (n=40; 6%). Sixty percent of metastatic tumors, compared with 54% of primaries, were in the RSI radiation-resistant peak, suggesting metastatic tumors may be slightly more radiation resistant than primaries (P=.01). In contrast, when we analyzed metastases based on anatomical site, we uncovered large differences in RSI. The median RSIs for metastases in descending order of radiation resistance were ovary (0.48), abdomen (0.47), liver (0.43), brain (0.42), lung (0.32), and lymph nodes (0.31) (P<.0001). These findings were confirmed when the analysis was restricted to lesions from the same patient (n=139). In our independent cohort of treated lung and liver metastases, lung metastases had an improved local control rate compared to that in patients with liver metastases (2-year local control rate of 100% vs 73.0%, respectively; P=.026). Conclusions: Assessment of radiation sensitivity between primary and metastatic tissues of colon cancer histology revealed significant differences based on anatomical location of metastases. These initial results warrant validation in a larger

  16. Differences between colon cancer primaries and metastases utilizing a molecular assay for tumor radiosensitivity suggest implications for potential oligometastatic SBRT patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Fulp, William J.; Berglund, Anders E.; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Shridhar, Ravi; Torres-Roca, Javier F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives We have previously developed a multigene expression model of tumor radiosensitivity (RSI) with clinical validation in multiple independent cohorts (breast, rectal, esophageal, and head and neck). The purpose of this study was to assess differences in RSI scores between primary colon cancer and metastases. Methods and Materials Patients were identified from our institutional IRB approved prospective observational protocol. A total of 704 metastatic and 1,362 primary lesions were obtained from a de-identified meta-data pool. RSI was calculated using the previously published ranked based algorithm. An independent cohort of 29 lung or liver colon metastases treated with 60 Gy in 5 fractions stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) was used for validation. Results The most common sites of metastases included liver (n=374; 53%), lung (n=116; 17%), and lymph nodes (n=40; 6%). Sixty percent of metastatic tumors compared with 54% of primaries were in the RSI-radioresistant (RSI-RR) peak, suggesting that, metastatic tumors may be slightly more radioresistant than primaries (p=0.01). In contrast, when we analyzed metastases based on anatomical site, we uncovered large differences in RSI. The median RSIs for metastases in descending order of radioresistance were ovary (0.48), abdomen (0.47), liver (0.43), brain (0.42), lung (0.32), and lymph nodes (0.31), p<0.0001. These findings were confirmed when the analysis was restricted to lesions from the same patient (n=139). In our independent cohort of treated lung and liver metastases, lung metastases had an improved local control (LC) rate over patients with liver metastases (2 yr LC 100% vs. 73.0%, p=0.026). Conclusions Assessment of radiosensitivity between primary and metastatic tissues of colon cancer histology, reveals significant differences based on anatomical location of metastases. These initial results warrant validation in a larger clinical cohort. PMID:25838188

  17. Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, David B.; Modlin, Leslie A.; Jayachandran, Priya; Von Eyben, Rie; Gibbs, Iris C.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Li, Gordon; Adler, John R.; Hancock, Steven L.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), for distant intracranial recurrences and identify factors associated with prolonged overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively identified 652 metastases in 95 patients treated with 2 or more courses of SRS for brain metastases, deferring WBRT. Cox regression analyzed factors predictive for OS. Results: Patients had a median of 2 metastases (range, 1-14) treated per course, with a median of 2 courses (range, 2-14) of SRS per patient. With a median follow-up after first SRS of 15 months (range, 3-98 months), the median OS from the time of the first and second course of SRS was 18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-24) and 11 months (95% CI 6-17), respectively. On multivariate analysis, histology, graded prognostic assessment score, aggregate tumor volume (but not number of metastases), and performance status correlated with OS. The 1-year cumulative incidence, with death as a competing risk, of local failure was 5% (95% CI 4-8%). Eighteen (24%) of 75 deaths were from neurologic causes. Nineteen patients (20%) eventually received WBRT. Adverse radiation events developed in 2% of SRS sites. Conclusion: Multiple courses of SRS, deferring WBRT, for distant brain metastases after initial SRS, seem to be a safe and effective approach. The graded prognostic assessment score, updated at each course, and aggregate tumor volume may help select patients in whom the deferral of WBRT might be most beneficial.

  18. Molecular and functional imaging for detection of lymph node metastases in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fortuin, Ansje; Rooij, Maarten de; Zamecnik, Patrik; Haberkorn, Uwe; Barentsz, Jelle

    2013-07-03

    Knowledge on lymph node metastases is crucial for the prognosis and treatment of prostate cancer patients. Conventional anatomic imaging often fails to differentiate benign from metastatic lymph nodes. Pelvic lymph node dissection is an invasive technique and underestimates the extent of lymph node metastases. Therefore, there is a need for more accurate non-invasive diagnostic techniques. Molecular and functional imaging has been subject of research for the last decades, in this respect. Therefore, in this article the value of imaging techniques to detect lymph node metastases is reviewed. These techniques include scintigraphy, sentinel node imaging, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI MRI) and magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL). Knowledge on pathway and size of lymph node metastases has increased with molecular and functional imaging. Furthermore, improved detection and localization of lymph node metastases will enable (focal) treatment of the positive nodes only.

  19. Linac stereotactic radiosurgery: An effective and safe treatment for elderly patients with brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Georges . E-mail: noel@ipno.in2p3.fr; Bollet, Marc A.; Noel, Sophie; Feuvret, Loic; Boisserie, Gilbert; Tep, Bernadette; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Baillet, Francois; Ambroise Valery, Charles; Cornu, Philippe; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of radiosurgery for brain metastases in patients 65 years or older. Patients and Methods: Between January 1994 and January 2003, 117 patients (47 women, 70 men), median age 71 years (range, 65-86 years), received radiosurgery for 227 metastases. Sixty-one patients (55%) presented symptoms in relation to the brain metastases. Thirty-eight patients (32%) received whole-brain radiotherapy. Median metastasis diameter and volume were 21 mm (range, 0.5-75 mm) and 1.7 cc (range, 0.02-71 cc), respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 7 months (range, 1-45 months), 9.5 months for alive patients (range, 1-45 months). Median minimum and maximum doses were 14.5 Gy (6.5 Gy, 19.5 Gy), and 20.4 Gy (13.2 Gy, 41.9 Gy), respectively. Median survival was 8 months from the date of radiosurgery. Overall survival rates at 6 and 24 months were 58% {+-} 5% and 13% {+-} 4%, respectively. According to multivariate analysis, a low Karnofsky performance status was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (p = 0.003; odds ratio [OR] = 0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-0.56). Median brain disease-free survival was 10 months. Brain disease-free survival rates at 6 and 24 months were 67% {+-} 6% and 40% {+-} 7%, respectively. According to multivariate analysis, a radiosensitive lesion was an independent favorable factor (p = 0.038; OR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.18-0.95); more than two metastases and a low Karnofsky performance status were independent unfavorable factors for brain disease-free survival (p = 0.046; OR = 2.15; 95% CI, 1.01-4.58 and p = 0.003; OR = 30.4; 95% CI, 3.1-296, respectively). Local control rates were 98% {+-} 2% and 91% {+-} 8.5% at 6 and 24 months. Out of the 61 patients presenting symptoms before radiosurgery, complete symptomatic response was achieved in 12 patients (20%), partial improvement in 25 (41%), stabilization in 7 (11%), and worsening in 4 (6%) related to a progression of the irradiated metastasis

  20. Salvage Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases: Prognostic Factors to Consider in Patient Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Goldie; Zadeh, Gelareh; Gingras-Hill, Geneviève; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Laperriere, Normand J.; Bernstein, Mark; Jiang, Haiyan; Ménard, Cynthia; Chung, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is offered to patients for recurrent brain metastases after prior brain radiation therapy (RT), but few studies have evaluated the efficacy of salvage SRS or factors to consider in selecting patients for this treatment. This study reports overall survival (OS), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) after salvage SRS, and factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of patients treated from 2009 to 2011 with salvage SRS after prior brain RT for brain metastases. Survival from salvage SRS and from initial brain metastases diagnosis (IBMD) was calculated. Univariate and multivariable (MVA) analyses included age, performance status, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, extracranial disease control, and time from initial RT to salvage SRS. Results: There were 106 patients included in the analysis with a median age of 56.9 years (range 32.5-82 years). A median of 2 metastases were treated per patient (range, 1-12) with a median dose of 21 Gy (range, 12-24) prescribed to the 50% isodose. With a median follow-up of 10.5 months (range, 0.1-68.2), LC was 82.8%, 60.1%, and 46.8% at 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively. Median PFS was 6.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9-7.6). Median OS was 11.7 months (95% CI = 8.1-13) from salvage SRS, and 22.1 months from IBMD (95% CI = 18.4-26.8). On MVA, age (P=.01; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.01-1.07), extracranial disease control (P=.004; HR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.27-0.78), and interval from initial RT to salvage SRS of at least 265 days (P=.001; HR = 2.46; 95% CI = 1.47-4.09) were predictive of OS. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that patients can have durable local control and survival after salvage SRS for recurrent brain metastases. In particular, younger patients with controlled extracranial disease and a durable response to initial brain RT are likely to benefit from salvage SRS.

  1. Immunotherapy of Brain Cancer.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Preusser, Matthias; Weller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The brain has long been considered an immune-privileged site precluding potent immune responses. Nevertheless, because of the failure of conventional anti-cancer treatments to achieve sustained control of intracranial neoplasms, immunotherapy has been considered as a promising strategy for decades. However, several efforts aimed at exploiting the immune system as a therapeutic weapon were largely unsuccessful. The situation only changed with the introduction of the checkpoint inhibitors, which target immune cell receptors that interfere with the activation of immune effector cells. Following the observation of striking effects of drugs that target CTLA-4 or PD-1 against melanoma and other tumor entities, it was recognized that these drugs may also be active against metastatic tumor lesions in the brain. Their therapeutic activity against primary brain tumors is currently being investigated within clinical trials. In parallel, other immunotherapeutics such as peptide vaccines are at an advanced stage of clinical development. Further immunotherapeutic strategies currently under investigation comprise adoptive immune cell transfer as well as inhibitors of metabolic pathways involved in the local immunosuppression frequently found in brain tumors. Thus, the ongoing implementation of immunotherapeutic concepts into clinical routine may represent a powerful addition to the therapeutic arsenal against various brain tumors. PMID:27260656

  2. Lung metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the lung; Metastatic cancer to the lung ... Metastatic tumors in the lungs are cancers that developed at other places in the body (or other parts of the lungs) and spread through the ...

  3. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean {+-} SD) was 4.0 {+-} 2.1 mm and 3.5 {+-} 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r {>=} 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 {+-} 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT.

  4. Infratentorial brain metastases of pediatric non-epithelial malignant tumors: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Shin-ichiro; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Saito, Ryuta; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Niizuma, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Mika; Tominaga, Teiji

    2011-04-01

    Three pediatric patients with infratentorial metastatic non-epithelial malignant brain tumors were successfully treated by radical surgical resection followed by aggressive radiochemotherapy. One patient with neuroblastoma and two with rhabdomyosarcoma were successfully treated by first line multimodal treatments, but developed infratentorial metastasis after several months of remission. All patients revealed intracranial metastases manifesting as rapidly progressing neurological symptoms caused by mass effect in the posterior fossa. Radical surgical resection was performed without morbidity. The patients were then treated by adjuvant radiochemotherapy with or without autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, resulting in complete remission. Two patients developed extracranial recurrences 4 months after the treatments for intracranial metastases. One patient was treated by second high-dose chemotherapy with allogeneic cord blood transplantation, again resulting in complete remission. Another patient was treated by second chemotherapy and maintaining stable disease. The other patient maintained complete remission. All three patients were alive without neurological deficit for 8, 11, and 12 months after diagnosis of brain metastasis. Patients with infratentorial brain metastases of highly malignant pediatric non-epithelial tumors are in a severe clinical state, but still can have longer and useful lives with aggressive multimodal treatments combined with radical surgical resection.

  5. Effect of prophylactic hyperbaric oxygen treatment for radiation-induced brain injury after stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ohguri, Takayuki . E-mail: ogurieye@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Imada, Hajime; Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Kakeda, Shingo; Ohnari, Norihiro; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Konda, Nobuhide; Korogi, Yukunori

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prophylactic effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy for radiation-induced brain injury in patients with brain metastasis treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: The data of 78 patients presenting with 101 brain metastases treated with SRS between October 1994 and September 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 32 patients with 47 brain metastases were treated with prophylactic HBO (HBO group), which included all 21 patients who underwent subsequent or prior radiotherapy and 11 patients with common predictors of longer survival, such as inactive extracranial tumors and younger age. The other 46 patients with 54 brain metastases did not undergo HBO (non-HBO group). Radiation-induced brain injuries were divided into two categories, white matter injury (WMI) and radiation necrosis (RN), on the basis of imaging findings. Results: Radiation-induced brain injury occurred in 5 lesions (11%) in the HBO group (2 WMIs and 3 RNs) and in 11 (20%) in the non-HBO group (9 WMIs and 2 RNs). The WMI was less frequent for the HBO group than for the non-HBO group (p = 0.05), although multivariate analysis by logistic regression showed that WMI was not significantly correlated with HBO (p = 0.07). The 1-year actuarial probability of WMI was significantly better for the HBO group (2%) than for the non-HBO group (36%) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present study showed a potential value of prophylactic HBO for Radiation-induced WMIs, which justifies further evaluation to confirm its definite benefit.

  6. Does colon cancer ever metastasize to bone first? a temporal analysis of colorectal cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background It is well recognized that colorectal cancer does not frequently metastasize to bone. The aim of this retrospective study was to establish whether colorectal cancer ever bypasses other organs and metastasizes directly to bone and whether the presence of lung lesions is superior to liver as a better predictor of the likelihood and timing of bone metastasis. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis on patients with a clinical diagnosis of colon cancer referred for staging using whole-body 18F-FDG PET and CT or PET/CT. We combined PET and CT reports from 252 individuals with information concerning patient history, other imaging modalities, and treatments to analyze disease progression. Results No patient had isolated osseous metastasis at the time of diagnosis, and none developed isolated bone metastasis without other organ involvement during our survey period. It took significantly longer for colorectal cancer patients to develop metastasis to the lungs (23.3 months) or to bone (21.2 months) than to the liver (9.8 months). Conclusion: Metastasis only to bone without other organ involvement in colorectal cancer patients is extremely rare, perhaps more rare than we previously thought. Our findings suggest that resistant metastasis to the lungs predicts potential disease progression to bone in the colorectal cancer population better than liver metastasis does. PMID:19664211

  7. Natural History of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer with Bone Metastases.

    PubMed

    Santini, Daniele; Daniele, Santini; Barni, Sandro; Sandro, Barni; Intagliata, Salvatore; Salvatore, Intagliata; Falcone, Alfredo; Alfredo, Falcone; Ferraù, Francesco; Francesco, Ferraù; Galetta, Domenico; Domenico, Galetta; Moscetti, Luca; Luca, Moscetti; La Verde, Nicla; Nicla, La Verde; Ibrahim, Toni; Toni, Ibrahim; Petrelli, Fausto; Fausto, Petrelli; Vasile, Enrico; Enrico, Vasile; Ginocchi, Laura; Laura, Ginocchi; Ottaviani, Davide; Davide, Ottaviani; Longo, Flavia; Flavia, Longo; Ortega, Cinzia; Cinzia, Ortega; Russo, Antonio; Antonio, Russo; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Badalamenti; Collovà, Elena; Elena, Collovà; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Gaetano, Lanzetta; Mansueto, Giovanni; Giovanni, Mansueto; Adamo, Vincenzo; Vincenzo, Adamo; De Marinis, Filippo; Filippo, De Marinis; Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Cantile, Flavia; Flavia, Cantile; Mancuso, Andrea; Andrea, Mancuso; Tanca, Francesca Maria; Addeo, Raffaele; Raffaele, Addeo; Russano, Marco; Marco, Russano; Sterpi, Michelle; Sterpi, M; Pantano, Francesco; Francesco, Pantano; Vincenzi, Bruno; Bruno, Vincenzi; Tonini, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Tonini

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large, multicenter, retrospective survey aimed to explore the impact of tumor bone involvement in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.Data on clinical-pathology, skeletal outcomes and bone-directed therapies for 661 deceased patients with evidence of bone metastasis were collected and statistically analyzed. Bone metastases were evident at diagnosis in 57.5% of patients. In the remaining cases median time to bone metastases appearance was 9 months. Biphosphonates were administered in 59.6% of patients. Skeletal-related events were experienced by 57.7% of patients; the most common was the need for radiotherapy. Median time to first skeletal-related event was 6 months. Median survival after bone metastases diagnosis was 9.5 months and after the first skeletal-related event was 7 months. We created a score based on four factors used to predict the overall survival from the diagnosis of bone metastases: age >65 years, non-adenocarcinoma histology, ECOG Performance Status >2, concomitant presence of visceral metastases at the bone metastases diagnosis. The presence of more than two of these factors is associated with a worse prognosis.This study demonstrates that patients affected by Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with bone metastases represent a heterogeneous population in terms of risk of skeletal events and survival.

  8. Natural History of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer with Bone Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Santini; Sandro, Barni; Salvatore, Intagliata; Alfredo, Falcone; Francesco, Ferraù; Domenico, Galetta; Luca, Moscetti; Nicla, La Verde; Toni, Ibrahim; Fausto, Petrelli; Enrico, Vasile; Laura, Ginocchi; Davide, Ottaviani; Flavia, Longo; Cinzia, Ortega; Antonio, Russo; Giuseppe, Badalamenti; Elena, Collovà; Gaetano, Lanzetta; Giovanni, Mansueto; Vincenzo, Adamo; Filippo, De Marinis; Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Flavia, Cantile; Andrea, Mancuso; Tanca, Francesca Maria; Raffaele, Addeo; Marco, Russano; Sterpi, M; Francesco, Pantano; Bruno, Vincenzi; Giuseppe, Tonini

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large, multicenter, retrospective survey aimed to explore the impact of tumor bone involvement in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.Data on clinical-pathology, skeletal outcomes and bone-directed therapies for 661 deceased patients with evidence of bone metastasis were collected and statistically analyzed. Bone metastases were evident at diagnosis in 57.5% of patients. In the remaining cases median time to bone metastases appearance was 9 months. Biphosphonates were administered in 59.6% of patients. Skeletal-related events were experienced by 57.7% of patients; the most common was the need for radiotherapy. Median time to first skeletal-related event was 6 months. Median survival after bone metastases diagnosis was 9.5 months and after the first skeletal-related event was 7 months. We created a score based on four factors used to predict the overall survival from the diagnosis of bone metastases: age >65 years, non-adenocarcinoma histology, ECOG Performance Status >2, concomitant presence of visceral metastases at the bone metastases diagnosis. The presence of more than two of these factors is associated with a worse prognosis.This study demonstrates that patients affected by Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with bone metastases represent a heterogeneous population in terms of risk of skeletal events and survival. PMID:26690845

  9. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Cervical Spinal Intramedullary Metastasis and Multiple Brain Metastases: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Kawamura, Toshiki; Ohshima, Yukihiko; Takeuchi, Arisa; Mori, Toshie; Ishiguchi, Tuneo

    2016-01-01

    A case of cervical (C) spinal intramedullary metastasis and multiple small brain metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma was presented. Spinal metastasis caused posterior neck and left shoulder pain, dysesthesia in both legs, and motor weakness in both legs and left arm, though the brain metastases were asymptomatic. Both the spinal and brain metastases were successfully treated by frameless stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT)/stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The patient's symptoms were almost entirely relieved within two months. A 76-year-old woman was diagnosed as having a thyroid tumor and lung metastasis by roentgenography and computed tomography. Biopsy of the thyroid tumor extending into the mediastinum revealed papillary thyroid carcinoma. She underwent surgical resection of thyroid with dissection of the mediastinum lymph node area. Internal oral radioisotope therapy was not effective for the multiple small lung metastases. She did well for 15 months, but later developed posterior neck and left shoulder pain and dysesthesia in the right leg and then dysesthesia and motor weakness in both legs. Then she experienced weakness in the left upper extremity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed a small cervical spinal intramedullary mass lesion at the level of C6 and C7 on the left side as well as nine small brain lesions. The cervical spinal intramedullary metastatic tumor was treated by volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) SRT and the nine small brain metastatic tumors were treated by dynamic conformal arc (DCA) SRS uneventfully. A total dose of 39 Gy (100% dose) was delivered in 13 fractions for the spinal lesion (prescription, D95=95% dose; maximum dose=46.3 Gy). Single fraction SRS of 22 Gy (prescription, D95=100% dose) was performed for each of the nine small brain tumors. The spinal tumor was decreased in size on follow-up MRI two months after SRT. Three of the nine brain lesions had disappeared and six were decreased in size on

  10. Predictors of Survival in Contemporary Practice After Initial Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Likhacheva, Anna; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Parikh, Neil R.; Allen, Pamela K.; McAleer, Mary F.; Chiu, Max S.; Sulman, Erik P.; Mahajan, Anita; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Prabhu, Sujit S.; Cahill, Daniel P.; Luo, Dershan; Shiu, Almon S.; Brown, Paul D.; Chang, Eric L.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The number of brain metastases (BM) is a major consideration in determining patient eligibility for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), but the evidence for this popular practice is equivocal. The purpose of this study was to determine whether, following multivariate adjustment, the number and volume of BM held prognostic significance in a cohort of patients initially treated with SRS alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 251 patients with primary malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (34%), melanoma (30%), and breast carcinoma (16%), underwent SRS for initial treatment of BM. SRS was used as the sole management (62% of patients) or was combined with salvage treatment with SRS (22%), whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT; 13%), or resection (3%). Median follow-up time was 9.4 months. Survival was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression was used to assess the effects of patient factors on distant brain failure (DBF), local control (LC), and overall survival (OS). Results: LC at 1 year was 94.6%, and median time to DBF was 10 months. Median OS was 11.1 months. On multivariate analysis, statistically significant predictors of OS were presence of extracranial disease (hazard ratio [HR], 4.2, P<.001), total tumor volume greater than 2 cm{sup 3} (HR, 1.98; P<.001), age ≥60 years (HR, 1.67; P=.002), and diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (HR, 0.71; P<.001). The presence of extracranial disease was a statistically significant predictor of DBF (HR, 2.15), and tumor volume was predictive of LC (HR, 4.56 for total volume >2 cm{sup 3}). The number of BM was not predictive of DBF, LC, or OS. Conclusions: The number of BM is not a strong predictor for clinical outcomes following initial SRS for newly diagnosed BM. Other factors including total treatment volume and systemic disease status are better determinants of outcome and may facilitate appropriate use of SRS or WBRT.

  11. Repeat stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of brain metastases from NSCLC: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MARVASO, GIULIA; BARONE, AGNESE; VACCARO, CATERINA; BRUZZANITI, VICENTE; GRESPI, SILVIA; SCOTTI, VALERIO; BIANCO, CATALDO

    2013-01-01

    The aims of radiotherapeutic treatment of brain metastases include maintaining neurocognitive function and improvement of survival. Based on these premises, we present a case report in which the role of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was investigated in a patient with a recurrent brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer in the same area as previously treated with radiosurgery. A 40-year-old male caucasian patient was diagnosed with brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and underwent SRS. The patient developed a recurrence of the disease and a second SRS on the same area was performed. After 8 months, tumor restaging demonstrated a lesion compatible with a recurrence and the patient underwent surgery. Histological diagnosis following surgery revealed only the occurrence of radionecrosis. Radiotherapy was well-tolerated and no grade 3/4 neurological toxicity occurred. To date, no consensus exists on the efficacy of retreatment with SRS. Despite the limited number of studies in this field, in the present case report, we outline the outcomes of this unconventional approach. PMID:24137433

  12. Characterization of bone quality in prostate cancer bone metastases using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiaohong; Patil, Chetan; Morrissey, Colm; Roudier, Martine P.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common primary tumor in men, with a high propensity to metastasize to bone. Bone metastases in prostate cancer are associated with active pathologic bone remodeling, leading to increased mortality and morbidity. Detailed characterization of bone metastases is important in the management of prostate cancer. Raman spectroscopy was applied in this study to investigate the structure and composition of metastatic bone in prostate cancer with the ultimate goal of identifying spectral features that are related to the alterations in bone quality as the bone metastases develop. Osteoblastic-, osteolytic- and tumor-absent bone specimens from prostate cancer patients were investigated using bench-top Raman microspectroscopy. Raman derived measurements of collagen mineralization, mineral crystallinity, and carbonate substitution were calculated. The osteolytic lesions demonstrated significantly lower collagen mineralization, determined by phosphate ν1/proline, and higher carbonate substitution than normal and osteoblastic bones. Mineral crystallinity was significantly lower in both blastic and lytic specimens. In addition, a significant increase in the ratio of hydroxyproine: proline was observed in the osteoblastic specimen, indicating an increase in the content of hydroxyproline at the blastic lesions. This study demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy shows promise in determining alterations in osteoblastic and osteolytic bone metastases as well as assessing the response of metastatic bone to therapies.

  13. Treatment of multiple brain metastases with a divide-and-conquer spatial fractionation radiosurgery approach.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Douglas A

    2014-10-01

    Brain metastases are a common problem, managed with surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), whole brain irradiation (WBI), or a combination. SRS targets individual tumors with large dosages of radiation. There is a trend toward using more SRS and less WBI, due to a reduction in cognitive damage, shorter treatment course, and improved tumor control. In conventional radiation a total dose of radiation is frequently divided over time into several smaller "fractions", which helps spare normal tissues such as the brain. Two doses of 10 Gy each given on separate days will result in 45% less damage to normal brain tissue than a single dose of 20 Gy, according to the linear quadratic model for biologically effective dose (BED). Unfortunately, standard fractionation also reduces the effective dose to the tumor. It would therefore be highly beneficial to be able to fractionate the dose to the normal brain, but not fractionate the tumor dose. When a tumor is irradiated, there are dozens of beams that pass through the skull and converge on the tumor, also irradiating healthy brain tissue in the beam paths. If multiple tumors are irradiated, there are areas of brain that are overlapped by beams that are targeting separate tumors. If these tumors were treated on separate days, then on any given day portions of normal brain may only see the radiation beams for one tumor instead of 2 or more. That is how spatial fractionation of multiple metastases works. By treating groups of tumors on separate days the beams are spread out over time, reducing areas of beam overlap, and effectively fractionating the dose to healthy brain. Yet, each tumor still receives a single treatment. The hypothesis is that an array of metastases may be divided into 2-5 different groups that are treated on different days such that the BED to normal brain tissue is minimized. This should benefit patients by reducing side effects, allowing greater numbers of tumors to be treated, and making retreatment safer

  14. Pseudo-progression after stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases: lesion analysis using MRI cine-loops.

    PubMed

    Wiggenraad, Ruud; Bos, Petra; Verbeek-de Kanter, Antoinette; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert; van Santvoort, Jan; Taphoorn, Martin; Struikmans, Henk

    2014-09-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of brain metastasis can lead to lesion growth caused by radiation toxicity. The pathophysiology of this so-called pseudo-progression is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of MRI cine-loops for describing the consecutive events in this radiation induced lesion growth. Ten patients were selected from our department's database that had received SRT of brain metastases and had lesion growth caused by pseudo-progression as well as at least five follow-up MRI scans. Pre- and post SRT MRI scans were co-registered and cine-loops were made using post-gadolinium 3D T1 axial slices. The ten cine loops were discussed in a joint meeting of the authors. The use of cine-loops was superior to evaluation of separate MRI scans for interpretation of events after SRT. There was a typical lesion evolution pattern in all patients with varying time course. Initially regression of the metastases was observed, followed by an enlarging area of new contrast enhancement in the surrounding brain tissue. Analysis of consecutive MRI's using cine-loops may improve understanding of pseudo-progression. It probably represents a radiation effect in brain tissue surrounding the irradiated metastasis and not enlargement of the metastasis itself.

  15. Delayed Effects of Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Germ Cell Tumor Patients With Central Nervous System Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Danielle M. Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases are uncommon in patients with germ cell tumors, with an incidence of 2-3%. CNS metastases have been managed with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and concomitant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Our previous study did not observe serious CNS toxicity (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1991;22:17-22). We now report on 5 patients who developed delayed significant CNS toxicity. Patients and Methods: We observed 5 patients with delayed CNS toxicity. The initial diagnosis was between 1981 and 2003. All patients had poor-risk disease according to the International Germ Cell Consensus Collaborative Group criteria. Of the 5 patients, 3 had CNS metastases at diagnosis and 2 developed relapses with CNS metastases. These 5 patients underwent WBRT to 4,000-5,000 cGy in 18-28 fractions concurrently with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: All 5 patients developed delayed symptoms consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The symptoms included seizures, hemiparesis, cranial neuropathy, headaches, blindness, dementia, and ataxia. The median time from WBRT to CNS symptoms was 72 months (range, 9-228). Head imaging revealed multiple abnormalities consistent with gliosis and diffuse cerebral atrophy. Of the 5 patients, 3 had progressive and 2 stable symptoms. Treatment with surgery and/or steroids had modest benefit. The progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy resulted in significant debility in all 5 patients, resulting in death (3 patients), loss of work, steroid-induced morbidity, and recurrent hospitalizations. Conclusion: Whole brain radiotherapy is not innocuous in young patients with germ cell tumors and can cause late CNS toxicity.

  16. Long-term risk of radionecrosis and imaging changes after stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Kohutek, Zachary A; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy A; Brennan, Cameron W; Tabar, Viviane; Gutin, Philip H; Yang, T Jonathan; Rosenblum, Marc K; Ballangrud, Åse; Young, Robert J; Zhang, Zhigang; Beal, Kathryn

    2015-10-01

    Radionecrosis is a well-characterized effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and is occasionally associated with serious neurologic sequelae. Here, we investigated the incidence of and clinical variables associated with the development of radionecrosis and related radiographic changes after SRS for brain metastases in a cohort of patients with long-term follow up. 271 brain metastases treated with single-fraction linear accelerator-based SRS were analyzed. Radionecrosis was diagnosed either pathologically or radiographically. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression was performed to determine the association between radionecrosis and clinical factors available prior to treatment planning. After median follow up of 17.2 months, radionecrosis was observed in 70 (25.8%) lesions, including 47 (17.3%) symptomatic cases. 22 of 70 cases (31.4%) were diagnosed pathologically and 48 (68.6%) were diagnosed radiographically. The actuarial incidence of radionecrosis was 5.2% at 6 months, 17.2% at 12 months and 34.0% at 24 months. On univariate analysis, radionecrosis was associated with maximum tumor diameter (HR 3.55, p < 0.001), prior whole brain radiotherapy (HR 2.21, p = 0.004), prescription dose (HR 0.56, p = 0.02) and histology other than non-small cell lung, breast or melanoma (HR 1.85, p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, only maximum tumor diameter (HR 3.10, p < 0.001) was associated with radionecrosis risk. This data demonstrates that with close imaging follow-up, radionecrosis after single-fraction SRS for brain metastases is not uncommon. Maximum tumor diameter on pre-treatment MR imaging can provide a reliable estimate of radionecrosis risk prior to treatment planning, with the greatest risk among tumors measuring >1 cm. PMID:26307446

  17. Multimodal imaging enables early detection and characterization of changes in tumor permeability of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Frits; Fite, Brett; Mahakian, Lisa M; Seo, Jai W; Qin, Shengping; Harrison, Victoria; Johnson, Sarah; Ingham, Elizabeth; Caskey, Charles; Sundstrøm, Terje; Meade, Thomas J; Harter, Patrick N; Skaftnesmo, Kai Ove; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2013-12-28

    Our goal was to develop strategies to quantify the accumulation of model therapeutics in small brain metastases using multimodal imaging, in order to enhance the potential for successful treatment. Human melanoma cells were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of immunodeficient mice. Bioluminescent, MR and PET imaging were applied to evaluate the limits of detection and potential for contrast agent extravasation in small brain metastases. A pharmacokinetic model was applied to estimate vascular permeability. Bioluminescent imaging after injecting d-luciferin (molecular weight (MW) 320 D) suggested that tumor cell extravasation had already occurred at week 1, which was confirmed by histology. 7T T1w MRI at week 4 was able to detect non-leaky 100 μm sized lesions and leaky tumors with diameters down to 200 μm after contrast injection at week 5. PET imaging showed that (18)F-FLT (MW 244 Da) accumulated in the brain at week 4. Gadolinium-based MRI tracers (MW 559 Da and 2.066 kDa) extravasated after 5 weeks (tumor diameter 600 μm), and the lower MW agent cleared more rapidly from the tumor (mean apparent permeabilities 2.27 × 10(-5)cm/s versus 1.12 × 10(-5)cm/s). PET imaging further demonstrated tumor permeability to (64)Cu-BSA (MW 65.55 kDa) at week 6 (tumor diameter 700 μm). In conclusion, high field T1w MRI without contrast may improve the detection limit of small brain metastases, allowing for earlier diagnosis of patients, although the smallest lesions detected with T1w MRI were permeable only to d-luciferin and the amphipathic small molecule (18)F-FLT. Different-sized MR and PET contrast agents demonstrated the gradual increase in leakiness of the blood tumor barrier during metastatic progression, which could guide clinicians in choosing tailored treatment strategies.

  18. Pseudo-Meigs' syndrome secondary to metachronous ovarian metastases from transverse colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kyo, Kennoki; Maema, Atsushi; Shirakawa, Motoaki; Nakamura, Toshio; Koda, Kenji; Yokoyama, Hidetaro

    2016-05-14

    Pseudo-Meigs' syndrome associated with colorectal cancer is extremely rare. We report here a case of pseudo-Meigs' syndrome secondary to metachronous ovarian metastases from colon cancer. A 65-year-old female with a history of surgery for transverse colon cancer and peritoneal dissemination suffered from metachronous ovarian metastases during treatment with systemic chemotherapy. At first, neither ascites nor pleural effusion was observed, but she later complained of progressive abdominal distention and dyspnea caused by rapidly increasing ascites and pleural effusion and rapidly enlarging ovarian metastases. Abdominocenteses were repeated, and cytological examinations of the fluids were all negative for malignant cells. We suspected pseudo-Meigs' syndrome, and bilateral oophorectomies were performed after thorough informed consent. The patient's postoperative condition improved rapidly after surgery. We conclude that pseudo-Meigs' syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of massive or rapidly increasing ascites and pleural effusion associated with large or rapidly enlarging ovarian tumors.

  19. Pseudo-Meigs’ syndrome secondary to metachronous ovarian metastases from transverse colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kyo, Kennoki; Maema, Atsushi; Shirakawa, Motoaki; Nakamura, Toshio; Koda, Kenji; Yokoyama, Hidetaro

    2016-01-01

    Pseudo-Meigs’ syndrome associated with colorectal cancer is extremely rare. We report here a case of pseudo-Meigs’ syndrome secondary to metachronous ovarian metastases from colon cancer. A 65-year-old female with a history of surgery for transverse colon cancer and peritoneal dissemination suffered from metachronous ovarian metastases during treatment with systemic chemotherapy. At first, neither ascites nor pleural effusion was observed, but she later complained of progressive abdominal distention and dyspnea caused by rapidly increasing ascites and pleural effusion and rapidly enlarging ovarian metastases. Abdominocenteses were repeated, and cytological examinations of the fluids were all negative for malignant cells. We suspected pseudo-Meigs’ syndrome, and bilateral oophorectomies were performed after thorough informed consent. The patient’s postoperative condition improved rapidly after surgery. We conclude that pseudo-Meigs’ syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of massive or rapidly increasing ascites and pleural effusion associated with large or rapidly enlarging ovarian tumors. PMID:27182170

  20. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Outcomes in Patients with Concurrent Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Henry S; Laurans, Maxwell S; Chiang, Veronica S; Yu, James B; Husain, Zain A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging technique for maximizing tumor and pain control in selected patients with spinal metastases. Outcomes for those with concurrent brain metastases (CBM) have not been well-described previously. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes for patients with or without CBM treated with spine SBRT. Methods: Records of all patients treated with SBRT for spine metastases at our institution from January 2008 to January 2014 were reviewed. Chi-square analyses and the Mann-Whitney test were used to assess the association of CBM (defined as brain metastasis present prior to or at the time of spinal SBRT) with potential covariates. The log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the impact of CBM on overall survival and local control from the time of the first course of spine SBRT. Results: Seventy-eight patients and a total of 86 SBRT lesions were treated. Median patient age was 60 years (range: 38-84 years); 28.2% had radioresistant histologies. A single fraction was used in 91.0% of treatments. One-year local control was 89.4%, and one-year overall survival was 45.8%. A total of 19 patients (24.4%) had CBM. Among these CBM patients, 18 (94.7%) underwent intracranial radiosurgery and nine (47.4%) were diagnosed synchronously with their spine metastases. Local control was not significantly different between patients with or without CBM on univariable (median: 58 months vs. not reached, p = 0.53) or multivariable analyses (HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.06-4.33). Overall survival was also not significantly different between patients with or without CBM on univariable (median: 7 vs. 11 months, log-rank p = 0.12) or multivariable analyses (HR 1.62, 95% CI 0.87-3.03). Conclusions: Patients with CBM do not appear to have a statistically significant detriment in clinical outcomes, suggesting that CBM should not necessarily be considered a contraindication for spine SBRT. Although our

  1. Non-coding RNAs in cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kerui; Sharma, Sambad; Venkat, Suresh; Liu, Keqin; Zhou, Xiaobo; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2016-01-01

    More than 90% of cancer death is attributed to metastatic disease, and the brain is one of the major metastatic sites of melanoma, colon, renal, lung and breast cancers. Despite the recent advancement of targeted therapy for cancer, the incidence of brain metastasis is increasing. One reason is that most therapeutic drugs can't penetrate blood-brain-barrier and tumor cells find the brain as sanctuary site. In this review, we describe the pathophysiology of brain metastases to introduce the latest understandings of metastatic brain malignancies. This review also particularly focuses on non-coding RNAs and their roles in cancer brain metastasis. Furthermore, we discuss the roles of the extracellular vesicles as they are known to transport information between cells to initiate cancer cell-microenvironment communication. The potential clinical translation of non-coding RNAs as a tool for diagnosis and for treatment is also discussed in this review. At the end, the computational aspects of non-coding RNA detection, the sequence and structure calculation and epigenetic regulation of non-coding RNA in brain metastasis are discussed.

  2. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases.

  3. The predictive capacity of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in response assessment of brain metastases following radiation.

    PubMed

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Zhou, Stephanie; Heyn, Chris; Soliman, Hany; Zhang, Liyang; Aviv, Richard; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the predictive capacity of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) as a biomarker of radiation response in brain metastases. Seventy brain metastases from 42 patients treated with either stereotactic radiosurgery or whole brain radiotherapy were imaged at baseline, 1 week, and 1 month post-treatment using diffusion-weighted MRI. Mean and median relative ADC for metastases was calculated by normalizing ADC measurements to baseline ADC. At 1 year post-treatment, or last available follow-up MRI, volume criteria determined final tumour response status. Uni- and multivariate analysis was used to account for factors associated with tumour response at 1 week and 1 month. A generalized estimating equations model took into consideration multiple tumours per subject. Optimal thresholds that distinguished responders from non-responders, as well as sensitivity and specificity were determined by receiver operator characteristic analysis and Youden's index. Lower relative ADC values distinguished responders from non-responders at 1 week and 1 month (P < 0.05). Optimal cut-off values for response were 1.060 at 1 week with a sensitivity and specificity of 75.0 and 56.3 %, respectively. At 1 month, the cut-off was 0.971 with a sensitivity and specificity of 70.0 and 68.8 %, respectively. A multivariate general estimating equations analysis identified no prior radiation [odds ratio (OR) 0.211 and 0.137, P = 0.033 and 0.0177], and a lower median relative ADC at 1 week and 1 month (OR 0.619 and 0.694, P = 0.0036 and 0.005), as predictors of tumour response. Lower relative ADC values at 1 week and 1 month following radiation distinguished responders from non-responders and may be a promising biomarker of early radiation response.

  4. Target Definition by C11-Methionine-PET for the Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Masayuki Miwa, Kazuhiro; Shinoda, Jun; Kako, Nobuo; Nishibori, Hironori; Sakurai, Kouta; Yano, Hirohito; Iwama, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) to delineate target volumes for brain metastases and to investigate to what extent tumor growth is presented by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MET-PET. Materials and Methods: Three observers undertook target definition in 19 patients with 95 brain metastases by MRI and MET-PET images. MRI gross target volume (GTV) (GTV-MRI) was defined as the contrast-enhanced area on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI. MET-PET GTV (GTV-PET) was defined as the area of an accumulation of MET-PET apparently higher than that of normal tissue on MET-PET images. The size of occupation ratio was determined using the following equation: SOR (%) of MET are within x mm margin outside GTV-MRI = the volume of the GTV-PET within x mm outside the GTV-MRI/the volume of the GTV-PET. Results: For GTV-MRI volumes of {<=}0.5 mL, the sensitivity of tumor detection by MET-PET was 43%. For GTV-MRI volume of >0.5 mL, GTV-PET volumes were larger than GTV-MRI volumes and a significant correlation was found between these variables by linear regression. For all tumor sizes and tumor characteristics, a 2-mm margin outside the GTV-MRI significantly improved the coverage of the GTV-PET. Conclusions: Although there were some limitations in our study associated with spatial resolution, blurring effect, and image registrations with PET images, MET-PET was supposed to have a potential as a promising tool for the precise delineation of target volumes in radiotherapy planning for brain metastases.

  5. Hypoxia in relation to vasculature and proliferation in liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van . E-mail: h.vanlaarhoven@onco.umcn.nl; Kaanders, Johannes; Lok, Jasper; Peeters, Wenny J.M.; Rijken, Paul F.J.W.; Wiering, Bastiaan; Ruers, Theo J.M.; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Heerschap, Arend; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate hypoxia measured by pimonidazole binding, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA-IX) expression, proliferation, and vascularity in liver metastases of colorectal cancer and to compare GLUT1 and CA-IX expression in corresponding primary tumors. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer, planned for metastasectomy, were included. The hypoxia marker pimonidazole and proliferation marker iododeoxyuridine were administered before surgery. After immunofluorescent staining of the frozen metastases, pimonidazole binding, vascularity, and proliferation were analyzed quantitatively. Thirteen paraffin-embedded primary tumors were stained immunohistochemically for GLUT1 and CA-IX expression, which was analyzed semiquantitatively in primary tumors and corresponding liver metastases. Results: In liver metastases, pimonidazole binding showed a pattern consistent with diffusion-limited hypoxia. The mean pimonidazole-positive fraction was 0.146; the mean distance from vessels to pimonidazole-positive areas was 80 {mu}m. When expressed, often co-localization was observed between pimonidazole binding and GLUT1 or CA-IX expression, but microregional areas of mismatch were also observed. No correlation between the level of pimonidazole binding and GLUT1 or CA-IX expression was observed. In some patients, a large fraction (up to 30%) of proliferating cells was present in pimonidazole-stained areas. Expression of CA-IX in primary tumors and metastases showed a significant correlation, which was absent for GLUT1 expression. Conclusions: Compared with other tumor types, liver metastases of colorectal cancer contain large amounts of hypoxic cells. The lack of correlation with pimonidazole binding brings into question the value of GLUT1 and CA-IX as endogenous markers of hypoxia.

  6. Whole Brain Radiotherapy and RRx-001: Two Partial Responses in Radioresistant Melanoma Brain Metastases from a Phase I/II Clinical Trial12

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michelle M.; Parmar, Hemant; Cao, Yue; Pramanik, Priyanka; Schipper, Matthew; Hayman, James; Junck, Larry; Mammoser, Aaron; Heth, Jason; Carter, Corey A.; Oronsky, Arnold; Knox, Susan J.; Caroen, Scott; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Lao, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with RRx-001 and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. RRx-001 is an reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent systemically nontoxic hypoxic cell radiosensitizer with vascular normalizing properties under investigation in patients with various solid tumors including those with brain metastases. SIGNIFICANCE: Metastatic melanoma to the brain is historically associated with poor outcomes and a median survival of 4 to 5 months. WBRT is a mainstay of treatment for patients with multiple brain metastases, but no significant therapeutic advances for these patients have been described in the literature. To date, candidate radiosensitizing agents have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit in patients with brain metastases, and in particular, no agent has demonstrated improved outcome in patients with metastatic melanoma. Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with novel radiosensitizing agent RRx-001 and WBRT without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. PMID:27084426

  7. Effectiveness of Proton Beam Therapy on Liver Metastases of Esophageal Cancer: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Muroi, Hiroto; Nakajima, Masanobu; Satomura, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Masakazu; Domeki, Yasushi; Murakami, Masao; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takada, Akinori; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with multiple liver metastasis of esophageal cancer underwent four courses of chemotherapy. After four courses of chemotherapy, positron emission tomography showed progressive disease. Because it was difficult to control the cancer only by chemotherapy, we performed proton beam therapy (PBT) combined with chemotherapy. The irradiated parts were the primary tumor, liver metastases (S2/S4/S6), and mediastinal lymph nodes. The primary tumor including the mediastinal lymph nodes and the S2/S4/S6 metastases received proton beam irradiation at a total dose of 68.2 Gy in 31 fractions and 66.0 Gy in 30 fractions, respectively, according to tumor location. This resulted in a complete response as shown by positron emission tomography. In our experience, PBT exerted a curative effect on liver metastases of esophageal cancer. It is thought that PBT may be effective in the treatment of esophageal cancer. This is the first report about PBT for liver metastases of esophageal cancer. PMID:25594660

  8. Metastases and Colon Cancer Tumor Growth Display Divergent Responses to Modulation of Canonical WNT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Chandan; Ruiz i Altaba, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Human colon cancers commonly harbor loss of function mutations in APC, a repressor of the canonical WNT pathway, thus leading to hyperactive WNT-TCF signaling. Re-establishment of Apc function in mice, engineered to conditionally repress Apc through RNAi, resolve the intestinal tumors formed due to hyperactivated Wnt-Tcf signaling. These and other results have prompted the search for specific WNT pathway antagonists as therapeutics for clinically problematic human colon cancers and associated metastases, which remain largely incurable. This widely accepted view seems at odds with a number of findings using patient-derived material: Canonical TCF targets are repressed, instead of being hyperactivated, in advanced colon cancers, and repression of TCF function does not generally result in tumor regression in xenografts. The results of a number of genetic mouse studies have also suggested that canonical WNT-TCF signaling drives metastases, but direct in vivo tests are lacking, and, surprisingly, TCF repression can enhance directly seeded metastatic growth. Here we have addressed the abilities of enhanced and blocked WNT-TCF signaling to alter tumor growth and distant metastases using xenografts of advanced human colon cancers in mice. We find that endogenous WNT-TCF signaling is mostly anti-metastatic since downregulation of TCF function with dnTCF generally enhances metastatic spread. Consistently, elevating the level of WNT signaling, by increasing the levels of WNT ligands, is not generally pro-metastatic. Our present and previous data reveal a heterogeneous response to modulating WNT-TCF signaling in human cancer cells. Nevertheless, the findings that a fraction of colon cancers tested require WNT-TCF signaling for tumor growth but all respond to repressed signaling by increasing metastases beg for a reevaluation of the goal of blocking WNT-TCF signaling to universally treat colon cancers. Our data suggest that WNT-TCF blockade may be effective in inhibiting tumor

  9. Management of bone metastases in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cathomas, Richard; Bajory, Zoltan; Bouzid, Mounira; El Ghoneimy, Ahmed; Gillessen, Silke; Goncalves, Frederico; Kacso, Gabriel; Kramer, Gero; Milecki, Piotr; Pacik, Dalibor; Tantawy, Wahid; Lesniewski-Kmak, Krzystof

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastases are a very common problem in prostate cancer. They are associated with considerable morbidity, adversely affect quality of life and frequently lead to advanced bone events (so-called skeletal-related events, SREs); SREs include fractures, spinal cord compression and the requirement for bone surgery or bone radiation. The aim of this paper was to evaluate currently available treatment options in the prevention and management of SREs and bone metastases in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer and to outline the importance of interdisciplinary management strategies. It also discusses the diagnostic workup of osseous metastases and practical considerations for the utilization of bone-targeted therapies in accordance with current guidelines to provide a consensus for special and/or difficult clinical situations.

  10. Decision Analysis of Stereotactic Radiation Surgery Versus Stereotactic Radiation Surgery and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for 1 to 3 Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Lester-Coll, Nataniel H.; Dosoretz, Arie P.; Yu, James B.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is effective for controlling intracranial disease, it is also associated with neurocognitive side effects. It is unclear whether a theoretically improved quality of life after stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) alone relative to that after SRS with adjuvant WBRT would justify the omission of WBRT, given the higher risk of intracranial failure. This study compares SRS alone with SRS and WBRT, to evaluate the theoretical benefits of intracranial tumor control with adjuvant WBRT against its possible side effects, using quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) as a primary endpoint. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision analysis model was used to compare QALE in a cohort of patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases and Karnofsky performance status of at least 70. Patients were treated with SRS alone or with SRS immediately followed by WBRT. Patients treated with SRS alone underwent surveillance magnetic resonance imaging and received salvage WBRT if they developed intracranial relapse. All patients whose cancer relapsed after WBRT underwent simulation as dying of intracranial progression. Model parameters were estimated from published literature. Results: Treatment with SRS yielded 6.2 quality-adjusted life months (QALMs). The addition of initial WBRT reduced QALE by 1.2 QALMs. On one-way sensitivity analysis, the model was sensitive only to a single parameter, the utility associated with the state of no evidence of disease after SRS alone. At values greater than 0.51, SRS alone was preferred. Conclusions: In general, SRS alone is suggested to have improved quality of life in patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases compared to SRS and immediate WBRT. Our results suggest that immediate treatment with WBRT after SRS can be reserved for patients who would have a poor performance status regardless of treatment. These findings are stable under a wide range of assumptions.

  11. What Is the Optimal Treatment of Large Brain Metastases? An Argument for a Multidisciplinary Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Atalar, Banu; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Single-modality treatment of large brain metastases (>2 cm) with whole-brain irradiation, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone, or surgery alone is not effective, with local failure (LF) rates of 50% to 90%. Our goal was to improve local control (LC) by using multimodality therapy of surgery and adjuvant SRS targeting the resection cavity. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 97 patients with brain metastases >2 cm in diameter treated with surgery and cavity SRS. Local and distant brain failure (DF) rates were analyzed with competing risk analysis, with death as a competing risk. The overall survival rate was calculated by the Kaplain-Meier product-limit method. Results: The median imaging follow-up duration for all patients was 10 months (range, 1-80 months). The 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF, with death as a competing risk, were 9.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.5%-16.1%), and the median time to LF was 6 months (range, 3-17 months). The 12-month cumulative incidence rate of DF, with death as a competing risk, was 53% (95% CI, 43%-63%). The median survival time for all patients was 15.6 months. The median survival times for recursive partitioning analysis classes 1, 2, and 3 were 33.8, 13.7, and 9.0 months, respectively (p = 0.022). On multivariate analysis, Karnofsky Performance Status ({>=}80 vs. <80; hazard ratio 0.54; 95% CI 0.31-0.94; p = 0.029) and maximum preoperative tumor diameter (hazard ratio 1.41; 95% CI 1.08-1.85; p = 0.013) were associated with survival. Five patients (5%) required intervention for Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.02 grade 2 and 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Surgery and adjuvant resection cavity SRS yields excellent LC of large brain metastases. Compared with other multimodality treatment options, this approach allows patients to avoid or delay whole-brain irradiation without compromising LC.

  12. Institutional, Retrospective Analysis of 777 Patients With Brain Metastases: Treatment Outcomes and Diagnosis-Specific Prognostic Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, Delphine; Clavier, Jean-Baptiste; Pop, Marius; Schumacher, Catherine; Lefebvre, François; Noël, Georges

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the prognostic factors and survival of a series of 777 patients with brain metastases (BM) from a single institution. Methods and Materials: Patients were treated with surgery followed by whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) or with WBRT alone in 16.3% and 83.7% of the cases, respectively. The patients were RPA (recursive partitioning analysis) class I, II, and III in 11.2%, 69.6%, and 18.4% of the cases, respectively; RPA class II-a, II-b, and II-c in 8.3%, 24.8%, and 66.9% of the cases, respectively; and with GPA (graded prognostic assessment) scores of 0-1.0, 1.5-2.0, 2.5-3.0, and 3.5-4.0 in 35%, 27.5%, 18.2%, and 8.6% of the cases, respectively. Results: The median overall survival (OS) times according to RPA class I, II, and III were 20.1, 5.1, and 1.3 months, respectively (P<.0001); according to RPA class II-a, II-b, II-c: 9.1, 8.9, and 4.0 months, respectively (P<.0001); and according to GPA score 0-1.0, 1.5-2.0, 2.5-3.0, and 3.5-4.0: 2.5, 4.4, 9.0, and 19.1 months, respectively (P<.0001). By multivariate analysis, the favorable independent prognostic factors for survival were as follows: for gastrointestinal tumor, a high Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (P=.0003) and an absence of extracranial metastases (ECM) (P=.003); for kidney cancer, few BM (P=.002); for melanoma, few BM (P=.01), an absence of ECM (P=.002), and few ECM (P=.0002); for lung cancer, age (P=.007), a high KPS (P<.0001), an absence of ECM (P<.0001), few ECM and BM (P<.0001 and P=.0006, respectively), and control of the primary tumor (P=.004); and for breast cancer, age (P=.001), a high KPS (P=.007), control of the primary tumor (P=.05), and few ECM and BM (P=.01 and P=.0002, respectively). The triple-negative subtype was a significant unfavorable factor (P=.007). Conclusion: Prognostic factors varied by pathology. Our analysis confirms the strength of prognostic factors used to determine the GPA score, including the genetic subtype for breast cancer.

  13. Integrated Genomic and Epigenomic Analysis of Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Salhia, Bodour; Kiefer, Jeff; Ross, Julianna T. D.; Metapally, Raghu; Martinez, Rae Anne; Johnson, Kyle N.; DiPerna, Danielle M.; Paquette, Kimberly M.; Jung, Sungwon; Nasser, Sara; Wallstrom, Garrick; Tembe, Waibhav; Baker, Angela; Carpten, John; Resau, Jim; Ryken, Timothy; Sibenaller, Zita; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Berens, Michael E.; Tran, Nhan L.

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a common site of metastatic disease in patients with breast cancer, which has few therapeutic options and dismal outcomes. The purpose of our study was to identify common and rare events that underlie breast cancer brain metastasis. We performed deep genomic profiling, which integrated gene copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation datasets on a collection of breast brain metastases. We identified frequent large chromosomal gains in 1q, 5p, 8q, 11q, and 20q and frequent broad-level deletions involving 8p, 17p, 21p and Xq. Frequently amplified and overexpressed genes included ATAD2, BRAF, DERL1, DNMTRB and NEK2A. The ATM, CRYAB and HSPB2 genes were commonly deleted and underexpressed. Knowledge mining revealed enrichment in cell cycle and G2/M transition pathways, which contained AURKA, AURKB and FOXM1. Using the PAM50 breast cancer intrinsic classifier, Luminal B, Her2+/ER negative, and basal-like tumors were identified as the most commonly represented breast cancer subtypes in our brain metastasis cohort. While overall methylation levels were increased in breast cancer brain metastasis, basal-like brain metastases were associated with significantly lower levels of methylation. Integrating DNA methylation data with gene expression revealed defects in cell migration and adhesion due to hypermethylation and downregulation of PENK, EDN3, and ITGAM. Hypomethylation and upregulation of KRT8 likely affects adhesion and permeability. Genomic and epigenomic profiling of breast brain metastasis has provided insight into the somatic events underlying this disease, which have potential in forming the basis of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:24489661

  14. The histological growth pattern of colorectal cancer liver metastases has prognostic value.

    PubMed

    Van den Eynden, Gert G; Bird, Nigel C; Majeed, Ali W; Van Laere, Steven; Dirix, Luc Y; Vermeulen, Peter B

    2012-08-01

    Little is known about the biological characteristics that determine the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. In previous work we reported three different histological patterns of the tumour-liver interface of CRC liver metastases, termed the pushing, replacement and desmoplastic growth pattern (GP). The purpose of this study was to confirm differences in angiogenic and hypoxic properties of CRC liver metastases with different GPs in a large data set and to study the value of the GP as a prognostic factor. In 205 patients undergoing a resection of CRC liver metastases, the GP of the metastasis was determined using haematoxylin-eosin and Gordon Sweet's silver staining. The tumour cell proliferation fraction (TCP%), endothelial cell proliferation fraction (ECP%) and carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) expression were determined using immunohistochemistry. Standard clinicopathological data and overall survival were recorded. 27.8, 15.6, 34.6 and 17.6 % of liver metastases had a replacement, pushing, desmoplastic and mixed GP, respectively. Analyses of TCP%, ECP% and CA9 expression demonstrated that CRC liver metastases with a replacement GP are non-angiogenic, while the ones with a pushing GP are the most angiogenic with angiogenesis being, at least partially, hypoxia-driven. GP (pushing or not) was the only independent predictor of survival at 2 years. CRC liver metastases grow according to different GP patterns with different angiogenic properties. At 2 years of follow-up a GP with a pushing component was an independent predictor of poor survival, suggesting that the pushing GP is characterized by a more aggressive tumour biology. Further elucidation of the mechanisms and biological pathways involved in and responsible for the differences in GP between CRC liver metastases in different patients might lead to therapeutic agents and strategies taking advantage of this 2 year 'window of opportunity'.

  15. Acetate is a Bioenergetic Substrate for Human Glioblastoma and Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Pichumani, Kumar; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Singh, Dinesh Kumar; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Nannepaga, Suraj; Piccirillo, Sara G.; Kovacs, Zoltan; Foong, Chan; Huang, Zhiguang; Barnett, Samuel; Mickey, Bruce E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Tu, Benjamin P.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas and brain metastases are highly proliferative brain tumors with short survival times. Previously, using 13C-NMR analysis of brain tumors resected from patients during infusion of 13C-glucose, we demonstrated that there is robust oxidation of glucose in the citric acid cycle, yet glucose contributes less than 50% of the carbons to the acetyl-CoA pool. Here we show that primary and metastatic mouse orthotopic brain tumors have the capacity to oxidize [1,2-13C]acetate and can do so simultaneously with [1,6-13C]glucose oxidation. The tumors do not oxidize [U-13C]glutamine. In vivo oxidation of [1,2-13C]acetate was validated in brain tumor patients and was correlated with expression of acetyl-CoA synthetase enzyme 2, ACSS2. Together the data demonstrate a strikingly common metabolic phenotype in diverse brain tumors that includes the ability to oxidize acetate in the citric acid cycle. This adaptation may be important for meeting the high biosynthetic and bioenergetic demands of malignant growth. PMID:25525878

  16. IL-6 Receptor Is a Possible Target against Growth of Metastasized Lung Tumor Cells in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Mami; Yamakawa, Yukiko; Matsunaga, Naoya; Naoe, Satoko; Jodoi, Taishi; Yamafuji, Megumi; Akimoto, Nozomi; Teramoto, Norihiro; Fujita, Kyota; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Iguchi, Haruo

    2013-01-01

    In the animal model of brain metastasis using human lung squamous cell carcinoma-derived cells (HARA-B) inoculated into the left ventricle of the heart of nude mice, metastasized tumor cells and brain resident cells interact with each other. Among them, tumor cells and astrocytes have been reported to stimulate each other, releasing soluble factors from both sides, subsequently promoting tumor growth significantly. Among the receptors for soluble factors released from astrocytes, only IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) on tumor cells was up-regulated during the activation with astrocytes. Application of monoclonal antibody against human IL-6R (tocilizumab) to the activated HARA-B cells, the growth of HARA-B cells stimulated by the conditioned medium of HARA-B/astrocytes was significantly inhibited. Injecting tocilizumab to animal models of brain metastasis starting at three weeks of inoculation of HARA-B cells, two times a week for three weeks, significantly inhibited the size of the metastasized tumor foci. The up-regulated expression of IL-6R on metastasized lung tumor cells was also observed in the tissue from postmortem patients. These results suggest that IL-6R on metastasized lung tumor cells would be a therapeutic target to inhibit the growth of the metastasized lung tumor cells in the brain. PMID:23271367

  17. Whole Brain Radiotherapy With Hippocampal Avoidance and Simultaneous Integrated Boost for 1-3 Brain Metastases: A Feasibility Study Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Fred; Carolan, Hannah; Nichol, Alan; Cao, Fred; Nuraney, Nimet; Lee, Richard; Gete, Ermias; Wong, Frances; Schmuland, Moira; Heran, Manraj; Otto, Karl

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to deliver whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with hippocampal avoidance and a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for one to three brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Ten patients previously treated with stereotactic radiosurgery for one to three brain metastases underwent repeat planning using VMAT. The whole brain prescription dose was 32.25 Gy in 15 fractions, and SIB doses to brain metastases were 63 Gy to lesions >=2.0 cm and 70.8 Gy to lesions <2.0 cm in diameter. The mean dose to the hippocampus was kept at <6 Gy{sub 2}. Plans were optimized for conformity and target coverage while minimizing hippocampal and ocular doses. Plans were evaluated on target coverage, prescription isodose to target volume ratio, conformity number, homogeneity index, and maximum dose to prescription dose ratio. Results: Ten patients had 18 metastases. Mean values for the brain metastases were as follows: conformity number = 0.73 +- 0.10, target coverage = 0.98 +- 0.01, prescription isodose to target volume = 1.34 +- 0.19, maximum dose to prescription dose ratio = 1.09 +- 0.02, and homogeneity index = 0.07 +- 0.02. For the whole brain, the mean target coverage and homogeneity index were 0.960 +- 0.002 and 0.39 +- 0.06, respectively. The mean hippocampal dose was 5.23 +- 0.39 Gy{sub 2}. The mean treatment delivery time was 3.6 min (range, 3.3-4.1 min). Conclusions: VMAT was able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage with conformal hippocampal avoidance and radiosurgical quality dose distributions for one to three brain metastases. The mean delivery time was under 4 min.

  18. Unusual presentation of non-small cell lung cancer with clival metastases: Case report.

    PubMed

    Abu Hijla, Fawzi; Yaser, Sameer; Al-Rabi, Kamal; Al-Ibraheem, Akram; Khzouz, Omar; Al Khairi, Laith; Ghatasheh, Hamza; Al-Oqaily, Ayat; Khader, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old female with unusual presentation of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as she presented with symptoms related to clival bone metastases. This case highlights the unpredictable presentations and the variety of metastatic sites of which metastatic NSCLC could be presented. PMID:27672350

  19. Rare Aggressive Behavior of MDM2-Amplified Retroperitoneal Dedifferentiated Liposarcoma, with Brain, Lung and Subcutaneous Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Ben Salha, Imen; Zaidi, Shane; Noujaim, Jonathan; Miah, Aisha B.; Fisher, Cyril; Jones, Robin L.; Thway, Khin

    2016-01-01

    Dedifferentiated liposarcoma (DDL) is a histologically pleomorphic sarcoma, traditionally defined as well-differentiated liposarcoma with abrupt transition to high grade, non-lipogenic sarcoma. It can occur as part of recurrent well-differentiated liposarcoma, or may arise de novo. DDL most frequently occurs within the retroperitoneum, and while it is prone to local recurrence, it usually has a lower rate of metastasis than other pleomorphic sarcomas. We describe a case of retroperitoneal dedifferentiated liposarcoma in a 63-year-old male, who showed MDM2 amplification with fluorescence in situ hybridization, which displayed unusually aggressive behavior, with brain, lung and subcutaneous soft tissue metastases. As previous reports of metastatic liposarcoma have largely grouped DDL in with other (genetically and clinically distinct) liposarcoma subtypes, we highlight and discuss the rare occurrence of brain metastasis in MDM2-amplified retroperitoneal liposarcoma. PMID:27746879

  20. Five-year survivors of brain metastases: A single-institution report of 32 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Samuel T.; Barnett, Gene H.; Liu, Stephanie W.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Toms, Steven A.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Videtic, Gregory; Suh, John H. . E-mail: suhj@ccf.org

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To report on 32 patients who survived {>=}5 years from brain metastases treated at a single institution. Methods and Materials: The records of 1288 patients diagnosed with brain metastases between 1973 and 1999 were reviewed. Patients were treated with whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), surgery, and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Thirty-two (2.5%) {>=}5-year survivors were identified. Factors contributing to long-term survival were identified. Results: Median survival was 9.3 years for {>=}5-year survivors. Seven of these patients lived {>=}10 years. Female gender was the only patient characteristic that correlated with better survival (p = 0.0369). When these patients were compared with <5-year survivors, age <65 years (p = 0.0044), control of the primary at diagnosis (p = 0.0052), no systemic disease (p = 0.0012), recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 1 (p = 0.0002 with Class 2; p = 0.0022 with Class 3), and single brain metastasis (p = 0.0018) were associated with long-term survival in the univariate logistic regression model. In the multivariate model, RPA Class 1 compared with Class 2 (OR = 0.39, p = 0.0196), surgery (OR = 0.16, p < 0.0001), and SRS (OR = 0.41, p = 0.0188) were associated with long-term survival. Conclusions: For patients with good prognostic factors such as young age, good RPA characteristics and single metastasis, treatment with surgery or SRS offers the best chance for long-term survival.

  1. Intensity-modulated radiosurgery with rapidarc for multiple brain metastases and comparison with static approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiazhu; Pawlicki, Todd; Rice, Roger; Mundt, Arno J.; Sandhu, Ajay; Lawson, Joshua; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2012-04-01

    Rotational RapidArc (RA) and static intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) have been used for brain radiosurgery. This study compares the 2 techniques from beam delivery parameters and dosimetry aspects for multiple brain metastases. Twelve patients with 2-12 brain lesions treated with IMRS were replanned using RA. For each patient, an optimal 2-arc RA plan from several trials was chosen for comparison with IMRS. Homogeneity, conformity, and gradient indexes have been calculated. The mean dose to normal brain and maximal dose to other critical organs were evaluated. It was found that monitor unit (MU) reduction by RA is more pronounced for cases with larger number of brain lesions. The MU-ratio of RA and IMRS is reduced from 104% to 39% when lesions increase from 2 to 12. The dose homogeneities are comparable in both techniques and the conformity and gradient indexes and critical organ doses are higher in RA. Treatment time is greatly reduced by RA in intracranial radiosurgery, because RA uses fewer MUs, fewer beams, and fewer couch angles.

  2. An evaluation of molecular markers for improved detection of breast cancer metastases in sentinel nodes

    PubMed Central

    Abdul‐Rasool, S; Kidson, S H; Panieri, E; Dent, D; Pillay, K; Hanekom, G S

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives In patients with breast cancer (BC), the sentinel node (SN) is the first node in the axillary basin that receives the primary lymphatic flow and can be used to accurately assess the axillary nodal status without removal of the axillary contents. Currently, histology and/or immunohistochemistry are the routine methods of SN analysis. The primary objective of this study was to develop a reproducible reverse transcription (RT) PCR assay, with emphasis on achieving high specificity for accurate detection of BC micrometastases in the SN. To correct for the heterogeneity of BC cells, a multimarker approach was followed, with the further aim of improving the detection rate of the assay. Methods In total, 73 markers were evaluated, of which 7 were breast epithelial markers and 66 were either cancer testis or tumour associated antigens. Twelve BC cell lines and 30 SNs (from 30 patients) were analysed using RT‐PCR to determine the in vitro and in vivo detection rates for each of the markers. In addition, 20 axillary nodes obtained from a patient with brain death were used as controls to optimise the PCR cycle numbers for all the markers. Results Of the 30 SNs, 37% (11/30) were positive on haematoxylin and eosin analysis. Extensive immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses of the haematoxylin and eosin negative nodes confirmed the presence of very small numbers of BC cells in an additional 40% (12/30) of SNs. Molecular analysis with the hMAM‐A alone identified metastases in 70% (21/30) of SNs. Using MAGE‐A3 in combination with hMAM‐A identified metastases in 90% (27/30) of patients. Seven SNs (23%) were negative for micrometastases (with haematoxylin and eosin and IHC) but RT‐PCR positive for either hMAM‐A or MAGE‐A3. Conclusions As IHC analysis resulted in a 77% detection rate compared with 37% for haematoxylin and eosin analysis, we consider that IHC is essential in order not to miss SN micrometastases. Molecular analysis with hMAM‐A and

  3. Role of bone-anabolic agents in the treatment of breast cancer bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Suvannasankha, Attaya; Chirgwin, John M

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal metastases are an incurable complication afflicting the majority of patients who die from advanced breast cancer. They are most often osteolytic, characterized by net bone destruction and suppressed new bone formation. Life expectancy from first diagnosis of breast cancer bone metastases is several years, during which time skeletal-related events - including pain, fracture, hypercalcemia, and spinal cord compression - significantly degrade quality of life. The bone marrow niche can also confer hormonal and chemo-resistance. Most treatments for skeletal metastases target bone-destroying osteoclasts and are palliative. Recent results from the Breast cancer trials of Oral Everolimus-2 trial suggest that agents such as the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus may have efficacy against breast cancer bone metastases in part via stimulating osteoblasts as well as by inhibiting tumor growth. Selective estrogen receptor modulators similarly inhibit growth of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers while having positive effects on the skeleton. This review discusses the future role of bone-anabolic agents for the specific treatment of osteolytic breast cancer metastases. Agents with both anti-tumor and bone-anabolic actions have been tested in the setting of multiple myeloma, a hematological malignancy that causes severe osteolytic bone loss and suppression of osteoblastic new bone formation. Stimulation of osteoblast activity inhibits multiple myeloma growth - a strategy that might decrease breast cancer burden in osteolytic bone metastases. Proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib) inhibit the growth of myeloma directly and are anabolic for bone. Drugs with limited anti-tumor activity but which are anabolic for bone include intermittent parathyroid hormone and antibodies that neutralize the WNT inhibitors DKK1 and sclerostin, as well as the activin A blocker sotatercept and the osteoporosis drug strontium ranelate. Transforming growth

  4. SU-E-T-536: LINAC-Based Single Isocenter Frameless SRT for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B; Zhang, L; Rigor, N; Kim, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Single-isocenter Stereotactic Radiotherapy of multiple brain metastases with Varian 21 IX LINAC, using Aktina Pinpoint system for patient setup. Methods: In 2014, five single-isocenter RapidArc SRT plans were delivered to five patients with 2 to 8 brain metastases using Varian 21 IX. Aktina Pinpoint system was used for setup and 2mm PTV margin were used. CBCT was acquired before and after the beam delivery. The prescription is 2100 cGy in 3 fractions. Eclipse planning system was used for treatment planning. Depending on the number of metastases and their locations, 1 to 5 coplanar or non coplanar arcs were used. Typically, 2 or 3 arcs are used. IMRT QAs were performed by comparing an A1SL ion chamber point dose measurement in solid water phantom to point dose of the plan; also, based on EPID measurement, 3D spatial dose was calculated using DosimetryCheck software package from MathResolutions Inc. The EPID system has an active area of 40cm by 30cm with 1024 by 768 photodiodes, which corresponds to a resolution of 0.4mm by 0.4mm pixel dimension. Results: for all the plans, at least 95% PTV coverage was achieved for full prescription dose, with plan normalization > 75%. RTOG conformity indices are less than 1.1 and Paddick gradient indices are less than 4.5. The distance from prescription IDL to 50% IDL increases as the number of metastases increases, and it ranges from 0.6mm to 0.8mm. Treatment time varies from 10mins to 30mins, depending on the number of arcs and if the arcs are coplanar. IMRT QA shows that the ion chamber measurement agree with the eclipse calculation within 3%, and 95% of the points passed Gamma, using 3% dose difference and 3mm DTA Conclusion: High quality single isocenter RapidArc SRT plan can be optimized and accurately delivered using Eclipse and Varian 21IX.

  5. Treatment sequence of synchronously (liver) metastasized colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Gruenberger, Thomas; Beets, Geerard; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Rougier, Philippe; Cervantes, Andrés; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Figueras, Joan; Gruenberger, Birgit; Haller, Daniel G; Labianca, Roberto; Maleux, Geert; Roth, Arnaud; Ducreux, Michel; Schmiegel, Wolff; Seufferlein, Thomas; Van Cutsem, Eric

    2016-10-01

    No standards for staging, systemic therapy or the timing of an operation are defined for patients newly diagnosed with synchronous metastases and a primary in the colon. An expert group of radiologists, medical, radiation and surgical oncologists therefore came together to discuss staging and treatment sequence for these patients and came up with a recommendation based on current evidence of potential therapeutic options. The discussion was organized to debate recommendations centred on 5 topics and therefore the position paper is built upon these titles and their subtitles. PMID:27375207

  6. Delayed Complications in Patients Surviving at Least 3 Years After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Kawabe, Takuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Sato, Yasunori; Nariai, Tadashi; Barfod, Bierta E.; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about delayed complications after stereotactic radiosurgery in long-surviving patients with brain metastases. We studied the actual incidence and predictors of delayed complications. Patients and Methods: This was an institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study that used our database. Among our consecutive series of 2000 patients with brain metastases who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) from 1991-2008, 167 patients (8.4%, 89 women, 78 men, mean age 62 years [range, 19-88 years]) who survived at least 3 years after GKRS were studied. Results: Among the 167 patients, 17 (10.2%, 18 lesions) experienced delayed complications (mass lesions with or without cyst in 8, cyst alone in 8, edema in 2) occurring 24.0-121.0 months (median, 57.5 months) after GKRS. The actuarial incidences of delayed complications estimated by competing risk analysis were 4.2% and 21.2% at the 60th month and 120th month, respectively, after GKRS. Among various pre-GKRS clinical factors, univariate analysis demonstrated tumor volume-related factors: largest tumor volume (hazard ratio [HR], 1.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.018-1.154; P=.0174) and tumor volume {<=}10 cc vs >10 cc (HR, 4.343; 95% CI, 1.444-12.14; P=.0108) to be the only significant predictors of delayed complications. Univariate analysis revealed no correlations between delayed complications and radiosurgical parameters (ie, radiosurgical doses, conformity and gradient indexes, and brain volumes receiving >5 Gy and >12 Gy). After GKRS, an area of prolonged enhancement at the irradiated lesion was shown to be a possible risk factor for the development of delayed complications (HR, 8.751; 95% CI, 1.785-157.9; P=.0037). Neurosurgical interventions were performed in 13 patients (14 lesions) and mass removal for 6 lesions and Ommaya reservoir placement for the other 8. The results were favorable. Conclusions: Long-term follow-up is crucial for patients with brain metastases

  7. Postoperative Stereotactic Radiosurgery Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: Potential Role of Preoperative Tumor Size

    SciTech Connect

    Hartford, Alan C.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Spire, William J.; Li, Zhongze; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Erkmen, Kadir; Friedman, Jonathan; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Simmons, Nathan E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy following resection of a brain metastasis increases the probability of disease control at the surgical site. We analyzed our experience with postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with an emphasis on identifying factors that might predict intracranial disease control and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed all patients through December 2008, who, after surgical resection, underwent SRS to the tumor bed, deferring WBRT. Multiple factors were analyzed for time to intracranial recurrence (ICR), whether local recurrence (LR) at the surgical bed or “distant” recurrence (DR) in the brain, for time to WBRT, and for OS. Results: A total of 49 lesions in 47 patients were treated with postoperative SRS. With median follow-up of 9.3 months (range, 1.1-61.4 months), local control rates at the resection cavity were 85.5% at 1 year and 66.9% at 2 years. OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 52.5% and 31.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis (preoperative) tumors larger than 3.0 cm exhibited a significantly shorter time to LR. At a cutoff of 2.0 cm, larger tumors resulted in significantly shorter times not only for LR but also for DR, ICR, and salvage WBRT. While multivariate Cox regressions showed preoperative size to be significant for times to DR, ICR, and WBRT, in similar multivariate analysis for OS, only the graded prognostic assessment proved to be significant. However, the number of intracranial metastases at presentation was not significantly associated with OS nor with other outcome variables. Conclusions: Larger tumor size was associated with shorter time to recurrence and with shorter time to salvage WBRT; however, larger tumors were not associated with decrements in OS, suggesting successful salvage. SRS to the tumor bed without WBRT is an effective treatment for resected brain metastases, achieving local control particularly for tumors up to

  8. Molecular and Functional Imaging of Bone Metastases in Breast and Prostate Cancers: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Azad, Gurdip Kaur; Taylor, Benjamin; Rubello, Domenico; Colletti, Patrick M; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to accurately assess the skeleton for metastases in breast and prostate cancers has improved significantly in recent years with hybrid imaging methods. Nevertheless, no consensus has been reached on the best imaging modality for diagnosis and treatment response assessment of skeletal disease. Hybrid SPECT/CT has low false-positive and false-negative rates compared with planar bone scintigraphy (BS) or BS augmented with SPECT in breast and prostate cancers. In breast cancer, 18F-FDG PET is more sensitive and accurate at detecting bone metastases than BS. Currently, little evidence has accrued to support the superiority of 18F-fluoride (18F-NaF) PET in diagnosing osseous metastases or monitoring treatment response in breast cancer when compared with conventional imaging. In prostate cancer, the sensitivities of 18F-NaF PET/CT, 18F-fluorocholine (18F-choline), or 11C-choline PET/CT are equivalent, although 11C-/18F-choline PET/CT scans are more specific. Whole-body MRI, using anatomical sequences complemented by diffusion-weighted MRI, shows early evidence of utility for diagnosis and monitoring therapy response. We review the literature for staging and response assessment in metastatic breast and prostate cancer. While staging accuracy has significantly improved with hybrid imaging, optimal methods for assessing early treatment response have not been determined, and this is an area of active research.

  9. Prevalence and distribution pattern of nodal metastases in advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Cornelia; Bachmann, Robert; Kraemer, Bernhard; Brucker, Sara Yvonne; Staebler, Anette; Fend, Falko; Rothmund, Ralf; Wallwiener, Diethelm

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relevance of pelvic and para-aortic lymph node involvement and the tumour characteristics affecting nodal metastases and survival in primary advanced ovarian cancer. A total of 130 consecutive patients were retrospectively investigated. All the patients received stage-related surgery with pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. The median follow-up was 53.5 months. The clinicopathological parameters and distribution pattern of nodal metastases were evaluated. Lymph node metastases were detectable in 74.62% of the cases. Overall, both pelvic and para-aortic nodes were affected in 35.9% of the patients, whereas 13.3% had metastases only in the pelvic and 13.3% only in the para-aortic lymph nodes. Histological grade 1/2 and 3, serous and endometrioid histology were independent predictors of nodal metastasis. Serous and endometrioid cancers have shown a predilection for metastasis to the pelvic lymph nodes alone, both to the pelvic and the para-aortic nodes, or the para-aortic nodes alone. Overall survival was significantly positively affected by serous histology with positive nodes (P=0.043). It is crucial to investigate the risk factors and metastatic patterns of such patients in a multicenter analysis to evaluate individual subgroups. Prospective studies are required to investigate the prognostic effect of lymphadenectomy in advanced ovarian cancer and its association with histology and distribution pattern of nodal metastasis. PMID:27703680

  10. Characterisation of the triple negative breast cancer phenotype associated with the development of central nervous system metastases

    PubMed Central

    Laimito, Katerin Rojas; Gámez-Pozo, Angelo; Sepúlveda, Juan; Manso, Luis; López-Vacas, Rocío; Pascual, Tomás; Fresno Vara, Juan A; Ciruelos, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Aims Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent tumour in women, representing 20–30% of all malignancies, and continues to be the leading cause of cancer deaths among European women. Triple-negative (TN) BC biological aggressiveness is associated with a higher dissemination rate, with central nervous system (CNS) metastases common. This study aims to elucidate the association between gene expression profiles of PTGS2, HBEGF and ST6GALNAC5 and the development of CNS metastases in TNBC. Methods This is a case-controlled retrospective study comparing patients (pts) with CNS metastases versus patients without them after adjuvant treatment. The selection of the samples was performed including 30 samples in both case and control groups. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples were retrieved from the Hospital 12 de Octubre Biobank. Five 10 µm sections from each FFPE sample were deparaffinised with xylene and washed with ethanol, and the RNA was then extracted with the RecoverAll Kit (Ambion). Gene expression was assessed using TaqMan assays. Results A total of 53 patients were included in the study. The average age was 55 years (range 25–85). About 47 patients (88.67%) had ductal histology and presented high grade (III) tumours (40 patients; 75.47%). Eight women in the case group presented first distant recurrence in the CNS (34.80%), local recurrence (three patients, 13.04%), lungs (two patients; 8.7%), bone (one patient; 4.34%) and other locations (seven patients; 30.38%). In the control group, first distant recurrence occurred locally (six patients; 46.1%), in bone (two patients; 15.4%), lungs (one patient; 7.7%) and other sites (four patients; 23.1%). RNA was successfully obtained from 53 out of 60 samples. PTGS2, HBEGF, and ST6GALNAC5 expression values were not related to metastasis location. Conclusion TN tumours frequently metastasise to the visceral organs, particularly lungs and brain, and are less common in bone. The literature suggests that expression of

  11. [Acute pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice secondary to metastases from lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Belhassen-García, Moncef; Velasco-Tirado, Virginia; Carpio-Pérez, Adela; Soler-Fernández, María Carmen; López-Bernús, Amparo; Pardo-Lledias, Javier; Fuentes-Pardo, Lucía; Iglesias-Gómez, Alicia

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms. The symptoms are due to the cancer itself, its extension, and associated paraneoplastic syndromes. Although biliopancreatic metastases are common, biliopancreatic involvement as the initial symptom of lung cancer--whether as pancreatitis or obstructive jaundice--is rare. We describe our clinical experience, reporting two patients with acute pancreatitis and one patient with obstructive jaundice as the clinical presentation of advanced lung cancer. We also provide a brief review that highlights the absence of guidelines in this situation.

  12. An acute adrenal insufficiency revealing pituitary metastases of lung cancer in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Marmouch, Hela; Arfa, Sondes; Mohamed, Saoussen Cheikh; Slim, Tensim; Khochtali, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Metastases of solid tumors to the pituitary gland are often asymptomatic or appereas as with diabetes insipid us. Pituitary metastases more commonly affect the posterior lobe and the infundibulum than the anterior lobe. The presentation with an acute adrenal insufficiency is a rare event. A 69-year-old men presented with vomiting, low blood pressure and hypoglycemia. Hormonal exploration confirmed a hypopituitarism. Appropriate therapy was initiated urgently. The hypothalamic-pituitary MRI showed a pituitary hypertrophy, a nodular thickening of the pituitary stalk. The chest X Rays revealed pulmonary opacity. Computed tomography scan of the chest showed a multiples tumors with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Bronchoscopy and biopsy demonstrated a pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Hence we concluded to a lung cancer with multiple pituitary and adrenal gland metastases. This case emphasizes the need for an etiological investigation of acute adrenal insufficiency after treatment of acute phase. PMID:27200139

  13. A new macroscopic classification predicts prognosis for patient with liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, K; Hirai, T; Kato, T; Torii, A; Uesaka, K; Morimoto, T; Kodera, Y; Yamamura, Y; Kito, T; Hamajima, N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors defined a new macroscopic classification of liver metastases from colorectal cancer. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: There were different prognostic results after the same operative procedure for liver metastases with similar background factors. METHODS: Eighty-one resected liver metastases were classified into simple nodular (SN) or confluent nodular (CN) types according to the characteristics of the cut surface of the tumor. RESULTS: The 5-year survival rates after hepatectomy were 41.7% for the SN lesions (n = 39) and 23.1% for the CN lesions (n = 42). The difference between the survival curves was statistically significant (p = 0.0307). Multivariate analysis using Cox's proportional hazards model revealed that the macroscopic type (p = 0.023), the tumor diameter (p = 0.0001), and the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0016) were statistically significant independent prognostic factors. CONCLUSION: The new macroscopic classification may be valuable as a prognostic factor reflecting the biologic behavior of liver metastases. Images Figure 1. PMID:9389391

  14. Managing synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer: a multidisciplinary international consensus.

    PubMed

    Adam, René; de Gramont, Aimery; Figueras, Joan; Kokudo, Norihiro; Kunstlinger, Francis; Loyer, Evelyne; Poston, Graeme; Rougier, Philippe; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Sobrero, Alberto; Teh, Catherine; Tejpar, Sabine; Van Cutsem, Eric; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Påhlman, Lars

    2015-11-01

    An international panel of multidisciplinary experts convened to develop recommendations for managing patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and synchronous liver metastases (CRCLM). A modified Delphi method was used. CRCLM is defined as liver metastases detected at or before diagnosis of the primary CRC. Early and late metachronous metastases are defined as those detected ⩽12months and >12months after surgery, respectively. To provide information on potential curability, use of high-quality contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) before chemotherapy is recommended. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly being used preoperatively to aid detection of subcentimetric metastases, and alongside CT in difficult situations. To evaluate operability, radiology should provide information on: nodule size and number, segmental localization and relationship with major vessels, response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, non-tumoral liver condition and anticipated remnant liver volume. Pathological evaluation should assess response to preoperative chemotherapy for both the primary tumour and metastases, and provide information on the tumour, margin size and micrometastases. Although the treatment strategy depends on the clinical scenario, the consensus was for chemotherapy before surgery in most cases. When the primary CRC is asymptomatic, liver surgery may be performed first (reverse approach). When CRCLM are unresectable, the goal of preoperative chemotherapy is to downsize tumours to allow resection. Hepatic resection should not be denied to patients with stable disease after optimal chemotherapy, provided an adequate liver remnant with inflow and outflow preservation remains. All patients with synchronous CRCLM should be evaluated by a hepatobiliary multidisciplinary team.

  15. Brain metastasis from ovarian cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pakneshan, Shabnam; Safarpour, Damoun; Tavassoli, Fattaneh; Jabbari, Bahman

    2014-08-01

    To review the existing literature on brain metastasis (BM) from ovarian cancer and to assess the frequency, anatomical, clinical and paraclinical information and factors associated with prognosis. Ovarian cancer is a rare cause of brain metastasis with a recently reported increasing prevalence. Progressive neurologic disability and poor prognosis is common. A comprehensive review on this subject has not been published previously. This systematic literature search used the Pubmed and Yale library. A total of 66 publications were found, 57 of which were used representing 591 patients with BM from ovarian cancer. The median age of the patients was 54.3 years (range 20-81). A majority of patients (57.3 %) had multiple brain lesions. The location of the lesion was cerebellar (30 %), frontal (20 %), parietal (18 %) and occipital (11 %). Extracranial metastasis was present in 49.8 % of cases involving liver (20.7 %), lung (20.4 %), lymph nodes (12.6 %), bones (6.6 %) and pelvic organs (4.3 %). The most common symptoms were weakness (16 %), seizures (11 %), altered mentality (11 %) visual disturbances (9 %) and dizziness (8 %). The interval from diagnosis of breast cancer to BM ranged from 0 to 133 months (median 24 months) and median survival was 8.2 months. Local radiation, surgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery and medical therapy were used. Factors that significantly increased the survival were younger age at the time of ovarian cancer diagnosis and brain metastasis diagnosis, lower grade of the primary tumor, higher KPS score and multimodality treatment for the brain metastases. Ovarian cancer is a rare cause of brain metastasis. Development of brain metastasis among older patients and lower KPS score correlate with less favorable prognosis. The more prolonged survival after using multimodality treatment for brain metastasis is important due to potential impact on management of brain metastasis in future.

  16. Stereotactic radiosurgery as therapy for melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma brain metastases: Impact of added surgical resection and whole-brain radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ganesh; Klimo, Paul; Thompson, Clinton J.; Samlowski, Wolfram; Wang, Michael; Watson, Gordon; Shrieve, Dennis; Jensen, Randy L. . E-mail: randy.jensen@hsc.utah.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Brain metastases of melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma have traditionally responded poorly to conventional treatments, including surgery and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Several studies have suggested a beneficial effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We evaluated our institutional experience with systematic SRS in patients harboring these 'radioresistant' metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 68 patients with brain metastases from melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma underwent SRS with or without WBRT or surgical resection. All patients had Karnofsky performance scores >70, and SRS was performed before the initiation of systemic therapy. The survival time was calculated from the diagnosis of brain metastases using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Statistical significance was calculated using the log-rank test. Factors influencing survival, including surgical resection, WBRT, gender, number of SRS sessions, and histologic type, were evaluated retrospectively using Cox univariate models. Results: The overall median survival was 427 days (14.2 months), which appears superior to the results obtained with conventional WBRT. The addition of neither surgery nor WBRT to SRS provided a statistically significant increase in survival. Conclusion: Our results suggest that patients undergoing SRS for up to five cerebral metastases from 'radioresistant' tumors (melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma) have survival rates comparable to those in other series of more selected patients. The addition of surgical resection or WBRT did not result in improved survival in our series.

  17. The Effect of Contouring Variability on Dosimetric Parameters for Brain Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Julia; Dunscombe, Peter; Lau, Harold; Burns, Paul; Lim, Gerald; Liu, Hong-Wei; Nordal, Robert; Starreveld, Yves; Valev, Boris; Voroney, Jon-Paul; Spencer, David P.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of contouring variation on stereotactic radiosurgery plan quality metrics for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Fourteen metastases, each contoured by 8 physicians, formed the basis of this study. A template-based dynamic conformal 5-arc dose distribution was developed for each of the 112 contours, and each dose distribution was applied to the 7 other contours in each patient set. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) plan quality metrics and the Paddick conformity index were calculated for each of the 896 combinations of dose distributions and contours. Results: The ratio of largest to smallest contour volume for each metastasis varied from 1.25 to 4.47, with a median value of 1.68 (n=8). The median absolute difference in RTOG conformity index between the value for the reference contour and the values for the alternative contours was 0.35. The variation of the range of conformity index for all contours for a given tumor varied with the tumor size. Conclusions: The high degree of interobserver contouring variation strongly suggests that peer review or consultation should be adopted to standardize tumor volume prescription. Observer confidence was not reflected in contouring consistency. The impact of contouring variability on plan quality metrics, used as criteria for clinical trial protocol compliance, was such that the category of compliance was robust to interobserver effects only 70% of the time.

  18. Fractionated SRT using VMAT and Gamma Knife for brain metastases and gliomas--a planning study.

    PubMed

    Huss, Marie; Barsoum, Pierre; Dodoo, Ernest; Sinclair, Georges; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana

    2015-11-08

    Stereotactic radiosurgery using Gamma Knife (GK) or linear accelerators has been used for decades to treat brain tumors in one fraction. A new positioning system, Extend™, was introduced by Elekta AB for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with GK. Another option for fractionated SRT is advanced planning and delivery using linacs and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). This project aims to assess the performance of GK Extend™ for delivering fractionated SRT by comparing GK treatments plans for brain targets performed using Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) with VMAT treatment plans. Several targets were considered for the planning: simulated metastasis- and glioma-like targets surrounding an organ at risk (OAR), as well as three clinical cases of metastases. Physical parameters such as conformity, gradient index, dose to OARs, and brain volume receiving doses above the threshold associated with risk of damaging healthy tissue, were determined and compared for the treatment plans. The results showed that GK produced better dose distributions for target volumes below 15 cm3, while VMAT results in better dose conformity to the target and lower doses to the OARs in case of fractionated treatments for large or irregular volumes. The volume receiving doses above a threshold associated with increased risk of damage to normal brain tissue was also smaller for VMAT. The GK consistently performed better than VMAT in producing a lower dose-bath to the brain. The above is subjected only to margin-dependent fractionated radiotherapy (CTV/PTV). The results of this study could lead to clinically significant decisions regarding the choice of the radiotherapy technique for brain targets.

  19. ZEB1 Expression in Endometrial Biopsy Predicts Lymph Node Metastases in Patient with Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Gang; Wang, Xiangming; Cao, Xiaozhi; Shen, Lijuan; Zhu, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to analyze the expression of zinc-finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) in endometrial biopsy and its correlation with preoperative characteristics, including lymph node metastases in patient with endometrial cancer. Methods. Using quantitative RT-PCR, ZEB1 expressions in endometrial biopsy from 452 patients were measured. The relationship between ZEB1 expression and preoperative characteristics was analyzed. Results. ZEB1 expressions were significantly associated with subtype, grade, myometrial invasion, and lymph node metastases. Lymph node metastases could be identified with a sensitivity of 57.8% at specificity of 74.1% by ZEB1 expression in endometrial biopsy. Based on combination of preoperative characteristics and ZEB1 expression, lymph node metastases could be identified with a sensitivity of 62.1% at specificity of 96.2% prior to hysterectomy. Conclusion. ZEB1 expression in endometrial biopsy could help physicians to better predict the lymph node metastasis in patients with endometrial cancer prior to hysterectomy. PMID:25544793

  20. Extracellular matrix signatures of human primary metastatic colon cancers and their metastases to liver

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer and the third cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Despite the fact that tumor cell-intrinsic mechanisms controlling colorectal carcinogenesis have been identified, novel prognostic and diagnostic tools as well as novel therapeutic strategies are still needed to monitor and target colon cancer progression. We and others have previously shown, using mouse models, that the extracellular matrix (ECM), a major component of the tumor microenvironment, is an important contributor to tumor progression. In order to identify candidate biomarkers, we sought to define ECM signatures of metastatic colorectal cancers and their metastases to the liver. Methods We have used enrichment of extracellular matrix (ECM) from human patient samples and proteomics to define the ECM composition of primary colon carcinomas and their metastases to liver in comparison with normal colon and liver samples. Results We show that robust signatures of ECM proteins characteristic of each tissue, normal and malignant, can be defined using relatively small samples from small numbers of patients. Comparisons with gene expression data from larger cohorts of patients confirm the association of subsets of the proteins identified by proteomic analysis with tumor progression and metastasis. Conclusions The ECM protein signatures of metastatic primary colon carcinomas and metastases to liver defined in this study, offer promise for development of diagnostic and prognostic signatures of metastatic potential of colon tumors. The ECM proteins defined here represent candidate serological or tissue biomarkers and potential targets for imaging of occult metastases and residual or recurrent tumors and conceivably for therapies. Furthermore, the methods described here can be applied to other tumor types and can be used to investigate other questions such as the role of ECM in resistance to therapy. PMID:25037231

  1. Frameless Image-Guided Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Clinical Outcomes for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Breneman, John C. Steinmetz, Ryan; Smith, Aaron; Lamba, Michael; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: After preclinical investigations confirming the accuracy of target localization by frameless image-guided radiosurgery, we report the clinical outcomes of patients with brain metastases who underwent frameless radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2006, 53 patients underwent frameless stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator equipped with on-board image guidance for the treatment of 158 brain metastases. The radiation doses were delivered in a single fraction (dose range, 12-22 Gy; median, 18). Patients were followed with magnetic resonance imaging scans at 2-3-month intervals. Progression-free survival was the primary study endpoint. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 weeks (range, 14-112), the overall survival rate was 70% at 6 months, 44% at 1 year, 29% at 18 months, and 16% at 24 months. Local control was achieved in 90% of 168 treated lesions at 6 months, 80% at 12 months, 78% at 18 months, and 78% at 24 months. Local control tended to be improved in lesions treated with {>=}18 Gy and for lesions <0.2 cm{sup 3}. Adverse events occurred in 5 patients (9.6%). No evidence of imaging changes on post-stereotactic radiosurgery scans was found to suggest mistargeting of a radiation isocenter. Conclusion: The clinical outcomes after frameless stereotactic radiosurgery were comparable to those after frame-based radiosurgery techniques. Given its significant advantages in terms of patient comfort, ability to use fractionated treatment regimens, and convenience in scheduling of personnel and equipment resources, frameless radiosurgery will likely become a common technique for intracranial radiosurgery.

  2. Portal vein-circulating tumor cells predict liver metastases in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bissolati, Massimiliano; Sandri, Maria Teresa; Burtulo, Giovanni; Zorzino, Laura; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Braga, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients underwent surgical resection often present distant metastases early after surgery. Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been correlated to a worse oncological outcome in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The objective of this pilot study is to investigate the possible prognostic role of CTCs in patients undergoing surgery for pancreatic cancer. In 20 patients undergoing pancreatic resection, 10 mL blood sample was collected intraoperatively from both systemic circulation (SC) and portal vein (PV). Blood sample was analyzed for CTCs with CellSearch® system. All patients underwent an oncologic follow-up for at least 3 years, quarterly. CTCs were detected in nine (45%) patients: five patients had CTCs in PV only, three patients in both SC and PV, and one patient in SC only. CTC-positive and CTC-negative patients were similar for demographics and cancer stage pattern. No significant differences were found in both overall and disease-free survival between CTC-positive and CTC-negative patients. At 3-year follow-up, portal vein CTC-positive patients presented a higher rate of liver metastases than CTC-negative patients (53 vs. 8%, p = 0.038). CTCs were found in 45% of the patients. No correlation between CTCs and survival was found. The presence of CTCs in portal vein has been associated to higher rate of liver metastases after surgery.

  3. Radiographically occult intrasinusoidal liver metastases leading to hepatic failure in a case of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gulia, Seema; Khurana, Sachin; Shet, Tanuja; Gupta, Sudeep

    2016-02-15

    The liver is one of the commonest sites of metastatic involvement in breast cancer, usually evident as focal lesions on imaging tests. Rarely, the pattern of metastatic spread is so diffuse that it remains radiologically occult. Such patients usually present with signs of hepatic insufficiency without any focal lesions on liver imaging. In such cases, liver biopsy is required to make a definitive diagnosis. We report a case of a 56-year-old postmenopausal woman with metastatic breast cancer who presented with subacute progressive liver failure. Repeated imaging of the liver was normal or non-descript. Liver biopsy finally established the diagnosis of intrasinusoidal metastases from breast cancer.

  4. Fractionated Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Large Brain Metastases: A Retrospective, Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Ran; Lee, Jae Meen; Kim, Jin Wook; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jung, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is widely used for brain metastases but has been relatively contraindicated for large lesions (>3 cm). In the present study, we analyzed the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery to treat metastatic brain tumors for which surgical resection were not considered as the primary treatment option. Methods and Materials Thirty-six patients, forty cases were treated with Gamma Knife-based fractionated SRS for three to four consecutive days with the same Leksell frame on their heads. The mean gross tumor volume was 18.3 cm³, and the median dose was 8 Gy at 50% isodose line with 3 fractions for three consecutive days (range, 5 to 11 Gy and 2 to 4 fractions for 2 to 4 consecutive days). Survival rates and prognostic factors were analyzed. Results The overall survival rate at one and two years was 66.7 and 33.1%, respectively. The median survival time was 16.2 months, and the local control rate was 90%. RTOG toxicity grade 1 was observed in 3 (8.3%) patients, grade 2 in 1 (2.7%) patient and grade 3 in 1 (2.7%) patient respectively. Radiation necrosis was developed in 1 (2.7%) patient. KPS scores and control of primary disease resulted in significant differences in survival. Conclusions Our findings suggest that consecutive hypofractionated Gamma Knife SRS could be applied to large metastatic brain tumors with effective tumor control and low toxicity rates. PMID:27661613

  5. Cancer Pain Management and Bone Metastases: An Update for the Clinician

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Guido; Voltz, Raymond; Gaertner, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer patients with bone metastases often suffer from cancer pain. In general, cancer pain treatment is far from being optimal for many patients. To date, morphine remains the gold standard as first-line therapy, but other pure μ agonists such as hydromorphone, fentanyl, or oxycodone can be considered. Transdermal opioids are an important option if the oral route is impossible. Due to its complex pharmacology, methadone should be restricted to patients with difficult pain syndromes. The availability of a fixed combination of oxycodone and naloxone is a promising development for the reduction of opioid induced constipation. Especially bone metastases often result in breakthrough pain episodes. Thus, the provision of an on-demand opioid (e.g., immediate-release morphine or rapid-onset fentanyl) in addition to the baseline (regular) opioid therapy (e.g., sustained-release morphine tablets) is mandatory. Recently, rapid onset fentanyls (buccal or nasal) have been strongly recommended for breakthrough cancer pain due to their fast onset and their shorter duration of action. If available, metamizole is an alternative non-steroid-anti-inflammatory-drug. The indication for bisphosphonates should always be checked early in the disease. In advanced cancer stages, glucocorticoids are an important treatment option. If bone metastases lead to neuropathic pain, coanalgetics (e.g., pregabalin) should be initiated. In localized bone pain, radiotherapy is the gold standard for pain reduction in addition to pharmacologic pain management. In diffuse bone pain radionuclids (such as samarium) can be beneficial. Invasive measures (e.g., neuroaxial blockage) are rarely necessary but are an important option if patients with cancer pain syndromes are refractory to pharmacologic management and radiotherapy as described above. Clinical guidelines agree that cancer pain management in incurable cancer is best provided as part of a multiprofessional palliative care approach and all

  6. Erlotinib Versus Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases in Patients With EGFR-Mutant Lung Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Naamit K.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Rimner, Andreas; Shi, Weiji; Riely, Gregory J.; Beal, Kathryn; Yu, Helena A.; Chan, Timothy A.; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Abraham J.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Radiation therapy (RT) is the principal modality in the treatment of patients with brain metastases (BM). However, given the activity of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the central nervous system, it is uncertain whether upfront brain RT is necessary for patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma with BM. Methods and Materials: Patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma and newly diagnosed BM were identified. Results: 222 patients were identified. Exclusion criteria included prior erlotinib use, presence of a de novo erlotinib resistance mutation, or incomplete data. Of the remaining 110 patients, 63 were treated with erlotinib, 32 with whole brain RT (WBRT), and 15 with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The median overall survival (OS) for the whole cohort was 33 months. There was no significant difference in OS between the WBRT and erlotinib groups (median, 35 vs 26 months; P=.62), whereas patients treated with SRS had a longer OS than did those in the erlotinib group (median, 64 months; P=.004). The median time to intracranial progression was 17 months. There was a longer time to intracranial progression in patients who received WBRT than in those who received erlotinib upfront (median, 24 vs 16 months, P=.04). Patients in the erlotinib or SRS group were more likely to experience intracranial failure as a component of first failure, whereas WBRT patients were more likely to experience failure outside the brain (P=.004). Conclusions: The survival of patients with EGFR-mutant adenocarcinoma with BM is notably long, whether they receive upfront erlotinib or brain RT. We observed longer intracranial control with WBRT, even though the WBRT patients had a higher burden of intracranial disease. Despite the equivalent survival between the WBRT and erlotinib group, this study underscores the role of WBRT in producing durable intracranial control in comparison with a targeted biologic agent with known central nervous system activity.

  7. [Preliminary application of strontium-89 for the treatment of bone metastases from prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiwei; Deng, Houfu; Jie, Peng; Qing, Chun; Zhang, Xiying

    2010-12-01

    Bone metastases are a major problem in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. Despite the use of analgesic for the relief of such pain, the outcomes are not often satisfactory. Strontium-89 (89Sr) is a pure beta-emitting radioisotope to be avidly concentrated in the areas of high osteoblastic activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of 89Sr in the therapy for bone metastases of prostate carcinoma. 116 patients received intravenous injection of 89Sr at the dose of 3mCi (111MBq). All patients underwent physical examination and Karnofsky's Performance Score (KPS) evaluation before and after administration; the analgesic effects were evaluated by scores of pain. The complete response (CR) was defined as scores of pain > 75%; no response (NR) was defined as scores of pain < 25% the remaining was partial response (PR). The changes of bone metastases were screened by CT, MRI and 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy according to the standards of WHO. After the treatment with 89Sr, the total response rate was 80.2%. In the 116 cases, 21 cases (18.1%) displayed complete response and 72 cases (62.1%) displayed partial response, but 23 cases (19.2%) showed no response. The mean score on Karnfsky's performance status (KPS) was 20.0% higher. About 1/3 cases exhibited an obvious decrease in the number of metastases, and some foci disappeared. Thirteen cases (12%) showed a greater decrease in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value. 89Sr chloride is an effective and safe therapy of the bone metastases from prostate cancer.

  8. Dose-Volume Response Relationship for Brain Metastases Treated with Frameless Single-Fraction Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianmin; Yusuf, Mehran B; Dragun, Anthony; Dunlap, Neal; Guan, Timothy; Boling, Warren; Rai, Shesh; Woo, Shiao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to identify a dose-volume response relationship for brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: We reviewed patients who underwent frameless single-fraction linear accelerator SRS for brain metastases between 2007 and 2013 from an institutional database. Proportional hazards modeling was used to identify predictors of outcome. A ratio of maximum lesion dose per mm-diameter (Gy/mm) was constructed to establish a dose-volume relationship. Results: There were 316 metastases evaluated in 121 patients (2 - 33 mm in the largest diameter). The median peripheral dose was 18.0 Gy (range: 10.0 – 24.0 Gy). Local control was 84.8% for all lesions and was affected by location, peripheral dose, maximum dose, and lesion size (p values < 0.050). A dose-volume response relationship was constructed using the maximum dose and lesion size. A unit increase in Gy/mm was associated with decreased local failure (p = 0.005). Local control of 80%, 85%, and 90% corresponded to maximum doses per millimeter of 1.67 Gy/mm, 2.86 Gy/mm, and 4.4 Gy/mm, respectively. Toxicity was uncommon and only 1.0% of lesions developed radionecrosis requiring surgery. Conclusions: For brain metastases less than 3 cm, a dose-volume response relationship exists between maximum radiosurgical dose and lesion size, which is predictive of local control. PMID:27284495

  9. A Case of Gastric Cancer with Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma Components, and Intramural Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Keishiro; Kizaki, Junya; Isobe, Taro; Akagi, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 67 Final Diagnosis: Gastric cancer with neuroendocrine carcinoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Total gastrectomy • splenectomy with D2 lymph node dissection Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Many neuroendocrine carcinomas exhibit medullary infiltration and expanded proliferation. Differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma is frequently seen in the superficial region in many neuroendocrine carcinoma cases. However, the present case showed non-medullary infiltration and signet ring cell carcinoma in the superficial region, with intramural metastases distributed throughout the whole of the stomach. Case Report: A 67-year-old man was referred to our institution for treatment of gastric cancer. Type IIc-like advanced gastric cancer was detected in the greater curvature of the middle body of the stomach. The patient underwent total gastrectomy, splenectomy with D2 lymph node dissection, and Roux-en-Y reconstruction with curative resection. The tumor was diagnosed as a large-cell endocrine carcinoma of the stomach. A solid growth of signet ring cells was seen in the mucosa and submucosa. Intramural metastases were observed in many other depressed lesions. Large-cell carcinoma invaded the submucosa, mainly in the intramural metastatic site. Metastasis to one lesser curvature lymph node was also seen on histological examination. The final diagnosis was a gastric cancer of type 0–IIc (T4a) [M] (with intramural metastases) at T4aN1H0P0M0 Stage IIIA. This patient has remained alive without recurrence for 72 months after surgery. Conclusions: We recommend close preoperative examination of neuroendocrine carcinoma, taking intramural metastases into consideration. PMID:27102318

  10. Preparation of neutron-activatable holmium nanoparticles for the treatment of ovarian cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Di Pasqua, Anthony J; Huckle, James E; Kim, Jin-Ki; Chung, Younjee; Wang, Andrew Z; Jay, Michael; Lu, Xiuling

    2012-04-10

    Nanoparticles containing stable holmium ((165) Ho) are prepared by nanotemplate engineering and subsequently irradiated in a neutron flux to yield (166) Ho, a beta-emitting radiotherapeutic isotope. After intraperitoneal injection to mice bearing SKOV-3 ovarian tumors, significant tumor accumulation of the (166) Ho-nanoparticles is observed by SPECT imaging indicating the potential of these neutron activatable nanoparticles for internal radiation therapy of ovarian cancer metastases.

  11. Pre-irradiation of mouse mammary gland stimulates cancer cell migration and development of lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, G; Bouvette, G; Therriault, H; Bujold, R; Saucier, C; Paquette, B

    2013-01-01

    Background: In most patients with breast cancer, radiotherapy induces inflammation that is characterised by an increase of promigratory factors in healthy tissues surrounding the tumour. However, their role in the emergence of the migration phenotype and formation of metastases is still unclear. Methods: A single mammary gland of BALB/c mice was irradiated with four doses of 6 Gy given at a 24-h interval. After the last session of irradiation, treated and control mammary glands were either collected for quantification of promigratory and proinflammatory factors or were implanted with fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI)-expressing mouse mammary cancer D2A1 cells. The migration of cancer cells in the mammary glands was monitored by optical imaging. On day 21, mammary tumours and lungs were collected for histology analyses and the quantification of metastases. Results: Pre-irradiation of the mammary gland increased by 1.8-fold the migration of cancer cells, by 2-fold the quantity of circulating cancer cells and by 2.4-fold the number of lung metastases. These adverse effects were associated with the induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Conclusion: The emergence of the metastasis phenotype is believed to be associated with the accumulation of mutations in cancer cells. Our results suggest an alternative mechanism based on promigratory factors from irradiated mammary glands. In clinic, the efficiency of radiotherapy could be improved by anti-inflammatory agents that would prevent the stimulation of cancer cell migration induced by radiation. PMID:24002607

  12. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian; Wang Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  13. Transmigration characteristics of breast cancer and melanoma cells through the brain endothelium: Role of Rac and PI3K.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Judit; Fazakas, Csilla; Haskó, János; Sipos, Orsolya; Nagy, Krisztina; Nyúl-Tóth, Ádám; Farkas, Attila E; Végh, Attila G; Váró, György; Galajda, Péter; Krizbai, István A; Wilhelm, Imola

    2016-05-01

    Brain metastases are common and devastating complications of both breast cancer and melanoma. Although mammary carcinoma brain metastases are more frequent than those originating from melanoma, this latter has the highest tropism to the brain. Using static and dynamic in vitro approaches, here we show that melanoma cells have increased adhesion to the brain endothelium in comparison to breast cancer cells. Moreover, melanoma cells can transmigrate more rapidly and in a higher number through brain endothelial monolayers than breast cancer cells. In addition, melanoma cells have increased ability to impair tight junctions of cerebral endothelial cells. We also show that inhibition of Rac or PI3K impedes adhesion of breast cancer cells and melanoma cells to the brain endothelium. In addition, inhibition of Rac or PI3K inhibits the late phase of transmigration of breast cancer cells and the early phase of transmigration of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the Rac inhibitor EHT1864 impairs the junctional integrity of the brain endothelium, while the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 has no damaging effect on interendothelial junctions. We suggest that targeting the PI3K/Akt pathway may represent a novel opportunity in preventing the formation of brain metastases of melanoma and breast cancer.

  14. Polyclonal breast cancer metastases arise from collective dissemination of keratin 14-expressing tumor cell clusters

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Kevin J.; Padmanaban, Veena; Silvestri, Vanesa; Schipper, Koen; Cohen, Joshua D.; Fairchild, Amanda N.; Gorin, Michael A.; Verdone, James E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Bader, Joel S.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic studies challenge the conventional model that each metastasis must arise from a single tumor cell and instead reveal that metastases can be composed of multiple genetically distinct clones. These intriguing observations raise the question: How do polyclonal metastases emerge from the primary tumor? In this study, we used multicolor lineage tracing to demonstrate that polyclonal seeding by cell clusters is a frequent mechanism in a common mouse model of breast cancer, accounting for >90% of metastases. We directly observed multicolored tumor cell clusters across major stages of metastasis, including collective invasion, local dissemination, intravascular emboli, circulating tumor cell clusters, and micrometastases. Experimentally aggregating tumor cells into clusters induced a >15-fold increase in colony formation ex vivo and a >100-fold increase in metastasis formation in vivo. Intriguingly, locally disseminated clusters, circulating tumor cell clusters, and lung micrometastases frequently expressed the epithelial cytoskeletal protein, keratin 14 (K14). RNA-seq analysis revealed that K14+ cells were enriched for desmosome and hemidesmosome adhesion complex genes, and were depleted for MHC class II genes. Depletion of K14 expression abrogated distant metastases and disrupted expression of multiple metastasis effectors, including Tenascin C (Tnc), Jagged1 (Jag1), and Epiregulin (Ereg). Taken together, our findings reveal K14 as a key regulator of metastasis and establish the concept that K14+ epithelial tumor cell clusters disseminate collectively to colonize distant organs. PMID:26831077

  15. Targeting mast cells in gastric cancer with special reference to bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Leporini, Christian; Ammendola, Michele; Marech, Ilaria; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Sacco, Rosario; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Oakley, Caroline; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2015-10-01

    Bone metastases from gastric cancer (GC) are considered a relatively uncommon finding; however, they are related to poorer prognosis. Both primary GC and its metastatic progression rely on angiogenesis. Several lines of evidence from GC patients strongly support the involvement of mast cells (MCs) positive to tryptase (MCPT) in primary gastric tumor angiogenesis. Recently, we analyzed infiltrating MCs and neovascularization in bone tissue metastases from primary GC patients, and observed a significant correlation between infiltrating MCPT and angiogenesis. Such a finding suggested the involvement of peritumoral MCPT by infiltrating surrounding tumor cells, and in bone metastasis angiogenesis from primary GC. Thus, an MCPT-stimulated angiogenic process could support the development of metastases in bone tissue. From this perspective, we aim to review the hypothetical involvement of tumor-infiltrating, peritumoral MCPT in angiogenesis-mediated GC cell growth in the bone microenvironment and in tumor-induced osteoclastic bone resorption. We also focus on the potential use of MCPT targeting agents, such as MCs tryptase inhibitors (gabexate mesylate, nafamostat mesylate) or c-KitR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, masitinib), as possible new anti-angiogenic and anti-resorptive strategies for the treatment of GC patients affected by bone metastases.

  16. Targeting mast cells in gastric cancer with special reference to bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Leporini, Christian; Ammendola, Michele; Marech, Ilaria; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Sacco, Rosario; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Oakley, Caroline; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastases from gastric cancer (GC) are considered a relatively uncommon finding; however, they are related to poorer prognosis. Both primary GC and its metastatic progression rely on angiogenesis. Several lines of evidence from GC patients strongly support the involvement of mast cells (MCs) positive to tryptase (MCPT) in primary gastric tumor angiogenesis. Recently, we analyzed infiltrating MCs and neovascularization in bone tissue metastases from primary GC patients, and observed a significant correlation between infiltrating MCPT and angiogenesis. Such a finding suggested the involvement of peritumoral MCPT by infiltrating surrounding tumor cells, and in bone metastasis angiogenesis from primary GC. Thus, an MCPT-stimulated angiogenic process could support the development of metastases in bone tissue. From this perspective, we aim to review the hypothetical involvement of tumor-infiltrating, peritumoral MCPT in angiogenesis-mediated GC cell growth in the bone microenvironment and in tumor-induced osteoclastic bone resorption. We also focus on the potential use of MCPT targeting agents, such as MCs tryptase inhibitors (gabexate mesylate, nafamostat mesylate) or c-KitR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, masitinib), as possible new anti-angiogenic and anti-resorptive strategies for the treatment of GC patients affected by bone metastases. PMID:26457010

  17. [Stereotactic radiosurgery of abdominal cancer metastases. Report on the first successful extracranial radiosurgical intervention in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Mangel, László; László, Zoltán; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Szappanos, Szabolcs; Lőcsei, Zoltán; Mezősi, Emese; Horváth, Örs Péter; Battyáni, István; Zemplényi, Antal; Földi, István; Kollár, Lajos

    2015-09-27

    Due to the development and increasing effectiveness of novel cancer therapies, the role of local treatments in metastatic diseases have been increasing in the last decades. The aim of the authors was to present the first successful extracranial stereotactic radiosurgical intervention in Hungary. A 58-year-old male patient with gastric adenocarcinoma underwent surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Later, surgical removal of suprarenal gland metastases and first line chemotherapy were carried out. Four years after the first surgery a follow up computed tomographic scan revealed bifocal peritoneal metastases caudally from the edge of the liver and the left kidney with diameters of 2 cm in size. Definitive stereotactic body radiosurgery of 12 Gy single dose was performed using cone beam computed tomography image guidance and intensity modulated arc therapy with two pairs of arcs. The total duration of the procedure was only 25 min and early or late side effects were not observed. Follow up computed tomography scans performed 3 and 7 months after the intervention showed complete regression of the metastases. The authors conclude that stereotactic body radiosurgery can be a safe and effective alternative of metastasis surgery in case of slow growing oligo-metastases.

  18. EGFR and HER2 signaling in breast cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sirkisoon, Sherona R; Carpenter, Richard L; Rimkus, Tadas; Miller, Lance; Metheny-Barlow, Linda; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer occurs in approximately 1 in 8 women and 1 in 37 women with breast cancer succumbed to the disease. Over the past decades, new diagnostic tools and treatments have substantially improved the prognosis of women with local diseases. However, women with metastatic disease still have a dismal prognosis without effective treatments. Among different molecular subtypes of breast cancer, the HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes typically have higher rates of metastasis to the brain. Basal-like metastatic breast tumors frequently express EGFR. Consequently, HER2- and EGFR-targeted therapies are being used in the clinic and/or evaluated in clinical trials for treating breast cancer patients with brain metastases. In this review, we will first provide an overview of the HER2 and EGFR signaling pathways. The roles that EGFR and HER2 play in breast cancer metastasis to the brain will then be discussed. Finally, we will summarize the preclinical and clinical effects of EGFR- and HER2-targeted therapies on breast cancer metastasis.

  19. Challenges relating to solid tumour brain metastases in clinical trials, part 1: patient population, response, and progression. A report from the RANO group.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nancy U; Lee, Eudocia Q; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Barani, Igor J; Baumert, Brigitta G; Brown, Paul D; Camidge, D Ross; Chang, Susan M; Dancey, Janet; Gaspar, Laurie E; Harris, Gordon J; Hodi, F Stephen; Kalkanis, Steven N; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Linskey, Mark E; Macdonald, David R; Margolin, Kim; Mehta, Minesh P; Schiff, David; Soffietti, Riccardo; Suh, John H; van den Bent, Martin J; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Wen, Patrick Y

    2013-09-01

    Therapeutic outcomes for patients with brain metastases need to improve. A critical review of trials specifically addressing brain metastases shows key issues that could prevent acceptance of results by regulatory agencies, including enrolment of heterogeneous groups of patients and varying definitions of clinical endpoints. Considerations specific to disease, modality, and treatment are not consistently addressed. Additionally, the schedule of CNS imaging and consequences of detection of new or progressive brain metastases in trials mainly exploring the extra-CNS activity of systemic drugs are highly variable. The Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) working group is an independent, international, collaborative effort to improve the design of trials in patients with brain tumours. In this two-part series, we review the state of clinical trials of brain metastases and suggest a consensus recommendation for the development of criteria for future clinical trials.

  20. Tumor Bed Dynamics After Surgical Resection of Brain Metastases: Implications for Postoperative Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, Lesley A.; Simmons, Nathan E.; Bellerive, Marc; Erkmen, Kadir; Eskey, Clifford J.; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Hartford, Alan C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze 2 factors that influence timing of radiosurgery after surgical resection of brain metastases: target volume dynamics and intracranial tumor progression in the interval between surgery and cavity stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Three diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were retrospectively analyzed for 41 patients with a total of 43 resected brain metastases: preoperative MRI scan (MRI-1), MRI scan within 24 hours after surgery (MRI-2), and MRI scan for radiosurgery planning, which is generally performed {<=}1 week before SRS (MRI-3). Tumors were contoured on MRI-1 scans, and resection cavities were contoured on MRI-2 and MRI-3 scans. Results: The mean tumor volume before surgery was 14.23 cm{sup 3}, and the mean cavity volume was 8.53 cm{sup 3} immediately after surgery and 8.77 cm{sup 3} before SRS. In the interval between surgery and SRS, 20 cavities (46.5%) were stable in size, defined as a change of {<=}2 cm{sup 3}; 10 cavities (23.3%) collapsed by >2 cm{sup 3}; and 13 cavities (30.2%) increased by >2 cm{sup 3}. The unexpected increase in cavity size was a result of local progression (2 cavities), accumulation of cyst-like fluid or blood (9 cavities), and nonspecific postsurgical changes (2 cavities). Finally, in the interval between surgery and SRS, 5 cavities showed definite local tumor progression, 4 patients had progression elsewhere in the brain, 1 patient had both local progression and progression elsewhere, and 33 patients had stable intracranial disease. Conclusions: In the interval between surgical resection and delivery of SRS, surgical cavities are dynamic in size; however, most cavities do not collapse, and nearly one-third are larger at the time of SRS. These observations support obtaining imaging for radiosurgery planning as close to SRS delivery as possible and suggest that delaying SRS after surgery does not offer the benefit of cavity collapse in most patients. A prospective, multi

  1. EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and HER-2 molecular status in brain metastases from 77 NSCLC patients

    PubMed Central

    Villalva, Claire; Duranton-Tanneur, Valérie; Guilloteau, Karline; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Wager, Michel; Doyen, Jérôme; Levillain, Pierre Marie; Fontaine, Denys; Blons, Hélène; Pedeutour, Florence; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and HER-2 mutations in brain metastases from non-small cell lung carcinomas (BM-NSCLC). A total of 77 samples of BM-NSCLC were included and 19 samples of BM from breast, kidney, and colorectal tumors were also studied as controls. These samples were collected from patients followed between 2008 and 2011 at Poitiers and Nice University Hospitals in France. The frequencies of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and HER-2 mutations in BM-NSCLC were 2.6, 38.5, 0, and 0% respectively. The incidence of KRAS mutation was significantly higher in female and younger patients (P < 0.05). No mutations of the four genes were found in BM from breast or kidney. However, among six BM from colorectal tumors, we identified KRAS mutations in three cases and BRAF mutations in two other cases. This study is the largest analysis on genetic alterations in BM-NSCLC performed to date. Our results suggest a low frequency of EGFR mutations in BM-NSCLC whereas KRAS mutations are as frequent in BM-NSCLC as in primitive NSCLC. These results raise the question of the variability of the brain metastatic potential of NSCLC cells in relation to the mutation pattern. PMID:23930206

  2. Systemic Delivery of an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Decorin for the Treatment of Breast Cancer Bone Metastases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuefeng; Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Hu, Zebin; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R; Guise, Theresa; Yun, Chae-Ok; Brendler, Charles B; Iozzo, Renato V; Seth, Prem

    2015-12-01

    The development of novel therapies for breast cancer bone metastasis is a major unmet medical need. Toward that end, we have constructed an oncolytic adenovirus, Ad.dcn, and a nonreplicating adenovirus, Ad(E1-).dcn, both containing the human decorin gene. Our in vitro studies showed that Ad.dcn produced high levels of viral replication and the decorin protein in the breast tumor cells. Ad(E1-).dcn-mediated decorin expression in MDA-MB-231 cells downregulated the expression of Met, β-catenin, and vascular endothelial growth factor A, all of which are recognized decorin targets and play pivotal roles in the progression of breast tumor growth and metastasis. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited cell migration and induced mitochondrial autophagy in MDA-MB-231 cells. Mice bearing MDA-MB-231-luc skeletal metastases were systemically administered with the viral vectors, and skeletal tumor growth was monitored over time. The results of bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography indicated that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn significantly inhibited the progression of bone metastases. At the terminal time point, histomorphometric analysis, micro-computed tomography, and bone destruction biomarkers showed that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn reduced tumor burden and inhibited bone destruction. A nonreplicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).luc expressing the luciferase 2 gene had no significant effect on inhibiting bone metastases, and in several assays, Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn were better than Ad.luc, a replicating virus expressing the luciferase 2 gene. Our data suggest that adenoviral replication coupled with decorin expression could produce effective antitumor responses in a MDA-MB-231 bone metastasis model of breast cancer. Thus, Ad.dcn could potentially be developed as a candidate gene therapy vector for treating breast cancer bone metastases.

  3. Density of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes correlates with extent of brain edema and overall survival time in patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, Anna S; Fuchs, Elisabeth; Ricken, Gerda; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Bindea, Gabriela; Spanberger, Thomas; Hackl, Monika; Widhalm, Georg; Dieckmann, Karin; Prayer, Daniela; Bilocq, Amelie; Heinzl, Harald; Zielinski, Christoph; Bartsch, Rupert; Birner, Peter; Galon, Jerome; Preusser, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The immune microenvironment of the brain differs from that of other organs and the role of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in brain metastases (BM), one of the most common and devastating complication of cancer, is unclear. We investigated TIL subsets and their prognostic impact in 116 BM specimens using immunohistochemistry for CD3, CD8, CD45RO, FOXP3, PD1 and PD-L1. The Immunoscore was calculated as published previously. Overall, we found TIL infiltration in 115/116 (99.1%) BM specimens. PD-L1 expression was evident in 19/67 (28.4%) BM specimens and showed no correlation with TIL density (p > 0.05). TIL density was not associated with corticosteroid administration (p > 0.05). A significant difference in infiltration density according to TIL subtype was present (p < 0.001; Chi Square); high infiltration was most frequently observed for CD3+ TILs (95/116; 81.9%) and least frequently for PD1+ TILs (18/116; 15.5%; p < 0.001). Highest TIL density was observed in melanoma, followed by renal cell cancer and lung cancer BM (p < 0.001). The density of CD8+ TILs correlated positively with the extent of peritumoral edema seen on pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (p = 0.031). The density of CD3+ (15 vs. 6 mo; p = 0.015), CD8+ (15 vs. 11 mo; p = 0.030) and CD45RO+ TILs (18 vs. 8 mo; p = 0.006) showed a positive correlation with favorable median OS times. Immunoscore showed significant correlation with survival prognosis (27 vs. 10 mo; p < 0.001). The prognostic impact of Immunoscore was independent from established prognostic parameters at multivariable analysis (HR 0.612, p < 0.001). In conclusion, our data indicate that dense TILs infiltrates are common in BM and correlate with the amount of peritumoral brain edema and survival prognosis, thus identifying the immune system as potential biomarker for cancer patients with CNS affection. Further studies are needed to substantiate our findings. PMID:26942067

  4. Targeting Bone Metastases in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    El-Amm, Joelle; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal involvement in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is common and results in significant morbidity and mortality. The interaction of prostate cancer with the bone microenvironment contributes to progression of cancer in the bone leading to skeletal-related events (SREs). Studies aimed at targeting the bone have been carried out over the recent years. Bisphosphonates are synthetic pyrophosphate analogs first investigated for their role in SRE prevention with zoledronic acid as the main bisphosphonate that is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for retardation of skeletal events in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Denosumab is another bone-targeted agent against uncontrolled osteolysis and serves as a RANK ligand inhibitor, superior to zoledronic acid in delaying SREs. Radiopharmaceuticals have played a role in targeting the bone microenvironment mainly in pain palliation in mCRPC utilizing strontium or samarium in the remote past, but only radium-223 is the first radiopharmaceutical that has yielded improvement in overall survival. The combination and sequencing strategies of these agents is the subject of multiple ongoing trials to guide the best use of these emerging agents. PMID:27042152

  5. Targeting Bone Metastases in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    El-Amm, Joelle; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal involvement in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is common and results in significant morbidity and mortality. The interaction of prostate cancer with the bone microenvironment contributes to progression of cancer in the bone leading to skeletal-related events (SREs). Studies aimed at targeting the bone have been carried out over the recent years. Bisphosphonates are synthetic pyrophosphate analogs first investigated for their role in SRE prevention with zoledronic acid as the main bisphosphonate that is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for retardation of skeletal events in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Denosumab is another bone-targeted agent against uncontrolled osteolysis and serves as a RANK ligand inhibitor, superior to zoledronic acid in delaying SREs. Radiopharmaceuticals have played a role in targeting the bone microenvironment mainly in pain palliation in mCRPC utilizing strontium or samarium in the remote past, but only radium-223 is the first radiopharmaceutical that has yielded improvement in overall survival. The combination and sequencing strategies of these agents is the subject of multiple ongoing trials to guide the best use of these emerging agents. PMID:27042152

  6. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter- vs multiple isocenter-based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Algan, Ozer; Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)-based or multiple isocenter (MI)-based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V100. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V95, V99, and D100 were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment.

  7. Extended Survival and Prognostic Factors for Patients With ALK-Rearranged Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Johung, Kimberly L.; Yeh, Norman; Desai, Neil B.; Williams, Terence M.; Lautenschlaeger, Tim; Arvold, Nils D.; Ning, Matthew S.; Attia, Albert; Lovly, Christine M.; Goldberg, Sarah; Beal, Kathryn; Yu, James B.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Camidge, D. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We performed a multi-institutional study to identify prognostic factors and determine outcomes for patients with ALK-rearranged non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and brain metastasis. Patients and Methods A total of 90 patients with brain metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC were identified from six institutions; 84 of 90 patients received radiotherapy to the brain (stereotactic radiosurgery [SRS] or whole-brain radiotherapy [WBRT]), and 86 of 90 received tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. Estimates for overall (OS) and intracranial progression-free survival were determined and clinical prognostic factors were identified by Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results Median OS after development of brain metastases was 49.5 months (95% CI, 29.0 months to not reached), and median intracranial progression-free survival was 11.9 months (95% CI, 10.1 to 18.2 months). Forty-five percent of patients with follow-up had progressive brain metastases at death, and repeated interventions for brain metastases were common. Absence of extracranial metastases, Karnofsky performance score ≥ 90, and no history of TKIs before development of brain metastases were associated with improved survival (P = .003, < .001, and < .001, respectively), whereas a single brain metastasis or initial treatment with SRS versus WBRT were not (P = .633 and .666, respectively). Prognostic factors significant by multivariable analysis were used to describe four patient groups with 2-year OS estimates of 33%, 59%, 76%, and 100%, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion Patients with brain metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with radiotherapy (SRS and/or WBRT) and TKIs have prolonged survival, suggesting that interventions to control intracranial disease are critical. The refinement of prognosis for this molecular subtype of NSCLC identifies a population of patients likely to benefit from first-line SRS, close CNS observation, and treatment of emergent CNS disease. PMID:26438117

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery for 318 brain metastases in a single Australian centre: the impact of histology and other factors.

    PubMed

    Sia, Joseph; Paul, Eldho; Dally, Michael; Ruben, Jeremy

    2015-02-01

    While melanoma brain metastases (BM) are consistently associated with worse survival compared to other histologies, whether they correlate with worse local control (LC) following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is not yet well-defined. In this study of prospectively and retrospectively collected data we investigated the impact of histology and other host, tumour and treatment factors on overall survival (OS) and LC. We analysed 162 patients and 318 BM lesions from various histologies treated with SRS between 2005 and 2011. We included patients who received SRS as first-line treatment, as well as patients who received SRS for residual or recurrent BM following prior surgery, whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) or both. Median OS for the entire cohort was 8.4 months. Median OS for tumour histologies of melanoma, lung and breast cancer were 5.1, 12.2, and 14.7 months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, melanoma predicted for worse OS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.515, p = 0.003) together with performance status (HR 1.662, p < 0.001) and uncontrolled systemic disease (HR 1.755, p = 0.003). Melanoma histology was also negatively predictive for LC (HR 1.828, p = 0.021) together with increasing tumour size (HR 1.038, p = 0.017). Other factors, including the use of WBRT with SRS, the use of planning treatment volume margins, and prescription dose were not significantly predictive for OS and LC. We conclude melanoma histology also portends poorer LC in the SRS setting. While survival depends significantly on the systemic behaviour of the disease, treatment refinements to reduce local failure still merit exploration, especially in the era of targeted therapies.

  9. A Phase I Study of Short-Course Accelerated Whole Brain Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Caravatta, Luciana; Deodato, Francesco; Ferro, Marica; Macchia, Gabriella; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Cilla, Savino; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa; Carrozza, Francesco; Flocco, Mariano; Cantore, Giampaolo; Scapati, Andrea; Buwenge, Milly; and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a SHort-course Accelerated whole brain RadiatiON therapy (SHARON) in the treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 trial in 4 dose-escalation steps was designed: 12 Gy (3 Gy per fraction), 14 Gy (3.5 Gy per fraction), 16 Gy (4 Gy per fraction), and 18 Gy (4.5 Gy per fraction). Eligibility criteria included patients with unfavorable recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class > or =2 with at least 3 brain metastases or metastatic disease in more than 3 organ systems, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the MTD. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any acute toxicity {>=}grade 3, according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Information on the status of the main neurologic symptoms and quality of life were recorded. Results: Characteristics of the 49 enrolled patients were as follows: male/female, 30/19; median age, 66 years (range, 23-83 years). ECOG performance status was <3 in 46 patients (94%). Fourteen patients (29%) were considered to be in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class 3. Grade 1-2 acute neurologic (26.4%) and skin (18.3%) toxicities were recorded. Only 1 patient experienced DLT (neurologic grade 3 acute toxicity). With a median follow-up time of 5 months (range, 1-23 months), no late toxicities have been observed. Three weeks after treatment, 16 of 21 symptomatic patients showed an improvement or resolution of presenting symptoms (overall symptom response rate, 76.2%; confidence interval 0.95: 60.3-95.9%). Conclusions: Short-course accelerated radiation therapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days is tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase 2 study has been planned to evaluate the efficacy on overall survival, symptom control, and quality of life indices.

  10. Brain Radiotherapy plus Concurrent Temozolomide versus Radiotherapy Alone for Patients with Brain Metastases: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Qin, Qin; Sun, Jinglong; Han, Dan; Wang, Zhongtang; Teng, Junjie; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective We performed a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials to compare the efficacy of brain radiotherapy (RT) combined with temozolomide (TMZ) versus RT alone as first-line treatment for brain metastases (BM). Methods Medline, Embase, and Pubmed were used to search for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Two investigators reviewed the abstracts and independently rated the quality of trials and relevant data. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), and adverse events. Results Seven studies were selected from the literature search. RT plus TMZ produced significant improvement in ORR with odds ratio (OR) of 2.27 (95% CI, 1.29 to 4.00; P = 0.005) compared with RT alone. OS and PFS were not significantly different between the two arms (OS: HR, 1.00; P = 0.959; PFS: HR, 0.73; P = 0.232). However, the RT plus TMZ arm was associated with significantly more grade 3 to 4 nausea and thrombocytopenia. Conclusion Concomitant RT and TMZ, compared to RT alone, significantly increases ORR in patients with BM, but yields increased toxicity and fails to demonstrate a survival advantage. PMID:26930609

  11. Evaluation of mini-mental status examination score after gamma knife radiosurgery as the first radiation treatment for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Nakazaki, Kiyoshi; Kano, Hideyuki

    2013-05-01

    This study evaluated the mini-mental status examination (MMSE) scores of patients with brain metastases after gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) without whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Between January 2009 and June 2011, 119 consecutive patients with new brain metastases were treated with a single session of GKS without WBRT. MMSE scores were determined for all patients before GKS and for surviving patients every 3 months after GKS. We evaluated 76 patients (63.9 %) after GKS. The median pre-GKS MMSE score was 28 (range 3-30). The median age, number of brain metastases, and total volume of brain metastases were 65.5 years (range 40-92 years), 2 (range 1-18), and 4.17 ml (range 0.04-27.0 ml), respectively. The median marginal dose was 22.0 Gy (range 14-24 Gy). Thirty-nine patients (51.3 %) developed new distant lesions. The median MMSE follow-up time was 5.8 months (range 0.9-21.6 months). In 16 of 37 patients (43.2 %) with pre-GKS MMSE scores ≤27, the MMSE scores improved by ≥3 points, whereas 15 of all patients (19.7 %) experienced deteriorations of ≥3 points. The incidences of 3-point drops due to new distant lesions and adverse radiation effects were 2.6 and 1.3 %, respectively. The 12-month rate of 3-point drops of the MMSE score due to these 2 causes was 4.2 % (1 of 24 patients). A larger tumor volume was a better prognostic factor for an improvement. GKS has a mild effect on neurocognitive function. Mental deterioration of patients with large symptomatic metastatic tumors tended to improve after GKS.

  12. Na,K-ATPase Isozymes in Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Baker Bechmann, Marc; Rotoli, Deborah; Morales, Manuel; Maeso, María del Carmen; García, María del Pino; Ávila, Julio; Mobasheri, Ali; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to define Na,K-ATPase α and β subunit isoform expression and isozyme composition in colorectal cancer cells and liver metastases. The α1, α3, and β1 isoforms were the most highly expressed in tumor cells and metastases; in the plasma membrane of non-neoplastic cells and mainly in a cytoplasmic location in tumor cells. α1β1 and α3β1 isozymes found in tumor and metastatic cells exhibit the highest and lowest Na+ affinity respectively and the highest K+ affinity. Mesenchymal cell isozymes possess an intermediate Na+ affinity and a low K+ affinity. In cancer, these ions are likely to favor optimal conditions for the function of nuclear enzymes involved in mitosis, especially a high intra-nuclear K+ concentration. A major and striking finding of this study was that in liver, metastasized CRC cells express the α3β1 isozyme. Thus, the α3β1 isozyme could potentially serve as a novel exploratory biomarker of CRC metastatic cells in liver. PMID:26858653

  13. Pharmacologic management of bone-related complications and bone metastases in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, Denise A

    2016-01-01

    There is a high risk for bone loss and skeletal-related events, including bone metastases, in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Both the disease itself and its therapeutic treatments can negatively impact bone, resulting in decreases in bone mineral density and increases in bone loss. These negative effects on the bone can significantly impact morbidity and mortality. Effective management and minimization of bone-related complications in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer remain essential. This review discusses the current understanding of molecular and biological mechanisms involved in bone turnover and metastases, increased risk for bone-related complications from breast cancer and breast cancer therapy, and current and emerging treatment strategies for managing bone metastases and bone turnover in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. PMID:27217795

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of primary tumors and metastases in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, François; Carbuccia, Nadine; Monneur, Audrey; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Goncalves, Anthony; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2016-01-01

    Personalized medicine uses genomic information for selecting therapy in patients with metastatic cancer. An issue is the optimal tissue source (primary tumor or metastasis) for testing. We compared the DNA copy number and mutational profiles of primary breast cancers and paired metastases from 23 patients using whole-genome array-comparative genomic hybridization and next-generation sequencing of 365 “cancer-associated” genes. Primary tumors and metastases harbored copy number alterations (CNAs) and mutations common in breast cancer and showed concordant profiles. The global concordance regarding CNAs was shown by clustering and correlation matrix, which showed that each metastasis correlated more strongly with its paired tumor than with other samples. Genes with recurrent amplifications in breast cancer showed 100% (ERBB2, FGFR1), 96% (CCND1), and 88% (MYC) concordance for the amplified/non-amplified status. Among all samples, 499 mutations were identified, including 39 recurrent (AKT1, ERBB2, PIK3CA, TP53) and 460 non-recurrent variants. The tumors/metastases concordance of variants was 75%, higher for recurrent (92%) than for non-recurrent (73%) variants. Further mutational discordance came from very different variant allele frequencies for some variants. We showed that the chosen targeted therapy in two clinical trials of personalized medicine would be concordant in all but one patient (96%) when based on the molecular profiling of tumor and paired metastasis. Our results suggest that the genotyping of primary tumor may be acceptable to guide systemic treatment if the metastatic sample is not obtainable. However, given the rare but potentially relevant divergences for some actionable driver genes, the profiling of metastatic sample is recommended. PMID:27028851

  15. The detectability of brain metastases using contrast-enhanced spin-echo or gradient-echo images: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Suh, Chong Hyun; Jung, Seung Chai; Kim, Kyung Won; Pyo, Junhee

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to compare the detectability of brain metastases using contrast-enhanced spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GRE) T1-weighted images. The Ovid-MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for studies on the detectability of brain metastases using contrast-enhanced SE or GRE images. The pooled proportions for the detectability of brain metastases were assessed using random-effects modeling. Heterogeneity among studies was determined using χ (2) statistics for the pooled estimates and the inconsistency index, I (2) . To overcome heterogeneity, subgroup analyses according to slice thickness and lesion size were performed. A total of eight eligible studies, which included a sample size of 252 patients and 1413 brain metastases, were included. The detectability of brain metastases using SE images (89.2 %) was higher than using GRE images (81.6 %; adjusted 84.0 %), but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.2385). In subgroup analysis of studies with 1-mm-thick slices and small metastases (<5 mm in diameter), 3-dimensional (3D) SE images demonstrated a higher detectability in comparison to 3D GRE images (93.7 % vs 73.1 % in 1-mm-thick slices; 89.5 % vs 59.4 % for small metastases) (p < 0.0001). Although both SE or GRE images are acceptable for detecting brain metastases, contrast-enhanced 3D SE images using 1-mm-thick slices are preferred for detecting brain metastases, especially small lesions (<5 mm in diameter).

  16. Gain of glucose-independent growth upon metastasis of breast cancer cells to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinyu; Lee, Ho-Jeong; Wu, Xuefeng; Huo, Lei; Kim, Sun-Jin; Xu, Lei; Wang, Yan; He, Junqing; Bollu, Lakshmi Reddy; Gao, Guang; Su, Fei; Briggs, James; Liu, Xiaojing; Melman, Tamar; Asara, John M.; Fidler, Isaiah J.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Locasale, Jason W.; Weihua, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer brain metastasis is resistant to therapy and a particularly poor prognostic feature in patient survival. Altered metabolism is a common feature of cancer cells but little is known as to what metabolic changes benefit breast cancer brain metastases. We found that brain-metastatic breast cancer cells evolved the ability to survive and proliferate independent of glucose due to enhanced gluconeogenesis and oxidations of glutamine and branched chain amino acids, which together sustain the non-oxidative pentose pathway for purine synthesis. Silencing expression of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases (FBPs) in brain metastatic cells reduced their viability and improved the survival of metastasis-bearing immunocompetent hosts. Clinically, we showed that brain metastases from human breast cancer patients expressed higher levels of FBP and glycogen than the corresponding primary tumors. Together, our findings identify a critical metabolic condition required to sustain brain metastasis, and suggest that targeting gluconeogenesis may help eradicate this deadly feature in advanced breast cancer patients. PMID:25511375

  17. The role of tumour markers in predicting skeletal metastases in breast cancer patients with equivocal bone scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Nicolini, A; Ferrari, P; Sagripanti, A; Carpi, A

    1999-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy (BS) is commonly performed in the staging and postoperative monitoring of breast cancer. Nevertheless, due to low specificity it often demonstrates hot spots with equivocal interpretation, which may be misleading in the management of these patients. The aim of this study was to assess the value of a serum tumour marker panel in selecting among the patients with equivocal BS those with bone metastases. Between January 1986 and December 1995, 297 breast cancer patients were followed-up after mastectomy with serial determinations of a CEA-TPA-CA15.3 tumour marker panel, BS and liver echography. The tumour marker panel was used to select patients with equivocal BS for examination of suspicious bone areas by further imaging techniques. Up to December 1995, 158 (53%) patients showed an equivocal BS and 47 patients developed bone metastases. In the 158 patients with equivocal BS, prolonged clinical and imaging follow-up over 45 months (mean; range 12–120) was used to ascertain the presence or absence of bone metastases. In these 158 patients the negative predictive value and positive predictive value of the tumour marker panel to predict bone metastases was 97% and 75% respectively. This study shows that in breast cancer patients the CEA-TPA-CA15.3 tumour marker panel has a high value in selecting those patients with bone metastases, or at high risk of developing clinically-evident bone metastases, among the large number of subjects with equivocal BS. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188888

  18. TGF-β in cancer and bone: implications for treatment of bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Patricia; Guise, Theresa A

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastases are common in patients with advanced breast, prostate and lung cancer. Tumor cells co-opt bone cells to drive a feed-forward cycle which disrupts normal bone remodeling to result in abnormal bone destruction or formation and tumor growth in bone. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a major bone-derived factor, which contributes to this vicious cycle of bone metastasis. TGF-β released from bone matrix during osteoclastic resorption stimulates tumor cells to produce osteolytic factors further increasing bone resorption adjacent to the tumor cells. TGF-β also regulates 1) key components of the metastatic cascade such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis and immunosuppression as well as 2) normal bone remodeling and coupling of bone resorption and formation. Preclinical models demonstrate that blockade of TGF-β signaling is effective to treat and prevent bone metastases as well as to increase bone mass.

  19. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in colorectal cancer liver metastases is associated with vascular structures.

    PubMed

    Illemann, Martin; Eefsen, Rikke Helene Løvendahl; Bird, Nigel Charles; Majeed, Ali; Osterlind, Kell; Laerum, Ole Didrik; Alpízar-Alpízar, Warner; Lund, Ida Katrine; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2016-02-01

    Metastatic growth by colorectal cancer cells in the liver requires the ability of the cancer cells to interact with the new microenvironment. This interaction results in three histological growth patterns of liver metastases: desmoplastic, pushing, and replacement. In primary colorectal cancer several proteases, involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix components, are up-regulated. In liver metastases, their expression is growth pattern dependent. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) is a strong prognostic marker in plasma from colorectal cancer patients, with significant higher levels in patients with metastatic disease. We therefore wanted to determine the expression pattern of TIMP-1 in primary colorectal cancers and their matching liver metastases. TIMP-1 mRNA was primarily seen in α-smooth-muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells. In all primary tumors and liver metastases with desmoplastic growth pattern, TIMP-1 mRNA was primarily found in α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts located at the invasive front. Some α-SMA-positive cells with TIMP-1 mRNA were located adjacent to CD34-positive endothelial cells, identifying them as pericytes. This indicates that TIMP-1 in primary tumors and liver metastases with desmoplastic growth pattern has dual functions; being an MMP-inhibitor at the cancer periphery and involved in tumor-induced angiogenesis in the pericytes. In the liver metastases with pushing or replacement growth patterns, TIMP-1 was primarily expressed by activated hepatic stellate cells at the metastasis/liver parenchyma interface. These cells were located adjacent to CD34-positive endothelial cells, suggesting a function in tumor-induced angiogenesis. We therefore conclude that TIMP-1 expression is growth pattern dependent in colorectal cancer liver metastases.

  20. Axillary metastases from occult breast cancer. Our experience.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Alessandro; Polistena, Andrea; D'Ermo, Giuseppe; Lucchini, Roberta; Triola, Roberta; Conti, Claudia; Avenia, Stefano; Cavallaro, Giuseppe; De Toma, Giorgio; Avenia, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with occult breast cancer who presented with a hard metastatic nodule in the left axilla. Although histology identified a metastatic carcinoma in the lymph nodes, numerous tests failed to detect the primary tumor. Resected lymph node was positive for both estrogen and progesterone receptors, suggesting the breast as the site of the primary tumor. Left modified radical mastectomy was performed. Pathology revealed an invasive lobular carcinoma (2.5 x 2 mm in size) with extensive lymphatic involvement, which strongly expressed both vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) and VEGF-D.

  1. [A Case of Radical Resection of Rectal Cancer with Multiple Liver and Lung Metastases after Preoperative Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinya; Shimizu, Yosuke; Tominaga, Harumi; Kimura, Yuri; Odagiri, Kazuki; Kurokawa, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Megumi; Takahashi, Gen; Sawada, Genta; Moon, JeongHo; Inoue, Masashi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Nakahira, Shin; Hatanaka, Nobutaka

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of radical resection of rectal cancer with multiple liver and lung metastases after preoperative chemotherapy. A 54-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and loss of body weight due to rectal cancer with multiple liver and lung metastases. Therefore, the patient received 14 courses of bevacizumab+mFOLFOX6, and 7 courses of panitumumab+FOLFIRI. After the chemotherapy, the size of the distant metastases reduced by 62% on computed tomography, according to RECIST. Due to the reduction in size, a conversion surgery was attempted. First, an abdominal operation with laparoscopy was performed, and 2 months later an operation to resect the lung metastases via thoracoscopy was performed. Currently, 3 months after surgery, the patient is alive, without recurrence.

  2. [A Case of Colon Cancer with Multiple Liver Metastases Successfully Treated with Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin plus Bevacizumab].

    PubMed

    Suematsu, Yuki; Ishibashi, Yuji; Hiratsuka, Miyuki; Suda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Miyuki; Saito, Hiroyuki; Omori, Keita; Morita, Akihiko; Wakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman was diagnosed with descending colon cancer with multiple liver metastases, and a left hemicolectomy was performed. The patient was treated with capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CapeOX) plus bevacizumab (Bmab). After 5 courses of chemotherapy, the number and size of liver metastases remarkably reduced, and after the 12th course, because of peripheral neuropathy, a "stop-and-go"fashion of administering oxaliplatin (L-OHP) was initiated. After 14 courses, the liver metastases had disappeared. After the 33rd course of L-OHP treatment, the patient started receiving capecitabine therapy. The patient is recurrence-free 3 years after surgery, 14 months after achieving a complete response (CR). We report a case of long-term CR after surgery for descending colon cancer with multiple liver metastases, followed by a "stop-and-go" method of administering L-OHP or CapeOX plus Bmab therapy. PMID:26805277

  3. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  4. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J.; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases. PMID:25981295

  5. Subclassification of Recursive Partitioning Analysis Class II Patients With Brain Metastases Treated Radiosurgically

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Sato, Yasunori; Serizawa, Toru; Kawabe, Takuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nagano, Osamu; Barfod, Bierta E.; Ono, Junichi; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Although the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class is generally used for predicting survival periods of patients with brain metastases (METs), the majority of such patients are Class II and clinical factors vary quite widely within this category. This prompted us to divide RPA Class II patients into three subclasses. Methods and Materials: This was a two-institution, institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study using two databases: the Mito series (2,000 consecutive patients, comprising 787 women and 1,213 men; mean age, 65 years [range, 19-96 years]) and the Chiba series (1,753 patients, comprising 673 female and 1,080 male patients; mean age, 65 years [range, 7-94 years]). Both patient series underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery alone, without whole-brain radiotherapy, for brain METs during the same 10-year period, July 1998 through June 2008. The Cox proportional hazard model with a step-wise selection procedure was used for multivariate analysis. Results: In the Mito series, four factors were identified as favoring longer survival: Karnofsky Performance Status (90% to 100% vs. 70% to 80%), tumor numbers (solitary vs. multiple), primary tumor status (controlled vs. not controlled), and non-brain METs (no vs. yes). This new index is the sum of scores (0 and 1) of these four factors: RPA Class II-a, score of 0 or 1; RPA Class II-b, score of 2; and RPA Class II-c, score of 3 or 4. Next, using the Chiba series, we tested whether our index is valid for a different patient group. This new system showed highly statistically significant differences among subclasses in both the Mito series and the Chiba series (p < 0.001 for all subclasses). In addition, this new index was confirmed to be applicable to Class II patients with four major primary tumor sites, that is, lung, breast, alimentary tract, and urogenital organs. Conclusions: Our new grading system should be considered when designing future clinical trials involving brain MET

  6. BM-16INCREASED ACUTE RADIATION EFFECT (ARE) WITH IPILUMUMAB AND RADIOSURGERY IN PATIENTS WITH MELANOMA BRAIN METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, Leila; Kurtz, Goldie; Zadeh, Gelareh; Laperriere, Normand; Menard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Bernstein, Mark; Kongkham, Paul; Joshua, Anthony; Hogg, David; Butler, Marcus; Chung, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ipilumumab (Ipi), an antibody that enhances T-cell activation, has been shown to improve survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. Ipilumumab may have synergistic effects with radiotherapy but this may result in increased toxicity. This study investigated the incidence of acute radiation effect (ARE) in patients with melanoma brain metastases treated with Ipi and radiosurgery (SRS) or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). METHODOLOGY: This retrospective study included metastatic melanoma patients treated at our institution from 2008-2013 who received SRS or WBRT for brain metastases within 4 months of Ipi treatment. We evaluated the incidence, timing and factors associated with acute radiation effect (ARE). RESULTS: From 159 patients treated with Ipi, 22 patients also received brain RT within 4 months of treatment. Three patients were excluded for lack of follow-up brain imaging, thus 19 were analysed: 14 males and 5 females, with median age 58 years (range 24-82). Ten were treated with SRS, 7 with WBRT, and 2 with SRS plus WBRT. Median dose for SRS was 21 Gy (range: 15-24 Gy). Five of 13 patients treated with SRS (38%) experienced symptomatic edema requiring steroids within 1 month of starting Ipi, and within 4 months of RT. One patient had a haemorrhage and 1 required surgical resection, which demonstrated viable disease. Therefore 3 patients (23%) treated with SRS developed isolated ARE. These metastases had volumes less than 4.2 cm3 and were treated within 4 months of Ipi to a median dose of 19.5 Gy (range 15-21 Gy). No patients with WBRT alone developed ARE. CONCLUSIONS: Following SRS for brain mets and Ipi, ARE was seen in 23% of patients within 4 months of starting Ipi treatment. This is greater than the commonly reported 10% risk of ARE after SRS alone for brain metastasis. No increased toxicity was seen with WBRT and Ipi.

  7. Skeletal metastases and impact of anticancer and bone-targeted agents in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vignani, Francesca; Bertaglia, Valentina; Buttigliero, Consuelo; Tucci, Marcello; Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Di Maio, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Incidence of bone metastases is very high in advanced prostate cancer patients. Bone metastases likely have a significant impact on functional status and quality of life, not only related to pain, but also to the relevant risk of skeletal-related events. A better understanding of mechanisms associated with bone metastatic disease secondary to prostate cancer and more specifically to the cross-talk between tumor cells and bone microenvironment in metastatic progression represented the background for the development of new effective bone-targeted therapies. Furthermore, a better knowledge of biological mechanisms driving disease progression led to significant advances in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer, with the development and approval of new effective drugs. Aim of this review is to outline the physiopathology of bone metastases in prostate cancer and summarize the main results of clinical trials conducted with different drugs to control morbidity induced by skeletal metastases and bone disease progression. For each agent, therapeutic effect on bone metastases has been measured in terms of pain control and/or incidence of skeletal-related events, usually defined as a composite endpoint, including the need for local treatment (radiation therapy or surgery), spinal cord compression, pathological bone fractures. In details, data obtained with chemotherapy (mitoxantrone, docetaxel, cabazitaxel), new generation hormonal agents (abiraterone, enzalutamide), radium-223, bone-targeted agents (zoledronic acid, denosumab) and with several experimental agents (cabozantinib, dasatinib, anti-endothelin and other agents) in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer are reviewed.

  8. Therapeutic nanomedicine for brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Stephany Y; Green, Jordan J

    2013-01-01

    Malignant brain cancer treatment is limited by a number of barriers, including the blood–brain barrier, transport within the brain interstitium, difficulties in delivering therapeutics specifically to tumor cells, the highly invasive quality of gliomas and drug resistance. As a result, the prognosis for patients with high-grade gliomas is poor and has improved little in recent years. Nanomedicine approaches have been developed in the laboratory, with some technologies being translated to the clinic, in order to address these needs. This review discusses the obstacles to effective treatment that are currently faced in the field, as well as various nanomedicine techniques that have been used or are being explored to overcome them, with a focus on liposomal and polymeric nanoparticles. PMID:23738667

  9. Percutaneous Cryoablation of Pulmonary Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yoshikane; Izumi, Yotaro; Kawamura, Masafumi; Nakatsuka, Seishi; Yashiro, Hideki; Tsukada, Norimasa; Inoue, Masanori; Asakura, Keisuke; Nomori, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of cryoablation for metastatic lung tumors from colorectal cancer. Methods The procedures were performed on 24 patients (36–82 years of age, with a median age of 62; 17 male patients, 7 female patients) for 55 metastatic tumors in the lung, during 30 sessions. The procedural safety, local progression free interval, and overall survival were assessed by follow-up computed tomographic scanning performed every 3–4 months. Results The major complications were pneumothorax, 19 sessions (63%), pleural effusion, 21 sessions (70%), transient and self-limiting hemoptysis, 13 sessions (43%) and tract seeding, 1 session (3%). The 1- and 3-year local progression free intervals were 90.8% and 59%, respectively. The 3-years local progression free intervals of tumors ≤15 mm in diameter was 79.8% and that of tumors >15 mm was 28.6% (p = 0.001; log-rank test). The 1- and 3-year overall survival rates were 91% and 59.6%, respectively. Conclusion The results indicated that percutaneous cryoablation is a feasible treatment option. The local progression free interval was satisfactory at least for tumors that were ≤15 mm in diameter. PMID:22096520

  10. Narciclasine as well as other Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyrils are promising GTP-ase targeting agents against brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Van Goietsenoven, Gwendoline; Mathieu, Véronique; Lefranc, Florence; Kornienko, Alexander; Evidente, Antonio; Kiss, Robert

    2013-03-01

    The anticancer activity of Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyrils is well documented. At pharmacological concentrations, that is, approximately 1 μM in vitro and approximately 10 mg/kg in vivo, narciclasine displays marked proapoptotic and cytotoxic activity, as does pancratistatin, and significant in vivo anticancer effects in various experimental models, but it is also associated with severe toxic side effects. At physiological doses, that is, approximately 50 nM in vitro and approximately 1 mg/kg in vivo, narciclasine is not cytotoxic but cytostatic and displays marked anticancer activity in vivo in experimental models of brain cancer (including gliomas and brain metastases), but it is not associated with toxic side effects. The cytostatic activity of narciclasine involves the impairment of actin cytoskeleton organization by targeting GTPases, including RhoA and the elongation factor eEF1A. We have demonstrated that chronic treatments of narciclasine (1 mg/kg) significantly increased the survival of immunodeficient mice orthotopically xenografted with highly invasive human glioblastomas and apoptosis-resistant brain metastases, including melanoma- and non-small-cell-lung cancer- (NSCLC) related brain metastases. Thus, narciclasine is a potentially promising agent for the treatment of primary brain cancers and various brain metastases. To date, efforts to develop synthetic analogs with anticancer properties superior to those of narciclasine have failed; thus, research efforts are now focused on narciclasine prodrugs.

  11. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of prostate cancer with bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Jatinder; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) frequently have metastases to the bone, which may cause pain and lead to a deterioration in quality-of-life. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are agents which, when administered systemically, localize to the site of bone metastases and deliver focal radiation there. In this review, we will summarize the current literature on bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for CRPC, focusing on strontium-89, samarium-153, rhenium-186 and radium-223. We will discuss their indications, clinical efficacy, and toxicities and highlight some of the challenges in optimizing treatment with these agents. Historically, clinical trials with these drugs have failed to demonstrate survival improvements, restricting their use for palliative purposes only. Radium-223 is the first agent in this class to show an overall survival advantage in CRPC patients with bone metastases. This landmark finding will likely have a considerable impact on the treatment paradigm of bone-metastatic CRPC, and will pave the way for further developments in the future. PMID:22521546

  12. KRAS Mutations in Primary Colorectal Cancer Tumors and Related Metastases: A Potential Role in Prediction of Lung Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cejas, Paloma; López-Gómez, Miriam; Aguayo, Cristina; Madero, Rosario; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Barriuso, Jorge; Moreno García, Víctor; Larrauri, Javier; López, Rocío; Casado, Enrique; Gonzalez-Barón, Manuel; Feliu, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Background KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer primary tumors predict resistance to anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and thus represent a true indicator of EGFR pathway activation status. Methodology/Principal Findings KRAS mutations were retrospectively studied using polymerase chain reactions and subsequent sequencing of codons 12 and 13 (exon 2) in 110 patients with metastatic colorectal tumors. These studies were performed using tissue samples from both the primary tumor and their related metastases (93 liver, 84%; 17 lung, 16%). All patients received adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil-based polychemotherapy after resection of metastases. None received anti-EGFR therapy. Mutations in KRAS were observed in 37 (34%) of primary tumors and in 40 (36%) of related metastases, yielding a 94% level of concordance (kappa index 0.86). Patients with primary tumors possessing KRAS mutations had a shorter disease-free survival period after metastasis resection (12.0 vs 18.0 months; P = 0.035) than those who did not. A higher percentage of KRAS mutations was detected in primary tumors of patiens with lung metastases than in patients with liver metastases (59% vs 32%; p = 0.054). To further evaluate this finding we analyzed 120 additional patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer who previously had their primary tumors evaluated for KRAS mutational status for clinical purposes. Separately, the analysis of these 120 patients showed a tendency towards a higher degree of KRAS mutations in primary tumors of patients with lung metastases, although it did not reach statistical significance. Taken together the group of 230 patients showed that KRAS was mutated significantly more often in the primary tumors of patients with lung metastases (57% vs 35%; P = 0.006). Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest a role for KRAS mutations in the propensity of primary colorectal tumors to

  13. Whole-brain radiotherapy with or without efaproxiral for the treatment of brain metastases: Determinants of response and its prognostic value for subsequent survival

    SciTech Connect

    Stea, Baldassarre . E-mail: bstea@azcc.arizona.edu; Suh, John H.; Boyd, Adam P. M.S.; Cagnoni, Pablo J.; Shaw, Edward

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic factors for radiographic response and its prognostic value for subsequent survival in patients undergoing whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Five hundred fifteen eligible patients were randomized in a phase III trial evaluating WBRT and supplemental oxygen with or without efaproxiral, an allosteric modifier of hemoglobin that reduces hemoglobin oxygen-binding affinity and enhances tumor oxygenation, potentially increasing tumor radiosensitivity. Brain images were obtained at baseline and at scheduled follow-up visits after WBRT. Landmark analysis was used to assess the ability of response at selected time points to predict subsequent survival. Logistic regression was used to assess determinants of response at 3 months. Results: Treatment arm, Karnofsky Performance Status, presence or absence of liver metastases, and primary site were all determinants of response at the 3-month follow-up visit, with patients in the efaproxiral arm experiencing a 67% greater odds of response at this visit (p = 0.02). Response at 3 and 6 months was a significant prognostic factor for longer subsequent survival. Conclusions: The 3-month scan is a valuable prognostic factor for subsequent survival in patients with brain metastases treated with WBRT. Patients in the efaproxiral arm had a higher response rate at 3 and 6 months than those in the control arm.

  14. A Simple and Efficient Methodology To Improve Geometric Accuracy in Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery: Implementation in Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Karaiskos, Pantelis; Moutsatsos, Argyris; Pappas, Eleftherios; Georgiou, Evangelos; Roussakis, Arkadios; Torrens, Michael; Seimenis, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To propose, verify, and implement a simple and efficient methodology for the improvement of total geometric accuracy in multiple brain metastases gamma knife (GK) radiation surgery. Methods and Materials: The proposed methodology exploits the directional dependence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-related spatial distortions stemming from background field inhomogeneities, also known as sequence-dependent distortions, with respect to the read-gradient polarity during MRI acquisition. First, an extra MRI pulse sequence is acquired with the same imaging parameters as those used for routine patient imaging, aside from a reversal in the read-gradient polarity. Then, “average” image data are compounded from data acquired from the 2 MRI sequences and are used for treatment planning purposes. The method was applied and verified in a polymer gel phantom irradiated with multiple shots in an extended region of the GK stereotactic space. Its clinical impact in dose delivery accuracy was assessed in 15 patients with a total of 96 relatively small (<2 cm) metastases treated with GK radiation surgery. Results: Phantom study results showed that use of average MR images eliminates the effect of sequence-dependent distortions, leading to a total spatial uncertainty of less than 0.3 mm, attributed mainly to gradient nonlinearities. In brain metastases patients, non-eliminated sequence-dependent distortions lead to target localization uncertainties of up to 1.3 mm (mean: 0.51 ± 0.37 mm) with respect to the corresponding target locations in the “average” MRI series. Due to these uncertainties, a considerable underdosage (5%-32% of the prescription dose) was found in 33% of the studied targets. Conclusions: The proposed methodology is simple and straightforward in its implementation. Regarding multiple brain metastases applications, the suggested approach may substantially improve total GK dose delivery accuracy in smaller, outlying targets.

  15. Evidence-based medical oncology and interventional radiology paradigms for liver-dominant colorectal cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Sag, Alan Alper; Selcukbiricik, Fatih; Mandel, Nil Molinas

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer metastasizes predictably, with liver predominance in most cases. Because liver involvement has been shown to be a major determinant of survival in this population, liver-directed therapies are increasingly considered even in cases where there is (limited) extrahepatic disease. Unfortunately, these patients carry a known risk of recurrence in the liver regardless of initial therapy choice. Therefore, there is a demand for minimally invasive, non-surgical, personalized cancer treatments to preserve quality of life in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of cancer therapy. This report aims to review evidence-based conceptual, pharmacological, and technological paradigm shifts in parenteral and percutaneous treatment strategies as well as forthcoming evidence regarding next-generation systemic, locoregional, and local treatment approaches for this patient population. PMID:27003990

  16. A Simple Scoring System Predicting the Survival Time of Patients with Bone Metastases after RT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Yi; Li, Hui-Fang; Su, Meng; Lin, Rui-Fang; Chen, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Ping; Zou, Chang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to develop a scoring system to predict the survival time of patients with bone metastases after radiation therapy (RT). The scoring system can guide physicians to a better selection of appropriate treatment regimens. Materials and Methods The medical records of 125 patients with bone metastases treated with RT between January 2007 and September 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Fifteen potential prognostic factors were investigated: sex, age, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), type of primary tumor, resection of tumor before bone metastases, interval between primary tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, Carcinoembryonic Antigen(CEA), lung metastases before bone metastases, liver metastases before bone metastases, brain metastases before bone metastases, stage, T, N, M, and degree of cellular differentiation. Results In an univariate analysis, 10 factors were significantly associated with survival time after bone metastasis: sex, KPS, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, interval between tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, CEA, lung metastases before bone metastases, T-staging, and differentiation. In a multivariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be significant: sex, KPS, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, interval between tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, T-staging, and differentiation. The median survival of all patients with bone metastases after RT was 14.1 months. There were significant differences in the median survival of patients with bone metastases after RT of 4.9 months, 10.5 months, and 29.7 months in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusion According to this scoring system, the survival time of patients after bone metastasis can be estimated. PMID:27438606

  17. Tumor repressor protein 53 and steroid hormones provide a new paradigm for ovarian cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; Liu, Zhilin; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Deneke, Victoria; Ren, Yi Athena; Herron, Alan; Richards, JoAnne S

    2014-01-01

    The functional status of the tumor repressor protein (TP53 or TRP53) is a defining feature of ovarian cancer. Mutant or null alleles of TP53 are expressed in greater than 90% of all high-grade serous adenocarcinomas. Wild-type TP53 is elevated in low-grade serous adenocarcinomas in women and in our Pten;Kras;Amhr2-Cre mutant mouse model. Disruption of the Trp53 gene in this mouse model did not lead to high-grade ovarian cancer but did increase expression of estrogen receptor α (ESR1) and markedly enhanced the responsiveness of these cells to estrogen. Specifically, when Trp53-positive and Trp53 null mutant mice were treated with estradiol or vehicle, only the Trp53 null and Esr1-positive tumors respond vigorously to estradiol in vivo and exhibit features characteristic of high-grade type ovarian cancer: invasive growth into the ovarian stroma, rampant metastases to the peritoneal cavity, and nuclear atypia. Estrogen promoted and progesterone suppressed the growth of Trp53 null ovarian tumors and tumor cells injected ip, sc, or when grown in matrigel. Exposure of the Trp53 depleted cells to estrogen also has a profound impact on the tumor microenvironment and immune-related events. These results led to the new paradigm that TRP53 status is related to the susceptibility of transformed ovarian surface epithelial cells to estradiol-induced metastases and nuclear atypia via increased levels of estradiol receptor α.

  18. Photodynamic therapy and fluorescence diagnostics of breast cancer metastases with photosense and alasense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoulovskaya, Elena G.; Shental, Victor V.; Letyagin, Victor P.; Brjezovsky, Vitaly J.; Oumnova, L. V.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.; Philinov, V.; Stranadko, Eugeny P.

    2002-06-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) and fluorescent diagnostics (FD) using photosensitizers Photosense (Aluminium Phtalocyanine, (NIOPIC, Russia)(PS) and Alasense have been provided in 101 patients with breast cancer as a multicenter study. All patients had recurrences of breast cancer (skin metastases) after combined treatment, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. FD of tumor with detecting of subclinical sites, accumulation of PS in tumor, adjacent tissue, skin before and during PDT was fulfilled. Multiple surface irradiations were carried on with interval 24-72 hours (semiconductive laser - (lambda) =672+2nm) in light does 100J/cm2 and total light does 300-900 J/cm2. 2 months after PDT we had overall response rate of 86,87% with complete response (CR) in 51,48% and partial response in 35,39%. During year after PDT in 52 patients with CR we had CR in 36,6% local recurrences in 23,1%, progression (distant (lung or bone) metastasis) in 40,4% of cases. Our experience show pronounced efficacy of PDT for skin metastases of breast cancer.

  19. Lymphatic drainage of the liver and its implications in the management of colorectal cancer liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Lupinacci, Renato Micelli; Paye, François; Coelho, Fabricio Ferreira; Kruger, Jaime Arthur Pirolla; Herman, Paulo

    2014-12-01

    The liver is the most common site of distant metastases in patients with colorectal cancer. Surgery represents the mainstream for curative treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM) with long-term survival up to 58 and 36 % at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Despite advances on diagnosis, staging and surgical strategies, 60-70 % of patients will develop recurrence of the disease even after R0 resection of CRCLM. Tumor staging, prognosis, and therapeutic approaches for cancer are most often based on the extent of involvement of regional lymph nodes (LNs) and, to a lesser extent, on the invasion of regional lymphatic vessels draining the primary tumor. For CRCLM, the presence of intra hepatic lymphatic and blood vascular dissemination has been associated with an increased risk of intra hepatic recurrence, poorer disease-free and overall survival after liver resection. Also, several studies have reviewed the role of surgery in the patient with concomitant CRCLM and liver pedicle LN metastasis. Although pedicle LN involvement is related to worst survival rates, it does not differentiate patients that will relapse from those that will not. This review aims to briefly describe the anatomy of the liver's lymphatic drainage, the incidence of intrahepatic lymphatic invasion and hilar lymph node involvement, as well as their clinical impact in CRCLM. A better understanding of the role of liver lymphatic metastasis might, in the near future, impact the strategy of systemic therapies after liver resection as for primary colorectal tumors.

  20. Analysis of radiation therapy in a model of triple-negative breast cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Smart, DeeDee; Garcia-Glaessner, Alejandra; Palmieri, Diane; Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J; Kramp, Tamalee; Gril, Brunilde; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Lyle, Tiffany; Hua, Emily; Cameron, Heather A; Camphausen, Kevin; Steeg, Patricia S

    2015-10-01

    Most cancer patients with brain metastases are treated with radiation therapy, yet this modality has not yet been meaningfully incorporated into preclinical experimental brain metastasis models. We applied two forms of whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) to the brain-tropic 231-BR experimental brain metastasis model of triple-negative breast cancer. When compared to sham controls, WBRT as 3 Gy × 10 fractions (3 × 10) reduced the number of micrometastases and large metastases by 87.7 and 54.5 %, respectively (both p < 0.01); whereas a single radiation dose of 15 Gy × 1 (15 × 1) was less effective, reducing metastases by 58.4 % (p < 0.01) and 47.1 % (p = 0.41), respectively. Neuroinflammation in the adjacent brain parenchyma was due solely to a reaction from metastases, and not radiotherapy, while adult neurogenesis in brains was adversely affected following both radiation regimens. The nature of radiation resistance was investigated by ex vivo culture of tumor cells that survived initial WBRT ("Surviving" cultures). The Surviving cultures surprisingly demonstrated increased radiosensitivity ex vivo. In contrast, re-injection of Surviving cultures and re-treatment with a 3 × 10 WBRT regimen significantly reduced the number of large and micrometastases that developed in vivo, suggesting a role for the microenvironment. Micrometastases derived from tumor cells surviving initial 3 × 10 WBRT demonstrated a trend toward radioresistance upon repeat treatment (p = 0.09). The data confirm the potency of a fractionated 3 × 10 WBRT regimen and identify the brain microenvironment as a potential determinant of radiation efficacy. The data also nominate the Surviving cultures as a potential new translational model for radiotherapy.

  1. [Radium-223 treatment of bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Jann; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2014-07-21

    The alpha emitter Radium-223 ((22)3Ra-Cl2) is a bone-seeking radionuclide studied as a new treatment for patients with bone metastases from hormone refractory prostate cancer. More than 1,000 patients have been included in clinical phase I-III tests showing significant reduction in alkaline phosphatase- and PSA level and prolonged survival. Adverse events are usually mild to moderate and comprise gastrointestinal and myelotoxic symptoms. Intravenously administered (22)3Ra-Cl2 (half-life 11.4 days) will likely be given every four weeks for six treatments to out-patients.

  2. Spurious thyroid cancer metastasis: saliva contamination artifact in high dose iodine-131 metastases survey

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.M.; Tarver, R.D.; Schauwecker, D.S.; Burt, R.

    1986-05-01

    The use of high dose /sup 131/I for workup of thyroid cancer patients increases the chance of contamination artifact which may mimic metastases. Two elderly male patients with follicular carcinoma of the thyroid had salivary contamination artifacts on metastatic survey scans. These patients received a 1 and 10 mCi dose of /sup 131/I, respectively. The artifacts were recognized only retrospectively when follow-up scans were obtained and compared. The characteristics of contamination artifacts and several methods to confirm these are discussed.

  3. A Rare Cause of Bowel Obstruction: Peritoneal Metastases in Osteosarcoma at the Tibia in a Young Female Patient with Brain Metastasis. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Badiu, Dumitru Cristinel; Manea, Cristina Alexandra; Porojan, Vlad; Paraschiv, Marius; Mehedintu, Claudia; Coman, Ionut Simion; Grigorean, Valentin Titus

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcomas are the most frequent primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Like brain metastases in osteosarcomas, the bowel metastases are very rare. We present the case of a 23-year-old female patient, diagnosed and operated in 2008 of osteosarcoma at the tibia, for which she had sessions of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy, but presented lungs metastases for which she underwent surgery in 2014. Then, in March 2015, she was diagnosed with an intracranial expansive process, an osteosarcoma metastasis, for which a total ablation of the tumor was performed during the early postoperatory period, being transferred to the General Surgery Clinic for abdominal pain, abdominal distention, vomiting, and lack of intestinal transit regarding faeces and intestinal gas. Both clinically and imagistically, the diagnosis was of bowel obstruction. This was the reason for performing surgery, thus discovering a bowel obstruction secondary to a metastasis of the terminal ileum and liver metastases that were confirmed as osteosarcoma metastases from an anatomopathological and immunohistochemical point of view. The bowel metastases and the osteosarcoma brain metastases are very rare entities and, their association, most often with young patients, is exceptional. However, bowel metastases must be taken into account as a possible cause of bowel obstruction in patients with osteosarcoma. PMID:27452942

  4. Durable Clinical Benefit of Pertuzumab in a Young Patient with BRCA2 Mutation and HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancer Involving the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koumarianou, Anna; Kontopoulou, Christina; Kouloulias, Vassilis; Tsionou, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Patients with HER2-positive breast cancer and brain metastases have limited treatment options, and, as a result of their poor performance status and worse prognosis, they are underrepresented in clinical trials. Not surprisingly, these patients may not be fit enough to receive any active treatment and are offered supportive therapy. BRCA2 mutations are reported to be rarely associated with HER2-overexpressing advanced breast cancer and even more rarely with brain metastases at diagnosis. We report on a BRCA2-positive breast cancer patient with metastatic disease in multiple sites, including the brain, and poor performance status who exhibited an extraordinary clinical and imaging response to the novel anti-HER2 therapy pertuzumab after multiple lines of therapy including anti-HER2 targeting. To our knowledge, the clinicopathologic and therapeutic characteristics of this patient point to a unique case and an urgent need for further investigation of pertuzumab in patients with brain metastases. PMID:27195161

  5. Non-invasive assessment of inter-and intrapatient variability of integrin expression in metastasized prostate cancer by PET

    PubMed Central

    Zantl, Niko; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Maurer, Tobias; Watzlowik, Petra; Kessler, Horst; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Krause, Bernd Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Due to the high expression of the integrin αvβ3 not only on endothelial cells, but also on mature osteoclasts and prostate cancer cells, imaging of osseous metastases with αvβ3-targeted tracers seems promising. However, little is known about the patterns of αvβ3-expression in metastasized prostate cancer lesions in-vivo. Thus we evaluated the uptake of the αvβ3-specific PET tracer [18F]Galacto-RGD for assessment of bone metastases in prostate cancer patients. Results [18F]Galacto-RGD PET identified 58/74 bone-lesions (detection rate of 78.4%) and lymph node metastases in 2/5 patients. The SUVmean was 2.12+/−0.94 (range 0.70–4.38; tumor/blood 1.36+/−0.53; tumor/muscle 2.82+/−1.31) in bone-lesions and 2.21+/−1.18 (range 0.75–3.56) in lymph node metastases. Good visualization and detection of bone metastases was feasible due to a low background activity of the surrounding normal bone tissue. Methods 12 patients with known metastasized prostate cancer according to conventional staging (including bone-scintigraphy and contrast-enhanced CT; median PSA 68.63 ng/ml, range 3.72-1935) were examined with PET after i.v.-injection of [18F]Galacto-RGD. Two blinded nuclear-medicine physicians evaluated the PET-scans in consensus concerning lesion detectability. Volumes-of-interest were drawn in the PET-scans over all metastases defined by conventional staging (maximum of 11 lesions/patient), over the left ventricle, liver and muscle and standardized-uptake-values (SUVs) were calculated. Conclusions Our data show generally elevated uptake of [18F]Galacto-RGD in bone metastases from prostate cancer with a marked inter- and intrapatient variability. While [18F]Galacto-RGD PET is inferior to bone scintigraphy for detection of osseous metastases, it might be valuable in patient screening and monitoring of αvβ3-targeted therapies due to the high variability of αvβ3-expression. PMID:27058620

  6. Stereotactic Radiosurgery of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastases: Prospective Evaluation of Target Margin on Tumor Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Given the neurocognitive toxicity associated with whole-brain irradiation (WBRT), approaches to defer or avoid WBRT after surgical resection of brain metastases are desirable. Our initial experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) targeting the resection cavity showed promising results. We examined the outcomes of postoperative resection cavity SRS to determine the effect of adding a 2-mm margin around the resection cavity on local failure (LF) and toxicity. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 120 cavities in 112 patients treated from 1998-2009. Factors associated with LF and distant brain failure (DF) were analyzed using competing risks analysis, with death as a competing risk. The overall survival (OS) rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method; variables associated with OS were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards and log rank tests. Results: The 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF and DF, with death as a competing risk, were 9.5% and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis, expansion of the cavity with a 2-mm margin was associated with decreased LF; the 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF with and without margin were 3% and 16%, respectively (P=.042). The 12-month toxicity rates with and without margin were 3% and 8%, respectively (P=.27). On multivariate analysis, melanoma histology (P=.038) and number of brain metastases (P=.0097) were associated with higher DF. The median OS time was 17 months (range, 2-114 months), with a 12-month OS rate of 62%. Overall, WBRT was avoided in 72% of the patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant SRS targeting the resection cavity of brain metastases results in excellent local control and allows WBRT to be avoided in a majority of patients. A 2-mm margin around the resection cavity improved local control without increasing toxicity compared with our prior technique with no margin.

  7. Early Significant Tumor Volume Reduction After Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Results in Long-Term Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Wook Ha; Kim, Dong Gyu; Han, Jung Ho; Paek, Sun Ha; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Jin Wook; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate survival of patients with brain metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Between 1998 and 2010, 46 patients were treated with radiosurgery, and the total number of lesions was 99. The mean age was 58.9 years (range, 33-78 years). Twenty-six patients (56.5%) had a single brain metastasis. The mean tumor volume was 3.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.01-35.1 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 20.8 Gy (range, 12-25 Gy) at the 50% isodose line. A patient was classified into the good-response group when the sum of the volume of the brain metastases decreased to less than 75% of the original volume at a 1-month follow-up evaluation using MRI. Results: As of December 28, 2010, 39 patients (84.8%) had died, and 7 (15.2%) survived. The overall median survival time was 10.0 {+-} 0.4 months (95% confidence interval, 9.1-10.8). After treatment, local tumor control was achieved in 72 (84.7%) of the 85 tumors assessed using MRI after radiosurgery. The good-response group survived significantly longer than the poor-response group (median survival times of 18.0 and 9.0 months, respectively; p = 0.025). In a multivariate analysis, classification in the good-response group was the only independent prognostic factor for longer survival (p = 0.037; hazard ratio = 0.447; 95% confidence interval, 0.209-0.953). Conclusions: Radiosurgery seems to be an effective treatment modality for patients with brain metastases from RCC. The early significant tumor volume reduction observed after radiosurgery seems to result in long-term survival in RCC patients with brain metastases.

  8. uPA and PAI-1-Related Signaling Pathways Differ between Primary Breast Cancers and Lymph Node Metastases12

    PubMed Central

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Wolff, Claudia; Berg, Daniela; Schuster, Tibor; Walch, Axel; Bronger, Holger; Mannsperger, Heiko; Schmidt, Christian; Korf, Ulrike; Höfler, Heinz; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    The supporting role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in migration and invasion is well known. In addition, both factors are key components in cancer cell-related signaling. However, little information is available for uPA and PAI-1-associated signaling pathways in primary cancers and corresponding lymph node metastases. The aim of this study was to compare the expression of uPA and PAI-1-associated signaling proteins in 52 primary breast cancers and corresponding metastases. Proteins were extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of the primary tumors and metastases. Protein lysates were subsequently analyzed by reverse phase protein array for the expression of members of the PI3K/AKT (FAK, GSK3-β, ILK, pGSK3-β, PI3K, and ROCK) and the MAPK pathways (pp38, pSTAT3, and p38). A solid correlation of uPA expression existed between primary tumors and metastases, whereas PAI-1 expression did not significantly correlate between them. The correlations of uPA and PAI-1 with signaling pathways found in primary tumors did not persist in metastases. Analysis of single molecules revealed that some correlated well between tumors and metastases (FAK, pGSK3-β, ILK, Met, PI3K, ROCK, uPA, p38, and pp38), whereas others did not (PAI-1 and GSK3-β). Whether the expression of a protein correlated between tumor and metastasis or not was independent of the pathway the protein is related to. These findings hint at a complete deregulation of uPA and PAI-1-related signaling in metastases, which might be the reason why uPA and PAI-1 reached clinical relevance only for lymph node-negative breast cancer tissues. PMID:22496926

  9. uPA and PAI-1-Related Signaling Pathways Differ between Primary Breast Cancers and Lymph Node Metastases.

    PubMed

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Wolff, Claudia; Berg, Daniela; Schuster, Tibor; Walch, Axel; Bronger, Holger; Mannsperger, Heiko; Schmidt, Christian; Korf, Ulrike; Höfler, Heinz; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2012-04-01

    The supporting role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in migration and invasion is well known. In addition, both factors are key components in cancer cell-related signaling. However, little information is available for uPA and PAI-1-associated signaling pathways in primary cancers and corresponding lymph node metastases. The aim of this study was to compare the expression of uPA and PAI-1-associated signaling proteins in 52 primary breast cancers and corresponding metastases. Proteins were extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of the primary tumors and metastases. Protein lysates were subsequently analyzed by reverse phase protein array for the expression of members of the PI3K/AKT (FAK, GSK3-β, ILK, pGSK3-β, PI3K, and ROCK) and the MAPK pathways (pp38, pSTAT3, and p38). A solid correlation of uPA expression existed between primary tumors and metastases, whereas PAI-1 expression did not significantly correlate between them. The correlations of uPA and PAI-1 with signaling pathways found in primary tumors did not persist in metastases. Analysis of single molecules revealed that some correlated well between tumors and metastases (FAK, pGSK3-β, ILK, Met, PI3K, ROCK, uPA, p38, and pp38), whereas others did not (PAI-1 and GSK3-β). Whether the expression of a protein correlated between tumor and metastasis or not was independent of the pathway the protein is related to. These findings hint at a complete deregulation of uPA and PAI-1-related signaling in metastases, which might be the reason why uPA and PAI-1 reached clinical relevance only for lymph node-negative breast cancer tissues.

  10. Malignant potential of cells isolated from lymph node or brain metastases of melanoma patients and implications for prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R D; Price, J E; Schackert, G; Itoh, K; Fidler, I J

    1991-04-15

    We studied the correlation between the formation of brain metastasis and the malignant growth potential of seven human melanoma cell lines, isolated from lymph node metastases (A375-SM, TXM-1, DM-4) or from brain metastases (TXM-13, TXM-18, TXM-34, TXM-40), and the potential of three variants of the mouse K-1735 melanoma. Growth rates in different concentrations of fetal bovine serum and colony-forming efficiency in semisolid agarose were measured, and the tumorigenicity and metastatic ability were determined in nude mice (for the human melanoma cell lines) or in C3H/HeN mice (for the K-1735 variants). The ability to form brain metastasis was tested by injection of cells into the carotid artery. A high colony-forming efficiency in agarose, especially at concentrations of agarose greater than 0.6%, corresponded with high tumor take rates, rapid tumor growth rates, and metastatic colonization of the lungs of the recipient mice. For the human melanomas, the lymph node metastasis-derived cells were more tumorigenic and metastatic than the brain metastasis-derived cells. In the K-1735 mouse melanoma, the tumorigenic and metastatic behavior of the cells after i.v. and s.c. injection corresponded with growth in agarose cultures. However, for growth in the brain after intracarotid injection, the different melanoma cell lines showed similar frequencies of tumor take, regardless of tumorigenicity in other sites of the recipient mice, although mice given injections of brain metastasis-derived cells survived longer than mice given injections of lymph node metastasis (human melanoma) or lung metastasis (K-1735 M-2)-derived cell lines. The results from the human and mouse melanoma cell lines show that the brain metastasis-derived cell lines were not more malignant than the lymph node or lung metastasis-derived cells. These data imply that the production of brain metastasis is not always the final stage of a metastatic cascade. PMID:1826230

  11. Radiogallium Complex-Conjugated Bifunctional Peptides for Detecting Primary Cancer and Bone Metastases Simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Yu, Jing; Ishizaki, Atsushi; Yokokawa, Masaru; Kitamura, Masanori; Kitamura, Yoji; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2015-08-19

    (68)Ga (T(1/2) = 68 min, a generator-produced nuclide) is an interesting radionuclide for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Recently, it was reported that radiogallium-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated (Asp)n peptide [Ga-DOTA-(Asp)n] has great potential for bone metastases imaging. In the current study, a compound containing an aspartic acid peptide linker (D11) as a carrier to bone metastases, an RGD peptide [c(RGDfK) peptide] as a carrier to the primary cancer, and Ga-DOTA as a stable radiometal complex for imaging in one molecule, Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK), was designed, prepared, and evaluated to detect both the primary cancer and bone metastases simultaneously using (67)Ga, which is easy to handle. After DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) was synthesized using Fmoc-based solid-phase methodology, (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) was prepared by complexing DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) with (67)Ga. Hydroxyapatite binding assays, integrin binding assays, biodistribution experiments, and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging using tumor-bearing mice were performed using (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK). (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) was prepared with a radiochemical purity of >97%. In vitro, (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) had a high affinity for hydroxyapatite and αvβ3 integrin. In vivo, (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) exhibited high uptake in bone and tumor. The accumulation of (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) in tumor decreased when it was co-injected with c(RGDfK) peptide. (68)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) has great potential as a PET tracer for the diagnosis of both the primary cancer and bone metastases simultaneously. PMID:26087328

  12. Stat3 orchestrates interaction between endothelial and tumor cells and inhibition of Stat3 suppresses brain metastasis of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsueh-Te; Xue, Jianfei; Chou, Ping-Chieh; Zhou, Aidong; Yang, Phillip; Conrad, Charles A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Priebe, Waldemar; Patterson, Cam; Sawaya, Raymond; Xie, Keping; Huang, Suyun

    2015-04-30

    Brain metastasis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with breast cancer. Our previous studies indicated that Stat3 plays an important role in brain metastasis. Here, we present evidence that Stat3 functions at the level of the microenvironment of brain metastases. Stat3 controlled constitutive and inducible VEGFR2 expression in tumor-associated brain endothelial cells. Furthermore, inhibition of Stat3 by WP1066 decreased the incidence of brain metastases and increased survival in a preclinical model of breast cancer brain metastasis. WP1066 inhibited Stat3 activation in tumor-associated endothelial cells, reducing their infiltration and angiogenesis. WP1066 also inhibited breast cancer cell invasion. Our results indicate that WP1066 can inhibit tumor angiogenesis and brain metastasis mediated by Stat3 in endothelial and tumor cells.

  13. A Matched-Pair Analysis Comparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy Plus Stereotactic Radiosurgery Versus Surgery Plus Whole-Brain Radiotherapy and a Boost to the Metastatic Site for One or Two Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kueter, Jan-Dirk; Pluemer, Andre; Veninga, Theo; Schild, Steven E.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To compare the results of whole-brain radiotherapy plus stereotactic radiosurgery (WBRT+SRS) with those of surgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy and a boost to the metastatic site (OP+WBRT+boost) for patients with one or two brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Survival, intracerebral control, and local control of the treated metastases were retrospectively evaluated. To reduce the risk of selection bias, a matched-pair analysis was performed. The outcomes of 47 patients who received WBRT+SRS were compared with those of a second cohort of 47 patients who received OP+WBRT+boost. The two treatment groups were matched for the following potential prognostic factors: WBRT schedule, age, gender, performance status, tumor type, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, recursive partitioning analysis class, and interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT. Results: The 1-year survival rates were 65% after WBRT+SRS and 63% after OP+WBRT+boost (p = 0.19). The 1-year intracerebral control rates were 70% and 78% (p = 0.39), respectively. The 1-year local control rates were 84% and 83% (p = 0.87), respectively. On multivariate analyses, improved survival was significantly associated with better performance status (p = 0.009), no extracerebral metastases (p = 0.004), recursive partitioning analysis Class 1 (p = 0.004), and interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT (p = 0.001). Intracerebral control was not significantly associated with any of the potential prognostic factors. Improved local control was significantly associated with no extracerebral metastases (p = 0.037). Conclusions: Treatment outcomes were not significantly different after WBRT+SRS compared with OP+WBRT+boost. However, WBRT+SRS is less invasive than OP+WBRT+boost and may be preferable for patients with one or two brain metastases. The results should be confirmed by randomized t0011ria.

  14. Somatic mutation profiles in primary colorectal cancers and matching ovarian metastases: Identification of driver and passenger mutations

    PubMed Central

    Crobach, Stijn; Ruano, Dina; van Eijk, Ronald; Schrumpf, Melanie; Fleuren, Gertjan; van Wezel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mutational profiles of primary colorectal cancers (CRCs) and corresponding ovarian metastases were compared. Using a custom‐made next generation sequencing panel, 115 cancer‐driving genes were analyzed in a cohort of 26 primary CRCs and 30 matching ovarian metastases (four with bilateral metastases). To obtain a complete overview of the mutational profile, low thresholds were used in bioinformatics analysis to prevent low frequency passenger mutations from being filtered out. A subset of variants was validated using Sanger and/or hydrolysis probe assays. The mutational landscape of CRC that metastasized to the ovary was not strikingly different from CRC in consecutive series. When comparing primary CRCs and their matching ovarian metastases, there was considerable overlap in the mutations of early affected genes. A subset of mutations demonstrated less overlap, presumably being passenger mutations. In particular, primary CRCs showed a substantially high number of passenger mutations. We also compared the primary CRCs and matching metastases for stratifying variants of six genes (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, FBXW7, PTEN and PIK3CA) that select for established (EGFR directed) or future targeted therapies. In a total of 31 variants 12 were not found in either of the two locations. Tumours thus differed in the number of discordant variants between the primary tumours and matching metastases. Half of these discordant variants were definitive class 4/5 pathogenic variants. However, in terms of temporal heterogeneity, no clear relationship was observed between the number of discordant variants and the time interval between primary CRCs and the detection of ovarian metastases. This suggests that dormant metastases may be present from the early days of the primary tumours. PMID:27499925

  15. Core Needle Biopsy of Breast Cancer Tumors Increases Distant Metastases in a Mouse Model12

    PubMed Central

    Mathenge, Edward Gitau; Dean, Cheryl Ann; Clements, Derek; Vaghar-Kashani, Ahmad; Photopoulos, Steffany; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Giacomantonio, Michael; Malueth, Benjamin; Nunokawa, Anna; Jordan, Julie; Lewis, John D.; Gujar, Shashi Ashok; Marcato, Paola; Lee, Patrick W.K.; Giacomantonio, Carman Anthony

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Incisional biopsies, including the diagnostic core needle biopsy (CNB), routinely performed before surgical excision of breast cancer tumors are hypothesized to increase the risk of metastatic disease. In this study, we experimentally determined whether CNB of breast cancer tumors results in increased distant metastases and examine important resultant changes in the primary tumor and tumor microenvironment associated with this outcome. METHOD: To evaluate the effect of CNB on metastasis development, we implanted murine mammary 4T1 tumor cells in BALB/c mice and performed CNB on palpable tumors in half the mice. Subsequently, emulating the human scenario, all mice underwent complete tumor excision and were allowed to recover, with attendant metastasis development. Tumor growth, lung metastasis, circulating tumor cell (CTC) levels, variation in gene expression, composition of the tumor microenvironment, and changes in immunologic markers were compared in biopsied and non-biopsied mice. RESULTS: Mice with biopsied tumors developed significantly more lung metastases compared to non-biopsied mice. Tumors from biopsied mice contained a higher frequency of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accompanied by reduced CD4 + T cells, CD8 + T cells, and macrophages, suggesting biopsy-mediated development of an increasingly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We also observed a CNB-dependent up-regulation in the expression of SOX4, Ezh2, and other key epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) genes, as well as increased CTC levels among the biopsy group. CONCLUSION: CNB creates an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, increases EMT, and facilitates release of CTCs, all of which likely contribute to the observed increase in development of distant metastases. PMID:25425969

  16. Nottingham prognostic index plus (NPI+) predicts risk of distant metastases in primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Green, Andrew R; Soria, D; Powe, D G; Nolan, C C; Aleskandarany, M; Szász, M A; Tőkés, A M; Ball, G R; Garibaldi, J M; Rakha, E A; Kulka, J; Ellis, I O

    2016-05-01

    The Nottingham prognostic index plus (NPI+) is based on the assessment of biological class combined with established clinicopathologic prognostic variables providing improved patient outcome stratification for breast cancer superior to the traditional NPI. This study aimed to determine prognostic capability of the NPI+ in predicting risk of development of distant disease. A well-characterised series of 1073 primary early-stage BC cases treated in Nottingham and 251 cases from Budapest were immunohistochemically assessed for cytokeratin (Ck)5/6, Ck18, EGFR, oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, HER2, HER3, HER4, Mucin 1 and p53 expression. NPI+ biological class and prognostic scores were assigned using individual algorithms for each biological class incorporating clinicopathologic parameters and investigated in terms of prediction of distant metastases-free survival (MFS). The NPI+ identified distinct prognostic groups (PG) within each molecular class which were predictive of MFS providing improved patient outcome stratification superior to the traditional NPI. NPI+ PGs, between series, were comparable in predicting patient outcome between series in luminal A, basal p53 altered and HER2+/ER+ (p > 0.01) tumours. The low-risk groups were similarly validated in luminal B, luminal N, basal p53 normal tumours (p > 0.01). Due to small patient numbers the remaining PGs could not be validated. NPI+ was additionally able to predict a higher risk of metastases at certain distant sites. This study may indicate the NPI+ as a useful tool in predicting the risk of metastases. The NPI+ provides accurate risk stratification allowing improved individualised clinical decision making for breast cancer. PMID:27116185

  17. POTENTIAL USE OF RECOMBINANT HUMAN THYROTROPIN IN THE TREATMENT OF DISTANT METASTASES IN PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Klubo-Guriezdzinska, Joanna; Burman, Kenneth D.; Van Nostrand, Douglas; Mete, Mihriye; Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Objective In order to effectively treat differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with radioiodine (RAI) it is necessary to raise serum TSH levels either endogenously by thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) or exogenously by administration of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). The goal of this review is to present current data on the relative efficacy and side effects profile of rhTSH-aided versus THW-aided RAI therapy for the treatment of patients with distant metastases of DTC. Methods We have searched the PubMed database for articles including the keywords “rhTSH”, “thyroid cancer”, and “distant metastases” published between January 1, 1996 and January 7, 2012. As references, we used clinical case series, case reports, review articles, and practical guidelines. Results Exogenous stimulation of TSH is associated with better quality of life because it obviates signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism resulting from endogenous TSH stimulation. The rate of neurological complications after rhTSH and THW-aided RAI therapy for brain and spine metastases is similar. The rate of leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, xerostomia, and pulmonary fibrosis is similar after preparation for RAI treatment with rhTSH and THW. There is currently a controversy regarding RAI uptake in metastatic lesions after preparation with rhTSH versus THW, with some studies suggesting equal and some superior uptake after preparation with THW. Analysis of available retrospective studies comparing survival rates, progression free survival, and biochemical and structural response to a dosimetrically-deterrnined dose of RAI shows similar efficacy after preparation for therapy with rhTSH and THW. Conclusion The rhTSH stimulation is not presently approved by the FDA as a method of preparation for adjunctive therapy with RAI in patients with metastatic DTC. Data on rhTSH compassionate use suggest that rhTSH stimulation is as equally effective as THW as a method of preparation for dosimetry-based RAI treatment in

  18. Brain microvascular endothelium induced-annexin A1 secretion contributes to small cell lung cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Yong-Shuo; Wu, Peng-Fei; Li, Qiang; Dai, Wu-Min; Yuan, Shuai; Xu, Zhi-Hua; Liu, Ting-Ting; Miao, Zi-Wei; Fang, Wen-Gang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Li, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Small cell lung cancer is the most aggressive histologic subtype of lung cancer, with a strong predilection for metastasizing to brain early. However, the cellular and molecular basis is poorly known. Here, we provided evidence to reveal the role of annexin A1 in small cell lung cancer metastasis to brain. Firstly, the elevated annexin A1 serum levels in small cell lung cancer patients were associated with brain metastasis. The levels of annexin A1 were also upregulated in NCI-H446 cells, a small cell lung cancer cell line, upon migration into the mice brain. More interestingly, annexin A1 was secreted by NCI-H446 cells in a time-dependent manner when co-culturing with human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which was identified with the detections of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants by ELISA and western blot. Further results showed that blockage of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants using a neutralized antibody significantly inhibited NCI-H446 cells adhesion to brain endothelium and its transendothelial migration. Conversely, the addition of Ac2-26, an annexin A1 mimic peptide, enhanced these effects. Furthermore, knockdown of annexin A1 in NCI-H446 cells prevented its transendothelial migration in vitro and metastasis to mice brain in vivo. Our data showed that small cell lung cancer cell in brain microvasculature microenvironment could express much more annexin A1 and release it outside, which facilitated small cell lung cancer cell to gain malignant properties of entry into brain. These findings provided a potential target for the management of SCLC brain metastasis. PMID:26135980

  19. Brain microvascular endothelium induced-annexin A1 secretion contributes to small cell lung cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Yong-Shuo; Wu, Peng-Fei; Li, Qiang; Dai, Wu-Min; Yuan, Shuai; Xu, Zhi-Hua; Liu, Ting-Ting; Miao, Zi-Wei; Fang, Wen-Gang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Li, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Small cell lung cancer is the most aggressive histologic subtype of lung cancer, with a strong predilection for metastasizing to brain early. However, the cellular and molecular basis is poorly known. Here, we provided evidence to reveal the role of annexin A1 in small cell lung cancer metastasis to brain. Firstly, the elevated annexin A1 serum levels in small cell lung cancer patients were associated with brain metastasis. The levels of annexin A1 were also upregulated in NCI-H446 cells, a small cell lung cancer cell line, upon migration into the mice brain. More interestingly, annexin A1 was secreted by NCI-H446 cells in a time-dependent manner when co-culturing with human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which was identified with the detections of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants by ELISA and western blot. Further results showed that blockage of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants using a neutralized antibody significantly inhibited NCI-H446 cells adhesion to brain endothelium and its transendothelial migration. Conversely, the addition of Ac2-26, an annexin A1 mimic peptide, enhanced these effects. Furthermore, knockdown of annexin A1 in NCI-H446 cells prevented its transendothelial migration in vitro and metastasis to mice brain in vivo. Our data showed that small cell lung cancer cell in brain microvasculature microenvironment could express much more annexin A1 and release it outside, which facilitated small cell lung cancer cell to gain malignant properties of entry into brain. These findings provided a potential target for the management of SCLC brain metastasis.

  20. Radium-223 chloride: Extending life in prostate cancer patients by treating bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Wissing, Michel D; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Gelderblom, Hans

    2013-11-01

    The treatment scope for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is rapidly expanding. On May 15, 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved radium-223 chloride ((223)RaCl2) for the treatment of mCRPC patients whose metastases are limited to the bones. Radium-223 is an α-emitting alkaline earth metal ion, which, similar to calcium ions, accumulates in the bone. In a phase III study (ALSYMPCA), mCRPC patients with bone metastases received best standard-of-care treatment with placebo or (223)RaCl2. At a prespecified interim analysis, the primary endpoint of median overall survival was significantly extended by 3.6 months in patients treated with radium-223 compared with placebo (P < 0.001). The radioisotope was well tolerated and gave limited bone marrow suppression. (223)RaCl2 is the first bone-targeting antitumor therapy that received FDA approval based on a significant extended median overall survival. Further studies are required to optimize its dosing and to confirm its efficacy and safety in cancer patients.

  1. Therapeutic opportunities for castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Zustovich, Fable; Fabiani, Francesca

    2014-08-01

    Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer are burdened not only with an unavoidable risk of mortality but also by severe mobility issues. This disease has a high tendency to induce bone metastases with concomitant general suffering, impaired mobility, and reduced self-sufficiency. The treatment of bone pain consists of opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiotherapy. To date, abiraterone, enzalutamide, zoledronate and denosumab are the only drugs able to delay skeletal events, and docetaxel is the only chemotherapeutic agent able to prolong survival after castration progression. Recently, 5 new drugs have proven to be efficacious in prolonging survival. Sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 have broadened the therapeutic choices, thus changing the clinical paradigm. This review analyzes the data supporting the use of all presently available therapeutic approaches for the management of pain, skeletal events, and survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Data based on phase 3 trials could identify new approaches depending on patient, disease, and therapy characteristics.

  2. Reconstruction with cutaneous flap after resection for breast cancer's skin metastases in a chemoresistant patient.

    PubMed

    Varricchio, Antonio; Di Libero, Lorenzo; Iannace, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    We reported a case of a breast cancer's skin metastases in a patient that had sustained 3 lines of chemotherapy. At first she received surgical treatment with Madden's mastectomy with dissection of axillary limphnodes and positioning of an expander. After that she underwent to chemo- and radiotherapy. The schedules we performed were: FEC, TC,Vinorelbine and Capecitabine. Only after the FEC there was a clinical remission just for 1 year. After that she underwent to surgery for the removal of a lozenge of skin on the right hemithorax, including also the subcutaneous tissue, a strip of muscular tissue, and a residue of the breast implant. The histology showed a multiple-nodules infiltration involving the dermis, the hypodermis, and the muscle. This pattern was valuated as a G3 breast cancer recurrence with ER 70%, PgR<5%, Ki67 50% Her2neu-. During the second line chemotherapy with TC she developed an high grade LCIS with lymphovascular infiltration on the left breast; on the right hemithorax there were cutaneous metastases with dermis' infiltration. Surgery with local excision was performed, and a cutaneous flap was realized. PMID:23685463

  3. Long-term disease-free survival after surgical resection for multiple bone metastases from rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seok Jin; Kim, Jong Hun; Lee, Min Ro; Lee, Chang Ho; Kuh, Ja Hong; Kim, Jung Ryul

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastasis of primary colorectal cancer is uncommon. When it occurs, it is usually a late manifestation of disease and is indicative of poor prognosis. We describe a patient with multiple metachronous bone metastases from lower rectal cancer who was successfully treated with multimodal treatment including surgical resections and has shown 32 mo disease-free survival. Surgical resection of metastatic bone lesion(s) from colorectal cancer may be a good treatment option in selected patients. PMID:21876853

  4. Incidence of Brain Atrophy and Decline in Mini-Mental State Examination Score After Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Brain Metastases: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shibamoto, Yuta Baba, Fumiya; Oda, Kyota; Hayashi, Shinya; Kokubo, Masaki; Ishihara, Shun-Ichi; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of brain atrophy and dementia after whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases not undergoing surgery. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients underwent WBRT to 40 Gy in 20 fractions with or without a 10-Gy boost. Brain magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were performed before and soon after radiotherapy, every 3 months for 18 months, and every 6 months thereafter. Brain atrophy was evaluated by change in cerebrospinal fluid-cranial ratio (CCR), and the atrophy index was defined as postradiation CCR divided by preradiation CCR. Results: Of 101 patients (median age, 62 years) entering the study, 92 completed WBRT, and 45, 25, and 10 patients were assessable at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Mean atrophy index was 1.24 {+-} 0.39 (SD) at 6 months and 1.32 {+-} 0.40 at 12 months, and 18% and 28% of the patients had an increase in the atrophy index by 30% or greater, respectively. No apparent decrease in mean MMSE score was observed after WBRT. Individually, MMSE scores decreased by four or more points in 11% at 6 months, 12% at 12 months, and 0% at 18 months. However, about half the decrease in MMSE scores was associated with a decrease in performance status caused by systemic disease progression. Conclusions: Brain atrophy developed in up to 30% of patients, but it was not necessarily accompanied by MMSE score decrease. Dementia after WBRT unaccompanied by tumor recurrence was infrequent.

  5. A comprehensive treatment for peritoneal metastases from gastric cancer with curative intent.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Y; Canbay, E; Li, Y; Coccolini, F; Glehen, O; Sugarbaker, P H; Morris, D; Moran, B; Gonzaletz-Moreno, S; Deraco, M; Piso, P; Elias, D; Batlett, D; Ishibashi, H; Mizumoto, A; Verwaal, V; Mahtem, H

    2016-08-01

    Recently, Peritoneal Surface Oncology Group International (PSOGI) developed a novel comprehensive treatment consisting of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and perioperative chemotherapy (POC) for the treatment of peritoneal metastases (PM) from gastric cancer with curative intent. This article reviews the results of this treatment and verifies its indication. In this strategy, peritoneal cancer index (PCI) is determined by laparoscopy, and a peritoneal port is placed. Neoadjuvant bidirectional intraperitoneal/systemic chemotherapy (NIPS) is performed for 3 cycles, and then laparotomy is performed. Cytoreductive surgery with peritonectomy procedures and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion (HIPEC) are performed. Multivariate analyses showed that completeness of cytoreduction, pathologic response to NIPS and PCI level and cytologic status after NIPS, as independent prognostic factors. PCI less than cut-off level after NIPS, negative cytology after NIPS, and positive response to NIPS were identified as the indications for comprehensive treatment. Patients who hold these criteria should be considered as the candidates for CRS and HIPEC. PMID:27160355

  6. Pazopanib diminishes non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth and metastases in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Honglin; Yang, Fan; Shen, Wang; Wang, Yuli; Li, Xuebing; You, Jiacong; Zhou, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenesis has been demonstrated to have a critical role in lung cancer pathogenesis. Here, we characterized the effect of the small-molecule angiogenesis inhibitor pazopanib on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods NSCLC cells were tested for viability and migration after incubation with varying concentrations of pazopanib. Further, the phosphorylation status of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, protein kinase B, and MEK were assessed in vitro. For in vivo testing, mice grafted with NSCLC cell lines L9981 and A549 were treated orally with pazopanib. Results Pazopanib inhibits signaling pathways in tumor cells, thus blocking NSCLC cell growth and migration in vitro and inducing tumor cell arrest at G0/G1 phase. We show that pazopanib could inhibit tumor cell growth, decrease metastases, and prolong survival in two mouse xenograft models of human NSCLC. Conclusion These preclinical studies of pazopanib show the possibility of clinical application and, ultimately, improvement in patient outcome. PMID:26273349

  7. Colorectal cancer with liver metastases -- is there a chance for cure?

    PubMed

    Parau, A; Vlad, L

    2014-01-01

    Combined treatment with chemotherapy and surgery is the currently accepted standard for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer which can be rendered to resectability and a very efficient way to increase survival of patients with hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. Cooperation between surgeons and oncologists is mandatory to insure these patients' best chance for survival. Patients with resectable disease must follow adjuvant chemotherapy, while patients with initially unresectable marginally resectable disease after downsizing with the help of chemotherapy must be given the chance of surgical reevaluation for having the metastatic disease resected,and then follow adjuvant chemotherapy. An impressive amount of new surgical techniques warrants the success of hepatic resection in metastatic disease while a whole constellation of novel chemotherapeutical and even more effective targeted agents assure better response rates, surgical resection rates and overall survival in these patients.

  8. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in the management of gastrointestinal cancers with peritoneal metastases: Progress toward a new standard of care.

    PubMed

    Sugarbaker, Paul H

    2016-07-01

    Peritoneal metastases from gastrointestinal cancer was, in the past, accepted as an inevitable component of the natural history of these diseases. It is a major cause of intestinal obstruction, fistula formation, and bowel perforation as the recurrent malignancy progresses to a terminal condition. Peritoneal metastases may be caused by full thickness penetration of the bowel wall by the primary cancer or by spilled cancer cells released into the peritoneal space by surgical trauma. Two new surgical technologies that have evolved to manage peritoneal metastases are cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). This combined treatment strategy uses peritonectomy procedures and visceral resections to reduce the disease in the abdomen and pelvis to a macroscopic volume. Then, HIPEC is used to preserve the complete cytoreduction by controlling the minimal residual disease. Since the extent of peritoneal metastases, as measured by the peritoneal cancer index (PCI), is crucial to a favorable outcome, prognostic indicators are used to select patients for treatment. The combined treatment may be used to prevent peritoneal metastases in gastrointestinal cancer patients having a resection of the primary malignancy. This is especially important in gastric cancer patients with serosal invasion. The combined treatment may be used synchronously with the primary cancer resection if peritoneal metastases are already apparent. The treatment is most frequently used with metachronous peritoneal metastases diagnosed in follow-up. Cure of peritoneal metastases is an option in selected patients and its knowledgeable use is progressing towards a new standard of care. PMID:27347669

  9. Mismatch repair status and synchronous metastases in colorectal cancer: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Morton, Dion; Harling, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    The causality between the metastatic potential, mismatch repair status (MMR) and survival in colorectal cancer (CRC) is complex. This study aimed to investigate the impact of MMR in CRC on the occurrence of synchronous metastases (SCCM) and survival in patients with SCCM on a national basis. A nationwide cohort study of 6,692 patients diagnosed with CRC between 2010 and 2012 was conducted. Data were prospectively entered into the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's database and merged with data from the Danish Pathology Registry and the National Patient Registry. Multivariable and multinomial logistic- and Cox-regression and proportional excess hazards analyses were used for confounder adjustment and to adjust for the general population mortality. In total, 983 of 6,692 patients (14.7%) had dMMR and 935 (14.0%) had SCCM. dMMR was associated with a decreased risk of SCCM, adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) = 0.54 (95% confidence interval (CI):0.40-0.70, p < 0.001). The association only applied to confined hepatic metastases (aOR = 0.30, 95%CI: 0.18-0.49, p < 0.001), whereas the presence of confined pulmonary metastases (aOR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.39-1.29, p = 0.258) or synchronous hepatic and pulmonary metastases (aOR = 0.69, 95% CI:0.26-1.29, p = 0.436) were unaffected by MMR. MMR in patients with SCCM had no impact on survival (Cox: adjusted Hazard Ratio (aHR) = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.54-1.06, p = 0.101; Proportional excess hazards: aHR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.50-1.07, p = 0.111) when adjusting for other prognostic factors. The metastatic pattern varied according to MMR status. MMR had no impact on survival in patients with UICC Stage IV CRC. These findings may be important for the understanding of the metastatic processes and thus for optimizing staging and treatment in CRC patients. PMID:25921209

  10. Large, central acellular zones indicating myoepithelial tumor differentiation in high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas as markers of predisposition to lung and brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, H; Takarabe, T; Hasegawa, F; Fukutomi, T; Hirohashi, S

    2000-02-01

    High-grade invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) of the breast with large, central acellular zones on their cut surfaces are usually associated with the myoepithelial immunophenotype of carcinoma cells, which includes the expression of S-100 protein, alpha-smooth muscle actin, and keratin 14. To clarify the clinical significance of these features of IDCs, the authors compared the incidence of the myoepithelial immunophenotype immunohistochemically, patient prognosis, and metastatic sites of the tumor between 20 high-grade IDCs with large, central acellular zones and 40 control high-grade IDCs without these zones. The myoepithelial immunophenotype was detected in 16 IDCs (80%) with large, central acellular zones but in only seven IDCs (18%) without. The risk ratio of metastasis, especially in the brain and lung, and death from cancer were significantly higher (p = 0.0096 and p = 0.030) for the 20 IDCs with large, central acellular zones than for those without by Cox's univariate analysis. Using Cox's multivariate analysis, large, central acellular zones in IDCs were an indicator of high risk of brain and lung metastases and of death by cancer independent of nodal status and tumor size. Examination of large, central acellular zones and myoepithelial immunophenotype in high-grade IDCs appears helpful in predicting patient prognosis and preferential metastatic sites of the tumors.

  11. Hepatocellular carcinoma and synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer in cirrhosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Maida, Marcello; Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Galia, Massimo; Cabibbo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old Caucasian man with hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis was admitted to our Unit in February 2010 for a diagnostic evaluation of three centimetric hypoechoic focal liver lesions detected by regular surveillance ultrasound. The subsequent computer tomography (CT) led to a diagnosis of unifocal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in VI hepatic segment, defined the other two nodules in the VI and VII segment as suspected metastases, and showed a luminal narrowing with marked segmental circumferential thickening of the hepatic flexure of the colon. Colonoscopy detected an ulcerated, bleeding and stricturing lesion at the hepatic flexure, which was subsequently defined as adenocarcinoma with a moderate degree of differentiation at histological examination. Finally, ultrasound-guided liver biopsy of the three focal liver lesions confirmed the diagnosis of HCC for the nodule in the VI segment, and characterized the other two lesions as metastases from colorectal cancer. The patient underwent laparotomic right hemicolectomy with removal of thirty-nine regional lymph nodes (three of them tested positive for metastasis at histological examination), and simultaneous laparotomic radio-frequency ablation of both nodule of HCC and metastases. The option of adjuvant chemotherapy was excluded because of the post-surgical onset of ascites. Abdomen CT and positron emission tomography/CT scans performed after 1, 6 and 12 mo highlighted a complete response to treatments without any radiotracer accumulation. After 18 mo, the patient died due to progressive liver failure. Our experience emphasizes the potential coexistence of two different neoplasms in a cirrhotic liver and the complexity in the proper diagnosis and management of the two tumours. PMID:24409337

  12. Pathological response after neoadjuvant bevacizumab- or cetuximab-based chemotherapy in resected colorectal cancer liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Pietrantonio, Filippo; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Miceli, Rosalba; Cotsoglou, Christian; Melotti, Flavia; Fanetti, Giuseppe; Perrone, Federica; Biondani, Pamela; Muscarà, Cecilia; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Coppa, Jorgelina; Maggi, Claudia; Milione, Massimo; Tamborini, Elena; de Braud, Filippo

    2015-07-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) prior to liver resection is advantageous for patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CLM). Bevacizumab- or cetuximab-based NACT may affect patient outcome and curative resection rate, but comparative studies on differential tumour regression grade (TRG) associated with distinct antibodies-associated regimens are lacking. Ninety-three consecutive patients received NACT plus bevacizumab (n = 46) or cetuximab (n = 47) followed by CLM resection. Pathological response was determined in each resected metastasis as TRG rated from 1 (complete) to 5 (no response). Except for KRAS mutations prevailing in bevacizumab versus cetuximab (57 vs. 21 %, p = 0.001), patients characteristics were well balanced. Median follow-up was 31 months (IQR 17-48). Bevacizumab induced significantly better pathological response rates (TRG1-3: 78 vs. 34 %, p < 0.001) as well as complete responses (TRG1: 13 vs. 0 %, p = 0.012) with respect to cetuximab. Three-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were not significantly different in the two cohorts. At multivariable analysis, significant association with pathological response was found for number of resected metastases (p = 0.015) and bevacizumab allocation (p < 0.001), while KRAS mutation showed only a trend. Significant association with poorer PFS and OS was found for low grades of pathological response (p = 0.009 and p < 0.001, respectively), R2 resection or presence of extrahepatic disease (both p < 0.001) and presence of KRAS mutation (p = 0.007 and p < 0.001, respectively). Bevacizumab-based regimens, although influenced by the number of metastases and KRAS status, improve significantly pathological response if compared to cetuximab-based NACT. Possible differential impact among regimens on patient outcome has still to be elucidated. PMID:26003673

  13. Pathological response after neoadjuvant bevacizumab- or cetuximab-based chemotherapy in resected colorectal cancer liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Pietrantonio, Filippo; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Miceli, Rosalba; Cotsoglou, Christian; Melotti, Flavia; Fanetti, Giuseppe; Perrone, Federica; Biondani, Pamela; Muscarà, Cecilia; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Coppa, Jorgelina; Maggi, Claudia; Milione, Massimo; Tamborini, Elena; de Braud, Filippo

    2015-07-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) prior to liver resection is advantageous for patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CLM). Bevacizumab- or cetuximab-based NACT may affect patient outcome and curative resection rate, but comparative studies on differential tumour regression grade (TRG) associated with distinct antibodies-associated regimens are lacking. Ninety-three consecutive patients received NACT plus bevacizumab (n = 46) or cetuximab (n = 47) followed by CLM resection. Pathological response was determined in each resected metastasis as TRG rated from 1 (complete) to 5 (no response). Except for KRAS mutations prevailing in bevacizumab versus cetuximab (57 vs. 21 %, p = 0.001), patients characteristics were well balanced. Median follow-up was 31 months (IQR 17-48). Bevacizumab induced significantly better pathological response rates (TRG1-3: 78 vs. 34 %, p < 0.001) as well as complete responses (TRG1: 13 vs. 0 %, p = 0.012) with respect to cetuximab. Three-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were not significantly different in the two cohorts. At multivariable analysis, significant association with pathological response was found for number of resected metastases (p = 0.015) and bevacizumab allocation (p < 0.001), while KRAS mutation showed only a trend. Significant association with poorer PFS and OS was found for low grades of pathological response (p = 0.009 and p < 0.001, respectively), R2 resection or presence of extrahepatic disease (both p < 0.001) and presence of KRAS mutation (p = 0.007 and p < 0.001, respectively). Bevacizumab-based regimens, although influenced by the number of metastases and KRAS status, improve significantly pathological response if compared to cetuximab-based NACT. Possible differential impact among regimens on patient outcome has still to be elucidated.

  14. A Phase III Study of Conventional Radiation Therapy Plus Thalidomide Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases (RTOG 0118)

    SciTech Connect

    Knisely, Jonathan P.S. Berkey, Brian; Chakravarti, Arnab; Yung, Al W.K.; Curran, Walter J.; Robins, H. Ian; Movsas, Benjamin; Brachman, David G.; Henderson, Randall H.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To compare whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) with WBRT combined with thalidomide for patients with brain metastases not amenable to resection or radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Patients with Zubrod performance status 0-1, MRI-documented multiple (>3), large (>4 cm), or midbrain brain metastases arising from a histopathologically confirmed extracranial primary tumor, and an anticipated survival of >8 weeks were randomized to receive WBRT to a dose of 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions with or without thalidomide during and after WBRT. Prerandomization stratification used Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA) Class and whether post-WBRT chemotherapy was planned. Endpoints included overall survival, progression-free survival, time to neurocognitive progression, the cause of death, toxicities, and quality of life. A protocol-planned interim analysis documented that the trial had an extremely low probability of ever showing a significant difference favoring the thalidomide arm given the results at the time of the analysis, and it was therefore closed on the basis of predefined statistical guidelines. Results: Enrolled in the study were 332 patients. Of 183 accrued patients, 93 were randomized to receive WBRT alone and 90 to WBRT and thalidomide. Median survival was 3.9 months for both arms. No novel toxicities were seen, but thalidomide was not well tolerated in this population. Forty-eight percent of patients discontinued thalidomide because of side effects. Conclusion: Thalidomide provided no survival benefit for patients with multiple, large, or midbrain metastases when combined with WBRT; nearly half the patients discontinued thalidomide due to side effects.

  15. Phase 3 Trials of Stereotactic Radiosurgery With or Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for 1 to 4 Brain Metastases: Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Kocher, Martin; Neupane, Binod; Collette, Sandra; Tago, Masao; Shaw, Prakesh; Beyene, Joseph; Chang, Eric L.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform an individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with or without whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for patients presenting with 1 to 4 brain metastases. Method and Materials: Three trials were identified through a literature search, and IPD were obtained. Outcomes of interest were survival, local failure, and distant brain failure. The treatment effect was estimated after adjustments for age, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) score, number of brain metastases, and treatment arm. Results: A total of 364 of the pooled 389 patients met eligibility criteria, of whom 51% were treated with SRS alone and 49% were treated with SRS plus WBRT. For survival, age was a significant effect modifier (P=.04) favoring SRS alone in patients ≤50 years of age, and no significant differences were observed in older patients. Hazard ratios (HRs) for patients 35, 40, 45, and 50 years of age were 0.46 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.24-0.90), 0.52 (95% CI = 0.29-0.92), 0.58 (95% CI = 0.35-0.95), and 0.64 (95% CI = 0.42-0.99), respectively. Patients with a single metastasis had significantly better survival than those who had 2 to 4 metastases. For distant brain failure, age was a significant effect modifier (P=.043), with similar rates in the 2 arms for patients ≤50 of age; otherwise, the risk was reduced with WBRT for patients >50 years of age. Patients with a single metastasis also had a significantly lower risk of distant brain failure than patients who had 2 to 4 metastases. Local control significantly favored additional WBRT in all age groups. Conclusions: For patients ≤50 years of age, SRS alone favored survival, in addition, the initial omission of WBRT did not impact distant brain relapse rates. SRS alone may be the preferred treatment for this age group.

  16. Effect of Lapatinib on the Outgrowth of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gril, Brunilde; Palmieri, Diane; Bronder, Julie L.; Herring, Jeanne M.; Vega-Valle, Eleazar; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Liewehr, David J.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Merino, Maria J.; Rubin, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    Background The brain is increasingly being recognized as a sanctuary site for metastatic tumor cells in women with HER2-overexpressing breast cancer who receive trastuzumab therapy. There are no approved or widely accepted treatments for brain metastases other than steroids, cranial radiotherapy, and surgical resection. We examined the efficacy of lapatinib, an inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2 kinases, for preventing the outgrowth of breast cancer cells in the brain in a mouse xenograft model of brain metastasis. Methods EGFR-overexpressing MDA-MB-231-BR (231-BR) brain-seeking breast cancer cells were transfected with an expression vector that contained or lacked the HER2 cDNA and used to examine the effect of lapatinib on the activation (ie, phosphorylation) of cell signaling proteins by immunoblotting, on cell growth by the tetrazolium salt 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, and on cell migration using a Boyden chamber assay. The outgrowth of large (ie, >50 μm2) and micrometastases was counted in brain sections from nude mice that had been injected into the left cardiac ventricle with 231-BR cells and, beginning 5 days later, treated by oral gavage with lapatinib or vehicle (n = 22–26 mice per treatment group). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results In vitro, lapatinib inhibited the phosphorylation of EGFR, HER2, and downstream signaling proteins; cell proliferation; and migration in 231-BR cells (both with and without HER2). Among mice injected with 231-BR-vector cells, those treated with 100 mg lapatinib/kg body weight had 54% fewer large metastases 24 days after starting treatment than those treated with vehicle (mean number of large metastases per brain section: 1.56 vs 3.36, difference = 1.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.92 to 2.68, P < .001), whereas treatment with 30 mg lapatinib/kg body weight had no effect. Among mice injected with 231-BR-HER2 cells, those treated with

  17. Breast cancer and bone metastases: the association of axial skeleton MRI findings with skeletal-related events and survival.

    PubMed

    van der Pol, Christian B; Schweitzer, Mark E; Di Primio, Gina; Sampaio, Marcos L; Kielar, Ania; Clemons, Mark; Jaberi, Arash

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if bone metastasis characteristics on axial skeleton MRI are associated with either skeletal-related events (SREs) or survival in breast cancer patients. A retrospective review was performed on 247 breast cancer patients with bone metastases identified on axial skeleton MRI. MRI studies were reviewed for metastases T1 signal, signal uniformity, complete vertebral metastatic marrow replacement, metastases quantity, and distribution. Odds ratio (OR) and hazard ratios (HR) were calculated, with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI), to determine association with either future SREs or survival. At the time of analysis, 174 (70 %) patients had developed SREs and 176 (71 %) patients were dead. Features of skeletal metastases associated with SREs included the presence of complete metastatic marrow replacement within any vertebra; OR 2.363 (95 % CI 1.240-4.504, P = 0.0090), and more widely distributed metastases; OR 1.239 (95 % CI 1.070-1.435, P = 0.0040). Features associated with shorter survival included the presence of complete metastatic marrow replacement within any vertebra; HR 1.500 (95 % CI 1.105-2.036, P = 0.0093), and more widely distributed metastases; HR 1.141 (95 % CI 1.047-1.243, P = 0.0027). Metastases T1 signal, signal uniformity, and surprisingly quantity were not associated with SREs or survival. Axial skeleton MRI was able to identify characteristics predictive of future SREs and survival. These characteristics could be used for risk stratification for future trials if prospectively validated.

  18. Reduced impact of nodal metastases as a prognostic factor for tonsil cancer in the HPV era.

    PubMed

    Vila, Peter M; Stucken, Chaz L; Morris, Luc G T; Posner, Marshall R; Genden, Eric M; Boffetta, Paolo; Sikora, Andrew G

    2014-09-01

    Metastatic lymph nodes (LN) are an adverse prognostic factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nodal metastases have reduced impact on survival in tonsil cancer in the HPV-predominant era. Incidence and mortality data of tonsil and oral cavity SCC between 1988 and 2007 were obtained from the SEER database. Based on published literature, we considered cases of tonsil cancer from 1988 to 1997 as the pre-HPV cohort (N = 752), and 1998-2007 as the HPV-predominant cohort (N = 2,755). Comparing the two cohorts, Kaplan-Meier 5-year overall survival (OS) for tonsil SCC improved from 54.0 to 74.3 % (p < 0.0001), and cancer-specific survival (CSS) improved from 66.0 to 82.9 % (p < 0.0001). Stratifying by LN involvement showed improved OS in the HPV-predominant cohort with one (63.6 vs. 79.7 %, p < 0.0001), two to three (54.2 vs. 75.9 %, p < 0.0001), four to eight (40.3 vs. 68.9 %, p < 0.0001), and greater than eight positive nodes (25.5 vs. 41.9 %, p < 0.0001). While metastatic LNs still negatively affect prognosis, their impact on OPC survival has diminished in the HPV-predominant era. This finding provides a rationale for additional studies of the prognostic significance of LN metastases in OPC cohorts of defined HPV status, and supports the concept that HPV-related OPC is a disease distinct from "classical" OPC, with unique prognostic features. PMID:24190760

  19. Reduced Impact of Nodal Metastases as a Prognostic Factor for Tonsil Cancer in the HPV Era

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Peter M.; Stucken, Chaz L.; Morris, Luc G.T.; Posner, Marshall R.; Genden, Eric M.; Boffetta, Paolo; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Metastatic lymph nodes (LN) are an adverse prognostic factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nodal metastases have reduced impact on survival in tonsil cancer in the HPV-predominant era. Methods Incidence and mortality data of tonsil and oral cavity SCC between 1988 and 2007 was obtained from the SEER database. Based on published literature, we considered cases of tonsil cancer from 1988–1997 the pre-HPV cohort (N=752), and 1998–2007 as the HPV-predominant cohort (N=2,755). Results Comparing the two cohorts, Kaplan-Meier five-year overall survival (OS) for tonsil SCC improved from 54.0% to 74.3% (p<0.0001), and cancer-specific survival (CSS) improved from 66.0 to 82.9% (p<0.0001). Stratifying by LN involvement showed improved OS in the HPV-predominant cohort with one (63.6 vs. 79.7%, p<0.0001), two to three (54.2 vs. 75.9%, P<0.0001), four to eight (40.3 vs. 68.9%, p<0.0001), and greater than eight positive nodes (25.5 vs. 41.9%, p<0.0001). Conclusion While metastatic LNs still negatively affect prognosis, their impact on OPC survival has diminished in the HPV-predominant era. This finding provides a rationale for additional studies of the prognostic significance of LN metastases in OPC cohorts of defined HPV status, and supports the concept that HPV-related OPC is a disease distinct from “classical” OPC, with unique prognostic features. PMID:24190760

  20. Palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases from lung cancer: Evidence-based medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Fairchild, Alysa

    2014-01-01

    To review current recommendations for palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases secondary to lung cancer, and to analyze surveys to examine whether global practice is evidence-based, English language publications related to best practice palliative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for bone metastases (BM) from lung cancer were sought via literature search (2003-2013). Additional clinical practice guidelines and consensus documents were obtained from the online Standards and Guidelines Evidence Directory. Eligible survey studies contained hypothetical case scenarios which required participants to declare whether or not they would administer palliative EBRT and if so, to specify what dose fractionation schedule they would use. There is no convincing evidence of differential outcomes based on histology or for spine vs non-spine uncomplicated BM. For uncomplicated BM, 8Gy/1 is widely recommended as current best practice; this schedule would be used by up to 39.6% of respondents to treat a painful spinal lesion. Either 8Gy/1 or 20Gy/5 could be considered standard palliative RT for BM-related neuropathic pain; 0%-13.2% would use the former and 5.8%-52.8% of respondents the latter (range 3Gy/1-45Gy/18). A multifraction schedule is the approach of choice for irradiation of impending pathologic fracture or spinal cord compression and 54% would use either 20Gy/5 or 30Gy/10. Survey results regarding management of complicated and uncomplicated BM secondary to lung cancer continue to show a large discrepancy between published literature and patterns of practice. PMID:25493222

  1. Clinicopathological features of breast cancers predict the development of leptomeningeal metastases: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Zairi, Fahed; Devos, Patrick; Pierret, Matthieu Faivre; Dubois, François; Assaker, Richard; Buisset, Etienne; Bonneterre, Jacques; Baranzelli, Marie Christine

    2011-11-01

    The incidence of leptomeningeal metastases (LM) in patients with breast cancer (BC) is increasing as a result of increased screening and improved patient survival. However, the median survival time after diagnosis of LM is between 5 weeks (without any treatment) and 5 months (for aggressively treated patients). In an attempt to identify clinicopathological risk factors for LM, we carried out a case-control study of 100 women with BC. Fifty patients with BC and LM were enrolled and an additional 50 patients with BC and no CNS metastases including leptomeningeal spread were selected as controls. Patients who had developed LM were selected between December 2006 and August 2008. The control group was matched for: age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis, and initiation of chemotherapy at BC diagnosis. The ILC type (P = 0.03), ER-negative (P = 0.01) and PR-negative status (P = 0.03), and initial M+ status at BC diagnosis (P = 0.008) tended to be more frequent in LM patients. These characteristics should lead to early appropriate assessments being performed in this targeted population when a neurological complaint appears, in order to detect LM as soon as possible.

  2. Use of CT perfusion to discriminate between brain metastases from different primaries.

    PubMed

    Dolgushin, Mikhail B; Pronin, Igor N; Holodny, Elena A; Fadeeva, Liudmila M; Holodny, Andrei I; Kornienko, Valeri N

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-six metastases in 22 patients were studied prospectively using computed tomography perfusion. Regions of interests were drawn around: the enhancing part of the tumor, necrotic central part, periphery, peritumoral edema, and normal white matter. Cerebral blood volume, cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time were calculated for each zone. The enhancing part of the tumor significantly differed from the other zones in 11 of 12. Metastases of different primaries can be differentiated from one another with statistically significance (P<.05) by at least one perfusion parameter in 57% of cases.

  3. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R.; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H.; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44+ cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380

  4. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R arrests growth of breast-cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Nan; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-02-20

    Brain metastasis is a morbid, treatment-resistant, end-stage frequent occurrence in breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on breast cancer brain metastases. High brain-metastatic variants of murine 4T1 breast cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were injected orthotopically in the mammary fat pad in non-transgenic nude mice or in the left ventricle of non-transgenic nude mice and transgenic nude mice expressing nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP). ND-GFP mice express GFP in nascent blood vessels. In the orthotopically-injected mice, the primary tumor was surgically-resected in order to allow brain metastasis to develop. At various time points, the tumors and vasculature in the brain were imaged by confocal and stereo fluorescence microscopy. Some of the breast cancer cells that reached the brain extravasated and grew perivascularly and some of the cells proliferated within the vasculature. S. typhimurium A1-R significantly inhibited brain metastasis in both metastatic models and increased survival of the orthotopically-transplanted, primary-tumor-resected mice (p<0.05). The results of the present study suggest the clinical potential of bacterial therapy of breast cancer brain metastasis.

  5. Optimization of Treatment Geometry to Reduce Normal Brain Dose in Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases with Single–Isocenter Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qixue; Snyder, Karen Chin; Liu, Chang; Huang, Yimei; Zhao, Bo; Chetty, Indrin J.; Wen, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases using a single-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been shown to decrease treatment time with the tradeoff of larger low dose to the normal brain tissue. We have developed an efficient Projection Summing Optimization Algorithm to optimize the treatment geometry in order to reduce dose to normal brain tissue for radiosurgery of multiple metastases with single-isocenter VMAT. The algorithm: (a) measures coordinates of outer boundary points of each lesion to be treated using the Eclipse Scripting Application Programming Interface, (b) determines the rotations of couch, collimator, and gantry using three matrices about the cardinal axes, (c) projects the outer boundary points of the lesion on to Beam Eye View projection plane, (d) optimizes couch and collimator angles by selecting the least total unblocked area for each specific treatment arc, and (e) generates a treatment plan with the optimized angles. The results showed significant reduction in the mean dose and low dose volume to normal brain, while maintaining the similar treatment plan qualities on the thirteen patients treated previously. The algorithm has the flexibility with regard to the beam arrangements and can be integrated in the treatment planning system for clinical application directly. PMID:27688047

  6. Comparative efficacy of whole-brain radiotherapy with and without elemene liposomes in patients with multiple brain metastases from non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y.N.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Zeng, Y.C.; Chi, F.; Jin, X.Y.; Wu, R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We explored and compared the clinical effects of whole-brain radiotherapy (wbrt) with and without elemene liposomes in patients with multiple brain metastases from non-small-cell lung carcinoma (nsclc). Methods We retrospectively analyzed 62 patients with multiple brain metastases from nsclc who received wbrt (30 Gy in 10 fractions) at Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University from January 2012 to May 2013. In 30 patients, elemene liposomes (400 mg) were injected intravenously via a peripherally inserted central catheter for 21 consecutive days from the first day of radiotherapy. Overall survival (os) and nervous system progression-free survival (npfs) for the two groups were compared by Kaplan–Meier analysis. Factors influencing npfs were examined by Cox regression analysis. Chi-square or Fisher exact tests were used for group comparisons. Results The median os was 9.0 months in the wbrt plus elemene group and 7.8 months in the wbrt-alone group (p = 0.581); the equivalent median npfs durations were 5.2 months and 3.7 months (p = 0.005). Patient treatment plan was an independent factor associated with npfs (p = 0.002). Tumour response and disease-control rates in the wbrt plus elemene group were 26.67% and 76.67% respectively; they were 18.75% and 62.5% in the wbrt group (p = 0.452). Compared with the patients in the wbrt-alone group, significantly fewer patients in the wbrt plus elemene group developed headaches (p = 0.04); quality of life was also significantly higher in the wbrt plus elemene group both at 1 month and at 2 months (p = 0.021 and p = 0.001 respectively). Conclusions The addition of elemene liposomes to wbrt might prolong npfs in patients with multiple brain metastases from nsclc, while also reducing the incidence of headache and improving patient quality of life. PMID:27536187

  7. Polymorphisms in MMP9 and SIPA1 are associated with increased risk of nodal metastases in early stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Rebecca; Kizer, Nora; Nguyen, Loan; Jaishuen, Atthapon; Wanat, Karolyn; Nugent, Elizabeth; Grigsby, Perry; Allsworth, Jenifer E.; Rader, Janet S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Heritable polymorphisms modulate metastatic efficiency in cancer. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MMP9 (rs17576) and SIPA1 (rs746429, rs931127) have been associated with nodal metastases in multiple cancers. We investigated the association of these SNPs with nodal metastases in early stage cervical cancer. Methods Consecutive patients with stage IB cervical cancer who underwent a pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection were included. Cases (≥ 1 positive LN, n=101) were compared with controls (negative LN pathology, n=273). Genotyping was performed on genomic DNA in the 3 SNPs using a Taqman assay, and correlated with clinical variables. Results The G allele at SIPA1 rs931127 was associated with an increased risk of nodal disease (OR 1.9, p=0.03), and approached significance at SIPA 1 rs746429 (OR 2.2, p=0.09) and MMP9 rs17576 (OR 1.5, 0.08). In patients with stage Ib1 lesions (n=304), the G allele at both SIPA1 SNPs were associated with LN metastases (rs746429 OR 10.1, p=0.01; rs931127 OR 2.4, p=0.01). In patients with no lymph vascular space invasion, SIPA1 SNPs were again associated with LN metastases, and all patients with nodal disease had at least one G allele at SIPA1 rs746429. Conclusions In this case control study, SNPs in SIPA1 varied statistically in cervical cancer patients with and without nodal metastases, and in MMP9 after controlling for stage and lymphvascular space invasion. Further work is needed to characterize inherited polymorphisms that provide a permissive background for the metastatic cascade. PMID:19906411

  8. Chemotherapy for the conversion of unresectable colorectal cancer liver metastases to resection.

    PubMed

    Power, Derek G; Kemeny, Nancy E

    2011-09-01

    Resection of colorectal liver metastases (CLM) is the ultimate aim of treatment strategies in most patients with liver-confined metastatic colorectal cancer. Long-term survival is possible in selected patients with initially resectable or unresectable CLM. As a majority of patients have unresectable liver disease at the outset, there is a clear role for chemotherapy to downstage liver disease making resection possible. Studies of systemic chemotherapy with or without biologic therapy in patients with unresectable CLM have resulted in increased response rates, liver resection rates and survival. A sound physiologic rationale exists for the use of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) therapy. Studies have shown that HAI with floxuridine combined with systemic chemotherapy increases response rates and liver resection rates in those patients with initially unresectable CLM. Toxicity from preoperative chemotherapy, biologic therapy and HAI therapy may adversely affect hepatic resection but can be kept minimal with appropriate monitoring. All conversion strategies should be decided by a multidisciplinary team.

  9. [PREVENTION OF THE BONES METASTASES OCCURRENCE IN THE PATIENTS WITH RENAL-CELL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Boychuk, S I; Dedkov, A G; Yugrinova, L G

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic significance of estimation of the tartratresistent acid phosphatase (bone TRAP--5b) activity was studied for prognosis of occurrence of metastases in bones (MB) in patients with a renal-cell cancer (RCC). The risk of the MB occurrence was determined in patients after surgical treatment. A skeleton affection rate in patients, to whom zolendronic acid was prescribed, was trustworthy bigger, than such while conduction of treatment. So, application of bisphosphonates is recommended, in particular--zolendronic acid in dosage 4 mg every month under control of the bone TRAP--5b activity with objective of prophylaxis of the MB occurrence in patients, suffering RCC. But, we recommend for the MB diagnosis the method of determination of this marker activity as additional one while examining patients together with standard methods, including osteoscintigraphy, computer tomography.

  10. Use of 3.0-T MRI for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Planning for Treatment of Brain Metastases: A Single-Institution Retrospective Review

    SciTech Connect

    Saconn, Paul A.; Shaw, Edward G.; Chan, Michael D.; Squire, Sarah E.; Johnson, Annette J.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Lovato, James; Bourland, J. Daniel; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; DeGuzman, Allan F.; Munley, Michael T.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting brain metastases for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) planning. Methods and Materials: All adult patients scheduled for SRS treatment for brain metastases at our institution between October 2005 and January 2008 were eligible for analysis. All patients underwent radiosurgery treatment planning 3.0-T MRI on the day of scheduled radiosurgery and a diagnostic 1.5-T MRI in the days or weeks prior to radiosurgery for comparison. Both scans were interpreted by neuroradiologists who reported their findings in the radiology reports. We performed a retrospective review of the radiology reports to determine the number of brain metastases identified using each MRI system. Results: Of 254 patients scheduled for treatment from October 2005 to January 2008, 138 patients had radiology reports that explicitly described the number of metastases identified on both scans. With a median interval of 17 days (range, 1-82) between scans, the number of metastases detected using 1.5-T MRI system ranged from 1 to 5 and from 1 to 8 using the 3.0 T-MRI system. Twenty-two percent of patients were found to have a greater number of metastases with the 3.0 T-MRI system. The difference in number of metastases detected between the two scans for the entire cohort ranged from 0 to 6. Neither histology (p = 0.52 by chi-sq test) nor time between scans (p = 0.62 by linear regression) were significantly associated with the difference in number of metastases between scans. Conclusions: The 3.0-T MRI system appears to be superior to a 1.5-T MRI system for detecting brain metastases, which may have significant implications in determining the appropriate treatment modality. Our findings suggest the need for a prospectively designed study to further evaluate the use of a 3.0 T-MRI system for stereotactic radiosurgery planning in the treatment of brain metastases.

  11. Treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer and bone metastases with radium-223 dichloride

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Lise Marie E; Tvedt, Birger; Heinrich, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Radium-223 dichloride (Ra-223) is the first α-particle emitting radiopharmaceutical to be approved for the treatment of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and associated bone metastases, and the first bone-targeting agent to significantly improve patient overall survival whilst reducing pain and the symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs) associated with bone metastases. Ra-223 exhibits a favourable safety profile, with low myelosuppression rates and fewer adverse events than placebo. Compared with other approved radiopharmaceuticals, the α-particle emitting Ra-223 has a high biological efficiency and a short penetration range, potentially sparing bone marrow toxicity and limiting unwanted exposure. Ra-223 has a short half-life and decays to a stable product, reducing the problem of storage and disposal associated with radiopharmaceuticals. Ra-223 offers a new treatment option with great potential in this setting. However, concerns remain amongst patients, their families and health care professionals over the use of radiopharmaceuticals. This article, which draws on the experiences of health care workers during the ALSYMPCA (ALpharadin in SYMtomatic Prostate CAncer) study, reviews the clinical development of Ra-223, highlighting the key issues for the uro-oncology nurse who has a pivotal role within the multi-disciplinary team (MDT) to ensure safe and effective treatment to the patient. The role of the uro-oncology nurse is multifaceted, including patient pre-assessment and post-treatment monitoring and coordination of the MDT. In addition, their role in communicating with and educating those involved with Ra-223 on what to expect from the agent can alleviate fears associated with its use. PMID:26097500

  12. Distribution of Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in primary colorectal cancer and secondary colorectal liver metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ebraheem, A.; Mersov, A.; Gurusamy, K.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2010-07-01

    A microbeam synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSRXRF) technique has been used to determine the localization and the relative concentrations of Zn, Cu, Fe and Ca in primary colorectal cancer and secondary colorectal liver metastases. 24 colon and 23 liver samples were examined, all of which were formalin fixed tissues arranged as microarrays of 1.0 mm diameter and 10 μm thickness. The distribution of these metals was compared with light transmission images of adjacent sections that were H and E stained to reveal the location of the cancer cells. Histological details were provided for each sample which enable concentrations of all elements in different tissue types to be compared. In the case of liver, significant differences have been found for all elements when comparing tumour, normal, necrotic, fibrotic, and blood vessel tissues (Kruskal Wallis Test, P<0.0001). The concentrations of all elements have also been found to be significantly different among tumour, necrotic, fibrotic, and mucin tissues in the colon samples (Kruskal Wallis Test, P<0.0001). The concentrations of all elements have been compared between primary colorectal samples and colorectal liver metastases. Concentration of Zn, Cu, Fe and Ca are higher in all types of liver tissues compared to those in the colon tissues. Comparing liver tumour and colon tumour samples, significant differences have been found for all elements (Mann Whitney, P<0.0001). For necrotic tissues, significant increase has been found for Zn, Ca, Cu and Fe (Mann Whitney, P<0.0001 for Fe and Zn, 0.014 for Ca, and 0.001 for Cu). The liver fibrotic levels of Zn, Ca, Cu and Fe were higher than the fibrotic colon areas (independent T test, P=0.007 for Zn and Mann Whitney test P<0.0001 for Cu, Fe and Ca). For the blood vessel tissue, the analysis revealed that the difference was only significant for Fe ( P=0.009) from independent T test.

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Madani, Indira Vakaet, Luc; Bonte, Katrien; Boterberg, Tom; Neve, Wilfried de

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy in the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary cancer (UPC). Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and September 2006, 23 patients with UPC of squamous cell carcinoma were treated with IMRT. Extended putative mucosal and bilateral nodal sites were irradiated to a median dose of 66 Gy. In 19 patients, IMRT was performed after lymph node dissection, and in 4 patients primary radiotherapy was given. The conventional radiotherapy group (historical control group) comprised 18 patients treated to a median dose of 66 Gy between August 1994 and October 2003. Results: Twenty patients completed treatment. As compared with conventional radiotherapy, the incidence of Grade 3 acute dysphagia was significantly lower in the IMRT group (4.5% vs. 50%, p = 0.003). By 6 months, Grade 3 xerostomia was detected in 11.8% patients in the IMRT group vs. 53.4% in the historical control group (p = 0.03). No Grade 3 dysphagia or skin fibrosis was observed after IMRT but these were noted after conventional radiotherapy (26.7%, p = 0.01) and 26.7%, p = 0.03) respectively). With median follow-up of living patients of 17 months, there was no emergence of primary cancer. One patient had persistent nodal disease and another had nodal relapse at 5 months. Distant metastases were detected in 4 patients. The 2-year overall survival and distant disease-free probability after IMRT did not differ significantly from those for conventional radiotherapy (74.8% vs. 61.1% and 76.3% vs. 68.4%, respectively). Conclusions: Use of IMRT for UPC resulted in lower toxicity than conventional radiotherapy, and was similar in efficacy.

  14. Mechanisms limiting distribution of the threonine-protein kinase B-RaF(V600E) inhibitor dabrafenib to the brain: implications for the treatment of melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Mittapalli, Rajendar K; Vaidhyanathan, Shruthi; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z; Elmquist, William F

    2013-03-01

    Brain metastases are a common cause of death in stage IV metastatic melanoma. Dabrafenib is a BRAF (gene encoding serine/threonine-protein kinase B-Raf) inhibitor that has been developed to selectively target the valine 600 to glutamic acid substitution (BRAF(V600E)), which is commonly found in metastatic melanoma. Clinical trials with dabrafenib have shown encouraging results; however, the central nervous system distribution of dabrafenib remains unknown. Thus, the objective of the current study was to evaluate the brain distribution of dabrafenib in mice, and to see whether active efflux by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) restricts its delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In vitro accumulation studies conducted in Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells indicate that dabrafenib is an avid substrate for both P-gp and BCRP. Directional flux studies revealed greater transport in the basolateral to apical direction with corrected efflux ratios greater than 2 for both P-gp and Bcrp1 transfected cell lines. In vivo, the ratio of area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)(brain) to AUC(plasma) (K(p)) of dabrafenib after an i.v. dose (2.5 mg/kg) was 0.023, which increased by 18-fold in Mdr1 a/b(-/-)Bcrp1(-/-) mice to 0.42. Dabrafenib plasma exposure was ∼2-fold greater in Mdr1 a/b(-/-)Bcrp1(-/-) mice as compared with wild-type with an oral dose (25 mg/kg); however, the brain distribution was increased by ~10-fold with a resulting K(p) of 0.25. Further, compared with vemurafenib, another BRAF(V600E) inhibitor, dabrafenib showed greater brain penetration with a similar dose. In conclusion, the dabrafenib brain distribution is limited in an intact BBB model, and the data presented herein may have clinical implications in the prevention and treatment of melanoma brain metastases. PMID:23249624

  15. Distant Metastases Following Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Recent publications have suggested high-risk patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a lower risk of distant metastases and improved cause-specific survival (CSS) than patients receiving definitive external beam radiation therapy (XRT). To date, none of these studies has compared distant metastases and CSS in brachytherapy patients. In this study, we evaluate such parameters in a consecutive cohort of brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2007, 1,840 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy. Risk groups were stratified according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( (www.nccn.org)) guidelines. Subgroups of 658, 893, and 289 patients were assigned to low, intermediate, and high-risk categories. Median follow-up was 7.2 years. Along with brachytherapy implantation, 901 (49.0%) patients received supplemental XRT, and 670 (36.4%) patients received androgen deprivation therapy (median duration, 4 months). The mode of failure (biochemical, local, or distant) was determined for each patient for whom therapy failed. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. Results: For the entire cohort, metastases-free survival (MFS) and CSS at 12 years were 98.1% and 98.2%, respectively. When rates were stratified by low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, the 12-year MFS was 99.8%, 98.1%, and 93.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. CSS rates were 99.8%, 98.0%, and 95.3% (p < 0.001) for low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival was 98.7%, 95.9% and 90.4% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, MFS was mostly closely related to Gleason score and year of treatment, whereas CSS was most closely associated with Gleason score. Conclusions: Excellent CSS and MFS rates are achievable with high

  16. Assessing response to treatment of bone metastases from breast cancer: what should be the standard of care?

    PubMed

    Woolf, D K; Padhani, A R; Makris, A

    2015-06-01

    Bone is the most common site for breast cancer metastases, occurring in up to 70% of those with metastatic disease. In order to effectively manage these patients, it is essential to have consistent, reproducible and validated methods of assessing response to therapy. We present current clinical practice of imaging response assessment of bone metastases. We also review the biology of bone metastases and measures of response assessment including clinical assessment, tumour markers and imaging techniques; bone scans (BSs), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WB DW-MRI). The current standard of care of BSs and CT has significant limitations and are not routinely recommended for the purpose of response assessment in the bones. WB DW-MRI has the potential to address this unmet need and should be evaluated in clinical trials.

  17. CogState computerized memory tests in patients with brain metastases: secondary endpoint results of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933.

    PubMed

    Caine, Chip; Deshmukh, Snehal; Gondi, Vinai; Mehta, Minesh; Tomé, Wolfgang; Corn, Benjamin W; Kanner, Andrew; Rowley, Howard; Kundapur, Vijayananda; DeNittis, Albert; Greenspoon, Jeffrey Noah; Konski, Andre A; Bauman, Glenn S; Raben, Adam; Shi, Wenyin; Wendland, Merideth; Kachnic, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is associated with memory dysfunction. As part of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933, a phase II study of WBRT for brain metastases that conformally avoided the hippocampal stem cell compartment (HA-WBRT), memory was assessed pre- and post-HA-WBRT using both traditional and computerized memory tests. We examined whether the computerized tests yielded similar findings and might serve as possible alternatives for assessment of memory in multi-institution clinical trials. Adult patients with brain metastases received HA-WBRT to 30 Gy in ten fractions and completed Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R), CogState International Shopping List Test (ISLT) and One Card Learning Test (OCLT), at baseline, 2 and 4 months. Tests' completion rates were 52-53 % at 2 months and 34-42 % at 4 months. All baseline correlations between HVLT-R and CogState tests were significant (p ≤ 0.003). At baseline, both CogState tests and one component of HVLT-R differentiated those who were alive at 6 months and those who had died (p ≤ 0.01). At 4 months, mean relative decline was 7.0 % for HVLT-R Delayed Recall and 18.0 % for ISLT Delayed Recall. OCLT showed an 8.0 % increase. A reliable change index found no significant changes from baseline to 2 and 4 months for ISLT Delayed Recall (z = -0.40, p = 0.34; z = -0.68, p = 0.25) or OCLT (z = 0.15, p = 0.56; z = 0.41, p = 0.66). Study findings support the possibility that hippocampal avoidance may be associated with preservation of memory test performance, and that these computerized tests also may be useful and valid memory assessments in multi-institution adult brain tumor trials. PMID:26511494

  18. CogState computerized memory tests in patients with brain metastases: secondary endpoint results of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933.

    PubMed

    Caine, Chip; Deshmukh, Snehal; Gondi, Vinai; Mehta, Minesh; Tomé, Wolfgang; Corn, Benjamin W; Kanner, Andrew; Rowley, Howard; Kundapur, Vijayananda; DeNittis, Albert; Greenspoon, Jeffrey Noah; Konski, Andre A; Bauman, Glenn S; Raben, Adam; Shi, Wenyin; Wendland, Merideth; Kachnic, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is associated with memory dysfunction. As part of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933, a phase II study of WBRT for brain metastases that conformally avoided the hippocampal stem cell compartment (HA-WBRT), memory was assessed pre- and post-HA-WBRT using both traditional and computerized memory tests. We examined whether the computerized tests yielded similar findings and might serve as possible alternatives for assessment of memory in multi-institution clinical trials. Adult patients with brain metastases received HA-WBRT to 30 Gy in ten fractions and completed Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R), CogState International Shopping List Test (ISLT) and One Card Learning Test (OCLT), at baseline, 2 and 4 months. Tests' completion rates were 52-53 % at 2 months and 34-42 % at 4 months. All baseline correlations between HVLT-R and CogState tests were significant (p ≤ 0.003). At baseline, both CogState tests and one component of HVLT-R differentiated those who were alive at 6 months and those who had died (p ≤ 0.01). At 4 months, mean relative decline was 7.0 % for HVLT-R Delayed Recall and 18.0 % for ISLT Delayed Recall. OCLT showed an 8.0 % increase. A reliable change index found no significant changes from baseline to 2 and 4 months for ISLT Delayed Recall (z = -0.40, p = 0.34; z = -0.68, p = 0.25) or OCLT (z = 0.15, p = 0.56; z = 0.41, p = 0.66). Study findings support the possibility that hippocampal avoidance may be associated with preservation of memory test performance, and that these computerized tests also may be useful and valid memory assessments in multi-institution adult brain tumor trials.

  19. Nanoparticles for imaging and treating brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Joseph D; Doane, Tennyson; Burda, Clemens; Basilion, James P

    2013-01-01

    Brain cancer tumors cause disruption of the selective properties of vascular endothelia, even causing disruptions in the very selective blood–brain barrier, which are collectively referred to as the blood–brain–tumor barrier. Nanoparticles (NPs) have previously shown great promise in taking advantage of this increased vascular permeability in other cancers, which results in increased accumulation in these cancers over time due to the accompanying loss of an effective lymph system. NPs have therefore attracted increased attention for treating brain cancer. While this research is just beginning, there have been many successes demonstrated thus far in both the laboratory and clinical setting. This review serves to present the reader with an overview of NPs for treating brain cancer and to provide an outlook on what may come in the future. For NPs, just like the blood–brain–tumor barrier, the future is wide open. PMID:23256496

  20. Secondary Analysis of RTOG 9508, a Phase 3 Randomized Trial of Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Versus WBRT Plus Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Patients With 1-3 Brain Metastases; Poststratified by the Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Shanley, Ryan; Luo, Xianghua; Andrews, David; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Valicenti, Richard; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Souhami, Luis; Won, Minhee; Mehta, Minesh

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9508 showed a survival advantage for patients with 1 but not 2 or 3 brain metastasis (BM) treated with whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) versus WBRT alone. An improved prognostic index, the graded prognostic assessment (GPA) has been developed. Our hypothesis was that if the data from RTOG 9508 were poststratified by the GPA, the conclusions may vary. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 252 of the 331 patients were evaluable by GPA. Of those, 211 had lung cancer. Breast cancer patients were excluded because the components of the breast GPA are not in the RTOG database. Multiple Cox regression was used to compare survival between treatment groups, adjusting for GPA. Treatment comparisons within subgroups were performed with the log-rank test. A free online tool ( (brainmetgpa.com)) simplified GPA use. Results: The fundamental conclusions of the primary analysis were confirmed in that there was no survival benefit overall for patients with 1 to 3 metastases; however, there was a benefit for the subset of patients with GPA 3.5 to 4.0 (median survival time [MST] for WBRT + SRS vs WBRT alone was 21.0 versus 10.3 months, P=.05) regardless of the number of metastases. Among patients with GPA 3.5 to 4.0 treated with WBRT and SRS, the MST for patients with 1 versus 2 to 3 metastases was 21 and 14.1 months, respectively. Conclusions: This secondary analysis of predominantly lung cancer patients, consistent with the original analysis, shows no survival advantage for the group overall when treated with WBRT and SRS; however, in patients with high GPA (3.5-4), there is a survival advantage regardless of whether they have 1, 2, or 3 BM. This benefit did not extend to patients with lower GPA. Prospective validation of this survival benefit for patients with multiple BM and high GPA when treated with WBRT and SRS is warranted.

  1. Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer with Metastases: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, Sadananda Rao; Ramanan, Ganapathi; Dedeepiya, Vidyasagar Devaprasad; Terunuma, Hiroshi; Deng, Xuewen; Baskar, Subramani; Senthilkumar, Rajappa; Thamaraikannan, Paramasivam; Srinivasan, Thangavelu; Preethy, Senthilkumar; Abraham, Samuel J.K.

    2012-01-01

    Current therapeutic modalities for ovarian cancer such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery have been reported to yield only marginal success in improving survival rates of patients and have associated adverse effects. We report here a case of recurrent stage IV ovarian cancer, treated with cell-based autologous immune enhancement therapy (AIET) along with chemotherapy and followed up for 18 months. A 54-year-old female was diagnosed with a recurrence of ovarian carcinoma 1 year after initial surgical removal followed by chemotherapy for stage IIIC ovarian carcinoma. When diagnosed in 2010 with recurrence, she had liver and spleen metastases with a CA-125 level of 243 U/ml and a stage IV clinical status. Six infusions of AIET using autologous in vitro expanded and activated natural killer (NK) cells (CD3–CD56+) and activated T lymphocytes (CD3+CD56+) were administered in combination with 6 cycles of chemotherapy with carboplatin and doxorubicin. Following this treatment, CA-125 decreased to 4.7 U/ml along with regression of the metastatic lesions and an improved quality of life. No adverse reactions were reported after the AIET transfusions. Eighteen months of follow-up revealed a static nonprogressive disease. Combining AIET with chemotherapy and other conventional treatments has been found to be effective in our experience, as reported earlier, even in patients with advanced ovarian cancer, and we recommend this strategy be considered in treating similar cases. PMID:22666198

  2. Infiltrating Mast Cells Correlate with Angiogenesis in Bone Metastases from Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ammendola, Michele; Marech, Ilaria; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Zuccalà, Valeria; Luposella, Maria; Zizzo, Nicola; Patruno, Rosa; Crovace, Alberto; Ruggieri, Eustachio; Zito, Alfredo Francesco; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sacco, Rosario; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2015-01-01

    While gastric cancer is a well established angiogenesis driven tumor, no data has been published regarding angiogenesis stimulated by mast cells (MCs) positive for tryptase in bone metastases from gastric cancer patients (BMGCP). It is well established that MCs play a role in immune responses and more recently it was demonstrated that MCs have been involved in tumor angiogenesis. We analyzed infiltrating MCs and neovascularization in BMGCP diagnosed by histology. A series of 15 stage T3-4N2-3M1 (by AJCC for Gastric Cancer Staging 7th Edition) BMGCP from bone biopsies were selected. Tumour tissue samples were evaluated by mean of immunohistochemistry and image analysis methods in terms of MCs density positive to tryptase (MCDPT), MCs area positive to tryptase (MCAPT), microvascular density (MVD) and endothelial area (EA). A significant correlation between MCDPT, MCAPT, MVD and EA groups to each other was found by Pearson and t-test analysis (r ranged from 0.68 to 0.82; p-value ranged from 0.00 to 0.02). Our very preliminary data suggest that infiltrating MCs positive for tryptase may play a role in BMGCP angiogenesis, and could be further evaluated as a novel target of anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:25648323

  3. Exploiting machine learning for predicting skeletal-related events in cancer patients with bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yaohong; Yao, Yang; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the bone metastases (BM) treatment is to prevent the occurrence of skeletal-related events (SREs). In clinical, physicians could only predict the occurrence of SREs by subjective experience. Machine learning (ML) could be used as predictive models in the medical field. But there is no published research using ML to predict SREs in cancer patients with BM. The purpose of this study was to assess the associations of clinical variables with the occurrence of SREs and to subsequently develop prediction models to help identify SREs risk groups. We analyzed 1143 cancer patients with BM. We used the statistical package of SPSS and SPSS Modeler for data analysis and the development of the prediction model. We compared the performance of logistic regression (LR), decision tree (DT) and support vector machine(SVM). The results suggested that Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scale was a key factor to SREs in LR, DT and SVM model. Modifiable factors such as Frankel classification, Mirels score, Ca, aminoterminal propeptide of type I collagen (PINP) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) were identified. We found that the result of applying LR, DT and SVM classification accuracy was 79.2%, 85.8% and 88.2%, with 9, 4 and 8 variables, respectively. In conclusion, DT and SVM achieved higher accuracies with smaller number of variables than the number of variables used in LR. ML techniques can be used to build model to predict SREs in cancer patients with BM. PMID:26871471

  4. Exploiting machine learning for predicting skeletal-related events in cancer patients with bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyu; Wen, Xiaoting; Lu, Yaohong; Yao, Yang; Zhao, Hui

    2016-03-15

    The aim of the bone metastases (BM) treatment is to prevent the occurrence of skeletal-related events (SREs). In clinical, physicians could only predict the occurrence of SREs by subjective experience. Machine learning (ML) could be used as predictive models in the medical field. But there is no published research using ML to predict SREs in cancer patients with BM. The purpose of this study was to assess the associations of clinical variables with the occurrence of SREs and to subsequently develop prediction models to help identify SREs risk groups.We analyzed 1143 cancer patients with BM. We used the statistical package of SPSS and SPSS Modeler for data analysis and the development of the prediction model. We compared the performance of logistic regression (LR), decision tree (DT) and support vector machine(SVM). The results suggested that Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scale was a key factor to SREs in LR, DT and SVM model. Modifiable factors such as Frankel classification, Mirels score, Ca, aminoterminal propeptide of type I collagen (PINP) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) were identified. We found that the result of applying LR, DT and SVM classification accuracy was 79.2%, 85.8% and 88.2%, with 9, 4 and 8 variables, respectively.In conclusion, DT and SVM achieved higher accuracies with smaller number of variables than the number of variables used in LR. ML techniques can be used to build model to predict SREs in cancer patients with BM.

  5. High CD10 expression in lymph node metastases from surgically treated prostate cancer independently predicts early death.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Achim; Rocha, Carla; Saxer-Sekulic, Nikolina; Zlobec, Inti; Sauter, Guido; Thalmann, George N

    2011-06-01

    Patients with nodal positive prostate cancers are an important cohort with poorly defined risk factors. CD10 is a cell surface metallopeptidase that has been suggested to play a role in prostate cancer progression. CD10 expression was evaluated in 119 nodal positive prostate cancer patients using tissue microarrays constructed from primary tumors and lymph node metastases. All patients underwent radical prostatectomy and standardized extended lymphadenectomy. They had no neoadjuvant therapy and received deferred androgen deprivation. In the primary tumor, high CD10 expression was significantly associated with earlier death from disease when compared with low CD10 expression (5-year survival 73.7% vs. 91.8%; p = 0.043). In the metastases, a high CD10 expression was significantly associated with larger total size of metastases (median 11.4 vs. 6.5 mm; p = 0.015), earlier death of disease (5-year survival 71.5% vs. 87.3%; p = 0.017), and death of any cause (5-year survival 70.0% vs. 87.2%; p = 0.001) when compared with low CD10 expression. CD10 expression in the metastases added independent prognostic information for overall survival (p = 0.029) after adjustment for Gleason score of the primary tumor, nodal tumor burden, and resection margins. In conclusion, a high CD10 expression in prostate cancer predicts early death. This information is inherent in the primary tumors and in the lymph node metastases and might help to personalize patient management.

  6. Nomogram to Predict Occult N2 Lymph Nodes Metastases in Patients With Squamous Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Long; Jiang, Shanshan; Lin, Yongbin; Yang, Han; Xie, Zehua; Lin, Yaobin; Long, Hao

    2015-11-01

    For nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients without distant metastases, occult involvement of N2 lymph nodes would be of the utmost importance in determining both treatment and survival. The key to optimal treatment strategies relied on accurate diagnosis, in particular accurate clinical tumor staging. Patients with clinical N0 or N1 staging preoperatively had a sizeable risk to have occult N2 lymph nodes metastases.From November 2004 to March 2007, the entire database in a tertiary hospital of all patients with a pathologic diagnosis of squamous NSCLC underwent anatomical pulmonary resection and systematic mediastinal lymph node dissection were retrospectively collected and reviewed. A nomogram was developed on the basis of a multivariable logistic regression model with a combination of all potential variables. In order to surmount the potential of overestimating predictive performance, both bootstrapping for internal validation and an independent external validation set were employed.A nomogram incorporating the significant risk factors was created to predict the probability of occult N2 lymph nodes metastases. The calibration plot for the probability of occult N2 lymph nodes metastases showed an optimal agreement between the predicted probabilities by nomogram and actual observed probabilities. An objective and accurate nomogram predictive model for occult N2 lymph nodes metastases was drawn up and validated internally and externally in patients with squamous NSCLC.The nomogram model, as a robust tool in predicting occult N2 lymph nodes involvement, could be involved in a cost-effective application of specific diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  7. Control of the blood-brain barrier function in cancer cell metastasis.

    PubMed

    Blecharz, Kinga G; Colla, Ruben; Rohde, Veit; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral metastases are the most common brain neoplasms seen clinically in the adults and comprise more than half of all brain tumours. Actual treatment options for brain metastases that include surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are rarely curative, although palliative treatment improves survival and life quality of patients carrying brain-metastatic tumours. Chemotherapy in particular has also shown limited or no activity in brain metastasis of most tumour types. Many chemotherapeutic agents used systemically d