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Sample records for cancer bronchique localise

  1. Métastases musculaires squelettique asymptomatique d'un cancer bronchique non à petites cellules

    PubMed Central

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Oukabli, Mohamed; Biyi, Abdelhamid; Elouazzani, Hanane; Rhorfi, Ismail Abderrahman; Abid, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Le cancer bronchique reste parmi les cancers les plus agressifs malgré les avancées diagnostiques et thérapeutiques, les métastases à distance constituent l’élément majeur d'un mauvais pronostic. Nous rapportons une observation de métastases musculaires chez un patient porteur d'un cancer du poumon inopérable. La détection de cette métastase était grâce au TEP scan au 18 FDG. Ce bilan a conduit à un traitement par chimiothérapie systémique après biopsie exérèse de la localisation fessière. Les métastases musculaires squelettiques du cancer bronchique sont rares mais bien qu'indiquant un mauvais pronostic, elles sont accessibles à un traitement local efficace. PMID:26918076

  2. Métastases cutanées révélant un adénocarcinome bronchique

    PubMed Central

    Zemmez, Youssef; Zegmout, Adil; Hamama, Jalal; Bouhamidi, Ahmed; El Amraoui, Mohammed; El Azhari, Jaouad; Boui, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Nous rapportons le cas d'un cancer bronchique révélé par des nodules cutanés métastatiques du cuir chevelu. Ce mode de découverte assez fréquent est souvent associé à un mauvais pronostic. Cette observation souligne l'intérêt de rechercher un cancer primitif pulmonaire en cas de localisation secondaire cutanée. PMID:27583066

  3. Cancer bronchique à petites cellules et grossesse: à propos d'un cas avec revue de la literature

    PubMed Central

    Safini, Fatima; Jjouhadi, Hassan; Chehal, Asmaa; Mernissi, Farida; Wilfried, Akpoo; Bouchbika, Zineb; Taleb, Amina; Benchakroun, Nadia; Tawfiq, Nezha; Sahraoui, Souha; Benider, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Le cancer broncho-pulmonaire (CBP) de la femme enceinte est une entité rare, d’évolution péjorative. Cette situation devient de plus en plus fréquente, du fait de l'augmentation du tabagisme chez la femme. La transmission tumorale trans-placentaire avec atteinte fœtale est décrite surtout chez les femmes non traitées. Le traitement est multidisciplinaire et n'est pas bien codifié. Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente de 23 ans chez qui le diagnostic d'un carcinome bronchique à petites cellules a été fait au cours de sa grossesse. Elle avait bénéficié d'une chimiothérapie pendant la grossesse, bien tolérée. L’évaluation radiologique a objectivé une stabilisation du processus pulmonaire. Le traitement a été complété par une association radio-chimiothérapie concomitante après l'accouchement. PMID:27279957

  4. [Value of galvanotherapy for localised prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Arsov, C; Winter, C; Albers, P

    2009-07-01

    In recent years electrotherapy has become an accepted treatment option in several medical subfields such as defibrillation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, electroconvulsive shock treatment (ECT) in conjunction with antidepressant therapy, pain management and physical therapy [transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), diathermia, Stanger bath therapy, etc.]. In recent years several groups, especially from Asia, have investigated the therapeutic effect of electricity in the treatment of malignant tumours. They determined basic principles of electrotherapy and developed different theories of tumour destruction. They postulated a multifactorial tissue effect of continuous current based on tumour cell necrosis due to pH shifting and alteration of membrane potential. In clinical trials similar oncological results of electrotherapy in several malignant tumours compared to established therapeutic methods were observed, whereas clinical trial designs to some extent were not consistent with internationally accepted scientific standards. Regarding electrotherapy of localised prostate cancer only limited data with a few cases and controversial study designs were published. According to EAU guidelines electrotherapy of localised prostate cancer as an alternative treatment option is not recommended and is still an experimental method. For this procedure well-designed clinical trials and a longer follow-up are mandatory to assess the true role of electrotherapy in the management of prostate cancer.

  5. Positron detection for the intraoperative localisation of cancer deposits

    PubMed Central

    Burian, Maria; Meisetschläger, Günther; Stein, Hubert J.; Ziegler, Sibylle; Nährig, Jörg; Picchio, Maria; Buck, Andreas; Siewert, Joerg R.; Schwaiger, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The study investigated the feasibility of a positron-sensitive hand-held detector system for the intraoperative localisation of tumour deposits resulting from intravenous [18F]FDG administration. Methods A total of 17 patients (12 receiving preoperative [18F]FDG PET imaging) with various histologically proven malignancies were included. Radioactivity from tumours and surrounding normal tissue was measured on average 3 h after administration of 36–110 MBq [18F]FDG and the tumour-to-background (T/B) ratio was calculated. In addition, phantom studies were performed to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the probe. Results All known targeted tumour sites were identified by the positron probe. T/B ratios were generally high, with a mean T/B ratio of 6.6, allowing easy identification of most tumour sites. In one case of a hepatic metastasis, the T/B ratio of 1.34 was below expectations, since the preoperative [18F]FDG PET scan was positive. The probe was instrumental in the localisation of three additional tumour lesions (two lymph nodes, one anastomotic ring) that were not immediately apparent at surgery. Phantom studies revealed that [18F]FDG-containing gel (simulating tumour tissue), having 10 times more [18F]FDG than surrounding “normal” background gel, was clearly detectable in quantities as low as 15 mg. As measured in two cases, the absorbed radiation doses ranged from 2.5 to 8.6 μSv/h for the surgical team to 0.8 μSv/h for the aesthetician. Conclusion [18F]FDG-accumulating tumour tissues can be localised with positron probes intraoperatively with a low radiation burden to the patient and medical personnel. The methodology holds promise for further clinical testing. PMID:17431612

  6. Current trends in the management of localised prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sibley, G N; Kabala, J

    1992-12-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer in the UK is increasing, and the disease is being detected more often in younger patients (e.g. from routine PSA measurement during health-care screening). Left untreated, a significant proportion of patients will undergo progression of their disease locally and/or develop metastases. Modern imaging techniques have greatly aided the assessment of early prostatic cancer, enabling both accurate assessment of the primary tumour and giving valuable information regarding lymph node metastases. PSA measurements are also extremely helpful, and this has replaced acid phosphatase as a marker for prostatic malignancy. Controversy still remains, however, over the best form of management. Radical prostatectomy undoubtedly produces the best results in the literature, but the patients are highly selected (e.g. those with nodal metastases are excluded) and some patients with well differentiated tumours may have been over-treated, as they may have been expected to do well with surveillance alone. Full clinical trials are required in identically staged patients to assess the relative merits of surveillance, radiotherapy and surgery, and this should now be possible with recent advances in imaging techniques.

  7. [Prognostic factors of localised, locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Joly, Florence; Henry-Amar, Michel

    2007-07-01

    In prostate cancer, whatever the stage of the disease, the selection of a treatment strategy is based on prognostic factors. Clinical stage, serum PSA concentration and Gleason score are among the most recognised factors. A combination of these three parameters leads to a score used to define prognostic groups that are routinely used in daily practice. More recently, predictive statistical models have been developed that were associated with nomograms. The objective of nomograms is, for a given patient, to calculate his probability to develop disease extension or relapse based on clinical, biological, histological and therapeutic (radiotherapy, hormonotherapy) data. Such nomograms are not all validated and their application in daily practice is more difficult than that of classical prognostic classifications. Nowadays, the progress and accessibility to novel technologies applied to biology will make possible in the near future the assessment of new prognostic profiles based on genetic and/or proteomic tumour characteristics.

  8. Cell surface localised Hsp70 is a cancer specific regulator of clathrin-independent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nimmervoll, Benedikt; Chtcheglova, Lilia A; Juhasz, Kata; Cremades, Nunilo; Aprile, Francesco A; Sonnleitner, Alois; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Vigh, Laszlo; Preiner, Johannes; Balogi, Zsolt

    2015-09-14

    The stress inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is present specifically on the tumour cell surface yet without a pro-tumour function revealed. We show here that cell surface localised Hsp70 (sHsp70) supports clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) in melanoma models. Remarkably, ability of Hsp70 to cluster on lipid rafts in vitro correlated with larger nano-domain sizes of sHsp70 in high sHsp70 expressing cell membranes. Interfering with Hsp70 oligomerisation impaired sHsp70-mediated facilitation of endocytosis. Altogether our findings suggest that a sub-fraction of sHsp70 co-localising with lipid rafts enhances CIE through oligomerisation and clustering. Targeting or utilising this tumour specific mechanism may represent an additional benefit for anti-cancer therapy.

  9. Genomic and Histopathological Tissue Biomarkers That Predict Radiotherapy Response in Localised Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Anna; Dearnaley, David; Somaiah, Navita

    2015-01-01

    Localised prostate cancer, in particular, intermediate risk disease, has varied survival outcomes that cannot be predicted accurately using current clinical risk factors. External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is one of the standard curative treatment options for localised disease and its efficacy is related to wide ranging aspects of tumour biology. Histopathological techniques including immunohistochemistry and a variety of genomic assays have been used to identify biomarkers of tumour proliferation, cell cycle checkpoints, hypoxia, DNA repair, apoptosis, and androgen synthesis, which predict response to radiotherapy. Global measures of genomic instability also show exciting capacity to predict survival outcomes following EBRT. There is also an urgent clinical need for biomarkers to predict the radiotherapy fraction sensitivity of different prostate tumours and preclinical studies point to possible candidates. Finally, the increased resolution of next generation sequencing (NGS) is likely to enable yet more precise molecular predictions of radiotherapy response and fraction sensitivity. PMID:26504789

  10. EphB4 localises to the nucleus of prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens-Walker, Inga; Lisle, Jessica E.; Nyberg, William A.; Stephens, Carson R.; Burke, Leslie; Rutkowski, Raphael; Herington, Adrian C.; Stephenson, Sally-Anne

    2015-04-10

    The EphB4 receptor tyrosine kinase is over-expressed in a variety of different epithelial cancers including prostate where it has been shown to be involved in survival, migration and angiogenesis. We report here that EphB4 also resides in the nucleus of prostate cancer cell lines. We used in silico methods to identify a bipartite nuclear localisation signal (NLS) in the extracellular domain and a monopartite NLS sequence in the intracellular kinase domain of EphB4. To determine whether both putative NLS sequences were functional, fragments of the EphB4 sequence containing each NLS were cloned to create EphB4NLS-GFP fusion proteins. Localisation of both NLS-GFP proteins to the nuclei of transfected cells was observed, demonstrating that EphB4 contains two functional NLS sequences. Mutation of the key amino residues in both NLS sequences resulted in diminished nuclear accumulation. As nuclear translocation is often dependent on importins we confirmed that EphB4 and importin-α can interact. To assess if nuclear EphB4 could be implicated in gene regulatory functions potential EphB4-binding genomic loci were identified using chromatin immunoprecipitation and Lef1 was confirmed as a potential target of EphB4-mediated gene regulation. These novel findings add further complexity to the biology of this important cancer-associated receptor. - Highlights: • The EphB4 protein can be found in the nucleus of prostate cancer cell lines. • EphB4 contains two functional nuclear localisation signals. • Chromatin immunoprecipitation has identified potential genome sequences to which EphB4 binds. • Lef1 is a confirmed target for EphB4-mediated gene regulation.

  11. The Role of Focal Therapy in the Management of Localised Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Massimo; Ahmed, Hashim U.; Emberton, Mark; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Lazzeri, Massimo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Nguyen, Paul L.; Trachtenberg, John; Polascik, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Context The incidence of localised prostate cancer is increasing worldwide. In light of recent evidence, current, radical, whole-gland treatments for organ-confined disease have being questioned with respect to their side effects, cancer control, and cost. Focal therapy may be an effective alternative strategy. Objective To systematically review the existing literature on baseline characteristics of the target population; preoperative evaluation to localise disease; and perioperative, functional, and disease control outcomes following focal therapy. Evidence acquisition Medline (through PubMed), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Review databases were searched from inception to 31 October 2012. In addition, registered but not yet published trials were retrieved. Studies evaluating tissue-preserving therapies in men with biopsy-proven prostate cancer in the primary or salvage setting were included. Evidence synthesis A total of 2350 cases were treated to date across 30 studies. Most studies were retrospective with variable standards of reporting, although there was an increasing number of prospective registered trials. Focal therapy was mainly delivered to men with low and intermediate disease, although some high-risk cases were treated that had known, unilateral, significant cancer. In most of the cases, biopsy findings were correlated to specific preoperative imaging, such as multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging or Doppler ultrasound to determine eligibility. Follow-up varied between 0 and 11.1 yr. In treatment-naïve prostates, pad-free continence ranged from 95% to 100%, erectile function ranged from 54% to 100%, and absence of clinically significant cancer ranged from 83% to 100%. In focal salvage cases for radiotherapy failure, the same outcomes were achieved in 87.2–100%, 29–40%, and 92% of cases, respectively. Biochemical disease-free survival was reported using a number of definitions that were not validated in the focal-therapy setting

  12. Localisation endobronchique d'une leucémie aiguë lymphoblastique de phénotype T

    PubMed Central

    Sajiai, Hafsa; Fikal, Siham; Serhane, Hind; Aitbatahar, Salma; Amro, Lamyae; Yazidi, Abdelhaq Alaoui

    2015-01-01

    La localisation endobronchique des leucémies aigues lymphoblastiques est exceptionnelle, de rares cas ont été rapportés dans la littérature. Nous rapportons le cas d'une localisation endobronchique d'une leucémie aigue lymphoblastique de phénotype T révélée par une pleurésie purulente et confirmée par biopsie bronchique. Une chimiothérapie a été démarrée avec bonne évolution. PMID:26401199

  13. Reduction in expression of the benign AR transcriptome is a hallmark of localised prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Stuchbery, Ryan; Macintyre, Geoff; Cmero, Marek; Harewood, Laurence M.; Peters, Justin S.; Costello, Anthony J.; Hovens, Christopher M.; Corcoran, Niall M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of androgen receptor (AR) signalling to prostate cancer development, little is known about how this signalling pathway changes with increasing grade and stage of the disease. Objective To explore changes in the normal AR transcriptome in localised prostate cancer, and its relation to adverse pathological features and disease recurrence. Design Publically accessible human prostate cancer expression arrays as well as RNA sequencing data from the prostate TCGA. Tumour associated PSA and PSAD were calculated for a large cohort of men (n=1108) undergoing prostatectomy. Outcome Measurements and Statistical Analysis We performed a meta-analysis of the expression of an androgen-regulated gene set across datasets using Oncomine. Differential expression of selected genes in the prostate TCGA database was probed using the edgeR Bioconductor package. Changes in tumour PSA density with stage and grade were assessed by Student's t-test, and its association with biochemical recurrence explored by Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression. Results Meta-analysis revealed a systematic decline in the expression of a previously identified benign prostate androgen-regulated gene set with increasing tumour grade, reaching significance in nine of 25 genes tested despite increasing AR expression. These results were confirmed in a large independent dataset from the TCGA. At the protein level, when serum PSA was corrected for tumour volume, significantly lower levels were observed with increasing tumour grade and stage, and predicted disease recurrence. Conclusions Lower PSA secretion-per-tumour-volume is associated with increasing grade and stage of prostate cancer, has prognostic relevance, and reflects a systematic perturbation of androgen signalling. PMID:27120785

  14. Relation between outcomes and localisation of p-mTOR expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, T; Inokuchi, M; Takagi, Y; Yamada, H; Kojima, K; Kumagai, J; Kawano, T; Sugihara, K

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a Ser/Thr protein kinase that mediates intracellular signalling related to cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation, has received considerable interest as a possible target for cancer treatment. We evaluated the correlation of mTOR expression with clinicopathological features, outcomes, and the expression of Akt, an upstream regulator of mTOR, in gastric cancer. Tumour samples were obtained from 109 patients with gastric adenocarcinomas who underwent a radical gastrectomy. The expressions of phosphorylated mTOR (p-mTOR) and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus were analysed by immunohistochemical staining. Cytoplasmic p-mTOR expression positively correlated with the depth of tumour invasion (T1 vs T2–4, P=0.003), involved lymph nodes (P=0.010), and tumour stage (I vs II–IV, P=0.002). In contrast, nuclear p-mTOR expression negatively correlated with these variables (P<0.001,=0.035, and <0.001). Cytoplasmic p-mTOR expression was associated with significantly poorer relapse-free survival (RFS, P=0.037) and overall survival (OS, P=0.024), whereas nuclear p-mTOR expression was associated with better RFS and OS (P=0.029, 0.059). Neither cytoplasmic nor nuclear p-Akt expression was associated with any clinicopathological factor or with survival. Localisation of p-mTOR may play an important role in tumour progression and outcomes in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:19223902

  15. Pulmonary metastasis as sole manifestation of relapse in previously treated localised prostate cancer: three exceptional case reports.

    PubMed

    Gago, Joaquim Peres; Câmara, Gabriela; Dionísio, Jorge; Opinião, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer recurrence after definitive local therapy can occur in any tissue. Usually, the first affected site is the bone. Lung metastases without bone or lymph node involvement are extremely rare in patients with prostate cancer, and only a handful of cases are reported in the literature. In several other malignancies, such as breast cancer, sarcomas, colorectal cancer, and renal cell carcinoma, long-term disease-free survival has been reported after resection of solitary pulmonary metastases. We present three unusual cases of isolated pulmonary recurrence of prostate cancer after initial definitive local therapy. One of the patients underwent resection of the lung metastasis, resulting in a long-term disease-free survival. Both surgical excision of solitary and oligometastatic lung secondary lesions and systemic therapy can play an important role in long-term disease control. Surgery should be considered for selected and well-informed patients with pulmonary metastasis after primary localised treatment for prostate cancer. PMID:27350790

  16. Efficacy and toxicity of external-beam radiation therapy for localised prostate cancer: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Z; Zhang, J; Liu, Y; Chen, M; Guo, P; Li, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many radiation regimens for treating prostate cancer have been used over the years, but which regimen is optimal for localised or locally advanced prostate cancer lacks consensus. We performed a network meta-analysis to identify the optimal radiation regimen. Methods: We systematically reviewed data from 27 randomised controlled trials and could group seven radiation regimens as follows: low- and high-dose radiation therapy (LDRT and HDRT), LDRT+ short- or long-term androgen deprivation therapy (LDRT+SADT and LDRT+LADT), HDRT+SADT, hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT), and HFRT+SADT. The main outcomes were overall mortality (OM), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure, cancer-specific mortality, and adverse events. Results: For the network meta-analysis of 27 trials, LDRT+LADT and LDRT+SADT were associated with decreased risk of OM as compared with LDRT alone as was LDRT+LADT compared with HDRT. Apart from HFRT, all other treatments were associated with decreased risk of PSA failure as compared with LDRT. HFRT+SADT was associated with decreased risk of cancer-specific mortality as compared with HFRT, LDRT+SADT, HDRT, and LDRT. Conclusions: HFRT+SADT therapy might be the most efficacious treatment but with worst toxicity for localised or locally advanced prostate cancer, and HDRT showed excellent efficacy but more adverse events. PMID:24736585

  17. ERG rearrangement as a novel marker for predicting the extra-prostatic extension of clinically localised prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    LU, LI; ZHANG, HAO; PANG, JUN; HOU, GUO-LIANG; LU, MIN-HUA; GAO, XIN

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are no well-established preoperative clinicopathological parameters for predicting extra-prostatic extension (EPE) in patients with clinically localised prostate cancer (PCa). The transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2)-ETS-related gene (ERG) fusion gene is a specific biomarker of PCa and is considered a prognostic predictor. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of this marker for predicting EPE in patients with clinically localised PCa. In total, 306 PCa patients with clinically localised disease, including 220 patients (71.9%) with organ-confined disease and 86 EPE cases (28.1%), were included in the study. Receiver operating characteristic curves and logistic regression were employed to establish the optimal cut-off value and to investigate whether ERG rearrangement was an independent predictor for the EPE of clinically localised PCa. A leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) model was implemented to validate the predictive power of ERG rearrangement. An increase in ERG rearrangements was identified to be associate'd with EPE, and the optimal cut-off for predicting EPE was determined to be 2.25%, with a sensitivity of 70.24% [95% confidence interval (CI), 62.6–78.9%], a specificity of 80.43% (95% CI, 75.4–85.1%), and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.781 (95% CI, 0.730–0.826). In the LOOCV model, ERG rearrangement also demonstrated good performance for predicting EPE (sensitivity, 76.923%; specificity, 71.429%; 95% CI for AUC, 0.724–0.958). In addition, a high Gleason score (≥7) and a cT2c classification upon biopsy were independent factors for EPE. PMID:27073512

  18. Fibulin-5 localisation in human endometrial cancer shifts from epithelial to stromal with increasing tumour grade, and silencing promotes endometrial epithelial cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    WINSHIP, AMY LOUISE; RAINCZUK, KATE; TON, AMANDA; DIMITRIADIS, EVA

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynaecological malignancy. While endocrine, genetic and inflammatory factors are thought to contribute to its pathogenesis, its precise etiology and molecular regulators remain poorly understood. Fibulin-5 is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that inhibits cell growth and invasion in several cancer cell types and is downregulated in a number of types of human cancer. However, it is unknown whether fibulin-5 plays a role in endometrial tumourigenesis. In the current report, the expression and localisation of fibulin-5 in type I endometrioid human endometrial cancers of grades (G) 1–3 was investigated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Fibulin-5 mRNA was found to be significantly reduced in whole tumour tissues from women across G1-3 compared with benign endometrium (P<0.0001). Consistently, fibulin-5 protein was also reduced in the tumour epithelial compartment across increasing tumour grades. By contrast, increased protein localisation to the tumour stroma was observed with increasing grade. Knockdown by small interfering RNA in Ishikawa endometrial epithelial cancer cells expressing fibulin-5 stimulated cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro. Fibulin-5 mRNA expression in Ishikawa cells was induced by transforming growth factor-β and fibulin-5 in turn activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), suggesting that it may act via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In summary, the present study identified fibulin-5 as a downregulated ECM gene in human endometrial cancer and observed a shift from epithelial to stromal protein localisation with increasing tumour grade in women. These data suggest that loss of fibulin-5 function may promote endometrial cancer progression by enhancing epithelial cell adhesion and proliferation. PMID:27347195

  19. Cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal adjuvant therapy for breast cancer: a case of localised urticarial vasculitis following anastrozole therapy and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bock, Vanessa L; Friedlander, Michael; Waring, Dale; Kossard, Steven; Wood, Glenda K

    2014-11-01

    Hormonal therapy with either tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors is commonly used to treat women with breast cancer in both the adjuvant and recurrent disease setting. Cutaneous adverse reactions to these drugs have been rarely reported in the literature. We report an unusual case of urticarial vasculitis following the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole that localised to the unilateral trunk and mastectomy scar, and review the literature on the cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal therapy for breast cancer.

  20. KPNA2 is a nuclear export protein that contributes to aberrant localisation of key proteins and poor prognosis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alshareeda, A T; Negm, O H; Green, A R; Nolan, C C; Tighe, P; Albarakati, N; Sultana, R; Madhusudan, S; Ellis, I O; Rakha, E A

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is recognised that modulations of the nuclear import of macromolecules have a role in changing cellular phenotypes and carcinogenesis. We and others have noticed that aberrant subcellular localisation of DNA damage response (DDR) proteins in breast cancer (BC) is associated with loss-of-function phenotype. This study aims to investigate the biological and clinical significance of the nucleocytoplasmic transport protein karyopherin α-2 (KPNA2), and its role in controlling DDR proteins subcellular localisation in BC. Methods: A large (n=1494) and well-characterised series of early-stage invasive BC with a long-term follow-up was assessed for KPNA2 protein by using immunohistochemistry. Results: KPNA2 expression was associated with the subcellular localisation of key DDR proteins that showed cytoplasmic expression including BRCA1, RAD51, SMC6L1, γH2AX, BARD1, UBC9, PIAS1 and CHK1. High level of KPNA2 was associated not only with cytoplasmic localisation of these proteins but also with their low/negative nuclear expression. Positive KPNA2 expression was associated with negative oestrogen receptor and triple-negative phenotype. Survival analysis showed that KPNA2 was associated with poor outcome (P<0.0001), but this effect was not independent of other prognostic variables. Conclusions: This study provides further evidence for the complexity of DDR mechanism in BC, and that KNPA2 has a role in the aberrant subcellular localisation of DDR proteins with subsequent impaired function. PMID:25989275

  1. Salvage robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy following failed primary high-intensity focussed ultrasound treatment for localised prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Declan G; Pedersen, John; Costello, Anthony J

    2008-09-01

    We report the first case of salvage robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) following failed primary high-intensity focussed ultrasound (HIFU) for localised carcinoma of the prostate. A 66-year-old male with a presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 5 ng/ml was diagnosed with T1c Gleason 3 + 4 prostate cancer. He underwent transurethral resection of the prostate and HIFU. His PSA dropped to 2.0 ng/ml and repeat biopsy revealed upgrading of his prostate cancer to Gleason 4 + 3. He was referred to us for a second opinion and, following discussion of his options, he underwent RALP. The total operative time was 159 min. There were no intra- or postoperative complications. He was discharged on postoperative day two and was fully continent 10 days following removal of his catheter. His PSA remained undetectable 6 months postoperatively. Salvage RALP was feasible in this case with good functional and short-term oncological outcomes for the patient. PMID:27628262

  2. Blood flow and associated pathophysiology of uterine cervix cancers: characterisation and relevance for localised hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Vaupel, Peter W; Kelleher, Debra K

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancers exhibit substantial intra- and inter-tumour heterogeneities in blood flow prior to treatment, reflecting similar variability in vascularisation. When clinically relevant hyperthermia is applied as an adjuvant to established treatment modalities, blood flow may change in non-predictable directions, extents and durations, indicating subsequent variability in heat dissipation and in flow-associated parameters of the tumour microenvironment. Before heating, locally advanced cervical cancers are mostly hypoxic, acidic, exhibit substrate and energy deprivation and show lactate accumulation, which is spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Additionally a relatively homogeneous interstitial hypertension is observed. Most probably, metabolic parameters of the hostile microenvironment are able to greatly modulate the thermosensitivity of cancer cells. Adequate information concerning changes upon heat treatment is not available so far. Due to this lack of proven data for cervical cancers upon heat treatment, clinical studies are urgently needed in order to judge the possible impact of blood flow and the above-mentioned microenvironmental parameters.

  3. Prognostic value of PTEN loss in men with conservatively managed localised prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, J; Yang, Z H; Fisher, G; Tikishvili, E; Stone, S; Lanchbury, J S; Camacho, N; Merson, S; Brewer, D; Cooper, C S; Clark, J; Berney, D M; Møller, H; Scardino, P; Sangale, Z

    2013-01-01

    Background: The natural history of prostate cancer is highly variable and difficult to predict. We report on the prognostic value of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) loss in a cohort of 675 men with conservatively managed prostate cancer diagnosed by transurethral resection of the prostate. Methods: The PTEN status was assayed by immunohistochemistry (PTEN IHC) and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (PTEN FISH). The primary end point was death from prostate cancer. Results: The PTEN IHC loss was observed in 18% cases. This was significantly associated with prostate cancer death in univariate analysis (hazard ratio (HR)=3.51; 95% CI 2.60–4.73; P=3.1 × 10−14). It was highly predictive of prostate cancer death in the 50% of patients with a low risk score based on Gleason score, PSA, Ki-67 and extent of disease (HR=7.4; 95% CI 2.2–24.6; P=0.012) ), but had no prognostic value in the higher risk patients. The PTEN FISH loss was only weakly associated with PTEN IHC loss (κ=0.5). Both PTEN FISH loss and amplification were univariately predictive of death from prostate cancer, but this was not maintained in the multivariate analyses. Conclusion: In low-risk patients, PTEN IHC loss adds prognostic value to Gleason score, PSA, Ki-67 and extent of disease. PMID:23695019

  4. Localisation Standards and Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Dimitra; Vázquez, Lucia Morado

    In this paper we describe a localisation process and focus on localisation standards. Localisation standards provide a common framework for localisers, including authors, translators, engineers, and publishers. Standards with rich semantic metadata generally facilitate, accelerate, and improve the localisation process. We focus particularly on the XML Localisation Interchange File Format (XLIFF), and present our experiment and results. An html file after converted into XLIFF, travels through different commercial localisation tools, and as a result, data as well as metadata are stripped away. Interoperability between file formats and application is a key issue for localisation and thus we stress how this can be achieved.

  5. The Subcellular Localisation of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E7 Protein in Cervical Cancer Cells and Its Perturbation by RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Cesur, Özlem; Nicol, Clare; Groves, Helen; Mankouri, Jamel; Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract, affecting both men and women. High-risk oncogenic types are responsible for almost 90% of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers including cervical cancer. Some of the HPV “early” genes, particularly E6 and E7, are known to act as oncogenes that promote tumour growth and malignant transformation. Most notably, HPV-16 E7 interacts with the tumour suppressor protein pRb, promoting its degradation, leading to cell cycle dysregulation in infected cells. We have previously shown that an RNA aptamer (termed A2) selectively binds to HPV16 E7 and is able to induce apoptosis in HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma cell lines (SiHa) through reduction of E7 levels. In this study, we investigated the effects of the A2 aptamer on E7 localisation in order to define its effects on E7 activity. We demonstrate for the first time that E7 localised to the plasma membrane. In addition, we show that A2 enhanced E7 localisation in the ER and that the A2-mediated reduction of E7 was not associated with proteasomal degradation. These data suggest that A2 perturbs normal E7 trafficking through promoting E7 ER retention. PMID:26131956

  6. Centrosomal localisation of the cancer/testis (CT) antigens NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 is regulated by proteasome activity in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Pagotto, Anna; Caballero, Otavia L; Volkmar, Norbert; Devalle, Sylvie; Simpson, Andrew J G; Lu, Xin; Christianson, John C

    2013-01-01

    The Cancer/Testis (CT) antigen family of genes are transcriptionally repressed in most human tissues but are atypically re-expressed in many malignant tumour types. Their restricted expression profile makes CT antigens ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy. As little is known about whether CT antigens may be regulated by post-translational processing, we investigated the mechanisms governing degradation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 in selected cancer cell lines. Inhibitors of proteasome-mediated degradation induced the partitioning of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 into a detergent insoluble fraction. Moreover, this treatment also resulted in increased localisation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 at the centrosome. Despite their interaction, relocation of either NY-ESO-1 or MAGE-C1 to the centrosome could occur independently of each other. Using a series of truncated fragments, the regions corresponding to NY-ESO-1(91-150) and MAGE-C1(900-1116) were established as important for controlling both stability and localisation of these CT antigens. Our findings demonstrate that the steady state levels of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 are regulated by proteasomal degradation and that both behave as aggregation-prone proteins upon accumulation. With proteasome inhibitors being increasingly used as front-line treatment in cancer, these data raise issues about CT antigen processing for antigenic presentation and therefore immunogenicity in cancer patients.

  7. Predicting the response of localised oesophageal cancer to neo-adjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Gillham, Charles M; Reynolds, John; Hollywood, Donal

    2007-01-01

    Background A complete pathological response to neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation for oesophageal cancer is associated with favourable survival. However, such a benefit is seen in the minority. If one could identify, at diagnosis, those patients who were unlikely to respond unnecessary toxicity could be avoided and alternative treatment can be considered. The aim of this review was to highlight predictive markers currently assessed and evaluate their clinical utility. Methods A systematic search of Pubmed and Google Scholar was performed using the following keywords; "neo-adjuvant", "oesophageal", "trimodality", "chemotherapy", "radiotherapy", "chemoradiation" and "predict". The original manuscripts were sourced for further articles of relevance. Results Conventional indices including tumour stage and grade seem unable to predict histological response. Immuno-histochemical markers have been extensively studied, but none has made its way into routine clinical practice. Global gene expression from fresh pre-treatment tissue using cDNA microarray has only recently been assessed, but shows considerable promise. Molecular imaging using FDG-PET seems to be able to predict response after neo-adjuvant chemoradiation has finished, but there is a paucity of data when such imaging is performed earlier. Conclusion Currently there are no clinically useful predictors of response based on standard pathological assessment and immunohistochemistry. Genomics, proteomics and molecular imaging may hold promise. PMID:17716369

  8. Establishing nurse-led active surveillance for men with localised prostate cancer: development and formative evaluation of a model of care in the ProtecT trial

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Julia; Holding, Peter N; Bonnington, Susan; Rooshenas, Leila; Lane, J Athene; Salter, C Elizabeth; Tilling, Kate; Speakman, Mark J; Brewster, Simon F; Evans, Simon; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a nurse-led, urologist-supported model of care for men managed by active surveillance or active monitoring (AS/AM) for localised prostate cancer and provide a formative evaluation of its acceptability to patients, clinicians and nurses. Nurse-led care, comprising an explicit nurse-led protocol with support from urologists, was developed as part of the AM arm of the Prostate testing for cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial. Design Interviews and questionnaire surveys of clinicians, nurses and patients assessed acceptability. Setting Nurse-led clinics were established in 9 centres in the ProtecT trial and compared with 3 non-ProtecT urology centres elsewhere in UK. Participants Within ProtecT, 22 men receiving AM nurse-led care were interviewed about experiences of care; 11 urologists and 23 research nurses delivering ProtecT trial care completed a questionnaire about its acceptability; 20 men managed in urology clinics elsewhere in the UK were interviewed about models of AS/AM care; 12 urologists and three specialist nurses working in these clinics were also interviewed about management of AS/AM. Results Nurse-led care was commended by ProtecT trial participants, who valued the flexibility, accessibility and continuity of the service and felt confident about the quality of care. ProtecT consultant urologists and nurses also rated it highly, identifying continuity of care and resource savings as key attributes. Clinicians and patients outside the ProtecT trial believed that nurse-led care could relieve pressure on urology clinics without compromising patient care. Conclusions The ProtecT AM nurse-led model of care was acceptable to men with localised prostate cancer and clinical specialists in urology. The protocol is available for implementation; we aim to evaluate its impact on routine clinical practice. Trial registration numbers NCT02044172; ISRCTN20141297. PMID:26384727

  9. Vascular targeted photochemotherapy using padoporfin and padeliporfin as a method of the focal treatment of localised prostate cancer - clinician’s insight

    PubMed Central

    Bugaj, Andrzej M

    2016-01-01

    Vascular targeted photochemotherapy (VTP) holds promise as a novel strategy of the focal treatment of localised prostate cancer (LPCa). It is convenient to perform, minimally invasive and can be conduct in ambulatory conditions. In this review, methodologic aspects of padoporfin- and padeliporfin-mediated VTP and its clinical application in focal treatment of LPCa as well as future perspective of this method were presented. Physicochemical and pharmacokinetic parameters of padoporphin and padeliporfin using as VTP photosensitizers were described, as well as methodologic question of radiation delivery and dosimetry, and oxygen monitoring in cancer tissue in context of VTP safety and efficiency of LPCa focal therapy were discussed. The results of clinical trials concerning application of padoporfin- and padeliporfin-mediated VTP in LPCa were also presented. The future of VTP is development of protocols, founded on the real-time feedback and rules-based approach to make this strategy a standard procedure in LPCa treatment. To evaluate clinical potential of this procedure, a cost-effectiveness analysis is also necessary. PMID:27019798

  10. Overexpression of LASP-1 mediates migration and proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells and influences zyxin localisation

    PubMed Central

    Grunewald, T G P; Kammerer, U; Winkler, C; Schindler, D; Sickmann, A; Honig, A; Butt, E

    2007-01-01

    LIM and SH3 protein 1 (LASP-1), initially identified from human breast cancer, is a specific focal adhesion protein involved in cell proliferation and migration. In the present work, we analysed the effect of LASP-1 on biology and function of human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3 using small interfering RNA technique (siRNA).Transfection with LASP-1-specific siRNA resulted in a reduced protein level of LASP-1 in SKOV-3 cells. The siRNA-treated cells were arrested in G2/M phase of the cell cycle and proliferation of the tumour cells was suppressed by 60–90% corresponding to around 70% of the cells being transfected successfully as seen by immunofluorescence. Moreover, transfected tumour cells showed a 40% reduced migration. LASP-1 silencing is accompanied by a reduced binding of the LASP-1-binding partner zyxin to focal contacts without changes in actin stress fibre and microtubule organisation or focal adhesion morphology as observed by immunofluorescence. In contrast, silencing of zyxin is not influencing cell migration and had neither influence on LASP-1 expression nor actin cytoskeleton and focal contact morphology suggesting that LASP-1 is necessary and sufficient for recruiting zyxin to focal contacts.The data provide evidence for an essential role of LASP-1 in tumour cell growth and migration, possibly through influencing zyxin localization. PMID:17211471

  11. Phase I trial and tumour localisation of the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody ICR62 in head and neck or lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Modjtahedi, H.; Hickish, T.; Nicolson, M.; Moore, J.; Styles, J.; Eccles, S.; Jackson, E.; Salter, J.; Sloane, J.; Spencer, L.; Priest, K.; Smith, I.; Dean, C.; Gore, M.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the first rat monoclonal antibody (MAb ICR62) to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a phase I clinical trial in patients with unresectable squamous cell carcinomas. This antibody effectively blocks the binding of EGF, transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha and HB-EGF to the EGFR, inhibits the growth in vitro of tumour cell lines which overexpress the EGFR and eradicates such tumours when grown as xenografts in athymic mice. Eleven patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and nine patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, whose tumours expressed EGFR, were recruited. Groups of three patients were treated with 2.5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg or 40 mg of ICR62 and a further eight patients received 100 mg. All patients were evaluated for toxicity using WHO criteria. Patients' sera were tested for the clearance of MAb ICR62 and the development of human anti-rat antibodies (HARA). No serious (WHO Grade III-IV) toxicity was observed in patients treated with up to 100 mg of antibody ICR62. Antibody ICR62 could be detected at 4 h and 24 h in the sera of patients treated with 40 mg or 100 mg of ICR62. Only 4/20 patients showed HARA responses (one at 20 mg, one at 40 mg and two at 100 mg doses) and of these only the former two were anti-idiotypic responses. In four patients receiving doses of ICR62 at 40 mg or greater, biopsies were obtained from metastatic lesions 24 h later and examined for the localisation of ICR62 using anti-rat antibody reagent. In these patients we showed the localisation of MAb ICR62 to the membranes of tumour cells; this appeared to be more prominent at the higher dose of 100 mg. On the basis of these data we conclude that MAb ICR62 can be administered safely to patients with squamous cell carcinomas and that it can localise efficiently to metastases even at relatively low doses. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8546911

  12. Radioactive seed localisation to guide removal of impalpable lymph nodes (Radioguided Occult Lesion Localisation using Iodine-125 seeds, “ROLLIS”)

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Lee; Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Abdul Aziz, Farah; Taylor, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Two patients with cancer requiring removal of specific impalpable lymph nodes for full pathological analysis underwent ultrasound-guided lesion localisation and marking with a low-activity I-125 seed. A gamma probe was used in theatre to localise the signal from the seed and guide excision. Successful removal of the lesions was confirmed with the probe and by specimen radiography. Radioguided Occult Lesion Localisation using I-125 Seeds (“ROLLIS”) provides a method of precisely marking impalpable lesions for surgical excision. PMID:24658526

  13. Extraction d'un corps étranger trachéo bronchique à l'aide d'un uretheroscope

    PubMed Central

    Kechna, Hicham; Ouzzad, Omar; Aissaoui, Youness; Nadour, Karim; Zaini, Rachid

    2015-01-01

    Les corps étrangers intratrachéobronchiques (CEITB) sont des accidents fréquents chez les enfants. Dans les pays développés, l'extraction de ces CEITB est réalisée grâce à la fibroscopie bronchique ou à la bronchoscopie rigide. Le recours à la chirurgie est rare. Dans notre contexte, le plateau technique adéquat est inexistant. Des alternatives d'extraction s'imposent afin d’éviter l’évacuation sanitaire, pas toujours à la portée des patients, mais surtout pour faire face à une mort imminente tel est le cas dans notre observation. Nous décrivons l'extraction d'un corps étranger radio-opaque trachéobronchique responsable d'une hypoxie sévère à l'aide d'un uréteroscope. PMID:26090032

  14. Hypofractionated radiotherapy versus conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for patients with intermediate-risk localised prostate cancer: 2-year patient-reported outcomes of the randomised, non-inferiority, phase 3 CHHiP trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Anna; Mossop, Helen; Syndikus, Isabel; Khoo, Vincent; Bloomfield, David; Parker, Chris; Logue, John; Scrase, Christopher; Patterson, Helen; Birtle, Alison; Staffurth, John; Malik, Zafar; Panades, Miguel; Eswar, Chinnamani; Graham, John; Russell, Martin; Kirkbride, Peter; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Gao, Annie; Cruickshank, Clare; Griffin, Clare; Dearnaley, David; Hall, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) might detect more toxic effects of radiotherapy than do clinician-reported outcomes. We did a quality of life (QoL) substudy to assess PROs up to 24 months after conventionally fractionated or hypofractionated radiotherapy in the Conventional or Hypofractionated High Dose Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer (CHHiP) trial. Methods The CHHiP trial is a randomised, non-inferiority phase 3 trial done in 71 centres, of which 57 UK hospitals took part in the QoL substudy. Men with localised prostate cancer who were undergoing radiotherapy were eligible for trial entry if they had histologically confirmed T1b–T3aN0M0 prostate cancer, an estimated risk of seminal vesicle involvement less than 30%, prostate-specific antigen concentration less than 30 ng/mL, and a WHO performance status of 0 or 1. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive a standard fractionation schedule of 74 Gy in 37 fractions or one of two hypofractionated schedules: 60 Gy in 20 fractions or 57 Gy in 19 fractions. Randomisation was done with computer-generated permuted block sizes of six and nine, stratified by centre and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk group. Treatment allocation was not masked. UCLA Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI), including Short Form (SF)-36 and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P), or Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) and SF-12 quality-of-life questionnaires were completed at baseline, pre-radiotherapy, 10 weeks post-radiotherapy, and 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post-radiotherapy. The CHHiP trial completed accrual on June 16, 2011, and the QoL substudy was closed to further recruitment on Nov 1, 2009. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary endpoint of the QoL substudy was overall bowel bother and comparisons between fractionation groups were done at 24 months post-radiotherapy. The CHHiP trial is registered with ISRCTN registry

  15. Can TRUS Power Doppler Predict the Preservation of Erectile Function in HIFU Treatment of Localised Prostate Cancer? — A Preliminary Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoh, I. M.; Calleary, J. G.; Moore, C.; Emberton, M.; Allen, C.

    2006-05-01

    Perhaps the single most significant unifying feature in men diagnosed with organ confined prostate cancer is the hope of erectile preservation in the treatment that offers cure. Although it is not 100% certain that the preservation of neurovascular bundle (NVB) can actually lead to intact sexual function, there is evidence that non-sparing nerve radical prostatectomy has a much higher incidence of impotence compared to nerve-sparing ones. The idea to monitor NVB flow can be realized using a simple power Doppler technique that was done before and after HIFU. The NVB flow was found intact in all patients (n=14). Tumescence returned in 93% of patients with a mean time of 6 weeks for this to occur. The erectile function score, IIEF-15 decreased by a third but shows a trend towards recovery. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of transrectal power Doppler as a monitoring tool to provide immediate feedback on the NVB flow which was found intact in all patients. Although early reports of the tumescence proved encouraging, its full impact on erectile function will require longer follow-up.

  16. Intrathoracic chemodectoma with multiple localisations.

    PubMed Central

    Lacquet, L K; Moulijn, A C; Jongerius, C M; Limburg, M; Rensing, J B

    1977-01-01

    In 1958 a mediastinal tumour was discovered in an asymptomatic woman with a history of vomiting and an oesophageal anomaly which had not been treated. A tumour of the anterosuperior mediastinum in relation to the aortic arch was extirpated and proved to be a chemodectoma or non-chromaffin paraganglioma. At subsequent follow-ups the mediastinum was never normal and the heart size progressively increased, the oesophageal anomaly remaining unchanged. A small opacity appeared in the left lung in 1974. An operation performed in 1975 revealed an osteochondroma in the lung, pericarditis, and an intrapericardial chemodectoma. The oesophagus was not explored. An intrathoracic chemodectoma is rare. The importance of angiography in its diagnosis is emphasised. Malignant degeneration is seldom observed. Therapy is surgical, the tumour being radioresistant. The possibility to be considered in our patient was either relapse of the tumour with degeneration or multiple localisations of the tumour. Images PMID:194350

  17. Visual localisation in patients with occipital infarction.

    PubMed

    Ross Russell, R W; Bharucha, N

    1984-02-01

    Visually directed pointing has been examined in a group of patients with occipital lobe infarction and in an age-matched control group. The visual field ipsilateral to the infarct showed normal localisation; there was no evidence that right sided infarction produced a bilateral disturbance. In quadrantanopia the spared quadrant on the affected side showed abnormal localisation in a few patients but this was not consistently associated with right or left sided defects. The majority of patients were able to detect a flashing light within the blind portion of the field although the same stimulus could not be seen during conventional perimetry. Some patients could localise the stimulus normally.

  18. Stress localisation in annular sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Gert; Starostin, Eugene

    2015-03-01

    For very thin sheets stretching is much more costly in terms of energy than bending. The limiting behaviour of thin sheets is therefore governed by geometry only and thus applies to a wide range of materials at vastly different scales: it is equally valid for a microscopic graphene sheet and a macroscopic solar sail. We derive new geometrically-exact equations for the deformation of annular strips. We use a formulation in which the inextensibility constraint is used to reduce the problem to a suitably-chosen reference curve (here the circular centreline). The equations are therefore ODEs, which allow for a detailed bifurcation analysis. Closed conical solutions are found for centreline lengths L less than Lc = 2 πκg , where κg is the geodesic curvature of the strip. For such `short' strips we find in addition a second branch of stable solutions easily reproduced in a paper strip. For `long' strips (L >Lc) we find modes of undulating solutions. All non-conical solutions turn out to feature points of stress localisation on the edge of the annulus, the outer edge for short solutions and the inner edge of long solutions. Our theory may be used to investigate singularities of constrained or loaded sheets more general than conical ones.

  19. Addition of docetaxel or bisphosphonates to standard of care in men with localised or metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analyses of aggregate data

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Claire L; Burdett, Sarah; Rydzewska, Larysa H M; Albiges, Laurence; Clarke, Noel W; Fisher, David; Fizazi, Karim; Gravis, Gwenaelle; James, Nicholas D; Mason, Malcolm D; Parmar, Mahesh K B; Sweeney, Christopher J; Sydes, Matthew R; Tombal, Bertrand; Tierney, Jayne F

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Results from large randomised controlled trials combining docetaxel or bisphosphonates with standard of care in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer have emerged. In order to investigate the effects of these therapies and to respond to emerging evidence, we aimed to systematically review all relevant trials using a framework for adaptive meta-analysis. Methods For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, trial registers, conference proceedings, review articles, and reference lists of trial publications for all relevant randomised controlled trials (published, unpublished, and ongoing) comparing either standard of care with or without docetaxel or standard of care with or without bisphosphonates for men with high-risk localised or metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. For each trial, we extracted hazard ratios (HRs) of the effects of docetaxel or bisphosphonates on survival (time from randomisation until death from any cause) and failure-free survival (time from randomisation to biochemical or clinical failure or death from any cause) from published trial reports or presentations or obtained them directly from trial investigators. HRs were combined using the fixed-effect model (Mantel-Haenzsel). Findings We identified five eligible randomised controlled trials of docetaxel in men with metastatic (M1) disease. Results from three (CHAARTED, GETUG-15, STAMPEDE) of these trials (2992 [93%] of 3206 men randomised) showed that the addition of docetaxel to standard of care improved survival. The HR of 0·77 (95% CI 0·68–0·87; p<0·0001) translates to an absolute improvement in 4-year survival of 9% (95% CI 5–14). Docetaxel in addition to standard of care also improved failure-free survival, with the HR of 0·64 (0·58–0·70; p<0·0001) translating into a reduction in absolute 4-year failure rates of 16% (95% CI 12–19). We identified 11 trials of

  20. Addition of docetaxel or bisphosphonates to standard of care in men with localised or metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analyses of aggregate data

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Claire L; Burdett, Sarah; Rydzewska, Larysa H M; Albiges, Laurence; Clarke, Noel W; Fisher, David; Fizazi, Karim; Gravis, Gwenaelle; James, Nicholas D; Mason, Malcolm D; Parmar, Mahesh K B; Sweeney, Christopher J; Sydes, Matthew R; Tombal, Bertrand; Tierney, Jayne F

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Results from large randomised controlled trials combining docetaxel or bisphosphonates with standard of care in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer have emerged. In order to investigate the effects of these therapies and to respond to emerging evidence, we aimed to systematically review all relevant trials using a framework for adaptive meta-analysis. Methods For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, trial registers, conference proceedings, review articles, and reference lists of trial publications for all relevant randomised controlled trials (published, unpublished, and ongoing) comparing either standard of care with or without docetaxel or standard of care with or without bisphosphonates for men with high-risk localised or metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. For each trial, we extracted hazard ratios (HRs) of the effects of docetaxel or bisphosphonates on survival (time from randomisation until death from any cause) and failure-free survival (time from randomisation to biochemical or clinical failure or death from any cause) from published trial reports or presentations or obtained them directly from trial investigators. HRs were combined using the fixed-effect model (Mantel-Haenzsel). Findings We identified five eligible randomised controlled trials of docetaxel in men with metastatic (M1) disease. Results from three (CHAARTED, GETUG-15, STAMPEDE) of these trials (2992 [93%] of 3206 men randomised) showed that the addition of docetaxel to standard of care improved survival. The HR of 0·77 (95% CI 0·68–0·87; p<0·0001) translates to an absolute improvement in 4-year survival of 9% (95% CI 5–14). Docetaxel in addition to standard of care also improved failure-free survival, with the HR of 0·64 (0·58–0·70; p<0·0001) translating into a reduction in absolute 4-year failure rates of 16% (95% CI 12–19). We identified 11 trials of

  1. Occult breast lesions: A comparison between radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) vs. wire-guided lumpectomy (WGL).

    PubMed

    Nadeem, R; Chagla, L S; Harris, O; Desmond, S; Thind, R; Titterrell, C; Audisio, R A

    2005-08-01

    Mammographic screening increases the number of impalpable breast cancers requiring surgical excision. It is important to optimise the localisation technique to remove the smallest amount of tissue, still adequately excising the lesion. The last 65 wire-guided lumpectomies (WGLs) were compared vs. the first 65 radioguided occult lesion localisations (ROLLs) performed for impalpable breast cancers. Data collection included patient's age, radiological abnormality, pre-operative core biopsy, type of primary surgery, length of localisation and excision, hospital stay, cancer size, weight and volume of the excised specimen, clearance margins. All patients were successfully localised with ROLL and WGL. Localisation time was reduced with ROLL (P<0.001). Clear margins were achieved in 83% ROLLs and 57% WGLs (P=0.001). Pathological cancer size and specimen weight were similar in both groups, although the specimen volume was slightly smaller for ROLL. A total of 74% ROLLs had excellent cosmetic outcomes and 26% good, vs. 55% excellent and 45% good in WGLs. A larger amount of normal breast tissue was excised with WGL, without achieving any better cancer clearance. ROLL provides a feasible alternative to WGL. This quick and simple technique achieves an improved rate of clear margins.

  2. Recovery of infrastructure networks after localised attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fuyu; Yeung, Chi Ho; Yang, Saini; Wang, Weiping; Zeng, An

    2016-04-01

    The stability of infrastructure network is always a critical issue studied by researchers in different fields. A lot of works have been devoted to reveal the robustness of the infrastructure networks against random and malicious attacks. However, real attack scenarios such as earthquakes and typhoons are instead localised attacks which are investigated only recently. Unlike previous studies, we examine in this paper the resilience of infrastructure networks by focusing on the recovery process from localised attacks. We introduce various preferential repair strategies and found that they facilitate and improve network recovery compared to that of random repairs, especially when population size is uneven at different locations. Moreover, our strategic repair methods show similar effectiveness as the greedy repair. The validations are conducted on simulated networks, and on real networks with real disasters. Our method is meaningful in practice as it can largely enhance network resilience and contribute to network risk reduction.

  3. Recovery of infrastructure networks after localised attacks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fuyu; Yeung, Chi Ho; Yang, Saini; Wang, Weiping; Zeng, An

    2016-01-01

    The stability of infrastructure network is always a critical issue studied by researchers in different fields. A lot of works have been devoted to reveal the robustness of the infrastructure networks against random and malicious attacks. However, real attack scenarios such as earthquakes and typhoons are instead localised attacks which are investigated only recently. Unlike previous studies, we examine in this paper the resilience of infrastructure networks by focusing on the recovery process from localised attacks. We introduce various preferential repair strategies and found that they facilitate and improve network recovery compared to that of random repairs, especially when population size is uneven at different locations. Moreover, our strategic repair methods show similar effectiveness as the greedy repair. The validations are conducted on simulated networks, and on real networks with real disasters. Our method is meaningful in practice as it can largely enhance network resilience and contribute to network risk reduction.

  4. Recovery of infrastructure networks after localised attacks

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fuyu; Yeung, Chi Ho; Yang, Saini; Wang, Weiping; Zeng, An

    2016-01-01

    The stability of infrastructure network is always a critical issue studied by researchers in different fields. A lot of works have been devoted to reveal the robustness of the infrastructure networks against random and malicious attacks. However, real attack scenarios such as earthquakes and typhoons are instead localised attacks which are investigated only recently. Unlike previous studies, we examine in this paper the resilience of infrastructure networks by focusing on the recovery process from localised attacks. We introduce various preferential repair strategies and found that they facilitate and improve network recovery compared to that of random repairs, especially when population size is uneven at different locations. Moreover, our strategic repair methods show similar effectiveness as the greedy repair. The validations are conducted on simulated networks, and on real networks with real disasters. Our method is meaningful in practice as it can largely enhance network resilience and contribute to network risk reduction. PMID:27075559

  5. Recovery of infrastructure networks after localised attacks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fuyu; Yeung, Chi Ho; Yang, Saini; Wang, Weiping; Zeng, An

    2016-01-01

    The stability of infrastructure network is always a critical issue studied by researchers in different fields. A lot of works have been devoted to reveal the robustness of the infrastructure networks against random and malicious attacks. However, real attack scenarios such as earthquakes and typhoons are instead localised attacks which are investigated only recently. Unlike previous studies, we examine in this paper the resilience of infrastructure networks by focusing on the recovery process from localised attacks. We introduce various preferential repair strategies and found that they facilitate and improve network recovery compared to that of random repairs, especially when population size is uneven at different locations. Moreover, our strategic repair methods show similar effectiveness as the greedy repair. The validations are conducted on simulated networks, and on real networks with real disasters. Our method is meaningful in practice as it can largely enhance network resilience and contribute to network risk reduction. PMID:27075559

  6. Consistency and variability in functional localisers

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Keith J.; Pattamadilok, Chotiga; Knierim, Iris; Devlin, Joseph T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying the use of functional localiser scans is that the voxels identified as the functional region-of-interest (fROI) are essentially the same as those activated by the main experimental manipulation. Intra-subject variability in the location of the fROI violates this assumption, reducing the sensitivity of the analysis and biasing the results. Here we investigated consistency and variability in fROIs in a set of 45 volunteers. They performed two functional localiser scans to identify word- and object-sensitive regions of ventral and lateral occipito-temporal cortex, respectively. In the main analyses, fROIs were defined as the category-selective voxels in each region and consistency was measured as the spatial overlap between scans. Consistency was greatest when minimally selective thresholds were used to define “active” voxels (p < 0.05 uncorrected), revealing that approximately 65% of the voxels were commonly activated by both scans. In contrast, highly selective thresholds (p < 10− 4 to 10− 6) yielded the lowest consistency values with less than 25% overlap of the voxels active in both scans. In other words, intra-subject variability was surprisingly high, with between one third and three quarters of the voxels in a given fROI not corresponding to those activated in the main task. This level of variability stands in striking contrast to the consistency seen in retinotopically-defined areas and has important implications for designing robust but efficient functional localiser scans. PMID:19289173

  7. Hémangiome fusiforme: une localisation inhabituelle

    PubMed Central

    Nasreddine, Fatima Zahra; Baghad, Bouchra; Chiheb, Soumiya

    2016-01-01

    L'hémangiome à cellules fusiformes été décrit par Weiss et Enzinger en 1986 et anciennement nommé hémangioendothéliome à cellules fusiformes. Depuis l'avènement des études immunohistochimique il n'est plus considéré en tant qu'angiosarcome de bas grade. C'est une tumeur bénigne vasculaire. Il touche presque exclusivement le derme des extrémités distales. Nous rapportons le premier cas avec localisation au niveau de l'omoplate, du sein, des cuisses et de la mandibule. Selon la littérature, seulement 9 cas localisés au niveau de la tête et le cou ont été rapportés. Nous rapportons un nouveau cas de cette entité rare et mal connue qui peut prêter confusion avec les tumeurs malignes. Notre patient avait une localisation au niveau de l'omoplate, du sein, des cuisses et de la mandibule. Une biopsie-exérèse était réalisée. L’évolution a été favorable avec un recul de 6 mois, sans rechute. PMID:27642429

  8. An innovative localisation algorithm for railway vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allotta, B.; D'Adamio, P.; Malvezzi, M.; Pugi, L.; Ridolfi, A.; Rindi, A.; Vettori, G.

    2014-11-01

    In modern railway automatic train protection and automatic train control systems, odometry is a safety relevant on-board subsystem which estimates the instantaneous speed and the travelled distance of the train; a high reliability of the odometry estimate is fundamental, since an error on the train position may lead to a potentially dangerous overestimation of the distance available for braking. To improve the odometry estimate accuracy, data fusion of different inputs coming from a redundant sensor layout may be used. The aim of this work has been developing an innovative localisation algorithm for railway vehicles able to enhance the performances, in terms of speed and position estimation accuracy, of the classical odometry algorithms, such as the Italian Sistema Controllo Marcia Treno (SCMT). The proposed strategy consists of a sensor fusion between the information coming from a tachometer and an Inertial Measurements Unit (IMU). The sensor outputs have been simulated through a 3D multibody model of a railway vehicle. The work has provided the development of a custom IMU, designed by ECM S.p.a, in order to meet their industrial and business requirements. The industrial requirements have to be compliant with the European Train Control System (ETCS) standards: the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS), a project developed by the European Union to improve the interoperability among different countries, in particular as regards the train control and command systems, fixes some standard values for the odometric (ODO) performance, in terms of speed and travelled distance estimation. The reliability of the ODO estimation has to be taken into account basing on the allowed speed profiles. The results of the currently used ODO algorithms can be improved, especially in case of degraded adhesion conditions; it has been verified in the simulation environment that the results of the proposed localisation algorithm are always compliant with the ERTMS requirements

  9. Anderson localisation in spin chains for perfect state transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronke, Rebecca; Estarellas, Marta P.; D'Amico, Irene; Spiller, Timothy P.; Miyadera, Takayuki

    2016-09-01

    Anderson localisation is an important phenomenon arising in many areas of physics, and here we explore it in the context of quantum information devices. Finite dimensional spin chains have been demonstrated to be important devices for quantum information transport, and in particular can be engineered to allow for "perfect state transfer" (PST). Here we present extensive investigations of disordered PST spin chains, demonstrating spatial localisation and transport retardation effects, and relate these effects to conventional Anderson localisation. We provide thresholds for Anderson localisation in these finite quantum information systems for both the spatial and the transport domains. Finally, we consider the effect of disorder on the eigenstates and energy spectrum of our Hamiltonian, where results support our conclusions on the presence of Anderson localisation.

  10. PHD filtering with localised target number variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delande, Emmanuel; Houssineau, Jérémie; Clark, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Mahler's Probability Hypothesis Density (PHD filter), proposed in 2000, addresses the challenges of the multipletarget detection and tracking problem by propagating a mean density of the targets in any region of the state space. However, when retrieving some local evidence on the target presence becomes a critical component of a larger process - e.g. for sensor management purposes - the local target number is insufficient unless some confidence on the estimation of the number of targets can be provided as well. In this paper, we propose a first implementation of a PHD filter that also includes an estimation of localised variance in the target number following each update step; we then illustrate the advantage of the PHD filter + variance on simulated data from a multiple-target scenario.

  11. To localise or to be localised with WiFi in the Hubei museum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbree, E.; Zlatanova, S.; van Winden, K. B. A.; van der Laan, E. B.; Makri, A.; Taizhou, L.; Haojun, A.

    2013-11-01

    Indoor localisation is in demand for a variety of applications within the built environment. An overall solution based on a single technology has not yet been determined. The aim of this paper is to gain insight on Signal Strength monitoring by a special kind of WiFi Monitors in comparison to the commonly known fingerprinting method for the purpose of a 3D indoor navigation system. Ttwo different WiFi based localisation techniques are tested during the MSc Geomatics DaRen Syntheses Project in the Hubei Provincial Museum, China. The first method detects the beacon frames send by smartphones, laptops and other WiFi enabled devices in range using Libelium Meshlium Xtreme monitors. Their MAC addresses and the signal strength is measured by the Meshlium Xtreme and stored on an external database. We call this method WiFi monitoring. The second method a Wifi enabled device, like a smartphone, measures the signal strength of multiple Wifi Access Points in range to localise itself based on a previously created radio map. This method is known as WiFi fingerprinting. Both methods have some advantages and disadvantages. Advantages of the common way of WiFi fingerprinting are that the implementation costs are relatively low, because it is usually possible to use (a part of) the existing WiFi AP infrastructure. WiFi fingerprinting can reach a relatively high accuracy in the order of magnitude of meters. Finally, the location granularity can be adjusted to what is necessary for the purpose of the indoor localisation. This makes it employable for a wide range of purposes. The question remains how suitable these methods are for a 3D indoor navigation system for the Hubei provincial museum. One important aspect is the localisation-granularity necessary for the application. In a museum it is not necessary to know the exact X,Y position of a user (such high accuracy is unnecessary), more important is to know in which room the user is located so the information on exhibitions can be

  12. Intensive chemotherapy for non-localised Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, A; Pritchard, J; Al-Saleem, T; Al-Naimi, M; Alash, N; Attra, A

    1986-01-01

    Between 1982 and 1984, 24 consecutively diagnosed children from Iraq with non-localised Burkitt lymphoma (Murphy stages II, III, and IV) were eligible for treatment with a multi-drug rotating chemotherapy schedule. This schedule was intensive and included early treatment directed at the central nervous system but was of only six months' duration and fairly inexpensive compared with schedules recently advocated for use in the developed world. Some patients had 'debulking' abdominal surgery, but no radiation treatment was used. There were a number of complications related to early treatment, some of them fatal, but of 13 patients entering complete remission 12 are long term survivors who are free of disease and, hopefully, cured. These results represent a substantial improvement over our experience before 1982 (6.9% survival). A similar treatment approach might be adopted by other centres, especially those in developing countries where cancer accounts for a rising proportion of childhood death but whose resources are limited. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3777984

  13. Visual detail about the body modulates tactile localisation biases.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Aaron N; Longo, Matthew R

    2015-02-01

    The localisation of tactile stimuli requires the integration of visual and somatosensory inputs within an internal representation of the body surface and is prone to consistent bias. Joints may play a role in segmenting such internal body representations, and may therefore influence tactile localisation biases, although the nature of this influence remains unclear. Here, we investigate the relationship between conceptual knowledge of joint locations and tactile localisation biases on the hand. In one task, participants localised tactile stimuli applied to the dorsum of their hand. A distal localisation bias was observed in all participants, consistent with previous results. We also manipulated the availability of visual information during this task, to determine whether the absence of this information could account for the distal bias observed here and by Mancini et al. (Neuropsychologia 49:1194-1201, 2011). The observed distal bias increased in magnitude when visual information was restricted, without a corresponding decrease in precision. In a separate task, the same participants indicated, from memory, knuckle locations on a silhouette image of their hand. Analogous distal biases were also seen in the knuckle localisation task. The accuracy of conceptual joint knowledge was not correlated with tactile localisation bias magnitude, although a similarity in observed bias direction suggests that both tasks may rely on a common, higher-order body representation. These results also suggest that distortions of conceptual body representation may be more common in healthy individuals than previously thought.

  14. Untangling visual and proprioceptive contributions to hand localisation over time.

    PubMed

    Bellan, Valeria; Gilpin, Helen R; Stanton, Tasha R; Newport, Roger; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies showed that self-localisation ability involves both vision and proprioception, integrated into a single percept, with the tendency to rely more heavily on visual than proprioceptive cues. Despite the increasing evidence for the importance of vision in localising the hands, the time course of the interaction between vision and proprioception during visual occlusion remains unclear. In particular, we investigated how the brain weighs visual and proprioceptive information in hand localisation over time when the visual cues do not reflect the real position of the hand. We tested three hypotheses: Self-localisations are less accurate when vision and proprioception are incongruent; under the same conditions of incongruence, people first rely on vision and gradually revert to proprioception; if vision is removed immediately prior to hand localisation, accuracy increases. Sixteen participants viewed a video of their hands, under three conditions each undertaken with eyes open or closed: Incongruent conditions (right hand movement seen: inward, right hand real movement: outward), Congruent conditions (movement seen congruent to real movement). The right hand was then hidden from view and participants performed a localisation task whereby a moving vertical arrow was stopped when aligned with the felt position of their middle finger. A second experiment used identical methodology, but with the direction of the arrow switched. Our data showed that, in the Incongruent conditions (both with eyes open and closed), participants perceived their right hand close to its last seen position. Over time, the perceived position of the hand shifted towards the physical position. Closing the eyes before the localisation task increased the accuracy in the Incongruent condition. Crucially, Experiment 2 confirmed the findings and showed that the direction of arrow movement had no effect on hand localisation. Our hypotheses were supported: When vision and proprioception were

  15. Localisation of atomic populations in the optical radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Efremova, E A; Gordeev, M Yu; Rozhdestvensky, Yu V

    2014-10-31

    The possibility of two-dimensional spatial localisation of atomic populations under the influence of the travelling wave fields in the tripod-configuration of quantum states is studied for the first time. Three travelling waves propagating in the same plane at an angle of 120° to each other form a system of standing waves under the influence of which atomic populations are localised. The size of the region of spatial localisation of the populations, in principle, can be hundredths of a wavelength of optical radiation. (quantum optics)

  16. Control of ADAM17 activity by regulation of its cellular localisation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, Inken; Lokau, Juliane; Korpys, Yvonne; Oldefest, Mirja; Flynn, Charlotte M.; Künzel, Ulrike; Garbers, Christoph; Freeman, Matthew; Grötzinger, Joachim; Düsterhöft, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    An important, irreversible step in many signalling pathways is the shedding of membrane-anchored proteins. A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase (ADAM) 17 is one of the major sheddases involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including regeneration, differentiation, and cancer progression. This central role in signalling implies that ADAM17 activity has to be tightly regulated, including at the level of localisation. Most mature ADAM17 is localised intracellularly, with only a small amount at the cell surface. We found that ADAM17 is constitutively internalised by clathrin-coated pits and that physiological stimulators such as GPCR ligands induce ADAM17-mediated shedding, but do not alter the cell-surface abundance of the protease. In contrast, the PKC-activating phorbol ester PMA, often used as a strong inducer of ADAM17, causes not only proteolysis by ADAM17 but also a rapid increase of the mature protease at the cell surface. This is followed by internalisation and subsequent degradation of the protease. Eventually, this leads to a substantial downregulation of mature ADAM17. Our results therefore imply that physiological activation of ADAM17 does not rely on its relocalisation, but that PMA-induced PKC activity drastically dysregulates the localisation of ADAM17. PMID:27731361

  17. Use of CT scanning to optimise the localisation procedure for breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rattray, G

    1989-07-01

    The continually improving technology in breast screening is now allowing diagnosis of patients with early stage breast cancer who would otherwise not have presented for many years. Surgical techniques are directed to achieving the best possible cosmetic result following the surgery. Radiotherapy treatment machines are becoming more complex and sophisticated in design and capability. Why, therefore, should we not employ today's technology for the localisation process? This is a report of our experience in using CT scanning to localise the treatment volumes for breast patients over a period of one year. A comparison between marking patients by palpation and the use of CT scanning has prevented a number of patients being under-treated and has enabled the reduction of lung volume included in the treatment volume for other patients. It has also proved a valuable aid in the decision to use electron fields for mastectomy patients. Other means of localising the treatment volumes are considered in the light of our experiences. PMID:2590443

  18. Localised anti-branes in flux backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, Gavin S.

    2015-06-01

    Solutions corresponding to finite temperature (anti)-D3 and M2 branes localised in flux backgrounds are constructed in a linear approximation. The flux backgrounds considered are toy models for the IR of the Klebanov-Strassler solution and its M-theory analogue, the Cvetič-Gibbons-Lü-Pope solution. Smooth solutions exist for either sign charge, in stark contrast with the previously considered case of smeared black branes. That the singularities of the anti-branes in the zero temperature extremal limit can be shielded behind a finite temperature horizon indicates that the singularities are physical and resolvable by string theory. As the charge of the branes grows large and negative, the flux at the horizon increases without bound and diverges in the extremal limit, which suggests a resolution via brane polarisation à la Polchinski-Strassler. It therefore appears that the anti-brane singularities do not indicate a problem with the SUSY-breaking metastable states corresponding to expanded anti-brane configurations in these backgrounds, nor with the use of these states in constructing the de Sitter landscape.

  19. Acquired localised hypertrichosis in a Chinese child after cast immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Yuen, M W; Lai, Loretta K P; Chan, P F; Chao, David V K

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrichosis refers to excessive hair growth that is independent of any androgen effect. Hypertrichosis could be congenital or acquired, localised or generalised. The phenomenon of acquired localised hypertrichosis following cast application for a fracture is well known to orthopaedic surgeons, but is rarely encountered by primary care physicians. We describe a 28-month-old Chinese boy who had fracture of right leg as a result of an injury. He had a cast applied by an orthopaedic surgeon as treatment. On removal of the cast 6 weeks later, he was noticed to have significant hair growth on his right leg compared with the left leg. The patient was reassessed 3 months after removal of the cast. The hypertrichosis resolved completely with time. This patient was one of the youngest among the reported cases of acquired localised hypertrichosis after cast application. We illustrate the significance of management of post-cast-acquired localised hypertrichosis in the primary care setting.

  20. Localised fibrous mesothelioma arising in an intralobar pulmonary sequestration.

    PubMed Central

    Paksoy, N; Demircan, A; Altiner, M; Artvinli, M

    1992-01-01

    A localised fibrous mesothelioma arising from an intralobar lung sequestration occurred in a 64 year old Turkish woman. This appears to be the first report of a mesothelioma occurring within a pulmonary sequestration. Images PMID:1481189

  1. Localising and lateralising value of ictal piloerection

    PubMed Central

    Loddenkemper, T; Kellinghaus, C; Gandjour, J; Nair, D; Najm, I; Bingaman, W; Luders, H

    2004-01-01

    Background: Piloerection is a rare clinical symptom described during seizures. Previous reports suggested that the temporal lobe is the ictal onset zone in many of these cases. One case series concluded that there is a predominant left hemispheric representation of ictal cold. The aim of this study is to evaluate the localising and lateralising value of pilomotor seizures. Methods: Medical records of patients who underwent video electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring at the Cleveland Clinic between 1994 and 2001 were reviewed for the presence of ictal piloerection. The clinical history, physical and neurological examination, video EEG data, neuroimaging data, cortical stimulation results, and postoperative follow ups were reviewed and used to define the epileptogenic zone. Additionally, all previously reported cases of ictal piloerection were reviewed. Results: Fourteen patients with ictal piloerection were identified (0.4%). Twelve out of 14 patients had temporal lobe epilepsy. In seven patients (50%), the ictal onset was located in the left hemisphere. Four out of five patients with unilateral ictal piloerection had ipsilateral temporal lobe epilepsy as compared with the ipsilateral side of pilomotor response. Three patients became seizure free after left temporal lobectomy for at least 12 months of follow up. An ipsilateral left leg pilomotor response with simultaneously recorded after-discharges was elicited in one patient during direct cortical stimulation of the left parahippocampal gyrus. Conclusions: Ictal piloerection is a rare ictal manifestation that occurs predominantly in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Unilateral piloerection is most frequently associated with ipsilateral focal epilepsy. No hemispheric predominance was found in patients with bilateral ictal piloerection. PMID:15146005

  2. Localised hydrogen peroxide sensing for reproductive health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdey, Malcolm S.; Schartner, Erik P.; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Ritter, Lesley J.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Monro, Tanya M.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2015-05-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to affect the developmental competence of embryos. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) an important reactive oxygen species, is also known to causes DNA damage and defective sperm function. Current techniques require incubating a developing embryo with an organic fluorophore which is potentially hazardous for the embryo. What we need is a localised ROS sensor which does not require fluorophores in solution and hence will allow continuous monitoring of H2O2 production without adversely affect the development of the embryo. Here we report studies on such a fibre-based sensor for the detection of H2O2 that uses a surface-bound aryl boronate fluorophore carboxyperoxyfluor-1(CPF1). Optical fibres present a unique platform due to desirable characteristics as dip sensors in biological solutions. Attempts to functionalise the fibre tips using polyelectrolyte layers and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) coatings resulted in a limited signal and poor fluorescent response to H2O2 due to a low tip surface density of the fluorophore. To increase the surface density, CPF1 was integrated into a polymer matrix formed on the fibre tip by a UV-catalysed polymerisation process of acrylamide onto a methacrylate silane layer. The polyacrylamide containing CPF1 gave a much higher surface density than previous surface attachment methods and the sensor was found to effectively detect H2O2. Using this method, biologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 were detected, enabling remote sensing studies into ROS releases from embryos throughout early development.

  3. On localised hotspots of an urban crime model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David J. B.; O'Farrell, Hayley

    2013-06-01

    We investigate stationary, spatially localised crime hotspots on the real line and the plane of an urban crime model of Short et al. [M. Short, M. DÓrsogna, A statistical model of criminal behavior, Mathematical Models and Methods in Applied Sciences 18 (2008) 1249-1267]. Extending the weakly nonlinear analysis of Short et al., we show in one-dimension that localised hotspots should bifurcate off the background spatially homogeneous state at a Turing instability provided the bifurcation is subcritical. Using path-following techniques, we continue these hotspots and show that the bifurcating pulses can undergo the process of homoclinic snaking near the singular limit. We analyse the singular limit to explain the existence of spike solutions and compare the analytical results with the numerical computations. In two-dimensions, we show that localised radial spots should also bifurcate off the spatially homogeneous background state. Localised planar hexagon fronts and hexagon patches are found and depending on the proximity to the singular limit these solutions either undergo homoclinic snaking or act like “multi-spot” solutions. Finally, we discuss applications of these localised patterns in the urban crime context and the full agent-based model.

  4. Subcellular mRNA localisation at a glance

    PubMed Central

    Parton, Richard M.; Davidson, Alexander; Davis, Ilan; Weil, Timothy T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT mRNA localisation coupled to translational regulation provides an important means of dictating when and where proteins function in a variety of model systems. This mechanism is particularly relevant in polarised or migrating cells. Although many of the models for how this is achieved were first proposed over 20 years ago, some of the molecular details are still poorly understood. Nevertheless, advanced imaging, biochemical and computational approaches have started to shed light on the cis-acting localisation signals and trans-acting factors that dictate the final destination of localised transcripts. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we provide an overview of mRNA localisation, from transcription to degradation, focusing on the microtubule-dependent active transport and anchoring mechanism, which we will use to explain the general paradigm. However, it is clear that there are diverse ways in which mRNAs become localised and target protein expression, and we highlight some of the similarities and differences between these mechanisms. PMID:24833669

  5. Bayesian Joint Modelling for Object Localisation in Weakly Labelled Images.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhiyuan; Hospedales, Timothy M; Xiang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    We address the problem of localisation of objects as bounding boxes in images and videos with weak labels. This weakly supervised object localisation problem has been tackled in the past using discriminative models where each object class is localised independently from other classes. In this paper, a novel framework based on Bayesian joint topic modelling is proposed, which differs significantly from the existing ones in that: (1) All foreground object classes are modelled jointly in a single generative model that encodes multiple object co-existence so that "explaining away" inference can resolve ambiguity and lead to better learning and localisation. (2) Image backgrounds are shared across classes to better learn varying surroundings and "push out" objects of interest. (3) Our model can be learned with a mixture of weakly labelled and unlabelled data, allowing the large volume of unlabelled images on the Internet to be exploited for learning. Moreover, the Bayesian formulation enables the exploitation of various types of prior knowledge to compensate for the limited supervision offered by weakly labelled data, as well as Bayesian domain adaptation for transfer learning. Extensive experiments on the PASCAL VOC, ImageNet and YouTube-Object videos datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of our Bayesian joint model for weakly supervised object localisation. PMID:26340253

  6. Voronoi-based localisation algorithm for mobile sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zixiao; Zhang, Yongtao; Zhang, Baihai; Dong, Lijing

    2016-11-01

    Localisation is an essential and important part in wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Many applications require location information. So far, there are less researchers studying on mobile sensor networks (MSNs) than static sensor networks (SSNs). However, MSNs are required in more and more areas such that the number of anchor nodes can be reduced and the location accuracy can be improved. In this paper, we firstly propose a range-free Voronoi-based Monte Carlo localisation algorithm (VMCL) for MSNs. We improve the localisation accuracy by making better use of the information that a sensor node gathers. Then, we propose an optimal region selection strategy of Voronoi diagram based on VMCL, called ORSS-VMCL, to increase the efficiency and accuracy for VMCL by adapting the size of Voronoi area during the filtering process. Simulation results show that the accuracy of these two algorithms, especially ORSS-VMCL, outperforms traditional MCL.

  7. Localising the auditory N1m with event-related beamformers: localisation accuracy following bilateral and unilateral stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Lauren; Furlong, Paul L.; Hillebrand, Arjan; Worthen, Siân F.; Witton, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The auditory evoked N1m-P2m response complex presents a challenging case for MEG source-modelling, because symmetrical, phase-locked activity occurs in the hemispheres both contralateral and ipsilateral to stimulation. Beamformer methods, in particular, can be susceptible to localisation bias and spurious sources under these conditions. This study explored the accuracy and efficiency of event-related beamformer source models for auditory MEG data under typical experimental conditions: monaural and diotic stimulation; and whole-head beamformer analysis compared to a half-head analysis using only sensors from the hemisphere contralateral to stimulation. Event-related beamformer localisations were also compared with more traditional single-dipole models. At the group level, the event-related beamformer performed equally well as the single-dipole models in terms of accuracy for both the N1m and the P2m, and in terms of efficiency (number of successful source models) for the N1m. The results yielded by the half-head analysis did not differ significantly from those produced by the traditional whole-head analysis. Any localisation bias caused by the presence of correlated sources is minimal in the context of the inter-individual variability in source localisations. In conclusion, event-related beamformers provide a useful alternative to equivalent-current dipole models in localisation of auditory evoked responses. PMID:27545435

  8. Localising the auditory N1m with event-related beamformers: localisation accuracy following bilateral and unilateral stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, Lauren; Furlong, Paul L; Hillebrand, Arjan; Worthen, Siân F; Witton, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The auditory evoked N1m-P2m response complex presents a challenging case for MEG source-modelling, because symmetrical, phase-locked activity occurs in the hemispheres both contralateral and ipsilateral to stimulation. Beamformer methods, in particular, can be susceptible to localisation bias and spurious sources under these conditions. This study explored the accuracy and efficiency of event-related beamformer source models for auditory MEG data under typical experimental conditions: monaural and diotic stimulation; and whole-head beamformer analysis compared to a half-head analysis using only sensors from the hemisphere contralateral to stimulation. Event-related beamformer localisations were also compared with more traditional single-dipole models. At the group level, the event-related beamformer performed equally well as the single-dipole models in terms of accuracy for both the N1m and the P2m, and in terms of efficiency (number of successful source models) for the N1m. The results yielded by the half-head analysis did not differ significantly from those produced by the traditional whole-head analysis. Any localisation bias caused by the presence of correlated sources is minimal in the context of the inter-individual variability in source localisations. In conclusion, event-related beamformers provide a useful alternative to equivalent-current dipole models in localisation of auditory evoked responses. PMID:27545435

  9. Modelling of edge localised modes and edge localised mode control [Modelling of ELMs and ELM control

    DOE PAGES

    Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Chang, C. S.; Ferraro, N.; Sugiyama, L.; Waelbroeck, F.; Xu, X. Q.; Loarte, A.; Futatani, S.

    2015-02-07

    Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in ITER Q = 10 H-mode plasmas are likely to lead to large transient heat loads to the divertor. In order to avoid an ELM induced reduction of the divertor lifetime, the large ELM energy losses need to be controlled. In ITER, ELM control is foreseen using magnetic field perturbations created by in-vessel coils and the injection of small D2 pellets. ITER plasmas are characterised by low collisionality at a high density (high fraction of the Greenwald density limit). These parameters cannot simultaneously be achieved in current experiments. Thus, the extrapolation of the ELM properties andmore » the requirements for ELM control in ITER relies on the development of validated physics models and numerical simulations. Here, we describe the modelling of ELMs and ELM control methods in ITER. The aim of this paper is not a complete review on the subject of ELM and ELM control modelling but rather to describe the current status and discuss open issues.« less

  10. Modelling of edge localised modes and edge localised mode control [Modelling of ELMs and ELM control

    SciTech Connect

    Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Chang, C. S.; Ferraro, N.; Sugiyama, L.; Waelbroeck, F.; Xu, X. Q.; Loarte, A.; Futatani, S.

    2015-02-07

    Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in ITER Q = 10 H-mode plasmas are likely to lead to large transient heat loads to the divertor. In order to avoid an ELM induced reduction of the divertor lifetime, the large ELM energy losses need to be controlled. In ITER, ELM control is foreseen using magnetic field perturbations created by in-vessel coils and the injection of small D2 pellets. ITER plasmas are characterised by low collisionality at a high density (high fraction of the Greenwald density limit). These parameters cannot simultaneously be achieved in current experiments. Thus, the extrapolation of the ELM properties and the requirements for ELM control in ITER relies on the development of validated physics models and numerical simulations. Here, we describe the modelling of ELMs and ELM control methods in ITER. The aim of this paper is not a complete review on the subject of ELM and ELM control modelling but rather to describe the current status and discuss open issues.

  11. Nationalisation, Localisation and Globalisation in Finnish Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valimaa, Jussi

    2004-01-01

    This article analyses and discusses the interplay between the social processes of nationalisation, localisation and globalisation in a single European nation state. The view of nationalisation put forward draws on a national case study based on historical and sociological research findings. The second part of the article presents a case study of…

  12. Strain localisation and weakening of the lithosphere during extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Weinberg, Roberto F.

    2008-10-01

    We explore the sensitivity of extensional systems to the thermal structure of the lithosphere using numerical simulations that fully couple the energy, momentum and continuity equations. The rheology of the lithosphere is controlled by weakening processes, such as shear heating, that localises strain into shear zones and faults. Numerical models show that during extension of an initially unpatterned lithosphere, structures develop spontaneously out of basic thermodynamic energy fluxes, and without the imposition of ad hoc rules on strain localisation. This contrasts with the classical Mohr-Coulomb theory for brittle localisation, which prescribes the angles of faults by a mathematical rule. Our results show that the mode of extension is sensitive to subtle changes in rheology, heat flux and geometry of the system. This sensitivity lies at the core of the variety and complexity observed in extensional systems. Localisation processes make the lithosphere weaker than previously estimated from the Brace-Goetze quasi-static approach. Consequently, typical estimates for plate tectonic forces are capable of splitting the lithosphere under extension, even without the role of active magmatism.

  13. Chinese Localisation of Evergreen: An Open Source Integrated Library System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Qing; Liu, Guoying

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate various issues related to Chinese language localisation in Evergreen, an open source integrated library system (ILS). Design/methodology/approach: A Simplified Chinese version of Evergreen was implemented and tested and various issues such as encoding, indexing, searching, and sorting…

  14. Raman micro spectroscopy for in vitro drug screening: subcellular localisation and interactions of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Farhane, Z; Bonnier, F; Casey, A; Byrne, H J

    2015-06-21

    Vibrational spectroscopy, including Raman micro spectroscopy, has been widely used over the last few years to explore potential biomedical applications. Indeed, Raman micro spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a powerful non-invasive tool in cancer diagnosis and monitoring. In confocal microscopic mode, the technique is also a molecularly specific analytical tool with optical resolution which has potential applications in subcellular analysis of biochemical processes, and therefore as an in vitro screening tool of the efficacy and mode of action of, for example, chemotherapeutic agents. In order to demonstrate and explore the potential in this field, established, model chemotherapeutic agents can be valuable. In this study paper, Raman micro spectroscopy coupled with confocal microscopy were used for the localization and tracking of the commercially available drug, doxorubicin (DOX), in the intracellular environment of the lung cancer cell line, A549. Cytotoxicity assays were employed to establish clinically relevant drug doses for 24 h exposure, and Confocal Laser Scanning Fluorescence Microscopy was conducted in parallel with Raman micro spectroscopy profiling to confirm the drug internalisation and localisation. Multivariate statistical analysis, consisting of PCA (principal components analysis) was used to highlight doxorubicin interaction with cancer cells and spectral variations due to its effects before and after DOX spectral features subtraction from nuclear and nucleolar spectra, were compared to non-exposed control spectra. Results show that Raman micro spectroscopy is not only able to detect doxorubicin inside cells and profile its specific subcellular localisation, but, it is also capable of elucidating the local biomolecular changes elicited by the drug, differentiating the responses in different sub cellular regions. Further analysis clearly demonstrates the early apoptotic effect in the nuclear regions and the initial responses of cells to this

  15. Germ plasm localisation of the HELICc of Vasa in Drosophila: analysis of domain sufficiency and amino acids critical for localisation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Szu-Chieh; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Lin, Gee-way; Wang, Ting-Fang; Chang, Chun-che; Lin, Ming-Der

    2015-01-01

    Formation of the germ plasm drives germline specification in Drosophila and some other insects such as aphids. Identification of the DEAD-box protein Vasa (Vas) as a conserved germline marker in flies and aphids suggests that they share common components for assembling the germ plasm. However, to which extent the assembly order is conserved and the correlation between functions and sequences of Vas remain unclear. Ectopic expression of the pea aphid Vas (ApVas1) in Drosophila did not drive its localisation to the germ plasm, but ApVas1 with a replaced C-terminal domain (HELICc) of Drosophila Vas (DmVas) became germ-plasm restricted. We found that HELICc itself, through the interaction with Oskar (Osk), was sufficient for germ-plasm localisation. Similarly, HELICc of the grasshopper Vas could be recruited to the germ plasm in Drosophila. Nonetheless, germ-plasm localisation was not seen in the Drosophila oocytes expressing HELICcs of Vas orthologues from aphids, crickets, and mice. We further identified that glutamine (Gln) 527 within HELICc of DmVas was critical for localisation, and its corresponding residue could also be detected in grasshopper Vas yet missing in the other three species. This suggests that Gln527 is a direct target of Osk or critical to the maintenance of HELICc conformation. PMID:26419889

  16. Germ plasm localisation of the HELICc of Vasa in Drosophila: analysis of domain sufficiency and amino acids critical for localisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Szu-Chieh; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Lin, Gee-Way; Wang, Ting-Fang; Chang, Chun-Che; Lin, Ming-Der

    2015-09-01

    Formation of the germ plasm drives germline specification in Drosophila and some other insects such as aphids. Identification of the DEAD-box protein Vasa (Vas) as a conserved germline marker in flies and aphids suggests that they share common components for assembling the germ plasm. However, to which extent the assembly order is conserved and the correlation between functions and sequences of Vas remain unclear. Ectopic expression of the pea aphid Vas (ApVas1) in Drosophila did not drive its localisation to the germ plasm, but ApVas1 with a replaced C-terminal domain (HELICc) of Drosophila Vas (DmVas) became germ-plasm restricted. We found that HELICc itself, through the interaction with Oskar (Osk), was sufficient for germ-plasm localisation. Similarly, HELICc of the grasshopper Vas could be recruited to the germ plasm in Drosophila. Nonetheless, germ-plasm localisation was not seen in the Drosophila oocytes expressing HELICcs of Vas orthologues from aphids, crickets, and mice. We further identified that glutamine (Gln) 527 within HELICc of DmVas was critical for localisation, and its corresponding residue could also be detected in grasshopper Vas yet missing in the other three species. This suggests that Gln527 is a direct target of Osk or critical to the maintenance of HELICc conformation.

  17. Germ plasm localisation of the HELICc of Vasa in Drosophila: analysis of domain sufficiency and amino acids critical for localisation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Szu-Chieh; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Lin, Gee-way; Wang, Ting-Fang; Chang, Chun-che; Lin, Ming-Der

    2015-09-30

    Formation of the germ plasm drives germline specification in Drosophila and some other insects such as aphids. Identification of the DEAD-box protein Vasa (Vas) as a conserved germline marker in flies and aphids suggests that they share common components for assembling the germ plasm. However, to which extent the assembly order is conserved and the correlation between functions and sequences of Vas remain unclear. Ectopic expression of the pea aphid Vas (ApVas1) in Drosophila did not drive its localisation to the germ plasm, but ApVas1 with a replaced C-terminal domain (HELICc) of Drosophila Vas (DmVas) became germ-plasm restricted. We found that HELICc itself, through the interaction with Oskar (Osk), was sufficient for germ-plasm localisation. Similarly, HELICc of the grasshopper Vas could be recruited to the germ plasm in Drosophila. Nonetheless, germ-plasm localisation was not seen in the Drosophila oocytes expressing HELICcs of Vas orthologues from aphids, crickets, and mice. We further identified that glutamine (Gln) 527 within HELICc of DmVas was critical for localisation, and its corresponding residue could also be detected in grasshopper Vas yet missing in the other three species. This suggests that Gln527 is a direct target of Osk or critical to the maintenance of HELICc conformation.

  18. Localisation vaginale de Mansonella perstans: à propos d’un cas au centre hospitalier universitaire de Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Bamba, Sanata; Barro-Traoré, Fatou; Liance, Martine; Chemla, Cathy; Sanou, Charles; Da, Olo; Guiguemdé, Tinga Robert

    2012-01-01

    Mansonella perstans est une filaire dont les adultes sont à localisation péritonéale et les microfilaires à localisation sanguine, qui sévit principalement en Amérique Equatoriale et aux bords de rivières, de plages en Afrique tropicale humide. Sa transmission est assurée par la piqûre de culicoïdes. Nous rapportons le cas d’une patiente souffrant de prurit dans un contexte biologique d’hyperéosinophilie au cours d’un dépistage du cancer du col de l’utérus. Une microfilaire de Mansonella perstans a été observée sur son frottis cervico-vaginal mais aussi dans son sang. La patiente a été traitée avec succès par une prise unique combinée de 400 mg d’albendazole et d’ivermectine (150 µg/kg). La localisation cervico-vaginale de Mansonella perstans est atypique et exceptionnelle. Nous proposons une recherche systématique de microfilaires lors de frottis cervico-vaginaux des femmes souhaitant un dépistage du cancer du col de l’utérus au Centre Hospitalier de Bobo-Dioulasso pour déterminer la fréquence réelle de cette localisation atypique. PMID:22937187

  19. Point localisation in patients with unilateral brain damage.

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglione, A; Benton, A L; Cocito, L; Bino, G; Favale, E

    1981-01-01

    The ability to reproduce the position of points in a plane was examined by a copying test in a control group and in unilaterally brain damaged patients. The procedure was designed to minimise the influence of visual field defects and of spatial hemi-inattention on performance. Accuracy of of localisation and direction of errors were studied in each half of the plane. Analysis showed a greater impairment of localisation ability in the patients with right hemisphere disease; however, the performance of both hemispheric groups was characterised by a reduction of accuracy in half of the plane contralateral to the side of the lesion. Both hemispheric groups showed an abnormal direction of errors in the left half of the plane, but the two groups presented a different pattern of errors. PMID:7310411

  20. Localised plasma density enhancements around comet CG/67P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Pierre; Broiles, Tom; Eriksson, Anders; Béghin, Christian; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Vallieres, Xavier; More, Jerome; Wattieaux, Gaetan; Engelhardt, Ilka A. D.; Edberg, Niklas; Odelstad, Elias; Vigren, Erik; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Goetz, Charlotte; Koenders, Christoph; Richter, Ingo; Volwerk, Martin; Burch, James L.; Goldstein, Ray; Mandt, Kathleen

    2016-04-01

    Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, target of the ESA's Rosetta mission, reached its perihelion at 1.3 AU from the Sun in August 2015. Its plasma environment will go on being monitored by the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) as the distance to the sun increases, until end of mission in September 2016. Combining observations from the different RPC sensors, we investigate localised, strong enhancements of the cometary plasma density over short timescales (~ minutes to seconds) observed during the period April 2015 - January 2016. These strong plasma density variations (RPC-MIP and RPC-LAP) are likely associated to cold electrons (RPC-IES) and generally observed during magnetic field rotations (RPC-MAG). The location of such events, both in the rotating comet frame and with regard to the magnetic field direction, is discussed to better constrain the mechanism at the origin of these localised plasma density enhancements.

  1. Segmented space: measuring tactile localisation in body coordinates.

    PubMed

    Harrar, Vanessa; Pritchett, Lisa M; Harris, Laurence R

    2013-01-01

    Previous research showing systematic localisation errors in touch perception related to eye and head position has suggested that touch is at least partially localised in a visual reference frame. However, many previous studies had participants report the location of tactile stimuli relative to a visual probe, which may force coding into a visual reference. Also, the visual probe could itself be subject to an effect of eye or head position. Thus, it is necessary to assess the perceived position of a tactile stimulus using a within-modality measure in order to make definitive conclusions about the coordinate system in which touch might be coded. Here, we present a novel method for measuring the perceived location of a touch in body coordinates: the Segmented Space Method (SSM). In the SSM participants imagine the region within which the stimulus could be presented divided into several equally spaced, and numbered, segments. Participants then simply report the number corresponding to the segment in which they perceived the stimulus. The SSM represents a simple and novel method that can be easily extended to other modalities by dividing any response space into numbered segments centred on some appropriate reference point (e.g. the head, the torso, the hand, or some point in space off the body). Here we apply SSM to the forearm during eccentric viewing and report localisation errors for touch similar to those previously reported using a crossmodal comparison. The data collected with the SSM strengthen the theory that tactile spatial localisation is generally coded in a visual reference frame even when visual coding is not required by the task.

  2. Localisation and expression of aquaporin subtypes in epithelial ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Hua; Yu, Yu-Qun; Yan, Chun-xiao

    2011-09-01

    To characterise AQP subtype localisation and expression in epithelial ovarian tumours, immunohistochemistry was used to assess the localisation and expression of AQP1-9 in 30 benign tumour cases, 30 borderline tumour cases, 50 malignant tumour cases and 20 normal ovarian tissue cases. Multiple AQP subtypes were expressed in epithelial ovarian tumours, with each AQP subtype displaying a different pattern of localisation and expression. AQP1 was mainly expressed in the microvascular endothelium, and AQP 2-9 were mainly expressed in tumour cells. Most AQP subtypes co-localised in the basolateral membranes of the epithelia of benign tumours and plasma membranes of malignant tumour cells. The positive rates for AQP1, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 were over 50%, but those for AQP2, 3 and 4 were only 10-40%. The expression of AQP1, 5 and 9 in malignant and borderline tumours was significantly higher than that in benign tumours (P<0.05) and normal ovarian tissue (P<0.05). However, AQP6 expression in ovarian malignant and borderline tumours was significantly lower than that in benign tumours (P<0.01) or normal ovarian tissue (P<0.01). AQP1 expression was increased in cases with ascites volumes greater than 1000 mL (P<0.05), AQP5 expression was greater in cases with lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), and more AQP9 expression was observed in G3 cases versus G1 and G2 cases (P<0.01). These results suggest that changes in the distribution and expression of AQP subtypes may be involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. This study presents a novel avenue of research that could illuminate the mechanism of ovarian carcinogenesis and treatment.

  3. Localisation of AMPK γ subunits in cardiac and skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Katalin; Grignani, Robert T; Watkins, Hugh; Redwood, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The trimeric protein AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important sensor of energetic status and cellular stress, and mutations in genes encoding two of the regulatory γ subunits cause inherited disorders of either cardiac or skeletal muscle. AMPKγ2 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with glycogen deposition and conduction abnormalities; mutations in AMPKγ3 result in increased skeletal muscle glycogen. In order to gain further insight into the roles of the different γ subunits in muscle and into possible disease mechanisms, we localised the γ2 and γ3 subunits, along with the more abundant γ1 subunit, by immunofluorescence in cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibres. The predominant cardiac γ2 variant, γ2-3B, gave a striated pattern in cardiomyocytes, aligning with the Z-disk but with punctate staining similar to T-tubule (L-type Ca(2+) channel) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2) markers. In skeletal muscle fibres AMPKγ3 localises to the I band, presenting a uniform staining that flanks the Z-disk, also coinciding with the position of Ca(2+) influx in these muscles. The localisation of γ2-3B- and γ3-containing AMPK suggests that these trimers may have similar functions in the different muscles. AMPK containing γ2-3B was detected in oxidative skeletal muscles which had low expression of γ3, confirming that these two regulatory subunits may be co-ordinately regulated in response to metabolic requirements. Compartmentalisation of AMPK complexes is most likely dependent on the regulatory γ subunit and this differential localisation may direct substrate selection and specify particular functional roles.

  4. Fully localised nonlinear energy growth optimals in pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, Chris C. T.; Willis, Ashley P.; Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-06-01

    A new, fully localised, energy growth optimal is found over large times and in long pipe domains at a given mass flow rate. This optimal emerges at a threshold disturbance energy below which a nonlinear version of the known (streamwise-independent) linear optimal [P. J. Schmid and D. S. Henningson, "Optimal energy density growth in Hagen-Poiseuille flow," J. Fluid Mech. 277, 192-225 (1994)] is selected and appears to remain the optimal up until the critical energy at which transition is triggered. The form of this optimal is similar to that found in short pipes [Pringle et al., "Minimal seeds for shear flow turbulence: Using nonlinear transient growth to touch the edge of chaos," J. Fluid Mech. 702, 415-443 (2012)], but now with full localisation in the streamwise direction. This fully localised optimal perturbation represents the best approximation yet of the minimal seed (the smallest perturbation which is arbitrarily close to states capable of triggering a turbulent episode) for "real" (laboratory) pipe flows. Dependence of the optimal with respect to several parameters has been computed and establishes that the structure is robust.

  5. Localised pulmonary metastatic calcification associated with pulmonary artery obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Bloodworth, J; Tomashefski, J F

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metastatic pulmonary calcification, a complication of uraemia and disordered calcium metabolism, may be diffuse or localised. The factors that determine calcium precipitation are complex, but tissue alkalosis is thought to be important. As obstruction of the pulmonary artery theoretically causes local alkalosis a retrospective necropsy study was carried out to examine the relation between metastatic pulmonary calcification and vascular obstruction. METHODS: Five patients with focal and two with diffuse metastatic calcification in the lungs were identified over eight years. Lungs were studied macroscopically and by light microscopy, haematoxylin and eosin and histochemical stains being used for calcium. RESULTS: Underlying risk factors for calcification in these patients included renal failure in six and disseminated malignancy in five. In the five patients with localised calcification obstruction of the pulmonary artery by thrombus or tumour was found proximal or adjacent to areas of calcium deposition. In two patients metastatic calcification was confined to a lung with unilateral pulmonary artery thromboembolic occlusion. Calcification was not specifically associated with infarction, pneumonia, or diffuse alveolar damage. Lesions of the pulmonary artery were not seen in the two patients with diffuse bilateral metastatic calcification. CONCLUSION: In this small series there was a spatial association between pulmonary artery obstruction and localised metastatic calcification. It is proposed that pulmonary artery obstruction alters the microchemical environment of the lung, favouring tissue alkalosis and thereby enhancing parenchymal calcification in patients predisposed to this condition. Images PMID:1519194

  6. Fully localised nonlinear energy growth optimals in pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Chris C. T.; Willis, Ashley P.; Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-06-15

    A new, fully localised, energy growth optimal is found over large times and in long pipe domains at a given mass flow rate. This optimal emerges at a threshold disturbance energy below which a nonlinear version of the known (streamwise-independent) linear optimal [P. J. Schmid and D. S. Henningson, “Optimal energy density growth in Hagen-Poiseuille flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 277, 192–225 (1994)] is selected and appears to remain the optimal up until the critical energy at which transition is triggered. The form of this optimal is similar to that found in short pipes [Pringle et al., “Minimal seeds for shear flow turbulence: Using nonlinear transient growth to touch the edge of chaos,” J. Fluid Mech. 702, 415–443 (2012)], but now with full localisation in the streamwise direction. This fully localised optimal perturbation represents the best approximation yet of the minimal seed (the smallest perturbation which is arbitrarily close to states capable of triggering a turbulent episode) for “real” (laboratory) pipe flows. Dependence of the optimal with respect to several parameters has been computed and establishes that the structure is robust.

  7. Strain localisation in mechanically Layered Rocks, insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, L.; Huet, B.; Agard, P.; Labrousse, L.; Jolivet, L.; Yao, K.

    2012-09-01

    Small scale deformation in stratified rocks displays a large diversity of micro-structures, from the microscopic scale to the scale of orogens. We have designed a series of fully dynamic numerical simulations aimed at assessing which parameters control this structural diversity and which underlying mechanisms lead to strain localisation. The influence of stratification orientation on the occurrence and mode of strain localisation is tested by varying the initial dip of inherited layering versus the large scale imposed simple shear. The detailed study of the models indicates that (1) the results are length-scale independent, (2) the new shear zones are always compatible with the kinematics imposed at the boundary (3) micro-structures formed encompass the full diversity of micro-structures observed in the field and chiefly depend on the direction of the initial anisotropy versus shear direction, (4) depending on the orientation of the anisotropy, the layers may deform along subtractive or additive shear bands, (5) the deformation in anisotropic media results in non-lithostatic pressure values that are on the order of the deviatoric stress in the strong layers and (6) the introduction of brittle rheology is necessary to form localised shear bands in the ductile regime.

  8. Kyste hydatique à localisation costo vertébrale

    PubMed Central

    Marouf, Rachid

    2014-01-01

    L'hydatidose est une affection parasitaire due à la contamination de l'homme par la forme larvaire de ténia échinococcus granulosus, la forme costo vertébrale est une localisation très rare qui représente 0,18 à 1,21% de l'ensemble des localisations hydatiques. Nous rapportons le cas d'une femme de 32 ans qui présente un kyste hydatique multi vésiculaire à localisation costovertébrale, traité par chirurgie radicale associée à un traitement médical anti parasitaire pour une durée de 6 mois, avec bonne évolution. L'atteinte costo-vertébrale par la maladie hydatique est rare et l’évolution est insidieuse. Malgré un traitement chirurgical radical, la fréquence des récidives rend le pronostic sombre. PMID:25922632

  9. Feeling blue, going green and finding other attractive alternatives: a case of biphasic anaphylaxis to patent blue and a literature review of alternative sentinel node localisation methods.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Fahad Mujtaba; Basit, Abdul; Salem, Fathi; Vidya, Raghavan

    2015-12-15

    Patent blue dye is used for sentinel lymph node localisation in order to stage the axilla in patients with breast cancer. Patent blue is one of the most common dyes used across the UK, however, the incidence of adverse effects seems to be increasing. This case highlights our experience of a biphasic anaphylactic reaction to patent blue dye, and we conduct a brief literature review of alternative and more novel methods to adequately visualise the lymphatics for sentinel lymph node biopsy.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors in human breast tumour: localisation and quantification by histo-autoradiographic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Jammes, H.; Peyrat, J. P.; Ban, E.; Vilain, M. O.; Haour, F.; Djiane, J.; Bonneterre, J.

    1992-01-01

    To assess the precise role of IGF1 in benign and malignant breast diseases, we analysed the tissular localisation, characterised, and quantified specific insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) binding sites in these heterogenous tissues, using histo-autoradiographic analysis (HAA). The 125I-IGF1 binding was performed on frozen tissue sections and analysed using 3H Ultrofilm autoradiography coupled to computerised image analysis. Competitive binding experiments using unlabelled IGF1, IGF2 and insulin showed that the tissues exhibited typical type I IGF binding sites. This specificity was confirmed by the use of alpha IR-3 monoclonal antibody, as inhibitor of 125I-IGF1 binding. IGF1 binding sites were detected in 18 human primary breast cancers, 12 benign breast tumours and two normal breast tissues. Using HAA we found that the human breast carcinomas studied exhibit a specific and high binding capacity for 125I-IGF1 exclusively localised on the proliferative epithelial component. The 125I-IGF1 binding activity of benign breast tumours or normal breast tissue was significantly lower than in cancerous tissues. There was a significant correlation between IGF1-R concentrations detected with HAA and those detected with a classical biochemical method. Moreover, HAA could be useful in further detailing whether a tumour is IGF1-R positive or negative HAA appears to be a useful method for the detection of growth factor receptors, specially in small biopsy specimens. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1323990

  11. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  12. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system.

  13. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns.

    PubMed

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  14. Localisation and interactions of the Vipp1 protein in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Samantha J; Burroughs, Nigel J; Shevela, Dmitriy; Yu, Jianfeng; Rupprecht, Eva; Liu, Lu-Ning; Mastroianni, Giulia; Xue, Quan; Llorente-Garcia, Isabel; Leake, Mark C; Eichacker, Lutz A; Schneider, Dirk; Nixon, Peter J; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2014-01-01

    The Vipp1 protein is essential in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts for the maintenance of photosynthetic function and thylakoid membrane architecture. To investigate its mode of action we generated strains of the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 in which Vipp1 was tagged with green fluorescent protein at the C-terminus and expressed from the native chromosomal locus. There was little perturbation of function. Live-cell fluorescence imaging shows dramatic relocalisation of Vipp1 under high light. Under low light, Vipp1 is predominantly dispersed in the cytoplasm with occasional concentrations at the outer periphery of the thylakoid membranes. High light induces Vipp1 coalescence into localised puncta within minutes, with net relocation of Vipp1 to the vicinity of the cytoplasmic membrane and the thylakoid membranes. Pull-downs and mass spectrometry identify an extensive collection of proteins that are directly or indirectly associated with Vipp1 only after high-light exposure. These include not only photosynthetic and stress-related proteins but also RNA-processing, translation and protein assembly factors. This suggests that the Vipp1 puncta could be involved in protein assembly. One possibility is that Vipp1 is involved in the formation of stress-induced localised protein assembly centres, enabling enhanced protein synthesis and delivery to membranes under stress conditions. PMID:25308470

  15. An extensive endoplasmic reticulum-localised glycoprotein family in trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Harriet; O’Reilly, Amanda J.; Sternberg, Jeremy; Field, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomes are evolutionarily highly divergent parasitic protozoa, and as a consequence the vast majority of trypanosome membrane proteins remain uncharacterised in terms of location, trafficking or function. Here we describe a novel family of type I membrane proteins which we designate ‘invariant glycoproteins’ (IGPs). IGPs are trypanosome-restricted, with extensive, lineage-specific paralogous expansions in related taxa. In T. brucei three IGP subfamilies, IGP34, IGP40 and IGP48 are recognised; all possess a putative C-type lectin ectodomain and are ER-localised, despite lacking a classical ER-retention motif. IGPs exhibit highest expression in stumpy stage cells, suggesting roles in developmental progression, but gene silencing in mammalian infective forms suggests that each IGP subfamily is also required for normal proliferation. Detailed analysis of the IGP48 subfamily indicates a role in maintaining ER morphology, while the ER lumenal domain is necessary and sufficient for formation of both oligomeric complexes and ER retention. IGP48 is detected by antibodies from T. b. rhodesiense infected humans. We propose that the IGPs represent a trypanosomatid-specific family of ER-localised glycoproteins, with potential contributions to life cycle progression and immunity, and utilise oligomerisation as an ER retention mechanism. PMID:26167471

  16. Localised pattern formation in a model for dryland vegetation.

    PubMed

    Dawes, J H P; Williams, J L M

    2016-07-01

    We analyse the model for vegetation growth in a semi-arid landscape proposed by von Hardenberg et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 87:198101, 2001), which consists of two parabolic partial differential equations that describe the evolution in space and time of the water content of the soil and the level of vegetation. This model is a generalisation of one proposed by Klausmeier but it contains additional terms that capture additional physical effects. By considering the limit in which the diffusion of water in the soil is much faster than the spread of vegetation, we reduce the system to an asymptotically simpler parabolic-elliptic system of equations that describes small amplitude instabilities of the uniform vegetated state. We carry out a thorough weakly nonlinear analysis to investigate bifurcations and pattern formation in the reduced model. We find that the pattern forming instabilities are subcritical except in a small region of parameter space. In the original model at large amplitude there are localised solutions, organised by homoclinic snaking curves. The resulting bifurcation structure is well known from other models for pattern forming systems. Taken together our results describe how the von Hardenberg model displays a sequence of (often hysteretic) transitions from a non-vegetated state, to localised patches of vegetation that exist with uniform low-level vegetation, to periodic patterns, to higher-level uniform vegetation as the precipitation parameter increases.

  17. Influence of HPV16 E2 and its localisation on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Mühlen, Sabrina; Behren, Andreas; Iftner, Thomas; Simon, Christian

    2010-08-01

    Infection with the high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 is the major cause of cervical cancer and plays a role in the development of certain head and neck and skin cancers. We have previously demonstrated that the Early Protein 2 of the Cottontail Rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV), required for skin carcinogenesis in a rabbit model, is able to induce the expression of a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9); a protease known to play a key role in invasion and metastasis. However, as of now we do not understand the underlying mechanism of activation nor relevance for the human system. Here, we report that high-risk human papillomavirus HPV16 E2 similar to our previously reported results on CRPV E2 activates the human MMP-9 promoter predominantly via the MEK1-ERK1/2-AP-1-signaling pathway. In addition this activation is associated with a nuclear sub-localisation of HPV16-E2 suggesting a nuclear protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction of E2 as the underlying mechanism of activation.

  18. Source localisation and dose verification for a novel brachytherapy unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Marinos G.

    A recent development in the field of radiotherapy has been the introduction of the PRS Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss Surgical GmbH, Oberkochen, Germany). This is essentially a portable, miniaturised, electron-driven photon generator that allows high intensity, soft-energy x-rays (50 kVp) to be delivered directly to the tumour site in a single fraction. The system has been used for the interstitial radiation treatment of both brain and breast tumours. At present, a standardised in-vivo dose verification technique is not available for the PRS treatments. The isotropical distribution of photons about the tip of the PRS probe inserted in the tissue can effectively be viewed as a point source of radiation buried in the body. This work has looked into ways of localising the PRS source utilising its own radiation field. Moreover, the response of monoenergetic sources, mimicking realistic brachytherapy sources, has also been investigated. The purpose of this project was to attempt to localise the source as well as derive important dosimetric information from the resulting image. A detection system comprised of a well-collimated Germanium detector (HPGe) has been devised in a rotate-translate Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) modality. The superior energy resolving ability of the detection system allowed for energy selective reconstruction to be carried out in the case of the monoenergetic source (241Am). Results showed that the monoenergetic source can be localised to within 1 mm and the continuous PRS x-ray source to within 3mm. For the PRS dose map derivation, Monte Carlo studies have been employed in order to extract information on the dosimetric aspect of the resulting image. The final goal of this work was therefore to formulate a direct mathematical relation (Transform Map) between the image created by the escaping photons and the dose map as predicted by the theoretical model. The formation therefore of the in-vivo PRS image could allow for a real-time monitoring

  19. The importance of strain localisation in shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Finch, Melanie; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Griera, Albert; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Steinbach, Florian; Weikusat, Ilka

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of various types of shear bands (C, C', C'') in shear zones indicate that heterogeneity of strain is common in strongly deformed rocks. However, the importance of strain localisation is difficult to ascertain if suitable strain markers are lacking, which is usually the case. Numerical modelling with the finite-element method has so far not given much insight in the development of shear bands. We suggest that this is not only because the modelled strains are often not high enough, but also because this technique (that usually assumes isotropic material properties within elements) does not properly incorporate mineral deformation behaviour. We simulated high-strain, simple-shear deformation in single- and polyphase materials with a full-field theory (FFT) model coupled to the Elle modelling platform (www.elle.ws; Lebensohn 2001; Bons et al. 2008). The FFT-approach simulates visco-plastic deformation by dislocation glide, taking into account the different available slip systems and their critical resolved shear stresses in relations to the applied stresses. Griera et al. (2011; 2013) have shown that this approach is particularly well suited for strongly anisotropic minerals, such as mica and ice Ih (Llorens 2015). We modelled single- and polyphase composites of minerals with different anisotropies and strengths, roughly equivalent to minerals such as ice Ih, mica, quartz and feldspar. Single-phase polycrystalline aggregates show distinct heterogeneity of strain rate, especially in case of ice Ih, which is mechanically close to mica (see also Griera et al. 2015). Finite strain distributions are heterogeneous as well, but the patterns may differ from that of the strain rate distribution. Dynamic recrystallisation, however, usually masks any strain and strain rate localisation (Llorens 2015). In case of polyphase aggregates, equivalent to e.g. a granite, we observe extensive localisation in both syn- and antithetic shear bands. The antithetic shear bands

  20. A size-dependent constitutive modelling framework for localised failure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Giang D.; Nguyen, Chi T.; Nguyen, Vinh P.; Bui, Ha H.; Shen, Luming

    2016-08-01

    Localised deformation of materials usually takes place in thin bands during the nonlinear phase of the deformation process. The orientation and size of these localisation bands are important properties characterising the post-localisation behaviour of the materials, and hence should be taken into account in constitutive modelling. In this research, a new approach is proposed for the integration of both size and orientation of a localisation band in the constitutive description beyond the onset of localisation. Since a length scale related to the size of the localisation band appears in the model description, its post-localisation response then scales with both the band size and the size of the volume element containing it. Therefore, size effects are intrinsically included and post-localisation behaviour is correctly captured, which helps ensure convergence of numerical solutions upon discretisation refinement in numerical analysis of boundary value problems. The concept together with implementation features of the framework and its performances at constitutive level and in the analysis of boundary value problems are presented in this paper.

  1. Fiber optic sensors for perimeter security with intruder localisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw; Życzkowski, Marek

    2005-09-01

    Fibre optic have been using in security technology for 25 years. It started from simple systems where an alarm was generated only when a fibre (placed inside a fence, a net or a wire) was cut or broken. Now, there is a growing interest in research of sensors for disturbance localization. These sensors can be specially useful for perimeter security. In comparison with other sensors, they are passive, multikilometer-long devices and can be sensitive to variety of parameters. The fiber optic sensors with intruder localisation can be divided into three classes, that base on: interferometers, internal modes interference and Brillion scattering. In this paper, we will present our research of interferometer-based sensors as well as state of art of the other sensors.

  2. Crossover localisation is regulated by the neddylation posttranslational regulatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Marina Tagliaro; Vezon, Daniel; Chambon, Aurélie; Pereira, Lucie; Falque, Matthieu; Martin, Olivier C; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Grelon, Mathilde

    2014-08-01

    Crossovers (COs) are at the origin of genetic variability, occurring across successive generations, and they are also essential for the correct segregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Their number and position are precisely controlled, however the mechanisms underlying these controls are poorly understood. Neddylation/rubylation is a regulatory pathway of posttranslational protein modification that is required for numerous cellular processes in eukaryotes, but has not yet been linked to homologous recombination. In a screen for meiotic recombination-defective mutants, we identified several axr1 alleles, disrupting the gene encoding the E1 enzyme of the neddylation complex in Arabidopsis. Using genetic and cytological approaches we found that axr1 mutants are characterised by a shortage in bivalent formation correlated with strong synapsis defects. We determined that the bivalent shortage in axr1 is not due to a general decrease in CO formation but rather due to a mislocalisation of class I COs. In axr1, as in wild type, COs are still under the control of the ZMM group of proteins. However, in contrast to wild type, they tend to cluster together and no longer follow the obligatory CO rule. Lastly, we showed that this deregulation of CO localisation is likely to be mediated by the activity of a cullin 4 RING ligase, known to be involved in DNA damage sensing during somatic DNA repair and mouse spermatogenesis. In conclusion, we provide evidence that the neddylation/rubylation pathway of protein modification is a key regulator of meiotic recombination. We propose that rather than regulating the number of recombination events, this pathway regulates their localisation, through the activation of cullin 4 RING ligase complexes. Possible targets for these ligases are discussed. PMID:25116939

  3. Crossover Localisation Is Regulated by the Neddylation Posttranslational Regulatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jahns, Marina Tagliaro; Vezon, Daniel; Chambon, Aurélie; Pereira, Lucie; Falque, Matthieu; Martin, Olivier C.; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Grelon, Mathilde

    2014-01-01

    Crossovers (COs) are at the origin of genetic variability, occurring across successive generations, and they are also essential for the correct segregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Their number and position are precisely controlled, however the mechanisms underlying these controls are poorly understood. Neddylation/rubylation is a regulatory pathway of posttranslational protein modification that is required for numerous cellular processes in eukaryotes, but has not yet been linked to homologous recombination. In a screen for meiotic recombination-defective mutants, we identified several axr1 alleles, disrupting the gene encoding the E1 enzyme of the neddylation complex in Arabidopsis. Using genetic and cytological approaches we found that axr1 mutants are characterised by a shortage in bivalent formation correlated with strong synapsis defects. We determined that the bivalent shortage in axr1 is not due to a general decrease in CO formation but rather due to a mislocalisation of class I COs. In axr1, as in wild type, COs are still under the control of the ZMM group of proteins. However, in contrast to wild type, they tend to cluster together and no longer follow the obligatory CO rule. Lastly, we showed that this deregulation of CO localisation is likely to be mediated by the activity of a cullin 4 RING ligase, known to be involved in DNA damage sensing during somatic DNA repair and mouse spermatogenesis. In conclusion, we provide evidence that the neddylation/rubylation pathway of protein modification is a key regulator of meiotic recombination. We propose that rather than regulating the number of recombination events, this pathway regulates their localisation, through the activation of cullin 4 RING ligase complexes. Possible targets for these ligases are discussed. PMID:25116939

  4. Crossover localisation is regulated by the neddylation posttranslational regulatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Marina Tagliaro; Vezon, Daniel; Chambon, Aurélie; Pereira, Lucie; Falque, Matthieu; Martin, Olivier C; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Grelon, Mathilde

    2014-08-01

    Crossovers (COs) are at the origin of genetic variability, occurring across successive generations, and they are also essential for the correct segregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Their number and position are precisely controlled, however the mechanisms underlying these controls are poorly understood. Neddylation/rubylation is a regulatory pathway of posttranslational protein modification that is required for numerous cellular processes in eukaryotes, but has not yet been linked to homologous recombination. In a screen for meiotic recombination-defective mutants, we identified several axr1 alleles, disrupting the gene encoding the E1 enzyme of the neddylation complex in Arabidopsis. Using genetic and cytological approaches we found that axr1 mutants are characterised by a shortage in bivalent formation correlated with strong synapsis defects. We determined that the bivalent shortage in axr1 is not due to a general decrease in CO formation but rather due to a mislocalisation of class I COs. In axr1, as in wild type, COs are still under the control of the ZMM group of proteins. However, in contrast to wild type, they tend to cluster together and no longer follow the obligatory CO rule. Lastly, we showed that this deregulation of CO localisation is likely to be mediated by the activity of a cullin 4 RING ligase, known to be involved in DNA damage sensing during somatic DNA repair and mouse spermatogenesis. In conclusion, we provide evidence that the neddylation/rubylation pathway of protein modification is a key regulator of meiotic recombination. We propose that rather than regulating the number of recombination events, this pathway regulates their localisation, through the activation of cullin 4 RING ligase complexes. Possible targets for these ligases are discussed.

  5. Biochemical properties and cellular localisation of STIM proteins.

    PubMed

    Dziadek, Marie A; Johnstone, Lorna S

    2007-08-01

    Human and murine STIM1 were originally discovered as candidate growth regulators in tumours and in the bone marrow stroma, and the structurally related vertebrate family members, STIM2 and the Drosophila homologue D-Stim, were subsequently identified. STIM proteins are ubiquitously expressed type I single-pass transmembrane proteins which have a unique combination of structural motifs within their polypeptide sequences. The extracellular regions contain an N-terminal unpaired EF-hand Ca(2+) binding motif adjacent to an unconventional glycosylated SAM domain, while the cytoplasmic regions contain alpha-helical coiled-coil domains within a region having homology to ERM domains adjacent to the transmembrane region, and phosphorylated proline-rich domains near the C-terminus. STIM1, STIM2 and D-Stim diverge significantly only in their structure C-terminal to the coiled-coil/ERM domains. The STIM structural domains were predicted to function in Ca(2+) binding as well as in mediating interactions between STIM proteins and other proteins, and homotypic STIM1-STIM1 and heterotypic STIM1-STIM2 interactions were demonstrated biochemically. However, the functional significance of the cellular localisation of STIM1 and its domain structure only became evident after recent breakthrough research identified STIM1 as a key regulator of store-operated calcium (SOC) entry into cells. It is now clear that STIM1 is both a sensor of Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and an activator of Orai1-containing SOC channels in the plasma membrane. On the basis of recent functional studies a model can be proposed to explain how the biochemical properties of STIM1 contribute to its precise membrane localisation and its function in regulating SOC entry. PMID:17382385

  6. Localising fast radio bursts and other transients using interferometric arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrocka, M.; Stappers, B.; Wilkinson, P.

    2015-07-01

    A new population of sources emitting fast and bright transient radio bursts (FRBs) has recently been identified. Their observed high dispersion measures suggests an extragalactic origin, and accurately determining their positions and distances will provide an opportunity to study the magneto-ionic properties of the intergalactic medium. So far, FRBs have all been found using large dishes equipped with multi-pixel arrays. While these dishes are well-suited to discovering transient sources, they are poor at providing accurate localisations. A 2D snapshot image of the sky, made with a correlation interferometer array, can accurately localise many compact radio sources simultaneously. However, the required time resolution and the need to detect them in real time makes this currently impractical. In a beam-forming approach many narrow tied-array beams (TABs) are produced and the advantages of single dishes and interferometers can be combined. We present a proof-of-concept analysis of a new non-imaging method that utilises the additional spectral and comparative spatial information obtained from multiply overlapping TABs to estimate a transient source location with up to arcsecond accuracy in almost real time. We demonstrate this for a variety of interferometric configurations, that is LOFAR and MeerKAT, and show that the estimated angular position may be sufficient for identifying a host galaxy or other related object, without reference to other simultaneous or follow-up observations. In cases where the position is less accurately determined, we can still significantly reduce the area that needs to be searched for associated emission at other wavelengths and from potential host galaxies.

  7. The contribution of carrier localisation to efficiency droop in GaN LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Colin

    2010-03-01

    One of the most significant problems preventing the widespread adoption of Solid State Lighting is the reduction in efficiency at high drive currents: so called ``efficiency droop''. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for explaining this phenomenon for example Auger recombination. However, the reason InGaN LEDs work, even though the dislocation density is high, is widely believed to due to carrier localisation. We propose that modification of carrier localisation may also control the droop. In this paper we discuss three localisation mechanisms which may be relevant to efficiency droop. In an InGaN/GaN QW the active region is strained and is also a random alloy. We have shown theoretically that random alloy fluctuations localise the holes on a 1-2 nm length scale (localisation mechanism 1). In addition, monolayer and bilayer steps on the upper InGaN/GaN QW interface localise the electrons on a 5-10 nm lateral length scale (mechanism 2). In addition, some InGaN QWs (depending on the growth conditions) exhibit a QW network structure with gross thickness fluctuations. These localise electrons and holes at room temperature on a typically 100 nm lateral length scale (mechanism 3). There are two related reasons carrier localisation may contribute to efficiency droop. First, localised carriers are in local potential minima. As the current density increases, carriers may fill these dot like regions and became delocalised, enabling them to diffuse to dislocations, reducing the light emission and resulting in efficiency droop. Second, in polar and semi-polar materials, as the current density increases, the electric field across the QW decreases, which reduces the size of the confining local potential wells, allowing the carriers to become delocalised. Experimentally we have found that the efficiency droop is significantly different in QWs with localisation mechanisms 1 plus 2 operating relative to those in which all three mechanisms operate.

  8. Radioguided localisation of impalpable breast lesions using 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin: Lessons learnt during introduction of a new technique to guide preoperative localisation

    SciTech Connect

    Landman, Joanne; Kulawansa, Sagarika; McCarthy, Michael; Troedson, Russell; Phillips, Michael; Tinning, Jill; Taylor, Donna

    2015-03-15

    Preoperative wire-guided localisation (WGL) of impalpable breast lesions is widely used but can be technically difficult. Risks include wire migration, inaccurate placement, and inadequate surgical margins. Research shows that radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) is quicker, easier, and can improve surgical and cosmetic outcomes. An audited introduction of ROLL was conducted to validate the technique as a feasible alternative to WGL. Fifty patients with single impalpable lesions and biopsy proven malignancy or indeterminate histology underwent WGL followed by intralesional radiopharmaceutical injection of 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin. Postprocedural mammography was performed to demonstrate wire position, and scintigraphy to evaluate radiopharmaceutical migration. Lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative sentinel node biopsy were performed if indicated, followed by lesion localisation and excision using a gamma probe. Specimen imaging was performed, with immediate reexcision for visibly inadequate margins. Accurate localisation was achieved in 86% of patients with ROLL compared to 72% with WGL. All lesions were successfully removed, with clear margins in 71.8% of malignant lesions. Reexcision and intraoperative sentinel node localisation rates were equivalent to preaudit figures for WGL. ROLL was easy to perform and problems were infrequent. Inaccurate radiopharmaceutical placement necessitating WGL occurred in four patients. Minor radiopharmaceutical migration was common, but precluded using ROLL in only two cases. ROLL is effective, simple, inexpensive, and easily learnt; however, preoperative confirmation of correct radiopharmaceutical placement using mammography and the gamma probe is important to help ensure successful lesion removal. Insertion of a backup hookwire is recommended during the initial introduction of ROLL.

  9. Localised excitation of a single photon source by a nanowaveguide.

    PubMed

    Geng, Wei; Manceau, Mathieu; Rahbany, Nancy; Sallet, Vincent; De Vittorio, Massimo; Carbone, Luigi; Glorieux, Quentin; Bramati, Alberto; Couteau, Christophe

    2016-01-29

    Nowadays, integrated photonics is a key technology in quantum information processing (QIP) but achieving all-optical buses for quantum networks with efficient integration of single photon emitters remains a challenge. Photonic crystals and cavities are good candidates but do not tackle how to effectively address a nanoscale emitter. Using a nanowire nanowaveguide, we realise an hybrid nanodevice which locally excites a single photon source (SPS). The nanowire acts as a passive or active sub-wavelength waveguide to excite the quantum emitter. Our results show that localised excitation of a SPS is possible and is compared with free-space excitation. Our proof of principle experiment presents an absolute addressing efficiency ηa ~ 10(-4) only ~50% lower than the one using free-space optics. This important step demonstrates that sufficient guided light in a nanowaveguide made of a semiconductor nanowire is achievable to excite a single photon source. We accomplish a hybrid system offering great potentials for electrically driven SPSs and efficient single photon collection and detection, opening the way for optimum absorption/emission of nanoscale emitters. We also discuss how to improve the addressing efficiency of a dipolar nanoscale emitter with our system.

  10. Localised excitation of a single photon source by a nanowaveguide

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Wei; Manceau, Mathieu; Rahbany, Nancy; Sallet, Vincent; De Vittorio, Massimo; Carbone, Luigi; Glorieux, Quentin; Bramati, Alberto; Couteau, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, integrated photonics is a key technology in quantum information processing (QIP) but achieving all-optical buses for quantum networks with efficient integration of single photon emitters remains a challenge. Photonic crystals and cavities are good candidates but do not tackle how to effectively address a nanoscale emitter. Using a nanowire nanowaveguide, we realise an hybrid nanodevice which locally excites a single photon source (SPS). The nanowire acts as a passive or active sub-wavelength waveguide to excite the quantum emitter. Our results show that localised excitation of a SPS is possible and is compared with free-space excitation. Our proof of principle experiment presents an absolute addressing efficiency ηa ~ 10−4 only ~50% lower than the one using free-space optics. This important step demonstrates that sufficient guided light in a nanowaveguide made of a semiconductor nanowire is achievable to excite a single photon source. We accomplish a hybrid system offering great potentials for electrically driven SPSs and efficient single photon collection and detection, opening the way for optimum absorption/emission of nanoscale emitters. We also discuss how to improve the addressing efficiency of a dipolar nanoscale emitter with our system. PMID:26822999

  11. Antenna array geometry optimization for a passive coherent localisation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Peter; Kuschel, Heiner; O'Hagan, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Passive Coherent Localisation (PCL), also known as Passive Radar, making use of RF sources of opportunity such as Radio or TV Broadcasting Stations, Cellular Phone Network Base Stations, etc. is an advancing technology for covert operation because no active radar transmitter is required. It is also an attractive addition to existing active radar stations because it has the potential to discover low-flying and low-observable targets. The CORA (Covert Radar) experimental passive radar system currently developed at Fraunhofer-FHR features a multi-channel digital radar receiver and a circular antenna array with separate elements for the VHF- and the UHF-range and is used to exploit alternatively Digital Audio (DAB) or Video Broadcasting (DVB-T) signals. For an extension of the system, a wideband antenna array is being designed for which a new discone antenna element has been developed covering the full DVB-T frequency range. The present paper describes the outline of the system and the numerical modelling and optimisation methods applied to solve the complex task of antenna array design: Electromagnetic full wave analysis is required for the parametric design of the antenna elements while combinatorial optimization methods are applied to find the best array positions and excitation coefficients for a regular omni-directional antenna performance. The different steps are combined in an iterative loop until the optimum array layout is found. Simulation and experimental results for the current system will be shown.

  12. Localised excitation of a single photon source by a nanowaveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Wei; Manceau, Mathieu; Rahbany, Nancy; Sallet, Vincent; de Vittorio, Massimo; Carbone, Luigi; Glorieux, Quentin; Bramati, Alberto; Couteau, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, integrated photonics is a key technology in quantum information processing (QIP) but achieving all-optical buses for quantum networks with efficient integration of single photon emitters remains a challenge. Photonic crystals and cavities are good candidates but do not tackle how to effectively address a nanoscale emitter. Using a nanowire nanowaveguide, we realise an hybrid nanodevice which locally excites a single photon source (SPS). The nanowire acts as a passive or active sub-wavelength waveguide to excite the quantum emitter. Our results show that localised excitation of a SPS is possible and is compared with free-space excitation. Our proof of principle experiment presents an absolute addressing efficiency ηa ~ 10-4 only ~50% lower than the one using free-space optics. This important step demonstrates that sufficient guided light in a nanowaveguide made of a semiconductor nanowire is achievable to excite a single photon source. We accomplish a hybrid system offering great potentials for electrically driven SPSs and efficient single photon collection and detection, opening the way for optimum absorption/emission of nanoscale emitters. We also discuss how to improve the addressing efficiency of a dipolar nanoscale emitter with our system.

  13. Localised mitogenic activity in horses following infection with Streptococcus equi.

    PubMed

    McLean, R; Rash, N L; Robinson, C; Waller, A S; Paillot, R

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi) is the causative agent of strangles, a highly contagious upper respiratory disease of equids. Streptococcus equi produces superantigens (sAgs), which are thought to contribute to strangles pathogenicity through non-specific T-cell activation and pro-inflammatory response. Streptococcus equi infection induces abscesses in the lymph nodes of the head and neck. In some individuals, some abscess material remains into the guttural pouch and inspissates over time to form chondroids which can harbour live S. equi. The aim of this study was to determine the sites of sAg production during infection and therefore improve our understanding of their role. Abscess material, chondroids and serum collected from Equidae with signs of strangles were tested in mitogenic assays. Mitogenic sAg activity was only detected in abscess material and chondroids. Our data support the localised in vivo activity of sAg during both acute and carrier phases of S. equi infection.

  14. Smoking in Crohn's disease: effect on localisation and clinical course.

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, E; Järnerot, G; Huitfeldt, B

    1992-01-01

    The effects of smoking on the localisation and clinical course of Crohn's disease is evaluated in 231 patients. Heavy smokers (greater than 10 cigarettes/day) had an increased risk of operation at least once--odds ratios for heavy smokers compared with never smokers after five and 10 years were 1.14 and 1.24 respectively (p = 0.03 and p = 0.017). The risk of further operations was even higher and after 10 years the odds ratio was 1.79 (p = 0.015). The accumulated number of fistulae and/or abscesses was higher for smokers than for never smokers (p = 0.046). Patients with a high life time tobacco exposure (greater than 150 cigarette years) and heavy smokers (greater than 10 cigarettes/day) had small bowel disease more often than patients with lower life time exposure (less than or equal to 150 cigarette years) and patients smoking less than or equal to 10 cigarettes/day (p = 0.002 and p = 0.045 respectively). The course of Crohn's disease analysed in different ways was unfavourable for smokers, especially heavy smokers. Patients with Crohn's disease should be dissuaded from smoking. PMID:1624159

  15. Tumour Suppressor Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) localisation is regulated by both Kinesin-1 and Kinesin-2

    PubMed Central

    Ruane, Peter T.; Gumy, Laura F.; Bola, Becky; Anderson, Beverley; Wozniak, Marcin J.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Allan, Victoria J.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules and their associated proteins (MAPs) underpin the polarity of specialised cells. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is one such MAP with a multifunctional agenda that requires precise intracellular localisations. Although APC has been found to associate with kinesin-2 subfamily members, the exact mechanism for the peripheral localization of APC remains unclear. Here we show that the heavy chain of kinesin-1 directly interacts with the APC C-terminus, contributing to the peripheral localisation of APC in fibroblasts. In rat hippocampal neurons the kinesin-1 binding domain of APC is required for its axon tip enrichment. Moreover, we demonstrate that APC requires interactions with both kinesin-2 and kinesin-1 for this localisation. Underlining the importance of the kinesin-1 association, neurons expressing APC lacking kinesin-1-binding domain have shorter axons. The identification of this novel kinesin-1-APC interaction highlights the complexity and significance of APC localisation in neurons. PMID:27272132

  16. In planta localisation patterns of MADS domain proteins during floral development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Urbanus, Susan L; de Folter, Stefan; Shchennikova, Anna V; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Immink, Richard GH; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    Background MADS domain transcription factors play important roles in various developmental processes in flowering plants. Members of this family play a prominent role in the transition to flowering and the specification of floral organ identity. Several studies reported mRNA expression patterns of the genes encoding these MADS domain proteins, however, these studies do not provide the necessary information on the temporal and spatial localisation of the proteins. We have made GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (GFP) translational fusions with the four MADS domain proteins SEPALLATA3, AGAMOUS, FRUITFULL and APETALA1 from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and analysed the protein localisation patterns in living plant tissues by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results We unravelled the protein localisation patterns of the four MADS domain proteins at a cellular and subcellular level in inflorescence and floral meristems, during development of the early flower bud stages, and during further differentiation of the floral organs. The protein localisation patterns revealed a few deviations from known mRNA expression patterns, suggesting a non-cell autonomous action of these factors or alternative control mechanisms. In addition, we observed a change in the subcellular localisation of SEPALLATA3 from a predominantly nuclear localisation to a more cytoplasmic localisation, occurring specifically during petal and stamen development. Furthermore, we show that the down-regulation of the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL in ovular tissues is preceded by the occurrence of both AGAMOUS and SEPALLATA3 proteins, supporting the hypothesis that both proteins together suppress WUSCHEL expression in the ovule. Conclusion This approach provides a highly detailed in situ map of MADS domain protein presence during early and later stages of floral development. The subcellular localisation of the transcription factors in the cytoplasm, as observed at certain stages during

  17. Strain localisation in mechanically layered rocks beneath detachment zones: insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, L.; Huet, B.; Labrousse, L.; Yao, K.; Agard, P.; Jolivet, L.

    2013-04-01

    We have designed a series of fully dynamic numerical simulations aimed at assessing how the orientation of mechanical layering in rocks controls the orientation of shear bands and the depth of penetration of strain in the footwall of detachment zones. Two parametric studies are presented. In the first one, the influence of stratification orientation on the occurrence and mode of strain localisation is tested by varying initial dip of inherited layering in the footwall with regard to the orientation of simple shear applied at the rigid boundary simulating a rigid hanging wall, all scaling and rheological parameter kept constant. It appears that when Mohr-Coulomb plasticity is being used, shear bands are found to localise only when the layering is being stretched. This corresponds to early deformational stages for inital layering dipping in the same direction as the shear is applied, and to later stages for intial layering dipping towards the opposite direction of shear. In all the cases, localisation of the strain after only γ=1 requires plastic yielding to be activated in the strong layer. The second parametric study shows that results are length-scale independent and that orientation of shear bands is not sensitive to the viscosity contrast or the strain rate. However, decreasing or increasing strain rate is shown to reduce the capacity of the shear zone to localise strain. In the later case, the strain pattern resembles a mylonitic band but the rheology is shown to be effectively linear. Based on the results, a conceptual model for strain localisation under detachment faults is presented. In the early stages, strain localisation occurs at slow rates by viscous shear instabilities but as the layered media is exhumed, the temperature drops and the strong layers start yielding plastically, forming shear bands and localising strain at the top of the shear zone. Once strain localisation has occured, the deformation in the shear band becomes extremely penetrative but

  18. Effect of season on peripheral resistance to localised cold stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Harimura, Y.; Tochihara, Y.; Yamazaki, S.; Ohnaka, T.; Matsui, J.; Yoshida, K.

    1984-03-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effect that seasonal changes have on the effect of localised cold stress on peripheral temperatures using the foot immersion method with a cold water bath. The subjects were six males and four females. The data were obtained in April, July, October and January. Skin temperature of the right index finger, the forehead, the arm, the cheek, the second toe and the instep were measured before, during and after the immersion of the feet in water at 15°C for 10 mins, as well as oxygen consumption before immersion of the feet. The average finger temperature was highest during foot immersion in the summer, next highest in the winter, then spring, and the lowest during foot immersion in the autumn. The finger temperatures during the pre-immersion period in the autumn tended to be lower than in other seasons. The finger temperatures during the pre-immersion period affected the temperature change of the finger during the immersion period. The rate of increase of the toe temperature and the foot temperature during post-immersion in the summer and the spring were greater than those in the autumn and winter. Oxygen consumption during the pre-immersion period in the autumn was significantly lower than in the other seasons (p<0.001 or 0.010). Cooling the feet caused no significant changes in the temperatures the cheek, forehead or forearm. The cheek temperature in the summer and autumn was cooler than corresponding temperatures taken in the winter and spring.

  19. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your life Being exposed to chemicals that can cause cancer Being at risk for skin cancer Depending on ... than nonsmokers. Other forms of tobacco can also cause cancer, such as cigars, chewing tobacco and snuff. If ...

  20. Subcellular localisations of the CPTI collection of YFP-tagged proteins in Drosophila embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lye, Claire M.; Naylor, Huw W.; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    A key challenge in the post-genomic area is to identify the function of the genes discovered, with many still uncharacterised in all metazoans. A first step is transcription pattern characterisation, for which we now have near whole-genome coverage in Drosophila. However, we have much more limited information about the expression and subcellular localisation of the corresponding proteins. The Cambridge Protein Trap Consortium generated, via piggyBac transposition, over 600 novel YFP-trap proteins tagging just under 400 Drosophila loci. Here, we characterise the subcellular localisations and expression patterns of these insertions, called the CPTI lines, in Drosophila embryos. We have systematically analysed subcellular localisations at cellularisation (stage 5) and recorded expression patterns at stage 5, at mid-embryogenesis (stage 11) and at late embryogenesis (stages 15-17). At stage 5, 31% of the nuclear lines (41) and 26% of the cytoplasmic lines (67) show discrete localisations that provide clues on the function of the protein and markers for organelles or regions, including nucleoli, the nuclear envelope, nuclear speckles, centrosomes, mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, lysosomes and peroxisomes. We characterised the membranous/cortical lines (102) throughout stage 5 to 10 during epithelial morphogenesis, documenting their apico-basal position and identifying those secreted in the extracellular space. We identified the tricellular vertices as a specialized membrane domain marked by the integral membrane protein Sidekick. Finally, we categorised the localisation of the membranous/cortical proteins during cytokinesis. PMID:25294944

  1. Sensor fusion for the localisation of birds in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millikin, Rhonda Lorraine

    Tracking and identification of birds in flight remains a goal of aviation safety worldwide and conservation in North America. Marine surveillance radar, tracking radar and more recently weather radar have been used to monitor mass movements of birds. The emphasis has been on prediction of migration fronts where thousands of birds follow weather patterns across a large geographic area. Microphones have been stationed over wide areas to receive calls of these birds and help catalogue the diversity of species comprising these migrations. A most critical feature of landbird migration is where the birds land to rest and feed. These habitats are not known and therefore cannot effectively be protected. For effective management of landbird migrants (nocturnal migrant birds), short-range flight behaviour (100--300 m above ground) is the critical air space to monitor. To ensure conservation efforts are focused on endangered species and species truly at risk, species of individual birds must be identified. Short-range monitoring of individual birds is also important for aviation safety. Up to 75% of bird-aircraft collisions occur within 500 ft (153 m) above the runway. Identification of each bird will help predict its flight path, a critical factor in the prevention of a collision. This thesis focuses on short-range identification of individual birds to localise birds in flight. This goal is achieved through fusing data from two sensor systems, radar and acoustic. This fusion provides more accurate tracking of birds in the lower airspace and allows for the identification of species of interest. In the fall of 1999, an experiment was conducted at Prince Edward Point, a southern projection of land on the north shore of Lake Ontario, to prove that the fusion of radar and acoustic sensors enhances the detection, location and tracking of nocturnal migrant birds. As these birds migrate at night, they are difficult to track visually. However, they are detectable with X

  2. Divergent RNA Localisation Patterns of Maternal Genes Regulating Embryonic Patterning in the Butterfly Pararge aegeria.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jean-Michel; Gibbs, Melanie; Breuker, Casper J

    2015-01-01

    The maternal effect genes responsible for patterning the embryo along the antero-posterior (AP) axis are broadly conserved in insects. The precise function of these maternal effect genes is the result of the localisation of their mRNA in the oocyte. The main developmental mechanisms involved have been elucidated in Drosophila melanogaster, but recent studies have shown that other insect orders often diverge in RNA localisation patterns. A recent study has shown that in the butterfly Pararge aegeria the distinction between blastodermal embryonic (i.e. germ band) and extra-embryonic tissue (i.e. serosa) is already specified in the oocyte during oogenesis in the ovariole, long before blastoderm cellularisation. To examine the extent by which a female butterfly specifies and patterns the AP axis within the region fated to be the germ band, and whether she specifies a germ plasm, we performed in situ hybridisation experiments on oocytes in P. aegeria ovarioles and on early embryos. RNA localisation of the following key maternal effect genes were investigated: caudal (cad), orthodenticle (otd), hunchback (hb) and four nanos (nos) paralogs, as well as TDRD7 a gene containing a key functional domain (OST-HTH/LOTUS) shared with oskar. TDRD7 was mainly confined to the follicle cells, whilst hb was exclusively zygotically transcribed. RNA of some of the nos paralogs, otd and cad revealed complex localisation patterns within the cortical region prefiguring the germ band (i.e. germ cortex). Rather interestingly, otd was localised within and outside the anterior of the germ cortex. Transcripts of nos-O formed a distinct granular ring in the middle of the germ cortex possibly prefiguring the region where germline stem cells form. These butterfly RNA localisation patterns are highly divergent with respect to other insects, highlighting the diverse ways in which different insect orders maternally regulate early embryogenesis of their offspring.

  3. Divergent RNA Localisation Patterns of Maternal Genes Regulating Embryonic Patterning in the Butterfly Pararge aegeria.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jean-Michel; Gibbs, Melanie; Breuker, Casper J

    2015-01-01

    The maternal effect genes responsible for patterning the embryo along the antero-posterior (AP) axis are broadly conserved in insects. The precise function of these maternal effect genes is the result of the localisation of their mRNA in the oocyte. The main developmental mechanisms involved have been elucidated in Drosophila melanogaster, but recent studies have shown that other insect orders often diverge in RNA localisation patterns. A recent study has shown that in the butterfly Pararge aegeria the distinction between blastodermal embryonic (i.e. germ band) and extra-embryonic tissue (i.e. serosa) is already specified in the oocyte during oogenesis in the ovariole, long before blastoderm cellularisation. To examine the extent by which a female butterfly specifies and patterns the AP axis within the region fated to be the germ band, and whether she specifies a germ plasm, we performed in situ hybridisation experiments on oocytes in P. aegeria ovarioles and on early embryos. RNA localisation of the following key maternal effect genes were investigated: caudal (cad), orthodenticle (otd), hunchback (hb) and four nanos (nos) paralogs, as well as TDRD7 a gene containing a key functional domain (OST-HTH/LOTUS) shared with oskar. TDRD7 was mainly confined to the follicle cells, whilst hb was exclusively zygotically transcribed. RNA of some of the nos paralogs, otd and cad revealed complex localisation patterns within the cortical region prefiguring the germ band (i.e. germ cortex). Rather interestingly, otd was localised within and outside the anterior of the germ cortex. Transcripts of nos-O formed a distinct granular ring in the middle of the germ cortex possibly prefiguring the region where germline stem cells form. These butterfly RNA localisation patterns are highly divergent with respect to other insects, highlighting the diverse ways in which different insect orders maternally regulate early embryogenesis of their offspring. PMID:26633019

  4. Divergent RNA Localisation Patterns of Maternal Genes Regulating Embryonic Patterning in the Butterfly Pararge aegeria

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jean-Michel; Gibbs, Melanie; Breuker, Casper J.

    2015-01-01

    The maternal effect genes responsible for patterning the embryo along the antero-posterior (AP) axis are broadly conserved in insects. The precise function of these maternal effect genes is the result of the localisation of their mRNA in the oocyte. The main developmental mechanisms involved have been elucidated in Drosophila melanogaster, but recent studies have shown that other insect orders often diverge in RNA localisation patterns. A recent study has shown that in the butterfly Pararge aegeria the distinction between blastodermal embryonic (i.e. germ band) and extra-embryonic tissue (i.e. serosa) is already specified in the oocyte during oogenesis in the ovariole, long before blastoderm cellularisation. To examine the extent by which a female butterfly specifies and patterns the AP axis within the region fated to be the germ band, and whether she specifies a germ plasm, we performed in situ hybridisation experiments on oocytes in P. aegeria ovarioles and on early embryos. RNA localisation of the following key maternal effect genes were investigated: caudal (cad), orthodenticle (otd), hunchback (hb) and four nanos (nos) paralogs, as well as TDRD7 a gene containing a key functional domain (OST-HTH/LOTUS) shared with oskar. TDRD7 was mainly confined to the follicle cells, whilst hb was exclusively zygotically transcribed. RNA of some of the nos paralogs, otd and cad revealed complex localisation patterns within the cortical region prefiguring the germ band (i.e. germ cortex). Rather interestingly, otd was localised within and outside the anterior of the germ cortex. Transcripts of nos-O formed a distinct granular ring in the middle of the germ cortex possibly prefiguring the region where germline stem cells form. These butterfly RNA localisation patterns are highly divergent with respect to other insects, highlighting the diverse ways in which different insect orders maternally regulate early embryogenesis of their offspring. PMID:26633019

  5. Sestamibi scintigraphy for parathyroid localisation: a reminder of the dangers of false positives.

    PubMed

    Whitcroft, Katherine Lisa; Sharma, Anup

    2014-03-11

    Surgical parathyroidectomy is the only curative treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism. As minimally invasive parathyroidectomy increases in popularity, so does reliance on preoperative parathyroid localisation techniques. One such technique is sestamibi scintigraphy. We report a case of false-positive sestamibi scintigraphy caused by follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Subsequent completion thyroidectomy was not possible due to widespread postoperative fibrosis. This case, therefore, highlights the potential dangers of false-positive results due to thyroid carcinoma and encourages surgeons to consider this possibility when faced with intrathyroidal or otherwise ambiguous parathyroid localisation results.

  6. Localised sarcoptic mange in dogs: a retrospective study of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Pin, D; Bensignor, E; Carlotti, D-N; Cadiergues, M C

    2006-10-01

    The authors report 10 cases of localised sarcoptic mange in dogs. In each case, lesions were localised to one precise area of the skin. Pruritus was present in nine cases and absent in one. Affected areas were the feet (one case), the face and/or the pinnae (six cases), the abdominal skin (one case), the flank (one case) and the lumbar area (one case). The types of lesions were erythema, papules, lichenification, scales, crusts and alopecia. Parasites were found in all cases except one, in which anti-immunoglobulin G Sarcoptes serology was positive. The acaricidal treatments given were lindane, ivermectin or selamectin and were all successful.

  7. Localisation of the MRX3 gene for non-specific X linked mental retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Gedeon, A; Kerr, B; Mulley, J; Turner, G

    1991-01-01

    A family is described with five affected males segregating a new gene for non-specific X linked mental retardation (MRX). Linkage analysis localised the gene at Xq28-qter. The maximum lod score was 2.89 with DXS52 (St14) at theta = 0.0. A recombinant was observed with DXS304 (U6.2) defining the proximal limit to the localisation. No evidence for linkage was determined using markers at several points along the remainder of the X chromosome, including the regions known to contain MRX1 and MRX2. This delineates the third gene for non-specific X linked mental retardation, MRX3. Images PMID:1870093

  8. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  9. Transient Flows and Stratification of an Enclosure Containing Both a Localised and Distributed Source of Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Jamie; Linden, Paul

    2014-11-01

    We examine the transient flow and stratification in a naturally ventilated enclosure containing both a localised and distributed source of buoyancy. Both sources of buoyancy are located at the base of the enclosure to represent a building where there is a distributed heat flux from the floor, for example from a sun patch, that competes with a localised heat source within the space. The steady conditions of the space are controlled purely by the geometry of the enclosure and the ratio of the distributed and localised buoyancy fluxes Ψ and are independent of the order buoyancy fluxes are introduced into the space. However, the order sources are introduced into the space, such as delaying the introduction of a localised source, alter the transients significantly. To investigate this problem, small-scale experiments were conducted and compared to a `perfect-mixing' model of the transients. How the stratification evolves in time, in particular how long it takes to reach steady conditions, is key to understanding what can be expected in real buildings. The transient evolution of the interior stratification is reported here and compared to the theoretical model.

  10. Non-Gaussian probabilistic MEG source localisation based on kernel density estimation.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Hamid R; Kringelbach, Morten L; Woolrich, Mark W; Baker, Adam; Aziz, Tipu Z; Probert-Smith, Penny

    2014-02-15

    There is strong evidence to suggest that data recorded from magnetoencephalography (MEG) follows a non-Gaussian distribution. However, existing standard methods for source localisation model the data using only second order statistics, and therefore use the inherent assumption of a Gaussian distribution. In this paper, we present a new general method for non-Gaussian source estimation of stationary signals for localising brain activity from MEG data. By providing a Bayesian formulation for MEG source localisation, we show that the source probability density function (pdf), which is not necessarily Gaussian, can be estimated using multivariate kernel density estimators. In the case of Gaussian data, the solution of the method is equivalent to that of widely used linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer. The method is also extended to handle data with highly correlated sources using the marginal distribution of the estimated joint distribution, which, in the case of Gaussian measurements, corresponds to the null-beamformer. The proposed non-Gaussian source localisation approach is shown to give better spatial estimates than the LCMV beamformer, both in simulations incorporating non-Gaussian signals, and in real MEG measurements of auditory and visual evoked responses, where the highly correlated sources are known to be difficult to estimate.

  11. Semi-Classical Localisation Properties of Quantum Oscillators on a Noncommutative Configuration Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benatti, Fabio; Gouba, Laure

    2015-11-01

    When dealing with the classical limit of two quantum mechanical oscillators on a noncommutative configuration space, the limits corresponding to the removal of configuration-space noncommutativity and position-momentum noncommutativity do not commute. We address this behaviour from the point of view of the phase-space localisation properties of the Wigner functions of coherent states under the two limits.

  12. Localisation of Sensor Nodes with Hybrid Measurements in Wireless Sensor Networks †

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad W.; Salman, Naveed; Kemp, Andrew H.; Mihaylova, Lyudmila

    2016-01-01

    Localisation in wireless networks faces challenges such as high levels of signal attenuation and unknown path-loss exponents, especially in urban environments. In response to these challenges, this paper proposes solutions to localisation problems in noisy environments. A new observation model for localisation of static nodes is developed based on hybrid measurements, namely angle of arrival and received signal strength data. An approach for localisation of sensor nodes is proposed as a weighted linear least squares algorithm. The unknown path-loss exponent associated with the received signal strength is estimated jointly with the coordinates of the sensor nodes via the generalised pattern search method. The algorithm’s performance validation is conducted both theoretically and by simulation. A theoretical mean square error expression is derived, followed by the derivation of the linear Cramer-Rao bound which serves as a benchmark for the proposed location estimators. Accurate results are demonstrated with 25%–30% improvement in estimation accuracy with a weighted linear least squares algorithm as compared to linear least squares solution. PMID:27455268

  13. Non-Gaussian probabilistic MEG source localisation based on kernel density estimation☆

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Hamid R.; Kringelbach, Morten L.; Woolrich, Mark W.; Baker, Adam; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Probert-Smith, Penny

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that data recorded from magnetoencephalography (MEG) follows a non-Gaussian distribution. However, existing standard methods for source localisation model the data using only second order statistics, and therefore use the inherent assumption of a Gaussian distribution. In this paper, we present a new general method for non-Gaussian source estimation of stationary signals for localising brain activity from MEG data. By providing a Bayesian formulation for MEG source localisation, we show that the source probability density function (pdf), which is not necessarily Gaussian, can be estimated using multivariate kernel density estimators. In the case of Gaussian data, the solution of the method is equivalent to that of widely used linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer. The method is also extended to handle data with highly correlated sources using the marginal distribution of the estimated joint distribution, which, in the case of Gaussian measurements, corresponds to the null-beamformer. The proposed non-Gaussian source localisation approach is shown to give better spatial estimates than the LCMV beamformer, both in simulations incorporating non-Gaussian signals, and in real MEG measurements of auditory and visual evoked responses, where the highly correlated sources are known to be difficult to estimate. PMID:24055702

  14. Localisation rare de la tuberculose: la ténosynovite des doigts

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abdelghani, Kaouther; Maatallah, Kaouther; Ajili, Faida; Souabni, Leila; Laatar, Ahmed; Zakraoui, Leith

    2014-01-01

    La ténosynovite tuberculeuse est une localisation rare de la tuberculose. Le diagnostic en est souvent tardif en raison de manifestations cliniques souvent pauvres et chroniques. Nous rapportons une observation de ténosynovite tuberculeuse du 2ème rayon de la main droite d’évolution favorable sous traitement antituberculeux. PMID:25317223

  15. Globalisation and Localisation in Music Education in Hong Kong and Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Wai-Chung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyse and discuss the influences of globalisation and localisation on music education in Hong Kong and Taiwan. It argues that the reform of music education concerns changes to the contents of the curriculum that envisage the cultural and political developments that arise from processes of globalisation and…

  16. [Cancer].

    PubMed

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  17. Subcellular localisation of BAG-1 and its regulation of vitamin D receptor-mediated transactivation and involucrin expression in oral keratinocytes: Implications for oral carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, San San; Crabb, Simon J.; Janghra, Nari; Carlberg, Carsten; Williams, Ann C.; Cutress, Ramsey I.; Packham, Graham; Hague, Angela

    2007-09-10

    In oral cancers, cytoplasmic BAG-1 overexpression is a marker of poor prognosis. BAG-1 regulates cellular growth, differentiation and survival through interactions with diverse proteins, including the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a key regulator of keratinocyte growth and differentiation. BAG-1 is expressed ubiquitously in human cells as three major isoforms of 50 kDa (BAG-1L), 46 kDa (BAG-1M) and 36 kDa (BAG-1S) from a single mRNA. In oral keratinocytes BAG-1L, but not BAG-1M and BAG-1S, enhanced VDR transactivation in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3.} BAG-1L was nucleoplasmic and nucleolar, whereas BAG-1S and BAG-1M were cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic in localisation. Having identified the nucleolar localisation sequence in BAG-1L, we showed that mutation of this sequence did not prevent BAG-1L from potentiating VDR activity. BAG-1L also potentiated transactivation of known vitamin-D-responsive gene promoters, osteocalcin and 24-hydroxylase, and enhanced VDR-dependent transcription and protein expression of the keratinocyte differentiation marker, involucrin. These results demonstrate endogenous gene regulation by BAG-1L by potentiating nuclear hormone receptor function and suggest a role for BAG-1L in 24-hydroxylase regulation of vitamin D metabolism and the cellular response of oral keratinocytes to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. By contrast to the cytoplasmic BAG-1 isoforms, BAG-1L may act to suppress tumorigenesis.

  18. Subcellular localisation of Medicago truncatula 9/13-hydroperoxide lyase reveals a new localisation pattern and activation mechanism for CYP74C enzymes

    PubMed Central

    De Domenico, Stefania; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Hughes, Richard K; Casey, Rod; Santino, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    Background Hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) is a key enzyme in plant oxylipin metabolism that catalyses the cleavage of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides produced by the action of lipoxygenase (LOX) to volatile aldehydes and oxo acids. The synthesis of these volatile aldehydes is rapidly induced in plant tissues upon mechanical wounding and insect or pathogen attack. Together with their direct defence role towards different pathogens, these compounds are believed to play an important role in signalling within and between plants, and in the molecular cross-talk between plants and other organisms surrounding them. We have recently described the targeting of a seed 9-HPL to microsomes and putative lipid bodies and were interested to compare the localisation patterns of both a 13-HPL and a 9/13-HPL from Medicago truncatula, which were known to be expressed in leaves and roots, respectively. Results To study the subcellular localisation of plant 9/13-HPLs, a set of YFP-tagged chimeric constructs were prepared using two M. truncatula HPL cDNAs and the localisation of the corresponding chimeras were verified by confocal microscopy in tobacco protoplasts and leaves. Results reported here indicated a distribution of M.truncatula 9/13-HPL (HPLF) between cytosol and lipid droplets (LD) whereas, as expected, M.truncatula 13-HPL (HPLE) was targeted to plastids. Notably, such endocellular localisation has not yet been reported previously for any 9/13-HPL. To verify a possible physiological significance of such association, purified recombinant HPLF was used in activation experiments with purified seed lipid bodies. Our results showed that lipid bodies can fully activate HPLF. Conclusion We provide evidence for the first CYP74C enzyme, to be targeted to cytosol and LD. We also showed by sedimentation and kinetic analyses that the association with LD or lipid bodies can result in the protein conformational changes required for full activation of the enzyme. This activation

  19. Photoletter to the editor: Dermatitis herpetiformis co-localised with vitiligo in a patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Abby E; Lee, Kevin Y C; Levell, Nick J; Igali, Laszlo; Millington, George W M

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of dermatitis herpetiformis co-localised with segmental vitiligo in a 37-year-old woman with a background history of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2. We propose genetic mosaicism as a possible mechanism. There has only been one previous case report in which dermatitis hepetiformis co-localised in close proximity but not exclusively within vilitigo in a patient with autoimmune thyroiditis. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of dermatitis herpetiformis co-localised exclusively to segmental vitiligo in the presence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. PMID:24133566

  20. Photoletter to the editor: Dermatitis herpetiformis co-localised with vitiligo in a patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Abby E; Lee, Kevin Y C; Levell, Nick J; Igali, Laszlo; Millington, George W M

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of dermatitis herpetiformis co-localised with segmental vitiligo in a 37-year-old woman with a background history of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2. We propose genetic mosaicism as a possible mechanism. There has only been one previous case report in which dermatitis hepetiformis co-localised in close proximity but not exclusively within vilitigo in a patient with autoimmune thyroiditis. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of dermatitis herpetiformis co-localised exclusively to segmental vitiligo in the presence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome.

  1. Radio-guided occult lesion localisation using iodine 125 Seeds “ROLLIS” to guide surgical removal of an impalpable posterior chest wall melanoma metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Dissanayake, Shashini; Dissanayake, Deepthi; Taylor, Donna B

    2015-09-15

    Cancer screening and surveillance programmes and the use of sophisticated imaging tools such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) have increased the detection of impalpable lesions requiring imaging guidance for excision. A new technique involves intra-lesional insertion of a low-activity iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) seed and detection of the radioactive signal in theatre using a hand-held gamma probe to guide surgery. Whilst several studies describe using this method to guide the removal of impalpable breast lesions, only a handful of publications report its use to guide excision of lesions outside the breast. We describe a case in which radio-guided occult lesion localisation using an iodine 125 seed was used to guide excision of an impalpable posterior chest wall metastasis detected on PET-CT.

  2. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight Minimizing your exposure to radiation and toxic chemicals Not smoking or chewing tobacco Reducing sun exposure, especially if you burn easily Cancer screenings, such as mammography and breast ...

  3. Une localisation exceptionnelle de la tuberculose vertébrale Mal de Pott sous-occipital

    PubMed Central

    Yahyaoui, Sana; Majdoub, Senda; Zaghouani, Houneida; Fradj, Hosni Ben; Bakir, Dejla; Bouajina, Elyes; Kraiem, Chakib

    2013-01-01

    Le mal de Pott est la forme la plus commune de la tuberculose osseuse touchant essentiellement le rachis dorso-lombaire. La localisation sous-occipitale reste exceptionnelle. Le diagnostic de cette entité est le plus souvent tardif ce qui expose à des complications graves. Les radiographies standard ne sont parlantes qu’à un stade tardif de la maladie, d'où l'intérêt de l'imagerie moderne notamment la tomodensitométrie (TDM) et l'imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) qui permettent un diagnostic précoce. Nous rapportons un nouveau cas de tuberculose sous-occipitale. Le diagnostic était posé sur l'imagerie en coupe et confirmé histologiquement à la biopsie transorale. Sont rappelés les aspects en imagerie de cette localisation particulière du mal de Pott. PMID:23819005

  4. Four-terminal resistances in mesoscopic networks of metallic wires: Weak localisation and correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Christophe; Montambaux, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    We consider the electronic transport in multi-terminal mesoscopic networks of weakly disordered metallic wires. After a brief description of the classical transport, we analyse the weak localisation (WL) correction to the four-terminal resistances, which involves an integration of the Cooperon over the wires with proper weights. We provide an interpretation of these weights in terms of classical transport properties. We illustrate the formalism on examples and show that weak localisation to four-terminal conductances may become large in some situations. In a second part, we study the correlations of four-terminal resistances and show that integration of Diffuson and Cooperon inside the network involves the same weights as the WL. The formulae are applied to multiconnected wire geometries.

  5. Clutter elimination for deep clinical optoacoustic imaging using localised vibration tagging (LOVIT)☆

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Michael; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Frenz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates a novel method which allows clutter elimination in deep optoacoustic imaging. Clutter significantly limits imaging depth in clinical optoacoustic imaging, when irradiation optics and ultrasound detector are integrated in a handheld probe for flexible imaging of the human body. Strong optoacoustic transients generated at the irradiation site obscure weak signals from deep inside the tissue, either directly by propagating towards the probe, or via acoustic scattering. In this study we demonstrate that signals of interest can be distinguished from clutter by tagging them at the place of origin with localised tissue vibration induced by the acoustic radiation force in a focused ultrasonic beam. We show phantom results where this technique allowed almost full clutter elimination and thus strongly improved contrast for deep imaging. Localised vibration tagging by means of acoustic radiation force is especially promising for integration into ultrasound systems that already have implemented radiation force elastography. PMID:25302147

  6. Modelling impacts and recovery in benthic communities exposed to localised high CO2.

    PubMed

    Lessin, Gennadi; Artioli, Yuri; Queirós, Ana M; Widdicombe, Stephen; Blackford, Jerry C

    2016-08-15

    Regulations pertaining to carbon dioxide capture with offshore storage (CCS) require an understanding of the potential localised environmental impacts and demonstrably suitable monitoring practices. This study uses a marine ecosystem model to examine a comprehensive range of hypothetical CO2 leakage scenarios, quantifying both impact and recovery time within the benthic system. Whilst significant mortalities and long recovery times were projected for the larger and longer term scenarios, shorter-term or low level exposures lead to reduced projected impacts. This suggests that efficient monitoring and leak mitigation strategies, coupled with appropriate selection of storage sites can effectively limit concerns regarding localised environmental impacts from CCS. The feedbacks and interactions between physiological and ecological responses simulated reveal that benthic responses to CO2 leakage could be complex. This type of modelling investigation can aid the understanding of impact potential, the role of benthic community recovery and inform the design of baseline and monitoring surveys.

  7. Modelling impacts and recovery in benthic communities exposed to localised high CO2.

    PubMed

    Lessin, Gennadi; Artioli, Yuri; Queirós, Ana M; Widdicombe, Stephen; Blackford, Jerry C

    2016-08-15

    Regulations pertaining to carbon dioxide capture with offshore storage (CCS) require an understanding of the potential localised environmental impacts and demonstrably suitable monitoring practices. This study uses a marine ecosystem model to examine a comprehensive range of hypothetical CO2 leakage scenarios, quantifying both impact and recovery time within the benthic system. Whilst significant mortalities and long recovery times were projected for the larger and longer term scenarios, shorter-term or low level exposures lead to reduced projected impacts. This suggests that efficient monitoring and leak mitigation strategies, coupled with appropriate selection of storage sites can effectively limit concerns regarding localised environmental impacts from CCS. The feedbacks and interactions between physiological and ecological responses simulated reveal that benthic responses to CO2 leakage could be complex. This type of modelling investigation can aid the understanding of impact potential, the role of benthic community recovery and inform the design of baseline and monitoring surveys. PMID:27289279

  8. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  9. Sound localisation ability of soldiers wearing infantry ACH and PASGT helmets.

    PubMed

    Scharine, Angelique A; Binseel, Mary S; Mermagen, Timothy; Letowski, Tomasz R

    2014-01-01

    Helmets provide soldiers with ballistic and fragmentation protection but impair auditory spatial processing. Missed auditory information can be fatal for a soldier; therefore, helmet design requires compromise between protection and optimal acoustics. Twelve soldiers localised two sound signals presented from six azimuth angles and three levels of elevation presented at two intensity levels and with three background noises. Each participant completed the task while wearing no helmet and with two U.S. Army infantry helmets - the Personnel Armor System for Ground Troops (PASGT) helmet and the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH). Results showed a significant effect of helmet type on the size of both azimuth and elevation error. The effects of level, background noise, azimuth and elevation were found to be significant. There was no effect of sound signal type. As hypothesised, localisation accuracy was greatest when soldiers did not wear helmet, followed by the ACH. Performance was worst with the PASGT helmet.

  10. Reprint of: Four-terminal resistances in mesoscopic networks of metallic wires: Weak localisation and correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Christophe; Montambaux, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    We consider the electronic transport in multi-terminal mesoscopic networks of weakly disordered metallic wires. After a brief description of the classical transport, we analyse the weak localisation (WL) correction to the four-terminal resistances, which involves an integration of the Cooperon over the wires with proper weights. We provide an interpretation of these weights in terms of classical transport properties. We illustrate the formalism on examples and show that weak localisation to four-terminal conductances may become large in some situations. In a second part, we study the correlations of four-terminal resistances and show that integration of Diffuson and Cooperon inside the network involves the same weights as the WL. The formulae are applied to multiconnected wire geometries.

  11. Linkage disequilibrium in Huntington's disease: an improved localisation for the gene.

    PubMed

    Snell, R G; Lazarou, L P; Youngman, S; Quarrell, O W; Wasmuth, J J; Shaw, D J; Harper, P S

    1989-11-01

    The search for the Huntington's disease gene has recently concentrated on the telomere of the short arm of chromosome 4. The evidence suggesting this position has been based on single crossover events, but there is conflicting evidence regarding the position of the gene relative to the most terminal markers. We have found significant linkage disequilibrium between the markers D4S98 (probe BS731B-C) and D4S95 (probe BS674E-D) and HD, which supports a localisation for the gene proximal to D4S90 and makes a telomeric localisation unlikely. This disequilibrium may also prove to be important in the future in allowing modification of risk estimates based on genetic linkage.

  12. Towards quantification of the interplay between strain weakening and strain localisation in granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Malte C.; Rosenau, Matthias; Leever, Karen; Oncken, Onno

    2014-05-01

    Strain weakening is the major agent of localisation of deformation into shear zones and faults at various scales in brittle media. Physical analogue models using granular material are especially apt to investigate both phenomena, because they are able to reproduce them without the need of any assumptions concerning the physics behind. Several attempts have been made to quantify either strain weakening (e. g. Lohrmann et al., 2003, using Ring-Shear tests) or strain localisation (e. g. Schrank et al., 2008, using a variation of the classical Riedel-experiment). While Ring-Shear tests yield excellent data on strain weakening through measuring shear stress during localisation, they do not allow monitoring the process of strain localisation in-situ because of experimental inaccessibility of the small scale kinematics. In Riedel-type strike-slip experiments, on the other hand, no direct measurements of shear stresses have been available so far. Furthermore, they contain a strong boundary condition in form of a pre-defined linear discontinuity at the base. This forces the formation of Riedel-Shears, i. e. a complex fault system, that makes it difficult to define strain localisation on single faults. We developed a new experimental set-up, in which the formation of a strike-slip shear zone in granular material is induced using an ndenter with stress and strain monitored at high accuracy and resolution. In a first set of experiments we used a horizontal sand layer indented by a vertical wall. The sand layer is laterally unconfined and rests on low-viscosity silicone oil in order to minimize basal shear strength. Compared to the Riedel experiments, this avoids the boundary condition of a pre-existing basal discontinuity allowing one single, hrough-going shear crack to form and propagate. The indenter moves at a constant rate and is equipped with a force sensor that measures the applied push, which integrates over shear stresses along the fault and the base of the sand pack

  13. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times. PMID:27274604

  14. Localisation of the SMC loading complex Nipbl/Mau2 during mammalian meiotic prophase I.

    PubMed

    Visnes, T; Giordano, F; Kuznetsova, A; Suja, J A; Lander, A D; Calof, A L; Ström, L

    2014-06-01

    Evidence from lower eukaryotes suggests that the chromosomal associations of all the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) complexes, cohesin, condensin and Smc5/6, are influenced by the Nipbl/Mau2 heterodimer. Whether this function is conserved in mammals is currently not known. During mammalian meiosis, very different localisation patterns have been reported for the SMC complexes, and the localisation of Nipbl/Mau2 has just recently started to be investigated. Here, we show that Nipbl/Mau2 binds on chromosomal axes from zygotene to mid-pachytene in germ cells of both sexes. In spermatocytes, Nipbl/Mau2 then relocalises to chromocenters, whereas in oocytes it remains bound to chromosomal axes throughout prophase to dictyate arrest. The localisation pattern of Nipbl/Mau2, together with those seen for cohesin, condensin and Smc5/6 subunits, is consistent with a role as a loading factor for cohesin and condensin I, but not for Smc5/6. We also demonstrate that Nipbl/Mau2 localises next to Rad51 and γH2AX foci. NIPBL gene deficiencies are associated with the Cornelia de Lange syndrome in humans, and we find that haploinsufficiency of the orthologous mouse gene results in an altered distribution of double-strand breaks marked by γH2AX during prophase I. However, this is insufficient to result in major meiotic malfunctions, and the chromosomal associations of the synaptonemal complex proteins and the three SMC complexes appear cytologically indistinguishable in wild-type and Nipbl (+/-) spermatocytes. PMID:24287868

  15. Ureteric angioplasty balloon placement to increase localised dosage of BCG for renal pelvis TCC.

    PubMed

    Forde, J C; O'Connor, K M; Fanning, D M; Guiney, M J; Grainger, R

    2012-03-01

    Endoscopic percutaneous resection of a renal pelvis transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is a viable treatment option in those who would be rendered dialysis dependent following a nephroureterectomy. We report endoscopic percutaneous resection of an upper tract TCC recurrence in a single functioning kidney followed by antegrade renal pelvis BCG instillation with novel placement of inflated angioplasty balloon in the ureter to help localise its effect.

  16. Disseminated malignant phaeochromocytoma: localisation with iodine-131-labelled meta-iodobenzylguanidine.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, H; Wyeth, P; Allen, A P; Thurtle, O A; Hames, T K; Cawley, M I; Ackery, D

    1982-01-01

    Meta-iodobenzylguanidine, a guanethidine analogue, is a newly synthesised substance capable of imaging the adrenal medulla. In a woman in whom phaeochromocytoma has been diagnosed iodine-131-labelled metaiodobenzylguanidine was given intravenously; gamma-camera images showed bilateral adrenal tumours and uptake corresponding to bone and liver metastases. 131I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine is effective in localising phaeochromocytomas, and the technique is safe, specific, and non-invasive. Images p1154-a PMID:6812783

  17. Localised hyperthermia in rodent models using an MRI-compatible high-intensity focused ultrasound system

    PubMed Central

    Bing, Chenchen; Nofiele, Joris; Staruch, Robert; Ladouceur-Wodzak, Michelle; Chatzinoff, Yonatan; Ranjan, Ashish; Chopra, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Localised hyperthermia in rodent studies is challenging due to the small target size. This study describes the development and characterisation of an MRI-compatible high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) system to perform localised mild hyperthermia treatments in rodent models. Material and methods The hyperthermia platform consisted of an MRI-compatible small animal HIFU system, focused transducers with sector-vortex lenses, a custom-made receive coil, and means to maintain systemic temperatures of rodents. The system was integrated into a 3T MR imager. Control software was developed to acquire images, process temperature maps, and adjust output power using a proportional-integral-derivative feedback control algorithm. Hyperthermia exposures were performed in tissue-mimicking phantoms and in a rodent model (n = 9). During heating, an ROI was assigned in the heated region for temperature control and the target temperature was 42 °C; 30 min mild hyperthermia treatment followed by a 10-min cooling procedure was performed on each animal. Results 3D-printed sector-vortex lenses were successful at creating annular focal regions which enables customisation of the heating volume. Localised mild hyperthermia performed in rats produced a mean ROI temperature of 42.1 ± 0.3 °C. The T10 and T90 percentiles were 43.2 ± 0.4 °C and 41.0 ± 0.3 °C, respectively. For a 30-min treatment, the mean time duration between 41–45 °C was 31.1 min within the ROI. Conclusions The MRI-compatible HIFU system was successfully adapted to perform localised mild hyperthermia treatment in rodent models. A target temperature of 42 °C was well-maintained in a rat thigh model for 30 min. PMID:26540488

  18. Illumination-invariant image matching for autonomous UAV localisation based on optical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xue; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Hongshi; Morgan, Gareth L. K.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) localisation algorithm for its autonomous navigation based on matching between on-board UAV image sequences to a pre-installed reference satellite image. As the UAV images and the reference image are not necessarily taken under the same illumination condition, illumination-invariant image matching is essential. Based on the investigation of illumination-invariant property of Phase Correlation (PC) via mathematical derivation and experiments, we propose a PC based fast and robust illumination-invariant localisation algorithm for UAV navigation. The algorithm accurately determines the current UAV position as well as the next UAV position even the illumination condition of UAV on-board images is different from the reference satellite image. A Dirac delta function based registration quality assessment together with a risk alarming criterion is introduced to enable the UAV to perform self-correction in case the UAV deviates from the planned route. UAV navigation experiments using simulated terrain shading images and remote sensing images have demonstrated a robust high performance of the proposed PC based localisation algorithm under very different illumination conditions resulted from solar motion. The superiority of the algorithm, in comparison with two other widely used image matching algorithms, MI (Mutual Information) and NCC (Normalised Correlation Coefficient), is significant for its high matching accuracy and fast processing speed.

  19. A genome-wide resource for the analysis of protein localisation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sarov, Mihail; Barz, Christiane; Jambor, Helena; Hein, Marco Y; Schmied, Christopher; Suchold, Dana; Stender, Bettina; Janosch, Stephan; KJ, Vinay Vikas; Krishnan, RT; Krishnamoorthy, Aishwarya; Ferreira, Irene RS; Ejsmont, Radoslaw K; Finkl, Katja; Hasse, Susanne; Kämpfer, Philipp; Plewka, Nicole; Vinis, Elisabeth; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Knust, Elisabeth; Hartenstein, Volker; Mann, Matthias; Ramaswami, Mani; VijayRaghavan, K; Tomancak, Pavel; Schnorrer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila genome contains >13000 protein-coding genes, the majority of which remain poorly investigated. Important reasons include the lack of antibodies or reporter constructs to visualise these proteins. Here, we present a genome-wide fosmid library of 10000 GFP-tagged clones, comprising tagged genes and most of their regulatory information. For 880 tagged proteins, we created transgenic lines, and for a total of 207 lines, we assessed protein expression and localisation in ovaries, embryos, pupae or adults by stainings and live imaging approaches. Importantly, we visualised many proteins at endogenous expression levels and found a large fraction of them localising to subcellular compartments. By applying genetic complementation tests, we estimate that about two-thirds of the tagged proteins are functional. Moreover, these tagged proteins enable interaction proteomics from developing pupae and adult flies. Taken together, this resource will boost systematic analysis of protein expression and localisation in various cellular and developmental contexts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12068.001 PMID:26896675

  20. TOR complex 2 localises to the cytokinetic actomyosin ring and controls the fidelity of cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Karen; Kirkham, Sara; Halova, Lenka; Atkin, Jane; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Cobley, David; Krug, Karsten; Maček, Boris; Petersen, Janni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The timing of cell division is controlled by the coupled regulation of growth and division. The target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling network synchronises these processes with the environmental setting. Here, we describe a novel interaction of the fission yeast TOR complex 2 (TORC2) with the cytokinetic actomyosin ring (CAR), and a novel role for TORC2 in regulating the timing and fidelity of cytokinesis. Disruption of TORC2 or its localisation results in defects in CAR morphology and constriction. We provide evidence that the myosin II protein Myp2 and the myosin V protein Myo51 play roles in recruiting TORC2 to the CAR. We show that Myp2 and TORC2 are co-dependent upon each other for their normal localisation to the cytokinetic machinery. We go on to show that TORC2-dependent phosphorylation of actin-capping protein 1 (Acp1, a known regulator of cytokinesis) controls CAR stability, modulates Acp1–Acp2 (the equivalent of the mammalian CAPZA–CAPZB) heterodimer formation and is essential for survival upon stress. Thus, TORC2 localisation to the CAR, and TORC2-dependent Acp1 phosphorylation contributes to timely control and the fidelity of cytokinesis and cell division. PMID:27206859

  1. Anti-tropomyosin antibodies co-localise with actin microfilaments and label plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Christine R; Blackman, Leila M; Collings, David A; Cordwell, Stuart J; Overall, Robyn L

    2009-06-01

    The actin cytoskeleton and associated actin-binding proteins form a complex network involved in a number of fundamental cellular processes including intracellular trafficking. In plants, both actin and myosin have been localised to plasmodesmata, and thus it is likely that other actin-binding proteins are also associated with plasmodesmata structure or function. A 75-kDa protein, enriched in plasmodesmata-rich cell wall extracts from the green alga Chara corallina, was sequenced and found to contain three peptides with similarity to the animal actin-binding protein tropomyosin. Western blot analysis with anti-tropomyosin antibodies confirmed the identity of this 75-kDa protein as a tropomyosin-like protein and further identified an additional 55-kDa protein, while immunofluorescence microscopy localised the antibodies to plasmodesmata and to the subcortical actin bundles and associated structures. The anti-tropomyosin antibodies detected a single protein at 42.5 kDa in Arabidopsis thaliana extracts and two proteins at 58.5 and 54 kDa in leek extracts, and these localised to plasmodesmata and the cell plate in A. thaliana and to plasmodesmata in leek tissue. Tropomyosin is an actin-binding protein thought to be involved in a range of functions associated with the actin cytoskeleton, including the regulation of myosin binding to actin filaments, but to date no tropomyosin-like proteins have been conclusively identified in plant genomes. Our data suggests that a tropomyosin-like protein is associated with plasmodesmata.

  2. Localised Badger Culling Increases Risk of Herd Breakdown on Nearby, Not Focal, Land

    PubMed Central

    Bielby, Jon; Vial, Flavie; Woodroffe, Rosie; Donnelly, Christl A.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is an important disease affecting the UK livestock industry. Controlling bovine tuberculosis (TB) is made more complex by the presence of a wildlife host, the Eurasian badger, Meles meles. Repeated large-scale badger culls implemented in the Randomised Badger Culling Trial (RBCT) were associated with decreased cattle risks inside the culling area, but also with increased cattle risks up to the 2km outside the culling area. Intermediate reductions in badger density, as achieved by localised reactive culling in the RBCT, significantly increased cattle TB. Using a matched-pairs case-control study design (n = 221 pairs of cattle herds), we investigated the spatial scale over which localised badger culling had its biggest impact. We found that reactive badger culling had a significant positive association with the risk of cattle TB at distances of 1-3km and 3-5km, and that no such association existed over shorter distances (<1km). These findings indicate that localised badger culls had significant negative effects, not on the land on which culling took place, but, perhaps more importantly, on adjoining lands and farms. PMID:27749934

  3. Counterintuitive electron localisation from density-functional theory with polarisable solvent models

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Stephen G.; Johnson, Erin R.

    2015-11-14

    Exploration of the solvated electron phenomena using density-functional theory (DFT) generally results in prediction of a localised electron within an induced solvent cavity. However, it is well known that DFT favours highly delocalised charges, rendering the localisation of a solvated electron unexpected. We explore the origins of this counterintuitive behaviour using a model Kevan-structure system. When a polarisable-continuum solvent model is included, it forces electron localisation by introducing a strong energetic bias that favours integer charges. This results in the formation of a large energetic barrier for charge-hopping and can cause the self-consistent field to become trapped in local minima thus converging to stable solutions that are higher in energy than the ground electronic state. Finally, since the bias towards integer charges is caused by the polarisable continuum, these findings will also apply to other classical polarisation corrections, as in combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. The implications for systems beyond the solvated electron, including cationic DNA bases, are discussed.

  4. Ionospheric localisation and expansion of long-period Pi1 pulsations at substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milling, David K.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Mann, Ian R.; Murphy, Kyle R.; Kale, Andy; Russell, Christopher T.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Mende, Stephen

    2008-07-01

    We examine the initial ionospheric localisation and expansion of Pi1 pulsations associated with a substorm onset observed on 1st November 2006 with the combined CARISMA and THEMIS GMAG network of ground-based magnetometers. We demonstrate how the first ionospheric pulsation disturbance lies in the long-period Pi1 band. The long-period Pi1 pulsations at substorm onset are initially localised in longitude, and expands away from an epicentre in the ionosphere, with ~16 s timing between stations. We further establish a link between the location of the downward field-aligned current (FAC) element which subsequently develops within the substorm current wedge (SCW), and the initial location of the onset of long-period Pi1 pulsations. The arrival of the initial long-period Pi1 wavepacket demonstrates the importance of global networks of ground-based magnetometers for probing substorm onset. The Pi1 expansion proceeds westward at a rate of approximately 1 MLT hour per ~20 seconds, representing a very rapid expansion of the Pi1 signal at the ground. The resolution of the Pi1 localisation and the rate of expansion suggest Pi1 waves can play an important role in studies of the causal sequence of energy release in substorms.

  5. Localisation of luminal epithelium edge in digital histopathology images of IHC stained slides of endometrial biopsies.

    PubMed

    Li, Guannan; Sanchez, Victor; Patel, Gnyaneshwari; Quenby, Siobhan; Rajpoot, Nasir

    2015-06-01

    Diagnosis of recurrent miscarriage due to abnormally high number of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells has recently been made possible by a protocol devised by Quenby et al. Hum Reprod 2009;24(1):45-54. The diagnosis involves detection and counting of stromal and uNK cell nuclei in endometrial biopsy slides immunohistochemically stained with haematoxylin for staining cell nuclei and CD56 as a marker for the uNK cells. However, manual diagnosis is a laborious process, fraught with subjective errors. In this paper, we present a novel method for detection of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells in the human female uterus lining and localisation of the luminal epithelium edge in endometrial biopsies. Specifically, we employ a local phase symmetry based method to detect stromal cell nuclei and propose an adaptive background removal method that significantly eases the segmentation of uNK cell nuclei regions. We also propose a novel method using alpha shapes for the identification of epithelial cell nuclei and B-Spline curve fitting on identified cell nuclei to localise the luminal epithelium edge. The objective of edge localisation is to avoid cell nuclei near the luminal epithelium edge being counted in the diagnosis process due to their non-relevance to the calculation of stromal to uNK cell ratio that determines the diagnosis of recurrent miscarriages in the end. The resulting algorithm offers a promising potential for computer-assisted diagnosis of recurrent miscarriage due to its high accuracy.

  6. Localised and delocalised excitons in star-like squaraine homo- and heterotrimers.

    PubMed

    Ceymann, Harald; Balkenhohl, Moritz; Schmiedel, Alexander; Holzapfel, Marco; Lambert, Christoph

    2016-01-28

    Exciton coupling of localised chromophore states within covalently bound superchromophores is a viable strategy to modify optical properties such as spectral broadening and red-shifting of absorption bands. These are desirable properties for e.g. organic photovoltaic applications. Attaching three squaraine dyes to a central nitrogen core in a star-shaped manner leads to the formation of superchromophores that may form localised and delocalised excitons upon photoexcitation. In this work we investigated two homotrimers, two heterotrimers and a heterodimer formed by the combination of two different squaraines SQA and SQB. Due to exciton coupling the two homotrimers display a red shift of the main absorption band by about 1000 cm(-1) compared to their monomeric reference compounds. On the other hand, the heterotrimers show a broadening of the absorption spectra with three peak maxima at the exciton manifold band. In fluorescence experiments the homotrimers display signals similar to the emission of the monomeric compounds but red shifted. However, the heterotrimers and the heterodimer show, beside emission from the delocalised lowest energy state, an additional signal that overlaps strongly with the absorption. Excitation and time-dependent emission spectra of the hetero compounds indicate that this emission stems from a localised higher energy state. This interpretation is corroborated by transient absorption measurements with fs-time resolution. PMID:26699932

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of Stereo Visual Odometry for Autonomous Vessel Localisation in Inland Waterway Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Thomas; Blackburn, Kim; Breckon, Toby P; Hamilton, Oliver; Casado, Monica Rivas

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous survey vessels can increase the efficiency and availability of wide-area river environment surveying as a tool for environment protection and conservation. A key challenge is the accurate localisation of the vessel, where bank-side vegetation or urban settlement preclude the conventional use of line-of-sight global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). In this paper, we evaluate unaided visual odometry, via an on-board stereo camera rig attached to the survey vessel, as a novel, low-cost localisation strategy. Feature-based and appearance-based visual odometry algorithms are implemented on a six degrees of freedom platform operating under guided motion, but stochastic variation in yaw, pitch and roll. Evaluation is based on a 663 m-long trajectory (>15,000 image frames) and statistical error analysis against ground truth position from a target tracking tachymeter integrating electronic distance and angular measurements. The position error of the feature-based technique (mean of ±0.067 m) is three times smaller than that of the appearance-based algorithm. From multi-variable statistical regression, we are able to attribute this error to the depth of tracked features from the camera in the scene and variations in platform yaw. Our findings inform effective strategies to enhance stereo visual localisation for the specific application of river monitoring. PMID:26694411

  8. Quantitative Evaluation of Stereo Visual Odometry for Autonomous Vessel Localisation in Inland Waterway Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kriechbaumer, Thomas; Blackburn, Kim; Breckon, Toby P.; Hamilton, Oliver; Rivas Casado, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous survey vessels can increase the efficiency and availability of wide-area river environment surveying as a tool for environment protection and conservation. A key challenge is the accurate localisation of the vessel, where bank-side vegetation or urban settlement preclude the conventional use of line-of-sight global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). In this paper, we evaluate unaided visual odometry, via an on-board stereo camera rig attached to the survey vessel, as a novel, low-cost localisation strategy. Feature-based and appearance-based visual odometry algorithms are implemented on a six degrees of freedom platform operating under guided motion, but stochastic variation in yaw, pitch and roll. Evaluation is based on a 663 m-long trajectory (>15,000 image frames) and statistical error analysis against ground truth position from a target tracking tachymeter integrating electronic distance and angular measurements. The position error of the feature-based technique (mean of ±0.067 m) is three times smaller than that of the appearance-based algorithm. From multi-variable statistical regression, we are able to attribute this error to the depth of tracked features from the camera in the scene and variations in platform yaw. Our findings inform effective strategies to enhance stereo visual localisation for the specific application of river monitoring. PMID:26694411

  9. On The Role of MHD Waves in Heating Localised Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, R.; Nelson, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    Satellite and ground-based observations from e.g. SOHO, TRACE, STEREO, Hinode, SDO and IRIS to DST/ROSA, IBIS, CoMP, STT/CRISP have provided a wealth of evidence of waves and oscillations present in a wide range of spatial scales of the magnetised solar atmosphere. Our understanding about localised solar structures has been considerably changed in light of these high spatial and time resolution observations. However, MHD waves not only enable us to perform sub-resolution magneto-seismology of magnetic waveguides but are also potential candidates to carry and damp the necessary non-thermal energy in these localised waveguides. First, we will briefly outline the basic recent developments in MHD wave theory focussing on linear waves. Next, we discuss the role of the most frequently studied wave classes, including the Alfven, and magneto-acoustic kink and sausage waves. The current theoretical (and often difficult) interpretations of the detected solar atmospheric wave and oscillatory phenomena within the framework of MHD will be shown. Last, the latest reported observational findings of potential MHD wave flux, in terms of localised plasma heating, in the solar atmosphere is discussed, bringing us closer to solve the coronal heating problem.

  10. Aquaporins 7 and 11 in boar spermatozoa: detection, localisation and relationship with sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Martínez, Noelia; Vilagran, Ingrid; Morató, Roser; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E; Yeste, Marc; Bonet, Sergi

    2016-04-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are integral membrane water channels that allow transport of water and small solutes across cell membranes. Although water permeability is known to play a critical role in mammalian cells, including spermatozoa, little is known about their localisation in boar spermatozoa. Two aquaporins, AQP7 and AQP11, in boar spermatozoa were identified by western blotting and localised through immunocytochemistry analyses. Western blot results showed that boar spermatozoa expressed AQP7 (25kDa) and AQP11 (50kDa). Immunocytochemistry analyses demonstrated that AQP7 was localised in the connecting piece of boar spermatozoa, while AQP11 was found in the head and mid-piece and diffuse labelling was also seen along the tail. Despite differences in AQP7 and AQP11 content between boar ejaculates, these differences were not found to be correlated with sperm quality in the case of AQP7. Conversely, AQP11 content showed a significant correlation (P<0.05) with sperm membrane integrity and fluidity and sperm motility. In conclusion, boar spermatozoa express AQP7 and AQP11, and the amounts of AQP11 but not those of AQP7 are correlated with sperm motility and membrane integrity.

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Stereo Visual Odometry for Autonomous Vessel Localisation in Inland Waterway Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Thomas; Blackburn, Kim; Breckon, Toby P; Hamilton, Oliver; Casado, Monica Rivas

    2015-12-17

    Autonomous survey vessels can increase the efficiency and availability of wide-area river environment surveying as a tool for environment protection and conservation. A key challenge is the accurate localisation of the vessel, where bank-side vegetation or urban settlement preclude the conventional use of line-of-sight global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). In this paper, we evaluate unaided visual odometry, via an on-board stereo camera rig attached to the survey vessel, as a novel, low-cost localisation strategy. Feature-based and appearance-based visual odometry algorithms are implemented on a six degrees of freedom platform operating under guided motion, but stochastic variation in yaw, pitch and roll. Evaluation is based on a 663 m-long trajectory (>15,000 image frames) and statistical error analysis against ground truth position from a target tracking tachymeter integrating electronic distance and angular measurements. The position error of the feature-based technique (mean of ±0.067 m) is three times smaller than that of the appearance-based algorithm. From multi-variable statistical regression, we are able to attribute this error to the depth of tracked features from the camera in the scene and variations in platform yaw. Our findings inform effective strategies to enhance stereo visual localisation for the specific application of river monitoring.

  12. An autonomous wearable system for predicting and detecting localised muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Al-Mulla, Mohamed R; Sepulveda, Francisco; Colley, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is an established area of research and various types of muscle fatigue have been clinically investigated in order to fully understand the condition. This paper demonstrates a non-invasive technique used to automate the fatigue detection and prediction process. The system utilises the clinical aspects such as kinematics and surface electromyography (sEMG) of an athlete during isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are used illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This demonstrated system can be used in sports scenarios to promote muscle growth/performance or prevent injury. To date, research on localised muscle fatigue focuses on the clinical side and lacks the implementation for detecting/predicting localised muscle fatigue using an autonomous system. Results show that automating the process of localised muscle fatigue detection/prediction is promising. The autonomous fatigue system was tested on five individuals showing 90.37% accuracy on average of correct classification and an error of 4.35% in predicting the time to when fatigue will onset. PMID:22319367

  13. TOR complex 2 localises to the cytokinetic actomyosin ring and controls the fidelity of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Baker, Karen; Kirkham, Sara; Halova, Lenka; Atkin, Jane; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Cobley, David; Krug, Karsten; Maček, Boris; Mulvihill, Daniel P; Petersen, Janni

    2016-07-01

    The timing of cell division is controlled by the coupled regulation of growth and division. The target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling network synchronises these processes with the environmental setting. Here, we describe a novel interaction of the fission yeast TOR complex 2 (TORC2) with the cytokinetic actomyosin ring (CAR), and a novel role for TORC2 in regulating the timing and fidelity of cytokinesis. Disruption of TORC2 or its localisation results in defects in CAR morphology and constriction. We provide evidence that the myosin II protein Myp2 and the myosin V protein Myo51 play roles in recruiting TORC2 to the CAR. We show that Myp2 and TORC2 are co-dependent upon each other for their normal localisation to the cytokinetic machinery. We go on to show that TORC2-dependent phosphorylation of actin-capping protein 1 (Acp1, a known regulator of cytokinesis) controls CAR stability, modulates Acp1-Acp2 (the equivalent of the mammalian CAPZA-CAPZB) heterodimer formation and is essential for survival upon stress. Thus, TORC2 localisation to the CAR, and TORC2-dependent Acp1 phosphorylation contributes to timely control and the fidelity of cytokinesis and cell division.

  14. Identification of the nuclear localisation signal of O-GlcNAc transferase and its nuclear import regulation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon Gyu; Kim, Han Byeol; Kang, Min Jueng; Ryum, Joo Hwan; Yi, Eugene C.; Cho, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) attaches a single GlcNAc to hydroxyl groups of serine and threonine residues. Although the cellular localisation of OGT is important to regulate a variety of cellular processes, the molecular mechanisms regulating the nuclear localisation of OGT is unclear. Here, we characterised three amino acids (DFP; residues 451–453) as the nuclear localisation signal of OGT and demonstrated that this motif mediated the nuclear import of non-diffusible β-galactosidase. OGT bound the importin α5 protein, and this association was abolished when the DFP motif of OGT was mutated or deleted. We also revealed that O-GlcNAcylation of Ser389, which resides in the tetratricopeptide repeats, plays an important role in the nuclear localisation of OGT. Our findings may explain how OGT, which possesses a NLS, exists in the nucleus and cytosol simultaneously. PMID:27713473

  15. Genetic optimisation of a plane array geometry for beamforming. Application to source localisation in a high speed train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Courtois, Florent; Thomas, Jean-Hugh; Poisson, Franck; Pascal, Jean-Claude

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to its easy implementation and robust performance, beamforming is applied for source localisation in several fields. Its effectiveness depends greatly on the array sensor configuration. This paper introduces a criterion to improve the array beampattern and increase the accuracy of sound source localisation. The beamwidth and the maximum sidelobe level are used to quantify the spatial variation of the beampattern through a new criterion. This criterion is shown to be useful, especially for the localisation of moving sources. A genetic algorithm is proposed for the optimisation of microphone placement. Statistical analysis of the optimised arrays provides original results on the algorithm performance and on the optimal microphone placement. An optimised array is tested to localise the sound sources of a high speed train. The results show an accurate separation.

  16. Development of a prototype of the tele-localisation system in radiotherapy using personal digital assistant via wireless communication.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vincent Wing-Cheung; Tang, Fuk-hay; Cheung, Wai-kwan; Chan, Kit-chi

    2013-02-01

    In localisation of radiotherapy treatment field, the oncologist is present at the simulator to approve treatment details produced by the therapist. Problems may arise if the oncologist is not available and the patient requires urgent treatment. The development of a tele-localisation system is a potential solution, where the oncologist uses a personal digital assistant (PDA) to localise the treatment field on the image sent from the simulator through wireless communication and returns the information to the therapist after his or her approval. Our team developed the first tele-localisation prototype, which consisted of a server workstation (simulator) for the administration of digital imaging and communication in medicine localisation images including viewing and communication with the PDA via a Wi-Fi network; a PDA (oncologist's site) installed with the custom-built programme that synchronises with the server workstation and performs treatment field editing. Trial tests on accuracy and speed of the prototype system were conducted on 30 subjects with the treatment regions covering the neck, skull, chest and pelvis. The average time required in performing the localisation using the PDA was less than 1.5 min, with the blocked field longer than the open field. The transmission speed of the four treatment regions was similar. The average physical distortion of the images was within 4.4% and the accuracy of field size indication was within 5.3%. Compared with the manual method, the tele-localisation system presented with an average deviation of 5.5%. The prototype system fulfilled the planned objectives of tele-localisation procedure with reasonable speed and accuracy.

  17. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Couples Localised Calcium Influx to Activation of Akt in Central Nerve Terminals.

    PubMed

    Nicholson-Fish, Jessica C; Cousin, Michael A; Smillie, Karen J

    2016-03-01

    The efficient retrieval of synaptic vesicle membrane and cargo in central nerve terminals is dependent on the efficient recruitment of a series of endocytosis modes by different patterns of neuronal activity. During intense neuronal activity the dominant endocytosis mode is activity-dependent endocytosis (ADBE). Triggering of ADBE is linked to calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation since the same stimulation intensities trigger both. Dynamin I dephosphorylation is maximised by a simultaneous inhibition of its kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) by the protein kinase Akt, however it is unknown how increased neuronal activity is transduced into Akt activation. To address this question we determined how the activity-dependent increases in intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) control activation of Akt. This was achieved using either trains of high frequency action potentials to evoke localised [Ca(2+)]i increases at active zones, or a calcium ionophore to raise [Ca(2+)]i uniformly across the nerve terminal. Through the use of either non-specific calcium channel antagonists or intracellular calcium chelators we found that Akt phosphorylation (and subsequent GSK3 phosphorylation) was dependent on localised [Ca(2+)]i increases at the active zone. In an attempt to determine mechanism, we antagonised either phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or calmodulin. Activity-dependent phosphorylation of both Akt and GSK3 was arrested on inhibition of PI3K, but not calmodulin. Thus localised calcium influx in central nerve terminals activates PI3K via an unknown calcium sensor to trigger the activity-dependent phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3.

  18. Contrasting impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in coastal wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.A.; Codi, S.

    1996-12-31

    A localised oil spill was observed on the wetland marshes bordering a tidal creek near Cairns, Queensland in January 1994. Pollution and conservation issues are of paramount public concern in this region which boarders World Heritage Areas of coral reefs and coastal habitats. Local residents observed oil being dumped from a truck which was contracted to of oil the surface of the roads in the contiguous sugar cane farm for dust control. During this incident several truckloads of mixed waste oil were dumped onto a short section of road and into the wetlands. The oil contaminated a band of marsh 15-30 m wide along approximately 200 m of road. Impacted marsh included Melaleuca forest on the high side of the road and intertidal mangroves on the seaward side. The Queensland Department of Environment (QDE) initiated an impact assessment and directed the trucking company to clean up impacted areas. The extent of damage to wetlands from oil spills is related to the amount and type of oil spilled and the sensitivity of the habitats oiled. QDE asked the Australian Institute of Marine Sciences to assist with their study on the fate of the oil in this localised spill. The initial levels of petroleum hydrocarbons in surface sediments reached 17% of the dry weight in heavily impacted areas. Thus levels were similar to those reached after the catastrophic oil spill in Panama. Clean up efforts and natural dissipation processes reduced sediment hydrocarbon loads to nonacutely toxic levels in only 1.5 years in the intertidal mangroves. High levels remain in the Melaleuca sediments. We used internal molecular markers to detail hydrocarbon dissipation vs degradation. This study provides a contrast between impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in deep mud coastal habitats.

  19. Localised slip controlled by dehydration embrittlement of partly serpentinised dunites, Leka Ophiolite Complex, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Kristina G.; Austrheim, Håkon; Cordonnier, Benoit; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Dehydration of serpentinised ultramafic rocks can increase the pore fluid pressure and induce brittle failure; however the extents of strain localisation and unstable frictional sliding are still under debate. Microstructural and mineralogical evidence from dunites of the Leka Ophiolite Complex in the Central Norwegian Caledonides demonstrates that prograde metamorphism of serpentinite veins led to local fluid production and to the growth of large-grained olivine rich in magnetite inclusions. The epitaxial growth of comparatively Fe-poor prograde olivine on Fe-richer relics of primary olivine caused a high variability in Fe-content, even within single crystals. On a larger scale, the average Fe-content of olivine rises towards the vein edges, which reflects a decrease in the degree of initial serpentinisation towards the host rock. The former distribution of serpentine strongly influenced the mechanical response of the rock to the fluid production during deserpentinisation: The faulting caused by the associated dehydration embrittlement occurred along highly localized slip planes in the centres of the meta-serpentinite veins. Around these slip planes, the prograde olivine experienced significant grain size reduction, but very limited shear strain. The strain concentration on narrow faults, also documented by a sharp offset of chromite layers, and the brittle deformation of the surrounding olivine suggest unstable frictional sliding rather than slower creep. This natural example of deserpentinisation-induced embrittlement illustrates that structural heterogeneities in the form of serpentinite veins have first-order controls on strain localisation and frictional sliding. While strain may be distributed during dehydration of a homogeneous serpentinite, as has been observed in recent experimental studies, it may become strongly localised in a heterogeneous rock volume where fluid pressure is locally increased along pre-existing veins. As most of the oceanic lithosphere

  20. Chromosome-specific physical localisation of expressed sequence tag loci in Corchorus olitorius L.

    PubMed

    Joshi, A; Das, S K; Samanta, P; Paria, P; Sen, S K; Basu, A

    2014-11-01

    Jute (Corchorus spp.), as a natural fibre-producing species, ranks next only to cotton. Inadequate understanding of its genetic architecture is a major lacuna for genetic improvement of this crop in terms of yield and quality. Establishment of a physical map provides a genomic tool that helps in positional cloning of valuable genes. In this report, an attempt was initiated to study association and localisation of single copy expressed sequence tag (EST) loci in the genome of Corchorus olitorius. The chromosome-specific association of EST was determined based on the appearance of an extra signal for a single copy cDNA probe in mitotic interphase nuclei of specific trisomic(s) for fluorescence in situ hybridisation, and validated using a cDNA fragment of the 26S rRNA gene (600 bp) as molecular probe. The probe exhibited three signals in meiotic interphase nuclei of trisomic 5, instead of two as observed in diploids and other trisomics, indicating its association with chromosome 5. Subsequent hybridisation of the same probe on the pachytene chromosomes of diploids confirmed that 26S rRNA occupies the terminal end of the short arm of chromosome 5 in C. olitorius. Subsequently, chromosome-specific association of 63 single copy EST and their physical localisation were determined on chromosomes 2, 4, 5 and 7. The study describes chromosome-specific physical localisation of genes in jute. The approach used here could be a step towards construction of genome-wide physical maps for any recalcitrant plant species like jute. PMID:24628982

  1. Advanced situation awareness with localised environmental community observatories in the Future Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabeur, Z. A.; Denis, H.; Nativi, S.

    2012-04-01

    The phenomenal advances in information and communication technologies over the last decade have led to offering unprecedented connectivity with real potentials for "Smart living" between large segments of human populations around the world. In particular, Voluntary Groups(VGs) and individuals with interest in monitoring the state of their local environment can be connected through the internet and collaboratively generate important localised environmental observations. These could be considered as the Community Observatories(CO) of the Future Internet(FI). However, a set of FI enablers are needed to be deployed for these communities to become effective COs in the Future Internet. For example, these communities will require access to services for the intelligent processing of heterogeneous data and capture of advancend situation awarness about the environment. This important enablement will really unlock the communities true potential for participating in localised monitoring of the environment in addition to their contribution in the creation of business entreprise. Among the eight Usage Areas(UA) projects of the FP7 FI-PPP programme, the ENVIROFI Integrated Project focuses on the specifications of the Future Internet enablers of the Environment UA. The specifications are developed under multiple environmental domains in context of users needs for the development of mash-up applications in the Future Internet. It will enable users access to real-time, on-demand fused information with advanced situation awareness about the environment at localised scales. The mash-up applications shall get access to rich spatio-temporal information from structured fusion services which aggregate COs information with existing environmental monitoring stations data, established by research organisations and private entreprise. These applications are being developed in ENVIROFI for the atmospheric, marine and biodiversity domains, together with a potential to be extended to other

  2. New insights into the organisation and intracellular localisation of the two subunits of glucose-6-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Soty, Maud; Chilloux, Julien; Casteras, Sylvie; Grichine, Alexeï; Mithieux, Gilles; Gautier-Stein, Amandine

    2012-03-01

    Glucose-6 phosphatase (G6Pase), a key enzyme of glucose homeostasis, catalyses the hydrolysis of glucose-6 phosphate (G6P) to glucose and inorganic phosphate. A deficiency in G6Pase activity causes type 1 glycogen storage disease (GSD-1), mainly characterised by hypoglycaemia. Genetic analyses of the two forms of this rare disease have shown that the G6Pase system consists of two proteins, a catalytic subunit (G6PC) responsible for GSD-1a, and a G6P translocase (G6PT), responsible for GSD-1b. However, since their identification, few investigations concerning their structural relationship have been made. In this study, we investigated the localisation and membrane organisation of the G6Pase complex. To this aim, we developed chimera proteins by adding a fluorescent protein to the C-terminal ends of both subunits. The G6PC and G6PT fluorescent chimeras were both addressed to perinuclear membranes as previously suggested, but also to vesicles throughout the cytoplasm. We demonstrated that both proteins strongly colocalised in perinuclear membranes. Then, we studied G6PT organisation in the membrane. We highlighted FRET between the labelled C and N termini of G6PT. The intramolecular FRET of this G6PT chimera was 27%. The coexpression of unlabelled G6PC did not modify this FRET intensity. Finally, the chimera constructs generated in this work enabled us for the first time to analyze the relationship between GSD-1 mutations and the intracellular localisation of both G6Pase subunits. We showed that GSD1 mutations did neither alter the G6PC or G6PT chimera localisation, nor the interaction between G6PT termini. In conclusion, our results provide novel information on the intracellular distribution and organisation of the G6Pase complex.

  3. Chromosome-specific physical localisation of expressed sequence tag loci in Corchorus olitorius L.

    PubMed

    Joshi, A; Das, S K; Samanta, P; Paria, P; Sen, S K; Basu, A

    2014-11-01

    Jute (Corchorus spp.), as a natural fibre-producing species, ranks next only to cotton. Inadequate understanding of its genetic architecture is a major lacuna for genetic improvement of this crop in terms of yield and quality. Establishment of a physical map provides a genomic tool that helps in positional cloning of valuable genes. In this report, an attempt was initiated to study association and localisation of single copy expressed sequence tag (EST) loci in the genome of Corchorus olitorius. The chromosome-specific association of EST was determined based on the appearance of an extra signal for a single copy cDNA probe in mitotic interphase nuclei of specific trisomic(s) for fluorescence in situ hybridisation, and validated using a cDNA fragment of the 26S rRNA gene (600 bp) as molecular probe. The probe exhibited three signals in meiotic interphase nuclei of trisomic 5, instead of two as observed in diploids and other trisomics, indicating its association with chromosome 5. Subsequent hybridisation of the same probe on the pachytene chromosomes of diploids confirmed that 26S rRNA occupies the terminal end of the short arm of chromosome 5 in C. olitorius. Subsequently, chromosome-specific association of 63 single copy EST and their physical localisation were determined on chromosomes 2, 4, 5 and 7. The study describes chromosome-specific physical localisation of genes in jute. The approach used here could be a step towards construction of genome-wide physical maps for any recalcitrant plant species like jute.

  4. Localisation of Mantle Upwelling Beneath Recent Intra-Plate Volcanism in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R.; Rawlinson, N.

    2014-12-01

    The widespread occurrence of intraplate volcanism is difficult to explain using the primary features of plate tectonics, such as subduction at convergent boundaries or upwelling at rifted margins, which are responsible for most volcanism on Earth. Instead, other mechanisms are invoked, foremost of which is the mantle plume model, typically characterised by a localised thermal upwelling that brings material from the deep mantle up to the base of the lithosphere to form a volcanic hotspot at Earth's surface. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that many instances of intraplate volcanism do not adhere to this model, which has lead to a variety of other causes being postulated, including edge driven convection (EDC), shear driven upwelling (SDU) of the asthenosphere, lithospheric cracking, ductile removal of lithosphere via gravitational instability, glacial rebound and slab tear. Here, we use a combination of seismic tomography and geodynamic modelling to show that the source of the most recent volcanism within the Australian continent is restricted to the upper mentle and is unlikely to be plume-fed. Moreover, we demonstrate, for the first time, that mantle upwelling induced by EDC can be localised and intensified as a result of 3-D variations in lithospheric thickness and SDU caused by plate motion. In this case, geodynamic modelling constrained by seismic imaging results predicts a localised zone of mantle upwelling beneath the Quaternary Newer Volcanics Province (NVP) in southeast Australia. This helps to solve the puzzle of why EDC - which occurs at step changes in lithospheric thickness - only manifests at isolated locations along craton edges and passive margins.

  5. Subdiffraction field localisation in the scattering of femtosecond laser radiation by a dielectric microsphere

    SciTech Connect

    Geints, Yu E; Zemlyanov, A A; Panina, E K

    2014-01-31

    The time dynamics of the optical field was theoretically considered in the near-field diffraction zone in the scattering of a femtosecond laser pulse by a transparent spherical microparticle. The spatial region of field focusing by the particle (the 'photonic jet' zone) was investigated; the evolution of the jet shape and the peak intensity in this region were analysed. For the first time it was determined that an extremely tight optical field localisation to a subdiffraction size is possible at a certain (resonance) temporal stage of photonic jet development. (radiation scattering)

  6. The Anderson model for electron localisation non-linear σ model, asymptotic gauge invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruisken, Adrianus M. M.; Schäfer, Lothar

    1982-01-01

    The Anderson model for localisation problems is treated with field theory, employing the replica trick. We show that no valid perturbation theory results out of the usual ( S2) 2 formalism due to mishandling of symmetries. The problem is reformulated in terms of matrix fields. It is shown that the Anderson model asymptotically exhibits an exact local gauge symmetry. Elimination of massive longitudinal components leads to a non-compact σ model, obtained earlier for the description of electronic disorder. We thus establish that the Anderson model is in the same universality class as Wegner's gauge invariant real matrix model.

  7. Fibre Tip Sensors for Localised Temperature Sensing Based on Rare Earth-Doped Glass Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Schartner, Erik P.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a point temperature sensor, based on monitoring upconversion emission from erbium:ytterbium-doped tellurite coatings on the tips of optical fibres. The dip coating technique allows multiple sensors to be fabricated simultaneously, while confining the temperature-sensitive region to a localised region on the end-face of the fibre. The strong response of the rare earth ions to changing temperature allows a resolution of 0.1–0.3 °C to be recorded over the biologically relevant range of temperatures from 23–39 °C. PMID:25407907

  8. Long Range Navigation for Mars Rovers Using Sensor-Based Path Planning and Visual Localisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, Sharon L.; Olson, Clark F.; Burdick, Joel W.; Hayati, Samad

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission illustrated the benefits of including a mobile robotic explorer on a planetary mission. However, for future Mars rover missions, significantly increased autonomy in navigation is required in order to meet demanding mission criteria. To address these requirements, we have developed new path planning and localisation capabilities that allow a rover to navigate robustly to a distant landmark. These algorithms have been implemented on the JPL Rocky 7 prototype microrover and have been tested extensively in the JPL MarsYard, as well as in natural terrain.

  9. Localisation of shear fracture networks in anisotropic materials: influence of strain rate and material strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rivas, E.; Griera, A.

    2009-04-01

    This contribution presents an experimental study of deformation localisation and the formation of fracture networks in elastoviscoplastic layered materials under pure shear boundary conditions. The mechanical properties of the analogue mixtures, which are made of plasticine, have been used to analyse the transition from models in which deformation is accommodated by homogeneous viscous flow to systems controlled by a few active faults. Two series of experiments have been studied: (a) the same material was deformed at different strain rates and (b) four materials with different mechanical properties were deformed at a fixed strain rate. The results show that strain rate and viscous ductility define a change on the degree of deformation localisation and the geometry of fracture networks. The increase of deformation also produces changes on the mechanical behaviour of the systems and the type of deformation. Localisation of fracture networks is enhanced when strain rate is increased. Moreover, there is a progressive increment in the relationship between fracture displacement and fracture length related to the strain rate applied to the system. This experimental observation is also corroborated by a series of simple finite element linear elastoviscous simulations. In these models, a horizontal inclusion within a matrix simulates a pre-existing fracture. The displacement along this fracture is tracked at all times using some selected nodes located at the two walls. The results indicate that there is a dependency of fracture displacements on the strain rate. A deviation between shear strains registered by fractures and the one applied by the boundary conditions is also detected, especially at low strain. The degree of localisation and the nucleation of shear fractures also depend strongly on the viscous ductility and strength of the analogue material. The raise of the material stiffness causes an increase of the length of fractures and displacements along them. This fact

  10. Co-localisation studies of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors reveal different types of speckles in plant cell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Lorkovic, Zdravko J.; Barta, Andrea

    2008-10-15

    SR proteins are multidomain splicing factors which are important for spliceosome assembly and for regulation of alternative splicing. In mammalian nuclei these proteins localise to speckles from where they are recruited to transcription sites. By using fluorescent protein fusion technology and different experimental approaches it has been shown that Arabidopsis SR proteins, in addition to diffuse nucleoplasmic staining, localise into an irregular nucleoplasmic network resembling speckles in mammalian cells. As Arabidopsis SR proteins fall into seven conserved sub-families we investigated co-localisation of members of the different sub-families in transiently transformed tobacco protoplast. Here we demonstrate the new finding that members of different SR protein sub-families localise into distinct populations of nuclear speckles with no, partial or complete co-localisation. This is particularly interesting as we also show that these proteins do interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay as well as in pull-down and in co-immunopreciptiation assays. Our data raise the interesting possibility that SR proteins are partitioned into distinct populations of nuclear speckles to allow a more specific recruitment to the transcription/pre-mRNA processing sites of particular genes depending on cell type and developmental stage.

  11. Adénocarcinome pulmonaire primitif: expérience d'un centre hospitalier tunisien

    PubMed Central

    Joobeur, Samah; Mribah, Hadhami; Saad, Ahmed Ben; Mhamed, Saoussen Cheikh; Mahou, Houda; Rouatbi, Naceur; El Kamel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    La fréquence de l'adénocarcinome pulmonaire primitif est en nette augmentation au dépend des autres types histologiques de cancer bronchique primitif. En effet, il représente environ 40% des cas des carcinomes bronchiques non à petites cellules (CNPC). Il se distingue par certaines particularités. Décrire les aspects épidémiologiques, cliniques, thérapeutiques et évolutifs de l'adénocarcinome pulmonaire primitif. Etude rétrospective incluant 322 patients porteurs d'adénocarcinome pulmonaire primitif, hospitalisés au service de pneumologie du centre hospitalo-universitaire de Monastir (Tunisie) entre janvier 1990 et septembre 2013. L’âge moyen de nos patients était de 59,4 ans. 25,8% sont âgés de moins de 50 ans. Une prédominance masculine (86,3%) a été notée. 81,7% des patients étaient tabagiques. La symptomatologie respiratoire était dominée par la douleur thoracique (57,1%) et la toux (46%). Au moment du diagnostic, 73,3% des patients étaient au stade métastatique. Les localisations secondaires les plus fréquentes étaient le poumon controlatéral (25,5%), la plèvre (21,1%) et l'os (19,25%). La prise en charge thérapeutique s'est basée essentiellement sur la chimiothérapie (48,5% des cas). Seulement 10,3% des patients ont bénéficié d'un traitement chirurgical. La médiane de survie de nos patients était de 6 mois avec une survie à 1 an, 3 ans et 5 ans respectivement de 25,9%, 3,2% et 2%. L'adénocarcinome bronchique primitif est un sous type histologique particulier parmi les cancers broncho-pulmonaires primitifs. Son incidence est en augmentation depuis une vingtaine d'année. Malgré les progrès thérapeutiques, il reste de mauvais pronostic. PMID:26448811

  12. Accumulation, localisation, and toxic effects of cadmium in the liverwort Lunularia cruciata.

    PubMed

    Carginale, V; Sorbo, S; Capasso, C; Trinchella, F; Cafiero, G; Basile, A

    2004-03-01

    Accumulation, tissue and intracellular localisation, and toxic effects of cadmium were investigated in the liverwort Lunularia cruciata. The results of analyses carried out by atomic absorption spectrometry on single plants showed that the cadmium accumulation was dose- and time-dependent. Cadmium localisation was assessed by X-ray scanning electron microscopy microanalysis in gemmalings and in the different tissues of the thallus and by X-ray transmission electron microscopy microanalysis at the cellular level. The metal preferentially accumulated in the hyaline parenchyma and at the base of the gemma cups. Inside the cell, cadmium accumulated in the vacuoles and the cell wall. Metal accumulation was accompanied by a concomitant increase in sulphur content within the vacuoles of stressed cells. Gel-permeation chromatography showed that most of the cadmium was associated with a low-molecular-mass fraction eluting at a ratio of elution volume to void volume corresponding to that of phytochelatins. The excess of sulphur deposited in the vacuoles may well have been caused by the stress-induced synthesis of phytochelatins. At the ultrastructural level, sublethal concentrations of cadmium caused alterations of the fine structure of the cells, inducing marked alterations of the chloroplast structure. Cadmium also induced a dose-dependent inhibition of apical thallus growth and gemma germination.

  13. Hetergeneous tumour response to photodynamic therapy assessed by in vivo localised 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ceckler, T. L.; Gibson, S. L.; Kennedy, S. D.; Hill, R.; Bryant, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is efficacious in the treatment of small malignant lesions when all cells in the tumour receive sufficient drug, oxygen and light to induce a photodynamic effect capable of complete cytotoxicity. In large tumours, only partial effectiveness is observed presumably because of insufficient light penetration into the tissue. The heterogeneity of the metabolic response in mammary tumours following PDT has been followed in vivo using localised phosphorus NMR spectroscopy. Alterations in nucleoside triphosphates (NTP), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and pH within localised regions of the tumour were monitored over 24-48 h following PDT irradiation of the tumour. Reduction of NTP and increases in Pi were observed at 4-6 h after PDT irradiation in all regions of treated tumours. The uppermost regions of the tumours (those nearest the skin surface and exposed to the greatest light fluence) displayed the greatest and most prolonged reduction of NTP and concomitant increase in Pi resulting in necrosis. The metabolite concentrations in tumour regions located towards the base of the tumour returned a near pre-treatment levels by 24-48 h after irradiation. The ability to follow heterogeneous metabolic responses in situ provides one means to assess the degree of metabolic inhibition which subsequently leads to tumour necrosis. Images Figure 4 PMID:1829953

  14. A Review of Non-Invasive Techniques to Detect and Predict Localised Muscle Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mulla, Mohamed R.; Sepulveda, Francisco; Colley, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is an established area of research and various types of muscle fatigue have been investigated in order to fully understand the condition. This paper gives an overview of the various non-invasive techniques available for use in automated fatigue detection, such as mechanomyography, electromyography, near-infrared spectroscopy and ultrasound for both isometric and non-isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are compared by illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This paper will be of interest to researchers who wish to select the most appropriate methodology for research on muscle fatigue detection or prediction, or for the development of devices that can be used in, e.g., sports scenarios to improve performance or prevent injury. To date, research on localised muscle fatigue focuses mainly on the clinical side. There is very little research carried out on the implementation of detecting/predicting fatigue using an autonomous system, although recent research on automating the process of localised muscle fatigue detection/prediction shows promising results. PMID:22163810

  15. The influence of strain localisation on the rotation behaviour of rigid objects in experimental shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Grotenhuis, Saskia M.; Passchier, Cees W.; Bons, Paul D.

    2002-03-01

    Mica fish and tourmaline fish from natural mylonites were analysed in thin section to determine their orientation distribution. They are oriented with their long axes tilted with respect to the mylonitic foliation, and fish with a small aspect ratio exhibit a slightly larger angle than fish with a large aspect ratio. This orientation seems to be a stable orientation for the mica and tourmaline fish. Analogue experiments with two rheologically different matrix materials were performed to explain the data. One material was PDMS, a linear viscous polymer. The other was tapioca pearls, a granular material with low cohesion and Mohr-Coulomb type behaviour. In contrast to a fairly homogeneous strain distribution in PDMS, distinct small-scale shear bands developed in tapioca pearls during deformation. Experiments modelled different vorticity numbers and parallelogram-shaped rigid objects with different aspect ratios were used. Rotation rates of objects in a viscous matrix are very similar to analytical solutions for ellipses in viscous flow, but stable orientations differ from data of natural examples. In all experiments with a Mohr-Coulomb matrix elongated objects had a stable orientation due to small-scale strain localisation. We therefore suggest that small-scale strain localisation (≤mm) that might be hidden by ongoing deformation and recrystallisation processes, is an important characteristic of the rheology of mylonites.

  16. Rare events statistics of random walks on networks: localisation and other dynamical phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bacco, Caterina; Guggiola, Alberto; Kühn, Reimer; Paga, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    Rare event statistics for random walks on complex networks are investigated using the large deviation formalism. Within this formalism, rare events are realised as typical events in a suitably deformed path-ensemble, and their statistics can be studied in terms of spectral properties of a deformed Markov transition matrix. We observe two different types of phase transition in such systems: (i) rare events which are singled out for sufficiently large values of the deformation parameter may correspond to localised modes of the deformed transition matrix; (ii) ‘mode-switching transitions’ may occur as the deformation parameter is varied. Details depend on the nature of the observable for which the rare event statistics is studied, as well as on the underlying graph ensemble. In the present paper we report results on rare events statistics for path averages of random walks in Erdős-Rényi and scale free networks. Large deviation rate functions and localisation properties are studied numerically. For observables of the type considered here, we also derive an analytical approximation for the Legendre transform of the large deviation rate function, which is valid in the large connectivity limit. It is found to agree well with simulations.

  17. Localisation and capacitation-dependent loss of buffalo sperm-coating antigens shared with rat sperm.

    PubMed

    Venditti, P; Bergamo, P; Talevi, R; Sansone, G; Abrescia, P

    1994-02-01

    The heterodimeric sperm-coating protein CFS was previously localised on the middle-piece region of rat spermatozoa by anti-CFS rabbit antibodies. CFS-immunorelated antigens were detected in the secretion of the water buffalo seminal vesicle by protein electrophoresis and Western blotting. Spermatozoa from buffalo epididymal cauda were incubated with the rat antigen and, upon immunostaining with anti-CFS antibodies and goat anti-rabbit fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated IgGs, CFS was found attached on both the post-acrosomal region and the tail. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis permitted the localisation of CFS-related antigens on the same domains of buffalo ejaculated spermatozoa. These results suggest that the buffalo antigens not only share some epitopes with the homologous rat antigen but may also have some of its functional properties. Ejaculated spermatozoa were capacitated in vitro and then assayed for their content of CFS-like antigens. An inverse relationship was found between the levels of capacitation and the amounts of antigens detected, thus suggesting that the in vitro treatment was effective at removing CFS-related proteins from the cell surface. Titration of these proteins to monitor plasma membrane changes during sperm manipulation or to evaluate sperm quality is proposed.

  18. Histochemical Localisation of Carbonic Anhydrase in the Inner Ear of developing Cichlid Fish, Oreochromis mossambicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, M.; Hilbig, R.; Anken, R.

    Inner ear otolith growth in terms of mineralisation mainly depends on the enzyme carbonic anhydrase CA CA is located in specialised mitochondria-rich macular cells ionocytes which are involved in the endolymphatic ion exchange and the enzyme is responsible for the provision of the pH-value necessary for otolithic calcium carbonate deposition In the present study for the first time the localisation of histochemically demonstrated CA was analysed during the early larval development of a teleost the cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus CA-reactivity was observed already in stage 7 animals onset of otocyst development staging follows Anken et al Zool Anz 231 1-10 1993 Neuroblasts from which sensory and supporting cells as well as ionocytes are derived proved to be CA positive Already at stage 12 hatch CA-positive regions could be attributed to ionocyte containg regions both in the so-called meshwork and patches area of the macula i e clearly before ionocytes can be identified on ultrastructural level or by employing immunocytochemistry In contrast to the circumstances observed in mammalian species sensory hair cells stained negative for CA in the cichlid With the onset of stage 16 finray primordia in dorsal fin yolk-sac being increasingly absorbed CA-reactivity was observed in the vestibular nerve This indicates the onset of myelinisation and thus commencement of operation The localisation of CA in the inner ear of fish especially the differences in comparison to mammals is discussed on the basis of its role in otolith

  19. Eimeria tenella microneme protein EtMIC3: identification, localisation and role in host cell infection.

    PubMed

    Labbé, M; de Venevelles, P; Girard-Misguich, F; Bourdieu, C; Guillaume, A; Péry, P

    2005-03-01

    The gene coding for Eimeria tenella protein EtMIC3 was cloned by screening a sporozoite cDNA library with two independent monoclonal antibodies raised against the oocyst stage. The deduced sequence of EtMIC3 is 988 amino acids long. The protein presents seven repeats in tandem, with four highly conserved internal repeats and three more divergent external repeats. Each repeat is characterised by a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, WRCY, and a reminiscent motif of the thrombospondin1 (TSP1)-type I domain, CXXXCG. The protein EtMIC3 is localised at the apex of free parasite stages. It is not detected in the early intracellular parasite stage but is synthesised in mature schizonts. Secretion of the protein is induced when sporozoites are incubated in complete medium at 41 degrees C. Strangely enough, the two independent mAb that allow cloning of EtMIC3 interfere with parasitic growth in different ways. One is able to inhibit parasite invasion whereas the other inhibits development. Expression and localisation of the protein EtMIC3 are consistent with a protein involved in the invasion process as is expected for a microneme protein.

  20. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Peddie, Christopher J; Blight, Ken; Wilson, Emma; Melia, Charlotte; Marrison, Jo; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; O'Toole, Peter; Larijani, Banafshe; Collinson, Lucy M

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged proteins is a fundamental tool in cell biology, but without seeing the structure of the surrounding cellular space, functional information can be lost. Here we present a protocol that preserves GFP and mCherry fluorescence in mammalian cells embedded in resin with electron contrast to reveal cellular ultrastructure. Ultrathin in-resin fluorescence (IRF) sections were imaged simultaneously for fluorescence and electron signals in an integrated light and scanning electron microscope. We show, for the first time, that GFP is stable and active in resin sections in vacuo. We applied our protocol to study the subcellular localisation of diacylglycerol (DAG), a modulator of membrane morphology and membrane dynamics in nuclear envelope assembly. We show that DAG is localised to the nuclear envelope, nucleoplasmic reticulum and curved tips of the Golgi apparatus. With these developments, we demonstrate that integrated imaging is maturing into a powerful tool for accurate molecular localisation to structure.

  1. Apical-basal membrane polarity of membrane phosphatases in isolated capillary endothelium: alteration in ultrastructural localisation under culture conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, R L; Sandra, A

    1993-01-01

    Capillaries from freshly isolated rat epididymal fat were subjected to protocols that allowed ultrastructural localisation of alkaline phosphatase and 5'-nucleotidase. Alkaline phosphatase was almost entirely restricted to the capillary luminal membrane and vesicles associated with this membrane. 5'-nucleotidase was localised on the basal or abluminal membrane and associated vesicles. Arterioles and occasional venules were also present in the cell isolates, and arteriole localisation of 5'-nucleotidase was identical to that in capillaries. In venules, 5'-nucleotidase often failed to exhibit a polarised distribution and was present on both membrane domains. In confluent cultured endothelial cells, 5'-nucleotidase was not expressed in a predominantly polarised arrangement. Alkaline phosphatase was found on apical surfaces and regions of lateral cell contact. The results of these studies show that capillary endothelial cells exhibit enzyme polarity of their surface membranes which is subject to change on introduction of the cells to tissue culture. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8226289

  2. Using Local Second Gradient Model and Shear Strain Localisation to Model the Excavation Damaged Zone in Unsaturated Claystone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, Benoît; Levasseur, Séverine; Collin, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    The drilling of galleries induces damage propagation in the surrounding medium and creates, around them, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). The prediction of the extension and fracture structure of this zone remains a major issue, especially in the context of underground nuclear waste storage. Experimental studies on geomaterials indicate that localised deformation in shear band mode usually appears prior to fractures. Thus, the excavation damaged zone can be modelled by considering the development of shear strain localisation bands. In the classical finite element framework, strain localisation suffers a mesh-dependency problem. Therefore, an enhanced model with a regularisation method is required to correctly model the strain localisation behaviour. Among the existing methods, we choose the coupled local second gradient model. We extend it to unsaturated conditions and we include the solid grain compressibility. Furthermore, air ventilation inside underground galleries engenders a rock-atmosphere interaction that could influence the damaged zone. This interaction has to be investigated in order to predict the damaged zone behaviour. Finally, a hydro-mechanical modelling of a gallery excavation in claystone is presented and leads to a fairly good representation of the EDZ. The main objectives of this study are to model the fractures by considering shear strain localisation bands, and to investigate if an isotropic model accurately reproduces the in situ measurements. The numerical results provide information about the damaged zone extension, structure and behaviour that are in very good agreement with in situ measurements and observations. For instance, the strain localisation bands that develop in chevron pattern during the excavation and rock desaturation, due to air ventilation, are observed close to the gallery.

  3. Improving the performance of monocular visual simultaneous localisation and mapping through the use of a gimballed camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Playle, Nicholas

    In this thesis modern vision based localisation methods are discussed and contrasted with existing satellite based approaches. Shortcomings are noted and potential solutions are highlighted. A novel method of using a gimballed camera to perform visual Simultaneous Localisation and Mapping (SLAM) is proposed, along with a control algorithm to point the camera toward feature dense regions. This method is then modularly coupled with existing visual SLAM techniques allowing seamless integration across different platforms. Ground tests are performed to verify operation of the gimbal controller and rotation inverser. Results from experimental flight tests are incorporated as a final means of obtaining information to verify gimbal operation.

  4. Localised quantum states of atomic and molecular particles physisorbed on carbon-based nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Trachta, Michal; Bludský, Ota; Špirko, Vladimír

    2014-09-21

    The vibrational states of atomic and molecular particles adsorbed on long linear nanographenes are described using reliable theoretical potentials and appropriate vibrational (lateral) Hamiltonians. Although they rigorously obey the Bloch theorem only for infinite nanographenes, the energy patterns of the probed states closely resemble the usual Bloch bands and gaps. In addition, for any finite nanographene, these patterns are enriched by the presence of “solitary” energy levels and the “resonance” structure of the bands. While typical band states are profoundly delocalised due to a fast tunneling of the adsorbed particle, the “solitary” and “resonance” states exhibit strong localisation, similar to the behaviour of the states of the Wannier-Stark ladders in optical and semiconductor superlattices.

  5. Localised quantum states of atomic and molecular particles physisorbed on carbon-based nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaprálová-Žánská, Petra Ruth; Trachta, Michal; Bludský, Ota; Špirko, Vladimír

    2014-09-01

    The vibrational states of atomic and molecular particles adsorbed on long linear nanographenes are described using reliable theoretical potentials and appropriate vibrational (lateral) Hamiltonians. Although they rigorously obey the Bloch theorem only for infinite nanographenes, the energy patterns of the probed states closely resemble the usual Bloch bands and gaps. In addition, for any finite nanographene, these patterns are enriched by the presence of "solitary" energy levels and the "resonance" structure of the bands. While typical band states are profoundly delocalised due to a fast tunneling of the adsorbed particle, the "solitary" and "resonance" states exhibit strong localisation, similar to the behaviour of the states of the Wannier-Stark ladders in optical and semiconductor superlattices.

  6. Localisation of an Unknown Number of Land Mines Using a Network of Vapour Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Chhadé, Hiba Haj; Abdallah, Fahed; Mougharbel, Imad; Gning, Amadou; Julier, Simon; Mihaylova, Lyudmila

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of localising an unknown number of land mines using concentration information provided by a wireless sensor network. A number of vapour sensors/detectors, deployed in the region of interest, are able to detect the concentration of the explosive vapours, emanating from buried land mines. The collected data is communicated to a fusion centre. Using a model for the transport of the explosive chemicals in the air, we determine the unknown number of sources using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-based technique. We also formulate the inverse problem of determining the positions and emission rates of the land mines using concentration measurements provided by the wireless sensor network. We present a solution for this problem based on a probabilistic Bayesian technique using a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling scheme, and we compare it to the least squares optimisation approach. Experiments conducted on simulated data show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25384008

  7. Globalisation, localisation and implications of a transforming nursing workforce in New Zealand: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Callister, Paul; Badkar, Juthika; Didham, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Severe staff and skill shortages within the health systems of developed countries have contributed to increased migration by health professionals. New Zealand stands out among countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in terms of the high level of movements in and out of the country of skilled professionals, including nurses. In New Zealand, much attention has been given to increasing the number of Māori and Pacific nurses as one mechanism for improving Māori and Pacific health. Against a backdrop of the changing characteristics of the New Zealand nursing workforce, this study demonstrates that the globalisation of the nursing workforce is increasing at a faster rate than its localisation (as measured by the growth of the Māori and New Zealand-born Pacific workforces in New Zealand). This challenges the implementation of culturally appropriate nursing programmes based on the matching of nurse and client ethnicities. PMID:21790871

  8. Separation and Localisation of P300 Sources and Their Subcomponents Using Constrained Blind Source Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyrou, Loukianos; Jing, Min; Sanei, Saeid; Sumich, Alex

    2006-12-01

    Separation and localisation of P300 sources and their constituent subcomponents for both visual and audio stimulations is investigated in this paper. An effective constrained blind source separation (CBSS) algorithm is developed for this purpose. The algorithm is an extension of the Infomax BSS system for which a measure of distance between a carefully measured P300 and the estimated sources is used as a constraint. During separation, the proposed CBSS method attempts to extract the corresponding P300 signals. The locations of the corresponding sources are then estimated with some indeterminancy in the results. It can be seen that the locations of the sources change for a schizophrenic patient. The experimental results verify the statistical significance of the method and its potential application in the diagnosis and monitoring of schizophrenia.

  9. Imaging cellular structures in super-resolution with SIM, STED and Localisation Microscopy: A practical comparison

    PubMed Central

    Wegel, Eva; Göhler, Antonia; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Wainman, Alan; Uphoff, Stephan; Kaufmann, Rainer; Dobbie, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Many biological questions require fluorescence microscopy with a resolution beyond the diffraction limit of light. Super-resolution methods such as Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM), STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy and Single Molecule Localisation Microscopy (SMLM) enable an increase in image resolution beyond the classical diffraction-limit. Here, we compare the individual strengths and weaknesses of each technique by imaging a variety of different subcellular structures in fixed cells. We chose examples ranging from well separated vesicles to densely packed three dimensional filaments. We used quantitative and correlative analyses to assess the performance of SIM, STED and SMLM with the aim of establishing a rough guideline regarding the suitability for typical applications and to highlight pitfalls associated with the different techniques. PMID:27264341

  10. Sneeze related area in the medulla: localisation of the human sneezing centre?

    PubMed Central

    Seijo‐Martínez, M; Varela‐Freijanes, A; Grandes, J; Vázquez, F

    2006-01-01

    Sneezing is a rarely explored symptom in neurological practice. In the cat, a sneeze evoking centre is located in the medulla. The existence of a sneezing centre has not been confirmed in humans. A case with abnormal sneezing secondary to a strategic infarct in the right latero‐medullary region is presented. A 66 year old man suddenly presented paroxysmal sneezing followed by ataxia, right sided motor and sensory symptoms, and hoarseness. The application of stimuli to the right nasal fossa did not evoke sneezing nor the wish to sneeze. The same stimuli to the contralateral nasal fossa evoked normal sneezing. The preservation of the superficial sensitivity of the nasal fossa indicates that the lesion was localised in the hypothetical human sneezing centre, very close to the spinal trigeminal tract and nucleus. This centre appears to be bilateral and functionally independent on both sides. PMID:16354739

  11. Localisation of an unknown number of land mines using a network of vapour detectors.

    PubMed

    Chhadé, Hiba Haj; Abdallah, Fahed; Mougharbel, Imad; Gning, Amadou; Julier, Simon; Mihaylova, Lyudmila

    2014-11-06

    We consider the problem of localising an unknown number of land mines using concentration information provided by a wireless sensor network. A number of vapour sensors/detectors, deployed in the region of interest, are able to detect the concentration of the explosive vapours, emanating from buried land mines. The collected data is communicated to a fusion centre. Using a model for the transport of the explosive chemicals in the air, we determine the unknown number of sources using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-based technique. We also formulate the inverse problem of determining the positions and emission rates of the land mines using concentration measurements provided by the wireless sensor network. We present a solution for this problem based on a probabilistic Bayesian technique using a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling scheme, and we compare it to the least squares optimisation approach. Experiments conducted on simulated data show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  12. Tuberculose du médio-pied, une localisation inhabituelle: à propos d’un cas

    PubMed Central

    Hachimi, Hicham; Tahiri, Latifa; Kadi, Nadira; Ibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid; Harzy, Taoufik

    2012-01-01

    La tuberculose ostéoarticulaire représente 2 à 5% de l’ensemble des tuberculoses, la localisation au médio-pieds est rare. Nous en rapportons le cas d’une patiente âgée de 18 ans, qui présente depuis 2 ans des douleurs du médio-pied droit inflammatoires avec tuméfactio, La radiographie a montré des géodes et des érosions des os naviculaire et cunéiformes. L’IRM a orienté vers le dignostic de tuberculose confirm par biospie et étude anathomopathologique. C’est pourquoi devant tout tableau clinique traînant ou devant toute lésion osseuse suspecte ou de présentation atypique le diagnostic de tuberculose doit être évoqué afin d’éviter un retard diagnostique. PMID:22593789

  13. Globalisation, localisation and implications of a transforming nursing workforce in New Zealand: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Callister, Paul; Badkar, Juthika; Didham, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Severe staff and skill shortages within the health systems of developed countries have contributed to increased migration by health professionals. New Zealand stands out among countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in terms of the high level of movements in and out of the country of skilled professionals, including nurses. In New Zealand, much attention has been given to increasing the number of Māori and Pacific nurses as one mechanism for improving Māori and Pacific health. Against a backdrop of the changing characteristics of the New Zealand nursing workforce, this study demonstrates that the globalisation of the nursing workforce is increasing at a faster rate than its localisation (as measured by the growth of the Māori and New Zealand-born Pacific workforces in New Zealand). This challenges the implementation of culturally appropriate nursing programmes based on the matching of nurse and client ethnicities.

  14. CARTOGAM - a portable gamma camera for remote localisation of radioactive sources in nuclear facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, O.; Izac, C.; Jean, F.; Lainé, F.; Lévêque, C.; Nguyen, A.

    2001-03-01

    We have developed a compact gamma-imaging system, CARTOGAM, for remote localisation of radioactive sources in nuclear facilities. This system is under industrial development and commercialisation by the firm EURISYS Mesures. The most specific characteristics of CARTOGAM lie in its size (8 cm in diameter) and mass (15 kg for the detection head, including the shield), which make it portable by a person. As an example, CARTOGAM detects a 660 keV source producing a 0.4 μGy/h dose rate at the camera location in 10 min. The angular resolution at that energy ranges from 1° to 3°, depending on the field of view (30° or 50°) and scintillator thickness (2 or 4 mm). We present here a review of the specifications of the camera and show a few images illustrating its performance.

  15. Distinguishing cause from correlation in tokamak experiments to trigger edge-localised plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Anthony J.

    2014-11-15

    The generic question is considered: How can we determine the probability of an otherwise quasi-random event, having been triggered by an external influence? A specific problem is the quantification of the success of techniques to trigger, and hence control, edge-localised plasma instabilities (ELMs) in magnetically confined fusion (MCF) experiments. The development of such techniques is essential to ensure tolerable heat loads on components in large MCF fusion devices, and is necessary for their development into economically successful power plants. Bayesian probability theory is used to rigorously formulate the problem and to provide a formal solution. Accurate but pragmatic methods are developed to estimate triggering probabilities, and are illustrated with experimental data. These allow results from experiments to be quantitatively assessed, and rigorously quantified conclusions to be formed. Example applications include assessing whether triggering of ELMs is a statistical or deterministic process, and the establishment of thresholds to ensure that ELMs are reliably triggered.

  16. A new TDOA estimation method in Three-satellite interference localisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Huijing; Lei, Qian; Li, Wenxue; Xing, Qingqing

    2015-05-01

    Time difference of arrival (TDOA) parameter estimation is the key to Three-satellite interference localisation. Therefore, in order to improve the accuracy of Three-satellite interference location, we must estimate the TDOA parameter accurately and effectively. Based on the study of wavelet transform correlation TDOA estimation algorithm, combining with correlation and Hilbert subtraction method, we put forward a high precision TDOA estimation method for Three-satellite interference location. The proposed algorithm utilises the characteristics of the zero-crossing point of Hilbert transform method corresponding to the correlation peak point of correlation method, using correlation function of wavelet transform correlation method minus the absolute value of its Hilbert transform, to sharpen peak point and improve the TDOA estimation precision, so that the positioning is more accurate and effective.

  17. Localisation of exogenous surfactants in cell membranes in the air-blood barrier: rat model.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Andrzej; Biczysko, Wiesława; Wasowicz, Marcin; Surowiak, Paweł; Zabel, Maciej; Florek, Ewa

    2003-11-01

    The use of exogenous surfactants has been introduced into the therapy of patients of different ages. Much better results have been obtained in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome with surfactants enriched with surfactant proteins. In the following study we used protein-containing surfactants (survanta and curosurf). The aim of the following study was to determine the localisation of artificial surfactants in the lung tissue. Using the Immunogold Technique, biotinylated surfactant proteins were traced in the air-blood barriers. In all lungs the exogenous surfactant was present only in some alveoli. In these parts small areas of atelectasis as well as oedema and transudate accumulation were seen. These changes were less severe after biotinylated curosurf treatment. In electron microscope studies we found surfactant elements in the air-blood barrier and other structures of the alveolar septa. Immunogold studies confirm the presence of biotynylated surfactant in the elements of the air-blood barrier. PMID:14655120

  18. La synovite villonodulaire de la cheville, une localisation rare: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Benabbouha, Abdellatif; Basinga, Jonathan; Anteri, Ismail; Jaafar, Abdelouab

    2016-01-01

    La synovite villonodulaire (SVN) est une prolifération pseudotumorale bénigne rare de la synoviale articulaire, d’étiologie inconnue. Elle peut aussi se développer au sein des bourses séreuses, des gaines tendineuses. Généralement, elle atteint les grosses articulations notamment le genou et la hanche. La localisation de la cheville est rare, avec seulement quelques cas publiés dans la littérature. Nous rapportons un cas de patiente de 52 ans présentant une SVN de la cheville droite. Elle a bénéficié d'une synovectomie subtotale. A deux ans de recul, il n'y avait pas de récidive clinique. PMID:27231502

  19. [Experimental definition of an optimal arrangement of electrodes for localisation of nerves (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Theiss, D; Robbel, G; Theiss, M; Gerbershagen, H U

    1977-08-01

    The use of electrical stimulation for the localisation of nerves facilitates regional anaesthesia, especially by assuring a sufficient approach of the tip of the cannula to the nerve by the intensity and duration of an impulse necessary for its stimulation. This necessitates an adequate and constant distribution of the intensity of the stimulus in the surroundings of the tip of the cannula and the capability to define the current of the impulse. In the electrolytic tank the distribution of the stimulating intensity was studied in 4 different types of electrode arrangements. An electrode arrangement most suitable for nerve blockades was found. It may be produced by coating an injection cannula with 1 conducting and 2 isolating layers.

  20. Strain localisation and thermal evolution of a thick ultramylonitic shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, M.; Hasalova, P.; Weinberg, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Ultramylonites are the ultimate result of mylonitisation in a ductile shear zone. They accommodate high amounts of strain because they are the weakest rock in the shear zone and usually form thin bands within rocks of lower strain (mylonites and protomylonites). Thick ultramylonites are rare; where they are reported in the literature they are up to a few hundred metres thick and indicate inefficient localisation processes. This work describes an ultramylonitic shear zone within the Sierras Pampeanas of Argentina: the El Pichao shear zone. The shear zone is part of the 470 Ma Sierra de Quilmes, a metamorphic complex of the Famatinian orogeny. The El Pichao shear zone is >3.5-km thick and contains a 1-km core of continuous ultramylonite. Globally, shear zones of similar width are rare and where reported are related to major orogenic fronts. Shear zone width is determined by plate velocity and rock strength, such that greater widths occur at high velocities and lower rock strengths. Shear zones widen when the degree of strain localisation decreases which can be caused by weakening of the host rock, hardening of the shear zone, or a decrease in the yield stress of the rock due to an increase in temperature. Different mechanisms lead to each of these processes and their determination is difficult in studies of shear zones. El Pichao shear zone overprints amphibolite faces Grt-schists in the footwall, granites in the ultramylonitic shear zone core, and migmatites in the hanging wall. Syn-kinematic anatexis in the migmatitic hanging wall indicates that the migmatites should have been weaker during shearing than the crystallised granite which formed the protolith to the ultramylonitic core. Additionally, the migmatites are very heterogenous with mica-rich melanosomes and syn-kinematic Qtz-Fsp leucosomes, making them the ideal site for strain localisation and strain partitioning between weaker and stronger phases. However, strain localised to the granite of the

  1. Characterisation of a novel proteolytic enzyme localised to goblet cells in rat and man.

    PubMed Central

    Nexø, E; Poulsen, S S; Hansen, S N; Kirkegaard, P; Olsen, P S

    1984-01-01

    A proteolytic enzyme, ingobsin , purified from rat duodenal extracts is shown to be localised to intestinal goblet cells of both man and rat. Enzyme positive cells decrease in number from duodenum to colon. The enzyme is a 33 000 Mr protein with an isoelectric point of 5.1. The pH optimum for enzymatic activity is 7.4-8.0. Based on substrate specificity for arg-x, lys-x and to a lesser degree tyr-x, on the effect of diisopropylphosphorofluoride , Trasylol and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride and on proteolytic activity towards intact proteins, ingobsin is classified as a serine proteinase with endoproteolytic activity. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:6735249

  2. Group localisation and unsupervised detection and classification of basic crowd behaviour events for surveillance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubtsova, Nadejda S.; de With, Peter H. N.

    2013-02-01

    Technology for monitoring crowd behaviour is in demand for surveillance and security applications. The trend in research is to tackle detection of complex crowd behaviour events (panic, ght, evacuation etc.) directly using machine learning techniques. In this paper, we present a contrary, bottom-up approach seeking basic group information: (1) instantaneous location and (2) the merge, split and lateral slide-by events - the three basic motion patterns comprising any crowd behaviour. The focus on such generic group information makes our algorithm suitable as a building block in a variety of surveillance systems, possibly integrated with static content analysis solutions. Our feature extraction framework has optical ow in its core. The framework is universal being motion-based, rather than object-detection-based and generates a large variety of motion-blob- characterising features useful for an array of classi cation problems. Motion-based characterisation is performed on a group as an atomic whole and not by means of superposition of individual human motions. Within that feature space, our classi cation system makes decisions based on heuristic rules and thresholds, without machine learning. Our system performs well on group localisation, consistently generating contours around both moving and halted groups. The visual output of our periodical group localisation is equivalent to tracking and the group contour accuracy ranges from adequate to exceptionally good. The system successfully detects and classi es within our merge/split/slide-by event space in surveillance-type video sequences, di ering in resolution, scale, quality and motion content. Quantitatively, its performance is characterised by a good recall: 83% on detection and 71% on combined detection and classi cation.

  3. Localisation of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during Solanum tuberosum cv. Rywal hypersensitive response to Potato virus Y.

    PubMed

    Otulak, Katarzyna; Garbaczewska, Grazyna

    2010-06-01

    The reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was detected cytochemically in Solanum tuberosum cv. Rywal tissues as a hypersensitive response (HR) 24 and 48 h after a Potato virus Y (PVY) infection. Hydrogen peroxide was detected in vivo by its reaction with 3.3-diaminobenzidine, producing a reddish-brown staining in contact with H(2)O(2). Hydrogen peroxide was detected in the necrotic area of the epidermal and mesophyll cells 24 and 48 h after the PVY infection. Highly localised accumulations of H(2)O(2) were found within xylem tracheary elements, and this was much more intensive than in non-infected leaves. Hydrogen peroxide was detected cytochemically in HR also by its reaction with cerium chloride, producing electron-dense deposits of cerium perhydroxides. Inoculation with PVY(NTN) and also PVY(N) Wi induced a rapid hypersensitive response during which highly localised accumulations of H(2)O(2) was detected in plant cell walls. The most intensive accumulation was present in the bordering cell walls of necrotic mesophyll cells and the adjacent non-necrotic mesophyll cells. Intensive electron-dense deposits of cerium perhydroxide were found along ER cistrenae and chloroplast envelopes connected with PVY particles. The precipitates of hydrogen peroxide were detected in the nuclear envelope and along tracheary elements, especially when virus particles were present inside. The intensive accumulation of H(2)O(2) at the early stages of potato-PVY interaction is consistent with its role as an antimicrobial agent and for this reason it has been regarded as a signalling molecule.

  4. The interaction of an asymmetrical localised synthetic jet on a side-supported sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findanis, N.; Ahmed, N. A.

    2008-10-01

    A localised synthetic jet offers promise of an optimum and cost-effective practical method of delaying separation and promoting reattachment in fluids with solid body interactions. The asymmetric flow that may result from its use may also be beneficial in improving the aerodynamic performance of a lifting body. There are insufficient studies of synthetic jets, particularly on three-dimensional bluff bodies that are more representative of complex flows in real situations. A comprehensive study on an 80 mm diameter sphere designed with localised synthetic jet orifices was, therefore, conducted in an 18 in×18 in open circuit closed test-section wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 5×104. The coefficient of pressure distribution was measured by continuously varying the location of the synthetic jet and compared with the no synthetic jet condition. The three-dimensional effects on the flow over the sphere body are particularly made apparent through the growth and the effects of the boundary layer and the deviation from potential flow. Overall, the synthetic jet had the effect of delaying the separation point and extending it further downstream on the sphere surface concomitantly producing a significant reduction in drag, providing solid support to the viability of strategically located synthetic jet when higher lift or lower drag is desired. A surprising discovery was the ability of the synthetic jet to improve the flow at the junction of the sting support and sphere. This has promising implications in devising methods to reduce interference drag that are common in many practical applications such as near junctions between wing and the fuselage.

  5. Localisation of laminin within Plasmodium berghei oocysts and the midgut epithelial cells of Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Nacer, Adéla; Walker, Karen; Hurd, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    Background Oocysts of the malaria parasite form and develop in close proximity to the mosquito midgut basal lamina and it has been proposed that components of this structure play a crucial role in the development and maturation of oocysts that produce infective sporozoites. It is further suggested that oocysts incorporate basal lamina proteins into their capsule and that this provides them with a means to evade recognition by the mosquito's immune system. The site of production of basal lamina proteins in insects is controversial and it is still unclear whether haemocytes or midgut epithelial cells are the main source of components of the mosquito midgut basal lamina. Of the multiple molecules that compose the basal lamina, laminin is known to interact with a number of Plasmodium proteins. In this study, the localisation of mosquito laminin within the capsule and cytoplasm of Plasmodium berghei oocysts and in the midgut epithelial cells of Anopheles stephensi was investigated. Results An ultrastructural examination of midgut sections from infected and uninfected An. stephensi was performed. Post-embedded immunogold labelling demonstrated the presence of laminin within the mosquito basal lamina. Laminin was also detected on the outer surface of the oocyst capsule, incorporated within the capsule and associated with sporozoites forming within the oocysts. Laminin was also found within cells of the midgut epithelium, providing support for the hypothesis that these cells contribute towards the formation of the midgut basal lamina. Conclusion We suggest that ookinetes may become coated in laminin as they pass through the midgut epithelium. Thereafter, laminin secreted by midgut epithelial cells and/or haemocytes, binds to the outer surface of the oocyst capsule and that some passes through and is incorporated into the developing oocysts. The localisation of laminin on sporozoites was unexpected and the importance of this observation is less clear. PMID:18808667

  6. Histochemical localisation of carbonic anhydrase in the inner ear of developing cichlid fish, Oreochromis mossambicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, M.; Hilbig, R.; Anken, R.

    2008-12-01

    Inner ear otolith growth in terms of mineralisation mainly depends on the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CAH). CAH is located in specialised, mitochondria-rich macular cells (ionocytes), which are involved in the endolymphatic ion exchange, and the enzyme is responsible for the provision of the pH-value necessary for otolithic calcium carbonate deposition. In the present study, for the first time the localisation of histochemically demonstrated CAH was analysed during the early larval development of a teleost, the cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus. CAH-reactivity was observed already in stage 7 animals (onset of otocyst development; staging follows Anken et al. [Anken, R., Kappel, T., Slenzka, K., Rahmann, H. The early morphogenetic development of the cichlid fish, Oreochromis mossambicus (Perciformes, Teleostei). Zool. Anz. 231, 1-10, 1993]). Neuroblasts (from which sensory and supporting cells are derived) proved to be CAH-positive. Already at stage 12 (hatch), CAH-positive regions could be attributed to ionocyte containing regions both in the so-called meshwork and patches area of the macula (i.e., clearly before ionocytes can be identified on ultrastructural level or by employing immunocytochemistry). In contrast to the circumstances observed in mammalian species, sensory hair cells stained negative for CAH in the cichlid. With the onset of stage 16 (finray primordia in dorsal fin, yolk-sac being increasingly absorbed), CAH-reactivity was observed in the vestibular nerve. This indicates the onset of myelinisation and thus commencement of operation. The localisation of CAH in the inner ear of fish (especially the differences in comparison to mammals) is discussed on the basis of its role in otolith calcification. Since the vestibular system is a detector of acceleration and thus gravity, also aspects regarding effects of altered gravity on CAH and hence on the mineralisation of otoliths in an adaptive process are addressed.

  7. Strain localisation and population changes during fault system growth within the Inner Moray Firth, Northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. J.; Childs, C.; Imber, J.; Manzocchi, T.; Watterson, J.; Nell, P. A. R.

    2003-02-01

    The evolution of fault populations is established for an area within the Late Jurassic Inner Moray Firth sub-basin of the North Sea. Sedimentation rates outstripped fault displacement rates resulting in the blanketing of fault scarps and the preservation of fault displacement histories. Displacement backstripping is used to establish the growth history of the fault system. Fault system evolution is characterised by early generation of the main fault pattern and progressive localisation of strain onto larger faults. This localisation is accompanied by the death of smaller faults and an associated change in the active fault population from power-law to scale-bound. Fault length populations evolve from a power-law frequency distribution containing all faults, to a power-law distribution with a marked non-power-law tail containing the largest faults. This change in population character is synchronous with the development of a fully-connected fault system extending across the mapped area and the accommodation of displacements almost exclusively on the largest faults. Strain localisation onto fewer and better connected faults represents the most efficient means of accommodating fault-related deformation and is considered to be a fundamental characteristic of the spatio-temporal evolution of fault systems. Progressive strain localisation requires complementary changes in the characteristics of associated earthquake populations.

  8. Apical localisation of crumbs in the boundary cells of the Drosophila hindgut is independent of its canonical interaction partner stardust.

    PubMed

    Kumichel, Alexandra; Knust, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs/Crb is a key regulator of apico-basal epithelial cell polarity, both in Drosophila and in vertebrates. In most cases studied so far, the apical localisation of Drosophila Crumbs depends on the interaction of its C-terminal amino acids with the scaffolding protein Stardust. Consequently, embryos lacking either Crumbs or Stardust develop a very similar phenotype, characterised by the loss of epithelial tissue integrity and cell polarity in many epithelia. An exception is the hindgut, which is not affected by the loss of either gene. The hindgut is a single layered epithelial tube composed of two cell populations, the boundary cells and the principal cells. Here we show that Crumbs localisation in the principal cells depends on Stardust, similarly to other embryonic epithelia. In contrast, localisation of Crumbs in the boundary cells does not require Stardust and is independent of its PDZ domain- and FERM-domain binding motifs. In line with this, the considerable upregulation of Crumbs in boundary cells is not followed by a corresponding upregulation of its canonical binding partners. Our data are the first to suggest a mechanism controlling apical Crumbs localisation, which is independent of its conserved FERM- and PDZ-domain binding motifs.

  9. Membrane glucocorticoid receptors are localised in the extracellular matrix and signal through the MAPK pathway in mammalian skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Boncompagni, Simona; Arthurton, Lewis; Akujuru, Eugene; Pearson, Timothy; Steverding, Dietmar; Protasi, Feliciano; Mutungi, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have previously proposed the existence of glucocorticoid receptors on the plasma membrane of many cell types, including skeletal muscle fibres. However, their exact localisation and the cellular signalling pathway(s) they utilise to communicate with the rest of the cell are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the localisation and the mechanism(s) underlying the non-genomic physiological functions of these receptors in mouse skeletal muscle cells. The results show that the receptors were localised in the cytoplasm in myoblasts, in the nucleus in myotubes, in the extracellular matrix, in satellite cells and in the proximity of mitochondria in adult muscle fibres. Also, they bound laminin in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner. Treating small skeletal muscle fibre bundles with the synthetic glucocorticoid beclomethasone dipropionate increased the phosphorylation (= activation) of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. This occurred within 5 min and depended on the fibre type and the duration of the treatment. It was also abolished by the glucocorticoid receptor inhibitor, mifepristone, and a monoclonal antibody against the receptor. From these results we conclude that the non-genomic/non-canonical physiological functions of glucocorticoids, in adult skeletal muscle fibres, are mediated by a glucocorticoid receptor localised in the extracellular matrix, in satellite cells and close to mitochondria, and involve activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. PMID:25846902

  10. Domains involved in calcineurin phosphatase inhibition and nuclear localisation in the African swine fever virus A238L protein

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Charles C.; Chapman, Dave A.G.; Silk, Rhiannon; Liverani, Elisabetta; Dixon, Linda K.

    2008-05-10

    The African swine fever virus A238L protein inhibits calcineurin phosphatase activity and activation of NF-{kappa}B and p300 co-activator. An 82 amino acid domain containing residues 157 to 238 at the C-terminus of A238L was expressed in E. coli and purified. This purified A238L fragment acted as a potent inhibitor of calcineurin phosphatase in vitro with an IC{sub 50} of approximately 70 nM. Two putative nuclear localisation signals were identified between residues 80 to 86 (NLS-1) and between residues 203 to 207 overlapping with the N-terminus of the calcineurin docking motif (NLS-2). Mutation of these motifs independently did not reduce nuclear localisation compared to the wild type A238L protein, whereas mutation of both motifs significantly reduced nuclear localisation of A238L. Mutation of the calcineurin docking motif resulted in a dramatic increase in the nuclear localisation of A238L provided an intact NLS was present. We propose that binding of calcineurin to A238L masks NLS-2 contributing to the cytoplasmic retention of A238L.

  11. Systemic differences in serum metabolome: a cross sectional comparison of women with localised and widespread pain and controls

    PubMed Central

    Hadrévi, J.; Björklund, M.; Kosek, E.; Hällgren, S.; Antti, H.; Fahlström, M.; Hellström, F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain exists either as localised to a single region or as widespread to multiple sites in several quadrants of the body. Prospective studies indicate that widespread pain could act as a far end of a continuum of musculoskeletal pain that started with chronic localised pain. The mechanism by which the transition from localised pain to widespread occurs is not clear, although many studies suggest it to be an altered metabolism. In this study, systemic metabolic differences between women with chronic localised neck-shoulder pain (NP), women with chronic widespread pain (CWP) and women who were healthy (CON) were assessed. Blood samples were analysed taking a metabolomics approach using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and orthogonal partial least square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The metabolomics analysis showed a clear systematic difference in the metabolic profiles between the subjects with NP and the CON but only a weak systematic difference between the subjects with CWP and the CON. This most likely reflects a difference in the portion of the metabolome influenced by the two pain conditions. In the NP group, the overall metabolic profile suggests that processes related to energy utilisation and lipid metabolism could be central aspects of mechanisms maintaining disorder. PMID:26522699

  12. Challenges to Globalisation, Localisation and Sinophilia in Music Education: A Comparative Study of Hong Kong, Shanghai and Taipei

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Wai-Chung; Law, Wing-Wah

    2006-01-01

    In the past, the music curricula of Hong Kong (HK), Mainland China and Taiwan have focused on Western music, but with the advent of music technology and the new tripartite paradigm of globalisation, localisation and Sinophilia this has begun to change. Hong Kong, Shanghai and Taipei share a common historical culture and their populations are…

  13. Effet de l'interaction coulombienne sur la localisation d'Anderson dans le gaz bidimensionnel d'électrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, G.

    2010-09-01

    Nous étudions l’effet des interactions coulombiennes sur la localisation d’Anderson dans le gaz bidimensionnel d’électrons désordonné. L’objectif est de statuer sur la question de l’existence de métaux à deux dimensions. En l’absence d’interaction, la théorie d’échelle de la localisation prédit qu’un désordre infinitésimal suffit à localiser la fonction d’onde électronique et donc à rendre le système isolant à température nulle (Abrahams et al., 1979). Dans certaines limites extrêmes, les interactions peuvent être prises en compte et l’on aboutit également à un état isolant. Cependant, aucune théorie analytique ne permet de traiter le régime quantique non-perturbatif où désordre et interaction sont intermédiaires. Expérimentalement, il est possible de l’explorer dans des échantillons de haute mobilité et basse densité. Depuis 1994, des comportements métalliques inexpliqués y ont été observés (Kravchenko et al., 1994). Nous avons mis au point une méthode numérique permettant d’étudier le problème couplé de la localisation d’Anderson en présence d’interaction. Cette méthode mêle Monte Carlo quantique à température nulle et théorie d’échelle pour la conductance de Thouless. Nous trouvons que la théorie d’échelle de la localisation est préservée en présence d’interaction et donc que le gaz bidimensionnel, même corrélé, est isolant à température nulle. Nos résultats montrent de plus que les interactions délocalisent le gaz bidimensionnel et que cet effet de délocalisation est accru en présence de dégénérescence de vallées. Ils nous permettent de proposer un mécanisme simple rendant compte des principales caractéristiques des comportements métalliques observés expérimentalement.

  14. Progress in neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.; Harrington, B.V. ); Moore, D.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Prognosis for some cancers is good, but for others, few patients will survive 12 months. This latter group of cancers is characterised by a proclivity to disseminate malignant cells in the host organ. In some cases systemic metastases occur, but in other cases, failure to achieve local control results in death. First among these cancers are the high grade brain tumours, astrocytoma 3,4 and glioblastoma multiforme. Local control of these tumors should lead to cure. Other cancers melanoma metastatic to the brain, for which a useful palliative therapy is not yet available, and pancreatic cancer for which localised control at an early stage could bring about improved prognosis. Patients with these cancers have little grounds for hope. Our primary objective is to reverse this situation with Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). The purpose of this fourth symposium is to hasten the day whereby patients with these cancers can reasonably hope for substantial remissions.

  15. Progress in neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.; Harrington, B.V.; Moore, D.E.

    1992-09-01

    Prognosis for some cancers is good, but for others, few patients will survive 12 months. This latter group of cancers is characterised by a proclivity to disseminate malignant cells in the host organ. In some cases systemic metastases occur, but in other cases, failure to achieve local control results in death. First among these cancers are the high grade brain tumours, astrocytoma 3,4 and glioblastoma multiforme. Local control of these tumors should lead to cure. Other cancers melanoma metastatic to the brain, for which a useful palliative therapy is not yet available, and pancreatic cancer for which localised control at an early stage could bring about improved prognosis. Patients with these cancers have little grounds for hope. Our primary objective is to reverse this situation with Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). The purpose of this fourth symposium is to hasten the day whereby patients with these cancers can reasonably hope for substantial remissions.

  16. Determinants of GPI-PLC localisation to the flagellum and access to GPI-anchored substrates in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Sunter, Jack; Webb, Helena; Carrington, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In Trypanosoma brucei, glycosylphosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) is a virulence factor that releases variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) from dying cells. In live cells, GPI-PLC is localised to the plasma membrane where it is concentrated on the flagellar membrane, so activity or access must be tightly regulated as very little VSG is shed. Little is known about regulation except that acylation within a short internal motif containing three cysteines is necessary for GPI-PLC to access VSG in dying cells. Here, GPI-PLC mutants have been analysed both for subcellular localisation and for the ability to release VSG from dying cells. Two sequence determinants necessary for concentration on the flagellar membrane were identified. First, all three cysteines are required for full concentration on the flagellar membrane. Mutants with two cysteines localise predominantly to the plasma membrane but lose some of their flagellar concentration, while mutants with one cysteine are mainly localised to membranes between the nucleus and flagellar pocket. Second, a proline residue close to the C-terminus, and distant from the acylated cysteines, is necessary for concentration on the flagellar membrane. The localisation of GPI-PLC to the plasma but not flagellar membrane is necessary for access to the VSG in dying cells. Cellular structures necessary for concentration on the flagellar membrane were identified by depletion of components. Disruption of the flagellar pocket collar caused loss of concentration whereas detachment of the flagellum from the cell body after disruption of the flagellar attachment zone did not. Thus, targeting to the flagellar membrane requires: a titratable level of acylation, a motif including a proline, and a functional flagellar pocket. These results provide an insight into how the segregation of flagellar membrane proteins from those present in the flagellar pocket and cell body membranes is achieved.

  17. The conserved Wdr8-hMsd1/SSX2IP complex localises to the centrosome and ensures proper spindle length and orientation.

    PubMed

    Hori, Akiko; Morand, Agathe; Ikebe, Chiho; Frith, David; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Toda, Takashi

    The centrosome plays a pivotal role in a wide range of cellular processes and its dysfunction is causally linked to many human diseases including cancer and developmental and neurological disorders. This organelle contains more than one hundred components, and yet many of them remain uncharacterised. Here we identified a novel centrosome protein Wdr8, based upon the structural conservation of the fission yeast counterpart. We showed that Wdr8 constitutively localises to the centrosome and super resolution microscopy uncovered that this protein is enriched at the proximal end of the mother centriole. Furthermore, we identified hMsd1/SSX2IP, a conserved spindle anchoring protein, as one of Wdr8 interactors by mass spectrometry. Wdr8 formed a complex and partially colocalised with hMsd1/SSX2IP. Intriguingly, knockdown of Wdr8 or hMsd1/SSX2IP displayed very similar mitotic defects, in which spindle microtubules became shortened and misoriented. Indeed, Wdr8 depletion resulted in the reduced recruitment of hMsd1/SSX2IP to the mitotic centrosome, though the converse is not true. Together, we propose that the conserved Wdr8-hMsd1/SSX2IP complex plays a critical role in controlling proper spindle length and orientation. PMID:26545777

  18. The conserved Wdr8-hMsd1/SSX2IP complex localises to the centrosome and ensures proper spindle length and orientation

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Akiko; Morand, Agathe; Ikebe, Chiho; Frith, David; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Toda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome plays a pivotal role in a wide range of cellular processes and its dysfunction is causally linked to many human diseases including cancer and developmental and neurological disorders. This organelle contains more than one hundred components, and yet many of them remain uncharacterised. Here we identified a novel centrosome protein Wdr8, based upon the structural conservation of the fission yeast counterpart. We showed that Wdr8 constitutively localises to the centrosome and super resolution microscopy uncovered that this protein is enriched at the proximal end of the mother centriole. Furthermore, we identified hMsd1/SSX2IP, a conserved spindle anchoring protein, as one of Wdr8 interactors by mass spectrometry. Wdr8 formed a complex and partially colocalised with hMsd1/SSX2IP. Intriguingly, knockdown of Wdr8 or hMsd1/SSX2IP displayed very similar mitotic defects, in which spindle microtubules became shortened and misoriented. Indeed, Wdr8 depletion resulted in the reduced recruitment of hMsd1/SSX2IP to the mitotic centrosome, though the converse is not true. Together, we propose that the conserved Wdr8-hMsd1/SSX2IP complex plays a critical role in controlling proper spindle length and orientation. PMID:26545777

  19. wannier90: A tool for obtaining maximally-localised Wannier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofi, Arash A.; Yates, Jonathan R.; Lee, Young-Su; Souza, Ivo; Vanderbilt, David; Marzari, Nicola

    2008-05-01

    We present wannier90, a program for calculating maximally-localised Wannier functions (MLWF) from a set of Bloch energy bands that may or may not be attached to or mixed with other bands. The formalism works by minimising the total spread of the MLWF in real space. This is done in the space of unitary matrices that describe rotations of the Bloch bands at each k-point. As a result, wannier90 is independent of the basis set used in the underlying calculation to obtain the Bloch states. Therefore, it may be interfaced straightforwardly to any electronic structure code. The locality of MLWF can be exploited to compute band-structure, density of states and Fermi surfaces at modest computational cost. Furthermore, wannier90 is able to output MLWF for visualisation and other post-processing purposes. Wannier functions are already used in a wide variety of applications. These include analysis of chemical bonding in real space; calculation of dielectric properties via the modern theory of polarisation; and as an accurate and minimal basis set in the construction of model Hamiltonians for large-scale systems, in linear-scaling quantum Monte Carlo calculations, and for efficient computation of material properties, such as the anomalous Hall coefficient. wannier90 is freely available under the GNU General Public License from http://www.wannier.org/. Program summaryProgram title: wannier90 Catalogue identifier: AEAK_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAK_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 556 495 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5 709 419 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90, perl Computer: any architecture with a Fortran 90 compiler Operating system: Linux, Windows, Solaris, AIX, Tru64

  20. [Cancer procoagulant activity in cases of esophageal, stomach and colorectal cancer considering progression degree and histological type of cancer].

    PubMed

    Kozuszko, B; Skrzydlewski, Z; Sulkowska, M; Snarska, J; Kozłowski, M; Skrzydlewska, E; Zalewski, B

    2001-09-01

    The cancer procoagulant activity has been evaluated in homogenates of esophagal, stomach and colorectal cancer tissues and in the blood serum of patients with these neoplasms's. Activity of CP was significantly higher in examined material than in control. The correlation between CP activity and progression degree as well as histological type was affirmed. The higher activity of CP in homogenates as well as in serum was observed in cases with higher degree of clinical progression and smaller activity of this enzyme corresponded with lower degree of the cancer progression. The highest activity of CP was observed in the cases of adenocarcinoma whereas the lowest in cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Higher activity of CP in homogenates of examined tissues correlated with higher activity of this enzyme in the serum. Activity of CP depended on the tissue localisation of the cancer and the highest was in the cases of stomach cancers whereas the lowest was in the cases of esophagal cancer.

  1. Dynamic Mitochondrial Localisation of STAT3 in the Cellular Adipogenesis Model 3T3-L1.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Adam H; Edkins, Adrienne L; Hoppe, Heinrich C; Prinsloo, Earl

    2015-07-01

    A mechanistic relationship exists between protein localisation, activity and cellular differentiation. Understanding the contribution of these molecular mechanisms is required for elucidation of conditions that drive development. Literature suggests non-canonical translocation of the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) to the mitochondria contributes to the regulation of the electron transport chain, cellular respiration and reactive oxygen species production. Based on this we investigated the role of mitochondrial STAT3, specifically the serine 727 phosphorylated form, in cellular differentiation using the well-defined mouse adipogenic model 3T3-L1. Relative levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the levels and dynamic localization of pSTAT3S727 were investigated during the initiation of adipogenesis. As a signalling entity, ROS is known to regulate the activation of C/EBPβ to stimulate a critical cascade of events prior to differentiation of 3T3-L1. Results indicate that upon induction of the differentiation programme, relative levels of mitochondrial pSTAT3S727 dramatically decrease in the mitochondria; in contrast the total cellular pSTAT3S727 levels increase. A positive correlation between increasing levels of ROS and dynamic changes in C/EBPβ indicate that mitochondrial STAT3 plays a potential critical role as an initiator of the process. Based on these findings we propose a model for mitochondrial STAT3 as a regulator of ROS in adipogenesis.

  2. Reproducibility and validity of electric source localisation with high-resolution electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Kristeva-Feige, R; Grimm, C; Huppertz, H J; Otte, M; Schreiber, A; Jäger, D; Feige, B; Büchert, M; Hennig, J; Mergner, T; Lücking, C H

    1997-12-01

    The present study investigates the reproducibility and validity of the EEG source localisation of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) using high-resolution EEG (61 scalp electrodes) and a source reconstruction on the basis of the individual brain morphology as obtained from magnetic resonance images (MRIs). The somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to electrical stimulation of the right median nerve were repeatedly collected from the scalp of one healthy subject in 9 replications run on 9 different days. The source reconstruction for the 19 ms SEP component was performed by using a single moving dipole model as a source model. Two different head models were used: a spherical 3 shell model and a more realistically shaped 3 compartment model computed using the boundary element method (BEM). The source locations of the 19 ms SEP component were found to be highly reproducible using both head models: the mean standard deviation of the dipole locations was found to be 2.6 mm for the 3 shell model and 4 mm for the more realistically shaped head model. By projection into the individual MRI, the dipoles resulting from either head models were found to be located within the postcentral gyrus. The electric source locations were consistent with the maximum of the task-specific changes seen in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment when using the same somatosensory stimulation protocol.

  3. Pressure-induced localisation of the hydrogen-bond network in KOH-VI

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, Andreas Nelmes, Richard J.; Loveday, John S.; Guthrie, Malcolm

    2015-12-28

    Using a combination of ab initio crystal structure prediction and neutron diffraction techniques, we have solved the full structure of KOH-VI at 7 GPa. Rather than being orthorhombic and proton-ordered as had previously be proposed, we find that this high-pressure phase of potassium hydroxide is tetragonal (space group I4/mmm) and proton disordered. It has an unusual hydrogen bond topology, where the hydroxyl groups form isolated hydrogen-bonded square planar (OH){sub 4} units. This structure is stable above 6.5 GPa and, despite being macroscopically proton-disordered, local ice rules enforce microscopic order of the hydrogen bonds. We suggest the use of this novel type of structure to study concerted proton tunneling in the solid state, while the topology of the hydrogen bond network could conceivably be exploited in data storage applications based solely on the manipulations of hydrogen bonds. The unusual localisation of the hydrogen bond network under applied pressure is found to be favored by a more compact packing of the constituents in a distorted cesium chloride structure.

  4. Structural damage localisation for a frame structure from changes in curvature of approximate entropy feature vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Y. H.; Ou, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    At present, accurate vibration-based damage localisation cannot be achieved very well in mechanical and civil engineering fields due to high noise in the measurements and low accuracy in finite element (FE) model of the measured structures. To address these issues, a method for damage detection is proposed in this work, i.e. the mean curvature difference method of approximate entropy (ApEn) feature vectors, based on the ApEn theory and curvature method. Simulation results of both single and multiple damage cases under pulse excitation indicate that the proposed method can be utilised to determine whether the damage is present in the structure or not and to locate the damage accurately, and the method exhibits strong anti-noise ability: it is feasible for damage with 5% stiffness reduction even if the noise level is up to 25%. Moreover, the proposed method does not require a structural FE model. Experimental results of a six-storey shear frame model also validated the proposed method. All of these lay a good foundation for its application in shear frame structures.

  5. Localised Skin Hyperpigmentation as a Presenting Symptom of Vitamin B12 Deficiency Complicating Chronic Atrophic Gastritis.

    PubMed

    El-Shafie, Kawther; Samir, Nafisa; Lakhtakia, Ritu; Davidson, Robin; Al-Waili, Ahmed; Al-Mamary, Muna; Al-Shafee, Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in developing countries and should be suspected in patients with unexplained anaemia or neurological symptoms. Dermatological manifestations associated with this deficiency include skin hyper- or hypopigmentation, angular stomatitis and hair changes. We report a case of a 28-year-old man who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in November 2013 with localised hyperpigmentation of the palmar and dorsal aspects of both hands of two months' duration. Other symptoms included numbness of the hands, anorexia, weight loss, dizziness, fatigability and a sore mouth and tongue. There was no evidence of hypocortisolaemia and a literature search revealed a possible B12 deficiency. The patient had low serum B12 levels and megaloblastic anaemia. An intrinsic factor antibody test was negative. A gastric biopsy revealed chronic gastritis. After B12 supplementation, the patient's symptoms resolved. Family physicians should familiarise themselves with atypical presentations of B12 deficiency. Many symptoms of this deficiency are reversible if detected and treated early. PMID:26357561

  6. Prodomains regulate the synthesis, extracellular localisation and activity of TGF-β superfamily ligands.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Craig A; Al-Musawi, Sara L; Walton, Kelly L

    2011-10-01

    All transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) ligands are synthesised as precursor molecules consisting of a signal peptide, an N-terminal prodomain and a C-terminal mature domain. During synthesis, prodomains interact non-covalently with mature domains, maintaining the molecules in a conformation competent for dimerisation. Dimeric precursors are cleaved by proprotein convertases, and TGF-β ligands are secreted from the cell non-covalently associated with their prodomains. Extracellularly, prodomains localise TGF-β ligands within the vicinity of their target cells via interactions with extracellular matrix proteins, including fibrillin and perlecan. For some family members (TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, myostatin, GDF-11 and BMP-10), prodomains bind with high enough affinity to suppress biological activity. The subsequent mechanism of activation of these latent TGF-β ligands varies according to cell type and context, but all activating mechanisms directly target prodomains. Thus, prodomains control many aspects of TGF-β superfamily biology, and alterations in prodomain function are often associated with disease.

  7. Un kyste hydatique osseux: une localisation rare au niveau de l’os iliaque

    PubMed Central

    Nhamoucha, Yassine; Alaoui, Othmane; Doumbia, Aliou; Oukhoya, Mohammed; Abdellaoui, Hicham; Tazi, Mohammed; Chater, Lamyae; Atarraf, Karima; Arroud, Mounir; Afifi, Abderahman

    2016-01-01

    L'hydatidose est une affection parasitaire liée au développement chez l'homme de la forme larvaire d'un cestode, à savoir un tænia de très petite taille dénommé Echinococcus Granulosus. Cette anthropozoonose présente une diversité de formes anatomoradiologiques lié aux nombreux aspects topographiques et évolutifs des kystes. L'hydatidose osseuse est rare, elle ne représente que 0,9 à 2,5% de l'ensemble des localisations. Nous rapportons l'observation d'un enfant de 9 ans, qui a été admis chez nous pour une boiterie fébrile avec une masse au niveau de la fosse iliaque droite, révélant un kyste hydatique au dépend de l'os iliaque. Le bilan lésionnel avait objectivé un kyste hydatique de l'os iliaque avec extension aux parties molles adjacentes. Le traitement chirurgical conclu a un kyste surinfecté d'ou la réalisation d'une exérèse chirurgicale du kyste avec drainage. L'ostéopathie hydatique est infiltrante, diffuse, lente et progressive, ce qui rend le diagnostic tardif et qui compromet la qualité du traitement. PMID:27800081

  8. Bacillus anthracis TIR Domain-Containing Protein Localises to Cellular Microtubule Structures and Induces Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Emil; Thwaite, Joanne E.; Jenner, Dominic C.; Spear, Abigail M.; Flick-Smith, Helen; Atkins, Helen S.; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognise invading pathogens and mediate downstream immune signalling via Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domains. TIR domain proteins (Tdps) have been identified in multiple pathogenic bacteria and have recently been implicated as negative regulators of host innate immune activation. A Tdp has been identified in Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. Here we present the first study of this protein, designated BaTdp. Recombinantly expressed and purified BaTdp TIR domain interacted with several human TIR domains, including that of the key TLR adaptor MyD88, although BaTdp expression in cultured HEK293 cells had no effect on TLR4- or TLR2- mediated immune activation. During expression in mammalian cells, BaTdp localised to microtubular networks and caused an increase in lipidated cytosolic microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3), indicative of autophagosome formation. In vivo intra-nasal infection experiments in mice showed that a BaTdp knockout strain colonised host tissue faster with higher bacterial load within 4 days post-infection compared to the wild type B. anthracis. Taken together, these findings indicate that BaTdp does not play an immune suppressive role, but rather, its absence increases virulence. BaTdp present in wild type B. anthracis plausibly interact with the infected host cell, which undergoes autophagy in self-defence. PMID:27391310

  9. Localised and distributed deformation in the lithosphere: the example of the Dead Sea valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, G. C.; Deves, M.; Agnon, A.; Klinger, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Earth’s lithosphere can be regarded as a strain softening elasto-plastic material. In the lab, such materials have been shown to deform in a brittle or a ductile manner depending on the applied geometric boundary conditions. Deformation in the lithosphere is usually thought to depend only on pressure, temperature and material composition with variations of these parameters determining the deformation style but the importance of boundary conditions has been largely ignored. By taking deformation associated with the Dead Sea (Jordan and Araba) valleys as an example, we demonstrate how boundary conditions control the deformation style causing some deformation to localise on a through-going strike-slip fault (~ 65%) but also requiring deformation associated with valley opening and change of valley strike to remain distributed (~35%). We show that while faults become weak, zones of distributed deformation remain strong and dissipate most energy. These results change dramatically our view of the deformation of the lithosphere, the strength of plate boundaries and more generally of the deformation of strain softening elasto-plastic materials.

  10. Nuclear Localised MORE SULPHUR ACCUMULATION1 Epigenetically Regulates Sulphur Homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin-Yuan; Chao, Dai-Yin; Koprivova, Anna; Danku, John; Wirtz, Markus; Müller, Steffen; Sandoval, Francisco J; Bauwe, Hermann; Roje, Sanja; Dilkes, Brian; Hell, Rüdiger; Kopriva, Stanislav; Salt, David E

    2016-09-01

    Sulphur (S) is an essential element for all living organisms. The uptake, assimilation and metabolism of S in plants are well studied. However, the regulation of S homeostasis remains largely unknown. Here, we report on the identification and characterisation of the more sulphur accumulation1 (msa1-1) mutant. The MSA1 protein is localized to the nucleus and is required for both S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) production and DNA methylation. Loss of function of the nuclear localised MSA1 leads to a reduction in SAM in roots and a strong S-deficiency response even at ample S supply, causing an over-accumulation of sulphate, sulphite, cysteine and glutathione. Supplementation with SAM suppresses this high S phenotype. Furthermore, mutation of MSA1 affects genome-wide DNA methylation, including the methylation of S-deficiency responsive genes. Elevated S accumulation in msa1-1 requires the increased expression of the sulphate transporter genes SULTR1;1 and SULTR1;2 which are also differentially methylated in msa1-1. Our results suggest a novel function for MSA1 in the nucleus in regulating SAM biosynthesis and maintaining S homeostasis epigenetically via DNA methylation. PMID:27622452

  11. Fully Automatic System for Accurate Localisation and Analysis of Cephalometric Landmarks in Lateral Cephalograms

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Claudia; Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Cootes, Tim F.

    2016-01-01

    Cephalometric tracing is a standard analysis tool for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a fully automatic landmark annotation (FALA) system for finding cephalometric landmarks in lateral cephalograms and its application to the classification of skeletal malformations. Digital cephalograms of 400 subjects (age range: 7–76 years) were available. All cephalograms had been manually traced by two experienced orthodontists with 19 cephalometric landmarks, and eight clinical parameters had been calculated for each subject. A FALA system to locate the 19 landmarks in lateral cephalograms was developed. The system was evaluated via comparison to the manual tracings, and the automatically located landmarks were used for classification of the clinical parameters. The system achieved an average point-to-point error of 1.2 mm, and 84.7% of landmarks were located within the clinically accepted precision range of 2.0 mm. The automatic landmark localisation performance was within the inter-observer variability between two clinical experts. The automatic classification achieved an average classification accuracy of 83.4% which was comparable to an experienced orthodontist. The FALA system rapidly and accurately locates and analyses cephalometric landmarks in lateral cephalograms, and has the potential to significantly improve the clinical work flow in orthodontic treatment. PMID:27645567

  12. Location service for wireless network using improved RSS-based cellular localisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayaz, Sara; Sarrafian, Sara

    2014-06-01

    Value-added services, especially in mobile environments, have recently become the key component of making more profit and attracting more subscribers. One of the most commonly used such service is location-based advertiser services. The main issue which should be considered in providing such services is determining the position of the mobile terminals precisely. In this paper, one pattern recognition localisation method based on the signal strength appropriated for implementing a location-based service is presented. The main aim is to introduce some practical solutions to decrease error and computational load and also eliminate the necessity of updating the database. Practical results illustrate high accuracy of this technique and its suitability to apply in such services. The mean error declines to 9.7 m and mean error corresponding to CDF = 67% and CDF = 95% are less than 11 m and 23 m, respectively. We also present a location-based advertising service, in which the customer's interests and local time are considered, in order to enhance the efficiency and individualism of this service.

  13. Post-GWAS methodologies for localisation of functional non-coding variants: ANGPTL3

    PubMed Central

    Oldoni, Federico; Palmen, Jutta; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Howard, Philip; Drenos, Fotios; Plagnol, Vincent; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Smith, Andrew J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have confirmed the involvement of non-coding angiopoietin-like 3 (ANGPTL3) gene variants with coronary artery disease, levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides and ANGPTL3 mRNA transcript. Extensive linkage disequilibrium at the locus, however, has hindered efforts to identify the potential functional variants. Using regulatory annotations from ENCODE, combined with functional in vivo assays such as allele-specific formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements, statistical approaches including eQTL/lipid colocalisation, and traditional in vitro methodologies including electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase reporter assays, variants affecting the ANGPTL3 regulome were examined. From 253 variants associated with ANGPTL3 mRNA expression, and/or lipid traits, 46 were located within liver regulatory elements and potentially functional. One variant, rs10889352, demonstrated allele-specific effects on DNA-protein interactions, reporter gene expression and chromatin accessibility, in line with effects on LDL-C levels and expression of ANGPTL3 mRNA. The ANGPTL3 gene lies within DOCK7, although the variant is within non-coding regions outside of ANGPTL3, within DOCK7, suggesting complex long-range regulatory effects on gene expression. This study illustrates the power of combining multiple genome-wide datasets with laboratory data to localise functional non-coding variation and provides a model for analysis of regulatory variants from GWAS. PMID:26800306

  14. Bacillus anthracis TIR Domain-Containing Protein Localises to Cellular Microtubule Structures and Induces Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Emil; Thwaite, Joanne E; Jenner, Dominic C; Spear, Abigail M; Flick-Smith, Helen; Atkins, Helen S; Byrne, Bernadette; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognise invading pathogens and mediate downstream immune signalling via Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domains. TIR domain proteins (Tdps) have been identified in multiple pathogenic bacteria and have recently been implicated as negative regulators of host innate immune activation. A Tdp has been identified in Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. Here we present the first study of this protein, designated BaTdp. Recombinantly expressed and purified BaTdp TIR domain interacted with several human TIR domains, including that of the key TLR adaptor MyD88, although BaTdp expression in cultured HEK293 cells had no effect on TLR4- or TLR2- mediated immune activation. During expression in mammalian cells, BaTdp localised to microtubular networks and caused an increase in lipidated cytosolic microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3), indicative of autophagosome formation. In vivo intra-nasal infection experiments in mice showed that a BaTdp knockout strain colonised host tissue faster with higher bacterial load within 4 days post-infection compared to the wild type B. anthracis. Taken together, these findings indicate that BaTdp does not play an immune suppressive role, but rather, its absence increases virulence. BaTdp present in wild type B. anthracis plausibly interact with the infected host cell, which undergoes autophagy in self-defence. PMID:27391310

  15. The anatomical basis for disease localisation in seronegative spondyloarthropathy at entheses and related sites

    PubMed Central

    BENJAMIN, M.; McGONAGLE, D.

    2001-01-01

    The 2 major categories of idiopathic inflammatory arthritis are rheumatoid arthritis and the seronegative spondyloarthropathies. Whilst the synovium is the primary site of joint disease in the former, the primary site in the latter is less well defined. However, it has recently been proposed that enthesitis-associated changes in the spondyloarthropathies are primary and that all other joint manifestations are secondary. Nevertheless, some of the sites of disease localisation have not been adequately explained in terms of enthesitis. This article summarises current knowledge of the structure, function, blood supply, innervation, molecular composition and histopathology of the classic enthesis (i.e. the bony attachment of a tendon or ligament) and introduces the concept of ‘functional’ and articular ‘fibrocartilaginous’ entheses. The former are regions where tendons or ligaments wrap-around bony pulleys, but are not attached to them, and the latter are synovial joints that are lined by fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage. We describe how these 3 types of entheses relate to other, and how all are prone to pathological changes in spondyloarthropathy. We propose that the inflammatory responses characteristic of spondyloarthropathies are triggered at these seemingly diverse sites, in genetically susceptible individuals, by a combination of anatomical factors which lead to higher levels of tissue microtrauma, and the deposition of microbes. PMID:11760883

  16. Resonant-like behaviour during edge-localised mode cycles in the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, A. J.; Morris, J.; Todd, T. N.; Coad, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Likonen, J.; Rubel, M.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2015-08-15

    A unique sequence of 120 almost identical plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET) recently provided two orders of magnitude more statistically equivalent data than ever previously available. The purpose was to study movement of eroded plasma-facing material from JET's new Beryllium wall, but it has allowed the statistical detection of otherwise unobservable phenomenon. This includes a sequence of resonant-like waiting times between edge-localised plasma instabilities (ELMs), instabilities that must be mitigated or avoided in large magnetically confined plasmas such as those planned for ITER. Here, we investigate the cause of this phenomenon, using the unprecedented quantity of data to produce a detailed picture of the plasma's behaviour. After combining the data, oscillations are clearly observable in the plasma's vertical position, in edge losses of ions, and in Beryllium II (527 nm) light emissions. The oscillations are unexpected, are not obvious in data from a single pulse alone, and are all clearly correlated with each other. They are likely to be caused by a small vertical oscillation that the plasma control system is not reacting to prevent, but a more complex explanation is possible. The clearly observable but unexpected link between small changes in the plasma's position and changes to edge-plasma transport and stability suggest that these characteristics cannot always be studied in isolation. It also suggests new opportunities for ELM mitigation and control that may exist.

  17. Unconventional localisation transition in high-dimensional semiconductors and Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syzranov, Sergey; Gurarie, Victor; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2015-03-01

    We study a class of non-interacting electron systems with a power-law quasiparticle dispersion ξk ~kα and a random short-correlated potential. We show that, unlike the case of lower dimensions, for d > 2 α there exists a critical disorder strength (set by the band width), at which the system exhibits a disorder-driven quantum phase transition at the bottom of the band, that lies in a universality class distinct from the Anderson transition. In contrast to the conventional wisdom, it manifests itself in, e.g., the disorder-averaged density of states. For systems in symmetry classes that permit localisation, the striking signature is a non-analytic behaviour of the mobility edge, that is pinned to the bottom of the band for subcritical disorder and grows for disorder exceeding a critical strength. Focusing on the density of states, we calculate the critical behaviour (exponents and scaling functions) at this novel transition, using a renormalisation group, controlled by an ɛ = d - 2 α expansion. We also apply our analysis to Dirac materials, e.g., Weyl semimetal, where this transition takes place in physically interesting three dimensions.

  18. Nuclear Localised MORE SULPHUR ACCUMULATION1 Epigenetically Regulates Sulphur Homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin-Yuan; Chao, Dai-Yin; Koprivova, Anna; Müller, Steffen; Sandoval, Francisco J.; Bauwe, Hermann; Roje, Sanja; Dilkes, Brian; Kopriva, Stanislav; Salt, David E

    2016-01-01

    Sulphur (S) is an essential element for all living organisms. The uptake, assimilation and metabolism of S in plants are well studied. However, the regulation of S homeostasis remains largely unknown. Here, we report on the identification and characterisation of the more sulphur accumulation1 (msa1-1) mutant. The MSA1 protein is localized to the nucleus and is required for both S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) production and DNA methylation. Loss of function of the nuclear localised MSA1 leads to a reduction in SAM in roots and a strong S-deficiency response even at ample S supply, causing an over-accumulation of sulphate, sulphite, cysteine and glutathione. Supplementation with SAM suppresses this high S phenotype. Furthermore, mutation of MSA1 affects genome-wide DNA methylation, including the methylation of S-deficiency responsive genes. Elevated S accumulation in msa1-1 requires the increased expression of the sulphate transporter genes SULTR1;1 and SULTR1;2 which are also differentially methylated in msa1-1. Our results suggest a novel function for MSA1 in the nucleus in regulating SAM biosynthesis and maintaining S homeostasis epigenetically via DNA methylation. PMID:27622452

  19. Intracranial tuberculomas: MRI signal intensity correlation with histopathology and localised proton spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R K; Pandey, R; Khan, E M; Mittal, P; Gujral, R B; Chhabra, D K

    1993-01-01

    In seven cases of intracranial tuberculomas showing different signal intensities on MRI (five characteristic and two nonspecific), detailed histopathological examination was performed to look for number of macrophages, fibrosis, gliosis, degree of inflammatory cellular infiltrate, and type of caseation. The granulomas showing more macrophages, fibrosis and gliosis appeared hypointense on T2-weighted images. Tuberculomas showing minimal macrophages, marked cellular infiltration, and minimal fibrosis appeared hyperintense on T2-weighted images. Lesions showing similar signal intensity on T2-weighted images showed variation in the amount of macrophages, cellular infiltrates, maturity and fibrosis. Trace element estimation was done (iron, copper, and magnesium) in two of these lesions appearing hypointense on T2 and two normal brain samples; these were significantly lower in tuberculoma compared to normal brain tissue. Localised proton spectroscopy was performed in two hypointense lesions which showed marked increase in peaks in the region of mobile lipids (1.28 ppm) compared to normal brain parenchyma. It is concluded that the signal intensity of the lesions is dependent on the number of macrophages, fibrosis and cellular infiltrates. In addition increased lipid contents in the tuberculoma also contribute to the hypointensity on T2-weighted images. PMID:8505879

  20. Strabismus is asymmetrically localised and binds to Prickle and Dishevelled during Drosophila planar polarity patterning.

    PubMed

    Bastock, Rebecca; Strutt, Helen; Strutt, David

    2003-07-01

    Planar polarity decisions in the wing of Drosophila involve the assembly of asymmetric protein complexes containing the conserved receptor Frizzled. In this study, we analyse the role of the Van Gogh/strabismus gene in the formation of these complexes and cell polarisation. We find that the Strabismus protein becomes asymmetrically localised to the proximal edge of cells. In the absence of strabismus activity, the planar polarity proteins Dishevelled and Prickle are mislocalised in the cell. We show that Strabismus binds directly to Dishevelled and Prickle and is able to recruit them to membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the putative PDZ-binding motif at the C terminus of Strabismus is not required for its function. We propose a two-step model for assembly of Frizzledcontaining asymmetric protein complexes at cell boundaries. First, Strabismus acts together with Frizzled and the atypical cadherin Flamingo to mediate apicolateral recruitment of planar polarity proteins including Dishevelled and Prickle. In the second phase, Dishevelled and Prickle are required for these proteins to become asymmetrically distributed on the proximodistal axis.

  1. Activation of multiple chemotherapeutic prodrugs by the natural enzymolome of tumour-localised probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lehouritis, Panos; Stanton, Michael; McCarthy, Florence O; Jeavons, Matthieu; Tangney, Mark

    2016-01-28

    Some chemotherapeutic drugs (prodrugs) require activation by an enzyme for efficacy. We and others have demonstrated the ability of probiotic bacteria to grow specifically within solid tumours following systemic administration, and we hypothesised that the natural enzymatic activity of these tumour-localised bacteria may be suitable for activation of certain such chemotherapeutic drugs. Several wild-type probiotic bacteria; Escherichia coli Nissle, Bifidobacterium breve, Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus species, were screened against a panel of popular prodrugs. All strains were capable of activating at least one prodrug. E. coli Nissle 1917 was selected for further studies because of its ability to activate numerous prodrugs and its resistance to prodrug toxicity. HPLC data confirmed biochemical transformation of prodrugs to their toxic counterparts. Further analysis demonstrated that different enzymes can complement prodrug activation, while simultaneous activation of multiple prodrugs (CB1954, 5-FC, AQ4N and Fludarabine phosphate) by E. coli was confirmed, resulting in significant efficacy improvement. Experiments in mice harbouring murine tumours validated in vitro findings, with significant reduction in tumour growth and increase in survival of mice treated with probiotic bacteria and a combination of prodrugs. These findings demonstrate the ability of probiotic bacteria, without the requirement for genetic modification, to enable high-level activation of multiple prodrugs specifically at the site of action. PMID:26655063

  2. On the localisation of four-dimensional brane-world black holes: II. The general case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanti, P.; Pappas, N.; Pappas, T.

    2016-01-01

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of a number of scalar field theories in an attempt to find analytically five-dimensional, localised-on-the-brane, black-hole solutions. Extending a previous analysis, we assume a generalised Vaidya ansatz for the five-dimensional metric tensor that allows for a time-dependent, non-trivial profile of the mass function in terms of the bulk coordinate and a deviation from the over-restricting Schwarzschild-type solution on the brane. In order to support such a solution, we study a variety of theories including single or multiple scalar fields, with canonical or non-canonical kinetic terms, minimally or non-minimally coupled to gravity. We demonstrate that for such a metric ansatz and for a carefully chosen energy-momentum tensor which is non-isotropic in five dimensions, solutions that have the form of a Schwarzschild-(anti)de Sitter or Reissner-Nordstrom type of solution do emerge. However, the resulting profile of the mass function along the bulk coordinate, when allowed, is not the correct one for eliminating bulk singularities.

  3. Fully Automatic System for Accurate Localisation and Analysis of Cephalometric Landmarks in Lateral Cephalograms.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Claudia; Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Cootes, Tim F

    2016-09-20

    Cephalometric tracing is a standard analysis tool for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a fully automatic landmark annotation (FALA) system for finding cephalometric landmarks in lateral cephalograms and its application to the classification of skeletal malformations. Digital cephalograms of 400 subjects (age range: 7-76 years) were available. All cephalograms had been manually traced by two experienced orthodontists with 19 cephalometric landmarks, and eight clinical parameters had been calculated for each subject. A FALA system to locate the 19 landmarks in lateral cephalograms was developed. The system was evaluated via comparison to the manual tracings, and the automatically located landmarks were used for classification of the clinical parameters. The system achieved an average point-to-point error of 1.2 mm, and 84.7% of landmarks were located within the clinically accepted precision range of 2.0 mm. The automatic landmark localisation performance was within the inter-observer variability between two clinical experts. The automatic classification achieved an average classification accuracy of 83.4% which was comparable to an experienced orthodontist. The FALA system rapidly and accurately locates and analyses cephalometric landmarks in lateral cephalograms, and has the potential to significantly improve the clinical work flow in orthodontic treatment.

  4. Passive impact localisation for the structural health monitoring of new airframe materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jacob; Croxford, Anthony; Paget, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    This experimental work considers the use of permanently attached sensors for the detection and location of impacts to a carbon fibre reinforced plastic panel with stringers. Deterministic knowledge of the propagation of Lamb waves in the structure is not used. Instead a statistical measure of the signal is used to determine the arrival time of elastic waves propagating in the structure as a result of the impact. A comparison is made between a conventional method and the statistical method. The conventional method, which has been routinely used in industry for acoustic emission imaging, uses the timing of a peak in the recorded signal. The statistical method uses the Rayleigh maximum likelihood estimator. The statistical method is shown to provide both more precise and robust estimates of the elastic wave arrival time. An array of just four sensors is used to locate the impacts. The accuracy of the localisations is used to visualise the effectiveness of the two methods for the low sensor density used. Low sensor density is necessary for minimising system weight and cost. The equivalent net sensor density used in this experiment was five sensors per meter squared. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic is today used for both exterior surfaces and primary structure of airframes entering service. The industrial relevance of this work is to mitigate the diminishing role of visual inspection for evaluating the health of aerospace structures, where impact damage may not be visible.

  5. Trypanosoma evansi is alike to Trypanosoma brucei brucei in the subcellular localisation of glycolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, S Andrea; Nava, Mayerly

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma evansi, which causes surra, is descended from Trypanosoma brucei brucei, which causes nagana. Although both parasites are presumed to be metabolically similar, insufficient knowledge of T. evansi precludes a full comparison. Herein, we provide the first report on the subcellular localisation of the glycolytic enzymes in T. evansi, which is a alike to that of the bloodstream form (BSF) of T. b. brucei: (i) fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, phosphoglycerate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase (glycolytic enzymes) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (a glycolysis-auxiliary enzyme) in glycosomes, (ii) enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase, pyruvate kinase (glycolytic enzymes) and a GAPDH isoenzyme in the cytosol, (iii) malate dehydrogenase in cytosol and (iv) glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in both glycosomes and the cytosol. Specific enzymatic activities also suggest that T. evansi is alike to the BSF of T. b. brucei in glycolytic flux, which is much faster than the pentose phosphate pathway flux, and in the involvement of cytosolic GAPDH in the NAD+/NADH balance. These similarities were expected based on the close phylogenetic relationship of both parasites. PMID:26061149

  6. Complement activation within the coeliac small intestine is localised to Brunner's glands.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, R B; Kelly, C P; Neville, S; Sheils, O; Weir, D G; Feighery, C F

    1989-01-01

    Complement activation may play an important role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease. In the present study immunohistochemical localisation of C3 and of a neoantigen exposed only on the terminal C5b-9 complement complex has been performed on small intestinal biopsy sections from newly diagnosed untreated coeliac patients, from coeliac patients on long-term gluten-free diet and from disease controls. Levels of C3 were markedly increased in treated coeliac patients compared with controls. Staining of C3 was concentrated subepithelially and within the centre of the lamina propria. No staining was detected at these sites using antibody to the neoantigen, however, strongly suggesting that the increased levels of C3 seen in the coeliac patients was the result of increased extravasation of serum proteins rather than complement activation. Surprisingly, complement activation was detected within the glands of Brunner. Positive staining using anti-C5b-9 neoantigen was found in all coeliac patients, both treated and untreated. Three of the 13 disease controls also showed reactivity with this antibody. This novel finding suggests that Brunner's glands, hitherto largely neglected structures, may play an important role in the development of coeliac disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2599443

  7. Localisation of deformation in the thermal contrast at a granite batholith margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. M.; Borcovsky, D. A.; Palin, J. M.; Toy, V. G.

    2014-07-01

    The Wainui Shear Zone is a ˜ 1.2 km wide steeply dipping ductile shear zone that is intimately associated with the western margin of a very extensive granite batholith in central New Zealand. Shear sense indicators and lineation orientations within the central high-strain portion of shear zone consistently show a reverse dip-slip east-side-up sense of motion. Shallower foliation in the margins of the shear zone is interpreted to pre-date the central high-strain zone. However, U-Pb and Ar-Ar data reveal that all ductile deformation occurred between ˜114 and 109 Ma (and probably between 114 and 111 Ma) requiring: (1) that deformation kinematics within the shear zone changed over a short time period, and (2) the shear fabrics formed immediately after emplacement of the voluminous granite batholith. The temporal and spatial link between the deformation and plutonism is hypothesised to be a result of thermal weakening of the cooler Paleozoic crust by Cretaceous granite intrusion, which promoted localisation of deformation onto the intrusive contact. Deformation was initially distributed over a wide zone but became focused into a central mylonite zone. Continental-scale shortening is recorded as a network of ductile shear zones that formed on thermal contrasts within the upper, middle and lower crust along the New Zealand Gondwana margin.

  8. Quantifying the risk of localised animal movement bans for foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Schley, David; Gubbins, Simon; Paton, David J

    2009-01-01

    The maintenance of disease-free status from Foot-and-Mouth Disease is of significant socio-economic importance to countries such as the UK. The imposition of bans on the movement of susceptible livestock following the discovery of an outbreak is deemed necessary to prevent the spread of what is a highly contagious disease, but has a significant economic impact on the agricultural community in itself. Here we consider the risk of applying movement restrictions only in localised zones around outbreaks in order to help evaluate how quickly nation-wide restrictions could be lifted after notification. We show, with reference to the 2001 and 2007 UK outbreaks, that it would be practical to implement such a policy provided the basic reproduction ratio of known infected premises can be estimated. It is ultimately up to policy makers and stakeholders to determine the acceptable level of risk, involving a cost benefit analysis of the potential outcomes, but quantifying the risk of spread from different sized zones is a prerequisite for this. The approach outlined is relevant to the determination of control zones and vaccination policies and has the potential to be applied to future outbreaks of other diseases.

  9. The Role of CT cholangiography in the Detection and Localisation of Suspected Bile Leakage Following Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Michael; Kaplan, Elan; Udayasiri, Ruwangi; Usatoff, Val

    2012-01-01

    Background Most bile duct injuries are not recognized at the time of initial surgery. Optimal treatment requires early recognition. CT IVC has become increasingly important in identifying bile leaks and their source after cholecystectomy. Our study aims to report the outcomes of using CT IVC post operatively and how accurately it can detect or localise bile leaks. Methods From 2000 - 2009, twenty patients were managed for suspected bile leak post cholecystectomy within the Alfred Hospital. The study included a retrospective evaluation of the initial procedure, presenting symptoms, site of ductal injury, diagnostic procedures and therapeutic interventions. Results were analysed to determine success of the imaging procedure, and to correlate imaging diagnosis with results both diagnostically and clinically. Results Twenty patients had a suspected bile leak, of which 3 were detected at the time of surgery. Seven patients had a CTIVC as their primary investigation. It identified bile leak in 6 and the anatomical site in 5. One had a leak excluded and was managed conservatively. Conclusions CT Cholangiography is a feasible and low-risk tool for imaging of the biliary tract in suspected bile leaks post cholecystectomy. It is a valuable non-invasive investigation that may help avoid endoscopic retrograde Cholangiography or surgery.

  10. Improved localisation for 2-hydroxyglutarate detection at 3T using long-TE semi-LASER

    PubMed Central

    Berrington, Adam; Voets, Natalie L.; Plaha, Puneet; Larkin, Sarah J.; Mccullagh, James; Stacey, Richard; Yildirim, Muhammed; Schofield, Christopher J.; Jezzard, Peter; Cadoux-Hudson, Tom; Ansorge, Olaf; Emir, Uzay E.

    2016-01-01

    2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) has emerged as a biomarker of tumour cell IDH mutations that may enable the differential diagnosis of glioma patients. At 3 Tesla, detection of 2-HG with magnetic resonance spectroscopy is challenging because of metabolite signal overlap and a spectral pattern modulated by slice selection and chemical shift displacement. Using density matrix simulations and phantom experiments, an optimised semi-LASER scheme (TE = 110 ms) improves localisation of the 2-HG spin system considerably compared to an existing PRESS sequence. This results in a visible 2-HG peak in the in vivo spectra at 1.9 ppm in the majority of IDH mutated tumours. Detected concentrations of 2-HG were similar using both sequences, although the use of semi-LASER generated narrower confidence intervals. Signal overlap with glutamate and glutamine, as measured by pairwise fitting correlation was reduced. Lactate was readily detectable across glioma patients using the method presented here (mean CLRB: (10±2)%). Together with more robust 2-HG detection, long TE semi-LASER offers the potential to investigate tumour metabolism and stratify patients in vivo at 3T. PMID:27547821

  11. Localising missing plants in squared-grid patterns of discontinuous crops from remotely sensed imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbez-Masson, J. M.; Foltête, J. C.

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to localise and characterise missing plants on very high resolution (VHR) aerial images of agricultural parcels, in the case of discontinuous crops like wine and olive tree, which are planted according to a squared-grid pattern. It aims to establish an assisted, image processing system for remote sensed images, allowing the inventory the missing or withering plants, and the monitoring of their evolution during time. The global approach considers the planted parcel as a topological graph of vertices, whose reciprocal location conforms to a set of geometrical rules about orientation and length. The proposed system initiates the graph from the original image; then it adds missing vertices and refines its knowledge of the spatial pattern on an iterative basis. Quality indicators are assigned at each added vertex, and several stopping criteria are estimated for each iteration, permitting an automated use of the algorithm. Test cases have been conducted on two data sets of three parcels each: olive groves and goblet vineyards. The results are compared to validation data. They show an efficient reconstruction of the geometry and satisfactory omission-commission errors; they allow drawing up a typology of the major errors, and propose calibration parameters based on a sensitivity analysis. The main improvements include essentially the preprocessing, filtering step of the initial image. The process is being used for Languedocian vineyards (France), and may be potentially usable for other problematic with the same kind of spatial patterns.

  12. Global Interior Robot Localisation by a Colour Content Image Retrieval System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaari, A.; Lelandais, S.; Montagne, C.; Ahmed, M. Ben

    2007-12-01

    We propose a new global localisation approach to determine a coarse position of a mobile robot in structured indoor space using colour-based image retrieval techniques. We use an original method of colour quantisation based on the baker's transformation to extract a two-dimensional colour pallet combining as well space and vicinity-related information as colourimetric aspect of the original image. We conceive several retrieving approaches bringing to a specific similarity measure [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] integrating the space organisation of colours in the pallet. The baker's transformation provides a quantisation of the image into a space where colours that are nearby in the original space are also nearby in the output space, thereby providing dimensionality reduction and invariance to minor changes in the image. Whereas the distance [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] provides for partial invariance to translation, sight point small changes, and scale factor. In addition to this study, we developed a hierarchical search module based on the logic classification of images following rooms. This hierarchical module reduces the searching indoor space and ensures an improvement of our system performances. Results are then compared with those brought by colour histograms provided with several similarity measures. In this paper, we focus on colour-based features to describe indoor images. A finalised system must obviously integrate other type of signature like shape and texture.

  13. Fully Automatic System for Accurate Localisation and Analysis of Cephalometric Landmarks in Lateral Cephalograms.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Claudia; Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Cootes, Tim F

    2016-01-01

    Cephalometric tracing is a standard analysis tool for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a fully automatic landmark annotation (FALA) system for finding cephalometric landmarks in lateral cephalograms and its application to the classification of skeletal malformations. Digital cephalograms of 400 subjects (age range: 7-76 years) were available. All cephalograms had been manually traced by two experienced orthodontists with 19 cephalometric landmarks, and eight clinical parameters had been calculated for each subject. A FALA system to locate the 19 landmarks in lateral cephalograms was developed. The system was evaluated via comparison to the manual tracings, and the automatically located landmarks were used for classification of the clinical parameters. The system achieved an average point-to-point error of 1.2 mm, and 84.7% of landmarks were located within the clinically accepted precision range of 2.0 mm. The automatic landmark localisation performance was within the inter-observer variability between two clinical experts. The automatic classification achieved an average classification accuracy of 83.4% which was comparable to an experienced orthodontist. The FALA system rapidly and accurately locates and analyses cephalometric landmarks in lateral cephalograms, and has the potential to significantly improve the clinical work flow in orthodontic treatment. PMID:27645567

  14. Prediction and comparison of downlink electric-field and uplink localised SAR values for realistic indoor wireless planning.

    PubMed

    Plets, David; Joseph, Wout; Aerts, Sam; Vanhecke, Kris; Vermeeren, Günter; Martens, Luc

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, for the first time a heuristic network calculator for both whole-body exposure due to indoor base station antennas or access points (downlink exposure) and localised exposure due to the mobile device (uplink exposure) in indoor wireless networks is presented. As an application, three phone call scenarios are investigated (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) macrocell, UMTS femtocell and WiFi voice-over-IP) and compared with respect to the electric-field strength and localised specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution. Prediction models are created and successfully validated with an accuracy of 3 dB. The benefits of the UMTS power control mechanisms are demonstrated. However, dependent on the macrocell connection quality and on the user's average phone call connection time, also the macrocell solution might be preferential from an exposure point of view for the considered scenario. PMID:24553049

  15. Localisation and quantification of elements within seeds of Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi praecox by micro-PIXE.

    PubMed

    Vogel-Mikus, Katarina; Pongrac, Paula; Kump, Peter; Necemer, Marijan; Simcic, Jure; Pelicon, Primoz; Budnar, Milos; Povh, Bogdan; Regvar, Marjana

    2007-05-01

    Cd, Zn and Pb accumulation, spatial distribution within seeds and germinating seedlings, and seeds fitness of metal hyperaccumulating Thlaspi praecox were investigated in order to gain more knowledge on plant reproductive success at metal polluted sites. The seeds contained up to 1351 microg g-1 (dry weight) of Cd, 121 microg g-1 of Zn and 17 microg g-1 of Pb. Seed fitness was negatively influenced by seed Cd hyperaccumulation. Nevertheless, the viability of seeds was decreased by maximally 20%, indicating very efficient tolerance of the plant embryos to Cd. Localisation by micro-PIXE revealed preferential storage of most elements in the embryonic axis. Cd and Zn were preferentially localised in the epidermis of cotyledons. The restriction of seed Pb and Zn uptake and hyperaccumulation of Cd, accompanied by partitioning of Cd in the epidermal tissues of cotyledons, may enable the survival of T. praecox embryos and seedlings in Cd polluted environments. PMID:17070633

  16. Simplified segmented human models for whole body and localised SAR evaluation of 20 MHz to 6 GHz electromagnetic field exposures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tongning; Shao, Qing; Yang, Lei

    2013-03-01

    The digital human model is a key element in evaluating the electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure. This paper proposes the application of simplified segmented human models for EMF exposure compliance evaluation with the whole body and the localised limits. The method is based on the fact that most of the EMF power absorption is concentrated in several major tissues. Two kinds of human models were simply (the proposed method) and precisely segmented from two sets of whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanned images. The whole body average-specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) and the peak localised SAR averaging over 10 g tissues for the two kinds of models are calculated for various exposure configurations. The results confirmed the efficiency and the validity of the proposed method. The application as evaluating the MRI radiofrequency EMF exposure is also discussed in the paper.

  17. Homogeneous self-aligned liquid crystals on wrinkled-wall poly(dimethylsiloxane) via localised ion-beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hae-Chang; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lee, Ju Hwan; Jung, Yoon Ho; Jang, Sang Bok; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate self-aligned liquid crystals (LCs) using a wrinkled-wall polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wrinkle structure, which is a key factor to obtain a stable homogeneous alignment state with positive LCs. We constructed the wrinkled walls via localised surface exposure to IB radiation, which passed through a long length localised pattern mask. The creation of the wrinkled wall helped to align the LC molecules homogeneously because the wrinkled wall acted as a guide for the arrangement of positive LC molecules. In addition, we confirmed the stability of the alignment state as the width of the wrinkled wall was changed. Although this wrinkled-wall method is a non-contact method, LC alignment is achieved via an anisotropic topographical guide, which provides the LC molecules with stable homogeneous alignment. PMID:25728372

  18. Uptake and localisation of O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides in the venous wall, measured by laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Neumann, H A; Carlsson, K; Brom, G H

    1992-01-01

    The uptake and localisation of O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides (HR) in the venous wall was studied in 8 patients undergoing crossectomy for a varicose long saphenous vein. The fluorescence of cross-sections of the vein wall was measured by laser scanning microscopy, based on the autofluorescence of HR. Four patients (treated group) received 2 x 1.5 g HR IV before surgery, and four (untreated patients) served as controls. Uptake of HR into the veins from treated patients was seen, with a mean fluorescence intensity of 80.9 units compared to 49.4 units in the untreated veins. The increase in fluorescence was clearly demarcated on the endothelial side of the vein wall. It is concluded that HR passes into the vascular wall, where it is localised in the endothelial and sub-endothelial areas.

  19. Immuno-electron microscopical localisation of alpha-actinin and actin in microvilli of prostatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, N; Aumüller, G

    1988-01-01

    The localisation of alpha-actinin and actin was investigated immunocytochemically in microvilli of rat ventral prostatic epithelial cells fixed by a solution containing 1.25% glutaraldehyde and 1% paraformaldehyde. Both proteins were localised in the microvilli by immunoperoxidase labelling of semithin or ultrathin sections. Almost the whole microvillous core region was labelled by antibodies for actin. Most of the label for alpha-actinin was confined to the region close to the plasma membrane along the length of the microvilli. In addition, positive staining was found at the microvillous tip and weak staining at a small area in the core. These results suggest a role of alpha-actinin in the stabilisation of actin filaments in these regions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3076168

  20. Quantitative elemental localisation in leaves and stems of nickel hyperaccumulating shrub Hybanthusfloribundus subsp. floribundus using micro-PIXE spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachenko, Anthony G.; Singh, Balwant; Bhatia, Naveen P.; Siegele, Rainer

    2008-02-01

    Hybanthusfloribundus (Lindl.) F.Muell. subsp. floribundus is a native Australian nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulating shrub and a promising species for rehabilitation and phytoremediation of Ni tailings. Spatial localisation and quantification of Ni in leaf and stem tissues of H.floribundus subsp. floribundus was studied using micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectroscopy. Young plants, grown in a potting mix under controlled glasshouse conditions were exposed to Ni concentrations of 0 and 26 mM kg-1 for 20 weeks. Leaf and stem samples were hand-sectioned and freeze-dried prior to micro-PIXE analysis. Elemental distribution maps of leaves revealed Ni concentration of 7800 mg kg-1 dry weight (DW) in whole leaf sections, which was identical to the bulk tissue analysis. Elemental maps showed that Ni was preferentially localised in the adaxial epidermis (10,000 mg kg-1 DW) and reached a maximum of up to 10,000 mg kg-1 DW in the leaf margin. Freeze-dried stem sections from the same plants contained lower Ni than leaf tissues (1800 mg kg-1 versus 7800 mg kg-1 DW, respectively), however did not resolve a clear pattern of compartmentalisation across different anatomical regions. Our results suggest localisation in epidermal cells is an important physiological mechanism involved in Ni accumulation and tolerance in leaves of H.floribundus subsp. floribundus.

  1. Huntingtin Subcellular Localisation Is Regulated by Kinase Signalling Activity in the StHdhQ111 Model of HD

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Kathryn R.; Brooks, Simon P.; Dunnett, Stephen B.; Jones, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterised primarily by motor abnormalities, and is caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat in the huntingtin protein. Huntingtin dynamically shuttles between subcellular compartments, and the mutant huntingtin protein is mislocalised to cell nuclei, where it may interfere with nuclear functions, such as transcription. However, the mechanism by which mislocalisation of mutant huntingtin occurs is currently unknown. An immortalised embryonic striatal cell model of HD (StHdhQ111) was stimulated with epidermal growth factor in order to determine whether the subcellular localisation of huntingtin is dependent on kinase signalling pathway activation. Aberrant phosphorylation of AKT and MEK signalling pathways was identified in cells carrying mutant huntingtin. Activity within these pathways was found to contribute to the regulation of huntingtin and mutant huntingtin localisation, as well as to the expression of immediate-early genes. We propose that altered kinase signalling is a phenotype of Huntington’s disease that occurs prior to cell death; specifically, that altered kinase signalling may influence huntingtin localisation, which in turn may impact upon nuclear processes such as transcriptional regulation. Aiming to restore the balance of activity between kinase signalling networks may therefore prove to be an effective approach to delaying Huntington’s disease symptom development and progression. PMID:26660732

  2. The Effect of the Treatment of Localised Friction in Two-Phase Mixtures on the Stability of Parallel Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, H.N.; Garea, V.B.; Larreteguy, A.E.

    2002-07-01

    A one-dimensional analytical model has been developed to be used for the linear analysis of density-wave oscillations in a parallel heated channel. The heated channel is divided into a single-phase and a two-phase region. The two-phase region is represented by the homogeneous model. The localised friction at the channel exit is treated considering the two-phase mixture. The exact equation for the total channel pressure drop is perturbed around the steady state. The stability characteristics of the heated channel are investigated using the Nyquist criterion. The marginal stability boundary (MSB) is determined in the two-dimensional thermodynamic equilibrium space parameters, the subcooled boiling number and the phase change number. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental results published in open literature. The results indicate a more stable system with (1) low system pressure, (2) high inlet restriction, (3) low outlet restriction, and (4) high inlet velocity. The results show that the model agrees well with the available experimental data. In particular, the results show the significance of correcting the localised friction due to the presence of the two-phase mixture in the two-phase region: explicit inclusion of the two-phase localised friction improves the agreement with experimental results. This effect is more important for high heating power and high inlet subcooling. (authors)

  3. Huntingtin Subcellular Localisation Is Regulated by Kinase Signalling Activity in the StHdhQ111 Model of HD.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Kathryn R; Brooks, Simon P; Dunnett, Stephen B; Jones, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterised primarily by motor abnormalities, and is caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat in the huntingtin protein. Huntingtin dynamically shuttles between subcellular compartments, and the mutant huntingtin protein is mislocalised to cell nuclei, where it may interfere with nuclear functions, such as transcription. However, the mechanism by which mislocalisation of mutant huntingtin occurs is currently unknown. An immortalised embryonic striatal cell model of HD (StHdhQ111) was stimulated with epidermal growth factor in order to determine whether the subcellular localisation of huntingtin is dependent on kinase signalling pathway activation. Aberrant phosphorylation of AKT and MEK signalling pathways was identified in cells carrying mutant huntingtin. Activity within these pathways was found to contribute to the regulation of huntingtin and mutant huntingtin localisation, as well as to the expression of immediate-early genes. We propose that altered kinase signalling is a phenotype of Huntington's disease that occurs prior to cell death; specifically, that altered kinase signalling may influence huntingtin localisation, which in turn may impact upon nuclear processes such as transcriptional regulation. Aiming to restore the balance of activity between kinase signalling networks may therefore prove to be an effective approach to delaying Huntington's disease symptom development and progression. PMID:26660732

  4. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  5. [Resection margins in conservative breast cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Medina Fernández, Francisco Javier; Ayllón Terán, María Dolores; Lombardo Galera, María Sagrario; Rioja Torres, Pilar; Bascuñana Estudillo, Guillermo; Rufián Peña, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Conservative breast cancer surgery is facing a new problem: the potential tumour involvement of resection margins. This eventuality has been closely and negatively associated with disease-free survival. Various factors may influence the likelihood of margins being affected, mostly related to the characteristics of the tumour, patient or surgical technique. In the last decade, many studies have attempted to find predictive factors for margin involvement. However, it is currently the new techniques used in the study of margins and tumour localisation that are significantly reducing reoperations in conservative breast cancer surgery.

  6. Expression, localisation and functional activation of NFAT-2 in normal human skin, psoriasis, and cultured keratocytes.

    PubMed

    Al-Daraji, Wael I; Malak, Tamer T; Prescott, Richard J; Abdellaoui, Adel; Ali, Mahmud M; Dabash, Tarek; Zelger, Bettina G; Zelger, Bernhard

    2009-06-18

    Ciclosporin A (CsA) is widely utilized for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis. The therapeutic effects of CsA are thought to be mediated via its immunosuppressive action on infiltrating lymphocytes in skin lesions. CsA and tacrolimus block T cell activation by inhibiting the phosphatase calcineurin and preventing translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of the transcription factor Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT). As calcineurin and NFAT 1 have been shown to be functionally active in cultured human keratocytes, expression of other NFAT family members such as NFAT-2 and possible functional activation was investigated in human keratocytes. RT-PCR and Western Analysis were used to investigate the presence of NFAT-2 mRNA and protein in human keratocytes. Tissue culture of human keratocytes and immunostaining of cells on coverslips and confocal microscopy were used to assess the degree of nuclear localisation of NFAT-2 in cultured cells. Keratome biopsies were taken from patients with psoriasis (lesional and non-lesional skin) and normal skin and immunohistochemistry was used to assess the NFAT-2 localisation in these biopsies using a well characterized anti-NFAT-2 antibody. The NFAT-2 mRNA and protein expression was demonstrated using RT-PCR and Western blotting. Moreover, the expression of NFAT-2 in normal skin, non-lesional and lesional psoriasis showed a striking basal staining suggesting a role for NFAT-2 in keratocytes proliferation. A range of cell types in the skin express NFAT-2. The expression of NFAT-2 in human keratocytes and response to different agonists provides perhaps a unique opportunity to examine the regulation, subcellular localization and kinetics of translocation of different NFATs in primary cultured human cells. In these experiments the author assessed the expression, localization of NFAT-2 in cultured human keratocytes and measured the degree of nuclear localisaion of NFAT-2 using immunofluorescence

  7. Laser photolysis of caged compounds at 405 nm: photochemical advantages, localisation, phototoxicity and methods for calibration.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Corrie, John E T; Ogden, David

    2009-05-30

    Rapid, localised photolytic release of neurotransmitters from caged precursors at synaptic regions in the extracellular space is greatly hampered at irradiation wavelengths in the near-UV, close to the wavelength of maximum absorption of the caged precursor, because of inner-filtering by strong absorption of light in the cage solution between the objective and cell. For this reason two-photon excitation is commonly used for photolysis, particularly at multiple points distributed over large fields; or, with near-UV, if combined with local perfusion of the cage. These methods each have problems: the small cross-sections of common cages with two-photon excitation require high cage concentrations and light intensities near the phototoxic limit, while local perfusion gives non-uniform cage concentrations over the field of view. Single-photon photolysis at 405 nm, although less efficient than at 330-350 nm, with present cages is more efficient than two-photon photolysis. The reduced light absorption in the bulk cage solution permits efficient wide-field uncaging at non-toxic intensities with uniform cage concentration. Full photolysis of MNI-glutamate with 100 micros pulses required intensities of 2 mW microm(-2) at the preparation, shown to be non-toxic with repeated exposures. Light scattering at 405 nm was estimated as 50% at 18 microm depth in 21-day rat cerebellum. Methods are described for: (1) varying the laser spot size; (2) photolysis calibration in the microscope with the caged fluorophore NPE-HPTS over the wavelength range 347-405 nm; and (3) determining the point-spread function of excitation. Furthermore, DM-Nitrophen photolysis at 405 nm was efficient for intracellular investigations of Ca2+-dependent processes.

  8. Localisation of the neuropeptide PACAP and its receptors in the rat parathyroid and thyroid glands.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2011-03-01

    PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide) is widely distributed neuropeptide acting via three subtypes of receptors, PAC(1), VPAC(1) and VPAC(2). Here we examined the localisation and nature of PACAP-immunoreactive nerves in the rat thyroid and parathyroid glands and defined the distribution of PAC(1), VPAC(1) and VPAC(2) receptor mRNA's. In the parathyroid gland a large number of nerve fibres displaying PACAP-immunoreactivity were distributed beneath the capsule, around blood vessels and close to glandular cells. Most of the PACAP-nerves were sensory, since they co-stored CGRP (calcitonin-gene-related peptide) and were sensitive to capsaicin-treatment. mRNA's for PAC(1) and VPAC(2) receptors occurred in the parathyroid gland, mainly located in the glandular cells. In the thyroid gland PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibres were associated with blood vessels, thyroid follicles and parafollicular C-cells. A high degree of co-existence between PACAP and VIP (vasoactive intestinal polypeptide) was observed in the intrathyroid nerve fibres and cell bodies of the thyroid ganglion indicating a common origin for the two peptides. A minor population of PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibres with relation to blood vessels co-stored NPY (neuropeptide Y), whereas only a few fibres co-stored CGRP. PAC(1) and VPAC(1) receptor mRNA's occurred in follicular cells and blood vessels, whereas the expression of the VPAC(2) receptor was low. The findings suggest that PACAP plays a role in the regulation of parathyroid and thyroid blood flow and hormone secretion.

  9. Climate data, localisation of the sting, grade of anaphylaxis and therapy of hymenoptera stings.

    PubMed

    Braun, Christian Tasso; Mikula, Mirko; Ricklin, Meret Elisabeth; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K; Helbling, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    International epidemiological studies indicate that around 1-7% of the population respond with an allergic reaction to a hymenoptera sting, which is frequently associated with admission to an emergency department. This retrospective study included patients admitted between 2009 and 2013 to an emergency department after a hymenoptera sting. In all, 86 (60.1%) men and 57 (39.9%) women were included in the study. The mean age was 43 years, with a range from 19 to 84 years. The most common localisations of a sting were the head (n = 33; 22.5%), the hands (n = 32; 21.9%) and the arms (n = 26; 17.8%). In women, we recorded significantly more stings in distal extremities (p = 0.033) and in men stings in the rump and head were most frequent. Local swellings were observed in 67.1% (n = 96) of patients and 34.3% (n = 49) patients exhibited an anaphylactic reaction. Of these, 21.7% (n = 31) suffered from a grade I, 6.3% (n = 9) grade II, 4.2% (n = 6) grade III and 2.1% (n = 3) grade IV anaphylactic reactions. 46% (66) of the patients were given antihistamines, 45% (64) intravenous glucocorticoids and only 12.5% (16) epinephrine. Most stings were recorded on days without rainfall (p = 0.013), with more hours of sunshine (p = 0.001), low relative humidity (p = 0.006), with mean air pressure above 954.3 hPa and on days with mean temperature above 24.2 °C (p = 0.001). In conclusion, the most hymenoptera stings induced local swelling only; severe reactions were rare. The most dangerous stings are enoral and result from inattentive drinking. Epinephrine was rarely used in anaphylactic reactions.

  10. Histochemical localisation of carboxylesterase activity in rat and mouse oral cavity mucosa.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Darren A; Bogdanffy, Matthew S; Reed, Celia J

    2002-12-01

    Vinyl acetate (VA) is widely used within the chemical industry, in the manufacture of polyvinyl alcohol, and as polyvinyl acetate emulsions in latex paints, adhesives, paper and paper board coatings. Chronic oral exposure of rodents to high concentrations of VA induces tumours within the oral cavity. Carboxylesterase-dependent hydrolysis of VA is thought to be critical in the development of nasal tumours following inhalation exposure of animals to VA. Therefore, carboxylesterase activity was determined histochemically in the oral cavities of male F344 rats and BDF mice in order to explore the potential role of carboxylesterase-dependent hydrolysis of VA in the development of oral tumours. Following fixation in 10% neutral buffered formalin heads were decalcified in neutral saturated EDTA, embedded in resin, sectioned at six levels (three each for the upper and lower jaws), and carboxylesterase activity revealed in the tissue using alpha-naphthyl butyrate as substrate. The localisation of carboxylesterase activity in freshly dissected rat oral tissue was compared to that of the resin sections and found to be identical, thus validating the decalcification process. A similar pattern of carboxylesterase activity was observed for the two species. Staining was low in areas surrounding the teeth, and medium/high in the buccal mucosa, the central/posterior upper palate and those regions of the lower jaw not proximal to the teeth. In general the intensity of staining was greater in sections from the rat compared to those from the mouse. By comparison, carboxylesterase activity was considerably higher in mouse nasal olfactory epithelium than in any of the oral tissues. Thus the mucosa of the oral cavity has the potential to hydrolyse VA to its metabolites, acetic acid and acetaldehyde, and the presence of carboxylesterases at this site is consistent with, and may be an important determining factor in, the development of oral cavity tumours following exposure to VA.

  11. gamma-tubulin in trypanosomes: molecular characterisation and localisation to multiple and diverse microtubule organising centres.

    PubMed

    Scott, V; Sherwin, T; Gull, K

    1997-01-01

    A genomic clone from Trypanosoma brucei, which contains a full length gamma-tubulin gene, was isolated using degenerate oligonucleotide primers. The sequence of this clone predicts a protein of 447 amino acids having a high degree of homology with gamma-tubulins from human and Xenopus laevis (67.2% amino acid identity) and only 57.7% identity with the Plasmodium falciparum gamma-tubulin. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ selected RNA from a procyclic culture detects a major transcript of approximately 2.2 kb plus a minor transcript of approximately 3.6 kb. A fusion protein comprising almost the full length gamma-tubulin gene product (amino acids 8-447) plus an amino-terminal histidine tag has been expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and used to raise a polyclonal antibody. Immunofluorescence, using this antibody, shows classical centrosomal localisation in mammalian cells. In T. brucei gamma-tubulin is present in the basal bodies which subtend the flagellum and also at the anterior tip of the cell body where many minus ends of microtubules are located. Furthermore the antibody reveals a small subset of the sub-pellicular microtubules and a discrete dot within the nucleus which alters form with progression through the mitotic cycle. Evidence is also presented for discrete punctate staining within the microtubules of the cell body which may represent the presence of gamma-tubulin on the ends of individual microtubules. Our results indicate that gamma-tubulin is associated with diverse microtubule organising centres and structures in trypanosomes.

  12. Towards understanding edge localised mode mitigation by resonant magnetic perturbations in MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, I. T.; Kirk, A.; Ham, C. J.; Harrison, J. R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Saarelma, S.; Scannell, R.; Thornton, A. J.; Team, MAST

    2013-05-15

    Type-I Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) have been mitigated in MAST through the application of n=3,4, and 6 resonant magnetic perturbations. For each toroidal mode number of the non-axisymmetric applied fields, the frequency of the ELMs has been increased significantly, and the peak heat flux on the divertor plates reduced commensurately. This increase in ELM frequency occurs despite a significant drop in the edge pressure gradient, which would be expected to stabilise the peeling-ballooning modes thought to be responsible for type-I ELMs. Various mechanisms which could cause a destabilisation of the peeling-ballooning modes are presented, including pedestal widening, plasma rotation braking, three dimensional corrugation of the plasma boundary, and the existence of radially extended lobe structures near to the X-point. This leads to a model aimed at resolving the apparent dichotomy of ELM control, which is to say ELM suppression occurring due to the pedestal pressure reduction below the peeling-ballooning stability boundary, whilst the reduction in pressure can also lead to ELM mitigation, which is ostensibly a destabilisation of peeling-ballooning modes. In the case of ELM mitigation, the pedestal broadening, 3d corrugation, or lobes near the X-point degrade ballooning stability so much that the pedestal recovers rapidly to cross the new stability boundary at lower pressure more frequently, whilst in the case of suppression, the plasma parameters are such that the particle transport reduces the edge pressure below the stability boundary, which is only mildly affected by negligible rotation braking, small edge corrugation or short, broad lobe structures.

  13. Spatial Localisation of Actin Filaments across Developmental Stages of the Malaria Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Angrisano, Fiona; Delves, Michael J.; Zuccala, Elizabeth S.; Turnbull, Lynne; Dekiwadia, Chaitali; Olshina, Maya A.; Marapana, Danushka S.; Wong, Wilson; Mollard, Vanessa; Bradin, Clare H.; Tonkin, Christopher J.; Gunning, Peter W.; Ralph, Stuart A.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Sinden, Robert E.; Cowman, Alan F.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Baum, Jake

    2012-01-01

    Actin dynamics have been implicated in a variety of developmental processes during the malaria parasite lifecycle. Parasite motility, in particular, is thought to critically depend on an actomyosin motor located in the outer pellicle of the parasite cell. Efforts to understand the diverse roles actin plays have, however, been hampered by an inability to detect microfilaments under native conditions. To visualise the spatial dynamics of actin we generated a parasite-specific actin antibody that shows preferential recognition of filamentous actin and applied this tool to different lifecycle stages (merozoites, sporozoites and ookinetes) of the human and mouse malaria parasite species Plasmodium falciparum and P. berghei along with tachyzoites from the related apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Actin filament distribution was found associated with three core compartments: the nuclear periphery, pellicular membranes of motile or invasive parasite forms and in a ring-like distribution at the tight junction during merozoite invasion of erythrocytes in both human and mouse malaria parasites. Localisation at the nuclear periphery is consistent with an emerging role of actin in facilitating parasite gene regulation. During invasion, we show that the actin ring at the parasite-host cell tight junction is dependent on dynamic filament turnover. Super-resolution imaging places this ring posterior to, and not concentric with, the junction marker rhoptry neck protein 4. This implies motor force relies on the engagement of dynamic microfilaments at zones of traction, though not necessarily directly through receptor-ligand interactions at sites of adhesion during invasion. Combined, these observations extend current understanding of the diverse roles actin plays in malaria parasite development and apicomplexan cell motility, in particular refining understanding on the linkage of the internal parasite gliding motor with the extra-cellular milieu. PMID:22389687

  14. Heat shock protein 27 is a potential indicator for response to YangZheng XiaoJi and chemotherapy agents in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Sioned; Zhao, Huishan; Dart, Alwyn; Wang, Yamei; Ruge, Fiona; Gao, Yong; Wei, Cong; Wu, Yiling; Jiang, Wen G.

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is a member of the heat shock protein family which has been linked to tumour progression and, most interestingly, to chemotherapy resistance in cancer patients. The present study examined the potential interplay between HSP27 and YangZheng XiaoJi, a traditional Chinese medicine used in cancer treatment. A range of cell lines from different tumour types including pancreatic, lung, gastric, colorectal, breast, prostate and ovarian cancer (both wild-type and resistant) were used. Levels and activation of HSP27 and its potential associated signalling pathways were evaluated by protein array and western blotting. Knockdown of HSP27 in cancer cells was achieved using siRNA. Localisation and co-localisation of HSP27 and other proteins were carried out by immunofluorescence. Cell growth and migration were evaluated in their response to a range of chemotherapeutic agents. The present study first identified, by way of protein array, that YangZheng XiaoJi was able to inhibit the phosphorylation of HSP27 protein in cancer cells. We further demonstrated that HSP27, which is co-localised with caspase-9, can be blocked from localising in focal adhesions and co-localising with caspase-9 by YangZheng XiaoJi. The study also demonstrated that YangZheng XiaoJi was able to sensitise cancer cells including those cells that were resistant to chemotherapy, to chemotherapeutic agents. Finally, knocking down HSP27 markedly reduced the migration of cancer cells and increased the sensitivity of cancer cells to the inhibitory effect on cellular migration by YangZheng XiaoJi. YangZheng XiaoJi can act as an agent in first sensitising cancer cells to chemotherapy and secondly to overcome, to some degree, chemoresistance when used in an appropriate fashion in patients who have active HSP27. PMID:27600495

  15. VIP induces NF-κB1-nuclear localisation through different signalling pathways in human tumour and non-tumour prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Carmena, María J; Bajo, Ana M; Vacas, Eva; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto, Juan C

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is a powerful activator of angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Transactivation and nuclear localisation of NF-κB is an index of recurrence in prostate cancer. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) exerts similar effects in prostate cancer models involving increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) which are related to NF-κB transactivation. Here we studied differential mechanisms of VIP-induced NF-κB transactivation in non-tumour RWPE-1 and tumour LNCaP and PC3 human prostate epithelial cells. Immunofluorescence studies showed that VIP increases translocation of the p50 subunit of NF-κB1 to the nucleus, an effect that was inhibited by curcumin. The signalling transduction pathways involved are different depending on cell transformation degree. In control cells (RWPE1), the effect is mediated by protein kinase A (PKA) activation and does not implicate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) or phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) pathways whereas the opposite is true in tumour LNCaP and PC3 cells. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC) pathway is involved in transformed cells but not in control cells. Curcumin blocks the activating effect of VIP on COX-2 promoter/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and VEGF expression and secretion. The study incorporates direct observation on COX-2 promoter and suggests that VIP effect on VEGF may be indirectly mediated by PGE2 after being synthesised by COX-2, thus amplifying the initial signal. We show that the signalling involved in VIP effects on VEGF is cAMP/PKA in non-tumour cells and cAMP/EPAC/ERK/PI3K in tumour cells which coincides with pathways mediating p50 nuclear translocation. Thus, VIP appears to use different pathways for NF-κB1 (p50) transactivation in prostate epithelial cells depending on whether they are transformed or not. Transformed cells depend on pro-survival and pro-proliferative signalling pathways

  16. Prostate cancer recurrence after Focal Therapy: Treatment options.

    PubMed

    Hamid, S; Guillaumier, S; Shah, T; Arya, M; Ahmed, H U

    2016-07-01

    Focal therapy is a novel treatment option in localised prostate cancer with or without a visible lesion on MRI. Treatment for low to intermediate risk prostate cancer with focal therapy has demonstrated good short to medium term outcomes with fewer undesirable genitourinary side effects. This has made focal therapy more appealing to men who find the implications of radical treatment unacceptable or are unable to tolerate active surveillance. In this paper we review the literature for treatment options in prostate cancer recurrence post focal therapy. We also cover the different definitions of failure agreed upon in previous consensus meetings, as well as their implications on future management focal therapy patients. PMID:27416641

  17. Probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici modulates both localised intestinal- and peripheral-immunity in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Standen, B T; Rawling, M D; Davies, S J; Castex, M; Foey, A; Gioacchini, G; Carnevali, O; Merrifield, D L

    2013-10-01

    The application of probiotics in aquaculture has received concerted research efforts but the localised intestinal immunological response of fish to probiotic bacteria is poorly understood. Therefore, a study was conducted to evaluate the probiotic effect of Pediococcus acidilactici on Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) with specific emphasis on intestinal health and probiotic levels as well as system level responses such as growth performance, feed utilization and haemato-immunological parameters under non-challenged conditions. Fish (9.19 ± 0.04 g) were fed either a control diet or a P. acidilactici supplemented diet (at 2.81 × 10(6) CFU g(-)(1)) for six weeks. At the end of the study the probiotic was observed to populate the intestine, accounting for ca. 3% (1.59 × 10(5) CFU g(-)(1)) of the cultivable intestinal bacterial load. Real-time PCR indicated that the probiotic treatment may potentiate the immune-responsiveness of the intestine as up-regulation of the gene expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα was observed in the probiotic fed fish (P < 0.05). Light microscopy observations revealed elevated intraepithelial leucocyte (IEL) levels in the intestine of P. acidilactici fed tilapia after six weeks (P < 0.05) of feeding and a trend towards elevated goblet cells was also observed after six weeks feeding (P = 0.08). Concomitantly at week six, along with elevated IELs and elevated TNFα mRNA levels in the intestine, an increased abundance of circulating neutrophils and monocytes were observed in fish fed the probiotic supplemented diet (P < 0.05). This haemopoietic expansion of innate immune cells could be reflective of an elevated state of immuno-readiness. Together these results suggest that the probiotic has a protective action on the intestinal mucosal cells, stimulating the innate immune response after feeding for a period of six weeks. These immunological modulations did not impair growth performance or the remaining haematological and

  18. Protocol: a fast and simple in situ PCR method for localising gene expression in plant tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An important step in characterising the function of a gene is identifying the cells in which it is expressed. Traditional methods to determine this include in situ hybridisation, gene promoter-reporter fusions or cell isolation/purification techniques followed by quantitative PCR. These methods, although frequently used, can have limitations including their time-consuming nature, limited specificity, reliance upon well-annotated promoters, high cost, and the need for specialized equipment. In situ PCR is a relatively simple and rapid method that involves the amplification of specific mRNA directly within plant tissue whilst incorporating labelled nucleotides that are subsequently detected by immunohistochemistry. Another notable advantage of this technique is that it can be used on plants that are not easily genetically transformed. Results An optimised workflow for in-tube and on-slide in situ PCR is presented that has been evaluated using multiple plant species and tissue types. The protocol includes optimised methods for: (i) fixing, embedding, and sectioning of plant tissue; (ii) DNase treatment; (iii) in situ RT-PCR with the incorporation of DIG-labelled nucleotides; (iv) signal detection using colourimetric alkaline phosphatase substrates; and (v) mounting and microscopy. We also provide advice on troubleshooting and the limitations of using fluorescence as an alternative detection method. Using our protocol, reliable results can be obtained within two days from harvesting plant material. This method requires limited specialized equipment and can be adopted by any laboratory with a vibratome (vibrating blade microtome), a standard thermocycler, and a microscope. We show that the technique can be used to localise gene expression with cell-specific resolution. Conclusions The in situ PCR method presented here is highly sensitive and specific. It reliably identifies the cellular expression pattern of even highly homologous and low abundance

  19. Transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy for the diagnosis of localised pulmonary lesions: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lacasse, Y.; Wong, E.; Guyatt, G.; Cook, D.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Persisting controversy surrounds the use of transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy (TNAB) stemming from its uncertain diagnostic accuracy. A systematic review and meta-analysis was therefore conducted to evaluate the accuracy of TNAB for the diagnosis of solitary or multiple localised pulmonary lesions.
METHODS—Searches for English literature papers in Index Medicus (1963-1965) and Medline (1966-1996) were performed and the bibliographies of the retrieved articles were systematically reviewed. Articles evaluating the accuracy of TNAB in series of consecutive patients presenting with solitary or multiple pulmonary lesions were considered. Only papers in which ⩾90% of patients were given a final diagnosis according to an appropriate reference standard were included in the meta-analysis.
RESULTS—A total of 48 studies were included and five meta-analyses were conducted according to four diagnostic thresholds. From the pooled sensitivity and specificity corresponding to each diagnostic threshold, associated likelihood ratios (LRs) were derived for malignant disease as follows: (1) malignant versus all other categories, LR = 72; (2) malignant or suspicious versus all others, LR = 49; (3) suspicious versus all categories but malignant, LR = 15; (4) benign versus all others, LR = 0.07; and (5) specific benign diagnosis versus all others, LR = 0.005. Differences in methodological quality of the studies, needle types, or whether a cytopathologist participated in the procedure failed to explain the heterogeneity of the results found in almost every meta-analysis. Given a 50% probability of malignancy prior to the TNAB, post-test probabilities of malignancy upon receiving the results would be malignant, 99%; suspicious, 94%; non-specific benign, 7%; and benign with a specific diagnosis, 0.6%.
CONCLUSIONS—Given the intermediate pre-test probabilities that would probably lead to performing TNAB, findings of "malignant" or of a specific diagnosis of a

  20. The Design of a Real-Time Nowcasting System for Localised Weather.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Mohammed

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. National meteorological offices are largely concerned with synoptic-scale forecasting where weather predictions are produced for a whole country for 24 hours ahead. In practice, many local organisations (such as emergency services, construction industries, forestry, farming, and sports) require only local short-term, bespoke, weather predictions and warnings. This thesis shows that these less-demanding requirements do not require exceptional computing power and can be met by a modern, desk-top system which monitors site-specific ground conditions (such as temperature, pressure, wind speed and direction, etc.) augmented with above ground information from satellite images to produce 'nowcasts'. The emphasis in this thesis has been towards the design of such a real-time system for nowcasting. Local site-specific conditions are monitored using a custom-built, stand alone, Motorola 6809 based sub-system. Above ground information is received from the METEOSAT 4 geo -stationary satellite using a sub-system based on a commercially available equipment. The information is ephemeral and must be captured in real-time. The real-time nowcasting system for localised weather handles the data as a transparent task using the limited capabilities of the PC system. Ground data produces a time series of measurements at a specific location which represents the past-to-present atmospheric conditions of the particular site from which much information can be extracted. The novel approach adopted in this thesis is one of constructing stochastic models based on the AutoRegressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) technique. The satellite images contain features (such as cloud formations) which evolve dynamically and may be subject to movement, growth, distortion, bifurcation, superposition, or elimination between images. The process of extracting a weather feature, following its motion and predicting its future evolution involves

  1. Multiple domains of Stardust differentially mediate localisation of the Crumbs-Stardust complex during photoreceptor development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bulgakova, Natalia A; Kempkens, Ozlem; Knust, Elisabeth

    2008-06-15

    Drosophila Stardust (Sdt), a member of the MAGUK family of scaffolding proteins, is a constituent of the evolutionarily conserved Crumbs-Stardust (Crb-Sdt) complex that controls epithelial cell polarity in the embryo and morphogenesis of photoreceptor cells. Although apical localisation is a hallmark of the complex in all cell types and in all organisms analysed, only little is known about how individual components are targeted to the apical membrane. We have performed a structure-function analysis of Sdt by constructing transgenic flies that express altered forms of Sdt to determine the roles of individual domains for localisation and function in photoreceptor cells. The results corroborate the observation that the organisation of the Crb-Sdt complex is differentially regulated in pupal and adult photoreceptors. In pupal photoreceptors, only the PDZ domain of Sdt - the binding site of Crb - is required for apical targeting. In adult photoreceptors, by contrast, targeting of Sdt to the stalk membrane, a distinct compartment of the apical membrane between the rhabdomere and the zonula adherens, depends on several domains, and seems to be a two-step process. The N-terminus, including the two ECR domains and a divergent N-terminal L27 domain that binds the multi-PDZ domain protein PATJ in vitro, is necessary for targeting the protein to the apical pole of the cell. The PDZ-, the SH3- and the GUK-domains are required to restrict the protein to the stalk membrane. Drosophila PATJ or Drosophila Lin-7 are stabilised whenever a Sdt variant that contains the respective binding site is present, independently of where the variant is localised. By contrast, only full-length Sdt, confined to the stalk membrane, stabilises and localises Crb, although only in reduced amounts. The amount of Crumbs recruited to the stalk membrane correlates with its length. Our results highlight the importance of the different Sdt domains and point to a more intricate regulation of the Crb

  2. Tetrahymena Expresses More than a Hundred Proteins with Lipid-binding MORN Motifs that can Differ in their Subcellular Localisations.

    PubMed

    Habicht, Jörn; Woehle, Christian; Gould, Sven B

    2015-01-01

    Proteins with membrane occupation and recognition nexus (MORN) motifs are associated with cell fission in apicomplexan parasites, chloroplast division in Arabidopsis and the motility of sperm cells. We found that ciliates are among those that encode the largest variety of MORN proteins. Tetrahymena thermophila expresses 129 MORN protein-encoding genes, some of which are specifically up-regulated during conjugation. A lipid-binding assay underpins the assumption that the predominant function of MORN motifs themselves is to confer the ability of lipid binding. The localisation of four MORN candidate proteins with similar characteristics highlights the functional diversity of this group especially in ciliates.

  3. Synchrotron X-ray Tomographic Quantification of Deformation Induced Strain Localisation in Semi-solid Al- 15wt.%Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, B.; Karagadde, S.; Marrow, T. J.; Connolley, T.; Lee, P. D.

    2015-06-01

    Uniaxial compression and indentation of a semi-solid Al-15wt.%Cu alloy was investigated by high speed synchrotron X-ray microtomography, quantifying the microstructural response of a solidifying alloy to applied strain. Tomograms were continuously acquired whilst performing deformation using a precision thermal-mechanical rig on a synchrotron beamline. The results illustrate how defects and shear bands can form in response to different loading conditions. Using digital volume correlation, the global and localised strains were measured, providing quantitative datasets for granular flow models of semi-solid deformation.

  4. Altered localisation of the copper efflux transporters ATP7A and ATP7B associated with cisplatin resistance in human ovarian carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalayda, Ganna V; Wagner, Christina H; Buß, Irina; Reedijk, Jan; Jaehde, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Background Copper homeostasis proteins ATP7A and ATP7B are assumed to be involved in the intracellular transport of cisplatin. The aim of the present study was to assess the relevance of sub cellular localisation of these transporters for acquired cisplatin resistance in vitro. For this purpose, localisation of ATP7A and ATP7B in A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells and their cisplatin-resistant variant, A2780cis, was investigated. Methods Sub cellular localisation of ATP7A and ATP7B in sensitive and resistant cells was investigated using confocal fluorescence microscopy after immunohistochemical staining. Co-localisation experiments with a cisplatin analogue modified with a carboxyfluorescein-diacetate residue were performed. Cytotoxicity of the fluorescent cisplatin analogue in A2780 and A2780cis cells was determined using an MTT-based assay. The significance of differences was analysed using Student's t test or Mann-Whitney test as appropriate, p values of < 0.05 were considered significant. Results In the sensitive cells, both transporters are mainly localised in the trans-Golgi network, whereas they are sequestrated in more peripherally located vesicles in the resistant cells. Altered localisation of ATP7A and ATP7B in A2780cis cells is likely to be a consequence of major abnormalities in intracellular protein trafficking related to a reduced lysosomal compartment in this cell line. Changes in sub cellular localisation of ATP7A and ATP7B may facilitate sequestration of cisplatin in the vesicular structures of A2780cis cells, which may prevent drug binding to genomic DNA and thereby contribute to cisplatin resistance. Conclusion Our results indicate that alterations in sub cellular localisation of transport proteins may contribute to cisplatin resistance in vitro. Investigation of intracellular protein localisation in primary tumour cell cultures and tumour tissues may help to develop markers of clinically relevant cisplatin resistance. Detection of resistant

  5. PDZ interaction of Vangl2 links PSD-95 and Prickle2 but plays only a limited role in the synaptic localisation of Vangl2

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Tadahiro; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Kishi, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Postsynaptic density-95/Discs large/Zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) domain-mediated protein interactions play pivotal roles in various molecular biological events, including protein localisation, assembly, and signal transduction. Although the vertebrate regulator of planar cell polarity Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2) was recently described as a postsynaptic molecule with a PDZ-binding motif, the role of its PDZ interaction at the synapse is unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that the PDZ interaction was dispensable for the normal cluster formation of Vangl2 and not absolutely required for the synapse-associated localisation of Vangl2 in cultured hippocampal neurons. We further showed that the synaptic localisation of Vangl2 was categorised into two types: overlapping co-localisation with postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 or highly correlated but complementary pattern of association with PSD-95. Only the former was significantly sensitive to deletion of the PDZ-binding motif. In addition, the PDZ interaction enhanced the protein interactions between PSD-95 and Prickle2, which is another planar cell polarity factor that is localised at the postsynaptic density. Taken together with our recent report that the density of PSD-95 clusters was reduced in Vangl2-silenced neurons, these results suggest that Vangl2 determines the complex formation and clustering of postsynaptic molecules for synaptogenesis in mammalian brains. PMID:26257100

  6. GEP-NETS update: functional localisation and scintigraphy in neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas (GEP-NETs).

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-05-01

    For patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas (GEP) (GEP-NETs), excellent care should ideally be provided by a multidisciplinary team of skilled health care professionals. In these patients, a combination of nuclear medicine imaging and conventional radiological imaging techniques is usually mandatory for primary tumour visualisation, tumour staging and evaluation of treatment. In specific cases, as in patients with occult insulinomas, sampling procedures can provide a clue as to where to localise the insulin-hypersecreting pancreatic NETs. Recent developments in these fields have led to an increase in the detection rate of primary GEP-NETs and their metastatic deposits. Radiopharmaceuticals targeted at specific tumour cell properties and processes can be used to provide sensitive and specific whole-body imaging. Functional imaging also allows for patient selection for receptor-based therapies and prediction of the efficacy of such therapies. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT) and single-photon emission CT/CT are used to map functional images with anatomical localisations. As a result, tumour imaging and tumour follow-up strategies can be optimised for every individual GEP-NET patient. In some cases, functional imaging might give indications with regard to future tumour behaviour and prognosis.

  7. Localisation of deformations of the midfacial complex in subjects with class III malocclusions employing thin-plate spline analysis

    PubMed Central

    SINGH, G. D.; McNAMARA JR, J. A.; LOZANOFF, S.

    1997-01-01

    This study determines deformations of the midface that contribute to a class III appearance, employing thin-plate spline analysis. A total of 135 lateral cephalographs of prepubertal children of European-American descent with either class III malocclusions or a class I molar occlusion were compared. The cephalographs were traced and checked, and 7 homologous landmarks of the midface were identified and digitised. The data sets were scaled to an equivalent size and subjected to Procrustes analysis. These statistical tests indicated significant differences (P<0.05) between the averaged class I and class III morphologies. Thin-plate spline analysis indicated that both affine and nonaffine transformations contribute towards the total spline for the averaged midfacial configuration. For nonaffine transformations, partial warp 3 had the highest magnitude, indicating the large scale deformations of the midfacial configuration. These deformations affected the palatal landmarks, and were associated with compression of the midfacial complex in the anteroposterior plane predominantly. Partial warp 4 produced some vertical compression of the posterior aspect of the midfacial complex whereas partial warps 1 and 2 indicated localised shape changes of the maxillary alveolus region. Large spatial-scale deformations therefore affect the midfacial complex in an anteroposterior axis, in combination with vertical compression and localised distortions. These deformations may represent a developmental diminution of the palatal complex anteroposteriorly that, allied with vertical shortening of midfacial height posteriorly, results in class III malocclusions with a retrusive midfacial profile. PMID:9449078

  8. On-Demand Information Retrieval in Sensor Networks with Localised Query and Energy-Balanced Data Collection

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Rui; Zhang, Bing

    2011-01-01

    On-demand information retrieval enables users to query and collect up-to-date sensing information from sensor nodes. Since high energy efficiency is required in a sensor network, it is desirable to disseminate query messages with small traffic overhead and to collect sensing data with low energy consumption. However, on-demand query messages are generally forwarded to sensor nodes in network-wide broadcasts, which create large traffic overhead. In addition, since on-demand information retrieval may introduce intermittent and spatial data collections, the construction and maintenance of conventional aggregation structures such as clusters and chains will be at high cost. In this paper, we propose an on-demand information retrieval approach that exploits the name resolution of data queries according to the attribute and location of each sensor node. The proposed approach localises each query dissemination and enable localised data collection with maximised aggregation. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, an analytical model that describes the criteria of sink proxy selection is provided. The evaluation results reveal that the proposed scheme significantly reduces energy consumption and improves the balance of energy consumption among sensor nodes by alleviating heavy traffic near the sink. PMID:22346581

  9. On-demand information retrieval in sensor networks with localised query and energy-balanced data collection.

    PubMed

    Teng, Rui; Zhang, Bing

    2011-01-01

    On-demand information retrieval enables users to query and collect up-to-date sensing information from sensor nodes. Since high energy efficiency is required in a sensor network, it is desirable to disseminate query messages with small traffic overhead and to collect sensing data with low energy consumption. However, on-demand query messages are generally forwarded to sensor nodes in network-wide broadcasts, which create large traffic overhead. In addition, since on-demand information retrieval may introduce intermittent and spatial data collections, the construction and maintenance of conventional aggregation structures such as clusters and chains will be at high cost. In this paper, we propose an on-demand information retrieval approach that exploits the name resolution of data queries according to the attribute and location of each sensor node. The proposed approach localises each query dissemination and enable localised data collection with maximised aggregation. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, an analytical model that describes the criteria of sink proxy selection is provided. The evaluation results reveal that the proposed scheme significantly reduces energy consumption and improves the balance of energy consumption among sensor nodes by alleviating heavy traffic near the sink.

  10. On the efficiency of 1D atom localisation via EIT in a degenerate two-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Jelena; Arsenović, Dušan; Jelenković, Branislav M.

    2016-04-01

    We analyse one-dimensional (1D) subwavelength atom localisation in a cold atomic medium under the action of two optical fields, the standing-wave and travelling probe fields, in the presence of a magnetic field. Optical Bloch equations are solved numerically for the hyperfine atomic transition {{F}g}=2\\to {{F}e}=1 of the 87Rb D1 line. All Zeeman sublevels are included in the calculations. This atomic scheme allows electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) if the applied magnetic field is zero or small. The results for the position-dependent probe absorption are presented for two configurations, depending on the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the optical fields’ polarisations. The efficiency of the atom localisation is analysed for a large range of field intensities and applied magnetic fields. The observed behaviour of the probe absorption is analysed through the effects of EIT induced by two fields of various strengths and its dependence on the applied magnetic fields.

  11. [Adenoma polymorphum localised out of salivary glands in material of ENT Department MSS Hospital between 2007-2009 - two cases].

    PubMed

    Borowska, Karolina; Pietniczka-Załeska, Mirosława; Sołtys, Justyna; Budzynowska, Krystyna

    2009-09-01

    The adenoma polymorphum is benign salivary glands tumor. The most common location of occurrence is the parotid followed by the minor salivary glands in which the palate, upper lip and buccal mucosa are most commonly affected. It is a demarcated from the surronding, painless, capsulated and slow growing mass. Microscopically these tumors are composed of varying proportions of epithelial and mesenchymal tissue. Treatment of adenoma polymorphum is complete surgical excision with a surronding margin of normal tissue. This procedure avoids local recurrence. In two years (2007-2009) In Otolaryngology Ward In Miedzyleski Szpiatl Specjalistyczny treated four patients with adenoma polymorphum localised out of salivary glands. The authors described two cases of tumor mixtus localised on soft palate and in external ear canal. The first is a 57-year old male presented a painless swelling over the palate of four months duration. Admitted to ENT Unit on april 2009. He denier dysphagia and dyspnoea. On examination there was a firm, circumscribed tumor of the palate in the right side. CT scans show a right soft palate well-defined mass. He underwent transoral surgical excision. Postoperative period was uneventful. Another case is 18-year old girl with progressive worsening of hearing .On examination external ear canal was blocked due to firm and round tumor on his upper wall. The tumor was excised In local anesthesia. During two years observation there was no evidence of local reccurence.

  12. SmartCell, a framework to simulate cellular processes that combines stochastic approximation with diffusion and localisation: analysis of simple networks.

    PubMed

    Ander, M; Beltrao, P; Di Ventura, B; Ferkinghoff-Borg, J; Foglierini, M; Kaplan, A; Lemerle, C; Tomás-Oliveira, I; Serrano, L

    2004-06-01

    SmartCell has been developed to be a general framework for modelling and simulation of diffusion-reaction networks in a whole-cell context. It supports localisation and diffusion by using a mesoscopic stochastic reaction model. The SmartCell package can handle any cell geometry, considers different cell compartments, allows localisation of species, supports DNA transcription and translation, membrane diffusion and multistep reactions, as well as cell growth. Moreover, different temporal and spatial constraints can be applied to the model. A GUI interface that facilitates model making is also available. In this work we discuss limitations and advantages arising from the approach used in SmartCell and determine the impact of localisation on the behaviour of simple well-defined networks, previously analysed with differential equations. Our results show that this factor might play an important role in the response of networks and cannot be neglected in cell simulations.

  13. Improvement of localised corrosion resistance of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel joints made by gas metal arc welding under electromagnetic interaction of low intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rentería, M. A.; López-Morelos, V. H.; García-Hernández, R.; Dzib-Pérez, L.; García-Ochoa, E. M.; González-Sánchez, J.

    2014-12-01

    The resistance to localised corrosion of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel plates joined by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) under the effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) was evaluated with sensitive electrochemical methods. Welds were made using two shielding gas mixtures: 98% Ar + 2% O2 (M1) and 97% Ar + 3% N2 (M2). Plates were welded under EMILI using the M1 gas with constant welding parameters. The modified microstructural evolution in the high temperature heat affected zone and at the fusion zone induced by application of EMILI during welding is associated with the increase of resistance to localised corrosion of the welded joints. Joints made by GMAW using the shielding gas M2 without the application of magnetic field presented high resistance to general corrosion but high susceptibility to undergo localised attack.

  14. Absolute High-Precision Localisation of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle by Using Real-Time Aerial Video Imagery for Geo-referenced Orthophoto Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnert, Lars; Ax, Markus; Langer, Matthias; Nguyen van, Duong; Kuhnert, Klaus-Dieter

    This paper describes an absolute localisation method for an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) if GPS is unavailable for the vehicle. The basic idea is to combine an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to the ground vehicle and use it as an external sensor platform to achieve an absolute localisation of the robotic team. Beside the discussion of the rather naive method directly using the GPS position of the aerial robot to deduce the ground robot's position the main focus of this paper lies on the indirect usage of the telemetry data of the aerial robot combined with live video images of an onboard camera to realise a registration of local video images with apriori registered orthophotos. This yields to a precise driftless absolute localisation of the unmanned ground vehicle. Experiments with our robotic team (AMOR and PSYCHE) successfully verify this approach.

  15. The treatment of localised anterior tooth wear with indirect Artglass restorations at an increased occlusal vertical dimension. Results after two years.

    PubMed

    Gow, Alex M; Hemmings, Ken W

    2002-09-01

    This study evaluated the use of indirect palatal veneers placed at an increased vertical dimension of occlusion in patients with advanced localised anterior tooth wear. A total of 75 indirect Artglass palatal veneers were cemented on 12 patients. Patients were reviewed until the posterior occlusion had re-established and then annually. Preliminary follow up at two years showed minor failures had occurred in 13.3% of cases. These were repaired with direct composite or polishing only. Posterior occlusion was restored after a mean duration of nine months in ten cases. Artglass indirect palatal restorations are an effective short-term treatment of localised anterior tooth wear.

  16. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  17. Focal therapy in prostate cancer: the current situation

    PubMed Central

    Jácome-Pita, FX; Sánchez-Salas, R; Barret, E; Amaruch, N; Gonzalez-Enguita, C; Cathelineau, X

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most significant pathologies in the field of urology. The adoption of screening strategies and improvements in biopsies have resulted in an increase in early-stage tumour detection. Radical global therapies provide very good oncological results in localised prostate cancer. However, excess treatment in low- and, in some cases, intermediate-risk groups affects the quality of life of these patients. In the case of localised prostate cancer, focal therapies offer a minimally invasive option with good results with respect to established treatments. Although this is currently not a standard treatment, it represents the therapeutic approach with the greatest potential. This literature review has the following objectives: to define selection criteria for patients who are candidates for focal therapy, to assess the current situation and results of the different therapeutic options, and to define procedures in cases of recurrence and for follow-ups. We concluded that focal therapy is a viable therapeutic alternative for localised prostate cancer, specifically cryosurgery and high-intensity targeted ultrasound, which have acceptable oncologic results and a lower comorbidity compared with global treatments. Studies with a high level of scientific evidence are still needed to validate these results. Acquisition of evidence A search was carried out on the Medline (PubMed), EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane databases of all papers published before 31 July 2013. We included clinical studies and literature reviews that evaluated primary focal therapy for prostate cancer confirmed by biopsy and excluded focal rescue therapy studies. The keywords used were focal therapy and prostate cancer. Initially, we found 42 articles; 15 studies were excluded because they did not meet the minimum criteria for inclusion. A total of 1350 cases were treated throughout 27 studies. PMID:24944577

  18. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Eye Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Eye Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Eye Cancer Overview Statistics ...

  19. Cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov

  20. Localised and limited impact of a dredging operation on coral cover in the northwestern lagoon of New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Adjeroud, Mehdi; Gilbert, Antoine; Facon, Mathilde; Foglia, Marion; Moreton, Benjamin; Heintz, Tom

    2016-04-15

    We report here an interannual survey (2006-2012) of coral cover in the northwestern lagoon of New Caledonia, to assess the impact of an important dredging operation (August 2008-February 2010) associated with the construction of the largest nickel mining site in the Pacific. A BACI (Before-After Control-Impact) analysis failed to detect any significant interaction between period (before, during, and after dredging) and the category of the stations (impact vs. control). Among the 31 stations surveyed, only seven showed decreasing coral cover during the study period, mainly due to a decline in Acroporidae. However, the relationship between the dredging and this decrease was highly plausible only for one station, situated 0.9km from the dredging site. High hydrodynamism in the study area, the abundance of resistant corals and efficient protective measures during the dredging operation might explain these localised and limited impacts. PMID:26902684

  1. Identifying low-dimensional dynamics in type-I edge-localised-mode processes in JET plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, F. A.; Chapman, S. C.; Nicol, R. M.; Dendy, R. O.; Webster, A. J.; Alper, B. [EURATOM Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2013-04-15

    Edge localised mode (ELM) measurements from reproducibly similar plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak, which differ only in their gas puffing rate, are analysed in terms of the pattern in the sequence of inter-ELM time intervals. It is found that the category of ELM defined empirically as type I-typically more regular, less frequent, and having larger amplitude than other ELM types-embraces substantially different ELMing processes. By quantifying the structure in the sequence of inter-ELM time intervals using delay time plots, we reveal transitions between distinct phase space dynamics, implying transitions between distinct underlying physical processes. The control parameter for these transitions between these different ELMing processes is the gas puffing rate.

  2. Point-contacting by localised dielectric breakdown: Characterisation of a metallisation technique for the rear surface of a solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Western, Ned J. Perez-Wurfl, Ivan; Wenham, Stuart R.; Bremner, Stephen P.

    2015-07-28

    Characterisation results are presented for ohmic contacts to passivated crystalline silicon, formed using the point-contacting by localised dielectric breakdown technique. Self aligned contact is made between the metal and heavily doped surface regions through an intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layer. Local doping is provided by a laser using a standard technique identical to that for selective emitter formation. Our results for gate metals of Au, Al, and Ti show that the technique does not rely on reactivity between the dielectric and the metal, excluding metal induced crystallisation from the contacting process. Diffusion of the gate metal into the dielectric is observed in transmission electron microscope images suggesting high temperatures are present locally during the breakdown process. The technique is equally applicable to contacting of n and p-type silicon, making it a potential alternative for ohmic contacting to silicon to passivated rear surfaces.

  3. Top- and bottom-emission-enhanced electroluminescence of deep-UV light-emitting diodes induced by localised surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kai; Gao, Na; Wang, Chunzi; Chen, Xue; Li, Jinchai; Li, Shuping; Yang, Xu; Kang, Junyong

    2014-01-01

    We report localised-surface-plasmon (LSP) enhanced deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (deep-UV LEDs) using Al nanoparticles for LSP coupling. Polygonal Al nanoparticles were fabricated on the top surfaces of the deep-UV LEDs using the oblique-angle deposition method. Both the top- and bottom-emission electroluminescence of deep-UV LEDs with 279 nm multiple-quantum-well emissions can be effectively enhanced by the coupling with the LSP generated in the Al nanoparticles. The primary bottom-emission wavelength is longer than the primary top-emission wavelength. This difference in wavelength can be attributed to the substrate-induced Fano resonance effect. For resonance modes with shorter wavelengths, the radiation fraction directed back into the LEDs is largest in the direction that is nearly parallel to the surface of the device and results in total reflection and re-absorption in the LEDs. PMID:24625660

  4. Unusual Localisation for Onychomatricoma on the 5th Toenail: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Coutellier, A.; Théate, I.

    2016-01-01

    Onychomatricoma is a rare and benign tumour of the nail matrix but originates rarely from the ventral portion of the proximal nail fold. This tumour is characterised by fingerlike projections that invade the nail plate. This lesion, of unknown aetiology, is typically asymptomatic with slow progression. Localisation on the finger is the most frequently described. We report the case of a 68-year-old woman who has an onychomatricoma in an unusual location, the fifth toe of the left foot. Due to its clinical appearance, the tumour can be confused with and treated as onychomycosis. However, if it is resistant to an oral antifungal well behaved treatment, one must consider onychomatricoma diagnosis. PMID:27478656

  5. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Petra; Bleibaum, Florian; Einwich, Angelika; Günther, Anja; Liedvogel, Miriam; Heyers, Dominik; Depping, Anne; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b) exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins), we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula), migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and pigeons (Columba livia). In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism.

  6. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Bolte, Petra; Bleibaum, Florian; Einwich, Angelika; Günther, Anja; Liedvogel, Miriam; Heyers, Dominik; Depping, Anne; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Janssen‐Bienhold, Ulrike; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b) exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins), we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula), migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and pigeons (Columba livia). In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism. PMID:26953791

  7. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Petra; Bleibaum, Florian; Einwich, Angelika; Günther, Anja; Liedvogel, Miriam; Heyers, Dominik; Depping, Anne; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b) exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins), we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula), migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and pigeons (Columba livia). In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism. PMID:26953791

  8. A prospective fMRI-based technique for localising the epileptogenic zone in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hunyadi, Borbála; Tousseyn, Simon; Dupont, Patrick; Van Huffel, Sabine; De Vos, Maarten; Van Paesschen, Wim

    2015-06-01

    There is growing evidence for the benefits of simultaneous EEG-fMRI as a non-invasive localising tool in the presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. However, many EEG-fMRI studies fail due to the absence of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) on EEG. Here we present an algorithm which makes use of fMRI as sole modality to localise the epileptogenic zone (EZ). Recent studies using various model-based or data-driven fMRI analysis techniques showed that it is feasible to find activation maps which are helpful in the detection of the EZ. However, there is lack of evidence that these techniques can be used prospectively, due to (a) their low specificity, (b) selecting multiple activation maps, or (c) a widespread epileptic network indicated by the selected maps. In the current study we present a method based on independent component analysis and a cascade of classifiers that exclusively detects a single map related to interictal epileptic brain activity. In order to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method, it was evaluated on a group of 18 EEG-negative patients with a single well-defined EZ and 13 healthy controls. The results show that our method provides maps which correctly indicate the EZ in several (N=4) EEG-negative cases but at the same time maintaining a high specificity (92%). We conclude that our fMRI-based approach can be used in a prospective manner, and can extend the applicability of fMRI to EEG-negative cases.

  9. Differential localisation of GFP fusions to cytoskeleton-binding proteins in animal, plant, and yeast cells. Green-fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Timmers, A C J; Niebel, A; Balagué, C; Dagkesamanskaya, A

    2002-10-01

    The structure and functioning of the cytoskeleton is controlled and regulated by cytoskeleton-associated proteins. Fused to the green-fluorescent protein (GFP), these proteins can be used as tools to monitor changes in the organisation of the cytoskeleton in living cells and tissues in different organisms. Since the localisation of a specific cytoskeleton protein may indicate a particular function for the associated cytoskeletal element, studies of cytoskeleton-binding proteins fused to GFP may provide insight into the organisation and functioning of the cytoskeleton. In this article, we focused on two animal proteins, human T-plastin and bovine tau, and studied the distribution of their respective GFP fusions in animal COS cells, plant epidermal cells (Allium cepa), and yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Plastin-GFP localised preferentially to membrane ruffles, lamellipodia and focal adhesion points in COS cells, to the actin filament cytoskeleton within cytoplasmic strands in onion epidermal cells, and to cortical actin patches in yeast cells. Thus, in these 3 very different types of cells plastin-GFP associated with mobile structures in which there are high rates of actin turnover. Chemical fixation was found to drastically alter the distribution of plastin-GFP. Tau-GFP bound to microtubules in COS cells and onion epidermal cells but failed to bind to yeast microtubules. Thus, animal and plant microtubules appear to have a common tau binding site which is absent in yeast. We conclude that the study of the distribution patterns of microtubule- and actin-filament-binding proteins fused to GFP in heterologous systems should be a valuable tool in furthering our knowledge about cytoskeleton function in eukaryotic cells. PMID:12417938

  10. Localisation of calcium ions and calcium-ATPase activity within myelinated nerve fibres of the adult guinea-pig optic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, W L; Watt, C; Pediani, J D; Graham, D I; Adams, J H; Gennarelli, T A

    1991-01-01

    There is no published description of the distribution of free Ca2+, nor of the distribution of Ca(2+)-ATPase activity associated with the maintenance of low axoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations, in normal central myelinated nerve fibres. We have used the oxalate-pyroantimonate technique to localise free Ca2+, together with the lead-citrate technique to localise Ca(2+)-ATPase activity within myelinated fibres from the adult guinea-pig optic nerve. Pyroantimonate precipitate occurred within the axoplasm at nodes of Ranvier and the internode, at areas of myelin disruption, within Schmidt-Lanterman incisures (SLI) and glial paranodal loops. But precipitate was absent from the axoplasm beneath SLI and at the paranode. Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was localised in axonal smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER), the outer membrane of mitochondria, the nodal axolemma, the glial membranes of the paranodal loops, the SLI and the external aspect of the myelin sheath. We have demonstrated large domains within the axons of CNS fibres where calcium is present or absent. Moreover, we have shown that, where calcium is absent, there is localisation of Ca(2+)-ATPase activity, which would serve to remove calcium from the adjacent axoplasm. Our results are compared with information obtained from PNS fibres and some differences of distribution discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:1833365

  11. Collaborations between Foreign-Invested Enterprises and China's VET Schools: Making the System Work amid Localised Skill Shortages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yiqiong; Sheldon, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article examines collaborative initiatives individual foreign-invested enterprises (FIEs) develop with China's vocational education and training (VET) schools amid localised shortages of skilled workers. It thus focuses on employer initiatives in responding to VET system weaknesses rather than, as is common, those weaknesses. Using…

  12. Localisation-based imaging of malarial antigens during erythrocyte entry reaffirms a role for AMA1 but not MTRAP in invasion

    PubMed Central

    Riglar, David T.; Whitehead, Lachlan; Cowman, Alan F.; Rogers, Kelly L.; Baum, Jake

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microscopy-based localisation of proteins during malaria parasite (Plasmodium) invasion of the erythrocyte is widely used for tentative assignment of protein function. To date, however, imaging has been limited by the rarity of invasion events and the poor resolution available, given the micron size of the parasite, which leads to a lack of quantitative measures for definitive localisation. Here, using computational image analysis we have attempted to assign relative protein localisation during invasion using wide-field deconvolution microscopy. By incorporating three-dimensional information we present a detailed assessment of known parasite effectors predicted to function during entry but as yet untested or for which data are equivocal. Our method, termed longitudinal intensity profiling, resolves confusion surrounding the localisation of apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) at the merozoite–erythrocyte junction and predicts that the merozoite thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (MTRAP) is unlikely to play a direct role in the mechanics of entry, an observation supported with additional biochemical evidence. This approach sets a benchmark for imaging of complex micron-scale events and cautions against simplistic interpretations of small numbers of representative images for the assignment of protein function or prioritisation of candidates as therapeutic targets. PMID:26604223

  13. Game Localisation as Software-Mediated Cultural Experience: Shedding Light on the Changing Role of Translation in Intercultural Communication in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hagan, Minako

    2015-01-01

    In this rapidly technologising age translation practice has been undergoing formidable changes with the implication that there is a need to expand the disciplinary scope of translation studies. Taking the case of game localisation this article problematises the role of translation as intercultural communication by focusing on cultural elements of…

  14. The sub-cellular localisation of the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes, CrtRb2 and PSY2.

    PubMed

    Pasare, Stefania; Wright, Kathryn; Campbell, Raymond; Morris, Wayne; Ducreux, Laurence; Chapman, Sean; Bramley, Peter; Fraser, Paul; Roberts, Alison; Taylor, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Carotenoids are isoprenoids with important biological roles both for plants and animals. The yellow flesh colour of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers is a quality trait dependent on the types and levels of carotenoids that accumulate. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is well characterised, facilitating the successful engineering of carotenoid content in numerous crops including potato. However, a clear understanding concerning the factors regulating carotenoid accumulation and localisation in plant storage organs, such as tubers, is lacking. In the present study, the localisation of key carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes was investigated, as one of the unexplored factors that could influence the accumulation of carotenoids in potato tubers. Stable transgenic potato plants were generated by over-expressing β-CAROTENE HYDROXYLASE 2 (CrtRb2) and PHYTOENE SYNTHASE 2 (PSY2) genes, fused to red fluorescent protein (RFP). Gene expression and carotenoid levels were both significantly increased, confirming functionality of the fluorescently tagged proteins. Confocal microscopy studies revealed different sub-organellar localisations of CrtRb2-RFP and PSY2-RFP within amyloplasts. CrtRb2 was detected in small vesicular structures, inside amyloplasts, whereas PSY2 was localised in the stroma of amyloplasts. We conclude that it is important to consider the location of biosynthetic enzymes when engineering the carotenoid metabolic pathway in storage organs such as tubers.

  15. Which domains should be included in a cancer pain classification system? Analyses of longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Anne Kari; Brunelli, Cinzia; Klepstad, Pål; Aass, Nina; Apolone, Giovanni; Corli, Oscar; Montanari, Mauro; Caraceni, Augusto; Kaasa, Stein

    2012-03-01

    The overall aim of the present study was to further develop an evidence-based platform for the content of an international cancer pain classification system. Data from a multicentre, observational longitudinal study of cancer patients were analysed. Analyses were carried out in 2 samples: (A) Cross-sectional data of patients on opioids at inclusion, and (B) patients just admitted to palliative care. Outcome measures in the models we investigated were pain on average, worst pain, and pain relief at inclusion, and at day 14, respectively. Uni- and multivariate regression models were applied to test the explicative power on pain outcomes of a series of known pain domains, including incident pain, psychological distress, neuropathic pain, pain localisation, sleep disturbances, total morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD), and cancer diagnosis. In the 2 analyses, 1529 (A) and 352 (B) patients were included, respectively. Incident pain, pain localisation, MEDD, use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and sleep were associated with one or more of the pain outcomes in analysis A, while initial pain intensity, initial pain relief, incident pain, localisation of pain, cancer diagnosis, and age were predictors in the longitudinal analysis. Identified domains explained 16% to 24% of the variability of the pain outcome. Initial pain intensity emerged as the strongest predictor of pain outcome after 2 weeks, and incident pain was confirmed to be a relevant domain. The regression models explained only a minor part of the variability of pain outcomes.

  16. Localisation of the gene for cylindromatosis (turban tumor syndrome) to chromosome 9p12-13

    SciTech Connect

    Wooster, R.; Mangion, J.; Quirk, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Cylindromatosis (multiple cylindromas, tomato syndrome syndrome, turban tumor syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by the development of multiple, slow growing neoplasms of the skin appendages. The tumors, known as dermal cylindromas, exhibit histological features of eccrine or apocrine sweat glands and occur most commonly in the scalp area. Genetic linkage analysis of two families yielded a maximum two point LOD score of 3.2 at D9S169. Critical recombinants place the gene between D9S161 and IFN, a distance of approximately 9 cM. This region of chromosome 9 harbors a gene that encodes a 16 kD protein which is an inhibitor of cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK-4) and which is somatically mutated in many classes of cancer. However, the observation of recombinants between the disease and a polymorphic microsatellite repeat CT29 close to this gene, suggests that the CDK-4 inhibitor gene is unlikely to be responsible for cylindromatosis.

  17. Cancer Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  18. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  19. A combined remote sensing and multi-tracer approach for localising and assessing groundwater-lake interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jean; Rocha, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The combination of thermal imagery and geochemical tracing has been demonstrated as an affordable and effective technique to identify potential groundwater discharge sites in coastal areas on a regional scale. In this paper, a combined multi-tracer approach is evaluated in its applicability to lakes and verified as an appropriate and powerful means to localise and assess groundwater-lake interactions, demonstrated through a case study of Lough Mask in the west of Ireland. Surface water temperature patterns generated from Landsat 7 Thermal Infrared (TIR) images were used to locate groundwater inputs captured as anomalous cold plumes visibly emanating from shallow lake margins during summer months. Radon-222 was used to confirm the presence of groundwater and to detect localised seepage points or groundwater "hotspots". Conductivity was used as a secondary tracer in support of radon to identify areas of active groundwater inflow. Radon results show that groundwater enters the lake through carboniferous limestones adjacent to the north and east of the lake and no groundwater inflows were observed from the west characterised by Ordivician sandstones and mixed volcanics. The observed strong anti-correlation between mapped radon and satellite derived temperature values implies that decreases in surface water temperatures are associated with increases in radon activity and hence groundwater inputs to the lake. Moreover the spatial pattern of mapped temperature anomaly displays a positive correlation to the mapped radon and conductivity anomalies which further suggests that the tracers are inextricably linked and support a common groundwater source. The study demonstrates the suitability of a multi tracer approach as a comprehensive and cost-effective preliminary screening tool for groundwater-lake interactions with the potential for application elsewhere. This information is important and can be used in support of national water policy and legislation by helping to

  20. Characterisation and localisation of the opsin protein repertoire in the brain and retinas of a spider and an onychophoran

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Opsins have been found in the majority of animals and their most apparent functions are related to vision and light-guided behaviour. As an increasing number of sequences have become available it has become clear that many opsin-like transcripts are expressed in tissues other than the eyes. Opsins can be divided into three main groups: rhabdomeric opsins (r-opsins), ciliary opsins (c-opsins) and group 4 opsins. In arthropods, the main focus has been on the r-opsins involved in vision. However, with increased sequencing it is becoming clear that arthropods also possess opsins of the c-type, group 4 opsins and the newly discovered arthropsins but the functions of these opsins are unknown in arthropods and data on their localisation is limited or absent. Results We identified opsins from the spider Cupiennius salei and the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis and characterised the phylogeny and localisation of these transcripts. We recovered all known visual opsins in C. salei, and in addition found a peropsin, a c-opsin and an opsin resembling Daphnia pulex arthropsin. The peropsin was expressed in all eye types except the anterior median eyes. The arthropsin and the c-opsin were expressed in the central nervous system but not the eyes. In E. kanangrensis we found: a c-opsin; an opsin resembling D. pulex arthropsins; and an r-opsin with high sequence similarity to previously published onychophoran onychopsins. The E. kanangrensis c-opsin and onychopsin were expressed in both the eyes and the brain but the arthropsin only in the brain. Conclusion Our novel finding that opsins of both the ciliary and rhabdomeric type are present in the onychophoran and a spider suggests that these two types of opsins were present in the last common ancestor of the Onychophora and Euarthropoda. The expression of the c-opsin in the eye of an onychophoran indicates that c-opsins may originally have been involved in vision in the arthropod clade. The lack of c

  1. Vulva cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - perineum; Cancer - vulvar; Genital warts - vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer ... is rare. Risk factors include: Human papilloma virus (HPV, or genital warts ) infection in women under age ...

  2. Medical treatment of renal cancer: new horizons

    PubMed Central

    Greef, Basma; Eisen, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) makes up 2–3% of adult cancers. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in the mid-2000s radically changed the management of RCC. These targeted treatments superseded immunotherapy with interleukin-2 and interferon. The pendulum now appears to be shifting back towards immunotherapy, with the evidence of prolonged overall survival of patients with metastatic RCC on treatment with the anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand monoclonal antibody, nivolumab. Clinical prognostic criteria aid prediction of relapse risk for resected localised disease. Unfortunately, for patients at high risk of relapse, no adjuvant treatment has yet shown benefit, although further trials are yet to report. Clinical prognostic models also have a role in the management of advanced disease; now there is a pressing need for predictive biomarkers to direct therapy. Treatment selection for metastatic disease is currently based on histology, prognostic group and patient preference based on side effect profile. In this article, we review the current medical and surgical management of localised, oligometastatic and advanced RCC, including side effect management and the evidence base for management of poor-risk and non-clear cell disease. We discuss recent results from clinical trials and how these are likely to shape future practice and a renaissance of immunotherapy for renal cell cancer. PMID:27490806

  3. Medical treatment of renal cancer: new horizons.

    PubMed

    Greef, Basma; Eisen, Tim

    2016-08-23

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) makes up 2-3% of adult cancers. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in the mid-2000s radically changed the management of RCC. These targeted treatments superseded immunotherapy with interleukin-2 and interferon. The pendulum now appears to be shifting back towards immunotherapy, with the evidence of prolonged overall survival of patients with metastatic RCC on treatment with the anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand monoclonal antibody, nivolumab. Clinical prognostic criteria aid prediction of relapse risk for resected localised disease. Unfortunately, for patients at high risk of relapse, no adjuvant treatment has yet shown benefit, although further trials are yet to report. Clinical prognostic models also have a role in the management of advanced disease; now there is a pressing need for predictive biomarkers to direct therapy. Treatment selection for metastatic disease is currently based on histology, prognostic group and patient preference based on side effect profile. In this article, we review the current medical and surgical management of localised, oligometastatic and advanced RCC, including side effect management and the evidence base for management of poor-risk and non-clear cell disease. We discuss recent results from clinical trials and how these are likely to shape future practice and a renaissance of immunotherapy for renal cell cancer. PMID:27490806

  4. Collagens XV and XVIII show different expression and localisation in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma: type XV appears in tumor stroma, while XVIII becomes upregulated in tumor cells and lost from microvessels.

    PubMed

    Karppinen, Sanna-Maria; Honkanen, Hanne-Kaisa; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Riihilä, Pilvi; Autio-Harmainen, Helena; Sormunen, Raija; Harjunen, Vanessa; Väisänen, Marja-Riitta; Väisänen, Timo; Hurskainen, Tiina; Tasanen, Kaisa; Kähäri, Veli-Matti; Pihlajaniemi, Taina

    2016-05-01

    As the second most common skin malignancy, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is an increasing health concern, while its pathogenesis at molecular level remains largely unknown. We studied the expression and localisation of two homologous basement membrane (BM) collagens, types XV and XVIII, at different stages of cSCC. These collagens are involved in angiogenesis and tumorigenesis, but their role in cancer development is incompletely understood. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed upregulation of collagen XVIII, but not collagen XV, in primary cSCC cells in comparison with normal human epidermal keratinocytes. In addition, the Ha-ras-transformed invasive cell line II-4 expressed high levels of collagen XVIII mRNA, indicating upregulation in the course of malignant transformation. Immunohistochemical analyses of a large human tissue microarray material showed that collagen XVIII is expressed by tumor cells from grade 1 onwards, while keratinocytes in normal skin and in premalignant lesions showed negative staining for it. Collagen XV appeared instead as deposits in the tumor stroma. Our findings in human cSCCs and in mouse cSCCs from the DMBA-TPA skin carcinogenesis model showed that collagen XVIII, but not collagen XV or the BM markers collagen IV or laminin, was selectively reduced in the tumor vasculature, and this decrease associated significantly with cancer progression. Our results demonstrate that collagens XV and XVIII are expressed in different sites of cSCC and may contribute in a distinct manner to processes related to cSCC tumorigenesis, identifying these collagens as potential biomarkers in the disease. PMID:26660139

  5. Stabilised DNA secondary structures with increasing transcription localise hypermutable bases for somatic hypermutation in IGHV3-23.

    PubMed

    Duvvuri, Bhargavi; Duvvuri, Venkata R; Wu, Jianhong; Wu, Gillian E

    2012-07-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a transcription-coupled mechanism most responsible for generating high affinity antibodies. An issue remaining enigmatic in SHM is how AID is preferentially targeted during transcription to hypermutable bases in its substrates (WRC motifs) on both DNA strands. AID targets only single stranded DNA. By modelling the dynamical behaviour of IGHV3-23 DNA, a commonly used human variable gene segment, we observed that hypermutable bases on the non-transcribed strand are paired whereas those on transcribed strand are mostly unpaired. Hypermutable bases (both paired and unpaired) are made accessible to AID in stabilised secondary structures formed with increasing transcription levels. This observation provides a rationale for the hypermutable bases on both the strands of DNA being targeted to a similar extent despite having differences in unpairedness. We propose that increasing transcription and RNAP II stalling resulting in the formation and stabilisation of stem-loop structures with AID hotspots in negatively supercoiled region can localise the hypermutable bases of both strands of DNA, to AID-mediated SHM.

  6. Processes and properties of edge-localised instabilities in 2T 2MA plasmas in the Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, A. J.; Webster, S. J.

    2014-11-01

    During July 2012, 150 almost identical H-mode plasmas were consecutively created in the Joint European Torus, providing a combined total of approximately 8 minutes of steady-state plasma with 15 000 Edge Localised Modes (ELMs). In principle, each of those 15 000 ELMs are statistically equivalent. Here, the changes in edge density and plasma energy associated with those ELMs are explored, using the spikes in Beryllium II (527 nm) radiation as an indicator for the onset of an ELM. Clearly different timescales are observed during the ELM process. Edge temperature falls over a 2 ms timescale, edge density and pressure fall over a 5 ms timescale, and there is an additional 10 ms timescale that is consistent with a resistive relaxation of the plasma's edge. The statistical properties of the energy and density losses due to the ELMs are explored. For these plasmas the ELM energy (δE) is found to be approximately independent of the time between ELMs, despite the average ELM energy ( <δE > ) and average ELM frequency (f) being consistent with the scaling of <δE >∝1 /f . Instead, beyond the first 0.02 s of waiting time between ELMs, the energy losses due to individual ELMs are found to be statistically the same. Surprisingly no correlation is found between the energies of consecutive ELMs either. A weak link is found between the density drop and the ELM waiting time. Consequences of these results for ELM control and modelling are discussed.

  7. Signatures of many-body localisation in a system without disorder and the relation to a glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James M.; Genway, Sam; Garrahan, Juan P.

    2016-05-01

    We study a quantum spin system—adapted from a facilitated spin model for classical glasses—with local bilinear interactions and without quenched disorder which seems to display characteristic signatures of a many-body localisation (MBL) transition. From direct diagonalisation of small systems, we find a change in certain dynamical and spectral properties at a critical value of a coupling, from those characteristic of a thermalising phase to those characteristic of a MBL phase. The system we consider is known to have a quantum phase transition in its ground-state in the limit of large size, related to a first-order active-to-inactive phase transition in the stochastic trajectories of an associated classical model of glasses. Our results here suggest that this first-order transition in the low-lying spectrum may influence the rest of the spectrum of the system in the large size limit. These findings may help understand the connection between MBL and structural glass transitions.

  8. A Role for Na+,K+-ATPase α1 in Regulating Rab27a Localisation on Melanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Antonia E. G.; Tarafder, Abul K.; Hume, Alistair N.; Recchi, Chiara; Seabra, Miguel C.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which Rab GTPases are specifically recruited to distinct intracellular membranes remains elusive. Here we used Rab27a localisation onto melanosomes as a model to investigate Rab targeting. We identified the α1 subunit of Na+,K+-ATPase (ATP1a1) as a novel Rab27a interacting protein in melanocytes and showed that this interaction is direct with the intracellular M4M5 loop of ATP1a1 and independent of nucleotide bound status of the Rab. Knockdown studies in melanocytes revealed that ATP1a1 plays an essential role in Rab27a-dependent melanosome transport. Specifically, expression of ATP1a1, like the Rab27a GDP/GTP exchange factor (Rab3GEP), is essential for targeting and activation of Rab27a to melanosomes. Finally, we showed that the ability of Rab27a mutants to target to melanosomes correlates with the efficiency of their interaction with ATP1a1. Altogether these studies point to a new role for ATP1a1 as a regulator of Rab27a targeting and activation. PMID:25051489

  9. Localisation of an acoustic signal in a noisy environment: the display call of the king penguin Aptenodytes patagonicus.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Thierry; Jouventin, Pierre

    2002-12-01

    King penguin chicks identify their parents by an acoustic signal, the display call. This call consists of a succession of similar syllables. Each syllable has two harmonic series, strongly modulated in frequency and amplitude, with added beats of varying amplitude generated by a two-voice system. Previous work showed that only one syllable of the call is needed for the chick to identify the calling adult. Both the frequency modulation pattern of the syllable and the two-voice system play a role in the call identification. The syllabic organisation of the call, the harmonic structure and the amplitude modulations of the syllables apparently do not contribute to individual recognition. Are these acoustic features useless? To answer to this question, playback experiments were conducted using three categories of experimental signals: (i) signal with only the fundamental frequencies of the natural call, (ii) signal with the amplitude of each syllable kept at a constant level and (iii) signals with only one syllable, repeated or not. The responses of chicks to these experimental signals were compared to those obtained with the calls of their natural parents. We found that these acoustic features, while not directly implicated in the individual recognition process, help the chicks to better localise the signal of their parents. In addition, the redundant syllabic organisation of the call is a means of counteracting the masking effect of the background noise of the colony. PMID:12432003

  10. Localised Ag(+) vibrations at the origin of ultralow thermal conductivity in layered thermoelectric AgCrSe2.

    PubMed

    Damay, F; Petit, S; Rols, S; Braendlein, M; Daou, R; Elkaïm, E; Fauth, F; Gascoin, F; Martin, C; Maignan, A

    2016-01-01

    In materials science, the substructure approach consists in imagining complex materials in which a particular property is associated with a distinct structural feature, so as to combine different chosen physical characteristics, which otherwise have little chance to coexist. Applied to thermoelectric materials, it has been used to achieve simultaneously phonon-glass and electron-crystal properties. Mostly studied for its superionic conductivity, AgCrSe2 is a naturally layered compound, which achieves very low thermal conductivity, ~0.4 W.K(-1).m(-1) at RT (room temperature), and is considered a promising thermoelectric. The Cr atoms of the [CrSe2]∞ layer bear a spin S = 3/2, which orders below TN = 55 K. Here we report low temperature inelastic neutron scattering experiments on AgCrSe2, alongside the magnetic field evolution of its thermal and electrical transport. We observe a very low frequency mode at 3 meV, ascribed to large anharmonic displacements of the Ag(+) ions in the [Ag]∞ layer, and 2D magnetic fluctuations up to 3 TN in the chromium layer. The low thermal conductivity of AgCrSe2 is attributed to acoustic phonon scattering by a regular lattice of Ag(+) oscillating in quasi-2D potential wells. These findings highlight a new way to achieve localised phonon modes in a perfectly crystalline solid. PMID:27000414

  11. Cellular oxygen sensing: Importins and exportins are mediators of intracellular localisation of prolyl-4-hydroxylases PHD1 and PHD2

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, Amrei; Pientka, Friederike Katharina; Moeckel, Sylvia; Kettelhake, Antje; Hartmann, Enno; Koehler, Matthias; Depping, Reinhard

    2009-10-02

    Hypoxia-inducible factors are crucial in the regulatory process of oxygen homeostasis of vertebrate cells. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylation of HIF-{alpha} subunits by prolyl-hydroxylases (PHD1, PHD2 and PHD3) leads to transcription of a greater number of hypoxia responsive genes. We have investigated the subcellular distribution and the molecular mechanisms regulating the intracellular allocation of PHD1 and PHD2. As reported earlier we find PHD1 located exclusively in the nucleus. We demonstrate that nuclear import of PHD1 occurs importin {alpha}/{beta} dependently and relies on a nuclear localisation signal (NLS). By contrast PHD2 is cycling between nucleus and cytoplasm, and nuclear import seems to be independent of 'classical' importin {alpha}/{beta} receptors. Furthermore, we reveal that the exit of PHD2 from the nucleus requires CRM1 and the N-terminal 100 amino acids of the protein. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of the regulation of the oxygen sensor cascade of PHDs in different cellular compartments.

  12. Does advancing male age influence the expression levels and localisation patterns of phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) in human sperm?

    PubMed Central

    Yeste, Marc; Jones, Celine; Amdani, Siti Nornadhirah; Yelumalai, Suseela; Mounce, Ginny; da Silva, Sarah J. Martins; Child, Tim; Coward, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Socio-economic factors have led to an increasing trend for couples to delay parenthood. However, advancing age exerts detrimental effects upon gametes which can have serious consequences upon embryo viability. While such effects are well documented for the oocyte, relatively little is known with regard to the sperm. One fundamental role of sperm is to activate the oocyte at fertilisation, a process initiated by phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ), a sperm-specific protein. While PLCζ deficiency can lead to oocyte activation deficiency and infertility, it is currently unknown whether the expression or function of PLCζ is compromised by advancing male age. Here, we evaluate sperm motility and the proportion of sperm expressing PLCζ in 71 males (22–54 years; 44 fertile controls and 27 infertile patients), along with total levels and localisation patterns of PLCζ within the sperm head. Three different statistical approaches were deployed with male age considered both as a categorical and a continuous factor. While progressive motility was negatively correlated with male age, all three statistical models concurred that no PLCζ–related parameter was associated with male age, suggesting that advancing male age is unlikely to cause problems in terms of the sperm’s fundamental ability to activate an oocyte. PMID:27270687

  13. Evc is a positive mediator of Ihh-regulated bone growth that localises at the base of chondrocyte cilia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Blair, Helen J; Rodriguez-Andres, M Elena; Blanco, Maria Jose; Wilson, Amy; Liu, Yu-Ning; Miles, Colin; Peters, Heiko; Goodship, Judith A

    2007-08-01

    EVC is a novel protein mutated in the human chondroectodermal dysplasia Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC; OMIM: 225500). We have inactivated Evc in the mouse and show that Evc(-/-) mice develop an EvC-like syndrome, including short ribs, short limbs and dental abnormalities. lacZ driven by the Evc promoter revealed that Evc is expressed in the developing bones and the orofacial region. Antibodies developed against Evc locate the protein at the base of the primary cilium. The growth plate of Evc(-/-) mice shows delayed bone collar formation and advanced maturation of chondrocytes. Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is expressed normally in the growth plates of Evc(-/-) mice, but expression of the Ihh downstream genes Ptch1 and Gli1 was markedly decreased. Recent studies have shown that Smo localises to primary cilia and that Gli3 processing is defective in intraflagellar transport mutants. In vitro studies using Evc(-/-) cells demonstrate that the defect lies downstream of Smo. Chondrocyte cilia are present in Evc(-/-) mice and Gli3 processing appears normal by western blot analysis. We conclude that Evc is an intracellular component of the hedgehog signal transduction pathway that is required for normal transcriptional activation of Ihh target genes.

  14. Localised Ag+ vibrations at the origin of ultralow thermal conductivity in layered thermoelectric AgCrSe2

    PubMed Central

    Damay, F.; Petit, S.; Rols, S.; Braendlein, M.; Daou, R.; Elkaïm, E.; Fauth, F.; Gascoin, F.; Martin, C.; Maignan, A.

    2016-01-01

    In materials science, the substructure approach consists in imagining complex materials in which a particular property is associated with a distinct structural feature, so as to combine different chosen physical characteristics, which otherwise have little chance to coexist. Applied to thermoelectric materials, it has been used to achieve simultaneously phonon-glass and electron-crystal properties. Mostly studied for its superionic conductivity, AgCrSe2 is a naturally layered compound, which achieves very low thermal conductivity, ~0.4 W.K−1.m−1 at RT (room temperature), and is considered a promising thermoelectric. The Cr atoms of the [CrSe2]∞ layer bear a spin S = 3/2, which orders below TN = 55 K. Here we report low temperature inelastic neutron scattering experiments on AgCrSe2, alongside the magnetic field evolution of its thermal and electrical transport. We observe a very low frequency mode at 3 meV, ascribed to large anharmonic displacements of the Ag+ ions in the [Ag]∞ layer, and 2D magnetic fluctuations up to 3 TN in the chromium layer. The low thermal conductivity of AgCrSe2 is attributed to acoustic phonon scattering by a regular lattice of Ag+ oscillating in quasi-2D potential wells. These findings highlight a new way to achieve localised phonon modes in a perfectly crystalline solid. PMID:27000414

  15. An N-terminally acetylated Arf-like GTPase is localised to lysosomes and affects their motility.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Irmgard; Munro, Sean

    2006-04-15

    Small GTPases of the Arf and Rab families play key roles in the function of subcellular organelles. Each GTPase is usually found on only one compartment and, hence, they confer organelle specificity to many intracellular processes. However, there has so far been little evidence for specific GTPases present on lysosomes. Here, we report that two closely related human Arf-like GTPases, Arl8a and Arl8b (also known as Arl10b/c and Gie1/2), localise to lysosomes in mammalian cells, with the single homologue in Drosophila cells having a similar location. Conventionally, membrane binding of Arf and Arl proteins is mediated by both an N-terminal myristoyl group and an N-terminal amphipathic helix that is inserted into the lipid bilayer upon activation of the GTPase. Arl8a and Arl8b do not have N-terminal myristoylation sites, and we find that Arl8b is instead N-terminally acetylated, and an acetylated methionine is necessary for its lysosomal localization. Overexpression of Arl8a or Arl8b results in a microtubule-dependent redistribution of lysosomes towards the cell periphery. Live cell imaging shows that lysosomes move more frequently both toward and away from the cell periphery, suggesting a role for Arl8a and Arl8b as positive regulators of lysosomal transport. PMID:16537643

  16. Virtual-'Light-Sheet' Single-Molecule Localisation Microscopy Enables Quantitative Optical Sectioning for Super-Resolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Palayret, Matthieu; Armes, Helen; Basu, Srinjan; Watson, Adam T.; Herbert, Alex; Lando, David; Etheridge, Thomas J.; Endesfelder, Ulrike; Heilemann, Mike; Laue, Ernest; Carr, Antony M.; Klenerman, David; Lee, Steven F.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule super-resolution microscopy allows imaging of fluorescently-tagged proteins in live cells with a precision well below that of the diffraction limit. Here, we demonstrate 3D sectioning with single-molecule super-resolution microscopy by making use of the fitting information that is usually discarded to reject fluorophores that emit from above or below a virtual-'light-sheet', a thin volume centred on the focal plane of the microscope. We describe an easy-to-use routine (implemented as an open-source ImageJ plug-in) to quickly analyse a calibration sample to define and use such a virtual light-sheet. In addition, the plug-in is easily usable on almost any existing 2D super-resolution instrumentation. This optical sectioning of super-resolution images is achieved by applying well-characterised width and amplitude thresholds to diffraction-limited spots that can be used to tune the thickness of the virtual light-sheet. This allows qualitative and quantitative imaging improvements: by rejecting out-of-focus fluorophores, the super-resolution image gains contrast and local features may be revealed; by retaining only fluorophores close to the focal plane, virtual-'light-sheet' single-molecule localisation microscopy improves the probability that all emitting fluorophores will be detected, fitted and quantitatively evaluated. PMID:25884495

  17. Genetic analysis of ecological relevant morphological variability in Plantago lanceolata L. : 2. Localisation and organisation of quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Wolff, K

    1987-04-01

    Morphological variability was analysed in an F2-generation derived from crosses between two ecotypes of Plantago lanceolata L. Six allozyme loci, localised in five linkage groups, were used as markers. For two marker loci, Got-2 and Gpi-1, segregations did not fit monogenic ratios. In the linkage groups to which these two loci belonged, male sterility genes appeared to be present. In these crosses, male sterility (type 3, as described by Van Damme 1983) may be determined by two recessive loci located in the linkage groups of Got-2 and of Gpi-1. Many correlations of morphological and life history characters with allozyme markers were observed. The quantitative trait loci did not appear to be concentrated in major gene complexes. Often many loci were involved, sometimes with effects opposite to those expected from the population values. Main effects of the linkage groups appeared to be more important than interaction effects in determining variability. It also appeared that there is a positive correlation between the number of heterozygous allozyme loci and generative growth. PMID:24241302

  18. Maladie de Kaposi à localisation broncho-pulmonaire révélant une infection VIH

    PubMed Central

    Sebbar, Amal; Zaghba, Nahid; Benjelloun, Hanane; Bakhatar, Abdelaziz; Yassine, Najiba

    2015-01-01

    La maladie de Kaposi (MK) associée au VIH, forme dite épidémique, a été décrite la 1ère fois en 1981 par Hymmes. C'est l'affection maligne la plus fréquente au cours du SIDA. La MK est à l'origine de 10% des atteintes pleuropulmonaires au cours de l'infection par le VIH et 40% des pneumopathies en cas de MK cutanéomuqueuse. Les localisations pulmonaires occupent la deuxième place des atteintes viscérales après la forme digestive. Le diagnostic repose sur des arguments épidémiologiques, cliniques, radiologiques, biologiques, endoscopiques et histologiques. Nous rapportons un cas de MK broncho-pulmonaire compliquant une infection VIH chez un patient présentant une maladie de Kaposi cutanée de découverte fortuite au cours de l'atteinte pulmonaire. Le diagnostic a été retenu après avoir éliminé les maladies opportunistes à tropisme pulmonaire. Le Kaposi pulmonaire constitue l'atteinte la plus grave de la MK-sida et la survie après le diagnostic est courte malgré les thérapeutiques agressives. PMID:26958142

  19. A role for Na+,K+-ATPase α1 in regulating Rab27a localisation on melanosomes.

    PubMed

    Booth, Antonia E G; Tarafder, Abul K; Hume, Alistair N; Recchi, Chiara; Seabra, Miguel C

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which Rab GTPases are specifically recruited to distinct intracellular membranes remains elusive. Here we used Rab27a localisation onto melanosomes as a model to investigate Rab targeting. We identified the α1 subunit of Na+,K+-ATPase (ATP1a1) as a novel Rab27a interacting protein in melanocytes and showed that this interaction is direct with the intracellular M4M5 loop of ATP1a1 and independent of nucleotide bound status of the Rab. Knockdown studies in melanocytes revealed that ATP1a1 plays an essential role in Rab27a-dependent melanosome transport. Specifically, expression of ATP1a1, like the Rab27a GDP/GTP exchange factor (Rab3GEP), is essential for targeting and activation of Rab27a to melanosomes. Finally, we showed that the ability of Rab27a mutants to target to melanosomes correlates with the efficiency of their interaction with ATP1a1. Altogether these studies point to a new role for ATP1a1 as a regulator of Rab27a targeting and activation. PMID:25051489

  20. Unravelling the concomitant role of zooplankton motion complexity and swimming speed in the localisation of food patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabia, Luciana; Uttieri, Marco; Zagami, Giacomo; Zambianchi, Enrico

    2013-04-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, phytoplankton cells are often aggregated in dense horizontal patches, representing a feeding hot-spot for zooplankters which concentrate their swimming and grazing activities there. The correct localisation of these patches is thus fundamental to appropriately identify food-rich areas. Outside these layers, swimming motion must trade-off between the search of the patch, the energetic costs associated with active movement and the predation risk. Through the implementation of an individual-based model (IBM) we investigated the concomitant effect of motion complexity (evaluated in terms of three-dimensional fractal dimension) and swimming speed in determining the effectiveness in finding a patch measured in terms of the First Passage Time (FPT), i.e. the time required for an animal to reach a target located at a given distance, and of the total travelled distance ΔTOT. The simulations account for the dependence of the FPT and ΔTOT on the relative distance between the starting point of the track and the patch, as well as for the domain size. Our simulations indicate that that less tortuous tracks are more efficient in finding a patch, representing a behavioural optimisation even when the organisms are moving in absence of driving environmental stimuli.

  1. Localised Ag+ vibrations at the origin of ultralow thermal conductivity in layered thermoelectric AgCrSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damay, F.; Petit, S.; Rols, S.; Braendlein, M.; Daou, R.; Elkaïm, E.; Fauth, F.; Gascoin, F.; Martin, C.; Maignan, A.

    2016-03-01

    In materials science, the substructure approach consists in imagining complex materials in which a particular property is associated with a distinct structural feature, so as to combine different chosen physical characteristics, which otherwise have little chance to coexist. Applied to thermoelectric materials, it has been used to achieve simultaneously phonon-glass and electron-crystal properties. Mostly studied for its superionic conductivity, AgCrSe2 is a naturally layered compound, which achieves very low thermal conductivity, ~0.4 W.K‑1.m‑1 at RT (room temperature), and is considered a promising thermoelectric. The Cr atoms of the [CrSe2]∞ layer bear a spin S = 3/2, which orders below TN = 55 K. Here we report low temperature inelastic neutron scattering experiments on AgCrSe2, alongside the magnetic field evolution of its thermal and electrical transport. We observe a very low frequency mode at 3 meV, ascribed to large anharmonic displacements of the Ag+ ions in the [Ag]∞ layer, and 2D magnetic fluctuations up to 3 TN in the chromium layer. The low thermal conductivity of AgCrSe2 is attributed to acoustic phonon scattering by a regular lattice of Ag+ oscillating in quasi-2D potential wells. These findings highlight a new way to achieve localised phonon modes in a perfectly crystalline solid.

  2. Localising the nitrogen imprint of the Paris food supply: the potential of organic farming and changes in human diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, G.; Garnier, J.; Thieu, V.; Silvestre, M.; Barles, S.; Chatzimpiros, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Seine watershed has long been the food-supplying hinterland of Paris, providing most of the animal and vegetal protein consumed in the city. Nowadays, the shift from manure-based to synthetic nitrogen fertilisation, has made possible a strong land specialisation of agriculture in the Seine watershed: it still provides most of the cereal consumed by the Paris agglomeration, but exports 80% of its huge cereal production. On the other hand the meat and milk supply originates mainly from regions in the North and West of France, specialised in animal farming and importing about 30% of their feed from South America. As it works today, this system is responsible for a severe nitrate contamination of surface and groundwater resources. Herein two scenarios of re-localising Paris's food supply are explored, based on organic farming and local provision of animal feed. We show that for the Seine watershed it is technically possible to design an agricultural system able to provide all the plant- and animal-based food required by the population, to deliver sub-root water meeting the drinking water standards and still to export a significant proportion of its production to areas less suitable for cereal cultivation. Decreasing the share of animal products in the human diet has a strong impact on the nitrogen imprint of urban food supply.

  3. Localising the nitrogen imprint of the Paris food supply: the potential of organic farming and changes in human diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, G.; Garnier, J.; Thieu, V.; Silvestre, M.; Barles, S.; Chatzimpiros, P.

    2011-11-01

    The Seine watershed has long been the food-supplying hinterland of Paris, providing most of the animal and vegetal protein consumed in the city. Nowadays, because of the land specialisation of agriculture made possible by the shift from manure-based to synthetic nitrogen fertilisation, the Seine watershed, although it exports 80% of its huge cereal production, still provides most of the cereal consumed by the Paris agglomeration. The meat and milk supply originate, however, mainly from regions in the North and West of France, specialised in animal farming and importing about 30% of their feed from South America. As it works today, this system is responsible for a severe nitrate contamination of surface groundwater resources. Herein two scenarios of re-localising Paris's food supply are explored, based on organic farming and local provision of animal feed. We show that for the Seine watershed it is technically possible to design an agricultural system able to provide all the plant- and animal-based food required by the population, to deliver sub-root water meeting the drinking water standards and still to export a significant proportion of its production to areas less suitable for cereal cultivation. Decreasing the share of animal products in the human diet has a strong impact on the nitrogen imprint of urban food supply.

  4. TAT and HA2 Facilitate Cellular Uptake of Gold Nanoparticles but Do Not Lead to Cytosolic Localisation

    PubMed Central

    Free, Paul; Lévy, Raphaël

    2015-01-01

    The methods currently available to deliver functional labels and drugs to the cell cytosol are inefficient and this constitutes a major obstacle to cell biology (delivery of sensors and imaging probes) and therapy (drug access to the cell internal machinery). As cell membranes are impermeable to most molecular cargos, viral peptides have been used to bolster their internalisation through endocytosis and help their release to the cytosol by bursting the endosomal vesicles. However, conflicting results have been reported on the extent of the cytosolic delivery achieved. To evaluate their potential, we used gold nanoparticles as model cargos and systematically assessed how the functionalisation of their surface by either or both of the viral peptides TAT and HA2 influenced their intracellular delivery. We evaluated the number of gold nanoparticles present in cells after internalisation using photothermal microscopy and their subcellular localisation by electron microscopy. While their uptake increased when the TAT and/or HA2 viral peptides were present on their surface, we did not observe a significant cytosolic delivery of the gold nanoparticles. PMID:25836335

  5. Genetic analysis of ecological relevant morphological variability in Plantago lanceolata L. : 2. Localisation and organisation of quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Wolff, K

    1987-04-01

    Morphological variability was analysed in an F2-generation derived from crosses between two ecotypes of Plantago lanceolata L. Six allozyme loci, localised in five linkage groups, were used as markers. For two marker loci, Got-2 and Gpi-1, segregations did not fit monogenic ratios. In the linkage groups to which these two loci belonged, male sterility genes appeared to be present. In these crosses, male sterility (type 3, as described by Van Damme 1983) may be determined by two recessive loci located in the linkage groups of Got-2 and of Gpi-1. Many correlations of morphological and life history characters with allozyme markers were observed. The quantitative trait loci did not appear to be concentrated in major gene complexes. Often many loci were involved, sometimes with effects opposite to those expected from the population values. Main effects of the linkage groups appeared to be more important than interaction effects in determining variability. It also appeared that there is a positive correlation between the number of heterozygous allozyme loci and generative growth.

  6. Statistical nanoscale study of localised radiative transitions in GaN/AlGaN quantum wells and AlGaN epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigutti, L.; Mancini, L.; Lefebvre, W.; Houard, J.; Hernàndez-Maldonado, D.; Di Russo, E.; Giraud, E.; Butté, R.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Blavette, D.; Vurpillot, F.

    2016-09-01

    Compositional disorder has important consequences on the optical properties of III-nitride ternary alloys. In AlGaN epilayers and AlGaN-based quantum heterostructures, the potential fluctuations induced by such disorder lead to the localisation of carriers at low temperature, which affects their transition energies. Using the correlations between micro-photoluminescence, scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography we have analysed the optical behaviour of Al0.25Ga0.75N epilayers and that of GaN/AlGaN quantum wells, and reconstructed in three dimensions the distribution of chemical species with sub-nanometre spatial resolution. These composition maps served as the basis for the effective mass calculation of electrons and holes involved in radiative transitions. Good statistical predictions were subsequently obtained for the above-mentioned transition and localisation energies by establishing a link with their microstructural properties.

  7. Localisation and protein-protein interactions of the Helicobacter pylori taxis sensor TlpD and their connection to metabolic functions.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Wiebke; Schweinitzer, Tobias; McMurry, Jonathan L; Loewen, Peter C; Buettner, Falk F R; Menz, Sarah; Josenhans, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori energy sensor TlpD determines tactic behaviour under low energy conditions and is important in vivo. We explored protein-protein interactions of TlpD and their impact on TlpD localisation and function. Pull-down of tagged TlpD identified protein interaction partners of TlpD, which included the chemotaxis histidine kinase CheAY2, the central metabolic enzyme aconitase (AcnB) and the detoxifying enzyme catalase (KatA). We confirmed that KatA and AcnB physically interact with TlpD. While the TlpD-dependent behavioural response appeared not influenced in the interactor mutants katA and acnB in steady-state behavioural assays, acetone carboxylase subunit (acxC) mutant behaviour was altered. TlpD was localised in a bipolar subcellular pattern in media of high energy. We observed a significant change in TlpD localisation towards the cell body in cheAY2-, catalase- or aconitase-deficient bacteria or in bacteria incubated under low energy conditions, including oxidative stress or respiratory inhibition. Inactivation of tlpD resulted in an increased sensitivity to iron limitation and oxidative stress and influenced the H. pylori transcriptome. Oxidative stress, iron limitation and overexpressing the iron-sulfur repair system nifSU altered TlpD-dependent behaviour. We propose that TlpD localisation is instructed by metabolic activity and protein interactions, and its sensory activity is linked to iron-sulfur cluster integrity. PMID:27045738

  8. Localisation and protein-protein interactions of the Helicobacter pylori taxis sensor TlpD and their connection to metabolic functions

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Wiebke; Schweinitzer, Tobias; McMurry, Jonathan L.; Loewen, Peter C.; Buettner, Falk F.R.; Menz, Sarah; Josenhans, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori energy sensor TlpD determines tactic behaviour under low energy conditions and is important in vivo. We explored protein-protein interactions of TlpD and their impact on TlpD localisation and function. Pull-down of tagged TlpD identified protein interaction partners of TlpD, which included the chemotaxis histidine kinase CheAY2, the central metabolic enzyme aconitase (AcnB) and the detoxifying enzyme catalase (KatA). We confirmed that KatA and AcnB physically interact with TlpD. While the TlpD-dependent behavioural response appeared not influenced in the interactor mutants katA and acnB in steady-state behavioural assays, acetone carboxylase subunit (acxC) mutant behaviour was altered. TlpD was localised in a bipolar subcellular pattern in media of high energy. We observed a significant change in TlpD localisation towards the cell body in cheAY2-, catalase- or aconitase-deficient bacteria or in bacteria incubated under low energy conditions, including oxidative stress or respiratory inhibition. Inactivation of tlpD resulted in an increased sensitivity to iron limitation and oxidative stress and influenced the H. pylori transcriptome. Oxidative stress, iron limitation and overexpressing the iron-sulfur repair system nifSU altered TlpD-dependent behaviour. We propose that TlpD localisation is instructed by metabolic activity and protein interactions, and its sensory activity is linked to iron-sulfur cluster integrity. PMID:27045738

  9. Sub-cellular localisation studies may spuriously detect the Yes-associated protein, YAP, in nucleoli leading to potentially invalid conclusions of its function.

    PubMed

    Finch, Megan L; Passman, Adam M; Strauss, Robyn P; Yeoh, George C; Callus, Bernard A

    2015-01-01

    The Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a potent transcriptional co-activator that functions as a nuclear effector of the Hippo signaling pathway. YAP is oncogenic and its activity is linked to its cellular abundance and nuclear localisation. Activation of the Hippo pathway restricts YAP nuclear entry via its phosphorylation by Lats kinases and consequent cytoplasmic retention bound to 14-3-3 proteins. We examined YAP expression in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) and surprisingly found that transformed LPCs did not show an increase in YAP abundance compared to the non-transformed LPCs from which they were derived. We then sought to ascertain whether nuclear YAP was more abundant in transformed LPCs. We used an antibody that we confirmed was specific for YAP by immunoblotting to determine YAP's sub-cellular localisation by immunofluorescence. This antibody showed diffuse staining for YAP within the cytosol and nuclei, but, noticeably, it showed intense staining of the nucleoli of LPCs. This staining was non-specific, as shRNA treatment of cells abolished YAP expression to undetectable levels by Western blot yet the nucleolar staining remained. Similar spurious YAP nucleolar staining was also seen in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and mouse liver tissue, indicating that this antibody is unsuitable for immunological applications to determine YAP sub-cellular localisation in mouse cells or tissues. Interestingly nucleolar staining was not evident in D645 cells suggesting the antibody may be suitable for use in human cells. Given the large body of published work on YAP in recent years, many of which utilise this antibody, this study raises concerns regarding its use for determining sub-cellular localisation. From a broader perspective, it serves as a timely reminder of the need to perform appropriate controls to ensure the validity of published data.

  10. Cancer Statistics: Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 60,050 % of All New Cancer Cases 3.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 10,470 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 635,437 women living with endometrial cancer in ...

  11. Willing to Be Involved in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Tilston-Lünel, Andrew M.; Reynolds, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequencing is now a common procedure, but prior to this, screening experiments using protein baits was one of the routinely used methods that, occasionally, allowed the identification of new gene products. One such experiment uncovered the gene product called willin/human Expanded/FRMD6. Initial characterization studies found that willin bound phospholipids and was strongly co-localised with actin. However, subsequently, willin was found to be the closest human sequence homologue of the Drosophila protein Expanded (Ex), sharing 60% homology with the Ex FERM domain. This in turn suggested, and then was proven that willin could activate the Hippo signalling pathway. This review describes the increasing body of knowledge about the actions of willin in a number of cellular functions related to cancer. However, like many gene products involved in aspects of cell signalling, a convincing direct role for willin in cancer remains tantalisingly elusive, at present. PMID:27438856

  12. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  13. Imaging ToF-SIMS and synchrotron-based FT-IR microspectroscopic studies of prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazi, E.; Lockyer, N. P.; Vickerman, J. C.; Gardner, P.; Dwyer, J.; Hart, C. A.; Brown, M. D.; Clarke, N. W.; Miyan, J.

    2004-06-01

    Imaging ToF-SIMS and synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FT-IR) microspectroscopy have been used to obtain chemical information from individual cells derived from human prostate cancer (CaP). ToF-SIMS imaging of molecular signals characteristic of membrane bound phospholipids are used to elucidate different fracture planes within individual freeze-fractured CaP cells. The localisation of Cu within the cytoplasm of cancer cells is consistent with increased metastatic potential. Line scans across CaP cells using SR-FT-IR microspectroscopy provide complimentary information on the localisation (±1 μm) of lipid and protein domains. This combined analytical approach offers a novel means of characterising individual CaP cells and investigating the biochemical basis of disease progression and metastases.

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics of phosphorus release, oxygen consumption and greenhouse gas emissions after localised soil amendment with organic fertilisers.

    PubMed

    Christel, Wibke; Zhu, Kun; Hoefer, Christoph; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Santner, Jakob; Bruun, Sander; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2016-06-01

    Organic fertilisation inevitably leads to heterogeneous distribution of organic matter and nutrients in soil, i.e. due to uneven surface spreading or inhomogeneous incorporation. The resulting localised hotspots of nutrient application will induce various biotic and abiotic nutrient turnover processes and fixation in the residue sphere, giving rise to distinct differences in nutrient availability, soil oxygen content and greenhouse gas (GHG) production. In this study we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of the reaction of manure solids and manure solids char with soil, focusing on their phosphorus (P) availability, as current emphasis on improving societal P efficiency through recycling waste or bio-based fertilisers necessitates a sound understanding of their behaviour. Soil layers amended at a constant P application rate with either pig manure solids or char made from pig manure solids were incubated for three weeks between layers of non-amended, P-depleted soil. Spatial and temporal changes in and around the amendment layers were simultaneously investigated in this study using a sandwich sensor consisting of a planar oxygen optode and multi-element diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) gels, combined with GHG emission measurements. After three weeks of incubation, the soil containing a layer amended with manure solids had a lower overall O2 content and had emitted significantly more CO2 than the non-amended control or the char-amended soil. The P availability from manure solids was initially higher than that from the char, but decreased over time, whereas from the char-amended layer P availability increased in the same period. In both treatments, increases in P availability were confined to the amended soil layer and did not greatly affect P availability in the directly adjacent soil layers during the three-week incubation. These results highlight the importance of placing organic P fertilisers close to where the plant roots will grow in order to

  15. Processes and properties of edge-localised instabilities in 2T 2MA plasmas in the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, A. J. Webster, S. J.

    2014-11-15

    During July 2012, 150 almost identical H-mode plasmas were consecutively created in the Joint European Torus, providing a combined total of approximately 8 minutes of steady-state plasma with 15 000 Edge Localised Modes (ELMs). In principle, each of those 15 000 ELMs are statistically equivalent. Here, the changes in edge density and plasma energy associated with those ELMs are explored, using the spikes in Beryllium II (527 nm) radiation as an indicator for the onset of an ELM. Clearly different timescales are observed during the ELM process. Edge temperature falls over a 2 ms timescale, edge density and pressure fall over a 5 ms timescale, and there is an additional 10 ms timescale that is consistent with a resistive relaxation of the plasma's edge. The statistical properties of the energy and density losses due to the ELMs are explored. For these plasmas the ELM energy (δE) is found to be approximately independent of the time between ELMs, despite the average ELM energy (〈δE〉) and average ELM frequency (f) being consistent with the scaling of 〈δE〉∝1/f. Instead, beyond the first 0.02 s of waiting time between ELMs, the energy losses due to individual ELMs are found to be statistically the same. Surprisingly no correlation is found between the energies of consecutive ELMs either. A weak link is found between the density drop and the ELM waiting time. Consequences of these results for ELM control and modelling are discussed.

  16. Spatiotemporal dynamics of phosphorus release, oxygen consumption and greenhouse gas emissions after localised soil amendment with organic fertilisers.

    PubMed

    Christel, Wibke; Zhu, Kun; Hoefer, Christoph; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Santner, Jakob; Bruun, Sander; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2016-06-01

    Organic fertilisation inevitably leads to heterogeneous distribution of organic matter and nutrients in soil, i.e. due to uneven surface spreading or inhomogeneous incorporation. The resulting localised hotspots of nutrient application will induce various biotic and abiotic nutrient turnover processes and fixation in the residue sphere, giving rise to distinct differences in nutrient availability, soil oxygen content and greenhouse gas (GHG) production. In this study we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of the reaction of manure solids and manure solids char with soil, focusing on their phosphorus (P) availability, as current emphasis on improving societal P efficiency through recycling waste or bio-based fertilisers necessitates a sound understanding of their behaviour. Soil layers amended at a constant P application rate with either pig manure solids or char made from pig manure solids were incubated for three weeks between layers of non-amended, P-depleted soil. Spatial and temporal changes in and around the amendment layers were simultaneously investigated in this study using a sandwich sensor consisting of a planar oxygen optode and multi-element diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) gels, combined with GHG emission measurements. After three weeks of incubation, the soil containing a layer amended with manure solids had a lower overall O2 content and had emitted significantly more CO2 than the non-amended control or the char-amended soil. The P availability from manure solids was initially higher than that from the char, but decreased over time, whereas from the char-amended layer P availability increased in the same period. In both treatments, increases in P availability were confined to the amended soil layer and did not greatly affect P availability in the directly adjacent soil layers during the three-week incubation. These results highlight the importance of placing organic P fertilisers close to where the plant roots will grow in order to

  17. Strain localisation in two-phase materials: Insights from centimetre-scale numerical models and laboratory experiments with ice mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, S.; Czaplinska, D.; Piazolo, S.; Wilson, C. J. L.; Quinteros, J.

    2015-12-01

    Most numerical models of lithosphere deformation approximate the rheological behavior of polymineralic crust and mantle via single-phase flow laws assuming that the weakest or most abundant material controls the bulk rheology. However, previous work showed that in two phase aggregates the bulk viscosity of the dominant phase is significantly affected by second phase particles. Here we combine two unconventional approaches to quantify the relative impact of such particles on strain localisation and bulk response: (1) We run centimetre-scale numerical models of a matrix with inclusions using the elasto-visco-plastic FEM software Slim3D. Recrystallization-induced weakening processes in the matrix, i.e. grain boundary migration and nucleation, are approximated using strain-dependent viscous softening. (2) We conduct high T, constant strain rate deformation experiments with a matrix of deuterated ice (D2O) containing rigid or soft particles, i.e. calcite and graphite, respectively. Ice is a valuable rock analogue, as it replicates the microstructural and fabric changes as well as the non-Newtonian response of other anisotropic minerals, such as olivine and quartz. The laboratory experiments exhibit two types of rheological behaviour: stress partitioning between ice and particles and strain localization in rheologically softer material. To quantify the contribution of both response types, we calibrate numerical simulations with data derived from laboratory experiments. The strain rate, stress, and viscosity evolution of the numerical experiment provides insight to non-linear strain localization processes, particle motion and time-dependent stress concentrations during the deformation. We fit the parameters of the viscous softening function and thereby quantify the amount of additional weakening in the matrix of ice mixtures in comparison to pure ice, which allows to constrain softening parameters used in large-scale simulations of glacial flow and lithosphere deformation.

  18. Identification and Functional Characterization of Three NoLS (Nucleolar Localisation Signals) Mutations of the CDC73 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Baorda, Filomena; Alfarano, Michela; Chetta, Massimiliano; Muscarella, Lucia Anna; Battista, Claudia; Copetti, Massimiliano; Kotzot, Dieter; Kapelari, Klaus; Al-Abdulrazzaq, Dalia; Perlman, Kusiel; Sochett, Etienne; Cole, David E. C.; Pellegrini, Fabio; Canaff, Lucie; Hendy, Geoffrey N.; D’Agruma, Leonardo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Carella, Massimo; Scillitani, Alfredo; Guarnieri, Vito

    2013-01-01

    Hyperparathyroidism Jaw-Tumour Syndrome (HPT-JT) is characterized by primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), maxillary/mandible ossifying fibromas and by parathyroid carcinoma in 15% of cases. Inactivating mutations of the tumour suppressor CDC73/HRPT2 gene have been found in HPT-JT patients and also as genetic determinants of sporadic parathyroid carcinoma/atypical adenomas and, rarely, typical adenomas, in familial PHPT. Here we report the genetic and molecular analysis of the CDC73/HRPT2 gene in three patients affected by PHPT due to atypical and typical parathyroid adenomas, in one case belonging to familial PHPT. Flag-tagged WT and mutant CDC73/HRPT2 proteins were transiently transfected in HEK293 cells and functional assays were performed in order to investigate the effect of the variants on the whole protein expression, nuclear localization and cell overgrowth induction. We identified four CDC73/HRPT2 gene mutations, three germline (c.679_680delAG, p.Val85_Val86del and p.Glu81_Pro84del), one somatic (p.Arg77Pro). In three cases the mutation was located within the Nucleolar Localisation Signals (NoLS). The three NoLS variants led to instability either of the corresponding mutated protein or mRNA or both. When transfected in HEK293 cells, NoLS mutated proteins mislocalized with a predeliction for cytoplasmic or nucleo-cytoplasmic localization and, finally, they resulted in overgrowth, consistent with a dominant negative interfering effect in the presence of the endogenous protein. PMID:24340015

  19. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  1. Thermoresponsive polymer colloids for drug delivery and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Abulateefeh, Samer R; Spain, Sebastian G; Aylott, Jonathan W; Chan, Weng C; Garnett, Martin C; Alexander, Cameron

    2011-12-01

    Many difficulties in treating cancer arise from the problems in directing highly cytotoxic agents to the deseased tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. Many drug delivery systems have been devised to address this problem, including those that show a change in properties in response to a temperature stimulus. In particular, colloidal materials based on thermoresponsive polymers offer a means to transport drugs selectively into tumour tissues that are hyperthermic, either intrinsically or through the application of clinical procedures such as localised heating. In this paper, the key attributes of thermoresponsive polymer colloids are considered, a number of important recent examples are discussed and the possible future developments of these materials are evaluated.

  2. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms ...

  3. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Anal Cancer Anal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Anal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Anal Cancer Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention Screening ...

  4. Cancer Statistics: Pancreas Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Pancreatic Cancer - Did you know that an estimated 46,000 Americans were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 53,070 % of All ...

  5. Light Localisation and Lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulinyan, Mher; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    List of contributors; Preface; 1. Light propagation and emission in complex photonic media W. L. Vos, A. Lagendijk and A. P. Mosk; 2. Transport of localized waves via modes and channels A. Genack and Z. Shi; 3. Modes structure and interaction in random lasers M. Leonetti and C. Lopez; 4. Ordered and disordered light transport in couple microring resonators S. Mookherjea; 5. One-dimensional photonic quasicrystals M. Ghulinyan; 6. 2D pseudo-random and deterministic aperiodic lasers H. Cao, H. Noh and L. Dal Negro; 7. 3D photonic quasicrystal and deterministic aperiodic structures A. Ledermann, M. Renner and G. von Freymann; 8. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with three-dimensional photonic bandgap crystals W. L. Vos and L. A. Woldering; References; Index.

  6. Current state of prostate cancer treatment in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Belinda F; Aiken, William D; Mayhew, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in Jamaica as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. One report suggested that Jamaica has the highest incidence rate of prostate cancer in the world, with an age-standardised rate of 304/100,000 per year. The Caribbean region is reported to have the highest mortality rate of prostate cancer worldwide. Prostate cancer accounts for a large portion of the clinical practice for health-care practitioners in Jamaica. The Jamaica Urological Society is a professional body comprising 19 urologists in Jamaica who provide most of the care for men with prostate cancer in collaboration with medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and a palliative care physician. The health-care system is structured in two tiers in Jamaica: public and private. The urologist-to-patient ratio is high, and this limits adequate urological care. Screening for prostate cancer is not a national policy in Jamaica. However, the Jamaica Urological Society and the Jamaica Cancer Society work synergistically to promote screening as well as to provide patient education for prostate cancer. Adequate treatment for localised prostate cancer is available in Jamaica in the forms of active surveillance, nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy, external beam radiation, and brachytherapy. However, there is a geographic maldistribution of centres that provide prostate cancer treatment, which leads to treatment delays. Also, there is difficulty in affording some treatment options in the private health-care sectors. Androgen deprivation therapy is available for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer and is subsidised through a programme called the National Health Fund. Second-line hormonal agents and chemotherapeutic agents are available but are costly to most of the population. The infrastructure for treatment of prostate cancer in Jamaica is good, but it requires additional technological advances as well as additional specialist

  7. Localised Effects of a Mega-Disturbance: Spatiotemporal Responses of Intertidal Sandy Shore Communities to the 2010 Chilean Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Roger D.; Valdivia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    -earthquake tsunami. Therefore, our results suggest that the effects of the Maule mega-earthquake on the ecological communities were spatially heterogeneous and highly localised. We suggest that high mobility and other species’ adaptations to the dynamic environmental conditions of sandy beaches might explain the comparatively high resilience of these assemblages. With this work we hope to motivate further experimental research on the role of individual- and population-level properties in the response of sandy-beach communities to interacting sources of disturbances. PMID:27383744

  8. Localised Effects of a Mega-Disturbance: Spatiotemporal Responses of Intertidal Sandy Shore Communities to the 2010 Chilean Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Roger D; Valdivia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    . Therefore, our results suggest that the effects of the Maule mega-earthquake on the ecological communities were spatially heterogeneous and highly localised. We suggest that high mobility and other species' adaptations to the dynamic environmental conditions of sandy beaches might explain the comparatively high resilience of these assemblages. With this work we hope to motivate further experimental research on the role of individual- and population-level properties in the response of sandy-beach communities to interacting sources of disturbances.

  9. Localised Effects of a Mega-Disturbance: Spatiotemporal Responses of Intertidal Sandy Shore Communities to the 2010 Chilean Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Roger D; Valdivia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    . Therefore, our results suggest that the effects of the Maule mega-earthquake on the ecological communities were spatially heterogeneous and highly localised. We suggest that high mobility and other species' adaptations to the dynamic environmental conditions of sandy beaches might explain the comparatively high resilience of these assemblages. With this work we hope to motivate further experimental research on the role of individual- and population-level properties in the response of sandy-beach communities to interacting sources of disturbances. PMID:27383744

  10. Co-localisation of advanced glycation end products and d-β-aspartic acid-containing proteins in gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oshika, Tetsuro; Takazawa, Yutaka; Fukayama, Masashi; Fujii, Noriko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy (GDLD), also known as familial subepithelial corneal amyloidosis, is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes progressive corneal opacity due to accumulation of amyloid fibrils in the corneal stroma. Genetic analyses have revealed that a mutation in membrane component chromosome 1 surface marker 1 gene is responsible for GDLD. However, the mechanism of amyloid formation in the corneal stroma remains unclear. The present study attempted to reveal the role of advanced glycation end products (AGE) and d-amino acids in amyloid formation in GDLD. Methods Informed consent was obtained from five patients with GDLD, three patients with bullous keratopathy and three patients with interstitial keratitis and all the specimens were analysed. Localisation of amyloid fibrils was analysed using Congo-red and thioflavin T staining. In addition, the localisation of AGE (Nɛ-carboxy(methyl)-l-lysine, pyrraline and pentosidine) and d-β-aspartic acid-containing proteins, a major form of d-amino acid-containing proteins, was analysed immunohistochemically. Results In all GDLD specimens, strong immunoreactivity to AGE and d-β-aspartic acid-containing proteins was detected in the subepithelial amyloid-rich region. In contrast, amyloid fibrils, AGE, or d-amino acid-containing proteins were slightly detected in the corneal stroma of patients with bullous keratopathy and interstitial keratitis. Conclusions Abnormally accumulated proteins rich in AGE and d-β-aspartic acid co-localise in the amyloid lesions in GDLD. These results indicate that non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of proteins, including AGE formation and isomerisation of aspartyl residues, will be the cause as well as the result of amyloid fibril formations in GDLD. PMID:22694960

  11. Nesfatin-1 suppresses energy intake, co-localises ghrelin in the brain and gut, and alters ghrelin, cholecystokinin and orexin mRNA expression in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Kerbel, B; Unniappan, S

    2012-02-01

    Nesfatin-1 is a novel anorectic peptide encoded in the precursor protein nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). We recently reported the presence and appetite suppressing effects of nesfatin-1 in goldfish. Nesfatin-1 has been co-localised with ghrelin in the stomach of rats. Whether nesfatin-1 influences other appetite regulatory peptides in goldfish remains unclear. The main objectives of the present study were to investigate whether nesfatin-1 co-localises ghrelin in goldfish, and to test whether exogenous nesfatin-1 influences endogenous ghrelin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and orexin A (OXA). We found co-localisation of nesfatin-1-like and ghrelin-like immunoreactivity in the enteroendocrine cells of the goldfish anterior intestine (J-loop). Furthermore, co-localisation of ghrelin and nesfatin-1 was also observed in the posterior nucleus lateralis tuberis of the goldfish hypothalamus, a brain region implicated in the regulation of food intake. These findings suggest a functional relationship between ghrelin and nesfatin-1 in goldfish. In support of this, i.c.v. administration of goldfish (gf) nesfatin-1 [25 ng/g body weight (BW)], suppressed food intake and the expression of mRNAs encoding preproghrelin, ghrelin receptor (GHS-R 1a-1), CCK and NUCB2 in the forebrain of fed fish, as well as ghrelin and NUCB2 mRNA in the hypothalamus of unfed fish, both at 1 h post-injection. Nesfatin-1 stimulated hypothalamic CCK mRNA expression at 30 min post-injection in fed fish, and inhibited OXA mRNA in the unfed fish hypothalamus 1 h post-injection. Similarly, i.c.v. injections of gfghrelin (1 ng/g BW), although stimulating food intake, suppressed NUCB2 and preproghrelin mRNAs, but not ghrelin receptor mRNA expression in the forebrain. It is also evident that exogenous ghrelin and nesfatin-1 mRNAs encoding these peptides. Our novel results indicate interactions between nesfatin-1 and ghrelin, CCK and orexin, and show that nesfatin-1 acts on other appetite regulatory peptides in a time

  12. La myosite ossifiante circonscrite, une localisation inhabituelle - à propos d'un cas et revue de la littérature

    PubMed Central

    Taam, Ikram; Boussouni, Khouloud; Redouane, Bouchaib; Amil, Touriya; Saouab, Rachida

    2016-01-01

    La myosite ossifiante circonscrite (MOC) est une pathologie rare caractérisée par une ossification hétérotopique non tumorale des tissus mous. C'est une pathologie du sujet jeune, survenant le plus souvent après un traumatisme. Sa localisation est ubiquitaire, prédominante au niveau des ceintures et des membres. Nous rapportons l'observation d'une jeune patiente présentant une MOC paravertébrale sans contexte traumatique, dans le but de rappeler les critères diagnostics et les aspects en imagerie. PMID:27642411

  13. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  14. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  15. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  16. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Ovarian Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, ... rare fallopian tube cancer.) This fact sheet about ovarian cancer is part of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  17. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer statistics across the world. U.S. Cancer Mortality Trends The best indicator of progress against cancer is ... the number of cancer survivors has increased. These trends show that progress is being made against the ...

  18. Testicular cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - testes; Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer ... The exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. Factors that may ... increases if he has: Abnormal testicle development Exposure ...

  19. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the ...

  1. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  2. What Causes Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » What Causes Cancer? Cancer is a complex group of diseases with ... cancer. Learn About Cancer Topics Cancer Basics What Causes Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate ...

  3. Loss of flotillin expression results in weakened desmosomal adhesion and Pemphigus vulgaris-like localisation of desmoglein-3 in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Völlner, Frauke; Ali, Jawahir; Kurrle, Nina; Exner, Yvonne; Eming, Rüdiger; Hertl, Michael; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2016-01-01

    Desmosomes are adhesion plaques that mediate cell-cell adhesion in many tissues, including the epidermis, and generate mechanical resistance to tissues. The extracellular domains of desmosomal cadherin proteins, desmogleins and desmocollins, are required for the interaction with cadherins of the neighbouring cells, whereas their cytoplasmic tails associate with cytoplasmic proteins which mediate connection to intermediate filaments. Disruption of desmosomal adhesion by mutations, autoantibodies or bacterial toxins results in severe human disorders of e.g. the skin and the heart. Despite the vital role of desmosomes in various tissues, the details of their molecular assembly are not clear. We here show that the two members of the flotillin protein family directly interact with the cytoplasmic tails of desmogleins. Depletion of flotillins in human keratinocytes results in weakened desmosomal adhesion and reduced expression of desmoglein-3, most likely due to a reduction in the desmosomal pool due to increased turnover. In the absence of flotillins, desmoglein-3 shows an altered localisation pattern in the cell-cell junctions of keratinocytes, which is highly similar to the localisation observed upon treatment with pemphigus vulgaris autoantibodies. Thus, our data show that flotillins, which have previously been connected to the classical cadherins, are also of importance for the desmosomal cell adhesion. PMID:27346727

  4. Localisations particulières de l'histiocytose langerhansienne chez l'enfant, scapula et pubis: à propos de deux cas

    PubMed Central

    Atarraf, Karima; Chater, Lamiae; Arroud, Mounir; Afifi, My Abderrahman

    2014-01-01

    L'histiocytose X ou histiocytose de Langerhans est une maladie de l'enfant et de l'adulte jeune. Dont l'incidence est estimée à 1 cas sur 200 000 par an. C'est une maladie au spectre clinique très divers, allant du simple granulome éosinophile à la forme grave multiviscérale avec dysfonctionnement d'organe. Les auteurs rapportent deux observations concernant deux localisations assez rares de cette maladie, au niveau du pubis chez le premier enfant, et au niveau de la scapula chez le deuxième. Chez nos deux malades la localisation était focale, et l’évolution était favorable. A travers ces deux observations, nous allons essayer de décrire les différents aspects cliniques et radiologiques et discuter a travers une revue de littérature les démarches diagnostiques et thérapeutiques de cette maladie rare. PMID:25478049

  5. Analysis of the expression patterns, subcellular localisations and interaction partners of Drosophila proteins using a pigP protein trap library

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Nick; Rees, Johanna S.; Roote, John; Ryder, Ed; Armean, Irina M.; Johnson, Glynnis; Drummond, Emma; Spriggs, Helen; Drummond, Jenny; Magbanua, Jose P.; Naylor, Huw; Sanson, Bénédicte; Bastock, Rebecca; Huelsmann, Sven; Trovisco, Vitor; Landgraf, Matthias; Knowles-Barley, Seymour; Armstrong, J. Douglas; White-Cooper, Helen; Hansen, Celia; Phillips, Roger G.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Russell, Steven; St Johnston, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Although we now have a wealth of information on the transcription patterns of all the genes in the Drosophila genome, much less is known about the properties of the encoded proteins. To provide information on the expression patterns and subcellular localisations of many proteins in parallel, we have performed a large-scale protein trap screen using a hybrid piggyBac vector carrying an artificial exon encoding yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and protein affinity tags. From screening 41 million embryos, we recovered 616 verified independent YFP-positive lines representing protein traps in 374 genes, two-thirds of which had not been tagged in previous P element protein trap screens. Over 20 different research groups then characterized the expression patterns of the tagged proteins in a variety of tissues and at several developmental stages. In parallel, we purified many of the tagged proteins from embryos using the affinity tags and identified co-purifying proteins by mass spectrometry. The fly stocks are publicly available through the Kyoto Drosophila Genetics Resource Center. All our data are available via an open access database (Flannotator), which provides comprehensive information on the expression patterns, subcellular localisations and in vivo interaction partners of the trapped proteins. Our resource substantially increases the number of available protein traps in Drosophila and identifies new markers for cellular organelles and structures. PMID:25294943

  6. Localised controlled release of simvastatin from porous chitosan-gelatin scaffolds engrafted with simvastatin loaded PLGA-microparticles for bone tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Piergiorgio; Nandagiri, Vijay Kumar; Daly, Jacqueline; Chiono, Valeria; Mattu, Clara; Tonda-Turo, Chiara; Ciardelli, Gianluca; Ramtoola, Zebunnissa

    2016-02-01

    Localised controlled release of simvastatin from porous freeze-dried chitosan-gelatin (CH-G) scaffolds was investigated by incorporating simvastatin loaded poly-(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) microparticles (MSIMs) into the scaffolds. MSIMs at 10% w/w simvastatin loading were prepared using a single emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The MSIM optimal amount to be incorporated into the scaffolds was selected by analysing the effect of embedding increasing amounts of blank PLGA microparticles (BL-MPs) on the scaffold physical properties and on the in vitro cell viability using a clonal human osteoblastic cell line (hFOB). Increasing the BL-MP content from 0% to 33.3% w/w showed a significant decrease in swelling degree (from 1245±56% to 570±35%). Scaffold pore size and distribution changed significantly as a function of BL-MP loading. Compressive modulus of scaffolds increased with increasing BL-MP amount up to 16.6% w/w (23.0±1.0kPa). No significant difference in cell viability was observed with increasing BL-MP loading. Based on these results, a content of 16.6% w/w MSIM particles was incorporated successfully in CH-G scaffolds, showing a controlled localised release of simvastatin able to influence the hFOB cell proliferation and the osteoblastic differentiation after 11 days.

  7. The Dynamics of Connexin Expression, Degradation and Localisation Are Regulated by Gonadotropins during the Early Stages of In Vitro Maturation of Swine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Santiquet, Nicolas; Robert, Claude; Richard, François J.

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctional communication (GJC) plays a primordial role in oocyte maturation and meiotic resumption in mammals by directing the transfer of numerous molecules between cumulus cells and the oocyte. Gap junctions are made of connexins (Cx), proteins that regulate GJC in numerous ways. Understanding the dynamic regulation of connexin arrangements during in vitro maturation (IVM) could provide a powerful tool for controlling meiotic resumption and consequently in vitro development of fully competent oocytes. However, physiological events happening during the early hours of IVM may still be elucidated. The present study reports the dynamic regulation of connexin expression, degradation and localization during this stage. Cx43, Cx45 and Cx60 were identified as the main connexins expressed in swine COC. Cx43 and Cx45 transcripts were judged too static to be a regulator of GJC, while Cx43 protein expression was highly responsive to gonadotropins, suggesting that it might be the principal regulator of GJC. In addition, the degradation of Cx43 expressed after 4.5 h of IVM in response to equine chorionic gonadotropin appeared to involve the proteasomal complex. Cx43 localisation appeared to be associated with GJC. Taken together, these results show for the first time that gonadotropins regulate Cx43 protein expression, degradation and localisation in porcine COC during the first several hours of IVM. Regulation of Cx43 may in turn, via GJC, participate in the development of fully competent oocytes. PMID:23861906

  8. Diagnostic et traitement de la Maladie du charbon à localisation palpébrale: à propos d'un cas et revue de littérature

    PubMed Central

    Hafidi, Zouheir; Handor, Hanan; Laghmari, Mina; Handor, Najat; Cherkaoui, Lalla Ouafae; Tachfouti, Samira; Seffar, Myriame; Daoudi, Rajae

    2013-01-01

    L′anthrax est une zoonose causée par le Bacillus anthracis. les humains contractent généralement cette maladie dans des régions endémiques, par contact direct avec des animaux infectés ou avec leurs produits contaminés. Les localisations palpébrales sont rares dans la pratique clinique et posent des problèmes de diagnostic différentiel. Les auteurs rapportent l'observation d'un patient admis dans un tableau de cellulite préseptale, avec escarre noirâtre étendue de la paupière supérieure et œdème extensif de l′hémiface, faisant suspecter une localisation palpébrale de la maladie du charbon. L'examen bactériologique a permis de confirmer le diagnostic. Le patient a bénéficié d′une antibiothérapie à base de pénicilline G avec une bonne évolution. PMID:24171070

  9. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  10. Combined surgery and photodynamic therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douplik, Alexandre

    According to the recent guidelines, the gold standard is resecting an extra 0.5-3 cm beyond the lesion margins that are visually detected and/or biopsy confirmed depending on type of malignancy and its localisation to avoid missing the residuals of the tumour. Often, such a large resection leads to dysfunctions of the organ or tissues, which underwent the surgery. In some cases, an extra tumour-free margin cannot be achieved because of tumour proximity to vital sites such as major vascular or nerve structures. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is an emerging clinical modality to locally destroy cancer lesions selectively. The limitation of photodynamic therapy is the curable depth of an order of one centimetre or less. A combination of cancer surgery following by PDT can bring a benefit to reduce the resection and minimise the impact on the organ or tissue functionality. Combination of cancer surgery and photodynamic therapy provides another opportunity-fluorescence image guidance of cancer removal. Most of the photosensitizers intensively fluoresce and hence facilitate a strong fluorescence contrast versus healthy adjacent tissues.

  11. Imaging oligometastatic cancer before local treatment.

    PubMed

    Franklin, James M; Sharma, Ricky A; Harris, Adrian L; Gleeson, Fergus V

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of novel treatment strategies to help widen the therapeutic window for patients with oligometastatic cancer, improved biomarkers are needed to reliably define patients who can benefit from these treatments. Multimodal imaging is one such option and should be optimised to comprehensively assess metastatic sites, disease burden, and response to neoadjuvant treatment in each disease setting. These features will probably remain important prognostic biomarkers, and are crucial in planning multidisciplinary treatment. There are opportunities to extract additional phenotypic information from conventional imaging, while novel imaging techniques can also reveal specific aspects of tumour biology. Imaging can both characterise and localise the phenotypic heterogeneity of multiple tumour sites. Novel approaches to existing imaging datasets and correlation with tumour biology will be important in realising the potential of imaging to guide treatment in the oligometastatic setting. In this Personal View, we discuss the current status and future directions of imaging before treatment in patients with extracranial oligometastases. PMID:27599145

  12. Mortality and cancer morbidity among cement workers.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, K; Horstmann, V; Welinder, H

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To explore associations between exposure to cement dust and cause specific mortality and tumour morbidity, especially gastrointestinal tumours. DESIGN--A retrospective cohort study. SUBJECTS AND SETTING--2400 men, employed for at least 12 months in two Swedish cement factories. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cause specific morality from death certificates (1952-86). Cancer morbidity from tumour registry information (1958-86). Standardised mortality rates (SMRs; national reference rates) and standardised morbidity incidence rates (SIRs; regional reference rates) were calculated. RESULTS--An increased risk of colorectal cancer was found > or = 15 years since the start of employment (SIR 1.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1-2.3), mainly due to an increased risk for tumours in the right part of the colon (SIR 2.7, 95% CI 1.4-4.8), but not in the left part (SIR 1.0, 95% CI 0.3-2.5). There was a numerical increase of rectal cancer (SIR 1.5, 95% CI 0.8-2.5). Exposure (duration of blue collar employment)-response relations were found for right sided colon cancer. After > or = 25 years of cement work, the risk was fourfold (SIR 4.3, 95% CI 1.7-8.9). There was no excess of stomach cancer or respiratory cancer. Neither total mortality nor cause specific mortality were significantly increased. CONCLUSIONS--Diverging risk patterns for tumours with different localisations within the large bowel were found in the morbidity study. Long term exposure to cement dust was a risk factor for right sided colon cancer. The mortality study did not show this risk. PMID:8457494

  13. Differences in breast cancer incidence and stage distribution between urban and rural female population in Podlaskie Voivodship, Poland in years 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, Michalina; Maslach, Dominik; Juczewska, Marzena; Lasota, Wieslaw; Rabczenko, Daniel; Marcinkowski, Jerzy; Szpak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate differences in breast cancer incidence and stage of disease between the urban and rural female population in Podlaskie Voivodship in 2001-2002, before the introduction of the Population Screening Programme in 2006. Analysis was based on 696 breast cancer cases diagnosed in years 2001-2002 and registered in the CR in Bialystok (Voivodship Cancer Registry). An average annual number of incidence, as well as crude and standardised incidence rates, were calculated. Age-specific incidence rates for 5-year age groups were also calculated and grouped as follows: < 50, 50-69, > =70 years old. Incidence differences related to place of residence: urban or rural, were presented with the use of u/r (urban/rural) ratio. In order to evaluate the stage of disease, a simplified classification recommended by ENCR (European Network of Cancer Registries) for population registries (localised, regional, metastatic) was applied. The breast cancer incidence rate in the urban population was higher than in rural areas with u/r ratio amounting to 1.4. The highest incidence and largely marked differences between urban and rural areas were among women aged 50-69 years with the u/r ratio amounting to 1.8. Overall, the proportion of stage localised in Podlaskie Voivodship was 33.1 percent and differed between urban and rural areas. The proportion of localised cancer was higher in urban areas, but patients were younger when compared to those living in rural areas. Knowledge of differences in incidence and breast cancer stage in urban and rural women investigated in this research, together with other epidemiological indicators, should be used for monitoring the Population Screening Programmes in these populations.

  14. Autoantibodies to endostatin in patients with breast cancer: correlation to endostatin levels and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bachelot, T; Ratel, D; Menetrier-Caux, C; Wion, D; Blay, J-Y; Berger, F

    2006-01-01

    Circulating autoantibodies to self-antigens overexpressed by cancer cells are common in cancer patients. As specific proteins are expressed during neoangiogenesis, a similar phenomenon might occur with particular antigens of tumour vessels. Collagen XVIII, from which endostatin is cleaved, is highly expressed in the perivascular basement membrane of tumour-associated blood vessels and autoantibodies to endostatin have been reported in cancer patients. The present study analyses the incidence of naturally occurring autoantibodies to endostatin in the sera of breast cancer patients and their relation to endostatin serum levels and patient clinical outcome. Serum samples from 36 patients with localised breast cancer and 59 patients with a fully documented history of metastatic breast cancer were used. The immunoreactivity of serum samples was tested against purified recombinant human endostatin and endostatin levels were determined by immunoassay. We could detect anti-endostatin antibodies in the sera of 66% of the patients with localised disease and 42% of the patients with metastatic disease (P=0.03). There was no correlation between the presence of antibodies to endostatin and circulating levels of endostatin. The detection of autoantibodies to endostatin was associated with better prognosis in metastatic breast cancer patients (median survival time: 20 vs 8 months, P=0.03), as was the presence of low levels of serum endostatin (median survival time: 20 vs 9 months, P=0.007). These results show that a natural immune reaction against endostatin can occur in breast cancer patients. This could have important therapeutic implications with regard to endostatin therapy and raises the question of a possible role of this humoral reaction against endostatin in the neoplastic process. PMID:16552441

  15. Autoantibodies to endostatin in patients with breast cancer: correlation to endostatin levels and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, T; Ratel, D; Menetrier-Caux, C; Wion, D; Blay, J-Y; Berger, F

    2006-04-10

    Circulating autoantibodies to self-antigens overexpressed by cancer cells are common in cancer patients. As specific proteins are expressed during neoangiogenesis, a similar phenomenon might occur with particular antigens of tumour vessels. Collagen XVIII, from which endostatin is cleaved, is highly expressed in the perivascular basement membrane of tumour-associated blood vessels and autoantibodies to endostatin have been reported in cancer patients. The present study analyses the incidence of naturally occurring autoantibodies to endostatin in the sera of breast cancer patients and their relation to endostatin serum levels and patient clinical outcome. Serum samples from 36 patients with localised breast cancer and 59 patients with a fully documented history of metastatic breast cancer were used. The immunoreactivity of serum samples was tested against purified recombinant human endostatin and endostatin levels were determined by immunoassay. We could detect anti-endostatin antibodies in the sera of 66% of the patients with localised disease and 42% of the patients with metastatic disease (P=0.03). There was no correlation between the presence of antibodies to endostatin and circulating levels of endostatin. The detection of autoantibodies to endostatin was associated with better prognosis in metastatic breast cancer patients (median survival time: 20 vs 8 months, P = 0.03), as was the presence of low levels of serum endostatin (median survival time: 20 vs 9 months, P = 0.007). These results show that a natural immune reaction against endostatin can occur in breast cancer patients. This could have important therapeutic implications with regard to endostatin therapy and raises the question of a possible role of this humoral reaction against endostatin in the neoplastic process. PMID:16552441

  16. Cancer - penis

    MedlinePlus

    ... an organ that makes up part of the male reproductive system. Causes The exact cause is unknown. Smegma, a ... Squamous cell cancer - penis Images Male reproductive anatomy Male reproductive system References National Comprehensive Cancer Network. National Comprehensive Cancer ...

  17. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  18. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  19. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  20. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Anal Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Whether you (or ... the topics below to get started. What Is Anal Cancer? What is anal cancer? What are the ...

  1. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  2. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink per day (women at high risk for breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) ... Services Task Force. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and ... cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date ...

  3. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  4. Stomach cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - stomach; Gastric cancer; Gastric carcinoma; Adenocarcinoma of the stomach ... Several types of cancer can occur in the stomach. The most common type is called adenocarcinoma. It starts from one of the cell ...

  5. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is pregnant. There are different types of uterine cancer. The most common type starts in the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. This type of cancer is sometimes called endometrial cancer. The symptoms of ...

  6. Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  7. Cancer Moonshot

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Moonshot, led by Vice President Joe Biden, will marshal resources across the federal government to speed progress in cancer research and lead to improved cancer prevention, detection, and treatment.

  8. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  9. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Treatment of Localized and Locally Advanced Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer: 2,5 Year Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovov, V. A.; Dvoynikov, S. Y.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    Introduction & Objectives: High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to be a successful treatment for localised prostate cancer (PC). Here we have explored the effectiveness of the HIFU treatment for hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC). Materials & Methods: 341 patients were treated in our center between September 2007 and December 2009; all of them showed treatment failure following hormone ablation. The median time before hormone-resistance was 20 (3-48) months. In the group with localised PC: number of patients 237, Gleason score ≤7, stage T1-2N0M0, age 69 (60-89) years, mean PSA before treatment 40,0 (5,8-92,9) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—39,3 (28-92) cc; in the group with locally advanced PC: number of patients 104, Gleason score ≤9, stage T2-3N0M0, age 72 (52-83) years, PSA before treatment 30,3 (20,1-60) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—41,2 (25-198) cc. HIFU was delivered under spinal anesthesia using the Ablatherm HIFU device (EDAP, France). Pre HIFU transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed for all patients. Mean follow-up time 18 months (3-30). Results: The median PSA level 12 months after HIFU treatment was 0,04 (0-2,24) ng/ml—localised PC, and for locally advanced disease—0,05 (0-48,4) ng/ml, at 18 months after HIFU treatment this was 0,2 (0,02-2,0) ng/ml for localised PC, and for locally advanced disease 0,18 (0,04-7,45) ng/ml. Patients with localised PC has 4,5% recurrence, those with locally advanced PC 20%. Kaplan-Meir analyses of the total group indicated that the risk of recurrence after 1 year follow-up was 10%, the risk of recurrence was 19% after 2 years of follow-up. Conclusions: Our initial experience shows that ultrasound ablation is safe, minimally invasive and effective as a treatment for localised and locally advanced hormone-resistant prostate cancer.

  10. A conserved role for Notch signaling in priming the cellular response to Shh through ciliary localisation of the key Shh transducer Smo.

    PubMed

    Stasiulewicz, Magdalena; Gray, Shona D; Mastromina, Ioanna; Silva, Joana C; Björklund, Mia; Seymour, Philip A; Booth, David; Thompson, Calum; Green, Richard J; Hall, Emma A; Serup, Palle; Dale, J Kim

    2015-07-01

    Notochord-derived Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is essential for dorsoventral patterning of the overlying neural tube. Increasing concentration and duration of Shh signal induces progenitors to acquire progressively more ventral fates. We show that Notch signalling augments the response of neuroepithelial cells to Shh, leading to the induction of higher expression levels of the Shh target gene Ptch1 and subsequently induction of more ventral cell fates. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated Notch1 leads to pronounced accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) within primary cilia and elevated levels of full-length Gli3. Finally, we show that Notch activity promotes longer primary cilia both in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, these Notch-regulated effects are Shh independent. These data identify Notch signalling as a novel modulator of Shh signalling that acts mechanistically via regulation of ciliary localisation of key components of its transduction machinery. PMID:25995356

  11. Tuberculome myocardique: localisation inhabituelle de la tuberculoseà propos d'une nouvelle observation avec une revue de la littérature

    PubMed Central

    Lambatten, Dalal; Hammi, Sanaa; Rhofir, Yasmina; Bourkadi, Jamal Eddine

    2016-01-01

    Nous rapportons l'observation d'un patient de 50 ans présentant une masse tumorale du ventricule gauche évoluant dans un contexte d'altération de l’état général et de fièvre. Cette masse a été objectivée par l’échocardiographie réalisée pour l'exploration d'une cardiomégalie radiologique. L'aspect en imagerie par résonance magnétique était évocateur d'un tuberculome intra myocardique. A travers notre observation, nous proposons une revue de la littérature sur cette localisation inhabituelle de la tuberculose. PMID:27583096

  12. A conserved role for Notch signaling in priming the cellular response to Shh through ciliary localisation of the key Shh transducer Smo

    PubMed Central

    Stasiulewicz, Magdalena; Gray, Shona D.; Mastromina, Ioanna; Silva, Joana C.; Björklund, Mia; Seymour, Philip A.; Booth, David; Thompson, Calum; Green, Richard J.; Hall, Emma A.; Serup, Palle; Dale, J. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Notochord-derived Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is essential for dorsoventral patterning of the overlying neural tube. Increasing concentration and duration of Shh signal induces progenitors to acquire progressively more ventral fates. We show that Notch signalling augments the response of neuroepithelial cells to Shh, leading to the induction of higher expression levels of the Shh target gene Ptch1 and subsequently induction of more ventral cell fates. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated Notch1 leads to pronounced accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) within primary cilia and elevated levels of full-length Gli3. Finally, we show that Notch activity promotes longer primary cilia both in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, these Notch-regulated effects are Shh independent. These data identify Notch signalling as a novel modulator of Shh signalling that acts mechanistically via regulation of ciliary localisation of key components of its transduction machinery. PMID:25995356

  13. Localisation humérale d'une tumeur à cellules géantes récidivantes (à propos d'un cas)

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Youssef; Serghini, Issam; Koulali, Idrissi Khalid; Salahi, Hicham; Galwia, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Les auteurs rapportent un cas de localisation rare d'une tumeur à cellules géantes au niveau de la palette humérale du coude droit chez un militaire de 36 ans de sexe masculin, la radio standard montrait une image kystique ne soufflant pas la corticale. L'examen anatomo-pathologique a permis d’ établir le diagnostic et le traitement a fait appel: au début a une Exérèse chirurgicale totale et une greffe osseuse par un greffon iliaque de la totalité de la palette huméral qui s'est compliquée à 6 mois de recule d une récidive locale. PMID:25995809

  14. Sub-cellular localisation of the white/scarlet ABC transporter to pigment granule membranes within the compound eye of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, S M; Howells, A J; Cox, G B; Ewart, G D

    2000-01-01

    The white, scarlet, and brown genes of Drosophila melanogaster encode ABC transporters involved with the uptake and storage of metabolic precursors to the red and brown eye colour pigments. It has generally been assumed that these proteins are localised in the plasma membrane and transport precursor molecules from the heamolymph into the eye pigment cells. However, the immuno-electron microscopy experiments in this study reveal that the White and Scarlet proteins are located in the membranes of pigment granules within pigment cells and retinula cells of the compound eye. No evidence of their presence in the plasma membrane was observed. This result suggests that, rather than tranporting tryptophan into the cell across the plasma membrane, the White/Scarlet complex transports a metabolic intermediate (such as 3-hydroxy kynurenine) from the cytoplasm into the pigment granules. Other functional implications of this new finding are discussed. PMID:11294610

  15. Late Cenozoic regional uplift and localised crustal deformation within the northern Arabian Platform in southeast Turkey: Investigation of the Euphrates terrace staircase using multidisciplinary techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Tuncer; Seyrek, Ali; Westaway, Rob; Guillou, Hervé; Scaillet, Stéphane; Beck, Ant; Bridgland, David R.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of detailed field investigations of the fluvial succession exposed along the Euphrates valley adjoining the Atatürk Dam in the northern part of the Arabian Platform within SE Turkey. This work, which has used Differential GPS surveying to obtain accurate heights of deposits and Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission imagery for location purposes, has included documentation of many fresh sections exposed by quarrying. The work has been supplemented by unspiked Ksbnd Ar dating of late Middle Miocene to Late Miocene basalt flows, which are widespread in the region, providing a chronology for the early stages of development of this river system following regional emergence above sea-level in the early Middle Miocene. For example, beside the Atatürk Dam Lake at Siverek İskelesi, basalt dated to 10.24 ± 0.22 Ma (± 2σ) caps a polymict Euphrates gravel some 80 m above the modern river; this is the oldest Euphrates terrace currently recognised. However, amounts and rates of fluvial incision are shown to vary across the northern Arabian Platform in a complex manner, due to the interaction between regional uplift and localised vertical crustal motions caused by slip on active reverse faults beneath anticlines. The study reach downstream of the Atatürk Dam includes the footwall of one such fault, beneath the Bozova Anticline; we estimate that the resulting rate of localised subsidence, superimposed onto the regional uplift that has also been occurring, has been ~ 0.01 mm a- 1 during the present phase of crustal deformation, which began at ~ 3.7-3.6 Ma, but was higher, maybe ~ 0.03 mm a- 1, during the previous phase, which began at ~ 6 Ma, when the pattern of plate motions in the surrounding region was different. A large palaeo-lake centred north of the present study region around the city of Adıyaman is inferred to have existed during this ~ 6 Ma to ~ 3.7-3.6 Ma phase of plate motion, apparently because the relatively rapid localised hanging

  16. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  17. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  18. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis and High Risk Individuals.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-12

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma

  19. Gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, H.O. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

  20. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread of the cancer. But it does not cure the cancer. If prostate cancer spreads even after hormone therapy, ... the Gleason score) when you are diagnosed. A cure is possible if the cancer has not spread. Hormone treatment can improve survival, ...

  1. Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  2. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  3. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  4. Radon and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  5. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  6. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Cancer Center History Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners ... Profiles in Cancer Research Outstanding Investigator Award Recipients ...

  7. Endometrial Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  8. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  9. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  10. Diet and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber and cancer; Cancer and fiber; Nitrates and cancer; Cancer and nitrates ... DIET AND BREAST CANCER The link between nutrition and breast cancer has been well studied. To reduce risk of breast cancer the American ...

  11. Rare cancers of the head and neck area in Europe.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, B A C; Gatta, G; Capocaccia, R; Pierannunzio, D; Strojan, P; Licitra, L

    2012-04-01

    The RARECARE project has proposed a different and more detailed grouping of cancers, based on localisation and histological type, in order to identify rare entities with clinical meaning. RARECARE gathered data on cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002 and archived in 76 population-based cancer registries, all of which had vital status information available up to at least 31st December 2003. This study provides incidence, prevalence and survival rates for rare head and neck epithelial (H&N) cancers. Among the rare H&N cancers, those of oral cavity had the highest annual crude incidence rate of 48 per million, followed by oropharynx and 'major salivary glands and salivary gland type tumours' (28 and 13 per million, respectively). Incidence rates of epithelial tumours of nasal cavities, nasopharynx, eye and adnexa and middle ears were all lower than 5 per million. The prevalence for all investigated entities was lower than 35 per 100,000. The 5-year relative survival rates ranged from 40% for epithelial cancer of oropharynx to 85% for epithelial cancer of eye and adnexa. Survival rates were lower for men and for patients aged ≥65 years. With few exceptions, the lowest and highest survival figures were observed for Eastern Europe and Northern Europe, respectively. According to the definition for rare tumours by RARECARE (incidence<6 per 100,000), as well as according to the definition for rare diseases by the European Commission (prevalence<50 per 100,000) the H&N cancers described in this paper should be considered rare and diagnosis and treatment of these cancers should therefore be centralised.

  12. Magnetic nanoparticle-based therapeutic agents for thermo-chemotherapy treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Hervault, Aziliz; Thanh, Nguyen Th Kim

    2014-10-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely investigated for their great potential as mediators of heat for localised hyperthermia therapy. Nanocarriers have also attracted increasing attention due to the possibility of delivering drugs at specific locations, therefore limiting systematic effects. The enhancement of the anti-cancer effect of chemotherapy with application of concurrent hyperthermia was noticed more than thirty years ago. However, combining magnetic nanoparticles with molecules of drugs in the same nanoformulation has only recently emerged as a promising tool for the application of hyperthermia with combined chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer. The main feature of this review is to present the recent advances in the development of multifunctional therapeutic nanosystems incorporating both magnetic nanoparticles and drugs, and their superior efficacy in treating cancer compared to either hyperthermia or chemotherapy as standalone therapies. The principle of magnetic fluid hyperthermia is also presented. PMID:25212238

  13. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette-Guérin).

  14. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  15. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential "liquid biopsy" in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice. PMID:27621566

  16. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential "liquid biopsy" in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice.

  17. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential “liquid biopsy” in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice. PMID:27621566

  18. Geographical epidemiology of prostate cancer in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Jarup, Lars; Best, Nicky; Toledano, Mireille B; Wakefield, Jon; Elliott, Paul

    2002-02-10

    Prostate cancer incidence has increased during recent years, possibly linked to environmental exposures. Exposure to environmental carcinogens is unlikely to be evenly distributed geographically, which may give rise to variations in disease occurrence that is detectable in a spatial analysis. The aim of our study was to examine the spatial variation of prostate cancer in Great Britain at ages 45-64 years. Spatial variation was examined across electoral wards from 1975-1991. Poisson regression was used to examine regional, urbanisation and socioeconomic effects, while Bayesian mapping techniques were used to assess spatial variability. There was an indication of geographical differences in prostate cancer risk at a regional level, ranging from 0.83 (95% CI: 0.78-0.87) to 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1-1.3) across regions. There was significant heterogeneity in the risk across wards, although the range of relative risks was narrow. More detailed spatial analyses within 4 regions did not indicate any clear evidence of localised geographical clustering for prostate cancer. The absence of any marked geographical variability at a small-area scale argues against a geographically varying environmental factor operating strongly in the aetiology of prostate cancer. PMID:11807800

  19. Geographical epidemiology of prostate cancer in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Jarup, Lars; Best, Nicky; Toledano, Mireille B; Wakefield, Jon; Elliott, Paul

    2002-02-10

    Prostate cancer incidence has increased during recent years, possibly linked to environmental exposures. Exposure to environmental carcinogens is unlikely to be evenly distributed geographically, which may give rise to variations in disease occurrence that is detectable in a spatial analysis. The aim of our study was to examine the spatial variation of prostate cancer in Great Britain at ages 45-64 years. Spatial variation was examined across electoral wards from 1975-1991. Poisson regression was used to examine regional, urbanisation and socioeconomic effects, while Bayesian mapping techniques were used to assess spatial variability. There was an indication of geographical differences in prostate cancer risk at a regional level, ranging from 0.83 (95% CI: 0.78-0.87) to 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1-1.3) across regions. There was significant heterogeneity in the risk across wards, although the range of relative risks was narrow. More detailed spatial analyses within 4 regions did not indicate any clear evidence of localised geographical clustering for prostate cancer. The absence of any marked geographical variability at a small-area scale argues against a geographically varying environmental factor operating strongly in the aetiology of prostate cancer.

  20. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential “liquid biopsy” in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice.

  1. Differential expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in association with invasion of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kotepui, Manas; Punsawad, Chuchard; Chupeerach, Chaowanee; Songsri, Apiram; Charoenkijkajorn, Lek; Petmitr, Songsak

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) has a potential role in tumour invasion and metastasis. However, its relevance to the prognosis of human breast cancer is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression patterns of MMP-13 protein and to determine its prognostic value in breast cancer, and to define its relation to the clinicopathological features. Immunohistochemistry analysis of MMP-13 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of cancerous breast tissue (n = 76) and normal breast tissue (n = 20), all of which had clinicopathological information available. Based on the principle of immunoreactivity, the detection of MMP-13 on breast tissue was conducted using monoclonal antibodies against MMP-13. A semi-quantitative scoring system was used to assess the presence of, as well as the cellular localisation of MMP-13. MMP-13 expression was significantly greater in the cancerous breast tissues in comparison to those of normal breast tissues. In addition, high levels of MMP-13 expression were also found to be related to the positive detection of breast cancer cells in lymph nodes-amongst breast cancer patients. The results of this study showed that MMP-13 was frequently present in breast tumours, especially when tumours were accompanied by positive breast cancer cell detection in lymph nodes. This suggests that MMP-13 plays a potentially significant role in breast cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27647987

  2. Avoiding obsolescence in advanced prostate cancer management: a guide for urologists.

    PubMed

    Shore, Neal D; Karsh, Lawrence; Gomella, Leonard G; Keane, Thomas E; Concepcion, Raoul S; Crawford, E David

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed in men in the USA and 20–30% of men treated for localised prostate cancer will fail therapy and develop advanced prostate cancer. More drugs have been approved for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer in the past 3 years than in the past three decades, and each drug has its own mechanism of action and, often, unique monitoring requirements. As the treatment landscape for men with advanced prostate cancer is undergoing significant expansion, the roles of both oncologists and urologists are shifting, and the decision for the urologist to treat vs refer requires early assessment to identify which patients are candidates for these novel treatments and the monitoring of patients for tolerability, response, and potential side-effects. Given these rapid changes, the authors of this review met in January 2013 and again in April 2013 to discuss the current challenges facing urologists in adopting these new treatments into their own practices. Here, we provide a brief overview of advanced prostate cancer medical therapies approved in the past decade, the necessary monitoring procedures and early detection methods needed to safely and effectively manage patients receiving these therapies, and our recommendations for applying these new therapies within different models of urology practice, such that urologists can remain an integral component of their patient's care once he has transitioned into advanced prostate cancer

  3. Avoiding obsolescence in advanced prostate cancer management: a guide for urologists.

    PubMed

    Shore, Neal D; Karsh, Lawrence; Gomella, Leonard G; Keane, Thomas E; Concepcion, Raoul S; Crawford, E David

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed in men in the USA and 20–30% of men treated for localised prostate cancer will fail therapy and develop advanced prostate cancer. More drugs have been approved for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer in the past 3 years than in the past three decades, and each drug has its own mechanism of action and, often, unique monitoring requirements. As the treatment landscape for men with advanced prostate cancer is undergoing significant expansion, the roles of both oncologists and urologists are shifting, and the decision for the urologist to treat vs refer requires early assessment to identify which patients are candidates for these novel treatments and the monitoring of patients for tolerability, response, and potential side-effects. Given these rapid changes, the authors of this review met in January 2013 and again in April 2013 to discuss the current challenges facing urologists in adopting these new treatments into their own practices. Here, we provide a brief overview of advanced prostate cancer medical therapies approved in the past decade, the necessary monitoring procedures and early detection methods needed to safely and effectively manage patients receiving these therapies, and our recommendations for applying these new therapies within different models of urology practice, such that urologists can remain an integral component of their patient's care once he has transitioned into advanced prostate cancer PMID:25756134

  4. Differential expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in association with invasion of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Punsawad, Chuchard; Chupeerach, Chaowanee; Songsri, Apiram; Charoenkijkajorn, Lek; Petmitr, Songsak

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) has a potential role in tumour invasion and metastasis. However, its relevance to the prognosis of human breast cancer is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression patterns of MMP-13 protein and to determine its prognostic value in breast cancer, and to define its relation to the clinicopathological features. Immunohistochemistry analysis of MMP-13 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of cancerous breast tissue (n = 76) and normal breast tissue (n = 20), all of which had clinicopathological information available. Based on the principle of immunoreactivity, the detection of MMP-13 on breast tissue was conducted using monoclonal antibodies against MMP-13. A semi-quantitative scoring system was used to assess the presence of, as well as the cellular localisation of MMP-13. MMP-13 expression was significantly greater in the cancerous breast tissues in comparison to those of normal breast tissues. In addition, high levels of MMP-13 expression were also found to be related to the positive detection of breast cancer cells in lymph nodes-amongst breast cancer patients. The results of this study showed that MMP-13 was frequently present in breast tumours, especially when tumours were accompanied by positive breast cancer cell detection in lymph nodes. This suggests that MMP-13 plays a potentially significant role in breast cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27647987

  5. Investigation of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18), lactoferrin and CD163 as potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of gynaecological cancer morbidity and mortality in women. Early stage ovarian cancer is usually asymptomatic, therefore, is often first diagnosed when it is widely disseminated. Currently available diagnostics lack the requisite sensitivity and specificity to be implemented as community-based screening tests. The identification of additional biomarkers may improve the diagnostic efficiency of multivariate index assays. The aims of this study were to characterise and compare the ovarian tissue immunohistochemical localisation and plasma concentrations of three putative ovarian cancer biomarkers: human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18); lactoferrin; and CD163 in normal healthy women and women with ovarian cancer. Methods In this case–control cohort study, ovarian tissue and blood samples were obtained from 164 women (73 controls, including 28 women with benign pelvic masses; 91 cancer, including 21 women with borderline tumours). Localisation of each antigen within the ovary was assessed by immunohistochemistry and serum concentrations determined by ELISA assays. Results Immunoreactive (ir) hCAP-18 and lactoferrin were identified in epithelial cells, while CD163 was predominately localised in stromal cells. Tissue ir CD163 increased significantly (P<0.05) with disease grade. Median plasma concentrations of soluble (s)CD163 were significantly greater in the cases (3220 ng/ml) than in controls (2488 ng/ml) (P< 0.01). Median plasma concentrations of hCAP-18 and lactoferrin were not significantly different between cases and controls. The classification efficiency of each biomarker (as determined by the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve; AUC) was: 0.67± 0.04; 0.62 ± 0.08 and 0.51 ± 0.07 for sCD163, hCAP-18 and lactoferrin, respectively. When the 3 biomarkers were modelled using stochastic gradient boosted logistic regression, the AUC increased to 0.95 ± 0.03. Conclusions

  6. Molecular characterisation and chromosomal localisation of a telomere-like repetitive DNA sequence highly enriched in the C genome of Brassica.

    PubMed

    Galvão Bezerra dos Santos, K; Becker, H C; Ecke, W; Bellin, U

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find C genome specific repetitive DNA sequences able to differentiate the homeologous A (B. rapa) and C (B. oleracea) genomes of Brassica, in order to assist in the physical identification of B. napus chromosomes. A repetitive sequence (pBo1.6) highly enriched in the C genome of Brassica was cloned from B. oleracea and its chromosomal organisation was investigated through fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) in B. oleracea (2n = 18, CC), B. rapa (2n = 20, AA) and B. napus (2n = 38, AACC) genomes. The sequence was 203 bp long with a GC content of 48.3%. It showed up to 89% sequence identity with telomere-like DNA from many plant species. This repeat was clearly underrepresented in the A genome and the in situ hybridisation showed its B. oleracea specificity at the chromosomal level. Sequence pBo1.6 was localised at interstitial and/or telomeric/subtelomeric regions of all chromosomes from B. oleracea, whereas in B. rapa no signal was detected in most of the cells. In B. napus 18 to 24 chromosomes hybridised with pBo1.6. The discovery of a sequence highly enriched in the C genome of Brassica opens the opportunity for detailed studies regarding the subsequent evolution of DNA sequences in polyploid genomes. Moreover, pBo1.6 may be useful for the determination of the chromosomal location of transgenic DNA in genetically modified oilseed rape.

  7. Sub‐cellular location of FtsH proteases in the cyanobacterium S ynechocystis sp. PCC 6803 suggests localised PSII repair zones in the thylakoid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sacharz, Joanna; Bryan, Samantha J.; Yu, Jianfeng; Burroughs, Nigel J.; Spence, Edward M.; Nixon, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In cyanobacteria and chloroplasts, exposure to HL damages the photosynthetic apparatus, especially the D1 subunit of Photosystem II. To avoid chronic photoinhibition, a PSII repair cycle operates to replace damaged PSII subunits with newly synthesised versions. To determine the sub‐cellular location of this process, we examined the localisation of FtsH metalloproteases, some of which are directly involved in degrading damaged D1. We generated transformants of the cyanobacterium S ynechocystis sp. PCC6803 expressing GFP‐tagged versions of its four FtsH proteases. The ftsH2–gfp strain was functional for PSII repair under our conditions. Confocal microscopy shows that FtsH1 is mainly in the cytoplasmic membrane, while the remaining FtsH proteins are in patches either in the thylakoid or at the interface between the thylakoid and cytoplasmic membranes. HL exposure which increases the activity of the Photosystem II repair cycle led to no detectable changes in FtsH distribution, with the FtsH2 protease involved in D1 degradation retaining its patchy distribution in the thylakoid membrane. We discuss the possibility that the FtsH2–GFP patches represent Photosystem II ‘repair zones’ within the thylakoid membranes, and the possible advantages of such functionally specialised membrane zones. Anti‐GFP affinity pull‐downs provide the first indication of the composition of the putative repair zones. PMID:25601560

  8. The evolution of novelty in conserved genes; evidence of positive selection in the Drosophila fruitless gene is localised to alternatively spliced exons

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D J; Gardiner, A; Neville, M C; Ritchie, M G; Goodwin, S F

    2014-01-01

    There has been much debate concerning whether cis-regulatory or coding changes are more likely to produce evolutionary innovation or adaptation in gene function, but an additional complication is that some genes can dramatically diverge through alternative splicing, increasing the diversity of gene function within a locus. The fruitless gene is a major transcription factor with a wide range of pleiotropic functions, including a fundamental conserved role in sexual differentiation, species-specific morphology and an important influence on male sexual behaviour. Here, we examine the structure of fruitless in multiple species of Drosophila, and determine the patterns of selective constraint acting across the coding region. We found that the pattern of selection, estimated from the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions, varied considerably across the gene, with most regions of the gene evolutionarily conserved but with several regions showing evidence of divergence as a result of positive selection. The regions that showed evidence of positive selection were found to be localised to relatively consistent regions across multiple speciation events, and are associated with alternative splicing. Alternative splicing may thus provide a route to gene diversification in key regulatory loci. PMID:24149653

  9. A framework for experimental determination of localised vertical pedestrian forces on full-scale structures using wireless attitude and heading reference systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocian, M.; Brownjohn, J. M. W.; Racic, V.; Hester, D.; Quattrone, A.; Monnickendam, R.

    2016-08-01

    A major weakness among loading models for pedestrians walking on flexible structures proposed in recent years is the various uncorroborated assumptions made in their development. This applies to spatio-temporal characteristics of pedestrian loading and the nature of multi-object interactions. To alleviate this problem, a framework for the determination of localised pedestrian forces on full-scale structures is presented using a wireless attitude and heading reference systems (AHRS). An AHRS comprises a triad of tri-axial accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers managed by a dedicated data processing unit, allowing motion in three-dimensional space to be reconstructed. A pedestrian loading model based on a single point inertial measurement from an AHRS is derived and shown to perform well against benchmark data collected on an instrumented treadmill. Unlike other models, the current model does not take any predefined form nor does it require any extrapolations as to the timing and amplitude of pedestrian loading. In order to assess correctly the influence of the moving pedestrian on behaviour of a structure, an algorithm for tracking the point of application of pedestrian force is developed based on data from a single AHRS attached to a foot. A set of controlled walking tests with a single pedestrian is conducted on a real footbridge for validation purposes. A remarkably good match between the measured and simulated bridge response is found, indeed confirming applicability of the proposed framework.

  10. Cellular localisation of the kinin B1R in the pancreas of streptozotocin-treated rat and the anti-diabetic effect of the antagonist SSR240612.

    PubMed

    Tidjane, Nejla; Gaboury, Louis; Couture, Réjean

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism by which kinin B1 receptor (B1R) contributes to type 1 diabetes is addressed by determining the impact of its inhibition on diabetes and on its pancreatic expression and cellular localisation on immunocompetent cells and primary sensory C-fibres. Rats were made diabetic with streptozotocin (STZ). On day 4, they were treated daily for 7 days with a B1R antagonist (SSR240612, 10 mg/kg) or its vehicle. The surviving β-cells were measured by immunostaining. The expression of B1R, iNOS, TNF-α, macrophages, TCD4+, CGRP and TRPV1 was measured by Western blotting, qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Macrophages and TCD4+ lymphocytes were absent in control, but distributed abundantly in the pancreas of STZ-diabetic rats. B1R was upregulated on these immune cells infiltrating the diabetic rat pancreas while it was not expressed on primary sensory C-fibres even if the expression of TRPV1 and CGRP was enhanced. SSR240612 prevented the infiltration of macrophages and TCD4+ lymphocytes and the upregulation of B1R, iNOS, TNF-α and TRPV1. SSR240612 corrected hyperglycaemia and hypoinsulinaemia by improving the Langerhans islets survival or regeneration. It is concluded that kinin B1R antagonism exerts anti-diabetic action by preventing the infiltration of immune cells in the pancreas and by preserving the integrity of Langerhans islets β-cells. PMID:26841446

  11. VvGONST-A and VvGONST-B are Golgi-localised GDP-sugar transporters in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.).

    PubMed

    Utz, Daniella; Handford, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Plant nucleotide-sugar transporters (NSTs) are responsible for the import of nucleotide-sugar substrates into the Golgi lumen, for subsequent use in glycosylation reactions. NSTs are specific for either GDP- or UDP-sugars, and almost all transporters studied to date have been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana L. In order to determine the conservation of the import mechanism in other higher plant species, here we report the identification and characterisation of VvGONST-A and VvGONST-B from grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Thompson Seedless), which are the orthologues of the GDP-sugar transporters GONST3 and GONST4 in Arabidopsis. Both grapevine NSTs possess the molecular features characteristic of GDP-sugar transporters, including a GDP-binding domain (GXL/VNK) towards the C-terminal. VvGONST-A and VvGONST-B expression is highest at berry setting and decreases throughout berry development and ripening. Moreover, we show using green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged versions and brefeldin A treatments, that both are localised in the Golgi apparatus. Additionally, in vitro transport assays after expression of both NSTs in tobacco leaves indicate that VvGONST-A and VvGONST-B are capable of transporting GDP-mannose and GDP-glucose, respectively, but not a range of other UDP- and GDP-sugars. The possible functions of these NSTs in glucomannan synthesis and/or glycosylation of sphingolipids are discussed.

  12. Microautoradiographic localisation of [3H]sucrose and [3H]mannitol in Robinia pseudoacacia pulvinar tissues during phytochrome-mediated nyctinastic closure.

    PubMed

    Moysset, L; Llambrich, E; López-Iglesias, C; Simón, E

    2006-11-01

    We have analysed the incorporation of [(3)H]sucrose and [(3)H]mannitol in pulvinar motor cells of Robinia pseudoacacia L. during phytochrome-mediated nyctinastic closure. Pairs of leaflets, excised 2 h after the beginning of the photoperiod, were fed with 50 mM [(3)H]sucrose or [(3)H]mannitol, irradiated with red (15 min) or far-red (5 min) light and placed in the dark for 2-3 h. Label uptake was measured in whole pulvini by liquid scintillation counting. The distribution of labelling in pulvinar sections was assessed by both light and electron microautoradiography. [(3)H]Sucrose uptake was twice that of [(3)H]mannitol incorporation in both red- and far-red-irradiated pulvini. In the autoradiographs, [(3)H]sucrose and [(3)H]mannitol labelling was localised in the area from the vascular bundle to the epidermis, mainly in vacuoles, cytoplasm, and cell walls. Extensor and flexor protoplasts displayed a different distribution of [(3)H]sucrose after red and far-red irradiation. Far-red light drastically reduced the [(3)H]sucrose incorporation in extensor protoplasts and caused a slight increase in internal flexor protoplasts. After red light treatment, no differences in [(3)H]sucrose labelling were found between extensor and flexor protoplasts. Our results indicate a phytochrome control of sucrose distribution in cortical motor cells and seem to rule out the possibility of sucrose acting as an osmoticum. PMID:17102931

  13. Cytogenetic variability in genus odontocheila (Coleoptera, Cicindelidae): karyotypes, C-banding, NORs and localisation of ribosomal genes of O. confusa and O. nodicornis.

    PubMed

    Proença, S J R; Serrano, A R M; Collares-Pereira, M J

    2002-04-01

    Two species of Odontocheila, O. confusa and O. nodicornis, from the Neotropical Region were studied regarding their karyotypes, localisation and activity of ribosomal genes and C-banding. The species, although belonging to the same genus, have quite distinct karyotypes. O. confusa has 10 pairs of autosomes and a single sex chromosome mechanism of the XY/XX type, thus a diploid value of 2n = 22 in males and females. One aneuploid male with a diploid number of 2n = 20 and one male with three B chromosomes were found in a total of eight males studied. O. nodicornis has 17 autosomal pairs and also a single chromosome system but of the X0/XX type, thus a diploid value of 2n = 35 in males and 2n = 36 in females. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) revealed the presence of rDNA clusters in two autosomes in both species in mitotic and meiotic figures. Silver staining of male interphase nuclei confirmed the FISH results and showed that all rDNA genes were active. C-banding analysis revealed the presence of constitutive heterochromatin in the centromeres of all chromosomes in the two species plus two pairs in O. nodicornis with terminal positive C-bands. These results are discussed from the cytogenetic and evolutionary point of view.

  14. Localisation and direction of mitral regurgitant flow in mitral orifice studied with combined use of ultrasonic pulsed Doppler technique and two dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, K; Nimura, Y; Sakakibara, H; Kinoshita, N; Okamoto, M; Nagata, S; Kawazoe, K; Fujita, T

    1982-01-01

    Regurgitant flow was analysed in 40 cases of mitral regurgitation, using combined ultrasonic pulsed Doppler technique and two dimensional echocardiography. Abnormal Doppler signals indicative of mitral regurgitant flow were detected in reference to the two dimensional image of the long axis view of the heart and the short axis view at the level of the mitral orifice. The overall direction of regurgitant flow into the left atrium was clearly seen in 28 of 40 cases, and the localisation of regurgitant flow in the mitral orifice in 38 cases. In cases with mitral valve prolapse of the anterior leaflet or posterior leaflet the regurgitant flow was directed posteriorly or anteriorly, respectively. The prolapse occurred at the anterolateral commissure or posteromedial commissure and resulted in regurgitant flow located near the anterolateral commissure or posteromedial commissure of the mitral orifice, respectively. In cases with rheumatic mitral regurgitation the regurgitant flow is usually towards the central portion of the left atrium and is sited in the mid-part of the orifice. The Doppler findings were consistent with left ventriculography and surgical findings. The ultrasonic pulsed Doppler technique combined with two dimensional echocardiography is useful for non-invasive analysis and preoperative assessment of mitral regurgitation. Images PMID:7138708

  15. Immunohistochemical localisation of the hypertrehalosaemic hormone II (Cam-HrTH-II) and related peptides in the nervous system of Carausius morosus and Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    Clottens, F; Gäde, G; Huybrechts, R; De Loof, A

    1989-12-01

    A polyclonal antiserum was prepared against an N-terminal modified Cam-HrTH-II (Leu-Asn-Phe-...), one of the members of the large AKH/RPCH peptide family, first isolated from Carausius morosus. The localisation of this peptide was performed by means of immunocytochemical methods in the brain and corpora cardiaca-corpora allata complex of the stick insect, Carausius morosus and the grey fleshfly, Sarcophaga bullata. The distribution patterns of molecules reactive to the Cam-HrTH-II and the Lom-AKH-I antisera in both insect species were compared. In Carausius, both antisera reacted in the same cell bodies. In Sarcophaga, some neurons were stained by both, others only by one of the two antisera. By combining two different antisera, we demonstrated that there are no Lom-AKH-I-like molecules present in Carausius and that there must occur at least three different AKH-like molecules in the brain of Sarcophaga. One is similar to Cam-HrTH-II, the second to Lom-AKH-I and the third is an AKH/RPCH-like peptide, different from Lom-AKH-I and Cam-HrTH-II.

  16. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  17. Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer occurs in the lining of the bladder. It ... urinate Low back pain Risk factors for developing bladder cancer include smoking and exposure to certain chemicals in ...

  18. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  19. Occupational Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carcinogen List Cancer Clusters Cancer Policy at NIOSH Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) Related Topics Asbestos ... Toxicology Program Report on Carcinogens NIOSH Pocket Guide Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) Recent NIOSH Research ...

  20. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  1. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... use. Some oral cancers are linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) infections of the mouth and throat. ... The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has risen dramatically over the past ...

  2. Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell. These cells help protect you from infections. Cancer of the thymus is rare. You are more ... Sometimes there are no symptoms. Other times, thymus cancer can cause A cough that doesn't go ...

  3. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  4. Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine. Cancer of the gallbladder is rare. It is more ... the abdomen It is hard to diagnose gallbladder cancer in its early stages. Sometimes doctors find it ...

  5. Cancer Disparities

    Cancer.gov

    Basic information about cancer disparities in the U.S., factors that contribute to the disproportionate burden of cancer in some groups, and examples of disparities in incidence and mortality among certain populations.

  6. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  7. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  8. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  9. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  10. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  11. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  12. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  13. Cytochrome P450 expression in oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, G I; Shaw, D; Weaver, R J; McKay, J A; Ewen, S W; Melvin, W T; Burke, M D

    1994-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes play a central part in the metabolism of carcinogens and anti-cancer drugs. The expression, cellular localisation, and distribution of different forms of P450 and the functionally associated enzymes epoxide hydrolase and glutathione S-transferases have been investigated in oesophageal cancer and non-neoplastic oesophageal tissue using immunohistochemistry. Expression of the different enzymes was confined to epithelial cells in both non-neoplastic samples and tumour samples except the CYP3A was also identified in mast cells and glutathione S-transferase pi was present in chronic inflammatory cells. CYP1A was present in a small percentage of non-neoplastic samples but both CYP2C and CYP3A were absent. Epoxide hydrolase was present in half of the non-neoplastic samples and the different classes of glutathione S-transferase were present in a low number of samples. In carcinomas CYP1A, CYP3A, epoxide hydrolase, and glutathione S-transferase pi were expressed in at least 60% of samples. The expression of glutathione S-transferases alpha and mu were significantly less in adenocarcinoma compared with squamous carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8200549

  14. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics for prostate cancer What is prostate cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  15. National Cancer Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  16. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  17. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  18. Secondhand Smoke and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  19. Psychological Stress and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  20. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...