Science.gov

Sample records for cancer care continuum

  1. Primary care physician use across the breast cancer care continuum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Lofters, Aisha; Moineddin, Rahim; Decker, Kathleen; Groome, Patti; Kendell, Cynthia; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Li, Dongdong; McBride, Mary L.; Mittmann, Nicole; Porter, Geoff; Turner, Donna; Urquhart, Robin; Winget, Marcy; Zhang, Yang; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe primary care physician (PCP) use and continuity of PCP care across the breast cancer care continuum. Design Population-based, retrospective cohort study using provincial cancer registries linked to health administrative databases. Setting British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. Participants All women with incident invasive breast cancer from 2007 to 2012 in Manitoba and Ontario and from 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia. Main outcome measures The number and proportions of visits to PCPs were determined. Continuity of care was measured using the Usual Provider of Care index calculated as the proportion of visits to the most-often-visited PCP in the 6 to 30 months before a breast cancer diagnosis (baseline) and from 1 to 3 years following a breast cancer diagnosis (survivorship). Results More than three-quarters of patients visited their PCPs 2 or more times during the breast cancer diagnostic period, and more than 80% of patients had at least 1 PCP visit during breast cancer adjuvant treatment. Contact with the PCP decreased over time during breast cancer survivorship. Of the 3 phases, women appeared to be most likely to not have PCP contact during adjuvant treatment, with 10.7% (Ontario) to 18.7% (British Columbia) of women having no PCP visits during this phase. However, a sizable minority of women had at least monthly visits during the treatment phase, particularly in Manitoba and Ontario, where approximately a quarter of women saw a PCP at least monthly. We observed higher continuity of care with PCPs in survivorship (compared with baseline) in all provinces. Conclusion Primary care physicians were generally involved throughout the breast cancer care continuum, but the level of involvement varied across care phases and by province. Future interventions will aim to further integrate primary and oncology care. PMID:27737994

  2. Cancer Patient Navigator Tasks across the Cancer Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Holden, Alan E. C.; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Tran, Jacqueline H.; Seals, Brenda F.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Tsark, JoAnn U.; Harjo, Lisa; Foo, Mary Anne; Ramirez, Amelie G.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patient navigation (PN) programs have been shown to increase access to and utilization of cancer care for poor and underserved individuals. Despite mounting evidence of its value, cancer patient navigation is not universally understood or provided. We describe five PN programs and the range of tasks their navigators provide across the cancer care continuum (education and outreach, screening, diagnosis and staging, treatment, survivorship, and end-of-life). Tasks are organized by their potential to make cancer services understandable, available, accessible, affordable, appropriate, and accountable. Although navigators perform similar tasks across the five programs, their specific approaches reflect differences in community culture, context, program setting, and funding. Task lists can inform the development of programs, job descriptions, training, and evaluation. They also may be useful in the move to certify navigators and establish mechanisms for reimbursement for navigation services. PMID:22423178

  3. Tobacco-Related Health Disparities Across the Cancer Care Continuum.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Pineiro, Barbara; Hooper, Monica Webb; Gray, Jhanelle E; Brandon, Thomas H

    2016-10-01

    Use of tobacco is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Racial/ethnic minorities and individuals of low socioeconomic status disproportionately experience tobacco-related disease and illness. Unique challenges and circumstances exist at each point in the cancer care continuum that may contribute to the greater cancer burden experienced by these groups. We reviewed tobacco-related disparities from cancer prevention to cancer survivorship. We also describe research that seeks to reduce tobacco-related disparities. Racial/ethnic minorities and low-income individuals experience unique social and environmental contextual challenges such as greater environmental cues to smoke and greater levels of perceived stress and social discrimination. Clinical practice guidelines support the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy and behavioral counseling for racial and ethnic minorities, yet smoking cessation rates are lower in this group when compared with non-Hispanic whites. Superior efficacy for culturally adapted interventions has not yet been established. To reduce health disparities in this population, a comprehensive strategy is needed with efforts directed at each point along the cancer care continuum. Strategies are needed to reduce the impact of contextual factors such as targeted tobacco marketing and social discrimination on smoking initiation and maintenance. Future efforts should focus on increasing the use of evidence-based cessation treatment methods and studying its effectiveness in these populations. Attention must also be focused on improving treatment outcomes by reducing smoking in diverse racial and ethnic patient populations.

  4. Cancer Core Europe: a consortium to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum challenge.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, Alexander M M; Caldas, Carlos; Ringborg, Ulrik; Medema, René; Tabernero, Josep; Wiestler, Otmar

    2014-11-01

    European cancer research for a transformative initiative by creating a consortium of six leading excellent comprehensive cancer centres that will work together to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum. Prerequisites for joint translational and clinical research programs are very demanding. These require the creation of a virtual single 'e-hospital' and a powerful translational platform, inter-compatible clinical molecular profiling laboratories with a robust underlying computational biology pipeline, standardised functional and molecular imaging, commonly agreed Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for liquid and tissue biopsy procurement, storage and processing, for molecular diagnostics, 'omics', functional genetics, immune-monitoring and other assessments. Importantly also it requires a culture of data collection and data storage that provides complete longitudinal data sets to allow for: effective data sharing and common database building, and to achieve a level of completeness of data that is required for conducting outcome research, taking into account our current understanding of cancers as communities of evolving clones. Cutting edge basic research and technology development serve as an important driving force for innovative translational and clinical studies. Given the excellent track records of the six participants in these areas, Cancer Core Europe will be able to support the full spectrum of research required to address the cancer research- cancer care continuum. Cancer Core Europe also constitutes a unique environment to train the next generation of talents in innovative translational and clinical oncology.

  5. Delivering High-Quality and Affordable Care Throughout the Cancer Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Ganz, Patricia A.; Aberle, Denise; Abernethy, Amy; Bekelman, Justin; Brawley, Otis; Goodwin, James S.; Hu, Jim C.; Schrag, Deborah; Temel, Jennifer S.; Schnipper, Lowell

    2013-01-01

    The national cost of cancer care is projected to reach $173 billion by 2020, increasing from $125 billion in 2010. This steep upward cost trajectory has placed enormous an financial burden on patients, their families, and society as a whole and raised major concern about the ability of the health care system to provide and sustain high-quality cancer care. To better understand the cost drivers of cancer care and explore approaches that will mitigate the problem, the National Cancer Policy Forum of the Institute of Medicine held a workshop entitled “Delivering Affordable Cancer Care in the 21st Century” in October 2012. Workshop participants included bioethicists, health economists, primary care physicians, and medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists, from both academic and community settings. All speakers expressed a sense of urgency about the affordability of cancer care resulting from the future demographic trend as well as the high cost of emerging cancer therapies and rapid diffusion of new technologies in the absence to evidence indicating improved outcomes for patients. This article is our summary of presentations at the workshop that highlighted the overuse and underuse of screening, treatments, and technologies throughout the cancer care continuum in oncology practice in the United States. PMID:24127450

  6. Assessing patients' experiences with communication across the cancer care continuum.

    PubMed

    Mazor, Kathleen M; Street, Richard L; Sue, Valerie M; Williams, Andrew E; Rabin, Borsika A; Arora, Neeraj K

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the relevance, performance and potential usefulness of the Patient Assessment of cancer Communication Experiences (PACE) items. Items focusing on specific communication goals related to exchanging information, fostering healing relationships, responding to emotions, making decisions, enabling self-management, and managing uncertainty were tested via a retrospective, cross-sectional survey of adults who had been diagnosed with cancer. Analyses examined response frequencies, inter-item correlations, and coefficient alpha. A total of 366 adults were included in the analyses. Relatively few selected Does Not Apply, suggesting that items tap relevant communication experiences. Ratings of whether specific communication goals were achieved were strongly correlated with overall ratings of communication, suggesting item content reflects important aspects of communication. Coefficient alpha was ≥.90 for each item set, indicating excellent reliability. Variations in the percentage of respondents selecting the most positive response across items suggest results can identify strengths and weaknesses. The PACE items tap relevant, important aspects of communication during cancer care, and may be useful to cancer care teams desiring detailed feedback. The PACE is a new tool for eliciting patients' perspectives on communication during cancer care. It is freely available online for practitioners, researchers and others. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rural Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Their Role in the Breast Cancer Care Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Kathleen M.; Edwards, Joellen

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rural women in the United States experience disparity in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment when compared to their urban counterparts. Given the 11% chance of lifetime occurrence of breast cancer for women overall, the continuum of breast cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery are of legitimate concern to rural women and…

  8. Rural Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Their Role in the Breast Cancer Care Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Kathleen M.; Edwards, Joellen

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rural women in the United States experience disparity in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment when compared to their urban counterparts. Given the 11% chance of lifetime occurrence of breast cancer for women overall, the continuum of breast cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery are of legitimate concern to rural women and…

  9. Primary care physician use across the breast cancer care continuum: CanIMPACT study using Canadian administrative data.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Lofters, Aisha; Moineddin, Rahim; Decker, Kathleen; Groome, Patti; Kendell, Cynthia; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Li, Dongdong; McBride, Mary L; Mittmann, Nicole; Porter, Geoff; Turner, Donna; Urquhart, Robin; Winget, Marcy; Zhang, Yang; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-10-01

    To describe primary care physician (PCP) use and continuity of PCP care across the breast cancer care continuum. Population-based, retrospective cohort study using provincial cancer registries linked to health administrative databases. British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. All women with incident invasive breast cancer from 2007 to 2012 in Manitoba and Ontario and from 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia. The number and proportions of visits to PCPs were determined. Continuity of care was measured using the Usual Provider of Care index calculated as the proportion of visits to the most-often-visited PCP in the 6 to 30 months before a breast cancer diagnosis (baseline) and from 1 to 3 years following a breast cancer diagnosis (survivorship). More than three-quarters of patients visited their PCPs 2 or more times during the breast cancer diagnostic period, and more than 80% of patients had at least 1 PCP visit during breast cancer adjuvant treatment. Contact with the PCP decreased over time during breast cancer survivorship. Of the 3 phases, women appeared to be most likely to not have PCP contact during adjuvant treatment, with 10.7% (Ontario) to 18.7% (British Columbia) of women having no PCP visits during this phase. However, a sizable minority of women had at least monthly visits during the treatment phase, particularly in Manitoba and Ontario, where approximately a quarter of women saw a PCP at least monthly. We observed higher continuity of care with PCPs in survivorship (compared with baseline) in all provinces. Primary care physicians were generally involved throughout the breast cancer care continuum, but the level of involvement varied across care phases and by province. Future interventions will aim to further integrate primary and oncology care. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  10. The continuum of care: a paradigm for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Richard M; Rothenberg, Mace L; Van Cutsem, Eric; Benson, Al B; Blanke, Charles D; Diasio, Robert B; Grothey, Axel; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Meropol, Neal J; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Becerra, Carlos H Roberto; Wickham, Rita; Armstrong, Delma; Viele, Carol

    2007-01-01

    New agents for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer have extended median overall survival to more than 20 months, an increase that has changed the view of advanced colorectal cancer from an acute to a chronic condition. This article proposes a shift in treatment strategy from the concept of successive "lines" of therapy, in which chemotherapy is continued until disease progression, to that of a continuum of care, in which the use of chemotherapy is tailored to the clinical setting and includes switching chemotherapy prior to disease progression, maintenance therapy, drug "holidays," and surgical resection of metastases in selected patients. In this approach, the distinction between lines of therapy is no longer absolute. This represents a paradigm shift in the management of metastatic colorectal cancer to that of a continuum of care approach that includes individualized planning, in which patients are given the opportunity to benefit from exposure to all active agents and modalities while minimizing unnecessary treatment and toxicity, with the ultimate goal of improving survival as well as quality of life.

  11. Introduction: Understanding and Influencing Multilevel Factors Across the Cancer Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Anhang Price, Rebecca; Edwards, Heather M.; Foster, Mary K.; Breslau, Erica S.; Chollette, Veronica; Prabhu Das, Irene; Clauser, Steven B.; Fennell, Mary L.; Zapka, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Health care in the United States is notoriously expensive while often failing to deliver the care recommended in published guidelines. There is, therefore, a need to consider our approach to health-care delivery. Cancer care is a good example for consideration because it spans the continuum of health-care issues from primary prevention through long-term survival and end-of-life care. In this monograph, we emphasize that health-care delivery occurs in a multilevel system that includes organizations, teams, and individuals. To achieve health-care delivery consistent with the Institute of Medicine's six quality aims (safety, effectiveness, timeliness, efficiency, patient-centeredness, and equity), we must influence multiple levels of that multilevel system. The notion that multiple levels of contextual influence affect behaviors through interdependent interactions is a well-established ecological view. This view has been used to analyze health-care delivery and health disparities. However, experience considering multilevel interventions in health care is much less robust. This monograph includes 13 chapters relevant to expanding the foundation of research for multilevel interventions in health-care delivery. Subjects include clinical cases of multilevel thinking in health-care delivery, the state of knowledge regarding multilevel interventions, study design and measurement considerations, methods for combining interventions, time as a consideration in the evaluation of effects, measurement of effects, simulations, application of multilevel thinking to health-care systems and disparities, and implementation of the Affordable Care Act of 2010. Our goal is to outline an agenda to proceed with multilevel intervention research, not because it guarantees improvement in our current approach to health care, but because ignoring the complexity of the multilevel environment in which care occurs has not achieved the desired improvements in care quality outlined by the Institute

  12. Helping cancer patients across the care continuum: the navigation program at the Queen's Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Allison, Amanda L; Ishihara-Wong, Debra D M; Domingo, Jermy B; Nishioka, Jocelyn; Wilburn, Andrea; Tsark, JoAnn U; Braun, Kathryn L

    2013-04-01

    Research suggests that cancer patient navigation improves care, but few reports describe the variety of patients managed by a hospital-based navigation program. Differences in navigated patients by the intensity (low, medium, or high) of navigation services they received were examined. The 835 clients seen by the navigators in a hospital-based cancer center were first stratified by quarter and by four ethnic groups. Randomized selection from each group assured there would be equal representation for analysis of Hawaiians, Filipinos, Japanese, and Whites and even numbers over all time intervals. Five professionals extracted data from these case records on demographics, type/stage of cancer, diagnosis and treatment dates, barriers, and navigator actions. Clients had breast (30.0%), lung (15.8%), esophageal (6.7%), colon (5.8%), ovarian (4.2%), prostate (3.3%), and other cancers (34.2%). The median number of actions taken on behalf of a client was 4 (range 1-83), and the median number of days a case was open was 14 (range 1-216). High intensity cases (those receiving more assistance over longer periods of time) were more likely than low-intensity cases to need help with education and reassurance, transportation, care coordination, and covering costs. Although there were no demographic differences across intensity groups, Neighbor Island patients from Hawai'i, Maui, Moloka'i, Lana'i and Kaua'i were more likely to need help with arranging travel, care coordination, and costs associated with getting treatment (all at P=.05), and patients on public insurance were more likely to have stage 4 cancer (P=.001) and to need help with costs (P=.006). Findings suggest that this hospital-based navigation program is filling a real need of patients across the cancer care continuum. A triage protocol and an integrated data capture system could help improve the targeting and documentation of cancer patient navigation services.

  13. Continuum of Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Care Options Advanced Care Planning Palliative Care Hospice Care Brain Tumor Treatments Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment ... Home Care Options Advanced Care Planning Palliative Care Hospice Care Brain Tumor Treatments Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment ...

  14. Ovarian cancer survivors' acceptance of treatment side effects evolves as goals of care change over the cancer continuum.

    PubMed

    Frey, Melissa K; Ellis, Annie E; Koontz, Laura M; Shyne, Savannah; Klingenberg, Bernhard; Fields, Jessica C; Chern, Jing-Yi; Blank, Stephanie V

    2017-08-01

    Women with ovarian cancer can have long overall survival and goals of treatment change over time from cure to remission to stable disease. We sought to determine whether survivors' acceptance of treatment side effects also changes over the disease continuum. Women with ovarian cancer completed an online survey focusing on survivors' goals and priorities. The survey was distributed through survivor networks and social media. Four hundred and thirty-four women visited the survey website and 328 (76%) completed the survey. Among participants, 141 (43%) identified themselves as having ever recurred, 119 (36%) were undergoing treatment at the time of survey completion and 86 (26%) had received four or more chemotherapy regimens. Respondents' goals of care were cure for 115 women (35%), remission for 156 (48%) and stable disease for 56 (17%). When asked what was most meaningful, 148 women (45%) reported overall survival, 135 (41%) reported quality of life and 40 (12%) reported progression-free survival. >50% of survivors were willing to tolerate the following symptoms for the goal of cure: fatigue (283, 86%), alopecia (281, 86%), diarrhea (232, 71%), constipation (227, 69%), neuropathy (218, 66%), arthralgia (210, 64%), sexual side effects (201, 61%), reflux symptoms (188, 57%), memory loss (180, 55%), nausea/vomiting (180, 55%), hospitalization for treatment side effects (179, 55%) and pain (169, 52%). The rates of tolerance for most symptoms decreased significantly as the goal of treatment changed from cure to remission to stable disease. Women with ovarian cancer willingly accept many treatment side effects when the goal of treatment is cure, however become less accepting when the goal is remission and even less so when the goal is stable disease. Physicians and survivors must carefully consider treatment toxicities and quality of life effects when selecting drugs for patients with incurable disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Implementation and spread of interventions into the multilevel context of routine practice and policy: implications for the cancer care continuum.

    PubMed

    Yano, Elizabeth M; Green, Lawrence W; Glanz, Karen; Ayanian, John Z; Mittman, Brian S; Chollette, Veronica; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2012-05-01

    The promise of widespread implementation of efficacious interventions across the cancer continuum into routine practice and policy has yet to be realized. Multilevel influences, such as communities and families surrounding patients or health-care policies and organizations surrounding provider teams, may determine whether effective interventions are successfully implemented. Greater recognition of the importance of these influences in advancing (or hindering) the impact of single-level interventions has motivated the design and testing of multilevel interventions designed to address them. However, implementing research evidence from single- or multilevel interventions into sustainable routine practice and policy presents substantive challenges. Furthermore, relatively few multilevel interventions have been conducted along the cancer care continuum, and fewer still have been implemented, disseminated, or sustained in practice. The purpose of this chapter is, therefore, to illustrate and examine the concepts underlying the implementation and spread of multilevel interventions into routine practice and policy. We accomplish this goal by using a series of cancer and noncancer examples that have been successfully implemented and, in some cases, spread widely. Key concepts across these examples include the importance of phased implementation, recognizing the need for pilot testing, explicit engagement of key stakeholders within and between each intervention level; visible and consistent leadership and organizational support, including financial and human resources; better understanding of the policy context, fiscal climate, and incentives underlying implementation; explication of handoffs from researchers to accountable individuals within and across levels; ample integration of multilevel theories guiding implementation and evaluation; and strategies for long-term monitoring and sustainability.

  16. Implementation and Spread of Interventions Into the Multilevel Context of Routine Practice and Policy: Implications for the Cancer Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Green, Lawrence W.; Glanz, Karen; Ayanian, John Z.; Mittman, Brian S.; Chollette, Veronica; Rubenstein, Lisa V.

    2012-01-01

    The promise of widespread implementation of efficacious interventions across the cancer continuum into routine practice and policy has yet to be realized. Multilevel influences, such as communities and families surrounding patients or health-care policies and organizations surrounding provider teams, may determine whether effective interventions are successfully implemented. Greater recognition of the importance of these influences in advancing (or hindering) the impact of single-level interventions has motivated the design and testing of multilevel interventions designed to address them. However, implementing research evidence from single- or multilevel interventions into sustainable routine practice and policy presents substantive challenges. Furthermore, relatively few multilevel interventions have been conducted along the cancer care continuum, and fewer still have been implemented, disseminated, or sustained in practice. The purpose of this chapter is, therefore, to illustrate and examine the concepts underlying the implementation and spread of multilevel interventions into routine practice and policy. We accomplish this goal by using a series of cancer and noncancer examples that have been successfully implemented and, in some cases, spread widely. Key concepts across these examples include the importance of phased implementation, recognizing the need for pilot testing, explicit engagement of key stakeholders within and between each intervention level; visible and consistent leadership and organizational support, including financial and human resources; better understanding of the policy context, fiscal climate, and incentives underlying implementation; explication of handoffs from researchers to accountable individuals within and across levels; ample integration of multilevel theories guiding implementation and evaluation; and strategies for long-term monitoring and sustainability. PMID:22623601

  17. Defining Health Across the Cancer Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Audrey S; Everett, Ashlyn S; Dover, Laura; McDonald, Andrew; Kropp, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Health is not defined by the absence of disease or suffering, but by response to a series of life events that can markedly alter the quality and quantity of life. Patients with cancer experience significant but dynamic physical, psychosocial, and financial challenges. With the increasing number of patients with early stage cancers transitioning to survivorship, there is a critical need to address health promotion and overall well-being. For those with advanced cancer, discussion about prognosis and early integration of palliative care can have a profound impact on the quality of life. Effective communication between healthcare providers and patients is important in aligning treatment recommendations with patient goals and preferences throughout cancer therapy. This review provides a dynamic definition of health and proposes actionable guidelines for health promotion at any point along the cancer continuum: survivorship after early cancer or when goals of care transition to improve quality at the end of life. PMID:28357161

  18. 77 FR 45367 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application... and renewal funding. State and local governments, public housing authorities and nonprofit...: Colette Pollard., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development,...

  19. Exercise therapy across the lung cancer continuum.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Eves, Neil D; Waner, Emily; Joy, Anil A

    2009-07-01

    A lung cancer diagnosis and associated therapeutic management are associated with unique and varying degrees of adverse physical/functional impairments that dramatically reduce patients' ability to tolerate exercise. Poor exercise capacity predisposes to increased susceptibility to other common age-related diseases, poor quality of life, and likely premature death. This article reviews the literature investigating the role of exercise as an adjunct therapy across the lung cancer continuum (ie, prevention to palliation). The current evidence suggests that exercise training is a safe and feasible adjunct therapy for patients with operable lung cancer both before and after pulmonary resection. Among patients with inoperable disease, feasibility and safety studies of carefully prescribed exercise training are warranted. Preliminary evidence in this area suggests that exercise therapy may be an important consideration in multidisciplinary management of patients diagnosed with lung cancer.

  20. Cancer communication and informatics research across the cancer continuum.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Bradford W; Beckjord, Ellen; Rutten, Lila J Finney; Fagerlin, Angela; Cameron, Linda D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, dramatic changes brought about by a rapid diffusion of Internet technologies, cellular telephones, mobile devices, personal digital assistants, electronic health records, and data visualization have helped to create a revolution in health communication. To understand the implications of this communication revolution for cancer care, the National Cancer Institute launched an ambitious set of research priorities under its "extraordinary opportunities" program. We present an overview of some of the relevant behavioral research being conducted within the perspective of this extraordinary opportunity in cancer communication research. We begin by tracing the implications of this research for behavioral scientists across the continuum of cancer care from primary prevention (e.g., tobacco control, diet, exercise, sun protection, and immunization against human papilloma virus), to secondary prevention (e.g., screening for polyps, lesions, and early stage neoplasms), to diagnosis and treatment, posttreatment survivorship, and end of life. Along each point of the continuum, we describe a natural evolution of knowledge from studies on the traditional role of media to research on the changing role of new media and informatics, and we carefully highlight the role that psychological research has played in improving communication- and health-related outcomes along the way. We conclude with an appeal to psychologists of many different backgrounds to join with biomedical researchers, engineers, clinical practitioners, and others to accelerate progress against cancer.

  1. Resilience among patients across the cancer continuum: diverse perspectives.

    PubMed

    Molina, Yamile; Yi, Jean C; Martinez-Gutierrez, Javiera; Reding, Kerryn W; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P; Rosenberg, Abby R

    2014-02-01

    Each phase of the cancer experience profoundly affects patients' lives. Much of the literature has focused on negative consequences of cancer; however, the study of resilience may enable providers to promote more positive psychosocial outcomes before, during, and after the cancer experience. The current review describes the ways in which elements of resilience have been defined and studied at each phase of the cancer continuum. Extensive literature searches were conducted to find studies assessing resilience during one or more stages of the adult cancer continuum. For all phases of the cancer continuum, resilience descriptions included preexisting or baseline characteristics, such as demographics and personal attributes (e.g., optimism, social support), mechanisms of adaptation, such as coping and medical experiences (e.g., positive provider communication), as well as psychosocial outcomes, such as growth and quality of life. Promoting resilience is a critical element of patient psychosocial care. Nurses may enable resilience by recognizing and promoting certain baseline characteristics and optimizing mechanisms of adaptation.

  2. Resilience Among Patients Across the Cancer Continuum: Diverse Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Yamile; Yi, Jean C.; Martinez-Gutierrez, Javiera; Reding, Kerryn W.; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P.; Rosenberg, Abby R.

    2014-01-01

    Each phase of the cancer experience profoundly affects patients’ lives. Much of the literature has focused on negative consequences of cancer; however, the study of resilience may enable providers to promote more positive psychosocial outcomes before, during, and after the cancer experience. The current review describes the ways in which elements of resilience have been defined and studied at each phase of the cancer continuum. Extensive literature searches were conducted to find studies assessing resilience during one or more stages of the adult cancer continuum. For all phases of the cancer continuum, resilience descriptions included preexisting or baseline characteristics, such as demographics and personal attributes (e.g., optimism, social support), mechanisms of adaptation, such as coping and medical experiences (e.g., positive provider communication), as well as psychosocial outcomes, such as growth and quality of life. Promoting resilience is a critical element of patient psychosocial care. Nurses may enable resilience by recognizing and promoting certain baseline characteristics and optimizing mechanisms of adaptation. PMID:24476731

  3. Health information needs, source preferences and engagement behaviours of women with metastatic breast cancer across the care continuum: protocol for a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Carol A; Martin, M Pilar; Jones, Ray B

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The health information needs, information source preferences and engagement behaviours of women with metastatic breast cancer (mBC) depend on personal characteristics such as education level, prior knowledge, clinical complications, comorbidities and where they are in the cancer journey. A thorough understanding of the information behaviours of women living with mBC is essential to the provision of optimal care. A preliminary literature review suggests that there is little research on this topic, but that there may be lessons from a slightly broader literature. This review will identify what is known and what is not known about the health information needs, acquisition and influences of women with mBC across the care continuum. Findings will help to identify research needs and specific areas where in-depth systematic reviews may be feasible, as well as inform evidence-based interventions to address the health information needs of female patients with mBC with different demographics and characteristics and across the mBC journey. Methods and analysis A scoping review will be performed using the guidelines of Arksey and O'Malley as updated by subsequent authors to systematically search scientific and grey literature for articles in English that discuss the health information needs, source preferences, engagement styles, and associated personal and medical attributes of women ≥18 years living with mBC at different stages of the disease course. A variety of databases (including Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Academic Search Premier, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PsycINFO, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, and PQDT Open), oncology, patient advocacy and governmental websites will be searched from inception to present day. Research and non-research literature will be included; no study designs will be excluded. The six-stage Arksey and O'Malley scoping review

  4. 77 FR 44653 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-Technical Submission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-- Technical Submission AGENCY... the original Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application. DATES: Comments Due Date: August... lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance...

  5. 77 FR 23491 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application--Continuum of Care Registration AGENCY: Office of the Chief... reporting burden associated with registration requirements that Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance...

  6. 24 CFR 578.39 - Continuum of Care planning activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., public housing agencies, school districts, social service providers, mental health agencies, hospitals... Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES CONTINUUM OF CARE PROGRAM Program Components and...

  7. 24 CFR 578.5 - Establishing the Continuum of Care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., public housing agencies, school districts, social service providers, mental health agencies, hospitals... Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES CONTINUUM OF CARE PROGRAM Establishing and Operating a...

  8. 24 CFR 578.39 - Continuum of Care planning activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., universities, affordable housing developers, law enforcement, organizations that serve veterans, and homeless and formerly homeless individuals; (2) Determining the geographic area that the Continuum of Care will... homeless providers, victim service providers, faith-based organizations, governments, businesses,...

  9. mHealth Education Applications Along the Cancer Continuum.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sharon Watkins; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    The majority of adults worldwide own a mobile phone, including those in under-resourced communities. Mobile health (mhealth) education technologies present a promising mechanism for improving cancer prevention, treatment, and follow-up. The purpose of this study was to summarize the literature related to mobile phone (mhealth) applications for patient education specific to cancer and identify current recommendations from randomized studies. In particular, we were interested in identifying mobile phone applications along the cancer continuum, from cancer prevention to survivorship. The authors identified 28 articles reporting on mobile applications for patients related to cancer. Articles were identified in all categories along the cancer continuum, including health professional involvement in application development. Of these, six involved direct patient education, and eight focused on improving patient/professional communication and patient self-management. However, only six of the studies were randomized interventions. The potential for mobile applications to help overcome the "health care gap" has not yet been realized in the studies from the USA that were reviewed for this paper. However, early recommendations are emerging that support the use of mHealth communications to change behaviors for cancer prevention, early detection, and symptom management and improved patient-provider communication. Recommendations include short messages, use of multiple modalities as patient characteristics dictate comfort with mHealth communication, and the inclusion of patients and health professionals to develop and test applications. Tailoring mHealth to particular cultures, languages, and ethnic groups may also represent a unique possibility to provide accessible information and education at minimal cost for under-resourced communities and individuals.

  10. HIV continuum of care in Europe and Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Drew, R S; Rice, B; Rüütel, K; Delpech, V; Attawell, K A; Hales, D K; Velasco, C; Amato-Gauci, A J; Pharris, A; Tavoschi, L; Noori, T

    2017-08-01

    The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) supports countries to monitor progress in their response to the HIV epidemic. In line with these monitoring responsibilities, we assess how, and to what extent, the continuum of care is being measured across countries. The ECDC sent out questionnaires to 55 countries in Europe and Central Asia in 2014. Nominated country representatives were questioned on how they defined and measured six elements of the continuum. We present our results using three previously described frameworks [breakpoints; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) 90-90-90 targets; diagnosis and treatment quadrant]. Forty countries provided data for at least one element of the continuum. Countries reported most frequently on the number of people diagnosed with HIV infection (37; 93%), and on the number in receipt of antiretroviral therapy (ART) (35; 88%). There was little consensus across countries in their approach to defining linkage to, and retention in, care. The most common breakpoint (>19% reduction between two adjacent elements) related to the estimated number of people living with HIV who were diagnosed (18 of 23; 78%). We present continuum data from multiple countries that provide both a snapshot of care provision and a baseline against which changes over time in care provision across Europe and Central Asia may be measured. To better inform HIV testing and treatment programmes, standard data collection approaches and definitions across the HIV continuum of care are needed. If countries wish to ensure an unbroken HIV continuum of care, people living with HIV need to be diagnosed promptly, and ART needs to be offered to all those diagnosed. © 2017 The Authors. HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association.

  11. Defining the HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis care continuum

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Amy S.; Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew; Patel, Rupa; Chan, Philip A.

    2017-01-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective HIV prevention strategy. There is little scientific consensus about how to measure PrEP program implementation progress. We draw on several years of experience in implementing PrEP programs and propose a PrEP continuum of care that includes: (1) identifying individuals at highest risk for contracting HIV, (2) increasing HIV risk awareness among those individuals, (3) enhancing PrEP awareness, (4) facilitating PrEP access, (5) linking to PrEP care, (6) prescribing PrEP, (7) initiating PrEP, (8) adhering to PrEP, and (9) retaining individuals in PrEP care. We also propose four distinct categories of PrEP retention in care that include being: (1) indicated for PrEP and retained in PrEP care, (2) indicated for PrEP and not retained in PrEP care, (3) no longer indicated for PrEP, and (4) lost to follow-up for PrEP care. This continuum of PrEP care creates a framework that researchers and practitioners can use to measure PrEP awareness, uptake, adherence, and retention. Understanding each point along the proposed continuum of PrEP care is critical for developing effective PrEP interventions and for measuring public health progress in PrEP program implementation. PMID:28060019

  12. 24 CFR 578.5 - Establishing the Continuum of Care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... geographic area to carry out the duties of this part. Relevant organizations include nonprofit homeless..., universities, affordable housing developers, law enforcement, and organizations that serve veterans and homeless and formerly homeless individuals. (b) The board. The Continuum of Care must establish a board...

  13. The HIV care continuum in Latin America: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Piñeirúa, Alicia; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Cahn, Pedro; Guevara Palmero, Rafael Napoleón; Martínez Buitrago, Ernesto; Young, Benjamin; Del Rio, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), also known as highly active antiretroviral therapy, provides clinical and immunological benefits for people living with HIV and is an effective strategy to prevent HIV transmission at the individual level. Early initiation of ART as part of a test and treat approach might decrease HIV transmission at the population level, but to do so the HIV continuum of care, from diagnosis to viral suppression, should be optimised. Access to ART has improved greatly in Latin America, and about 600,000 people are on treatment. However, health-care systems are deficient in different stages of the HIV continuum of care, and in some cases only a small proportion of individuals achieve the desired outcome of virological suppression. At present, data for most Latin American countries are not sufficient to build reliable metrics. Available data and estimates show that many people living with HIV in Latin America are unaware of their status, are diagnosed late, and enter into care late. Stigma, administrative barriers, and economic limitations seem to be important determinants of late diagnosis and failure to be linked to and retained in care. Policy makers need reliable data to optimise the HIV care continuum and improve individual-based and population-based outcomes of ART in Latin America. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The South Carolina rural-urban HIV continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Edun, Babatunde; Iyer, Medha; Albrecht, Helmut; Weissman, Sharon

    2016-12-16

    The HIV continuum of care model is widely used by various agencies to describe the HIV epidemic in stages from diagnosis through to virologic suppression. It identifies the various points at which persons living with HIV (PLWHIV) within a population fail to reach their next step in HIV care. The rural population in the Southern United States is disproportionally affected by the HIV epidemic. The purpose of this study was to examine these rural-urban disparities using the HIV care continuum model and determine at what stages these differences become apparent. PLWHIV aged 13 years and older in South Carolina (SC) were identified using data from the enhanced HIV/AIDS Reporting System. The percentages of PLWHIV linked to care, retained in care, and virologically suppressed were determined. Rural versus urban residence was determined using the Office of Management and Budget classification. There were 14,523 PLWHIV in SC at the end of 2012; 11,193 (77%) of whom were categorized as urban and 3305 (22%) as rural. There was no difference between urban and rural for those who had received any care: 64% versus 64% (p = .61); retention in care 53% versus 53% (p = .71); and virologic suppression 49% versus 48% (p = .35), respectively. The SC rural-urban HIV cascade represents the first published cascade of care model using rural versus urban residence. Although significant health care disparities exist between rural and urban residents, there were no major differences between rural and urban residents at the various stages of engagement in HIV care using the HIV continuum of care model.

  15. The 2013 HIV Continuum of Care in Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Wester, Carolyn; Rebeiro, Peter F.; Shavor, Thomas J.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; McGoy, Shanell L.; Daley, Benn; Morrison, Melissa; Vermund, Sten H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We measured patient engagement in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continuum of care in Tennessee after implementation of enhanced surveillance activities to assess progress toward 2015 statewide goals. We also examined subgroup disparities to identify groups at risk for poor outcomes. Methods: We estimated linkage to care, retention in care, and viral suppression among HIV-infected people in Tennessee in 2013, overall and by subgroup, after implementation of enhanced laboratory reporting, address verification, and death-matching procedures. Results: Of 792 people newly diagnosed with HIV infection in 2013, 632 (79.8%) were linked to care, close to the 2015 goal of ≥80%. Of 15 473 people living and diagnosed with HIV infection before 2013, 8458 (54.7%) were retained in care, approaching the 2015 goal of ≥64.0%. A total of 8640 (55.8%) were virally suppressed, surpassing the 2015 goal of ≥51.0%. Compared with people living and diagnosed with HIV infection before 2013, newly diagnosed people were more likely to be younger, male, non-Hispanic black, and men who have sex with men (MSM). For linkage to care, retention in care, and viral suppression, younger and non-Hispanic black people fared worse, whereas females and those enrolled in the Ryan White program fared better. For retention in care and viral suppression, Hispanic people, injection drug users, and East Tennessee residents fared worse than those in Memphis, whereas MSM fared better. Nashville residents fared worse in retention in care than Memphis residents. Conclusion: Tennessee’s HIV continuum of care in 2013 showed progress toward 2015 goals. Future efforts to improve the HIV continuum of care should be directed toward vulnerable groups and regions, particularly young, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic people; injection drug users; and residents of the East Tennessee and Nashville regions. PMID:28123210

  16. Infection prevention: the surgical care continuum.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Sue

    2015-05-01

    Lack of careful attention to the increasing complexity of surgical procedures, instrument cleaning and processing, and the transition of surgical and other invasive procedures from the OR to areas outside the traditional hospital OR can contribute to surgical site infection (SSI) risk. Regardless of the location of an intervention, when basic infection prevention measures are applied reliably, even low infection rates can be reduced. To address infection prevention challenges, infection preventionists (IPs) must be well informed regarding infection risk and prevention during surgical and other invasive procedures and the effect a facility type may have on patients' infection risk. The IP must have a solid understanding of surgical asepsis, instrument disinfection, and sterilization to educate and support clinical teams in identifying opportunities for improvement relative to infection prevention.

  17. SMART Careplan System for Continuum of Care

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ah; Jang, Seon Young; Ahn, Meejung; Kim, Kyung Duck

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes the integrated Careplan system, designed to manage and utilize the existing Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system; the system also defines key items for interdisciplinary communication and continuity of patient care. Methods We structured the Careplan system to provide effective interdisciplinary communication for healthcare services. The design of the Careplan system architecture proceeded in four steps-defining target datasets; construction of conceptual framework and architecture; screen layout and storyboard creation; screen user interface (UI) design and development, and pilot test and step-by-step deployment. This Careplan system architecture consists of two parts, a server-side and client-side area. On the server-side, it performs the roles of data retrieval and storage from target EMRs. Furthermore, it performs the role of sending push notifications to the client depending on the careplan series. Also, the Careplan system provides various convenient modules to easily enter an individual careplan. Results Currently, Severance Hospital operates the Careplan system and provides a stable service dealing with dynamic changes (e.g., domestic medical certification, the Joint Commission International guideline) of EMR. Conclusions The Careplan system should go hand in hand with key items for strengthening interdisciplinary communication and information sharing within the EMR environment. A well-designed Careplan system can enhance user satisfaction and completed performance. PMID:25705559

  18. The continuum of HIV care in a Veterans' Affairs clinic.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Jed P; Rimland, David; Marconi, Vincent C

    2014-05-01

    The cascade of HIV care in the United States has become a focus for interventions aimed at improving the success of HIV treatment. The Atlanta VA Medical Center (AVAMC) Infectious Disease Clinic (IDC) is an urban clinic that provides care for over 1,400 people living with HIV (PLHIV) annually. Using data from the HIV Atlanta VA Cohort Study (HAVACS), we modeled the continuum of care in the AVAMC IDC and explored similarities and differences with national models. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 1,474 individuals receiving care in the AVAMC IDC. We estimated total PLHIV and defined several categories within the spectrum of HIV care. We then developed the continuum of care using two methodologies. The first required each stage to be a dependent subset of the immediate upstream stage. The second allowed each stage to be independent of upstream stages. Dependent stage categorization estimated that 95.3% of individuals were diagnosed with HIV, 89.8% of individuals were linked to care, 73.0% of individuals were retained in care, 65.9% of individuals were eligible for antiretroviral treatment (ART), 62.8% were prescribed ART, and 52.4% had a suppressed viral load (VL). Independent stage categorization estimated that 83.9% of individuals were prescribed ART and 61.5% had a suppressed VL. Our analyses showed that the AVAMC IDC estimates were significantly better than national estimates at every stage. This may reflect the benefits of a universal healthcare system. We propose the use of independent stages for the continuum as this more accurately represents healthcare utilization.

  19. Supporting cancer patients through the continuum of care: a view from the age of social networks and computer-mediated communication.

    PubMed

    Bender, J L; O'Grady, L; Jadad, A R

    2008-08-01

    Almost since its inception, the Internet has been used by ordinary people to connect with peers and to exchange health-related information and support. With the rapid development of software applications deliberately designed to facilitate social interaction, a new era is dawning in which patients and their loved ones can collaboratively build knowledge related to coping with illness, while meeting their mutual supportive care needs in a timely way, regardless of location. In this article, we provide background information on the use of "one-to-one" (for example, e-mail), "one-to-many" (for example, e-mail lists), and "many-to-many" (for example, message boards and chat rooms, and more recently, applications associated with Web 2.0) computer-mediated communication to nurture health-related social networks and online supportive care. We also discuss research that has investigated the use of social networks by patients, highlight opportunities for health professionals in this area, and describe new advances that are fuelling this new era of collaboration in the management of cancer.

  20. 77 FR 27243 - Notice of Propose Information Collection for Public Comment; Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Propose Information Collection for Public Comment; Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application--Continuum of Care Application AGENCY: Office of Assistant Secretary... information: Title of Proposal: HEARTH Continuum of Care Program Application. Description of the need for...

  1. 77 FR 33229 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment; Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment; Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application--Continuum of Care Application AGENCY: Office of Assistant Secretary... 27243, HUD published a proposed information collection for public comment entitled Continuum of Care...

  2. 24 CFR 578.7 - Responsibilities of the Continuum of Care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES CONTINUUM OF CARE PROGRAM Establishing and Operating a... receive permanent supportive housing assistance; and (vi) Where the Continuum is designated a...

  3. Health Communication and the HIV Continuum of Care

    PubMed Central

    Mallalieu, Elizabeth C.; Van Lith, Lynn M.; Struthers, Helen E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Health communication is a broad term that applies to the fundamental need for practitioners, policy makers, patients, and community members to understand one another around health promotion and health care issues. Whether in a consultation between nurse and patient, a health clinic director's engagement with the health ministry, or a community campaign for encouraging HIV testing, all have critical health communication elements. When people's needs are not perceived by them to be addressed or clients/patients do not understand what is being communicated, they are unmotivated to engage. Health communication may be deployed at multiple levels to encourage positive behavior change and affect HIV treatment outcomes. As countries move to treatment for all as soon as possible after testing, health communication can help address significant losses at each stage of the HIV continuum of care, thereby contributing to achieving the 90-90-90 global treatment goals. This JAIDS supplement presents compelling studies that are anchored on the health communication exigencies in highly diverse HIV and AIDS contexts in low and middle income settings. Our special focus is health communication needs and challenges within the HIV continuum of care. We introduce the supplement with thumbnails summaries of the work presented by an experienced array of public health, behavioral, and clinical scientists. PMID:27930605

  4. Health Communication and the HIV Continuum of Care.

    PubMed

    Vermund, Sten H; Mallalieu, Elizabeth C; Van Lith, Lynn M; Struthers, Helen E

    2017-01-01

    Health communication is a broad term that applies to the fundamental need for practitioners, policy makers, patients, and community members to understand one another around health promotion and health care issues. Whether in a consultation between nurse and patient, a health clinic director's engagement with the health ministry, or a community campaign for encouraging HIV testing, all have critical health communication elements. When people's needs are not perceived by them to be addressed or clients/patients do not understand what is being communicated, they are unmotivated to engage. Health communication may be deployed at multiple levels to encourage positive behavior change and affect HIV treatment outcomes. As countries move to treatment for all as soon as possible after testing, health communication can help address significant losses at each stage of the HIV continuum of care, thereby contributing to achieving the 90-90-90 global treatment goals. This JAIDS supplement presents compelling studies that are anchored on the health communication exigencies in highly diverse HIV and AIDS contexts in low and middle income settings. Our special focus is health communication needs and challenges within the HIV continuum of care. We introduce the supplement with thumbnails summaries of the work presented by an experienced array of public health, behavioral, and clinical scientists.

  5. Online cancer news: trends regarding article types, specific cancers, and the cancer continuum.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Ryan J; Riles, Julius Matthew; Sangalang, Angeline

    2014-01-01

    The Internet is one of the fastest growing news sources for many worldwide (Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism, 2011), and cancer news is one frequently consumed form of online health information (Google, Inc., 2007). This content analysis of online cancer news (n = 862) retrieved from the four most frequented news websites describes trends regarding specific cancers, stages in the cancer continuum, and types of news articles. In general, treatment information received the most attention in online cancer news. Breast cancer received the most attention of each specific cancer, followed by digestive and genitourinary cancers. Research reports and profiles of people (more than 60% of which were about celebrities) were the most common article types. Risk, uncertainty, and clinical trials were also present across several types of cancer news articles. Implications of content trends are discussed as relevant to consumers, producers, health campaign designers, and researchers alike.

  6. 77 FR 24214 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... Homeless Assistance--Technical Submission AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Community Planning... following information: Title of Proposal: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance--Technical Submission... technical information not contained in the original Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application...

  7. Findings from the Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum (NNACC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Krebs, Linda U.; Dignan, Mark B.; Jones, Kate; Harjo, Lisa D.; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Petereit, Daniel G.; Pingatore, Noel L.; Isham, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum (NNACC) was a community based participatory research study among Native American Cancer Research Corporation, CO; Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, MI; Rapid City Regional Hospital's Walking Forward, SD; Great Plains Tribal Chairman's' Health Board, SD; and Muscogee (Creek) Nation, OK. The project goal was to collaborate, refine, expand and adapt navigator/community education programs to address American Indian communities' and patients' needs across the continuum of cancer care (prevention through end-of-life). The intervention consisted of 4 to 6 site-specific education workshop series at all 5 sites. Each series encompassed 24 hours of community education. The Social Ecology Theory guided intervention development; community members from each site helped refine education materials. Following extensive education, Native Patient Navigators (NPNs) implemented the workshops, referred participants to cancer screenings, helped participants access local programs and resources and assisted those with cancer to access quality cancer care in a timely manner. The intervention was highly successful; 1,964 community participants took part. Participants were primarily American Indians (83%), female (70%) and between 18 and 95 years of age. The education programs increased community knowledge by 28%, facilitated referral to local services, and, through site-specific navigation services, improved access to care for 77 participants diagnosed with cancer during the intervention. Approximately 90% of participants evaluated workshop content as useful and 92.3% said they would recommend the workshop to others. The intervention successfully increased community members' knowledge and raised the visibility of the NPNs in all 5 sites. PMID:25053462

  8. Optimisation of the continuum of supportive and palliative care for patients with breast cancer in low-income and middle-income countries: executive summary of the Breast Health Global Initiative, 2014.

    PubMed

    Distelhorst, Sandra R; Cleary, James F; Ganz, Patricia A; Bese, Nuran; Camacho-Rodriguez, Rolando; Cardoso, Fatima; Ddungu, Henry; Gralow, Julie R; Yip, Cheng-Har; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2015-03-01

    Supportive care and palliative care are now recognised as critical components of global cancer control programmes. Many aspects of supportive and palliative care services are already available in some low-income and middle-income countries. Full integration of supportive and palliative care into breast cancer programmes requires a systematic, resource-stratified approach. The Breast Health Global Initiative convened three expert panels to develop resource allocation recommendations for supportive and palliative care programmes in low-income and middle-income countries. Each panel focused on a specific phase of breast cancer care: during treatment, after treatment with curative intent (survivorship), and after diagnosis with metastatic disease. The panel consensus statements were published in October, 2013. This Executive Summary combines the three panels' recommendations into a single comprehensive document covering breast cancer care from diagnosis through curative treatment into survivorship, and metastatic disease and end-of-life care. The recommendations cover physical symptom management, pain management, monitoring and documentation, psychosocial and spiritual aspects of care, health professional education, and patient, family, and caregiver education.

  9. Care pathways across the primary-hospital care continuum: using the multi-level framework in explaining care coordination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Care pathways are widely used in hospitals for a structured and detailed planning of the care process. There is a growing interest in extending care pathways into primary care to improve quality of care by increasing care coordination. Evidence is sparse about the relationship between care pathways and care coordination. The multi-level framework explores care coordination across organizations and states that (inter)organizational mechanisms have an effect on the relationships between healthcare professionals, resulting in quality and efficiency of care. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which care pathways support or create elements of the multi-level framework necessary to improve care coordination across the primary - hospital care continuum. Methods This study is an in-depth analysis of five existing local community projects located in four different regions in Flanders (Belgium) to determine whether the available empirical evidence supported or refuted the theoretical expectations from the multi-level framework. Data were gathered using mixed methods, including structured face-to-face interviews, participant observations, documentation and a focus group. Multiple cases were analyzed performing a cross case synthesis to strengthen the results. Results The development of a care pathway across the primary-hospital care continuum, supported by a step-by-step scenario, led to the use of existing and newly constructed structures, data monitoring and the development of information tools. The construction and use of these inter-organizational mechanisms had a positive effect on exchanging information, formulating and sharing goals, defining and knowing each other’s roles, expectations and competences and building qualitative relationships. Conclusion Care pathways across the primary-hospital care continuum enhance the components of care coordination. PMID:23919518

  10. Multi Texture Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Continuum Using Multispectral Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Desrosiers, Christian; Bouridane, Ahmed; Toews, Matthew; Hassan, Lama; Tanougast, Camel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This paper proposes to characterize the continuum of colorectal cancer (CRC) using multiple texture features extracted from multispectral optical microscopy images. Three types of pathological tissues (PT) are considered: benign hyperplasia, intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma. Materials and Methods In the proposed approach, the region of interest containing PT is first extracted from multispectral images using active contour segmentation. This region is then encoded using texture features based on the Laplacian-of-Gaussian (LoG) filter, discrete wavelets (DW) and gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM). To assess the significance of textural differences between PT types, a statistical analysis based on the Kruskal-Wallis test is performed. The usefulness of texture features is then evaluated quantitatively in terms of their ability to predict PT types using various classifier models. Results Preliminary results show significant texture differences between PT types, for all texture features (p-value < 0.01). Individually, GLCM texture features outperform LoG and DW features in terms of PT type prediction. However, a higher performance can be achieved by combining all texture features, resulting in a mean classification accuracy of 98.92%, sensitivity of 98.12%, and specificity of 99.67%. Conclusions These results demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of combining multiple texture features for characterizing the continuum of CRC and discriminating between pathological tissues in multispectral images. PMID:26901134

  11. Cancer care for individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Kelly E; Henderson, David C; Knight, Helen P; Pirl, William F

    2014-02-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia are a vulnerable population that has been relatively neglected in health disparities research. Despite having an equivalent risk of developing most cancers, patients with schizophrenia are more likely to die of cancer than the general population. Cancer care disparities are likely the result of patient-, provider-, and systems-level factors and influenced by the pervasive stigma of mental illness. Individuals with schizophrenia have higher rates of health behaviors linked with cancer mortality including cigarette smoking. They also have significant medical comorbidity, are less likely to have up-to-date cancer screening, and may present at more advanced stages of illness. Patients with schizophrenia may be less likely to receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, have more postoperative complications, and have less access to palliative care. However, opportunities exist for the interdisciplinary team, including medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists; psychiatrists; and primary care physicians, to intervene throughout the continuum of cancer care to promote survival and quality of life. This review summarizes data on overall and cancer-specific mortality for individuals with schizophrenia and reviews specific disparities across the cancer care continuum of screening, diagnosis, treatment, and end-of-life care. Using a case, the authors illustrate clinical challenges for this population including communication, informed consent, and risk of suicide, and provide suggestions for care. Finally, recommendations for research to address the disparities in cancer care for individuals with schizophrenia are discussed. Despite significant challenges, with collaboration between oncology and mental health teams, individuals with schizophrenia can receive high-quality cancer care.

  12. Severe Brain Injury in Massachusetts: Assessing the Continuum of Care.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Laura; Katz, Gabrielle

    2015-12-10

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is a major public health problem in Massachusetts (Hackman et al, 2014) and includes traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, ABI-related infectious diseases, metabolic disorders affecting the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), and brain tumor. Advances in emergency medical care and neurosurgery mean that more people are surviving severe traumatic brain injury (Trexler et al, 2014). Yet many patients with severe TBI in particular, are not receiving inpatient services after initial treatment (Hackman et al, 2014; CDC, 2014) or later that are known to be effective (Malec & Kean, 2015; Lewis & Horn, 2015; BI Commission, 2011; Kolakowsky-Hayner et al, 2000; Interviews). These services include post-acute rehabilitation, case management, and brain injury-specific community programming (CDC, 2014; BI Commission, 2011; Interviews). Governance and data for decision-making are also major gaps in the continuum of care for severe brain injury in MA (Interviews; NASHIA, 2005). The last two decades saw a surge in interest in the brain, with advances in neuroscience, diagnosis and measurement of brain injury, rehabilitation services, and brain theory (Boyle, 2001). Severe brain injury however is the new "hidden epidemic" in our society. For many, an injury to the brain is not a short-term event that can be "cured" but the beginning of a life-long disability (CDC, 2014; Langlois et al, 2006). Fortunately, even after a severe brain injury, when the right rehabilitation is provided at the right time, the "rest of life" journey can be a positive one for many (Marquez de la Plata, 2015; Langlois et al, 2006). Severe brain injury can lead to a "new normal" as patients regain skills, find new meaning and in life, and take on new family, volunteer, and work roles. Throughout this brief, the term "severe brain injury" refers to "severe acquired brain injury," or any injury to the brain that occurs after birth. This definition does not include

  13. Perspectives of the Breast Cancer Survivorship Continuum: Diagnosis through 30 Months Post-Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hulett, Jennifer M.; Armer, Jane M.; Stewart, Bob R.; Wanchai, Ausanee

    2015-01-01

    This study explored breast cancer survivors’ perspectives regarding their experiences of the survivorship continuum from diagnosis through 30 months post-treatment. The sample included women (N = 379) with newly-diagnosed breast cancer undergoing treatment at a Midwestern university-affiliated cancer center. Semi-structured interviews were conducted using the Lymphedema and Breast Cancer Questionnaire at time of diagnosis, post-operatively, quarterly during the first year, and then semi-annually thereafter through 30 months post-treatment. A mixed-methodology was used to analyze participants’ comments. Themes central to long-term survivorship experiences included social support, positive worldviews, breast cancer and lymphedema health literacy, religious/spiritual beliefs, self-empowerment, and recovery expectations. These themes were consistent with a psychoneuroimmunological model of health in which psychosocial variables mediate stress and influence health outcomes. Qualitative data showed that social support and positive worldviews were the two themes with the most significant impact on long-term breast cancer survivorship experiences. Survivors expressed a need to advance their health care literacy in order to share ownership of breast cancer and lymphedema treatment decisions. Since breast cancer is an immune-mediated disease, long-term survivorship planning should address psychosocial factors that influence the long-term psychological distress associated with immune dysfunction. PMID:26030800

  14. The HIV treatment cascade and care continuum: updates, goals, and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Kay, Emma Sophia; Batey, D Scott; Mugavero, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The HIV care continuum is a framework that models the dynamic stages of HIV care. The continuum consists of five main steps, which, at the population level, are depicted cross-sectionally as the HIV treatment cascade. These steps include diagnosis, linkage to care (LTC), retention in care (RiC), adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), and viral suppression. Although the HIV treatment cascade is represented as a linear, unidirectional framework, persons living with HIV (PLWH) often experience the care continuum in a less streamlined fashion, skip steps altogether, or even exit the continuum for a period of time and regress to an earlier stage. The proportion of PLWH decreases at each successive step of the cascade, beginning with an estimated 86% who are diagnosed and dropping dramatically to approximately 30% of PLWH who are virally suppressed in the United States (US). In this current issues review, we describe each step in the cascade, discuss targeted interventions that address weak points in the continuum, review domestic and international policies that help shape and direct HIV care strategies, and conclude with recommendations and future directions for HIV providers and policymakers. While we primarily examine issues related to domestic HIV care in the US, we also discuss international applications of the continuum in order to provide broader context.

  15. Continuum of palliative care: lessons from caring for children infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Oleske, J M; Czarniecki, L

    1999-10-09

    This article presents the essence of continuum of palliative and hospice care for HIV-infected children. Based on the principles of palliative care and the provision of hospice services, the relief of suffering has not always been available to most children with life-limiting illnesses. The palliative care ensures child's comfort and maximum function through the course of their illness. The guiding ethical principle of palliative care includes autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance, and justice. Thus, the family and child are full partners with the health care team in management decisions. Its benefit did not just be reserved for end-of-life care. It starts from the time an HIV-1 infected woman becomes pregnant through the course of disease and eventual death of her child. However, there were barriers in providing palliative care. One of which was the lack of appreciation towards acute and chronic pain associated with disease and painful procedures. Another thing was the social and economic barriers to the provisions of appropriate palliative care and hospital services, which also exist. A collaborative multidiscipline program will therefore provide the best environment in providing palliative and hospice care. To sum up, a child with life-limiting illnesses should receive palliative care and hospice services that give them the best quality of life and ease the burden of dying.

  16. CancerCare

    MedlinePlus

    ... social worker » Cancer Care ® E-News and E-Alerts Get news and updates from Cancer Care ® right ... Hope Video Library Blog E-News and E-Alerts Calendar Resource Database Open Portals For Patients and ...

  17. CancerCare

    MedlinePlus

    ... social worker » Cancer Care ® E-News and E-Alerts Get news and updates from Cancer Care ® right ... Hope Video Library Blog E-News and E-Alerts Calendar Resource Database Open Portals For Patients and ...

  18. Your cancer survivorship care plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000822.htm Your cancer survivorship care plan To use the sharing features on this page, ... get one. What Is a Cancer Survivorship Care Plan? A cancer survivorship care plan is a document ...

  19. Cancer care in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat; Attiga, Fadwa; Mansour, Asem

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in Jordan after cardiovascular diseases. Due to increase in life expectancy and prolonged exposure to risk factors, cancer mortality and morbidity are expected to increase as the young population ages. This increase will constitute a challenging burden on healthcare systems in Jordan and many other neighboring countries. Planning is key to managing the expected rise in the demand for cancer care, and this will require public health initiatives to guarantee access to quality cancer care. Over the past decade, cancer care in Jordan has witnessed remarkable improvement through access to advanced diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we address the history of cancer care in Jordan, including cancer statistics, infrastructure, workforce as well as cancer care outcomes. We also discuss many of the challenges that we face and offer suggestions for the improvement of cancer management in Jordan and the region. Copyright © 2015 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Leading the Future We Envision: Nurturing a Culture of Innovation Across the Continuum of Care.

    PubMed

    DʼAlfonso, Jim; Zuniga, Anita; Weberg, Daniel; Orders, Ann E

    2016-01-01

    In the Fall of 2012, this large integrated health care system located in Northern California, comprising 21 hospitals and employing more than 25 000 nurses across all inpatient, outpatient, and continuum of care areas, embarked upon a comprehensive initiative to further engage the "hearts and minds" of its nursing workforce while establishing a foundation for innovation in an era of health care reform. This article will outline the strategy employed to ensure that professional nurses across the continuum of care were made aware of the impact of the Affordable Care Act. Major shifts to value-based care and improved performance expectations focus our attention on quality, service, and affordability, also known as the "Triple Aim." Transitioning from a volume-focused model to a value-based care model requires measurable and sustainable improvements over current performance, reinforcing the importance of increased levels of engagement, shared accountability, and purposeful collaboration. Over a span of 18 months, the organization conducted 55 interactive educational forums for point-of-care care teams and leadership. These dynamic learning events helped recalibrate the working foundation for how leaders would nurture the process for innovation among care teams and transform care across the continuum of care.

  1. Focusing on Patient Safety: the Challenge of Securely Sharing Electronic Medical Records in Complex Care Continuums.

    PubMed

    Key, Diana; Ferneini, Elie M

    2015-09-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's (PPACA) regulated approach to inclusive provision of care will increase the challenge health care administrators face ensuring secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records between divisions and care subcontractors. This analysis includes a summary overview of the PPACA; the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (HCERA) of 2010; and required Essential Health Benefits (EHB). The analysis integrates an overview of how secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records will be essential to clinical outcomes across complex care continuums; as well as the actionable strategies health care leadership can employ to overcome associated IT security challenges.

  2. Outcomes along the HIV care continuum among undocumented immigrants in clinical care.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jonathan; Felsen, Uriel R; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Patel, Viraj V; Hanna, David B

    2017-04-26

    HIV-infected undocumented immigrants face unique barriers to care yet little is known about their clinical outcomes. We performed a retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults in clinical care from 2006-2014 at a large academic medical center in a setting where medical insurance is available to HIV-infected undocumented immigrants. Undocumented status was assessed based on Social Security number and insurance status and verified through medical chart review. Using Poisson regression models, we compared undocumented and documented patients with respect to retention in care (≥ 2 HIV-related lab tests ≥ 90 days apart), antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription (≥ 3 active antiretroviral agents prescribed in a year) and viral suppression (HIV RNA <200 copies/ml for the last measured viral load) for each year in care. Of 7,551 patients included in the analysis, we classified 173 (2.3%) as undocumented. For each year of the analysis, higher proportions of undocumented patients were retained in care, prescribed ART and virally suppressed. In adjusted models, undocumented status was associated with increased probability of retention in care (risk ratio [RR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.09), ART prescription (RR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.08) and viral suppression (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.08-1.19) compared to documented status. Undocumented patients achieved clinical outcomes at modestly higher rates than documented patients, despite entering care with more advanced disease. In a setting where insurance is available to undocumented patients, similar outcomes along the HIV care continuum may be achieved regardless of immigration status.

  3. A role for health communication in the continuum of HIV care, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Cecilia; Risher, Kathryn; Limaye, Rupali J; Van Lith, Lynn M; Gibbs, Susannah; Smelyanskaya, Marina; Celentano, David D

    2014-08-15

    : Health communication has played a pivotal role in HIV prevention efforts since the beginning of the epidemic. The recent paradigm of combination prevention, which integrates behavioral, biomedical, and structural interventions, offers new opportunities for employing health communication approaches across the entire continuum of care. We describe key areas where health communication can significantly enhance HIV treatment, care, and prevention, presenting evidence from interventions that include health communication components. These interventions rely primarily on interpersonal communication, especially individual and group counseling, both within and beyond clinical settings to enhance the uptake of and continued engagement in care. Many successful interventions mobilize a network of trained community supporters or accompagnateurs, who provide education, counseling, psychosocial support, treatment supervision, and other pragmatic assistance across the care continuum. Community treatment supporters reduce the burden on overworked medical providers, engage a wider segment of the community, and offer a more sustainable model for supporting people living with HIV. Additionally, mobile technologies are increasingly seen as promising avenues for ongoing cost-effective communication throughout the treatment cascade. A broader range of communication approaches, traditionally employed in HIV prevention efforts, that address community and sociopolitical levels through mass media, school- or workplace-based education, and entertainment modalities may be useful to interventions seeking to address the full care continuum. Future interventions would benefit from development of a framework that maps appropriate communication theories and approaches onto each step of the care continuum to evaluate the efficacy of communication components on treatment outcomes.

  4. A Role for Health Communication in the Continuum of HIV Care, Treatment, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Tomori, Cecilia; Risher, Kathryn; Limaye, Rupali J.; Lith, Lynn Van; Gibbs, Susannah; Smelyanskaya, Marina; Celentano, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Health communication has played a pivotal role in HIV prevention efforts since the beginning of the epidemic. The recent paradigm of combination prevention, which integrates behavioral, biomedical, and structural interventions, offers new opportunities for employing health communication approaches across the entire continuum of care. We describe key areas where health communication can significantly enhance HIV treatment, care, and prevention, presenting evidence from interventions that include health communication components. These interventions rely primarily on interpersonal communication, especially individual and group counseling, both within and beyond clinical settings to enhance the uptake of and continued engagement in care. Many successful interventions mobilize a network of trained community supporters or accompagnateurs, who provide education, counseling, psychosocial support, treatment supervision and other pragmatic assistance across the care continuum. Community treatment supporters reduce the burden on overworked medical providers, engage a wider segment of the community, and offer a more sustainable model for supporting people living with HIV. Additionally, mobile technologies are increasingly seen as promising avenues for ongoing cost-effective communication throughout the treatment cascade. A broader range of communication approaches, traditionally employed in HIV prevention efforts, that address community and sociopolitical levels through mass media, school- or workplace-based education, and entertainment modalities may be useful to interventions seeking to address the full care continuum. Future interventions would benefit from development of a framework that maps appropriate communication theories and approaches onto each step of the care continuum in order to evaluate the efficacy of communication components on treatment outcomes. PMID:25007201

  5. Marketing in the long-term care continuum.

    PubMed

    Laurence, J Nathan; Kash, Bita A

    2010-04-01

    Today, long-term care facilities are composed of independent, assisted living, and skilled nursing facilities along with many variations of those themes in between. The clientele for these various types of facilities differ because of the level of care the facility provides as well as the amenities long-term care consumers are looking for. However, there many similarities and common approaches to how reaching the target audience through effective marketing activities. Knowing who the target audience is, how to reach them, and how to communicate with them will serve any facility well in this competitive market. Developing marketing strategies for long-term care settings is as important as understanding what elements of care can be marketed individually as a niche market. Determining the market base for a facility is equally crucial since the target populations differ among the three types of facilities. By reviewing current marketing articles and applying marketing practices, we have crafted some general principles for which each facility type can learn from. Finally, we will discuss the types of marketing and how they related to the spectrum of long-term care facilities.

  6. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; Manca, Donna P.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. Methods This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Main findings Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Conclusion Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still

  7. Homeopathy in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    Homeopathy is a controversial system of care that is practiced extensively in Europe, Asia, and South America primarily for functional and minor ailments. In this review, published studies on homeopathic remedies and cancer were examined. Data were obtained from multiple research disciplines, ranging from basic science to scientifically valid animal and clinical studies. The data from a few laboratory experiments in cancer models show some beneficial effect of homeopathic remedies on selected cancer cell lines. However, in the clinical arena, this effect is not clear. Several published outcome studies and some randomized controlled trials have shown that there may be a role for homeopathy in symptom relief and improving quality of life in patients touched by cancer. Such effects have not been demonstrated unequivocally, and specific antitumor effects have not been shown in any controlled clinical research to date, which raises the need for further clinical trials to investigate the use of homeopathy in cancer care.

  8. Translating genomics in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Bombard, Yvonne; Bach, Peter B; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    There is increasing enthusiasm for genomics and its promise in advancing personalized medicine. Genomic information has been used to personalize health care for decades, spanning the fields of cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, endocrinology, metabolic medicine, and hematology. However, oncology has often been the first test bed for the clinical translation of genomics for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Notable hereditary cancer examples include testing for mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in unaffected women to identify those at significantly elevated risk for developing breast and ovarian cancers, and screening patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer for mutations in 4 mismatch repair genes to reduce morbidity and mortality in their relatives. Somatic genomic testing is also increasingly used in oncology, with gene expression profiling of breast tumors and EGFR testing to predict treatment response representing commonly used examples. Health technology assessment provides a rigorous means to inform clinical and policy decision-making through systematic assessment of the evidentiary base, along with precepts of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and consideration of risks and benefits for health care delivery and society. Although this evaluation is a fundamental step in the translation of any new therapeutic, procedure, or diagnostic test into clinical care, emerging developments may threaten this standard. These include "direct to consumer" genomic risk assessment services and the challenges posed by incidental results generated from next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. This article presents a review of the evidentiary standards and knowledge base supporting the translation of key cancer genomic technologies along the continuum of validity, utility, cost-effectiveness, health service impacts, and ethical and societal issues, and offers future research considerations to guide the responsible introduction of

  9. Good continuum of HIV care in Belgium despite weaknesses in retention and linkage to care among migrants.

    PubMed

    Van Beckhoven, D; Florence, E; Ruelle, J; Deblonde, J; Verhofstede, C; Callens, S; Vancutsem, E; Lacor, P; Demeester, R; Goffard, J-C; Sasse, A

    2015-11-03

    The Belgian HIV epidemic is largely concentrated among men who have sex with men and Sub-Saharan Africans. We studied the continuum of HIV care of those diagnosed with HIV living in Belgium and its associated factors. Data on new HIV diagnoses 2007-2010 and HIV-infected patients in care in 2010-2011 were analysed. Proportions were estimated for each sequential stage of the continuum of HIV care and factors associated with attrition at each stage were studied. Of all HIV diagnosed patients living in Belgium in 2011, an estimated 98.2% were linked to HIV care, 90.8% were retained in care, 83.3% received antiretroviral therapy and 69.5% had an undetectable viral load (<50 copies/ml). After adjustment for sex, age at diagnosis, nationality and mode of transmission, we found lower entry into care in non-Belgians and after preoperative HIV diagnoses; lower retention in non-Belgians and injecting drug users; higher retention in men who have sex with men and among those on ART. Younger patients had lower antiretroviral therapy uptake and less viral suppression; those with longer time from diagnosis had higher ART uptake and more viral suppression; Sub-Saharan Africans on ART had slightly less viral suppression. The continuum of HIV care in Belgium presents low attrition rates over all stages. The undiagnosed HIV-infected population, although not precisely estimated, but probably close to 20% based on available survey and surveillance results, could be the weakest stage of the continuum of HIV care. Its identification is a priority along with improving the HIV care continuum of migrants.

  10. Sorting Through the Lost and Found: Are Patient Perceptions of Engagement in Care Consistent with Standard Continuum of Care Measures?

    PubMed Central

    Castel, Amanda D.; Tang, Wenze; Peterson, James; Mikre, Meriam; Parenti, David; Elion, Richard; Wood, Angela; Kuo, Irene; Willis, Sarah; Allen, Sean; Kulie, Paige; Ikwuemesi, Ifeoma; Dassie, Kossia; Dunning, Jillian; Saafir-Callaway, Brittani; Greenberg, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background Indicators for determining one’s status on the HIV care continuum are often measured using clinical and surveillance data but do not typically assess patient perspectives. We assessed patient-reported care status along the care continuum and whether it differed from medical records and surveillance data. Methods Between June 2013–October 2014, a convenience sample of clinic-attending HIV-infected persons was surveyed regarding care-seeking behaviors and self-perceived status along the care continuum. Participant responses were matched to DC Department of Health surveillance data and clinic records. Participants’ care patterns were classified using HRSA-defined care status: in care (IC); sporadic care (SC), or out-of-care (OOC). Semi–structured qualitative interviews were analyzed using an open coding process to elucidate relevant themes regarding participants’ perceptions of engagement in care. Results Of 169 participants, most were male (64%), black (72%), and a mean age of 50.7 years. Using self-reported visit patterns, 115 (68%) were consistent with being IC, 33 (20%) SC, and 21 (12%) OOC. Among OOC participants, 52% perceived themselves to be fully engaged in HIV care. In the prior year, among OOC participants, 71% reported having a non-HIV related medical visit and 90% reported current antiretroviral use. Qualitatively, most SC and OOC persons did not see their HIV providers regularly because they felt healthy. Conclusions Participants’ perceptions of HIV care engagement differed from actual care receipt as measured by surveillance and clinical records. Measures of care engagement may need to be reconsidered as persons not receiving regular HIV care may be accessing other health care and HIV medications elsewhere. PMID:25867778

  11. 24 CFR 578.7 - Responsibilities of the Continuum of Care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... counted as unsheltered homeless persons. (ii) Persons living in emergency shelters and transitional... funded under the Emergency Solutions Grants program and the Continuum of Care program, and report to HUD; (8) In consultation with recipients of Emergency Solutions Grants program funds within the geographic...

  12. 77 FR 59543 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Continuum of Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 578 RIN 2506-AC29 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Continuum of Care Program: Extension of Public Comment Period AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development, HUD. ACTION: Interim rule; extension of comment period...

  13. 76 FR 52676 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Continuum of Care Check-Up...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Continuum of Care Check... lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Continuum of Care Check-up Assessment Tool....

  14. An innovative interdisciplinary approach to self-directed learning with a focus on the continuum of patient care.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Dina; Everson, Claire R

    2004-01-01

    Current regulatory review standards emphasize the hospital's role in providing continuum of care. Today, patient care staff must know more about the "continuum of care" concept so they can help patients more fully understand their treatment and take an active role in their own care. One of the challenges is finding creative and effective ways to get the message across to everyone on the staff. This article describes one approach to self-directed learning that takes into consideration individual learning styles and level of proficiency with a focus on the continuum of patient care.

  15. Patients’ experiences with continuity of cancer care in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Manca, Donna P.; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore patient perspectives on and experiences with the coordination and continuity of cancer care. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants Thirty-eight breast and colorectal cancer survivors 1 to 4 years after diagnosis. Methods Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with the participants. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and proofread. Transcripts were reviewed to create a focused coding scheme that was used to develop categories for participants’ experiences. Main findings Although this study focused on the continuity of cancer care, patients described their experiences with cancer care in general, concentrating predominantly on their relationships with individual health care providers (HCPs). Based on patients’ experiences, several themes were identified as the core components of providing good continuity and well coordinated care. The most important overarching theme was communication, which overlapped with 4 other themes: patient-HCP relationships, the role of HCPs, lack of access to care, and timely and tailored information. Conclusion Patients believed that good communication between HCPs and patients was key to improving the overall continuity of cancer care. Continuity of care is an important theoretical concept in cancer care, but it is not easily recognized by patients. They perceive the cancer care continuum and continuity of care as cancer care in general, which is typically framed by the individual relationships with their HCPs. Future research and interventions need to focus on finding and testing ways to improve communication to enhance continuity of cancer care. PMID:27737982

  16. The 2013 HIV Continuum of Care in Tennessee: Progress Made, but Disparities Persist.

    PubMed

    Wester, Carolyn; Rebeiro, Peter F; Shavor, Thomas J; Shepherd, Bryan E; McGoy, Shanell L; Daley, Benn; Morrison, Melissa; Vermund, Sten H; Pettit, April C

    2016-09-01

    We measured patient engagement in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continuum of care in Tennessee after implementation of enhanced surveillance activities to assess progress toward 2015 statewide goals. We also examined subgroup disparities to identify groups at risk for poor outcomes. We estimated linkage to care, retention in care, and viral suppression among HIV-infected people in Tennessee in 2013, overall and by subgroup, after implementation of enhanced laboratory reporting, address verification, and death-matching procedures. Of 792 people newly diagnosed with HIV infection in 2013, 632 (79.8%) were linked to care, close to the 2015 goal of ≥80%. Of 15 473 people living and diagnosed with HIV infection before 2013, 8458 (54.7%) were retained in care, approaching the 2015 goal of ≥64.0%. A total of 8640 (55.8%) were virally suppressed, surpassing the 2015 goal of ≥51.0%. Compared with people living and diagnosed with HIV infection before 2013, newly diagnosed people were more likely to be younger, male, non-Hispanic black, and men who have sex with men (MSM). For linkage to care, retention in care, and viral suppression, younger and non-Hispanic black people fared worse, whereas females and those enrolled in the Ryan White program fared better. For retention in care and viral suppression, Hispanic people, injection drug users, and East Tennessee residents fared worse than those in Memphis, whereas MSM fared better. Nashville residents fared worse in retention in care than Memphis residents. Tennessee's HIV continuum of care in 2013 showed progress toward 2015 goals. Future efforts to improve the HIV continuum of care should be directed toward vulnerable groups and regions, particularly young, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic people; injection drug users; and residents of the East Tennessee and Nashville regions.

  17. 1.4 GHz continuum sources in the Cancer cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpeter, E. E.; Dickey, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Results of 1.4-GHz continuum observations are presented for 11 VLA fields, using the D-configuration, which contain the A group of the Cnc cluster (CC). Sixteen Zwicky spiral galaxies in the CC were detected, but no ellipticals, confirming the finding that spiral galaxies with close companions tend to have enhanced radio emission. Over 200 continuum sources beyond the CC are tabulated. The spectral index (relative to 610 MHz) is given for many of the sources, including some of the Zwicky galaxies. There is a suggestion for a nonuniform number surface-density distribution of the sources, not correlated with the CC. Possible predictions of such nonuniformities, from assumptions on 'super-superclusters', are discussed.

  18. The HIV Care Continuum among Female Sex Workers: A Key Population in Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Kathryn Elizabeth; Powers, Kimberly A.; Lungu, Thandie; Mmodzi, Pearson; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Chadwick, Katy; Go, Vivian F.; Pence, Brian W.; Hoffman, Irving F.; Miller, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The HIV care continuum among female sex workers (FSW), a key population, has not been well characterized, especially within the generalized epidemics of sub-Saharan Africa. This was the first study to characterize the HIV care continuum among FSW in Lilongwe, Malawi. Methods From July through September 2014, we used venue-based sampling to enroll 200 adult FSW in Lilongwe, Malawi into a cross-sectional evaluation assessing HIV care continuum outcomes. Seropositive FSW, identified using HIV rapid testing, received rapid CD4 counts in addition to viral loads using dried blood spots. We calculated proportions of HIV-infected FSW who had history of care, were on ART, and had suppressed viral load and we used Poisson regression to estimate the associations of demographic characteristics and transmission risk behaviors with each outcome. Results HIV seroprevalence was 69% (n = 138). Among all FSW the median age was 24 years (IQR: 22–28). Among the 20% who were newly diagnosed and reported previously testing negative, the median time since last HIV test was 11 months (interquartile range: 3–17). The majority (69%) of HIV-infected FSW had a history of HIV care, 52% reported current ART use, and 45% were virally suppressed. Of the FSW who reported current ART use, 86% were virally suppressed. Transmission risk behaviors were not associated with continuum outcomes. Conclusions FSW in Lilongwe were predominately young and have a high HIV prevalence. Only half of HIV-infected FSW reported current ART use, but the majority of those on ART were virally suppressed. To reduce ongoing transmission and improve health outcomes, increased HIV testing, care engagement, and ART coverage is urgently needed among FSW. Universal testing and treatment strategies for all FSW in Malawi must be strongly considered. PMID:26808043

  19. Continuum of care for persons with common mental health disorders in Nunavik: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Lily; Fournier, Louise; Gauthier, Josée; Morin, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Changing Directions, Changing Lives, the Mental Health Strategy for Canada, prioritizes the development of coordinated continuums of care in mental health that will bridge the gap in services for Inuit populations. In order to target ways of improving the services provided in these contexts to individuals in Nunavik with depression or anxiety disorders, this research examines delays and disruptions in the continuum of care and clinical, individual and organizational characteristics possibly associated with their occurrences. A total of 155 episodes of care involving a common mental disorder (CMD), incident or recurring, were documented using the clinical records of 79 frontline health and social services (FHSSs) users, aged 14 years and older, living in a community in Nunavik. Each episode of care was divided into 7 stages: (a) detection; (b) assessment; (c) intervention; (d) planning the first follow-up visit; (e) implementation of the first follow-up visit; (f) planning a second follow-up visit; (g) implementation of the second follow-up visit. Sequential analysis of these stages established delays for each one and helped identify when breaks occurred in the continuum of care. Logistic and linear regression analysis determined whether clinical, individual or organizational characteristics influenced the breaks and delays. More than half (62%) the episodes of care were interrupted before the second follow-up. These breaks mostly occurred when planning and completing the first follow-up visit. Episodes of care were more likely to end early when they involved anxiety disorders or symptoms, limited FHSS teams and individuals over 21 years of age. The median delay for the first follow-up visit (30 days) exceeded guideline recommendations significantly (1-2 weeks). Clinical primary care approaches for CMDs in Nunavik are currently more reactive than preventive. This suggests that recovery services for those affected are suboptimal.

  20. Sexual Functioning Along the Cancer Continuum: Focus Group Results from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS™)

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kathryn E.; Jeffery, Diana D.; Keefe, Francis J.; Porter, Laura S.; Shelby, Rebecca A.; Fawzy, Maria R.; Gosselin, Tracy K.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Cancer and treatments for cancer affect specific aspects of sexual functioning and intimacy; however, limited qualitative work has been done in diverse cancer populations. As part of an effort to improve measurement of self-reported sexual functioning, we explored the scope and importance of sexual functioning and intimacy to patients across cancer sites and along the continuum of care. Methods We conducted 16 diagnosis- and sex-specific focus groups with patients recruited from the Duke University tumor registry and oncology/hematology clinics (N=109). A trained note taker produced field notes summarizing the discussions. An independent auditor verified field notes against written transcripts. The content of the discussions was analyzed for major themes by two independent coders. Results Across all cancers, the most commonly discussed cancer- or treatment-related effects on sexual functioning and intimacy were fatigue, treatment-related hair loss, weight gain, and organ loss or scarring. Additional barriers were unique to particular diagnoses, such as shortness of breath in lung cancer, gastrointestinal problems in colorectal cancers, and incontinence in prostate cancer. Sexual functioning and intimacy were considered important to quality of life. While most effects of cancer were considered negative, many participants identified improvements to intimacy after cancer. Conclusion Overall evaluations of satisfaction with sex life did not always correspond to specific aspects of functioning (e.g. erectile dysfunction), presenting a challenge to researchers aiming to measure sexual functioning as an outcome. Health care providers should not assume that level of sexual impairment determines sexual satisfaction and should explore cancer patients’ sexual concerns directly. PMID:20878833

  1. Are Nurse Leaders Prepared to Lead Across the Continuum of Care in the New Paradigm?

    PubMed

    Reitz, O Ed; Malin, Shelly

    2017-05-01

    The movement toward linking reimbursement with outcomes necessitates providing care across a continuum of settings, leading to the need for a new healthcare paradigm. Issues related to shifting to this new paradigm include disagreement about what this paradigm encompasses, the fragmentation of the healthcare system, and overreliance on the medical model as a framework for driving health policy decisions. We advocate for nurse leaders to guide the development of this new paradigm.

  2. The evolving paradigm of adult cancer survivor care.

    PubMed

    Grant, Marcia; Economou, Denice

    2008-04-01

    As a result of earlier diagnosis and improved treatment, the number of cancer survivors is steadily increasing, with over 11 million in the US today. These survivors face a multitude of long-term and late effects as a result of their cancer and its treatment. It is increasingly recognized that this group has complex and ongoing needs for medical care education, surveillance, screening, and support. Many organizations have helped to advance survivorship care; key among them are the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, the Institute of Medicine, the Lance Armstrong Foundation, and the Office of Cancer Survivorship of the National Cancer Institute. Important reports have defined goals of care; identified interventions to improve outcomes among survivors; and recognized the need for posttreatment surveillance, healthy lifestyle behaviors, and continued research in all of these areas. With these advances, survivorship care is emerging as a distinct component of the continuum of care in oncology.

  3. Implementing a continuum of care model for older people—results from a Swedish case study

    PubMed Central

    Dunér, Anna; Blomberg, Staffan; Hasson, Henna

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There is a need for integrated care and smooth collaboration between care-providing organisations and professions to create a continuum of care for frail older people. However, collaboration between organisations and professions is often problematic. The aim of this study was to examine the process of implementing a new continuum of care model in a complex organisational context, and illuminate some of the challenges involved. The introduced model strived to connect three organisations responsible for delivering health and social care to older people: the regional hospital, primary health care and municipal eldercare. Methods The actions of the actors involved in the process of implementing the model were understood to be shaped by the actors' understanding, commitment and ability. This article is based on 44 qualitative interviews performed on four occasions with 26 key actors at three organisational levels within these three organisations. Results and conclusions The results point to the importance of paying regard to the different cultures of the organisations when implementing a new model. The role of upper management emerged as very important. Furthermore, to be accepted, the model has to be experienced as effectively dealing with real problems in the everyday practice of the actors in the organisations, from the bottom to the top. PMID:22128279

  4. Assessing the Continuum of Care Pathway for Maternal Health in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kavita; Story, William T; Moran, Allisyn C

    2016-02-01

    We assess how countries in regions of the world where maternal mortality is highest-South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa-are performing with regards to providing women with vital elements of the continuum of care. Using recent Demographic and Health Survey data from nine countries including 18,036 women, descriptive and multilevel regression analyses were conducted on four key elements of the continuum of care-at least one antenatal care visit, four or more antenatal care visits, delivery with a skilled birth attendant and postnatal checks for the mother within the first 24 h since birth. Family planning counseling within a year of birth was also included in the descriptive analyses. Results indicated that a major drop-out (>50 %) occurs early on in the continuum of care between the first antenatal care visit and four or more antenatal care visits. Few women (<5 %) who do not receive any antenatal care go on to have a skilled delivery or receive postnatal care. Women who receive some or all the elements of the continuum of care have greater autonomy and are richer and more educated than women who receive none of the elements. Understanding where drop-out occurs and who drops out can enable countries to better target interventions. Four or more ANC visits plays a pivotal role within the continuum of care and warrants more programmatic attention. Strategies to ensure that vital services are available to all women are essential in efforts to improve maternal health.

  5. Patterns and determinants of dropout from maternity care continuum in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Joshua O; Afolabi, Rotimi F; Awolude, Olutosin A

    2016-09-27

    The maternal, newborn and child health care continuum require that mother/child pair should receive the full package of antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal care in order to derive maximum benefits. Continuity of care is a challenge in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study, we investigate the patterns and factors associated with dropout in the continuum of maternity (antenatal, delivery and postnatal) care in Nigeria. Using women recode file from the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey, we analysed data on 20,467 women with an index birth within 5 years prior to data collection. Background characteristics and pattern of dropouts were summarised using descriptive statistics. The outcome variable was dropout which we explored in three stages: antenatal, antenatal-delivery, delivery-6 weeks postnatal visit. Multilevel logistic regression models were fitted to identify independent predictors of dropout at each stage. Measure of effect was expressed as Odds Ratio (OR) with 95 % confidence interval (CI). Overall, 12,392 (60.6 %) of all women received antenatal care among whom 38.1 % dropout and never got skilled delivery assistance. Of those who received skilled delivery care, 50.8 % did not attend postnatal visit. The predictors of dropout between antenatal care and delivery include problem with getting money for treatment (OR = 1.18, CI: 1.04-1.34), distance to health facility (OR = 1.31, CI: 1.13-1.52), lack of formal education, being in poor wealth quintile (OR = 2.22, CI: 1.85-2.67), residing in rural areas (OR = 1.98, CI: 1.63-2.41). Regional differences between North East, North West and South West were significant. Between delivery and postnatal visit, the same factors were also associated with dropout. The rate of dropout from maternity care continuum is high in Nigeria and driven by low or lack of formal education, poverty and healthcare access problems (distance to facility and difficulty with getting money for treatment). Unexpectedly

  6. Multi-Level Factors Affecting Entry into and Engagement in the HIV Continuum of Care in Iringa, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Erica H.; Kennedy, Caitlin E.; Beckham, Sarah W.; Mbwambo, Jessie K.; Likindikoki, Samuel; Davis, Wendy W.; Kerrigan, Deanna L.; Brahmbhatt, Heena

    2014-01-01

    Progression through the HIV continuum of care, from HIV testing to lifelong retention in antiretroviral therapy (ART) care and treatment programs, is critical to the success of HIV treatment and prevention efforts. However, significant losses occur at each stage of the continuum and little is known about contextual factors contributing to disengagement at these stages. This study sought to explore multi-level barriers and facilitators influencing entry into and engagement in the continuum of care in Iringa, Tanzania. We used a mixed-methods study design including facility-based assessments and interviews with providers and clients of HIV testing and treatment services; interviews, focus group discussions and observations with community-based providers and clients of HIV care and support services; and longitudinal interviews with men and women living with HIV to understand their trajectories in care. Data were analyzed using narrative analysis to identify key themes across levels and stages in the continuum of care. Participants identified multiple compounding barriers to progression through the continuum of care at the individual, facility, community and structural levels. Key barriers included the reluctance to engage in HIV services while healthy, rigid clinic policies, disrespectful treatment from service providers, stock-outs of supplies, stigma and discrimination, alternate healing systems, distance to health facilities and poverty. Social support from family, friends or support groups, home-based care providers, income generating opportunities and community mobilization activities facilitated engagement throughout the HIV continuum. Findings highlight the complex, multi-dimensional dynamics that individuals experience throughout the continuum of care and underscore the importance of a holistic and multi-level perspective to understand this process. Addressing barriers at each level is important to promoting increased engagement throughout the continuum. PMID

  7. Multi-level factors affecting entry into and engagement in the HIV continuum of care in Iringa, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Layer, Erica H; Kennedy, Caitlin E; Beckham, Sarah W; Mbwambo, Jessie K; Likindikoki, Samuel; Davis, Wendy W; Kerrigan, Deanna L; Brahmbhatt, Heena

    2014-01-01

    Progression through the HIV continuum of care, from HIV testing to lifelong retention in antiretroviral therapy (ART) care and treatment programs, is critical to the success of HIV treatment and prevention efforts. However, significant losses occur at each stage of the continuum and little is known about contextual factors contributing to disengagement at these stages. This study sought to explore multi-level barriers and facilitators influencing entry into and engagement in the continuum of care in Iringa, Tanzania. We used a mixed-methods study design including facility-based assessments and interviews with providers and clients of HIV testing and treatment services; interviews, focus group discussions and observations with community-based providers and clients of HIV care and support services; and longitudinal interviews with men and women living with HIV to understand their trajectories in care. Data were analyzed using narrative analysis to identify key themes across levels and stages in the continuum of care. Participants identified multiple compounding barriers to progression through the continuum of care at the individual, facility, community and structural levels. Key barriers included the reluctance to engage in HIV services while healthy, rigid clinic policies, disrespectful treatment from service providers, stock-outs of supplies, stigma and discrimination, alternate healing systems, distance to health facilities and poverty. Social support from family, friends or support groups, home-based care providers, income generating opportunities and community mobilization activities facilitated engagement throughout the HIV continuum. Findings highlight the complex, multi-dimensional dynamics that individuals experience throughout the continuum of care and underscore the importance of a holistic and multi-level perspective to understand this process. Addressing barriers at each level is important to promoting increased engagement throughout the continuum.

  8. Hypnosis in Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Wortzel, Joshua; Spiegel, David

    2017-07-01

    Cancer affects a growing proportion of the population as survival improves. The illness and its treatment brings a substantial burden of symptoms, including pain, anxiety, insomnia, and grief. Here, the uses of hypnosis in the treatment of these cancer-related problems will be reviewed. The utility of measuring hypnotizability in the clinical setting will be discussed. The current neurobiology of hypnotizability and hypnosis will be reviewed. Methods and results of using hypnosis for pain control in acute and chronic settings will be presented. Effects of hypnotic analgesia in specific brain regions associated with pain reduction, notably the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and the somatosensory cortex, underlies its utility as a potent and side-effect free analgesic. Methods for helping those with cancer to better manage their anxiety, insomnia, and grief will be described. These involve facing disease-related stressors while dissociating the experience from somatic arousal. Given the serious complications of medications widely used to treat pain, anxiety, and insomnia, this article provides methods and an evidence base for wider use of techniques involving hypnosis in cancer care. Altering patients' perception of pain, disease-related stress, and anxiety can help change the reality of their life with cancer.

  9. Validation of the Continuum of Care Conceptual Model for Athletic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lafave, Mark R.; Butterwick, Dale; Eubank, Breda

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of conceptual models in field-based emergency care currently borrows from existing standards of medical and paramedical professions. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a comprehensive conceptual model that could account for injuries ranging from nonurgent to catastrophic events including events that do not follow traditional medical or prehospital care protocols. The conceptual model should represent the continuum of care from the time of initial injury spanning to an athlete's return to participation in their sport. Finally, the conceptual model should accommodate both novices and experts in the AT profession. This paper chronicles the content validation steps of the Continuum of Care Conceptual Model for Athletic Therapy (CCCM-AT). The stages of model development were domain and item generation, content expert validation using a three-stage modified Ebel procedure, and pilot testing. Only the final stage of the modified Ebel procedure reached a priori 80% consensus on three domains of interest: (1) heading descriptors; (2) the order of the model; (3) the conceptual model as a whole. Future research is required to test the use of the CCCM-AT in order to understand its efficacy in teaching and practice within the AT discipline. PMID:26464897

  10. A Coupled Discrete/Continuum Model for Describing Cancer-Therapeutic Transport in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Erbertseder, Karin; Reichold, Johannes; Flemisch, Bernd; Jenny, Patrick; Helmig, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    We propose a computational simulation framework for describing cancer-therapeutic transport in the lung. A discrete vascular graph model (VGM) is coupled to a double-continuum model (DCM) to determine the amount of administered therapeutic agent that will reach the cancer cells. An alveolar cell carcinoma is considered. The processes in the bigger blood vessels (arteries, arterioles, venules and veins) are described by the VGM. The processes in the alveolar capillaries and the surrounding tissue are represented by a continuum approach for porous media. The system of equations of the coupled discrete/continuum model contains terms that account for degradation processes of the therapeutic agent, the reduction of the number of drug molecules by the lymphatic system and the interaction of the drug with the tissue cells. The functionality of the coupled discrete/continuum model is demonstrated in example simulations using simplified pulmonary vascular networks, which are designed to show-off the capabilities of the model rather than being physiologically accurate. PMID:22438873

  11. The postpartum management of women with gestational diabetes using a continuum model for health care.

    PubMed

    Castorino, Kristin; Jovanovič, Lois

    2013-12-01

    Women with gestational diabetes mellitus require a continuum of care before, during, and after pregnancy for optimal management of hyperglycemia. Postpartum education and lifestyle modification should begin during pregnancy, and should continue during the postpartum period. Women should receive education on the long-term risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and should be encouraged to breastfeed, engage in regular physical activity, and select a highly effective contraceptive method in preparation for subsequent pregnancy. Postpartum women with gestational diabetes mellitus should be empowered to take ownership of their own health, including knowledge of health indicators such as weight, waist circumference hemoglobin A1C levels, and fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels.

  12. Telemanagement of Heart Failure Patients Across the Post-Acute Care Continuum.

    PubMed

    Dadosky, Amy; Overbeck, Heather; Barbetta, Laura; Bertke, Ken; Corl, Maureen; Daly, Kathleen; Hiles, Natasha; Rector, Nancy; Chung, Eugene; Menon, Santosh

    2017-09-13

    Heart failure (HF) is a chronic condition causing nearly 1 million hospital admissions annually in the United States with 25% of patients rehospitalized within 30 days. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether telemanagement of HF patients throughout the post-acute continuum of care would reduce rehospitalization rates and improve patient self-care knowledge and satisfaction. HF patients discharged to a skilled nursing facility (SNF) received telemanagement by HF clinicians with opportunity for continuation at home with assistance of home healthcare (HHC) nurses. Wireless sensors worn at SNF and home captured continuous health information visible to HF clinicians on secure cloud database. Point-of-care devices were available at SNF. Patients had scheduled and as-needed video visits with audio and auscultation capacity with HF clinician. HF education was provided by SNF and HHC nursing. Patients were compared with historical control group receiving standard care at same SNF. Patients receiving telemanagement had 29% lower rehospitalization rates (17% vs. 24%), despite higher predicted rehospitalization risk. Median age was 81. Seven of eight patients who were rehospitalized in the telemanagement group had advanced HF symptoms (New York Heart Association Class IV). Five patients in telemanagement group were receiving continuous inotrope infusions. Patients reported good satisfaction and self-care knowledge. Reduction of rehospitalization rates was clinically significant in population of advanced age and HF symptoms. Technology enhanced communication content and timeliness across the post-acute care continuum. Post-acute telemanagement may reduce rehospitalization rates even in high-risk, older HF populations.

  13. Stigma And HIV Care Continuum Outcomes Among Ethiopian Adults Initiating ART.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Susie; Tymejczyk, Olga; Kulkarni, Sarah; Lahuerta, Maria; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Remien, Robert H; Melaku, Zenebe; Nash, Denis; Elul, Batya

    2017-08-22

    Stigma harms the mental health of HIV-positive individuals and reduces adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), but less is known about stigma and other outcomes across the HIV care continuum. Among 1180 Ethiopian adults initiating ART at six urban HIV clinics, we examined the relationship of internalized, anticipated, and enacted stigma to HIV care-related outcomes ascertained by interview (repeat HIV-positive testing, provider vs. self-referred testing, missed clinic visit before ART initiation, eagerness to begin ART) and by abstraction of routinely collected clinical data (late ART initiation, 3-month gap in care following ART initiation). Logistic regression was used to assess the association of each type of stigma with each outcome, adjusting for potential confounders. Scoring higher on each stigma domain was associated with 50%-90% higher odds of repeat HIV-positive testing. High internalized stigma was associated with higher odds of provider vs. self-referred test (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]high vs. low: 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-2.2). Higher anticipated stigma was associated with lower eagerness to begin ART (aORhigh vs. low: 0.55; 0.35-0.87; aORmedium vs. low: 0.45; 95%CI: 0.30-0.69). Any enacted stigma was associated with higher odds of a missed visit (aORany vs. none 1.8; 1.2-2.8). Stigma was not associated with late ART-initiation or with a subsequent gap in care. These findings provide further evidence of the importance of measuring and addressing stigma across the entire care continuum. Future work should test hypotheses about specific stigma domains and outcomes in prospective intervention or observational studies.

  14. Why is continuum of care from home to health facilities essential to improve perinatal survival?

    PubMed

    Bahl, Rajiv; Qazi, Shamim; Darmstadt, Gary L; Martines, Jose

    2010-12-01

    The period around the time of delivery is extremely hazardous for infants in developing countries. After the first week the risk drops sharply, and survival improves markedly. To reduce perinatal mortality, a continuum of care between the home and the various facilities is essential during pregnancy, childbirth and the newborn period. This paper reviews strategies to promote the establishment of this continuum: providing health care within or close to home by frontline workers and increasing the use of services in health facilities through community mobilization and financing strategies. As perinatal care and care for seriously sick children face common challenges and lessons could be learned from successful strategies for management of other illnesses, this paper also reviews intervention models involving community health workers (CHWs) to improve case management of sick children at the household and community levels. Available evidence suggests that the community strategy with the greatest impact on neonatal mortality is home visits by CHWs combined with community mobilization. The same strategy appears to be effective in increasing health facility utilization. An equally effective strategy for increasing health facility utilization seems to be financing health care to remove financial access barriers, particularly using conditional cash transfers or vouchers. Although the availability of information on the effect of community interventions to improve newborn health has increased in the recent past, significant gaps remain. Information on the effectiveness of strategies in different settings, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, cost-effectiveness and sustainability are particularly needed and should be gathered in future studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Impact of Alcohol Use and Related Disorders on the HIV Continuum of Care: a Systematic Review : Alcohol and the HIV Continuum of Care.

    PubMed

    Vagenas, Panagiotis; Azar, Marwan M; Copenhaver, Michael M; Springer, Sandra A; Molina, Patricia E; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol use is highly prevalent globally with numerous negative consequences to human health, including HIV progression, in people living with HIV (PLH). The HIV continuum of care, or treatment cascade, represents a sequence of targets for intervention that can result in viral suppression, which ultimately benefits individuals and society. The extent to which alcohol impacts each step in the cascade, however, has not been systematically examined. International targets for HIV treatment as prevention aim for 90 % of PLH to be diagnosed, 90 % of them to be prescribed with antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 90 % to achieve viral suppression; currently, only 20 % of PLH are virally suppressed. This systematic review, from 2010 through May 2015, found 53 clinical research papers examining the impact of alcohol use on each step of the HIV treatment cascade. These studies were mostly cross-sectional or cohort studies and from all income settings. Most (77 %) found a negative association between alcohol consumption on one or more stages of the treatment cascade. Lack of consistency in measurement, however, reduced the ability to draw consistent conclusions. Nonetheless, the strong negative correlations suggest that problematic alcohol consumption should be targeted, preferably using evidence-based behavioral and pharmacological interventions, to indirectly increase the proportion of PLH achieving viral suppression, to achieve treatment as prevention mandates, and to reduce HIV transmission.

  16. Addressing the continuum of maternal and newborn care in Ghana: implications for policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Engmann, Cyril M; Hodgson, Abraham; Aborigo, Raymond; Adongo, Philip L; Moyer, Cheryl A

    2016-12-01

    Although the past decade has brought global reductions in maternal, infant and child mortality, many low-resource settings have failed to make significant gains relative to their high-income counterparts. In Ghana, nearly 50% of under-five mortality in 2014 could be attributed to deaths during the first 28 days after birth. This article analyses the data across a mixed-methods study of the factors impacting maternal and neonatal care in northern Ghana. The stillbirth and neonatal death study (SANDS) was conducted in 2010 and included both quantitative (N = 20 497) and qualitative data collection (N = 253) to explore the issues associated with the continuum of reproductive health care. Findings were compared against an adaptation of the WHO/UNICEF framework for integrated maternal and newborn care and used to generate concrete recommendations for clinicians, policymakers and programmers across the continuum of care, from pregnancy through delivery and postnatal care. SANDS elucidated epidemiological trends: 40% of neonatal deaths occurred on the first day after birth, and the leading causes of early neonatal mortality were birth asphyxia/injury, infection and complications of prematurity. Qualitative data reflect findings along two axes-community to facility-based care, and pre-pregnancy through the postnatal period. Resulting recommendations include the need to improving clinicians' understanding of and sensitization to local traditional practices, the need for policies to better address quality of care and coordination of training efforts, and the need for comprehensive, integrated programmes that ensure continuity of care from pre-pregnancy through the post-partum period. SANDS illustrates complex medical-social-cultural knowledge, attitudes and practices that span the reproductive period in rural northern Ghana. Data illustrate that not only are the first few days of life critical in infant survival but also there are significant social and cultural

  17. How geographical information systems analysis influences the continuum of patient care.

    PubMed

    Pliskie, Jennifer; Wallenfang, Laura

    2014-01-01

    As the vast repository of data about millions of patients grows, the analysis of this information is changing the provider-patient relationship and influencing the continuum of care for broad swaths of the population. At the same time, while population health management moves from a volume-based model to a value-based one and additional patients seek care due to healthcare reform, hospitals and healthcare networks are evaluating their business models and searching for new revenue streams. Utilizing geographical information systems to model and analyze large amounts of data is helping organizations better understand the characteristics of their patient population, demographic and socioeconomic trends, and shifts in the utilization of healthcare. In turn, organizations can more effectively conduct service line planning, strategic business plans, market growth strategies, and human resource planning. Healthcare organizations that use GIS modeling can set themselves apart by making more informed and objective business strategy decisions.

  18. Assessing the Continuum of Care Pathway for Maternal Health in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kavita; Story, William T.; Moran, Allisyn C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We assess how countries in regions of the world where maternal mortality is highest - South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa - are performing with regards to providing women with vital elements of the continuum of care. Methods Using recent Demographic and Health Survey data from nine countries including 18,036 women, descriptive and multilevel regression analyses were conducted on four key elements of the continuum of care - at least one antenatal care visit, four or more antenatal care visits, delivery with a skilled birth attendant and postnatal checks for the mother within the first 24 hours since birth. Family planning counseling within a year of birth was also included in the descriptive analyses. Results Results indicated that a major drop-out (more than 50%) occurs early on in the continuum of care between the first antenatal care visit and four or more antenatal care visits. Few women (less than 5%) who do not receive any antenatal care go on to have a skilled delivery or receive postnatal care. Women who receive some or all the elements of the continuum of care have greater autonomy and are richer and more educated than women who receive none of the elements. Conclusion Understanding where drop-out occurs and who drops out can enable countries to better target interventions. Four or more ANC visits plays a pivotal role within the continuum of care and warrants more programmatic attention. Strategies to ensure that vital services are available to all women are essential in efforts to improve maternal health. PMID:26511130

  19. Effects of a continuum of care intervention on frail older persons' life satisfaction: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Helene; Hasson, Henna; Kjellgren, Karin; Wilhelmson, Katarina

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse effects of a comprehensive continuum of care (intervention group) on frail older persons' life satisfaction, as compared to those receiving usual care (control group). The intervention included geriatric assessment, case management, interprofessional collaboration, support for relatives and organising of care-planning meetings in older persons' own homes. Improvements in older persons' subjective well-being have been shown in studies including care planning and coordination by a case manager. However, effects of more complex continuum of care interventions on frail older persons' life satisfaction are not well explored. Randomised controlled study. The validated LiSat-11 scale was used in face-to-face interviews to assess older persons' life satisfaction at baseline and at three, six and 12 months after the baseline. The odds ratio for improving or maintaining satisfaction was compared for intervention and control groups from baseline to three-month, three- to six-month as well as six- to 12-month follow-ups. Older persons who received the intervention were more likely to improve or maintain satisfaction than those who received usual care, between 6 and 12 month follow-ups, for satisfaction regarding functional capacity, psychological health and financial situation. A comprehensive continuum of care intervention comprising several components had a positive effect on frail older persons' satisfaction with functional capacity, psychological health and financial situation. Frail older persons represent a great proportion of the persons in need of support from the health care system. Health care professionals need to consider continuum of care interventions' impact on life satisfaction. As life satisfaction is an essential part of older persons' well-being, we propose that policy makers and managers promote comprehensive continuum of care solutions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Continuum of Care Among People Living with Perinatally Acquired HIV Infection in New York City, 2014.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiang; Shah, Dipal; Gill, Balwant; Torian, Lucia V; Braunstein, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    The HIV care continuum outlines the steps from HIV infection to diagnosis, linkage to care, and viral suppression among people living with HIV. We examined data for steps along the HIV care continuum among people living with perinatally acquired infection in New York City using surveillance data. This study included data for people who acquired HIV infection perinatally and lived in New York City as of December 31, 2014. We defined "in care" as having ≥1 CD4 or viral load test in 2014, "in continuous care" as having ≥2 CD4 or viral load tests ≥3 months apart in 2014, and "virally suppressed" as having a viral load of #200 copies per milliliter in the most recent test in 2014. We estimated factors associated with viral suppression from a weighted log-binomial regression model that included sex, race/ethnicity, age, and country of birth as independent variables. As of December 31, 2014, an estimated 1,596 people were living with perinatally acquired HIV infection in New York City. All were diagnosed, 96% were in care, 80% were in continuous care, and 61% were virally suppressed. The multivariable analysis showed significant differences in viral suppression by race/ethnicity and age. Black patients (59%, 534/907) were the least likely of all racial/ethnic groups examined to have a suppressed viral load. By age, compared with 73% (80/109) of children aged 0-12 years who were virally suppressed, 58% (568/987) of adults aged 20-29 years and 56% (54/96) of adults aged 30-39 years were virally suppressed; the adjusted prevalence ratio was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69, 0.92) for those aged 20-29 years and 0.79 (95% CI 0.63, 0.99) for those aged 30-39 years. The low level of viral suppression among people living with perinatally acquired infection found in this study warrants further exploration to identify the best management strategies to improve viral suppression in this population, especially those transitioning from pediatric to adult health care.

  1. Cancer patient satisfaction with care.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, J H; Donovan, K O; Redman, S; Sanson-Fisher, R W

    1990-08-01

    A diagnosis of cancer places considerable stress on patients and requires them to make major adjustments in many areas of their lives. As a consequence, considerable demands are placed on health care providers to satisfy the complex care needs of cancer patients. Currently, there is little available information to indicate the extent to which cancer patients are satisfied with the quality of care they receive. The present study assessed the perceptions of 232 ambulatory cancer patients about the importance of and satisfaction with the following aspects of care: doctors technical competence and interpersonal and communication skills, accessibility and continuity of care, hospital and clinic care, nonmedical care, family care, and finances. The results indicate that all 60 questionnaire items used were considered to reflect important aspects of care, but that greater importance was given to the technical quality of medical care, the interpersonal and communication skills of doctors, and the accessibility of care. Most patients were satisfied with the opportunities provided to discuss their needs with doctors, the interpersonal support of doctors, and the technical competence of doctors. However, few patients were satisfied with the provision of information concerning their disease, treatment, and symptom control and the provision of care in the home and to family and friends.

  2. Measuring Patients' Experience of Rehabilitation Services Across the Care Continuum. Part II: Key Dimensions.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Josephine; McNeil, Heather; Lafortune, Claire; Black, Samantha; Prorok, Jeanette; Stolee, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To identify key dimensions of patients' experience across the rehabilitative care system and to recommend a framework to develop survey items that measure the rehabilitative care experience. Data were sourced from a literature review that searched MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL (Ebsco), and PsycINFO (APA PsycNET) databases from 2004 to 2014, the reference lists of the final accepted articles, and hand searches of relevant journals. Four reviewers performed the screening process on 2472 articles; 33 were included for analysis. Interrater reliability was confirmed through 2 rounds of title review and 1 round of abstract review, with an average κ score of .69. The final sample of 33 accepted articles was imported into a qualitative data analysis software application. Multiple levels of coding and a constant comparative methodology generated 6 themes. There were 502 discreet survey questions measuring patient experience that were categorized using the following dimensions: rehabilitative care ecosystem, client and informal caregiver engagement, patient and health care provider relation, pain and functional status, group and individual identity, and open ended. The most common survey questions examine the care delivery ecosystem (37%), the engagement of clients and their informal caregivers (24.9%), and the quality of relations between providers and patients (21.7%). Examination of patient's functional status and management of pain yielded (15.3%) of the instruments' questions. Currently available instruments and questions that measure patients' experience in rehabilitative care are unable to assess the performance of rehabilitative delivery systems that aspire to integrate care across the continuum. However, question panels derived from our 6 key themes may measure the key concepts that define rehabilitative care and facilitate measurement of patient experience at the system level. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc

  3. Your cancer care team

    MedlinePlus

    Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Nutrition during and after cancer treatment. Updated June 2016. www.eatright.org/resource/health/diseases-and-conditions/cancer/nutrition-during-and-after-cancer-treatment . Accessed July 15, ...

  4. Palliative care in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Suhatno

    2000-05-01

    1. Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer in females and also the most frequent among female genital cancers. 2. Ever though the modality of diagnostic procedures for early detection has improved, in fact most of the patients present in the late stages, so the disease is already incurable, and palliative care is really needed. 3. Palliative care is needed not only for the terminally ill patients, but can be started at the time the cancer is diagnosed. 4. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach requiring teamwork. 5. Palliative care in Indonesia, especially in Dr. Soetomo Hospital, is a new modality in the fight against cancer, so we suffer many disadvantages, e.g., disability, limitation, lack of experience. However, such problems will stimulate the team to learn more.

  5. Accountability across the Continuum: The Participation of Postacute Care Providers in Accountable Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Colla, Carrie H; Lewis, Valerie A; Bergquist, Savannah L; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-08-01

    To examine the extent to which accountable care organizations (ACOs) formally incorporate postacute care providers. The National Survey of ACOs (N = 269, response rate 66 percent). We report statistics on ACOs' formal inclusion of postacute care providers and the organizational characteristics and clinical capabilities of ACOs that have postacute care. Half of ACOs formally include at least one postacute service, with inclusion at higher rates in ACOs with commercial (64 percent) and Medicaid contracts (70 percent) compared to ACOs with Medicare contracts only (45 percent). ACOs that have a formal relationship with a postacute provider are more likely to have advanced transition management, end of life planning, readmission prevention, and care management capabilities. Many ACOs have not formally engaged postacute care, which may leave room to improve service integration and care management. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  6. Syndemic vulnerability, sexual and injection risk behaviors, and HIV continuum of care outcomes in HIV-positive injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Yuko; Purcell, David W.; Knowlton, Amy R.; Wilkinson, James D.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Knight, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Limited investigations have been conducted on syndemics and HIV continuum of care outcomes. Using baseline data from a multi-site, randomized controlled study of HIV-positive injection drug users (n=1052), we examined whether psychosocial factors co-occurred, and whether these factors were additively associated with behavioral and HIV continuum of care outcomes. Experiencing one type of psychosocial problem was significantly (p<0.05) associated with an increased odds of experiencing another type of problem. Persons with 3 or more psychosocial problems were significantly more likely to report sexual and injection risk behaviors and were less likely to be adherent to HIV medications. Persons with 4 or more problems were less likely to be virally suppressed. Reporting any problems was associated with not currently taking HIV medications. Our findings highlight the association of syndemics not only with risk behaviors, but also with outcomes related to the continuum of care for HIV-positive persons. PMID:25249392

  7. An evaluation of access to health care services along the rural-urban continuum in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies comparing the access to health care of rural and urban populations have been contradictory and inconclusive. These studies are complicated by the influence of other factor which have been shown to be related to access and utilization. This study assesses the equity of access to health care services across the rural-urban continuum in Canada before and after taking other determinants of access into account. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of the population of the 10 provinces of Canada using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS 2.1). Five different measures of access and utilization are compared across the continuum of rural-urban. Known determinants of utilization are taken into account according to Andersen's Health Behaviour Model (HBM); location of residence at the levels of province, health region, and community is also controlled for. Results This study found that residents of small cities not adjacent to major centres, had the highest reported utilisation rates of influenza vaccines and family physician services, were most likely to have a regular medical doctor, and were most likely to report unmet need. Among the rural categories there was a gradient with the most rural being least likely to have had a flu shot, use specialist physicians services, or have a regular medical doctor. Residents of the most urban centres were more likely to report using specialist physician services. Many of these differences are diminished or eliminated once other factors are accounted for. After adjusting for other factors those living in the most urban areas were more likely to have seen a specialist physician. Those in rural communities had a lower odds of receiving a flu shot and having a regular medical doctor. People residing in the most urban and most rural communities were less likely to have a regular medical doctor. Those in any of the rural categories were less likely to report unmet need. Conclusion Inequities in access to

  8. A Review of Social Media Technologies Across the Global HIV Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Garett, Renee; Smith, Justin; Young, Sean D.

    2016-01-01

    HIV remains one of the main health global threats of the 21st century. There is a great need to reach HIV at-risk and HIV+ populations across the HIV care continuum to improve HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. New technologies, such as Social Media (SM) and Social Networking Sites (SNS) have shown early promise in HIV research studies. To assess the state of research on the use of SM/SNSs across the HIV continuum, we conducted a systematic literature review on HIV-related research using SM during the last 10 years. A total of 44 papers were identified, of which 17 (38.6%) were classified as intervention studies and 19 (61.3%) as observational. The focus areas of the studies was evenly distributed between outreach outreach/recruitment (n=15, 34.1%), surveillance/observation (n=13, 29.5%) and prevention/treatment (n=16, 36.4%). Researchers engaged the community through Facebook (n=26, 59.1%), multiple-platforms (n=13, 29.5%), or one of several geo-social networking sites (n=10, 22.7%). Studies primarily targeted MSM (n=24, 54.5%) and youth (n=13, 29.5%) with little research focused on HIV+ populations (n=5, 11.4%). The current state of the field, trends, and limitations of this work are discussed. PMID:26925455

  9. A Review of Social Media Technologies Across the Global HIV Care Continuum.

    PubMed

    Garett, Renee; Smith, Justin; Young, Sean D

    2016-06-01

    HIV remains one of the main health global threats of the 21(st) century. There is a great need to reach HIV at-risk and HIV+ populations across the HIV care continuum to improve HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. New technologies, such as Social Media (SM) and Social Networking Sites (SNS) have shown early promise in HIV research studies. To assess the state of research on the use of SM/SNSs across the HIV continuum, we conducted a systematic literature review on HIV-related research using SM during the last 10 years. A total of 44 papers were identified, of which 17 (38.6%) were classified as intervention studies and 19 (61.3%) as observational. The focus areas of the studies was evenly distributed between outreach outreach/recruitment (n=15, 34.1%), surveillance/observation (n=13, 29.5%) and prevention/treatment (n=16, 36.4%). Researchers engaged the community through Facebook (n=26, 59.1%), multiple-platforms (n=13, 29.5%), or one of several geo-social networking sites (n=10, 22.7%). Studies primarily targeted MSM (n=24, 54.5%) and youth (n=13, 29.5%) with little research focused on HIV+ populations (n=5, 11.4%). The current state of the field, trends, and limitations of this work are discussed.

  10. Ongoing HIV Transmission and the HIV Care Continuum in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Anna B.; Powers, Kimberly A.; Kuruc, JoAnn D.; Leone, Peter A.; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Ping, Li-Hua; Kincer, Laura P.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Mobley, Victoria L.; Foust, Evelyn; Gay, Cynthia L.; Eron, Joseph J.; Cohen, Myron S.; Miller, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV transmission is influenced by status awareness and receipt of care and treatment. We analyzed these attributes of named partners of persons with acute HIV infection (index AHI cases) to characterize the transmission landscape in North Carolina (NC). Design Secondary analysis of programmatic data. Methods We used data from the NC Screening and Tracing of Active Transmission Program (2002–2013) to determine HIV status (uninfected, AHI, or chronic HIV infection [CHI]), diagnosis status (new or previously-diagnosed), and care and treatment status (not in care, in care and not on treatment, in care and on treatment) of index AHI cases' named partners. We developed an algorithm identifying the most likely transmission source among known HIV-infected partners to estimate the proportion of transmissions arising from contact with persons at different HIV continuum stages. We conducted a complementary analysis among a subset of index AHI cases and partners with phylogenetically-linked viruses. Results Overall, 358 index AHI cases named 932 partners, of which 218 were found to be HIV-infected (162 (74.3%) previously-diagnosed, 11 (5.0%) new AHI, 45 (20.6%) new CHI). Most transmission events appeared attributable to previously-diagnosed partners (77.4%, 95% confidence interval 69.4–85.3%). Among these previously-diagnosed partners, 23.2% (14.0–32.3%) were reported as in care and on treatment near the index AHI case diagnosis date. In the subset study of 33 phylogenetically-linked cases and partners, 60.6% of partners were previously diagnosed (43.9–77.3%). Conclusions A substantial proportion of HIV transmission in this setting appears attributable to contact with previously-diagnosed partners, reinforcing the need for improved engagement in care after diagnosis. PMID:26042804

  11. Ongoing HIV Transmission and the HIV Care Continuum in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Cope, Anna B; Powers, Kimberly A; Kuruc, JoAnn D; Leone, Peter A; Anderson, Jeffrey A; Ping, Li-Hua; Kincer, Laura P; Swanstrom, Ronald; Mobley, Victoria L; Foust, Evelyn; Gay, Cynthia L; Eron, Joseph J; Cohen, Myron S; Miller, William C

    2015-01-01

    HIV transmission is influenced by status awareness and receipt of care and treatment. We analyzed these attributes of named partners of persons with acute HIV infection (index AHI cases) to characterize the transmission landscape in North Carolina (NC). Secondary analysis of programmatic data. We used data from the NC Screening and Tracing of Active Transmission Program (2002-2013) to determine HIV status (uninfected, AHI, or chronic HIV infection [CHI]), diagnosis status (new or previously-diagnosed), and care and treatment status (not in care, in care and not on treatment, in care and on treatment) of index AHI cases' named partners. We developed an algorithm identifying the most likely transmission source among known HIV-infected partners to estimate the proportion of transmissions arising from contact with persons at different HIV continuum stages. We conducted a complementary analysis among a subset of index AHI cases and partners with phylogenetically-linked viruses. Overall, 358 index AHI cases named 932 partners, of which 218 were found to be HIV-infected (162 (74.3%) previously-diagnosed, 11 (5.0%) new AHI, 45 (20.6%) new CHI). Most transmission events appeared attributable to previously-diagnosed partners (77.4%, 95% confidence interval 69.4-85.3%). Among these previously-diagnosed partners, 23.2% (14.0-32.3%) were reported as in care and on treatment near the index AHI case diagnosis date. In the subset study of 33 phylogenetically-linked cases and partners, 60.6% of partners were previously diagnosed (43.9-77.3%). A substantial proportion of HIV transmission in this setting appears attributable to contact with previously-diagnosed partners, reinforcing the need for improved engagement in care after diagnosis.

  12. A systematic review of recent smartphone, Internet and Web 2.0 interventions to address the HIV continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; Nekkanti, Manali; Bauermeister, Jose; Bull, Sheana; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2015-03-01

    eHealth, mHealth and "Web 2.0" social media strategies can effectively reach and engage key populations in HIV prevention across the testing, treatment, and care continuum. To assess how these tools are currently being used within the field of HIV prevention and care, we systematically reviewed recent (2013-2014) published literature, conference abstracts, and funded research. Our searches identified 23 published intervention studies and 32 funded projects underway. In this synthesis we describe the technology modes applied and the stages of the HIV care cascade addressed, including both primary and secondary prevention activities. Overall trends include use of new tools including social networking sites, provision of real-time assessment and feedback, gamification and virtual reality. While there has been increasing attention to use of technology to address the care continuum, gaps remain around linkage to care, retention in care, and initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

  13. A Systematic Review of Recent Smartphone, Internet and Web 2.0 Interventions to Address the HIV Continuum of Care

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn E.; Nekkanti, Manali; Bauermeister, Jose; Bull, Sheana

    2015-01-01

    eHealth, mHealth and “Web 2.0” social media strategies can effectively reach and engage key populations in HIV prevention across the testing, treatment, and care continuum. To assess how these tools are currently being used within the field of HIV prevention and care, we systematically reviewed recent (2013–2014) published literature, conference abstracts, and funded research. Our searches identified 23 published intervention studies and 32 funded projects underway. In this synthesis we describe the technology modes applied and the stages of the HIV care cascade addressed, including both primary and secondary prevention activities. Overall trends include use of new tools including social networking sites, provision of real-time assessment and feedback, gamification and virtual reality. While there has been increasing attention to use of technology to address the care continuum, gaps remain around linkage to care, retention in care, and initiation of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25626718

  14. Postacute Care in Cancer Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Fu, Jack B; Guo, Hong; Camp, Jennifer; Shin, Ki Y; Tu, Shi-Ming; Palmer, Lynn J; Yadav, Rajesh

    2017-02-01

    Acute care is usually associated with disease progression, treatments for cancer, and medical comorbidities. Patients with cancer may develop sudden functional deficits that require rehabilitation. Some of these patients benefit from acute rehabilitation, others benefit from subacute rehabilitation. After acute rehabilitation, continuous care for these patients has not been well described. Three studies are presented to demonstrate that cancer rehabilitation is a continuous process. Rehabilitation professionals should know how to detect fall risk, monitor symptoms, and render symptom management. Patients with cancer often require rehabilitation services during their entire disease trajectory.

  15. Healthcare utilization in community-acquired pneumonia episodes of care: a comparison across the continuum of managed care.

    PubMed

    Landsman, Pamela B; Smith, Dean G; Fendrick, A Mark

    2009-10-01

    Compare healthcare utilization and total payments for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) episodes-of-care among 5 health plan designs spanning the continuum of managed care. Medical and prescription claims analysis of CAP episodes among enrollees of employer-sponsored health plans. Episode characteristics, healthcare utilization, and payments were compared across fee-for-service, Preferred Provider Organizations (PPO), point of service, partial capitation, and Health Maintenance Organizations as defined by the employers. Medstat Episode of Care Grouper Version 2.1.5 was employed to create episodes of CAP care. Categorical and continuous measures of patient and care characteristics across plan designs were compared by chi tests and one-way analysis-of-variance as appropriate. Total per-episode payments for provided services across plan designs were compared using a general linear model with a log-link function and gamma distribution. Greater average patient age, episode severity, number of office visits, rate of hospitalization, length of stay, and inpatient mortality overall were found within PPO episodes compared with all other plan designs. Total episode payments controlling for age, sex, disease severity, and geography were greatest among PPO episodes and attributed largely to more office visits and longer lengths of hospital stays compared with other plan types. As previously shown among other patient populations and conditions, PPO episodes of CAP are associated with greater total payments due in large part to increased resource utilization among the episodes of lowest severity.

  16. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus Continuum of Care in European Union Countries in 2013: Data and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Gourlay, Annabelle; Noori, Teymur; Pharris, Anastasia; Axelsson, Maria; Costagliola, Dominique; Cowan, Susan; Croxford, Sara; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Del Amo, Julia; Delpech, Valerie; Díaz, Asunción; Girardi, Enrico; Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer, Barbara; Hernando, Victoria; Jose, Sophie; Leierer, Gisela; Nikolopoulos, Georgios; Obel, Niels; Op de Coul, Eline; Paraskeva, Dimitra; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Sasse, André; Schmid, Daniela; Sonnerborg, Anders; Spina, Alexander; Suligoi, Barbara; Supervie, Virginie; Touloumi, Giota; Van Beckhoven, Dominique; van Sighem, Ard; Vourli, Georgia; Zangerle, Robert; Porter, Kholoud

    2017-06-15

    The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has set a "90-90-90" target to curb the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic by 2020, but methods used to assess whether countries have reached this target are not standardized, hindering comparisons. Through a collaboration formed by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) with European HIV cohorts and surveillance agencies, we constructed a standardized, 4-stage continuum of HIV care for 11 European Union countries for 2013. Stages were defined as (1) number of people living with HIV in the country by end of 2013; (2) proportion of stage 1 ever diagnosed; (3) proportion of stage 2 that ever initiated ART; and (4) proportion of stage 3 who became virally suppressed (≤200 copies/mL). Case surveillance data were used primarily to derive stages 1 (using back-calculation models) and 2, and cohort data for stages 3 and 4. In 2013, 674500 people in the 11 countries were estimated to be living with HIV, ranging from 5500 to 153400 in each country. Overall HIV prevalence was 0.22% (range, 0.09%-0.36%). Overall proportions of each previous stage were 84% diagnosed, 84% on ART, and 85% virally suppressed (60% of people living with HIV). Two countries achieved ≥90% for all stages, and more than half had reached ≥90% for at least 1 stage. European Union countries are nearing the 90-90-90 target. Reducing the proportion undiagnosed remains the greatest barrier to achieving this target, suggesting that further efforts are needed to improve HIV testing rates. Standardizing methods to derive comparable continuums of care remains a challenge.

  17. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus Continuum of Care in European Union Countries in 2013: Data and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Teymur; Pharris, Anastasia; Axelsson, Maria; Costagliola, Dominique; Cowan, Susan; Croxford, Sara; d’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; del Amo, Julia; Delpech, Valerie; Díaz, Asunción; Girardi, Enrico; Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer, Barbara; Hernando, Victoria; Jose, Sophie; Leierer, Gisela; Nikolopoulos, Georgios; Obel, Niels; Op de Coul, Eline; Paraskeva, Dimitra; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Sasse, André; Schmid, Daniela; Sonnerborg, Anders; Spina, Alexander; Suligoi, Barbara; Supervie, Virginie; Touloumi, Giota; Van Beckhoven, Dominique; van Sighem, Ard; Vourli, Georgia; Zangerle, Robert; Porter, Kholoud

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has set a “90-90-90” target to curb the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic by 2020, but methods used to assess whether countries have reached this target are not standardized, hindering comparisons. Methods. Through a collaboration formed by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) with European HIV cohorts and surveillance agencies, we constructed a standardized, 4-stage continuum of HIV care for 11 European Union countries for 2013. Stages were defined as (1) number of people living with HIV in the country by end of 2013; (2) proportion of stage 1 ever diagnosed; (3) proportion of stage 2 that ever initiated ART; and (4) proportion of stage 3 who became virally suppressed (≤200 copies/mL). Case surveillance data were used primarily to derive stages 1 (using back-calculation models) and 2, and cohort data for stages 3 and 4. Results. In 2013, 674500 people in the 11 countries were estimated to be living with HIV, ranging from 5500 to 153400 in each country. Overall HIV prevalence was 0.22% (range, 0.09%–0.36%). Overall proportions of each previous stage were 84% diagnosed, 84% on ART, and 85% virally suppressed (60% of people living with HIV). Two countries achieved ≥90% for all stages, and more than half had reached ≥90% for at least 1 stage. Conclusions. European Union countries are nearing the 90-90-90 target. Reducing the proportion undiagnosed remains the greatest barrier to achieving this target, suggesting that further efforts are needed to improve HIV testing rates. Standardizing methods to derive comparable continuums of care remains a challenge. PMID:28369283

  18. Engagement in the HIV Care Continuum among Key Populations in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laramie R; Patterson, Thomas L; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Ojeda, Victoria D; Burgos, Jose Luis; Rojas, Sarah A; Zúñiga, María Luisa; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2016-05-01

    In Tijuana, Mexico, HIV is concentrated in sub-epidemics of key populations: persons who inject drugs (PWID), sex workers (SW), and men who have sex with men (MSM). To date, data on engagement in the HIV care continuum among these key populations, particularly in resource-constrained settings, are sparse. We pooled available epidemiological data from six studies (N = 3368) to examine HIV testing and treatment uptake in these key populations; finding an overall HIV prevalence of 5.7 %. Of the 191 identified HIV-positive persons, only 11.5 % knew their HIV-positive status and 3.7 % were on ART. Observed differences between these HIV-positive key populations suggest PWID (vs. non-PWID) were least likely to have previously tested or initiate HIV care. MSM (vs. non-MSM) were more likely to have previously tested but not more likely to know their HIV-positive status. Of persons aware of their HIV-positive status, SW (vs. non-SW) were more likely to initiate HIV care. Findings suggest engagement of key populations in HIV treatment is far below estimates observed for similarly resource-constrained generalized epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa. These data provide one of the first empirical-snapshots highlighting the extent of HIV treatment disparities in key populations.

  19. Engagement in the HIV Care Continuum among Key Populations in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Laramie R; Patterson, Thomas L.; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Ojeda, Victoria D.; Burgos, Luis Jose; Rojas, Sarah A.; Zúñiga, María Luisa; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2015-01-01

    In Tijuana, Mexico, HIV is concentrated in sub-epidemics of key populations: persons who inject drugs (PWID), sex workers (SW), and men who have sex with men (MSM). To date, data on engagement in the HIV care continuum among these key populations, particularly in resource-constrained settings, are sparse. We pooled available epidemiological data from six studies (N=3,368) to examine HIV testing and treatment uptake in these key populations; finding an overall HIV prevalence of 5.7%. Of the 191 identified HIV-positive persons, only 11.5% knew their HIV-positive status and 3.7% were on ART. Observed differences between these HIV-positive key populations suggest PWID (vs. non-PWID) were least likely to have previously tested or initiate HIV care. MSM (vs. non-MSM) were more likely to have previously tested but not more likely to know their HIV-positive status. Of persons aware of their HIV-positive status, SW (vs. non-SW) were more likely to initiate HIV care. Findings suggest engagement of key populations in HIV treatment is far below estimates observed for similarly resource-constrained generalized epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa. These data provide one of the first empirical-snapshots highlighting the extent of HIV treatment disparities in key populations. PMID:26354518

  20. Perceived value of stroke outcome measures across the post-acute care continuum: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Danzl, Megan M; Hunter, Elizabeth G

    2013-04-01

    Connecting the continuum of post-acute care stroke services may be important for easing patients' transition between settings and facilitating recovery and community reintegration. The use of outcome measures is suggested as one means of connecting the continuum. The purpose of this qualitative case study is to describe administrators' and physiotherapists' perceived value of an outcomes program across the post-acute care stroke continuum at a rehabilitation hospital. Data were collected through individual interviews and focus groups with 18 participants. Three themes emerged on the value of the outcomes program: 1) enhanced communication; 2) supports clinical decision-making; and 3) value of objective data. These findings lend support for the use of standardized outcome measures by physiotherapists in stroke rehabilitation. Findings from this study may be useful for organizations and physiotherapists who wish to integrate outcome measures into practice.

  1. Damage control and point of injury care: extending the care continuum to military prehospital providers.

    PubMed

    Hetzler, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Damage control principles are well founded, well proven, and have been incorporated into many specialties of clinical care in both military and civilian practice. Theories regarding hemostatic and hypovolemic resuscitation and preventing the Lethal Triad have had profound effects on the survival of wounded during the present conflicts. As we continue to refine these practices, implementation of this theory should be extended to military prehospital providers. The impacts of damage control practices from those providing initial treatment could complete the continuity of care, prime patients for additional success, and affect overall morbidity and mortality. The basic tenets of damage control theory are easily transferred to the Role I provider in the field and may even address their unique requirements more appropriately. Understanding the working concept of damage control would improve decision-making skills in both therapeutics and evacuation while managing casualties in the uncontrolled environment of combat. Military prehospital damage control differs greatly from in-hospital use, in that the principles must incorporate both medical and tactical considerations for care of the wounded. Introducing damage control principles to established casualty care guidelines will recognize and unite an often underappreciated level of care into a successful practice.

  2. The providers' coordination of care: a model for collaboration across the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Maria E

    2008-01-01

    With guidance from Health Services Advisory Group, the Arizona Medicare Quality Improvement Organization, a Prescott, Arizona, workgroup consisting of a hospital, nursing home, and 2 home health agencies have come together to improve continuity of care as related to pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. Weekly, then monthly, meetings were held to develop recommendations for practice standardization, a treatment grid for easy reference, an educational module with posttests, and standardized physicians' orders, which were developed and disseminated to the local provider community. More than 200 staff members were educated at Yavapai Regional Medical Center (YRMC), local skilled nursing facilities, and home health agencies. In addition, new employees and nursing students are now educated on the Providers' Coordination of Care Educational Module at YRMC. The Module has been placed on the hospital's Web site and offered free to all interested parties. With pressure being mounted by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG), and the general public, the role of the case manager (in all practice settings) will increasingly become more crucial. Through development of a network of local venues of care, the case manager can facilitate care transitions throughout the healthcare system with the goal of improved outcomes for the patient regardless of setting. Providing the right care, in the right setting to improve patient care, can only benefit our aging and declining populations. Cross-setting work will become more essential as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services goal of pay-for-performance is realized across all care settings. As a national priority, pressure ulcer prevention and treatment needs to be embraced by all settings. It serves the patient, as well as the healthcare providers, to improve care regardless of setting or competition. Positive results can be accomplished if the best interests of the patient are kept

  3. Continuum of Care in a Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Program in Ghana: Low Completion Rate and Multiple Obstacle Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yeji, Francis; Shibanuma, Akira; Oduro, Abraham; Debpuur, Cornelius; Kikuchi, Kimiyo; Owusu-Agei, Seth; Gyapong, Margaret; Okawa, Sumiyo; Ansah, Evelyn; Asare, Gloria Quansah; Nanishi, Keiko; Williams, John; Addei, Sheila; Tawiah, Charlotte; Yasuoka, Junko; Enuameh, Yeetey; Sakeah, Evelyn; Wontuo, Peter; Jimba, Masamine; Hodgson, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Background Slow progress has been made in achieving the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in Ghana. Ensuring continuum of care (at least four antenatal visits; skilled birth attendance; postnatal care within 48 hours, at two weeks, and six weeks) for mother and newborn is crucial in helping Ghana achieve these goals and beyond. This study examined the levels and factors associated with continuum of care (CoC) completion among Ghanaian women aged 15–49. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted among women who experienced live births between January 2011 and April 2013 in three regions of Ghana. In a two-stage random sampling method, 1,500 women with infants were selected and interviewed about maternal and newborn service usage in line with CoC. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with CoC completion. Results Only 8.0% had CoC completion; the greatest gap and contributor to the low CoC was detected between delivery and postnatal care within 48 hours postpartum. About 95% of women had a minimum of four antenatal visits and postnatal care at six weeks postpartum. A total of 75% had skilled assisted delivery and 25% received postnatal care within 48 hours. Factors associated with CoC completion at 95% CI were geographical location (OR = 0.35, CI 0.13–0.39), marital status (OR = 0.45; CI 0.22–0.95), education (OR = 2.71; CI 1.11–6.57), transportation (OR = 1.97; CI 1.07–3.62), and beliefs about childhood illnesses (OR = 0.34; CI0.21–0.61). Conclusion The continuum of care completion rate is low in the study site. Efforts should focus on increasing postnatal care within 48 hours and overcoming the known obstacles to increasing the continuum of care completion rate. PMID:26650388

  4. Continuum of Care in a Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Program in Ghana: Low Completion Rate and Multiple Obstacle Factors.

    PubMed

    Yeji, Francis; Shibanuma, Akira; Oduro, Abraham; Debpuur, Cornelius; Kikuchi, Kimiyo; Owusu-Agei, Seth; Gyapong, Margaret; Okawa, Sumiyo; Ansah, Evelyn; Asare, Gloria Quansah; Nanishi, Keiko; Williams, John; Addei, Sheila; Tawiah, Charlotte; Yasuoka, Junko; Enuameh, Yeetey; Sakeah, Evelyn; Wontuo, Peter; Jimba, Masamine; Hodgson, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Slow progress has been made in achieving the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in Ghana. Ensuring continuum of care (at least four antenatal visits; skilled birth attendance; postnatal care within 48 hours, at two weeks, and six weeks) for mother and newborn is crucial in helping Ghana achieve these goals and beyond. This study examined the levels and factors associated with continuum of care (CoC) completion among Ghanaian women aged 15-49. A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted among women who experienced live births between January 2011 and April 2013 in three regions of Ghana. In a two-stage random sampling method, 1,500 women with infants were selected and interviewed about maternal and newborn service usage in line with CoC. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with CoC completion. Only 8.0% had CoC completion; the greatest gap and contributor to the low CoC was detected between delivery and postnatal care within 48 hours postpartum. About 95% of women had a minimum of four antenatal visits and postnatal care at six weeks postpartum. A total of 75% had skilled assisted delivery and 25% received postnatal care within 48 hours. Factors associated with CoC completion at 95% CI were geographical location (OR = 0.35, CI 0.13-0.39), marital status (OR = 0.45; CI 0.22-0.95), education (OR = 2.71; CI 1.11-6.57), transportation (OR = 1.97; CI 1.07-3.62), and beliefs about childhood illnesses (OR = 0.34; CI0.21-0.61). The continuum of care completion rate is low in the study site. Efforts should focus on increasing postnatal care within 48 hours and overcoming the known obstacles to increasing the continuum of care completion rate.

  5. High Drop-off Along the HIV Care Continuum and ART Interruption Among Female Sex Workers in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Zulliger, Rose; Barrington, Clare; Donastorg, Yeycy; Perez, Martha; Kerrigan, Deanna

    2015-06-01

    Engagement in HIV care offers clear individual and societal benefits, but little evidence exists on the care experiences of key populations. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 268 female sex workers (FSWs) living with HIV in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, to describe the HIV care continuum and to determine factors associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption. FSWs disengaged throughout the care continuum with the highest drop-off after ART initiation. Most participants were linked to care (92%), retained in care (85%), and initiated onto ART (78%), but ART discontinuation and irregular adherence were frequent. Only 48% of participants had an undetectable HIV viral load. Overall, 36% of participants ever initiated onto ART reported lifetime experience with ART interruption. The odds of ART interruption were 3.24 times higher among women who experienced FSW-related discrimination [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.28 to 8.20], 2.41 times higher among women who used any drug (95% CI: 1.09 to 5.34), and 2.35 times higher among women who worked in an FSW establishment (95% CI: 1.20 to 4.60). Internalized stigma related to FSW was associated with higher odds of interruption (adjusted odds ratio: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.16), and positive perceptions of HIV providers were protective (adjusted odds ratio: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.85 to 0.98). FSWs living with HIV confront multiple barriers throughout the HIV care continuum, many of which are related to the social context and stigmatization of sex work. Given the clear importance of maximizing the potential benefits of engagement in HIV care, there is an urgent need for interventions to support FSWs throughout the HIV care continuum.

  6. Conceptualizing Prevention as the First Line of Offense against Homelessness: Implications for the Federal Continuum of Care Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Dennis L.; Zugazaga, Carole B.

    2003-01-01

    The Community Prevention Model, which reinforces competencies and strengths, promotes independent living and social mainstreaming, and utilizes emergency shelters as a last resort, is offered for discussion. It is argued that the federal continuum of care model does not adequately address prevention as the first line of offense against…

  7. 78 FR 70958 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Recordkeeping for HUD's Continuum of Care Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Recordkeeping for HUD's Continuum of Care Program AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HUD has... allow for an additional 30 days of public comment. DATES: Comments Due Date: December 27,...

  8. Outcomes of a Randomized Trial of Continuum of Care Services for Children in a Child Welfare System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, E. Wayne; O'Connell, Susan Rousseau; Liao, Qinghong; Krivelyova, Anna; Connor, Tim; Blau, Gary; Long, Dorian

    2007-01-01

    The Connecticut Department of Children and Families Title IV-E waiver demonstration evaluated whether the well-being of children approved for residential mental health services could be improved, and lengths of stay in restrictive placements reduced, by providing case rate payments to community agencies to provide continuum of care services.…

  9. Relationship between women's characteristics and continuum of care for maternal health in Kenya: Complex survey analysis using structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Owili, Patrick Opiyo; Muga, Miriam Adoyo; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Huang, Nicole; Chien, Li-Yin

    2016-08-11

    The objective of this study was to understand and estimate the complex relationships in the continuum of care for maternal health to provide information to improve maternal and newborn health outcomes. Women (n = 4,082) aged 15-49 years in the 2008/2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey data were used to explore the complex relationships in the continuum of care for maternal health (i.e., before, during, and after delivery) using structural equation modeling. Results showed that the use of antenatal care was significantly positively related to the use of delivery care (β = 0.06; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.10) but not postnatal care, while delivery care was associated with postnatal care (β = 0.68; AOR = 1.97; 95% CI: 1.75-2.22). Socioeconomic status was significantly related to all elements in the continuum of care for maternal health; barriers to delivery of care and personal characteristics were only associated with the use of delivery care (β = 0.34; AOR = 1.40; 95% CI: 1.30-1.52) and postnatal care (β = 0.03; AOR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05), respectively. The three periods of maternal health care were related to each other. Developing a referral system of continuity of care is critical in the Sustainable Development Goals era.

  10. A clarion call for nurse-led SBIRT across the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Finnell, Deborah S

    2012-07-01

    This commentary discusses the impact of the study by Broyles and colleagues (2012) that reported on hospitalized patients' acceptability of nurse-delivered screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). This cross-sectional survey study assessed patient acceptability for and comfort with nurse-delivered SBIRT. The majority (95%) of inpatients found it acceptable for the nurse to ask about and/or discuss alcohol use during their hospitalization. This is a significant finding, as hospitals in the United States consider whether and how to implement The Joint Commission's performance measures related to SBIRT for hospitalized patients. The findings related to subgroups of patients who are more accepting of SBIRT and those who expressed some degree of discomfort highlight the importance for individualized patient-centered approaches. This study raises several important implications for nurse-delivered SBIRT. First, intensive efforts must be directed to enhancing the knowledge and competence of healthcare providers in general, and the current and future nursing workforce in particular, related to alcohol use and evidence-based care for patients who are drinking alcohol above recommended limits. Second, registered nurses, working to the full extent of their education and licensure are in key roles as members of the interdisciplinary team to provide cost-effective care at the bedside and across the continuum of care. Nurse-led SBIRT implementation models could help bridge the curricular gap and promote widespread and sustained integration of SBIRT as standard nursing care across all specialties and practice settings. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  11. Finding Like-Minded Partners to Span the Continuum of Care.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    This is an era of profound industry transformation, characterized by such forces as acceleration away from inpatient-centered care and toward alternative payment models, rising rates of chronic disease, and an aging population. Add to this mix physician and nurse shortages and a newfound understanding that today's patients are informed consumers, and the reality becomes clear: Healthcare providers must be adaptable, agile, and innovative to survive. Sometimes, the best way forward in transformative times is collaboration with other like-minded organizations.For INTEGRIS, an integrated, not-for-profit health system based in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, partnering has always been a part of the corporate culture and a vital strategy in fulfilling its mission to improve the health of the people and communities it serves. In earlier days, collaborations often took the form of partnerships with community organizations to go beyond the hospital's walls and reach deeply into the community to address the underlying health needs of its population.However, the concept of partnerships has expanded to meet today's strategic business needs. INTEGRIS, for example, evaluates most partnerships in terms of population health management and the system's continuum of care. Care settings are viewed as being of three distinct types: community-based, acute, and post-acute. When it comes to health-and, increasingly, wellness-the goal of the system is to connect patients to whatever service they need, at whatever stage of life, whether that service is fully or partly owned by INTEGRIS or provided through partner affiliations.This network of partnerships involves the patient, the community, physicians, other clinicians and providers, insurers, regional collaborators, and others. INTEGRIS's partnership strategies have evolved over the years, and its partnerships have produced synergy and alignment to decrease costs, increase revenue, and better serve customers with the right care, in the right

  12. Exploring How Substance Use Impedes Engagement along the HIV Care Continuum: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Gwadz, Marya; de Guzman, Rebecca; Freeman, Robert; Kutnick, Alexandra; Silverman, Elizabeth; Leonard, Noelle R.; Ritchie, Amanda Spring; Muñoz-Plaza, Corinne; Salomon, Nadim; Wolfe, Hannah; Hilliard, Christopher; Cleland, Charles M.; Honig, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Drug use is associated with low uptake of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART), an under-studied step in the HIV care continuum, and insufficient engagement in HIV primary care. However, the specific underlying mechanisms by which drug use impedes these HIV health outcomes are poorly understood. The present qualitative study addresses this gap in the literature, focusing on African-American/Black and Hispanic persons living with HIV (PLWH) who had delayed, declined, or discontinued ART and who also were generally poorly engaged in health care. Participants (N = 37) were purposively sampled from a larger study for maximum variation on HIV indices. They engaged in 1–2 h audio-recorded in-depth semi-structured interviews on HIV histories guided by a multilevel social-cognitive theory. Transcripts were analyzed using a systematic content analysis approach. Consistent with the existing literature, heavy substance use, but not casual or social use, impeded ART uptake, mainly by undermining confidence in medication management abilities and triggering depression. The confluence of African-American/Black or Hispanic race/ethnicity, poverty, and drug use was associated with high levels of perceived stigma and inferior treatment in health-care settings compared to their peers. Furthermore, providers were described as frequently assuming participants were selling their medications to buy drugs, which strained provider–patient relationships. High levels of medical distrust, common in this population, created fears of ART and of negative interactions between street drugs and ART, but participants could not easily discuss this concern with health-care providers. Barriers to ART initiation and HIV care were embedded in other structural- and social-level challenges, which disproportionately affect low-income African-American/Black and Hispanic PLWH (e.g., homelessness, violence). Yet, HIV management was cyclical. In collaboration with trusted providers and ancillary staff

  13. Exploring How Substance Use Impedes Engagement along the HIV Care Continuum: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Gwadz, Marya; de Guzman, Rebecca; Freeman, Robert; Kutnick, Alexandra; Silverman, Elizabeth; Leonard, Noelle R; Ritchie, Amanda Spring; Muñoz-Plaza, Corinne; Salomon, Nadim; Wolfe, Hannah; Hilliard, Christopher; Cleland, Charles M; Honig, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Drug use is associated with low uptake of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART), an under-studied step in the HIV care continuum, and insufficient engagement in HIV primary care. However, the specific underlying mechanisms by which drug use impedes these HIV health outcomes are poorly understood. The present qualitative study addresses this gap in the literature, focusing on African-American/Black and Hispanic persons living with HIV (PLWH) who had delayed, declined, or discontinued ART and who also were generally poorly engaged in health care. Participants (N = 37) were purposively sampled from a larger study for maximum variation on HIV indices. They engaged in 1-2 h audio-recorded in-depth semi-structured interviews on HIV histories guided by a multilevel social-cognitive theory. Transcripts were analyzed using a systematic content analysis approach. Consistent with the existing literature, heavy substance use, but not casual or social use, impeded ART uptake, mainly by undermining confidence in medication management abilities and triggering depression. The confluence of African-American/Black or Hispanic race/ethnicity, poverty, and drug use was associated with high levels of perceived stigma and inferior treatment in health-care settings compared to their peers. Furthermore, providers were described as frequently assuming participants were selling their medications to buy drugs, which strained provider-patient relationships. High levels of medical distrust, common in this population, created fears of ART and of negative interactions between street drugs and ART, but participants could not easily discuss this concern with health-care providers. Barriers to ART initiation and HIV care were embedded in other structural- and social-level challenges, which disproportionately affect low-income African-American/Black and Hispanic PLWH (e.g., homelessness, violence). Yet, HIV management was cyclical. In collaboration with trusted providers and ancillary staff

  14. Developing a medication communication framework across continuums of care using the Circle of Care Modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Kitson, Nicole A; Price, Morgan; Lau, Francis Y; Showler, Grey

    2013-10-17

    Medication errors are a common type of preventable errors in health care causing unnecessary patient harm, hospitalization, and even fatality. Improving communication between providers and between providers and patients is a key aspect of decreasing medication errors and improving patient safety. Medication management requires extensive collaboration and communication across roles and care settings, which can reduce (or contribute to) medication-related errors. Medication management involves key recurrent activities (determine need, prescribe, dispense, administer, and monitor/evaluate) with information communicated within and between each. Despite its importance, there is a lack of conceptual models that explore medication communication specifically across roles and settings. This research seeks to address that gap. The Circle of Care Modeling (CCM) approach was used to build a model of medication communication activities across the circle of care. CCM positions the patient in the centre of his or her own healthcare system; providers and other roles are then modeled around the patient as a web of relationships. Recurrent medication communication activities were mapped to the medication management framework. The research occurred in three iterations, to test and revise the model: Iteration 1 consisted of a literature review and internal team discussion, Iteration 2 consisted of interviews, observation, and a discussion group at a Community Health Centre, and Iteration 3 consisted of interviews and a discussion group in the larger community. Each iteration provided further detail to the Circle of Care medication communication model. Specific medication communication activities were mapped along each communication pathway between roles and to the medication management framework. We could not map all medication communication activities to the medication management framework; we added Coordinate as a separate and distinct recurrent activity. We saw many examples of

  15. Developing a medication communication framework across continuums of care using the Circle of Care Modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication errors are a common type of preventable errors in health care causing unnecessary patient harm, hospitalization, and even fatality. Improving communication between providers and between providers and patients is a key aspect of decreasing medication errors and improving patient safety. Medication management requires extensive collaboration and communication across roles and care settings, which can reduce (or contribute to) medication-related errors. Medication management involves key recurrent activities (determine need, prescribe, dispense, administer, and monitor/evaluate) with information communicated within and between each. Despite its importance, there is a lack of conceptual models that explore medication communication specifically across roles and settings. This research seeks to address that gap. Methods The Circle of Care Modeling (CCM) approach was used to build a model of medication communication activities across the circle of care. CCM positions the patient in the centre of his or her own healthcare system; providers and other roles are then modeled around the patient as a web of relationships. Recurrent medication communication activities were mapped to the medication management framework. The research occurred in three iterations, to test and revise the model: Iteration 1 consisted of a literature review and internal team discussion, Iteration 2 consisted of interviews, observation, and a discussion group at a Community Health Centre, and Iteration 3 consisted of interviews and a discussion group in the larger community. Results Each iteration provided further detail to the Circle of Care medication communication model. Specific medication communication activities were mapped along each communication pathway between roles and to the medication management framework. We could not map all medication communication activities to the medication management framework; we added Coordinate as a separate and distinct recurrent activity

  16. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

    PubMed

    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2017-10-09

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  17. The care continuum in acromegaly: how patients, nurses, and physicians can collaborate for successful treatment experiences

    PubMed Central

    Plunkett, Cynthia; Barkan, Ariel L

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acromegaly (a condition of chronic growth hormone hypersecretion by a pituitary adenoma) often require pharmacological treatment. Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) such as pasireotide, lanreotide, and octreotide are frequently used as first-line medical therapy. As SSAs are delivered by regular subcutaneous or intramuscular injections, they can result in injection-related pain or anxiety and can be challenging to fit into patients’ lifestyles. When combined with the prolonged, debilitating psychological complications associated with acromegaly, these administration challenges can negatively impact compliance, adherence, and quality of life. Proactively managing patients’ expectations and providing appropriate, timely guidance are crucial for maximizing adherence, and ultimately, optimizing the treatment experience. As part of ongoing clinical research since 1997, our team at the University of Michigan has used SSAs to treat 30 patients with acromegaly. Based on our clinical experiences with multiple SSA administration regimens (long-acting intramuscular, long-acting deep subcutaneous, and twice-daily subcutaneous), we generated a dialog map that guides health care professionals through the many sensitive and complex patient communication issues surrounding this treatment process. Beginning with diagnosis, the dialog map includes discussion of treatment options, instruction on proper drug administration technique, and ensuring of appropriate follow-up care. At each step, we provide talking points that address the following: the patients’ clinical situation; their geographic, economic, and psychological concerns; and their inclination to communicate with clinicians. We have found that involving patients, nurses, and physicians as equal partners in the treatment process optimizes treatment initiation, adherence, and persistence in acromegaly. By encouraging collaboration across the care continuum, this dialog map can facilitate identification of the

  18. Palliative Care in Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approvals Annual Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Contact Overview & Mission History of NCI Contributing to ...

  19. Spirituality in childhood cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nádia Nara Rolim; do Nascimento, Vânia Barbosa; de Carvalho, Sionara Melo Figueiredo; Neto, Modesto Leite Rolim; Moreira, Marcial Moreno; Brasil, Aline Quental; Junior, Francisco Telésforo Celestino; de Oliveira, Gislene Farias; Reis, Alberto Olavo Advíncula

    2013-01-01

    To deal with the suffering caused by childhood cancer, patients and their families use different coping strategies, among which, spirituality appears a way of minimizing possible damage. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of spirituality in childhood cancer care, involving biopsychosocial aspects of the child, the family, and the health care team facing the disease. To accomplish this purpose, a nonsystematic review of literature of articles on national and international electronic databases (Scientific Electronic Library Online [SciELO], PubMed, and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS]) was conducted using the search terms “spirituality,” “child psychology,” “child,” and “cancer,” as well as on other available resources. After the search, 20 articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final sample. Our review showed that the relation between spirituality and health has lately become a subject of growing interest among researchers, as a positive influence of spirituality in the people’s welfare was noted. Studies that were retrieved using the mentioned search strategy in electronic databases, independently assessed by the authors according to the systematic review, showed that spirituality emerges as a driving force that helps pediatric patients and their families in coping with cancer. Health care workers have been increasingly attentive to this dimension of care. However, it is necessary to improve their knowledge regarding the subject. The search highlighted that spirituality is considered a source of comfort and hope, contributing to a better acceptance of his/her chronic condition by the child with cancer, as well as by the family. Further up-to-date studies facing the subject are, thus, needed. It is also necessary to better train health care practitioners, so as to provide humanized care to the child with cancer. PMID:24133371

  20. Interrogating concepts of care in the HIV care continuum: ethnographic insights from the implementation of a "Universal Test and Treat" approach in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Wademan, Dillon T; Reynolds, Lindsey J

    2016-01-01

    South Africa currently sustains the largest antiretroviral treatment (ART) programme in the world. The number of people on ART is set to grow even more in the coming years as incidence remains stable, people on ART stay healthy, and guidelines for initiation become increasingly inclusive. The South African public health sector has increasingly relied on community- and home-based lay and professional "carers" to carry out the everyday tasks of rolling out the ART programme. Drawing on ethnographic research in one locality in the Western Cape, the paper explores the care practices of two such groups of carers implementing a 'Universal Test and Treat' (UTT) approach. The UTT approach being evlauated in this place is based on one model of the HIV treatment cascade, or care continuum, which focuses on the steps necessary to identify and link HIV-positive individuals to care and retain them in lifelong HIV treatment. In this context, community-based care workers are responsible for carrying out several discrete steps in the HIV care continuum, including testing people for HIV, linking HIV-positive individuals to care, and supporting adherence. In order to retain clients within the continuum, however, carers also perform other forms of labour that stretch their care work beyond more bounded notions of a stepwise progression of care. These broader forms of care, which can be material, emotional, social or physical in nature, appear alongside the more structured technical and biomedical tasks formally expected of carers. We argue that understanding the dynamics of these more distributed and relational forms of care is essential for the effective implementation of the care continuum, and of the UTT approach, in diverse contexts.

  1. Invisible seams: Preventing childhood obesity through an improved obstetrics-pediatrics care continuum.

    PubMed

    Moscetti, Craig W; Pronk, Nicolaas P

    2017-03-01

    Progress in altering the current obesity epidemic among children and adolescents remains elusive. Evidence continues to underscore the challenges of altering weight status as children age. Further, weight loss interventions among children and adults alike tend to demonstrate efficacy in the short-term, however individuals tend to slowly revert back to their original weight status over time. New understanding of obesity's early origins suggests the need to rethink current approaches, particularly within healthcare. Instead of a predominant focus on "mid-flight course corrections," healthcare should consider the "take-off" time period for health trajectories. This means improved support and promotion of healthy behaviors before and after birth, and with both the mother and infant. To meet the challenge, greater continuity will be required across obstetrics and pediatrics, which often operate independently, focused on different clinical outcomes. Likewise, there is an urgent need to remedy a significant skills gap within both practices. Through its connection with almost every new mother, healthcare plays a unique and vital role in maternal and child health outcomes. A more seamless obstetrics-pediatrics care continuum could better address the early origins of obesity, factors that we are coming to learn have life-long consequences.

  2. Prediction models in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Prediction is ubiquitous across the spectrum of cancer care from screening to hospice. Indeed, oncology is often primarily a prediction problem; many of the early stage cancers cause no symptoms, and treatment is recommended because of a prediction that tumor progression would ultimately threaten a patient's quality of life or survival. Recent years have seen attempts to formalize risk prediction in cancer care. In place of qualitative and implicit prediction algorithms, such as cancer stage, researchers have developed statistical prediction tools that provide a quantitative estimate of the probability of a specific event for an individual patient. Prediction models generally have greater accuracy than reliance on stage or risk groupings, can incorporate novel predictors such as genomic data, and can be used more rationally to make treatment decisions. Several prediction models are now widely used in clinical practice, including the Gail model for breast cancer incidence or the Adjuvant! Online prediction model for breast cancer recurrence. Given the burgeoning complexity of diagnostic and prognostic information, there is simply no realistic alternative to incorporating multiple variables into a single prediction model. As such, the question should not be whether but how prediction models should be used to aid decision-making. Key issues will be integration of models into the electronic health record and more careful evaluation of models, particularly with respect to their effects on clinical outcomes.

  3. The primary care provider (PCP)-cancer specialist relationship: A systematic review and mixed-methods meta-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dossett, Lesly A; Hudson, Janella N; Morris, Arden M; Lee, M Catherine; Roetzheim, Richard G; Fetters, Michael D; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2017-03-01

    Although they are critical to models of coordinated care, the relationship and communication between primary care providers (PCPs) and cancer specialists throughout the cancer continuum are poorly understood. By using predefined search terms, the authors conducted a systematic review of the literature in 3 databases to examine the relationship and communication between PCPs and cancer specialists. Among 301 articles identified, 35 met all inclusion criteria and were reviewed in-depth. Findings from qualitative, quantitative, and disaggregated mixed-methods studies were integrated using meta-synthesis. Six themes were identified and incorporated into a preliminary conceptual model of the PCP-cancer specialist relationship: 1) poor and delayed communication between PCPs and cancer specialists, 2) cancer specialists' endorsement of a specialist-based model of care, 3) PCPs' belief that they play an important role in the cancer continuum, 4) PCPs' willingness to participate in the cancer continuum, 5) cancer specialists' and PCPs' uncertainty regarding the PCP's oncology knowledge/experience, and 6) discrepancies between PCPs and cancer specialists regarding roles. These data indicate a pervasive need for improved communication, delineation, and coordination of responsibilities between PCPs and cancer specialists. Future interventions aimed at these deficiencies may improve patient and physician satisfaction and cancer care coordination. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:156-169. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  4. Use of Multiple Data Sources and Individual Case Investigation to Refine Surveillance-Based Estimates of the HIV Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowski, Julia C.; Buskin, Susan E.; Bennett, Amy; Thiede, Hanne; Golden, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the HIV care continuum among HIV-infected persons residing in Seattle & King County, Washington at the end of 2011 and compare estimates of viral suppression derived from different population-based data sources. Methods We derived estimates for the HIV care continuum using a combination of HIV case and laboratory surveillance data supplemented with individual investigation of cases that appeared to be unlinked to or not retained in HIV care, a jurisdiction-wide population-based retrospective chart review, and local data from the CDC's Medical Monitoring Project and National HIV Behavioral Surveillance. Results Adjusting for in- and out-migration of persons diagnosed with HIV, laboratory surveillance data supplemented with individual case investigation suggest that 67% of persons diagnosed with HIV and 57% of all HIV-infected persons living in King County at the end of 2011 were virally suppressed (plasma HIV RNA <200 copies/mL). The viral suppression estimates we derived from a population-based chart review and adjusted local Medical Monitoring Project data were similar to the surveillance-derived estimate and identical to each other (59% viral suppression among all HIV-infected persons). Conclusions The level of viral suppression in King County is more than twice the national estimate and exceeds estimates of control for other major chronic diseases in the U.S. Our findings suggest that national care continuum estimates may be substantially too pessimistic, and highlight the need to improve HIV surveillance data. PMID:25140904

  5. Reviewing Cancer Care Team Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, Stephen H.; Weaver, Sallie; Salas, Eduardo; Chollette, Veronica; Edwards, Heather M.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Kosty, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The management of cancer varies across its type, stage, and natural history. This necessitates involvement of a variety of individuals and groups across a number of provider types. Evidence from other fields suggests that a team-based approach helps organize and optimize tasks that involve individuals and groups, but team effectiveness has not been fully evaluated in oncology-related care. Methods: We undertook a systematic review of literature published between 2009 and 2014 to identify studies of all teams with clear membership, a comparator group, and patient-level metrics of cancer care. When those teams included two or more people with specialty training relevant to the care of patients with cancer, we called them multidisciplinary care teams (MDTs). After reviews and exclusions, 16 studies were thoroughly evaluated: two addressing screening and diagnosis, 11 addressing treatment, two addressing palliative care, and one addressing end-of-life care. The studies included a variety of end points (eg, adherence to quality indicators, patient satisfaction with care, mortality). Results: Teams for screening and its follow-up improved screening use and reduced time to follow-up colonoscopy after an abnormal screen. Discussion of cases within MDTs improved the planning of therapy, adherence to recommended preoperative assessment, pain control, and adherence to medications. We did not see convincing evidence that MDTs affect patient survival or cost of care, or studies of how or which MDT processes and structures were associated with success. Conclusion: Further research should focus on the association between team processes and structures, efficiency in delivery of care, and mortality. PMID:25873056

  6. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists: Importance of communication.

    PubMed

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C; Manca, Donna P; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-10-01

    To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Canada. A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still exist. This can lead to serious consequences that affect clinical decision making

  7. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee Report.

    PubMed

    Zweigenhaft, Burt; Bosserman, Linda; Kenney, James T; Lawless, Grant D; Marsland, Thomas A; Deligdish, Craig K; Burgoyne, Douglas S; Knopf, Kevin B; Long, Douglas M; McKercher, Patrick; Owens, Gary M; Hennessy, John E; Lang, James R; Malin, Jennifer; Natelson, Leonard; Palmgren, Matthew C; Slotnik, Jayson; Shockney, Lillie D; Vogenberg, F Randy

    2013-07-01

    The AVBCC Annual Meeting experiences exponential growth in attendance and participation as oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, patient advocates, and drug manufacturers convened in Hollywood, FL, on May 2-5, 2013, for the Third Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The conference presented an all-inclusive open forum for stakeholder dialogue and integration across the cancer care continuum, facilitating an open dialogue among the various healthcare stakeholders to align their perspectives around the urgent need to address value in cancer care, costs, patient education, safety, outcomes, and quality. The AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee was held on the first day of the conference to define value in cancer care. The committee was divided into 7 groups, each representing a key stakeholder in oncology. The goal of the Steering Committee was to define value from the particular point of view of each of the stakeholder groups and to suggest how that particular perspective can contribute to the value proposition in oncology, by balancing cost, quality, and access to care to improve overall patient outcomes. The following summary highlights the major points addressed by each group.

  8. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee Report

    PubMed Central

    Zweigenhaft, Burt; Bosserman, Linda; Kenney, James T.; Lawless, Grant D.; Marsland, Thomas A.; Deligdish, Craig K.; Burgoyne, Douglas S.; Knopf, Kevin B.; Long, Douglas M.; McKercher, Patrick; Owens, Gary M.; Hennessy, John E.; Lang, James R.; Malin, Jennifer; Natelson, Leonard; Palmgren, Matthew C.; Slotnik, Jayson; Shockney, Lillie D.; Vogenberg, F. Randy

    2013-01-01

    The AVBCC Annual Meeting experiences exponential growth in attendance and participation as oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, patient advocates, and drug manufacturers convened in Hollywood, FL, on May 2–5, 2013, for the Third Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The conference presented an all-inclusive open forum for stakeholder dialogue and integration across the cancer care continuum, facilitating an open dialogue among the various healthcare stakeholders to align their perspectives around the urgent need to address value in cancer care, costs, patient education, safety, outcomes, and quality. The AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee was held on the first day of the conference to define value in cancer care. The committee was divided into 7 groups, each representing a key stakeholder in oncology. The goal of the Steering Committee was to define value from the particular point of view of each of the stakeholder groups and to suggest how that particular perspective can contribute to the value proposition in oncology, by balancing cost, quality, and access to care to improve overall patient outcomes. The following summary highlights the major points addressed by each group. PMID:24991360

  9. [Bereavement Care in Cancer].

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideki; Ishida, Mayumi; Tanahashi, Iori

    2015-01-01

    Bereavement may become the most severe stressor in the lives of bereaved families, and it has a variety of influences on their psychological and physical aspects. Physical effects include worsening of physical conditions and an increase in the mortality, and psychological ones include increases in the suicide rate and morbidity of depression. Bereavement also has a social influence, such as causing changes in relationships. Therefore, it is necessary to provide bereaved families requiring support with appropriate intervention. Since bereaved families experience various types of distress, assessment of grief-related problems alone is inadequate. It is essential to assess the psychological, physical, social, and other aspects of bereaved families. Intervention can be expressed using the concept of postvention. There are various types of intervention : from care provided by non-specialists to psychiatric treatment provided by mental care specialists. Although bereavement is the strongest risk factor for depression, depressive symptoms following bereavement are often overlooked. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to such depression. Support is provided by not only health care professionals but also the general public in society, and it is essential to obtain knowledge of bereavement care in society. It should be noted that support not based on established knowledge may have an adverse effect on bereaved families (unhelpful support).

  10. Molecular voting for glioma classification reflecting heterogeneity in the continuum of cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Gregory N; Mircean, Cristian; Tabus, Ioan; Taylor, Ellen; Sawaya, Raymond; Bruner, Janet M; Shmulevich, Ilya; Zhang, Wei

    2005-09-01

    Gliomas, the most common brain tumors, are generally categorized into two lineages (astrocytic and oligodendrocytic) and further classified as low-grade (astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma), mid-grade (anaplastic astrocytoma and anaplastic oligodendroglioma), and high-grade (glioblastoma multiforme) based on morphological features. A strict classification scheme has limitations because a specific glioma can be at any stage of the continuum of cancer progression and may contain mixed features. Thus, a more comprehensive classification based on molecular signatures may reflect the biological nature of specific tumors more accurately. In this study, we used microarray technology to profile the gene expression of 49 human brain tumors and applied the k-nearest neighbor algorithm for classification. We first trained the classification gene set with 19 of the most typical glioma cases and selected a set of genes that provide the lowest cross-validation classification error with k=5. We then applied this gene set to the 30 remaining cases, including several that do not belong to gliomas such as atypical meningioma. The results showed that not only does the algorithm correctly classify most of the gliomas, but the detailed voting results also provide more subtle information regarding the molecular similarities to neighboring classes. For atypical meningioma, the voting was equally split among the four classes, indicating a difficulty in placement of meningioma into the four classes of gliomas. Thus, the actual voting results, which are typically used only to decide the winning class label in k-nearest neighbor algorithms, provide a useful method for gaining deeper insight into the stage of a tumor in the continuum of cancer development.

  11. Texture Analysis of Abnormal Cell Images for Predicting the Continuum of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanougast, Camel

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal cell (ABC) is a markedly heterogeneous tissue area and can be categorized into three main types: benign hyperplasia (BH), carcinoma (Ca), and intraepithelial neoplasia (IN) or precursor cancerous lesion. In this study, the goal is to determine and characterize the continuum of colorectal cancer by using a 3D-texture approach. ABC was segmented in preprocessing step using an active contour segmentation technique. Cell types were analyzed based on textural features extracted from the gray level cooccurrence matrices (GLCMs). Significant texture features were selected using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) of ABC with a p value cutoff of p < 0.01. Features selected were reduced with a principal component analysis (PCA), which accounted for 97% of the cumulative variance from significant features. The simulation results identified 158 significant features based on ANOVA from a total of 624 texture features extracted from GLCMs. Performance metrics of ABC discrimination based on significant texture features showed 92.59% classification accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 94.44% specificity. These findings suggest that texture features extracted from GLCMs are sensitive enough to discriminate between the ABC types and offer the opportunity to predict cell characteristics of colorectal cancer. PMID:28331793

  12. Influence of hospitalization on prescribing safety across the continuum of care: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    von Klüchtzner, Wilko; Grandt, Daniel

    2015-05-13

    Transitions between different levels of healthcare, such as hospital admission and discharge, pose a considerable threat to the quality and continuity of drug therapy. This study aims to further explore the current role of hospitalization in prescribing error exposure and medication-related communication as patients are transferred from and back to ambulatory care. Assisted by electronic decision support, pre-admission and discharge medication regimens of 187 adult patients in a German university hospital were comparatively screened for clinically relevant categories of potentially inadequate prescribing. Binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify risk factors predisposing individuals to prescribing errors as a result of hospitalization. Additionally, it was established to what extent medication changes and potentially inappropriate prescribing decisions originating from inpatient treatment were communicated in discharge letters. 94.7% of the patients are subjected to differences between pre-admission and discharge prescriptions occurring at a rate of 461 per 100 hospitalizations. However, these modifications in drug therapy do not have a significant effect on the total number of potential prescribing errors per patient (p = 0.135) even though a large potential for improvement exists throughout the care continuum. For instance, almost a quarter of study participants with impaired kidney function lacks appropriate dose adjustment for one or more drugs before onset and at the end of inpatient treatment alike (22.5% [95% CI: 13.5%-34.0%] vs. 22.8% [95% CI: 14.1%-33.6%]). Overall, the probability of error exposure following hospitalization rises with an increasing number of prescribed drugs per patient, while individuals treated on surgical wards are four times more likely to be discharged with a prescribing-related safety hazard than their counterparts from medical departments (OR: 4.069 [95% CI: 1.126-14.703]; p = 0.032). In the study population

  13. “Taking a Half Day at a Time:” Patient Perspectives and the HIV Engagement in Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Amina D.; Lopez, Andrea M.; Geng, Elvin H.; Johnson, Mallory O.; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Fielding, Hegla; Dawson-Rose, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The HIV treatment continuum, or “cascade,” outlines key benchmarks in the successful treatment of HIV-infected individuals. However, the cascade fails to capture important dimensions of the patient experience in that it has been constructed from a provider point of view. In order to understand meaningful steps in the HIV care cascade for individuals diagnosed with HIV through expanded, more routine testing, we conducted in-depth interviews (n=34) with three groups of individuals: those diagnosed with HIV in the emergency department/urgent care clinic who linked to HIV care and exhibited 100% appointment adherence in the first 6 months of HIV care; those diagnosed in the emergency department/urgent care clinic who linked to HIV care and exhibited sporadic appointment adherence in the first 6 months of HIV care, and; hospitalized patients with no outpatient HIV care for at least 6 months. This last group was chosen to supplement data from in-care patients. The engagement in care process was defined by a changing perspective on HIV, one's HIV identity, and the role of health care. The linkage to care experience laid the groundwork for subsequent retention. Interventions to support engagement in care should acknowledge that patient concerns change over time and focus on promoting shifts in perspective. PMID:23565926

  14. [Implementation of a continuum of care for people living with HIV/AIDS in Hanoi (Vietnam)].

    PubMed

    de Loenzien, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    its consequences. Hospital staff with the greatest contact with PLWHA report more frequent attempts to avoid this contact. This stigmatisation is due to lack of information, failure to implement workplace safety measures, and to pejorative representations of HIV/AIDS. Official and unofficial discourse still follows the Ministry of Health in associating HIV/AIDS with drug use and commercial sex, and HIV/AIDS prevention and control policy is still linked to the "social evils" policy. Hospital staff also emphasized the importance of community care for PLWHA in their interviews. Informal care for PLWHA by family, close relatives, close friends and members of non-official groups complements hospital care, which is sometimes limited to its biomedical component and provides the material, moral, financial, social, economic and relational care essential for PLWHA and their close relatives and friends. This informal care has also some pernicious effects and leads to internal contradictions due to the multiple social roles played by the many and various participants involved. HIV/AIDS prevention and control policy relies on a series of choices between more specificity through vertical programmes specialised in HIV/AIDS and the synergy that can develop through more integrated health services. Vietnam has developed links between HIV/AIDS prevention and control programmes on the one hand, and harm reduction programmes for injecting drug users (access to substitution products such as methadone) and condom distribution, on the other. Nonetheless, HIV/AIDS prevention and control policy faces difficulties in reaching its objectives. The results of this policy, intended to help achieve Millennium Development Goal (MDG) n degrees 6, depends partly on the success for other MDGs, including the fight against poverty, the promotion of gender equality and empowerment of women, and the improvement of reproductive health. To be able to succeed in implementing the continuum of care necessary for

  15. Uncovering differences across the cancer control continuum: a comparison of ethnic and mainstream cancer newspaper stories.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Jo Ellen; Emmons, Karen M; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2007-01-01

    The use of the news media to disseminate control research could play a pivotal role in reducing the cancer burden. An important first step is to understand how newspapers cover cancer and if differences exist between mainstream and ethnic newspapers. Cancer news in the major U.S. (MAJN) (N=5327) and ethnic (ENW) newspapers (N=565) appearing in 2003 were content analyzed. Comparisons of mainstream and ethnic newspapers utilized Pearson x(2) tests of two-sided statistical significance and independent samples t tests for interval-level variables. Breast cancer dominated coverage: 27% of MAJN and 35% of ENW stories mentioned breast cancer. Coverage focused primarily on cancer treatment (MAJN: 60%; ENW: 52%) rather than on primary or secondary prevention. Compared to mainstream newspapers, the ethnic newspapers required lower literacy levels for understanding news stories, were substantially more likely to cover primary and secondary cancer prevention, and paid more attention to cancer awareness and education. The ethnic media are a promising vehicle for dissemination of cancer control messages. However, the successful utilization of any U.S. newspaper as a dissemination mechanism requires a greater understanding of the root causes for imbalances in cancer coverage and work with journalists to reframe cancer news coverage.

  16. Continuing care after cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Pateman, Brian; Wilson, Kate; McHugh, Gretl; Luker, Karen A

    2003-10-01

    Despite nearly three decades of debate and policy guidance there is evidence that, in the United Kingdom, patient hospital discharge remains problematic. District nurses, who deliver skilled home nursing care, receive referrals from hospitals for continuing nursing care needs. However, district nurses' expectations of appropriate patient referral from hospitals are not always achieved. In an attempt to improve services after hospital discharge, government policy has emphasized partnership between care providers, highlighting the need for smooth transition between care settings. To explore hospital discharge and referral procedures for patients with cancer, with particular emphasis on referrals made by hospital nurses to district nurses. In-depth interviews were carried out with nurses actively involved in the discharge process as both referrers and recipients of referrals. Twenty nurses from a regional cancer centre and 20 district nurses from three adjacent primary care trusts were interviewed. Interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically, and themes compared between the two care settings. We conclude that competing sets of expectations, not only between hospital and community nursing settings, but amongst district nurses themselves, are a major factor impeding agreement on referral criteria and satisfaction with the referral process.

  17. Cannabis in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I; Guzman, M

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis has been used in medicine for thousands of years prior to achieving its current illicit substance status. Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, mimic the effects of the endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), activating specific cannabinoid receptors, particularly CB1 found predominantly in the central nervous system and CB2 found predominantly in cells involved with immune function. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main bioactive cannabinoid in the plant, has been available as a prescription medication approved for treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and anorexia associated with the AIDS wasting syndrome. Cannabinoids may be of benefit in the treatment of cancer-related pain, possibly synergistic with opioid analgesics. Cannabinoids have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that they may be worthy of study in patients with other neuropathic symptoms. Cannabinoids have a favorable drug safety profile, but their medical use is predominantly limited by their psychoactive effects and their limited bioavailability. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  18. Controversies in terminal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Diehl, V

    1994-03-01

    In the long term, about 75% of all cancer patients will need palliative care, but the curricula in courses of study leading to qualifications in the caring professions take no account of this, being concerned exclusively with curative strategies. Precise definition of palliative care as a medical discipline is needed, followed by an insistence on proper funding and instruction. In addition, palliation should be integrated into the early stages of patient contact, e.g., prevention, diagnosis, treatment planning, and not only implemented when attempts at curative therapy have failed. Public and political awareness must be promoted; in particular it should be recognized that the care givers themselves need support. There is a growing need for well-run hospices with purpose-trained staff. While "mercy killing" might be considered out of charity and humanity, the death of a terminally ill patient should be neither hastened nor postponed.

  19. Human papillomavirus genotype-specific prevalence across the continuum of cervical neoplasia and cancer.

    PubMed

    Joste, Nancy E; Ronnett, Brigitte M; Hunt, William C; Pearse, Amanda; Langsfeld, Erika; Leete, Thomas; Jaramillo, MaryAnn; Stoler, Mark H; Castle, Philip E; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2015-01-01

    The New Mexico HPV Pap Registry was established to measure the impact of cervical cancer prevention strategies in the United States. Before widespread human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine implementation, we established the baseline prevalence for a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes across the continuum of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cancer. A population-based sample of 6,272 tissue specimens was tested for 37 HPV genotypes. The number of specimens tested within each diagnostic category was: 541 negative, 1,411 CIN grade 1 (CIN1), 2,226 CIN grade 2 (CIN2), and 2,094 CIN grade 3 (CIN3) or greater. Age-specific HPV prevalence was estimated within categories for HPV genotypes targeted by HPV vaccines. The combined prevalence of HPV genotypes included in the quadrivalent and nonavalent vaccines increased from 15.3% and 29.3% in CIN1 to 58.4% and 83.7% in CIN3, respectively. Prevalence of HPV types included in both vaccines tended to decrease with increasing age for CIN1, CIN2, CIN3, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), most notably for CIN3 and SCC. The six most common HPV types in descending order of prevalence were HPV-16, -31, -52, -58, -33, and -39 for CIN3 and HPV-16, -18, -31, -45, -52, and -33 for invasive cancers. Health economic modeling of HPV vaccine impact should consider age-specific differences in HPV prevalence. Population-based HPV prevalence in CIN is not well described, but is requisite for longitudinal assessment of vaccine impact and to understand the effectiveness and performance of various cervical screening strategies in vaccinated and unvaccinated women. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Predictors of change in unmet supportive care needs in cancer.

    PubMed

    McDowell, M E; Occhipinti, S; Ferguson, M; Dunn, J; Chambers, S K

    2010-05-01

    Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) assessments can assist health professionals to tailor their health practices to the individual needs of patients and improve patient care over time. The present study assessed prospective predictors of unmet supportive care needs in cancer patients over a six-month period. Participants were recruited from a regional cancer treatment centre in Australia and completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS) at recruitment (n=439; 61.4% response rate) and six months follow-up (n=396). Hierarchical logistic regression was used to identify predictors of change in unmet needs across each supportive care domain. Predictor variables were socio-demographic, treatment and psychosocial factors including depression, anxiety, social support, and patient satisfaction. Unmet needs were reported by approximately two-thirds of patients at baseline and half of patients at six months follow-up. Having unmet needs at baseline was the strongest predictor of unmet needs at six months. Longer time since diagnosis was a consistent predictor of greater unmet needs, associated with change in physical/daily living, psychological and health system and information unmet needs over time. By contrast, a complex relationship was found in that patient satisfaction, psychosocial and treatment characteristics predicted higher needs in some domains and lower needs in others. Unmet supportive care needs persist over time and psychological needs may emerge later in the illness continuum. Interventions to meet the needs of longer term cancer survivors are needed and should closely articulate with reported supportive care needs. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. How to evaluate population management? Transforming the Care Continuum Alliance population health guide toward a broadly applicable analytical framework.

    PubMed

    Struijs, Jeroen N; Drewes, Hanneke W; Heijink, Richard; Baan, Caroline A

    2015-04-01

    Many countries face the persistent twin challenge of providing high-quality care while keeping health systems affordable and accessible. As a result, the interest for more efficient strategies to stimulate population health is increasing. A possible successful strategy is population management (PM). PM strives to address health needs for the population at-risk and the chronically ill at all points along the health continuum by integrating services across health care, prevention, social care and welfare. The Care Continuum Alliance (CCA) population health guide, which recently changed their name in Population Health Alliance (PHA) provides a useful instrument for implementing and evaluating such innovative approaches. This framework is developed for PM specifically and describes the core elements of the PM-concept on the basis of six subsequent interrelated steps. The aim of this article is to transform the CCA framework into an analytical framework. Quantitative methods are refined and we operationalized a set of indicators to measure the impact of PM in terms of the Triple Aim (population health, quality of care and cost per capita). Additionally, we added a qualitative part to gain insight into the implementation process of PM. This resulted in a broadly applicable analytical framework based on a mixed-methods approach. In the coming years, the analytical framework will be applied within the Dutch Monitor Population Management to derive transferable 'lessons learned' and to methodologically underpin the concept of PM.

  2. Applying a PrEP Continuum of Care for Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Colleen F; Kahle, Erin; Siegler, Aaron; Sanchez, Travis; Del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Rosenberg, Eli S

    2015-11-15

    Reductions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence with pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for men who have sex with men (MSM) will require significant coverage of those at risk. We propose a simplified framework, similar to the HIV care continuum, to achieve protection with PrEP as follows: 1. At-risk MSM; 2. Awareness of and willingness to take PrEP; 3. Access to healthcare; 4. Receiving a prescription; and 5. Adhering to effective PrEP. We evaluated the PrEP care continuum on an Atlanta cohort of MSM and projected how many MSM might achieve protection from HIV. Even with optimistic estimates, few Atlanta MSM (15%) are projected to achieve protection from HIV with PrEP given the significant barriers described. Each continuum step represents an important point for intervention that could substantially increase the overall effectiveness of PrEP. In addition, novel strategies for PrEP delivery are needed to achieve the necessary effectiveness for Atlanta MSM at risk of HIV.

  3. Applying a PrEP Continuum of Care for Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Colleen F.; Kahle, Erin; Siegler, Aaron; Sanchez, Travis; del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S.; Rosenberg, Eli S.

    2015-01-01

    Reductions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence with pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for men who have sex with men (MSM) will require significant coverage of those at risk. We propose a simplified framework, similar to the HIV care continuum, to achieve protection with PrEP as follows: 1. At-risk MSM; 2. Awareness of and willingness to take PrEP; 3. Access to healthcare; 4. Receiving a prescription; and 5. Adhering to effective PrEP. We evaluated the PrEP care continuum on an Atlanta cohort of MSM and projected how many MSM might achieve protection from HIV. Even with optimistic estimates, few Atlanta MSM (15%) are projected to achieve protection from HIV with PrEP given the significant barriers described. Each continuum step represents an important point for intervention that could substantially increase the overall effectiveness of PrEP. In addition, novel strategies for PrEP delivery are needed to achieve the necessary effectiveness for Atlanta MSM at risk of HIV. PMID:26270691

  4. Analysis of dropout across the continuum of maternal health care in Tanzania: findings from a cross-sectional household survey.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Diwakar; LeFevre, Amnesty E; George, Asha; Mpembeni, Rose; Bazant, Eva; Rusibamayila, Neema; Killewo, Japhet; Winch, Peter J; Baqui, Abdullah H

    2017-03-16

    The 'continuum of care' is proposed as a key framework for the delivery of maternal, neonatal and child health services. This study examined the extent of dropout as well as factors associated with retention across the MNCH continuum from antenatal care (ANC), through skilled birth attendance (SBA), to postnatal care (PNC).We analyzed data from 1931 women who delivered in the preceding 2-14 months, from a two-stage cluster sampling household survey in four districts of Tanzania's Morogoro region. The survey was conducted in 2011 as a part of a baseline for an independent evaluation of a maternal health program. Using the Anderson model of health care seeking, we fitted logistic models for three transition stages in the continuum.Only 10% of women received the 'recommended' care package (4+ ANC visits, SBA, and 1+ PNC visit), while 1% reported not having care at any stage. Receipt of four ANC visits was positively associated with women being older in age (age 20-34 years-OR: 1.77, 95%CI: 1.22-2.56; age 35-49 years-2.03, 1.29-3.2), and knowledge of danger signs (1.75, 1.39 -2.1). A pro-rich bias was observed in facility-based deliveries (proxy for SBA), with women from the fourth (1.66, 1.12-2.47) and highest quintiles of household wealth (3.4, 2.04-5.66) and the top tertile of communities by wealth (2.9, 1.14-7.4). Higher rates of facility deliveries were also reported with antenatal complications (1.37, 1.05-1.79), and 4+ ANC visits (1.55, 1.14-2.09). Returning for PNC was highest among the wealthiest communities (2.25, 1.21-4.44); catchment areas of a new PNC program (1.89, 1.03-3.45); knowledge of danger signs (1.78, 1.13-2.83); community health worker counselling (4.22, 1.97-9.05); complicated delivery (3.25, 1.84-5.73); and previous health provider counselling on family planning (2.39, 1.71-3.35).Dropout from maternal care continuum is high, especially for the poorest, in rural Tanzania. Interactions with formal health system and perceived need for future

  5. Human Papillomavirus Genotype-Specific Prevalence Across the Continuum of Cervical Neoplasia and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joste, Nancy E.; Ronnett, Brigitte M.; Hunt, William C.; Pearse, Amanda; Langsfeld, Erika; Leete, Thomas; Jaramillo, MaryAnn; Stoler, Mark H.; Castle, Philip E.; Wheeler, Cosette M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The New Mexico HPV Pap Registry was established to measure the impact of cervical cancer prevention strategies in the United States. Prior to widespread HPV vaccine implementation, we established the baseline prevalence for a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes across the continuum of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cancer. Methods A population-based sample of 6,272 tissue specimens were tested for 37 HPV genotypes. The number of specimens tested within each diagnostic category was: 541 negative, 1,411 CIN grade 1 (CIN1), 2,226 CIN grade 2 (CIN2), and 2,094 CIN grade 3 (CIN3) or greater. Age-specific HPV prevalence was estimated within categories for HPV genotypes targeted by HPV vaccines. Results The combined prevalence of HPV genotypes included in the quadrivalent and nonavalent vaccines increased from 15.3% and 29.3% in CIN1 to 58.4% and 83.7% in CIN3, respectively. The prevalence of HPV types included in both vaccines tended to decrease with increasing age for CIN1, CIN2, CIN3, and squamous cell carcinoma, most notably for CIN3 and SCC. The six most common HPV types in descending order of prevalence were HPV-16, −31, −52, −58, −33, and −39 for CIN3 and HPV-16, −18, −31, −45, −52, and −33 for invasive cancers. Conclusions Health economic modeling of HPV vaccine impact should consider age-specific differences in HPV prevalence. Impact Population-based HPV prevalence in CIN is not well described but is requisite for longitudinal assessment of vaccine impact and to understand the effectiveness and performance of various cervical screening strategies in vaccinated and unvaccinated women. PMID:25363635

  6. Sexual minority cancer survivors' satisfaction with care.

    PubMed

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Kamen, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Satisfaction with care is important to cancer survivors' health outcomes. Satisfaction with care is not equal for all cancer survivors, and sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) cancer survivors may experience poor satisfaction with care. Data were drawn from the 2010 LIVESTRONG national survey. The final sample included 207 sexual minority cancer survivors and 4,899 heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care was compared by sexual orientation, and a Poisson regression model was computed to test the associations between sexual orientation and satisfaction with care, controlling for other relevant variables. Sexual minority cancer survivors had lower satisfaction with care than did heterosexual cancer survivors (B = -0.12, SE = 0.04, Wald χ(2) = 9.25, p< .002), even controlling for demographic and clinical variables associated with care. Sexual minorities experience poorer satisfaction with care compared to heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care is especially relevant to cancer survivorship in light of the cancer-related health disparities reported among sexual minority cancer survivors.

  7. Regional Multiteam Systems in Cancer Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Monson, John R.T.; Rizvi, Irfan; Savastano, Ann; Green, James S.A.; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Teamwork is essential for addressing many of the challenges that arise in the coordination and delivery of cancer care, especially for the problems that are presented by patients who cross geographic boundaries and enter and exit multiple health care systems at various times during their cancer care journeys. The problem of coordinating the care of patients with cancer is further complicated by the growing number of treatment options and modalities, incompatibilities among the vast variety of technology platforms that have recently been adopted by the health care industry, and competing and misaligned incentives for providers and systems. Here we examine the issue of regional care coordination in cancer through the prism of a real patient journey. This article will synthesize and elaborate on existing knowledge about coordination approaches for complex systems, in particular, in general and cancer care multidisciplinary teams; define elements of coordination derived from organizational psychology and human factors research that are applicable to team-based cancer care delivery; and suggest approaches for improving multidisciplinary team coordination in regional cancer care delivery and avenues for future research. The phenomenon of the mobile, multisystem patient represents a growing challenge in cancer care. Paradoxically, development of high-quality, high-volume centers of excellence and the ease of virtual communication and data sharing by using electronic medical records have introduced significant barriers to effective team-based cancer care. These challenges urgently require solutions. PMID:27650833

  8. Regional Multiteam Systems in Cancer Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Rizvi, Irfan; Savastano, Ann; Green, James S A; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-11-01

    Teamwork is essential for addressing many of the challenges that arise in the coordination and delivery of cancer care, especially for the problems that are presented by patients who cross geographic boundaries and enter and exit multiple health care systems at various times during their cancer care journeys. The problem of coordinating the care of patients with cancer is further complicated by the growing number of treatment options and modalities, incompatibilities among the vast variety of technology platforms that have recently been adopted by the health care industry, and competing and misaligned incentives for providers and systems. Here we examine the issue of regional care coordination in cancer through the prism of a real patient journey. This article will synthesize and elaborate on existing knowledge about coordination approaches for complex systems, in particular, in general and cancer care multidisciplinary teams; define elements of coordination derived from organizational psychology and human factors research that are applicable to team-based cancer care delivery; and suggest approaches for improving multidisciplinary team coordination in regional cancer care delivery and avenues for future research. The phenomenon of the mobile, multisystem patient represents a growing challenge in cancer care. Paradoxically, development of high-quality, high-volume centers of excellence and the ease of virtual communication and data sharing by using electronic medical records have introduced significant barriers to effective team-based cancer care. These challenges urgently require solutions.

  9. Forensic Assertive Community Treatment in a Continuum of Care for Male Internees in Belgium: Results After 33 Months.

    PubMed

    Marquant, Thomas; Sabbe, Bernard; Van Nuffel, Meike; Verelst, Rudy; Goethals, Kris

    2017-08-08

    Non-forensic or regular assertive community treatment (ACT) has positive effects on non-forensic outcomes but has poor effects on forensic outcome measures. In this study, we examined non-forensic and forensic outcome measures of a forensic adaptation of ACT (ForACT) within a continuum of care for internees. Data were collected retrospectively from files of 70 participants in the ForACT group who had been released from a forensic hospital. The control group comprised internees who had left prison and entered community-based care (n = 56). The ForACT group demonstrated significantly better outcomes on forensic measures, such as arrests and incarcerations, and had better community tenure. However, this group showed high hospitalization rates. The findings indicate that this type of community-based care can be beneficial for such internees; however, internees continue to experience difficulties reintegrating into society.

  10. Sexual Minority Cancer Survivors’ Satisfaction with Care

    PubMed Central

    Jabson, Jennifer; Kamen, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Satisfaction with care is important to cancer survivors’ health outcomes. Satisfaction with care is not equal for all cancer survivors and sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) cancer survivors may experience poor satisfaction with care. Methods Data were drawn from the 2010 LIVESTRONG national survey. The final sample included 207 sexual minority and 4,899 heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care was compared by sexual orientation and a Poisson regression model was computed to test the associations between sexual orientation and satisfaction with care, controlling for other relevant variables. Results Sexual minority cancer survivors had lower satisfaction with care than heterosexual cancer survivors (B=−0.12, SE=0.04, Wald χ2=9.25, p<0.002), even controlling for demographic and clinical variables associated with care. Conclusions Sexual minorities experience poorer satisfaction with care compared to heterosexual cancer survivors. Clinical Implications: Satisfaction with care is especially relevant to cancer survivorship in light of the cancer-related health disparities reported among sexual minority cancer survivors. PMID:26577277

  11. Integrating yoga into cancer care.

    PubMed

    DiStasio, Susan A

    2008-02-01

    Although yoga has been practiced in Eastern culture for thousands of years as part of life philosophy, classes in the United States only recently have been offered to people with cancer. The word yoga is derived from the Sanskrit root yuj, meaning to bind, join, and yoke. This reflection of the union of the body, mind, and spirit is what differentiates yoga from general exercise programs. Yoga classes in the United States generally consist of asanas (postures), which are designed to exercise every muscle, nerve, and gland in the body. The postures are combined with pranayama, or rhythmic control of the breath. As a complementary therapy, yoga integrates awareness of breath, relaxation, exercise, and social support--elements that are key to enhancing quality of life in patients with cancer. Yoga practice may assist cancer survivors in managing symptoms such as depression, anxiety, insomnia, pain, and fatigue. As with all exercise programs, participants need to be aware of potential risks and their own limitations. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with yoga as a complementary therapy, including current research findings, types of yoga, potential benefits, safety concerns, teacher training, and ways to integrate yoga into cancer care.

  12. Severe Obesity in Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Streu, Erin

    2016-05-01

    Increasing weight and body fat composition has an impact on cancer detection and staging. Obese women are less likely to engage in breast and cervical screening practices. Excessive adipose tissue makes physical assessment more difficult, and patients with a BMI greater than 35 kg/m2 may have deeper and wider pelvic structures, which make internal examinations problematic. A retrospective review of 324 primary surgical patients found that patients with a BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 are seven times less likely to undergo complete surgical staging for endometrial cancer compared with individuals with a BMI less than 40 kg/m2. In addition, healthcare provider bias against the need for screening, feelings of discomfort and embarrassment, as well as patient's fears of guilt, humiliation, and shame pose significant barriers to addressing the issue of obesity in clinical care with patients and family members. 
.

  13. Survivorship and Supportive Care - Cancer Currents Blog

    Cancer.gov

    A catalog of posts from NCI’s Cancer Currents blog on research related to survivorship and supportive care. Includes posts on the physical, psychosocial, and economic issues faced by cancer survivors and their caregivers.

  14. Research on Skin Cancer-Related Behaviors and Outcomes in the NIH Grant Portfolio, 2000-2014: Skin Cancer Intervention Across the Cancer Control Continuum (SCI-3C).

    PubMed

    Perna, Frank M; Dwyer, Laura A; Tesauro, Gina; Taber, Jennifer M; Norton, Wynne E; Hartman, Anne M; Geller, Alan C

    2017-05-01

    The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer broadly identified research gaps, but specific objectives are needed to further behavioral intervention research. To review National Institute of Health (NIH) grants targeting skin cancer-related behaviors and relevant outcomes. A portfolio analysis of the title, abstract, specific aims, and research plans of identified grant applications from 2000 to 2014 targeting skin cancer-related behaviors or testing behavioral intervention effects on cancer-relevant outcomes along the cancer continuum. Funding trends were compared along the cancer control continuum, with respect to investigator demographics and use of theory, technology, policy, and changes to environmental surroundings (built environment). A total of 112 submitted applications met inclusion criteria; of these, 40 (35.7%) were funded, and 31 of the 40 were interventions. Comparing the 40 funded grants with the 72 unfunded grants, the overall success rates did not differ significantly between male (33.3%) and female (37.3%) investigators, nor did the frequency of R01 awards (36.7% and 28.1%, respectively). Among intervention awards, most (24 of 31) addressed prevention. Fewer awards targeted detection alone or in conjunction with prevention (3) or cancer survivorship (4), and no grant addressed emotional sequelae or adherence behavior related to diagnosis or treatment. Fewer than half of funded grants aimed for clinically related targets (eg, sunburn reduction). Use of theory and technology occurred in more than 75% of grants. However, the full capability of proposed technology was infrequently used, and rarely did constructs of the proposed behavior change theory clearly and comprehensively drive the intervention approach. Policy or environmental manipulation was present in all dissemination grants but was rarely used elsewhere, and 19.4% included policy implementation and 25.8% proposed changes in built environment. Grant success rate in skin

  15. Coping - Care for Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Cancer.gov

    Survivorship care for children who have been treated for cancer is important. Get your child's treatment summary, survivorship plan, and recommendations on follow-up care clinics. Learn about long-term and late effects.

  16. Coping with Cancer - Survivorship Care for Children

    Cancer.gov

    Survivorship care for children who have been treated for cancer is important. Get your child's treatment summary, survivorship plan, and recommendation on follow-up care clinics. Learn about long-term and late effects.

  17. Continuous Retention and Viral Suppression Provide Further Insights Into the HIV Care Continuum Compared to the Cross-sectional HIV Care Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Colasanti, Jonathan; Kelly, Jane; Pennisi, Eugene; Hu, Yi-Juan; Root, Christin; Hughes, Denise; del Rio, Carlos; Armstrong, Wendy S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care continuum has become an important tool for evaluating HIV care. Current depictions of the care continuum are often cross-sectional and evaluate retention and viral suppression (VS) in a single year, yet the National HIV/AIDS Strategy calls for programs with long-lasting outcomes. Methods. Retrospective chart review of HIV-infected patients enrolled in a large, urban clinic in 2010 followed longitudinally for 36 months. McNemar comparisons and logistic regression analyses were conducted to evaluate covariate association with continuous retention and VS. Generalized estimating equation log-linear models were used to integrate time into the model. Results. Among 655 patients (77% male, 83% black, 54% men who have sex with men (MSM), 78% uninsured) continuous retention/VS at 12 months (84%/64%), 24 months (60%/48%), and 36 months (49%/39%) showed significant attrition (P < .0001) over time. Continuous retention was associated with prevalent VS at the end of 36 months (adjusted prevalence ratio 3.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.40, 4.07). 12-month retention for black (84%) and nonblack (85%) patients was equivalent, yet fewer blacks (46%) than nonblacks (63%) achieved 36-month continuous retention due to a significant interaction between race and time (aOR 0.75, 95% CI, .59, .95). Conclusions. Continuous retention is a critically important measure of long-term success in HIV treatment and the crucial component of successful treatment-as-prevention but is infrequently evaluated. Single cross-sections may overestimate successful retention and virologic outcomes. A longitudinal HIV care continuum provides greater insight into long-term outcomes and exposes disparities not evident with traditional cross-sectional care continua. PMID:26567263

  18. Approaches to chronic disease management for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: strategies through the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Hart, Mary K; Millard, Mark W

    2010-07-01

    Investigator-initiated research in both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease conducted at the Baylor Martha Foster Lung Care Center has sought to improve management throughout the continuum of respiratory care using a multidisciplinary approach. Respiratory care therapists employed in the primary care setting were shown to improve the quality of asthma care: rescue inhaler use decreased by 75% and respiratory symptom score decreased by 49% in patients who were seen by this midlevel specialty provider. In addition to similar results in a geriatric population, patients' diagnosis was changed in 48% of cases and treatment was changed in 76% of cases after the intervention. For pulmonary rehabilitation, an activity of daily living assessment form was created, and rehabilitation-whether traditional or water-based-was shown to improve patients' ability to perform activities of daily living and improve quality of life scores. The Rules of Two((R)), developed by Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas to simplify understanding of good asthma control, continues to be taught, and patient education has also been offered through asthma summer camps for children. Finally, a multidisciplinary team worked to develop a protocol for treatment of asthma patients in the emergency department and, through this effort, was able to reduce length of stay from an average of 278 minutes to an average of 168 minutes. These efforts aim to overcome the gap between recommended care and actual practice, so that patients benefit from evidence-based medicine and continuing refinements to diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Integrating oral health throughout cancer care.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Erin

    2015-10-01

    Oral health is often not a priority during cancer treatment; however, patients with cancer are at increased risk for oral complications during and after treatment. This article focuses on the importance of oral health care before, during, and after cancer treatment using the head, eyes, ears, nose, oral cavity, and throat, or HEENOT, approach. AT A GLANCE: Oral health is linked to overall health, and healthcare providers must be cognizant of the oral-systemic connection with patients undergoing cancer treatment, which may cause acute and chronic oral health problems. 
Oral assessment, prevention, early recognition, and treatment of oral problems must be incorporated into cancer care, particularly with the aid of an interprofessional team to meet patients' oral care needs. 
The head, eyes, ears, nose, oral cavity, and throat, or HEENOT, approach integrates oral care into patients' history taking, physical examination, and plan of cancer care.
.

  20. Breast cancer risk assessment in primary care.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shannon Lynn; Kartoz, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer (when excluding skin cancers) in women and the second most common cause of cancer death in women, with a lifetime prevalence of 12.5% (, ; ). Breast cancer screening reduces risk of cancer death, thereby increasing rate of survival to up to 89% for women with stage 1 and 2 breast cancer (; ). Despite these data, undue harm may occur with unnecessary screening because overidentification of risk, and excessive, costly biopsies may result. Costs and benefits of screening must be weighed. Nurses at all levels can play a pivotal role in promotion of appropriate breast cancer screening and subsequently breast cancer prevention by using accurate screening tools, such as the Tyrer-Cuzick model. Although there are some limitations with this tool, screening at the primary care level has demonstrated improved clinical outcomes (). Its use can help nurses accurately assess a woman's breast cancer risk, by promoting appropriate screening at the primary care level ().

  1. Understanding Fragmentation of Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Skolarus, Ted A.; Zhang, Yun; Hollenbeck, Brent K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancer survivors are particularly prone to the effects of a fragmented health care delivery system. The implications of fragmented cancer care across providers likely include greater spending and worse quality of care. For this reason, the authors measured relations between increasing fragmentation of cancer care, expenditures, and quality of care among prostate cancer survivors. METHODS A total of 67,736 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1992 and 2005 were identified using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data. Using the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index and a measure of the average number of prostate cancer providers over time, patients were sorted into 3 fragmentation groups (low, intermediate, and high). The authors then examined annual per capita survivorship expenditures and a measure of quality (ie, repetitive prostate-specific antigen [PSA] testing within 30 days) according to their fragmentation exposure using multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS Patients with highly fragmented cancer care tended to be younger, white, and of higher socioeconomic status (all P < .001). Prostate cancer survivorship interventions were most common among patients with the highest fragmentation of care across providers (P < .001). After adjustment for clinical characteristics and prostate cancer survivorship interventions, higher degrees of fragmentation continued to be associated with repetitive PSA testing (13.6% for high vs 7.0% for low fragmentation; P < .001) and greater spending, particularly among patients not treated with androgen deprivation therapy. CONCLUSIONS Fragmented prostate cancer survivorship care is expensive and associated with potentially unnecessary services. Efforts to improve care coordination via current policy initiatives, electronic medical records, and the implementation of cancer survivorship tools may help to decrease fragmentation of care and mitigate downstream consequences for prostate cancer

  2. Effectiveness of Continuum of Care—Linking Pre-Pregnancy Care and Pregnancy Care to Improve Neonatal and Perinatal Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kimiyo; Okawa, Sumiyo; Zamawe, Collins O. F.; Shibanuma, Akira; Nanishi, Keiko; Iwamoto, Azusa; Saw, Yu Mon; Jimba, Masamine

    2016-01-01

    In an era of Sustainable Development Goals, maternal, newborn, and child health still require improvement. Continuum of care is considered key to improving the health status of these populations. The continuum of care is a series of care strategies starting from pre-pregnancy to motherhood-childhood. The effectiveness of such linkage between the pregnancy, birth, and postnatal periods has been demonstrated. However, almost no study has assessed the impact of linkage that starts from pre-pregnancy to pregnancy care on maternal and child health. The present study attempts to fill this gap by assessing the effectiveness of the care linkage between pre-pregnancy and pregnancy care for reducing neonatal, perinatal, and maternal mortality in low- and middle-income countries. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials in low- and middle-income countries. The outcome variables were neonatal, perinatal, and maternal mortality. We searched databases such as PubMed/Medline, POPLINE, EBSCO/CINAHL, and ISI Web of Science for the period 2000–2014, using broad search terms (e.g., pre-pregnancy OR adolescent OR mother), combined with search terms specific for interventions, (e.g., family planning OR contraception OR spacing). From the 1,325 retrieved articles, five studies were finally analyzed. The meta-analysis showed that interventions linking pre-pregnancy and pregnancy care effectively reduced neonatal mortality (risk ratio [RR]: 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.71–0.89, I2 = 62%) and perinatal mortality (RR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.75–0.94, I2 = 73%), but did not show an effect on maternal mortality. Neonatal and perinatal mortality could be reduced by linking pre-pregnancy and pregnancy care. This linkage of pre-pregnancy and pregnancy cares is an essential component of continuum of care to improve newborn health. Review Registration PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews (CRD

  3. Improving Modern Cancer Care Through Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Steven B.; Wagner, Edward H.; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; Tuzzio, Leah; Greene, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer care system is increasingly complex, marked by multiple hand-offs between primary care and specialty providers, inadequate communication among providers, and lack of clarity about a “medical home” (the ideal accountable care provider) for cancer patients. Patients and families often cite such difficulties as information deficits, uncoordinated care, and insufficient psychosocial support. This article presents a review of the challenges of delivering well coordinated, patient-centered cancer care in a complex modern healthcare system. An examination is made of the potential role of information technology (IT) advances to help both providers and patients. Using the published literature as background, a review is provided of selected work that is underway to improve communication, coordination, and quality of care. Also discussed are additional challenges and opportunities to advancing understanding of how patient data, provider and patient involvement, and informatics innovations can support high-quality cancer care. PMID:21521595

  4. Assessing the HIV Care Continuum in Latin America: progress in clinical retention, cART use and viral suppression.

    PubMed

    Rebeiro, Peter F; Cesar, Carina; Shepherd, Bryan E; De Boni, Raquel B; Cortés, Claudia P; Rodriguez, Fernanda; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo; Pape, Jean W; Padgett, Denis; Hoces, Daniel; McGowan, Catherine C; Cahn, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We assessed trends in HIV Care Continuum outcomes associated with delayed disease progression and reduced transmission within a large Latin American cohort over a decade: clinical retention, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) use and viral suppression (VS). Adults from Caribbean, Central and South America network for HIV epidemiology clinical cohorts in seven countries contributed data between 2003 and 2012. Retention was defined as two or more HIV care visits annually, >90 days apart. cART was defined as prescription of three or more antiretroviral agents annually. VS was defined as HIV-1 RNA <200 copies/mL at last measurement annually. cART and VS denominators were subjects with at least one visit annually. Multivariable modified Poisson regression was used to assess temporal trends and examine associations between age, sex, HIV transmission mode, cohort, calendar year and time in care. Among 18,799 individuals in retention analyses, 14,380 in cART analyses and 13,330 in VS analyses, differences existed between those meeting indicator definitions versus those not by most characteristics. Retention, cART and VS significantly improved from 2003 to 2012 (63 to 77%, 74 to 91% and 53 to 82%, respectively; p<0.05, each). Female sex (risk ratio (RR)=0.97 vs. males) and injection drug use as HIV transmission mode (RR=0.83 vs. male sexual contact with males (MSM)) were significantly associated with lower retention, but unrelated with cART or VS. MSM (RR=0.96) significantly decreased the probability of cART compared with heterosexual transmission. HIV Care Continuum outcomes improved over time in Latin America, though disparities for vulnerable groups remain. Efforts must be made to increase retention, cART and VS, while engaging in additional research to sustain progress in these settings.

  5. Assessing the HIV Care Continuum in Latin America: progress in clinical retention, cART use and viral suppression

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiro, Peter F; Cesar, Carina; Shepherd, Bryan E; De Boni, Raquel B; Cortés, Claudia P; Rodriguez, Fernanda; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo; Pape, Jean W; Padgett, Denis; Hoces, Daniel; McGowan, Catherine C; Cahn, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We assessed trends in HIV Care Continuum outcomes associated with delayed disease progression and reduced transmission within a large Latin American cohort over a decade: clinical retention, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) use and viral suppression (VS). Methods Adults from Caribbean, Central and South America network for HIV epidemiology clinical cohorts in seven countries contributed data between 2003 and 2012. Retention was defined as two or more HIV care visits annually, >90 days apart. cART was defined as prescription of three or more antiretroviral agents annually. VS was defined as HIV-1 RNA <200 copies/mL at last measurement annually. cART and VS denominators were subjects with at least one visit annually. Multivariable modified Poisson regression was used to assess temporal trends and examine associations between age, sex, HIV transmission mode, cohort, calendar year and time in care. Results Among 18,799 individuals in retention analyses, 14,380 in cART analyses and 13,330 in VS analyses, differences existed between those meeting indicator definitions versus those not by most characteristics. Retention, cART and VS significantly improved from 2003 to 2012 (63 to 77%, 74 to 91% and 53 to 82%, respectively; p<0.05, each). Female sex (risk ratio (RR)=0.97 vs. males) and injection drug use as HIV transmission mode (RR=0.83 vs. male sexual contact with males (MSM)) were significantly associated with lower retention, but unrelated with cART or VS. MSM (RR=0.96) significantly decreased the probability of cART compared with heterosexual transmission. Conclusions HIV Care Continuum outcomes improved over time in Latin America, though disparities for vulnerable groups remain. Efforts must be made to increase retention, cART and VS, while engaging in additional research to sustain progress in these settings. PMID:27065108

  6. Criminal justice involvement history is associated with better HIV care continuum metrics among a population-based sample of young black MSM.

    PubMed

    Schneider, John A; Kozloski, Michael; Michaels, Stuart; Skaathun, Britt; Voisin, Dexter; Lancki, Nicola; Morgan, Ethan; Khanna, Aditya; Green, Keith; Coombs, Robert W; Friedman, Samuel R; Laumann, Edward; Schumm, Phil

    2017-01-02

    To examine how history of criminal justice involvement (CJI) is related to HIV care continuum metrics among young black MSM 16-29 years of age. Population-based survey. From 2013 to 2014, a representative sample of young black MSM was generated using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in Chicago (n = 618). HIV antibody/antigen and RNA testing were performed using dry blood spots. Factors assessed in the care continuum included HIV testing, HIV diagnosis, linkage to care within 6 months, retention in care, adherence to antiretrovirals, and viral suppression. RDS-weighted regression models examined the associations between history of CJI, including frequency of CJI and durations of stay and each of the continuum metrics. A final analytic sample of 618 participants was generated through RDS chains of up to 13 waves in length and with a mean of 2.1 recruits per participant. At enrollment, 40.8% had prior history of CJI and 34.6% were HIV seropositive. Of persons reporting HIV seropositive status, 58.4% were linked to care, 40.2% were retained in care, 32.2% were adherent to antiretrovirals, and 24.3% were virally suppressed. Any CJI history was associated with the overall care continuum (adjusted odds ratio = 2.35; 95% confidence interval 1.13-4.88) and was most associated with increased retention in care [adjusted odds ratio = 3.72 (1.77-7.84)]. Having one CJI experience and detention for only 1 day was associated with better retention in care compared with no or more frequent CJI. Those with a previous history of CJI were more successful in achieving most HIV care continuum metrics. Frequent and cycling CJI, however, was detrimental to HIV care.

  7. Stroke family caregivers' support needs change across the care continuum: a qualitative study using the timing it right framework.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jill I; Naglie, Gary; Silver, Frank L; Gignac, Monique A M

    2013-02-01

    Family caregivers provide essential support as stroke survivors' return to community living, but it is not standard clinical practice to prepare or provide ongoing support for their care-giving role. In addition, health care professionals (HCPs) experiences with providing support to caregivers have not been explored previously. The objectives of this qualitative study were to: (1) explore the support needs over time from the perspective of caregivers, (2) explore the support needs over time from the perspective of HCPs, and (3) compare and contrast caregivers' and HCPs' perspectives. A qualitative study with stroke family caregivers (n = 24) and HCPs (n = 14). In-depth interviews were audio taped, transcribed, and analyzed using Framework Analysis. Three main themes emerged concerning: (1) types and intensity of support needed; (2) who provides support and the method of providing support; and (3) primary focus of care. These themes are discussed in relation to the TIR framework. Caregivers' needs for support and the individuals most suited to providing support change across the stroke survivor's recovery trajectory. Changes to service delivery to better support caregivers may include: (1) addressing caregivers' changing needs across the care continuum; (2) implementing a family-centered model of care; and (3) providing 7-day per week inpatient rehabilitation.

  8. Perceptions of Cancer Care and Clinical Trials in the Black Community: Implications for Care Coordination Between Oncology and Primary Care Teams.

    PubMed

    Sprague Martinez, Linda; Freeman, Elmer R; Winkfield, Karen M

    2017-09-01

    communities and increasing awareness of clinical trials. However, PCPs and CHCs are often stretched to capacity with caring for their communities. This leaves the oncology community well positioned to create programs to bridge the communication gaps and provide resources necessary to support oncologic care along the cancer continuum, from prevention through survivorship. © AlphaMed Press 2017.

  9. Best practice in colorectal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Claire

    Nurses need up-to-date knowledge of colorectal cancer. This article provides an overview of the aetiology and risk factors for this disease, diagnostic and staging investigations, treatment options and future care. Managing colorectal cancer is complex. Patients can have a range of healthcare needs. Nurses play an increasingly important role in informing, supporting and coordinating care to improve patients' quality of life.

  10. Optimizing Cancer Care Delivery through Implementation Science

    PubMed Central

    Adesoye, Taiwo; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 Institute of Medicine report investigating cancer care concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to an increased demand for care, increasing complexity of treatment, decreasing work force, and rising costs. Engaging patients and incorporating evidence-based care into routine clinical practice are essential components of a high-quality cancer delivery system. However, a gap currently exists between the identification of beneficial research findings and the application in clinical practice. Implementation research strives to address this gap. In this review, we discuss key components of high-quality implementation research. We then apply these concepts to a current cancer care delivery challenge in women’s health, specifically the implementation of a surgery decision aid for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. PMID:26858933

  11. Contribution of imaging to cancer care costs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Czernin, Johannes

    2011-12-01

    Health care costs in the United States are increasing faster than the gross domestic product (GDP), and the growth rate of costs related to diagnostic imaging exceeds those of overall health care expenditures. Here we show that the contribution of imaging to cancer care costs pales in comparison to those of other key cost components, such as cancer drugs. Specifically, we estimate that (18)F-FDG PET or PET/CT accounted for approximately 1.5% of overall Medicare cancer care costs in 2009. Moreover, we propose that the appropriate use of (18)F-FDG PET or PET/CT could reduce the costs of cancer care. Because the U.S. health care system is complex and because it is difficult to find accurate data elsewhere, most cost and use assessments are based on published data from the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

  12. [Spiritual care model for terminal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ju-Fen; Lin, Ya-Ching; Huang, Pai-Ho; Wei, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Jia-Ling

    2014-12-01

    Providing spiritual care to patients with advanced cancer may improve the quality of life of these patients and help them experience a good death. Cancer patients are eager for additional spiritual care and for a sense of peace at the end of their life. However, spirituality is an abstract concept. The literature on spiritual care focuses primarily on elaborations of spirituality theory. Thus, first-line medical care professionals lack clear guidelines for managing the spiritual needs of terminal cancer patients. The purposes of this article were to: 1) introduce a spiritual care model based on the concept of repair and recovery of relationships that addresses the relationship between the self and God, others, id, and objects and 2) set out a four-step strategy for this model that consists of understanding, empathizing, guiding, and growing. This article provides operational guidelines for the spiritual care of terminal cancer patients.

  13. Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Survival following a diagnosis of cancer is contingent upon an interplay of factors, some non-modifiable (e.g., age, sex, genetics) and some modifiable (e.g., volitional choices) but the majority determined by circumstance (personal, social, health system context and capacity, and health policy). Accordingly, mortality and survival rates vary considerably as a function of geography, opportunity, wealth and development. Quality of life is impacted similarly, such that aspects of care related to coordination and integration of care across primary, community and specialist environments; symptom control, palliative and end-of-life care for those who will die of cancer; and survivorship challenges for those who will survive cancer, differs greatly across low, middle and high-income resource settings. Session 3 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on cancer care and treatment through three plenary presentations and five interactive workshop discussions: 1) establishing, implementing, operating and sustaining the capacity for quality cancer care; 2) the role of primary, community, and specialist care in cancer care and treatment; 3) the economics of affordable and sustainable cancer care; 4) issues around symptom control, support, and palliative/end-of-life care; and 5) issues around survivorship. A number of recommendations were proposed relating to capacity-building (standards and guidelines, protocols, new technologies and training and deployment) for safe, appropriate evidence-informed care; mapping and analysis of variations in primary, community and specialist care across countries with identification of models for effective, integrated clinical practice; the importance of considering the introduction, or expansion, of evidence-supported clinical practices from the perspectives of health economic impact, the value for health resources expended, and sustainability; capacity-building for palliative, end-of-life care and symptom control and

  14. Perspectives on personalized cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Dancik, Garrett M.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Summary Sir William Osler has been quoted as saying “If it were not for the great variability among individuals, medicine might as well be a science and not an art”. Molecular profiles, be they host or those providing insight into the genomic changes that define a cancerous cell, together possess the predictive ability required for the various aspects of individualized care: risk assessment, patient prognosis, and prediction of therapeutic responses. Such profiles, obtained by RNA, DNA and protein microarrays, SNP arrays, methylation screens, and high throughput or targeted gene sequencing can provide patient- and tumor-specific information that details the biological complexity of a particular cancer and can be exploited to understand its clinical implications and glean therapeutic insights. This knowledge is also being combined with host factors to begin formulating an understanding at the system level of how the tumor interacts with the host and how this relationship can be exploited therapeutically or for biomarker development. Here we discuss these advances and how they may relate to urologic oncology. PMID:22489325

  15. Cancer Survivorship for Primary Care Annotated Bibliography.

    PubMed

    Westfall, Matthew Y; Overholser, Linda; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M

    2015-06-01

    Long-term cancer survivorship care is a relatively new and rapidly advancing field of research. Increasing cancer survivorship rates have created a huge population of long-term cancer survivors whose cancer-specific needs challenge healthcare infrastructure and highlight a significant deficit of knowledge and guidelines in transitional care from treatment to normalcy/prolonged survivorship. As the paradigm of cancer care has changed from a fixation on the curative to the maintenance on long-term overall quality of life, so to, has the delineation of responsibility between oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). As more patients enjoy long-term survival, PCPs play a more comprehensive role in cancer care following acute treatment. To this end, this annotated bibliography was written to provide PCPs and other readers with an up-to-date and robust base of knowledge on long-term cancer survivorship, including definitions and epidemiological information as well as specific considerations and recommendations on physical, psychosocial, sexual, and comorbidity needs of survivors. Additionally, significant information is included on survivorship care, specifically Survivorship Care Plans (SPCs) and their evolution, utilization by oncologists and PCPs, and current gaps, as well as an introduction to patient navigation programs. Given rapid advancements in cancer research, this bibliography is meant to serve as current baseline reference outlining the state of the science.

  16. Behind the Cascade: Analyzing Spatial Patterns along the HIV Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Eberhart, Michael G.; Yehia, Baligh R.; Hillier, Amy; Voytek, Chelsea D.; Blank, Michael; Frank, Ian; Metzger, David S.; Brady, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Successful HIV treatment as prevention requires individuals to be tested, aware of their status, linked to and retained in care, and virally suppressed. Spatial analysis may be useful for monitoring HIV care by identifying geographic areas with poor outcomes. Methods Retrospective cohort of 1,704 people newly diagnosed with HIV identified from Philadelphia’s Enhanced HIV/AIDS Reporting System in 2008–2009, with follow-up to 2011. Outcomes of interest were not linked to care, not linked to care within 90 days, not retained in care, and not virally suppressed. Spatial patterns were analyzed using K-functions to identify ‘hot spots’ for targeted intervention. Geographic components were included in regression analyses along with demographic factors to determine their impact on each outcome. Results Overall, 1,404 persons (82%) linked to care; 75% (1,059/1,404) linked within 90 days; 37% (526/1,059) were retained in care; and 72% (379/526) achieved viral suppression. 59 census tracts were in ‘hot spots’, with no overlap between outcomes. Persons residing in geographic areas identified by the local K-function analyses were more likely to not link to care (AOR 1.76 [95% CI 1.30–2.40]), not link to care within 90 days (1.49, 1.12–1.99), not be retained in care (1.84, 1.39–2.43), and not be virally suppressed (3.23, 1.87–5.59) than persons not residing in the identified areas. Conclusion This study is the first to identify spatial patterns as a strong independent predictor of linkage to care, retention in care, and viral suppression. Spatial analyses are a valuable tool for characterizing the HIV epidemic and treatment cascade. PMID:24126447

  17. Gaps in the hepatitis C continuum of care among sex workers in Vancouver, British Columbia: Implications for voluntary hepatitis C virus testing, treatment and care

    PubMed Central

    Socías, M Eugenia; Shannon, Kate; Montaner, Julio S; Guillemi, Silvia; Dobrer, Sabina; Nguyen, Paul; Goldenberg, Shira; Deering, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) eradication leads to reduced morbidity, mortality and transmission. Despite the disproportionate burden of HCV among sex workers, data regarding the HCV care continuum in this population remain negligible. METHODS: Using baseline data from an ongoing cohort of women sex workers in Vancouver (An Evaluation of Sex Workers’ Health Access, January 2010 to August 2013), the authors assessed HCV prevalence and engagement in the HCV care continuum within the past year. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate associations with recent (ie, in the past year) HCV testing. RESULTS: Among 705 sex workers, 302 (42.8%) were HCV seropositive. Of these, 22.5% were previously unaware of their HCV status, 41.7% had accessed HCV-related care, 13.9% were offered treatment and only 1.0% received treatment. Among 552 HCV-seronegative sex workers, only one-half (52.9%) reported a recent HCV test. In multivariable analysis, women who self-identified as a sexual/gender minority (adjusted OR [aOR] 1.89 [95% CI 1.11 to 3.24]), resided in the inner city drug use epicentre (aOR 3.19 [95%CI 1.78 to 5.73]) and used injection (aOR 2.00 [95% CI 1.19 to 3.34]) or noninjection drugs (aOR 1.95 [95% CI 1.00 to 3.78]) had increased odds of undergoing a recent HCV test, while immigrant participants (aOR 0.24 [95% CI 0.12 to 0.48]) had decreased odds. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a high burden of HCV among sex workers, large gaps in the HCV care continuum remain. Particularly concerning are the low access to HCV testing, with one-fifth of women living with HCV being previously unaware of their status, and the exceptionally low prevalence of HCV treatment. There is a critical need for further research to better understand and address barriers to engage in the HCV continuum for sex workers. PMID:26492129

  18. Latinos in the United States on the HIV/AIDS care continuum by birth country/region: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Diana M; Trepka, Mary Jo; Dillon, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    Twenty percent of Latinos with HIV in the US are unaware of their HIV status, 33% are linked to care late, and 74% do not reach viral suppression. Disparities along this HIV/AIDS care continuum may be present between various ethnic groups historically categorised as Latino. To identify differences along the HIV/AIDS care continuum between US Latinos of varying birth countries/regions a systematic review of articles published in English between 2002 and 2013 was conducted using MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Web of Science. Studies that reported on one or more steps of the HIV/AIDS care continuum and reported results by birth country/region for Latinos were included. Latinos born in Mexico and Central America were found to be at increased risk of late diagnosis compared with US-born Latinos. No studies were found that reported on linkage to HIV care or viral load suppression by country/region of birth. Lower survival was found among Latinos born in Puerto Rico compared with Latinos born in mainland US. Inconsistent differences in survival were found among Latinos born in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America. Socio/cultural context, immigration factors, and documentation status are discussed as partial explanations for disparities along the HIV/AIDS care continuum.

  19. Interventions to optimise the care continuum for chronic viral hepatitis: a systematic review and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kali; Fitzpatrick, Thomas; Walsh, Nick; Kim, Ji Young; Chou, Roger; Lackey, Mellanye; Scott, Julia; Lo, Ying-Ru; Tucker, Joseph D

    2016-12-01

    Advances in therapy for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) have ushered in a new era in chronic hepatitis treatment. To maximise the effectiveness of these medicines, individuals must be engaged and retained in care. We analysed operational interventions to enhance chronic viral hepatitis testing, linkage to care, treatment uptake, adherence, and viral suppression or cure. We did a systematic review of operational interventions, and did meta-analyses for sufficiently comparable data. We searched PubMed, Embase, WHO library, International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, PsycINFO, and CINAHL for randomised controlled trials and controlled non-randomised studies that examined operational interventions along the chronic viral hepatitis care continuum, published in English up to Dec 31, 2014. We included non-pharmaceutical intervention studies with primary or secondary outcomes of testing, linkage to care, treatment uptake, treatment adherence, treatment completion, treatment outcome, or viral endpoints. We excluded dissertations and studies of children only. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers, with disagreements resolved by a third reviewer. Studies were assessed for bias. Data from similar interventions were pooled and quality of evidence was assessed using GRADE. This study was registered in PROSPERO (42014015094). We identified 7583 unduplicated studies, and included 56 studies that reported outcomes along the care continuum (41 for HCV and 18 for HBV). All studies except one were from high-income countries. Lay health worker HBV test promotion interventions increased HBV testing rates (relative risk [RR] 2·68, 95% CI 1·82-3·93). Clinician reminders to prompt HCV testing during clinical visits increased HCV testing rates (3·70, 1·81-7·57). Nurse-led educational interventions improved HCV treatment completion (1·14, 1·05-1·23) and cure (odds ratio [OR] 1·93, 95% CI 1·44-2·59). Coordinated mental health, substance misuse

  20. Global health from a cancer care perspective.

    PubMed

    Pesec, Madeline; Sherertz, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is now recognized as one of the four leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and incidence is expected to rise significantly in the next two decades. Unfortunately, low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) suffer disproportionately from the world's cancer cases. The growing burden of cancer and maldistribution of cancer care resources in LMIC warrant a massive re-evaluation of the structural inequalities that produce global oncological disparities and a worldwide commitment to improve both prevention and treatment strategies. Efforts to improve cancer care capacity should focus on horizontal strengthening of healthcare systems that provide safe, affordable, effective and sustainable care. In response to current deficiencies, many international organizations have started to partner with LMIC to create solutions. Telemedicine and international collaboration are also promising ways to effect change and improve global oncological care.

  1. American Cancer Society prostate cancer survivorship care guidelines.

    PubMed

    Skolarus, Ted A; Wolf, Andrew M D; Erb, Nicole L; Brooks, Durado D; Rivers, Brian M; Underwood, Willie; Salner, Andrew L; Zelefsky, Michael J; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Slovin, Susan F; Wittmann, Daniela A; Hoyt, Michael A; Sinibaldi, Victoria J; Chodak, Gerald; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer survivors approach 2.8 million in number and represent 1 in 5 of all cancer survivors in the United States. While guidelines exist for timely treatment and surveillance for recurrent disease, there is limited availability of guidelines that facilitate the provision of posttreatment clinical follow-up care to address the myriad of long-term and late effects that survivors may face. Based on recommendations set forth by a National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center expert panel, the American Cancer Society developed clinical follow-up care guidelines to facilitate the provision of posttreatment care by primary care clinicians. These guidelines were developed using a combined approach of evidence synthesis and expert consensus. Existing guidelines for health promotion, surveillance, and screening for second primary cancers were referenced when available. To promote comprehensive follow-up care and optimal health and quality of life for the posttreatment survivor, the guidelines address health promotion, surveillance for prostate cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, long-term and late effects assessment and management, psychosocial issues, and care coordination among the oncology team, primary care clinicians, and nononcology specialists. A key challenge to the development of these guidelines was the limited availability of published evidence for management of prostate cancer survivors after treatment. Much of the evidence relies on studies with small sample sizes and retrospective analyses of facility-specific and population databases.

  2. Access to Medical and Mental Health Services Across the HIV Care Continuum Among Young Transgender Women: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Dowshen, Nadia; Lee, Susan; Franklin, Joshua; Castillo, Marné; Barg, Frances

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: (1) To describe psychosocial, medical, and mental health outcomes of young transgender women (YTW) living with or at risk for HIV infection and (2) to explore barriers and facilitators to medical and mental health services across the HIV care continuum. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional observational study of YTW aged 16-24 years who were at risk for contracting or living with HIV. Participants were recruited from an adolescent HIV clinic and local community-based organizations that serve YTW. The single study visit included: a computer-assisted self-interview of demographics, medical and mental health measures, a qualitative semi-structured interview, optional rapid HIV testing for HIV-negative/status-unknown participants, and a chart review to determine rates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription and viral suppression among HIV+ participants. Descriptive statistics were used for quantitative data, and a modified-grounded theory approach was used for qualitative analysis. Results: Participants (n=25) had a mean age of 21.2 years; the majority were non-white (76%), had less than a college education (76%), were unemployed (52%), and had an income <$12,000/year (80%). More than one-third were unstably housed (36%) and uninsured (36%), and 28% reported having transactional sex. A majority had taken gender-affirming hormones (72%), but 17% obtained them from a source other than their doctor. Among HIV+ participants (n=8), 50% were prescribed ART and all four participants achieved viral suppression. Qualitative themes included lack of respect for or misunderstanding of gender identity, mismatch of mental health needs with available provider skills, challenges in finding HIV prevention services during adolescence or when transitioning to adult care, and importance of workforce diversity, including representation of transgender women in care teams. Conclusion: This study identified significant unmet mental health needs and several barriers and

  3. PALLIATIVE CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Alan; Ezzat, Adnan

    1997-01-01

    The increasing life expectancy in Saudi Arabia will be accompanied by an alteration of the patterns of disease similar to that in Western countries. One of these will be cancer, the second leading cause of death in the west at present, where 1:3 people develop cancer during their lifetime and 1:4 die of it. Cancer deaths are rarely easy. The distress particularly the pain it can cause is legendary. Palliative care is the care and study of patients with active progressive far advanced disease, where cure is impossible, the prognosis predictably short, and the focus of care is the patient's quality of life. A Palliative Care Program has been developed at KFSH&RC, since 1991. This has broadened the spectrum of health services available to cancer patients. Palliative care needs to be more widely available in the kingdom to relieve an important cause of human suffering. PMID:23008572

  4. Pediatric Dentistry Specialty as Part of a Longer Continuum of Care: A Commentary.

    PubMed

    Waldman, H Barry; Rader, Rick; Sulkes, Stephen; Perlman, Steven P

    The transition of teenagers with special needs to young adulthood is a complex period for the children and their families. This transition is especially difficult when it comes to securing needed oral health care. The teenager is forced to transfer from the services of an age defined pediatric dental specialist with training to provide care for individuals with special needs, to 1) general practitioners with limited formal training and often unwillingness to provide care and 2) at a period when most states provide limited or lack of adult dental Medicaid programs. These issues and the need to expand pediatric dental specialist involvement in the general transitional period are reviewed. "Pediatric dentistry is an age-defined specialty that provides both primary and comprehensive preventive and therapeutic oral health care for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health care needs."(1) "Our system of preparing and maintaining our abilities to provide oral health services for an increasing diverse population must be brought up to date to meet the challenges posed by the treatment of young adults with disabilities."(2) "Most responding dentists (to a national study of pediatric dentists) helped adolescents with and without SHCNs (Special Health Care Needs) make the transition into adult care, but the major barrier was the availability of general dentists and specialists."(3).

  5. Clinical perspective: Linking psychosocial care to the disease continuum in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zabora, James; Buzaglo, Joanne; Kennedy, Vicki; Richards, Tiffany; Schapmire, Tara; Zebrack, Brad; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2015-08-01

    A model of psychosocial care specific for patients with multiple myeloma and their caregivers has not yet been proposed. We sought to develop a model of care that considers the specific profile of this disease. The authors, representing a multidisciplinary care team, met in December of 2012 to identify a model of psychosocial care for patients with multiple myeloma and their caregivers. This model was determined by consensus during the meeting and via total agreement following the meeting. The meeting was sponsored by Onyx Pharmaceuticals. The need for targeted psychosocial care for the multiple myeloma patient and caregiver throughout the disease process is essential to ensure quality of life and optimal treatment outcomes. We propose herein the first known model of care for the treatment of multiple myeloma that engages both the patient and their caregivers. Innovative partnerships between psychosocial providers and other entities such as pharmaceutical companies can maximize resources for comprehensive program development. This manuscript proposes a model of care that promotes active engagement in therapies for multiple myeloma while engaging the individual patient and their family caregivers. This treatment approach must be evidence based in terms of distress screening tools, comprehensive psychosocial assessments, and, most importantly, in the interventions and measurements of response that clinicians apply to this population.

  6. Associations in the continuum of care for maternal, newborn and child health: a population-based study of 12 sub-Saharan Africa countries.

    PubMed

    Owili, Patrick Opiyo; Muga, Miriam Adoyo; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Huang, Nicole; Chien, Li-Yin

    2016-05-17

    Despite the progress in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5, inequity in the utilization of maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) care services still remain high in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The continuum of care for MNCH that recognizes a tight inter-relationship between maternal, newborn and child health at different time periods and location is key towards reducing inequity in health. In this study, we explored the distributions in the utilization MNCH services in 12 SSA countries and further investigated the associations in the continuum of care for MNCH. Using Demographic and Health Surveys data of 12 countries in SSA, structural equation modeling approach was employed to analyze the complex relationships in continuum of care for MNCH model. The Full Information Maximum Likelihood estimation procedure which account for the Missing at Random (MAR) and Missing Completely at Random (MCAR) assumptions was adopted in LISREL 8.80. The distribution of MNCH care utilization was presented before the estimated association in the continuum of care for MNCH model. Some countries have a consistently low (Mali, Nigeria, DR Congo and Rwanda) or high (Namibia, Senegal, Gambia and Liberia) utilization in at least two levels of MNCH care. The path relationships in the continuum of care for MNCH from 'adequate antenatal care' to 'adequate delivery care' (0.32) and to 'adequate child's immunization' (0.36); from 'adequate delivery care' to 'adequate postnatal care' (0.78) and to 'adequate child's immunization' (0.15) were positively associated and statistically significant at p < 0.001. Only the path relationship from 'adequate postnatal care' to 'adequate child's immunization' (-0.02) was negatively associated and significant at p < 0.001. In conclusion, utilization of each level of MNCH care is related to the next level of care, that is - antenatal care is associated with delivery care which is then associated with postnatal and subsequently with child

  7. Quality along the continuum: a health facility assessment of intrapartum and postnatal care in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Robin C; Lohela, Terhi J; Manu, Alexander; Vesel, Linda; Okyere, Eunice; Edmond, Karen; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Kirkwood, Betty R; Gabrysch, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care using a health facility assessment, and to estimate "effective coverage" of skilled attendance in Brong Ahafo, Ghana. We conducted an assessment of all 86 health facilities in seven districts in Brong Ahafo. Using performance of key signal functions and the availability of relevant drugs, equipment and trained health professionals, we created composite quality categories in four dimensions: routine delivery care, emergency obstetric care (EmOC), emergency newborn care (EmNC) and non-medical quality. Linking the health facility assessment to surveillance data we estimated "effective coverage" of skilled attendance as the proportion of births in facilities of high quality. Delivery care was offered in 64/86 facilities; only 3-13% fulfilled our requirements for the highest quality category in any dimension. Quality was lowest in the emergency care dimensions, with 63% and 58% of facilities categorized as "low" or "substandard" for EmOC and EmNC, respectively. This implies performing less than four EmOC or three EmNC signal functions, and/or employing less than two skilled health professionals, and/or that no health professionals were present during our visit. Routine delivery care was "low" or "substandard" in 39% of facilities, meaning 25/64 facilities performed less than six routine signal functions and/or had less than two skilled health professionals and/or less than one midwife. While 68% of births were in health facilities, only 18% were in facilities with "high" or "highest" quality in all dimensions. Our comprehensive facility assessment showed that quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care was generally low in the study region. While coverage with facility delivery was 68%, we estimated "effective coverage" of skilled attendance at 18%, thus revealing a large "quality gap." Effective coverage could be a meaningful indicator of progress towards reducing maternal

  8. Development of an HIV Testing Dashboard to Complement the HIV Care Continuum Among MSM, PWID, and Heterosexuals in Washington, DC, 2007-2015.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Rudy; Greenberg, Alan; Magnus, Manya; Opoku, Jenevieve; Kharfen, Michael; Kuo, Irene

    2017-07-01

    We developed an HIV testing dashboard to complement the HIV care continuum in selected high-risk populations. Using National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) data, we examined trends in HIV testing and care for men who have sex with men (MSM), persons who inject drugs (PWID), and heterosexuals at elevated risk (HET). Between 2007 and 2015, 4792 participants ≥18 years old completed a behavioral survey and were offered HIV testing. For the testing dashboard, proportions ever tested, tested in the past year, testing HIV-positive, and newly testing positive were calculated. An abbreviated care continuum for self-reported positive (SRP) persons included ever engagement in care, past year care, and current antiretroviral (ARV) use. The testing dashboard and care continuum were calculated separately for each population. Chi-square test for trend was used to assess significant trends over time. Among MSM, lifetime HIV testing and prevalence significantly increased from 96% to 98% (P = 0.01) and 14%-20% (P = 0.02) over time; prevalence was highest among black MSM at all time points. HIV prevalence among female persons who inject drugs was significantly higher in 2015 vs. 2009 (27% and 13%; P < 0.01). Among heterosexuals at elevated risk from 2010 to 2013, annual testing increased significantly (45%-73%; P < 0.001) and the proportion newly diagnosed decreased significantly (P < 0.01). Self-reported positive MSM had high levels of care engagement and antiretroviral use; among self-reported positive persons who inject drugs and heterosexuals at elevated risk, past year care engagement and antiretroviral use increased over time. The HIV testing dashboard can be used to complement the HIV care continuum to display improvements and disparities in HIV testing and care over time.

  9. Effect of a Novel Interdisciplinary Teaching Program in the Care-continuum on Medical Student Knowledge and Self-Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lathia, Amanda; Rothberg, Michael; Heflin, Mitchell; Nottingham, Kelly; Messinger-Rapport, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Medical students report that they receive inadequate training in different levels of care, including care transitions to and from post-acute (PA) and long-term care (LTC). The authors implemented the Medical Students as Teachers in Extended Care (MedTEC) program as an educational innovation at the Cleveland Clinic to address training in the care-continuum, as well as the new medical student and physician competencies in PA/LTC. MedTEC is a 7-hour interactive program that supplements standard geriatric didactics during the medical student primary care rotation. This study evaluated the performance of the program in improving medical student knowledge and attitudes on levels and transitions of care. The program occurs in a community facility that includes subacute/skilled nursing, assisted living, and nursing home care. Five to 8 students completing their primary care rotation at the Cleveland Clinic are required to participate in the MedTEC program each month. The program includes up to 3 hours of interactive discussion and opportunities to meet facility staff, residents, and patients. The highlight of the program is a student-led in-service for facility staff. With institutional review board approval as an exempt educational research project, pre- and postactivity surveys assessed self-efficacy and knowledge regarding levels of care for students who participated in the program and a student comparison group. The post-program knowledge test also was administered to hospital medicine staff, and test performance was compared with medical students who participated in the MedTEC program. Between October 2011 and December 2013, approximately 100 students participated in 20 sessions of MedTEC. All students reported improved self-efficacy and attitudes regarding care of older adults and care transition management. Mean percentage correct on the knowledge test increased significantly from 59.8% to 71.2% (P = .004) for the MedTEC participants but not for the comparison group

  10. Outside the box: will information technology be a viable intervention to improve the quality of cancer care?

    PubMed

    Hesse, Bradford W; Hanna, Christopher; Massett, Holly A; Hesse, Nicola K

    2010-01-01

    The use of health information technology (IT) to resolve the crisis in communication inherent within the fragmented service environment of medical care in the United States is a strategic priority for the Department of Health and Human Services. Yet the deployment of health IT alone is not sufficient to improve quality in health service delivery; what is needed is a human factors approach designed to optimize the balance between health-care users, health-care providers, policies, procedures, and technologies. An evaluation of interface issues between primary and specialist care related to cancer reveals opportunities for human factors improvement along the cancer care continuum. Applications that emphasize cognitive support for prevention recommendations and that encourage patient engagement can help create a coordinated health-care environment conducive to cancer prevention and early detection. An emphasis on reliability, transparency, and accountability can help improve the coordination of activities among multiple service providers during diagnosis and treatment. A switch in emphasis from a transaction-based approach to one emphasizing long-term support for healing relationships should help improve patient outcomes during cancer survivorship and end-of-life care. Across the entire continuum of care, an emphasis on "meaningful use" of health IT-rather than on IT as an endpoint-should help put cancer on a path toward substantive continuous quality improvement. The accompanying research questions will focus on reducing the variance between the social and technical subsystems as IT is used to improve patient outcomes across the interfaces of care.

  11. The Importance of Disclosure: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender/Transsexual, Queer/Questioning, Intersex (LGBTQI) Individuals and the Cancer Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Schabath, Matthew B.; Sanchez, Julian; Sutton, Steven K.; Green, B. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Precis The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender/Transsexual, Queer/Questioning, Intersex (LGBTQI) population experiences cancer health disparities due to lack of disclosure and knowledge about increased cancer risk. Oncology health care providers and institutions should create environments that encourage disclosure of sexual orientation and identity. PMID:25521303

  12. Tailoring communications to the evolving needs of patients throughout the cancer care trajectory: a qualitative exploration with breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shim, Eun-Jung; Park, Jee Eun; Yi, Myungsun; Jung, Dooyoung; Lee, Kwang-Min; Hahm, Bong-Jin

    2016-10-18

    Doctor-patient communication is a crucial aspect of patient care. This study explored the communication experience of patients in a cancer consultation over the course of the cancer continuum. In-depth interviews with seven breast cancer patients were carried out. Themes related to communication experiences across the five phases of cancer consultation, from diagnosis to recurrence, were identified. The most salient issue is that patients also perceived cancer as 'a disease of the mind', which is not adequately cared for in consultation. This highlights the notion that cancer care providers should provide appropriate care for the psychological dimensions of the cancer experience with an empathic and sincere attitude during consultations. To this end, non-verbal aspects of communication that convey caring, support, and respect seem important. Furthermore, patients perceived that the consultation time was far shorter then they needed and reported that they felt pressured for time. Moreover, the stance taken by patients and the needs and preferences of patients varied across the phases of the cancer trajectory. As patients progressed through the phases of their treatment, they assumed more active roles in the course of their care and the need for more detailed information and questioning increased. Thus, ensuring that patients have opportunities to ask questions in the consultation is important. Current findings suggest that the efficacy of communication varies depending on which phase patients are in and that effective communication should be tailored to these evolving needs and preferences of breast cancer patients. Also, patients perceived that the consultation did not adequately address their need for information related to their care or their emotional issues associated with the cancer experience. It is therefore important to address their needs by paying particular attention to non-verbal aspects of communication that convey empathy and respect toward patients

  13. Shared care involving cancer specialists and primary care providers - What do cancer survivors want?

    PubMed

    Lawn, Sharon; Fallon-Ferguson, Julia; Koczwara, Bogda

    2017-10-01

    Cancer survivors are living longer, prompting greater focus on managing cancer as a chronic condition. Shared care between primary care providers (PCPs) and cancer specialists, involving explicit partnership in how care is communicated, could ensure effective transitions between services. However, little is known about cancer patients' and survivors' preferences regarding shared care. To explore Australian cancer survivors' views on shared care: what cancer survivors need from shared care; enablers and barriers to advancing shared care; and what successful shared care looks like. Community forum held in Adelaide, Australia, in 2015 with 21 participants: 11 cancer survivors, 2 family caregivers, and 8 clinicians and researchers (members of PC4-Primary Care Collaborative Cancer Clinical Trials Group). Qualitative data from group discussion of the objectives. Participants stressed that successful shared care required patients being at the centre, ensuring accurate communication, ownership, and access to their medical records. PCPs were perceived to lack skills and confidence to lead complex cancer care. Patients expressed burden in being responsible for navigating information sharing and communication processes between health professionals and services. Effective shared care should include: shared electronic health records, key individuals as care coordinators; case conferences; shared decision making; preparing patients for self-management; building general practitioners' skills; and measuring outcomes. There was clear support for shared care but a lack of good examples to help guide it for this population. Recognizing cancer as a chronic condition requires a shift in how care is provided to these patients. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Optimizing cancer care through mobile health.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Bassel; Kayyali, Reem; Nabhani-Gebara, Shereen; Philip, Nada

    2015-07-01

    The survival rates for patients living with cancer are increasing, due to recent advances in detection, prevention and treatment. It has been estimated that there were 28 million cancer survivors around the world in 2012. In the UK, for patients diagnosed in 2007, it is predicted that more than half of them will survive their cancer for 5 years or more. A large majority of cancer survivors report unmet supportive care needs and distressing symptoms and adverse long-term consequences related to their cancer. Cancer management could be optimized to better meet patients demand through technology, including mobile health (m-Health). m-Health is defined as the use of mobile communications and network technologies for health care. m-Health can help both patients and health-care professionals and play an important part in managing and delivering cancer care including managing side effects, supporting drug adherence, providing cancer information, planning and follow up and detecting and diagnosing cancer. Health authorities have already published guidelines regulating m-Health to insure patient safety and improve the accountability of its applications.

  15. Quality along the Continuum: A Health Facility Assessment of Intrapartum and Postnatal Care in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Robin C.; Lohela, Terhi J.; Manu, Alexander; Vesel, Linda; Okyere, Eunice; Edmond, Karen; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Kirkwood, Betty R.; Gabrysch, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care using a health facility assessment, and to estimate “effective coverage” of skilled attendance in Brong Ahafo, Ghana. Methods We conducted an assessment of all 86 health facilities in seven districts in Brong Ahafo. Using performance of key signal functions and the availability of relevant drugs, equipment and trained health professionals, we created composite quality categories in four dimensions: routine delivery care, emergency obstetric care (EmOC), emergency newborn care (EmNC) and non-medical quality. Linking the health facility assessment to surveillance data we estimated “effective coverage” of skilled attendance as the proportion of births in facilities of high quality. Findings Delivery care was offered in 64/86 facilities; only 3-13% fulfilled our requirements for the highest quality category in any dimension. Quality was lowest in the emergency care dimensions, with 63% and 58% of facilities categorized as “low” or “substandard” for EmOC and EmNC, respectively. This implies performing less than four EmOC or three EmNC signal functions, and/or employing less than two skilled health professionals, and/or that no health professionals were present during our visit. Routine delivery care was “low” or “substandard” in 39% of facilities, meaning 25/64 facilities performed less than six routine signal functions and/or had less than two skilled health professionals and/or less than one midwife. While 68% of births were in health facilities, only 18% were in facilities with “high” or “highest” quality in all dimensions. Conclusion Our comprehensive facility assessment showed that quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care was generally low in the study region. While coverage with facility delivery was 68%, we estimated “effective coverage” of skilled attendance at 18%, thus revealing a large “quality gap.” Effective

  16. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Expanding a Continuum of Care: Outcomes of a Partial Day Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Kristin E.

    A study investigated the outcomes of the Acute Children's Extended Services (ACES) program, a Salt Lake City, Utah, program designed to help children with emotional and behavioral disabilities reintegrate into the community from inpatient or residential care. The study examined outcomes of the ACES program within four domains: access, clinical…

  18. Interactive Patient Engagement: System Design to Cross the Continuum of Care.

    PubMed

    Burke, K

    2016-01-01

    Patient Engagement is a critical and fundamental driver in the transformation of healthcare. Patient involvement through interactive care is a proven approach for improved health outcomes; however, a single strategy to achieve success will not suffice. An interactive patient engagement system design, as a multi-tactic landscape of solutions, is necessary to effectively engage patients.

  19. Caring for the breast cancer survivor’s health and well-being

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Petra M; Faubion, Stephanie S; MacLaughlin, Kathy L; Long, Margaret E; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer care continuum entails detection, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship. During this time, focus on the whole woman and medical concerns beyond the breast cancer diagnosis itself is essential. In this comprehensive review, we critically review and evaluate recent evidence regarding several topics pertinent to and specific for the woman living with a prior history of breast cancer. More specifically, we discuss the most recent recommendations for contraceptive options including long-acting reversible contraception and emergency contraception, fertility and pregnancy considerations during and after breast cancer treatment, management of menopausal vasomotors symptoms and vulvovaginal atrophy which often occurs even in young women during treatment for breast cancer. The need to directly query the patient about these concerns is emphasized. Our focus is on non-systemic hormones and non-hormonal options. Our holistic approach to the care of the breast cancer survivor includes such preventive health issues as sexual and bone health,which are important in optimizing quality of life. We also discuss strategies for breast cancer recurrence surveillance in the setting of a prior breast cancer diagnosis. This review is intended for primary care practitioners as well as specialists caring for female breast cancer survivors and includes key points for evidence-based best practice recommendations. PMID:25302171

  20. The HIV care continuum among men who have sex with men in Moscow, Russia: a cross-sectional study of infection awareness and engagement in care

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, AL; Zelaya, CE; Latkin, C; Peryshkina, A; Galai, N; Mogilnyi, V; Dzhigun, P; Kostetskaya, I; Mehta, SH; Beyrer, C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Early diagnosis and treatment of HIV infection is critical to improving clinical outcomes for HIV-infected individuals. We sought to characterise the HIV care continuum and identify correlates of being unaware of one’s HIV infection among MSM in Moscow, Russia. Methods Participants (N=1,376) were recruited via respondent-driven sampling and completed a socio-behavioural survey and HIV testing from 2010–2013. Sample and population estimates were calculated for key steps along the HIV care continuum for HIV-infected MSM and logistic regression methods were utilized to examine correlates of being unaware of HIV infection. Results 15.6% (184/1177; population estimate:11.6%; 95%CI:8.5–14.7%) of participants were HIV infected. Of these, only 23.4% (43/184; population estimate:13.2; 95%CI:11.0–15.4) were previously aware of their infection, 8.7% (16/184 population estimate:4.7; 95%CI:1.0–8.5) were on ART, and 4.4% (8/164; population estimate:3.0; 95%CI:0.3 – 5.6) reported an undetectable viral load. Bisexual identity (reference: homosexual; AOR:3.69; 95%CI:1.19–11.43), having ≥5 sexual partners in the last 6 months (reference: ≤1; AOR:4.23; 95%CI:1.17–15.28), and employment HIV testing requirements (reference: no; AOR:15.43; 95%CI:1.62–147.01) were associated with being unaware of one’s HIV infection. HIV testing in a specialized facility (reference: private; AOR: 0.06; 95%CI: 0.01–0.53) and testing ≥2 times in the last 12 months (reference: none; AOR:0.17; 95%CI:0.04–0.73) were inversely associated with being unaware of HIV infection. Conclusion There is a steep gradient along the HIV care continuum for Moscow-based MSM beginning with low awareness of HIV infection. Efforts that improve access to acceptable HIV testing strategies, such as alternative testing facilities, and linkage to care are needed for key populations. PMID:26297721

  1. HIV primary care by the infectious disease physician in the United States - extending the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Seetha; Beekmann, Susan E; Polgreen, Philip M; Rodriguez, Allan; Alcaide, Maria L

    2017-10-09

    Models of care for people living with HIV (PLWH) have varied over time due to long term survival, development of HIV-associated non-AIDS conditions, and HIV specific primary care guidelines that differ from those of the general population. The objectives of this study are to assess how often infectious disease (ID) physicians provide primary care for PLWH, assess their practice patterns and barriers in the provision of primary care. We used a 6-item survey electronically distributed to ID physician members of Emerging Infections Network (EIN). Of the 1248 active EIN members, 644 (52%) responded to the survey. Among the 644 respondents, 431 (67%) treated PLWH. Of these 431 responders, 326 (75%) acted as their primary care physicians. Responders who reported always/mostly performing a screening assessment as recommended per guidelines were: (1) Screening specific to HIV (tuberculosis 95%, genital chlamydia/gonorrhoea 77%, hepatitis C 67%, extra genital chlamydia/gonorrhoea 47%, baseline anal PAP smear for women 36% and men 34%); (2) Primary care related screening (fasting lipids 95%, colonoscopy 95%, mammogram 90%, cervical PAP smears 88%, depression 57%, osteoporosis in postmenopausal women 55% and men >50 yrs 33%). Respondents who worked in university hospitals, had <5 years of ID experience, and those who cared for more PLWH were most likely to provide primary care to all or most of their patients. Common barriers reported include: refusal by patient (72%), non-adherence to HIV medications (43%), other health priorities (44%), time constraints during clinic visit (43%) and financial/insurance limitations (40%). Most ID physicians act as primary care providers for their HIV infected patients especially if they are recent ID graduates and work in university hospitals. Current screening rates are suboptimal. Interventions to increase screening practices and to decrease barriers are urgently needed to address the needs of the aging HIV population in the United States.

  2. Continuum of care in maternal, newborn and child health in Pakistan: analysis of trends and determinants from 2006 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Sarosh; Maqsood, Sidra; Zakar, Rubeena; Zakar, Muhammad Zakria; Fischer, Florian

    2017-03-09

    Pakistan, being a developing country, presents the dismal picture of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. The majority of maternal and neonatal deaths could be avoided if Continuum of Care (CoC) is provided in a structured pathway from pregnancy to birth and to the first week of life of the newborn child. This study aimed to analyse the trends of CoC at all three levels (antenatal care, skilled delivery and postpartum care) and to identify various factors affecting the continuation in receiving CoC in Pakistan during 2006 to 2012. Secondary data analysis was performed on nationally representative data from the last two iterations of Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey (PDHS), conducted during 2006/07 to 2012/13. The analysis is limited to women of the reproductive age group (15-49 years) who gave birth during the last five years preceding both surveys. This leads to a sample size of 5,724 and 7,461 respondents from PDHS 2006/07 and 2012/13 respectively. The association between CoC and several factors, including individual attributes (reproductive status), family influences, community context, as well as cultural and social values was assessed in bivariate analyses in a first step. Furthermore, odds ratios and adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals using a binary and multivariable logistic regression were calculated. Our research presents the trends of a composite measure of CoC including antenatal care, delivery assistance and postpartum care. The largest gap in CoC was observed at antenatal care followed by delivery and postnatal care within 48 h after delivery. Results show that CoC completion rate has increased from 15% to 27% amongst women in Pakistan over time from 2006 to 2012. Women with high age at first birth, having less number of children, with higher education, belonging to richest quintile, living in Sindh province and urban areas, having high autonomy and exposure to mass media were most likely to avail complete CoC. The

  3. The impact of neighborhood social and built environment factors across the cancer continuum: Current research, methodological considerations, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Shariff-Marco, Salma; DeRouen, Mindy; Keegan, Theresa H M; Yen, Irene H; Mujahid, Mahasin; Satariano, William A; Glaser, Sally L

    2015-07-15

    Neighborhood social and built environments have been recognized as important contexts in which health is shaped. The authors reviewed the extent to which these neighborhood factors have been addressed in population-level cancer research by scanning the literature for research focused on specific social and/or built environment characteristics and their association with outcomes across the cancer continuum, including incidence, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and survival. The commonalities and differences in methodologies across studies, the current challenges in research methodology, and future directions in this research also were addressed. The assessment of social and built environment factors in relation to cancer is a relatively new field, with 82% of the 34 reviewed articles published since 2010. Across the wide range of social and built environment exposures and cancer outcomes considered by the studies, numerous associations were reported. However, the directions and magnitudes of associations varied, in large part because of the variation in cancer sites and outcomes studied, but also likely because of differences in study populations, geographic regions, and, importantly, choice of neighborhood measures and geographic scales. The authors recommend that future studies consider the life-course implications of cancer incidence and survival, integrate secondary and self-report data, consider work neighborhood environments, and further develop analytical and statistical approaches appropriate to the geospatial and multilevel nature of the data. Incorporating social and built environment factors into research on cancer etiology and outcomes can provide insights into disease processes, identify vulnerable populations, and generate results with translational impact of relevance for interventionists and policy makers. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  4. The continuum of care for individuals with lifelong disabilities: role of the physical therapist.

    PubMed

    Orlin, Margo N; Cicirello, Nancy A; O'Donnell, Anne E; Doty, Antonette K

    2014-07-01

    Many individuals with lifelong disabilities (LLDs) of childhood onset are living longer, participating in adult roles, and seeking comprehensive health care services, including physical therapy, with greater frequency than in the past. Individuals with LLDs have the same goals of health and wellness as those without disabilities. Aging with a chronic LLD is not yet well understood; however, impairments such as pain, fatigue, and osteoporosis often present earlier than in adults who are aging typically. People with LLDs, especially those living with developmental disabilities such as cerebral palsy, myelomeningocele, Down syndrome, and intellectual disabilities, frequently have complex and multiple body system impairments and functional limitations that can: (1) be the cause of numerous and varied secondary conditions, (2) limit overall earning power, (3) diminish insurance coverage, and (4) create unique challenges for accessing health care. Collaboration between adult and pediatric practitioners is encouraged to facilitate smooth transitions to health practitioners, including physical therapists. A collaborative client-centered emphasis to support the transition to adult-oriented facilities and promote strategies to increase accessibility should become standard parts of examination, goal setting, and intervention. This perspective article identifies barriers individuals with selected LLDs experience in accessing health care, including physical therapy. Strategies are suggested, including establishment of niche practices, physical accessibility improvement, and inclusion of more specific curriculum content in professional (entry-level) doctorate physical therapy schools. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  5. Inequity in access to cancer care: a review of the Canadian literature.

    PubMed

    Maddison, André R; Asada, Yukiko; Urquhart, Robin

    2011-03-01

    Despite the policy and research attention on ensuring equitable access--equal access for equal need--to health care, research continues to identify inequities in access to cancer services. We conducted a literature review to identify the current state of knowledge about inequity in access to cancer health services in Canada in terms of the continuum of care, disease sites, and dimensions of inequity (e.g., income). We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Embase for studies published between 1990 and 2009. We retrieved 51 studies, which examine inequity in access to cancer services from screening to end-of-life care, for multiple cancer types, and a variety of socioeconomic, geographic, and demographic factors that may cause concern for inequity in Canada. This review demonstrates that income has the most consistent influence on inequity in access to screening, while age and geography are most influential for treatment services and end-of-life care, even after adjusting for patient need. Our review also reports on methods used in the literature and new techniques to explore. Equitable access to cancer care is vitally important in all health systems. Obtaining information on the current status of inequities in access to cancer care is a critical first step toward action.

  6. Cancer Care Coordination: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Over 30 Years of Empirical Studies.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Sherri Sheinfeld; Haggstrom, David; Han, Paul K J; Fairfield, Kathleen M; Krebs, Paul; Clauser, Steven B

    2017-07-06

    According to a landmark study by the Institute of Medicine, patients with cancer often receive poorly coordinated care in multiple settings from many providers. Lack of coordination is associated with poor symptom control, medical errors, and higher costs. The aims of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to (1) synthesize the findings of studies addressing cancer care coordination, (2) describe study outcomes across the cancer continuum, and (3) obtain a quantitative estimate of the effect of interventions in cancer care coordination on service system processes and patient health outcomes. Of 1241 abstracts identified through MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library, 52 studies met the inclusion criteria. Each study had US or Canadian participants, comparison or control groups, measures, times, samples, and/or interventions. Two researchers independently applied a standardized search strategy, coding scheme, and online coding program to each study. Eleven studies met the additional criteria for the meta-analysis; a random effects estimation model was used for data analysis. Cancer care coordination approaches led to improvements in 81 % of outcomes, including screening, measures of patient experience with care, and quality of end-of-life care. Across the continuum of cancer care, patient navigation was the most frequent care coordination intervention, followed by home telehealth; nurse case management was third in frequency. The meta-analysis of a subset of the reviewed studies showed that the odds of appropriate health care utilization in cancer care coordination interventions were almost twice (OR = 1.9, 95 % CI = 1.5-3.5) that of comparison interventions. This review offers promising findings on the impact of cancer care coordination on increasing value and reducing healthcare costs in the USA.

  7. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  8. The Impact of Neighborhood Social and Built Environment Factors across the Cancer Continuum: Current Research, Methodologic Considerations, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Shariff-Marco, Salma; De Rouen, Mindy; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Yen, Irene H.; Mujahid, Mahasin; Satariano, William A.; Glaser, Sally L.

    2015-01-01

    Neighborhood social and built environments have been recognized as important contexts in which health is shaped. We review the extent to which these neighborhood factors have been addressed in population-level cancer research, with a scan of the literature for research that focuses on specific social and/or built environment characteristics and association with outcomes across the cancer continuum, including incidence, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and survival. We discuss commonalities and differences in methodologies across studies, current challenges in research methodology, and future directions in this research area. The assessment of social and built environment factors in relation to cancer is a relatively new field, with 82% of 34 reviewed papers published since 2010. Across the wide range of social and built environment exposures and cancer outcomes considered by the studies, numerous associations were reported. However, the directions and magnitudes of association varied, due in large part to the variation in cancer sites and outcomes being studied, but also likely due to differences in study populations, geographical region, and, importantly, choice of neighborhood measure and geographic scale. We recommend that future studies consider the life course implications of cancer incidence and survival, integrate secondary and self-report data, consider work neighborhood environments, and further develop analytical and statistical approaches appropriate to the geospatial and multilevel nature of the data. Incorporating social and built environment factors into research on cancer etiology and outcomes can provide insights into disease processes, identify vulnerable populations, and generate results with translational impact of relevance for interventionists and policy makers. PMID:25847484

  9. Music therapy in supportive cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy is a part of a complementary medicine program in supportive cancer care which accompanies medical treatment. There are many benefits of music therapy for cancer patients—interactive music therapy techniques (instrumental improvisation, singing) as well as receptive music therapy techniques (listening to recorded or live music, music and imaginary) can be used to improve mood, decrease stress, pain, anxiety level and enhance relaxation. Music therapy is an effective form of supporting cancer care for patients during the treatment process. It may be also basic for planning effective programs of rehabilitation to promote wellness, improve physical and emotional well-being and the quality of life. PMID:24376975

  10. Music therapy in supportive cancer care.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-06-08

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy is a part of a complementary medicine program in supportive cancer care which accompanies medical treatment. There are many benefits of music therapy for cancer patients-interactive music therapy techniques (instrumental improvisation, singing) as well as receptive music therapy techniques (listening to recorded or live music, music and imaginary) can be used to improve mood, decrease stress, pain, anxiety level and enhance relaxation. Music therapy is an effective form of supporting cancer care for patients during the treatment process. It may be also basic for planning effective programs of rehabilitation to promote wellness, improve physical and emotional well-being and the quality of life.

  11. Pediatric dog bite victims: a need for a continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Boat, Barbara W; Dixon, Cinnamon A; Pearl, Erica; Thieken, Lacey; Bucher, Sarah E

    2012-05-01

    The authors assessed the ongoing needs of 34 pediatric dog bite victims and their families 1 month after receiving care in a pediatric emergency department. More than 70% of the parents noted at least 1 new concerning behavior in their children, and more than 85% of the parents also endorsed concerns about their own reactions. Half of the parents believed that children, in general, might benefit from interventions to help with postbite fears and nearly three quarters felt that families would benefit from education regarding dog bite prevention. The majority (85%) of the parents believed that additional supportive services could be offered effectively at emergency department or pediatric office/clinic visits. A template for a dog bite information card is presented.

  12. A new analytical framework of 'continuum of prevention and care' to maximize HIV case detection and retention in care in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masami; Poudel, Krishna C; Do, Thi Nhan; Bui, Duc Duong; Nguyen, Van Kinh; Green, Kimberly; Nguyen, Thi Minh Thu; Kato, Masaya; Jacka, David; Cao, Thi Thanh Thuy; Nguyen, Thanh Long; Jimba, Masamine

    2012-12-29

    The global initiative 'Treatment 2.0' calls for expanding the evidence base of optimal HIV service delivery models to maximize HIV case detection and retention in care. However limited systematic assessment has been conducted in countries with concentrated HIV epidemic. We aimed to assess HIV service availability and service connectedness in Vietnam. We developed a new analytical framework of the continuum of prevention and care (COPC). Using the framework, we examined HIV service delivery in Vietnam. Specifically, we analyzed HIV service availability including geographical distribution and decentralization and service connectedness across multiple services and dimensions. We then identified system-related strengths and constraints in improving HIV case detection and retention in care. This was accomplished by reviewing related published and unpublished documents including existing service delivery data. Identified strengths included: decentralized HIV outpatient clinics that offer comprehensive care at the district level particularly in high HIV burden provinces; functional chronic care management for antiretroviral treatment (ART) with the involvement of people living with HIV and the links to community- and home-based care; HIV testing and counseling integrated into tuberculosis and antenatal care services in districts supported by donor-funded projects, and extensive peer outreach networks that reduce barriers for the most-at-risk populations to access services. Constraints included: fragmented local coordination mechanisms for HIV-related health services; lack of systems to monitor the expansion of HIV outpatient clinics that offer comprehensive care; underdevelopment of pre-ART care; insufficient linkage from HIV testing and counseling to pre-ART care; inadequate access to HIV-related services in districts not supported by donor-funded projects particularly in middle and low burden provinces and in mountainous remote areas; and no systematic monitoring of

  13. An effective, efficient elder care program. Providence ElderPlace focuses on maintaining the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Gorshe, N

    1993-04-01

    Providence ElderPlace, Portland, OR, is an innovative long-term care health maintenance organization. The program is a type of integrated delivery network, offering comprehensive benefits and coordinating the delivery of healthcare services in a specific geographic market. Providence ElderPlace is based on the Program for All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), which was developed 20 years ago by On Lok Health Services of San Francisco. PACE helps frail elderly persons remain in their homes as long as possible. PACE is financed through an integrated funding pool of Medicare, Medicaid, and private fees. To be eligible for PACE, an individual must be in need of nursing home care but able to live in the community, with support. Providence ElderPlace provides all healthcare, community-based, and long-term care support services from an adult day healthcare setting. Participants usually attend the day center three times a week. When participants are not at the center, a team of workers visit their homes to observe participants and provide personal and chore support services.

  14. The Impact of Alcohol Use and Related Disorders on the HIV Continuum of Care: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vagenas, Panagiotis; Azar, Marwan M.; Copenhaver, Michael M.; Springer, Sandra A.; Molina, Patricia E.; Altice, Frederick L.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use is highly prevalent globally with numerous negative consequences to human health, including HIV progression, in people living with HIV (PLH). The HIV continuum of care, or treatment cascade, represents a sequence of targets for intervention that can result in viral suppression, which ultimately benefits individuals and society. The extent to which alcohol impacts each step in the cascade, however, has not been systematically examined. International targets for HIV treatment as prevention aim for 90 % of PLH to be diagnosed, 90 % of them to be prescribed with antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 90 % to achieve viral suppression; currently, only 20 % of PLH are virally suppressed. This systematic review, from 2010 through May 2015, found 53 clinical research papers examining the impact of alcohol use on each step of the HIV treatment cascade. These studies were mostly cross-sectional or cohort studies and from all income settings. Most (77 %) found a negative association between alcohol consumption on one or more stages of the treatment cascade. Lack of consistency in measurement, however, reduced the ability to draw consistent conclusions. Nonetheless, the strong negative correlations suggest that problematic alcohol consumption should be targeted, preferably using evidence-based behavioral and pharmacological interventions, to indirectly increase the proportion of PLH achieving viral suppression, to achieve treatment as prevention mandates, and to reduce HIV transmission. PMID:26412084

  15. Mass casualty events: blood transfusion emergency preparedness across the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Heidi; Glasgow, Simon; Kristoffersen, Einar

    2016-04-01

    Transfusion support is a key enabler to the response to mass casualty events (MCEs). Transfusion demand and capability planning should be an integrated part of the medical planning process for emergency system preparedness. Historical reviews have recently supported demand planning for MCEs and mass gatherings; however, computer modeling offers greater insights for resource management. The challenge remains balancing demand and supply especially the demand for universal components such as group O red blood cells. The current prehospital and hospital capability has benefited from investment in the management of massive hemorrhage. The management of massive hemorrhage should address both hemorrhage control and hemostatic support. Labile blood components cannot be stockpiled and a large surge in demand is a challenge for transfusion providers. The use of blood components may need to be triaged and demand managed. Two contrasting models of transfusion planning for MCEs are described. Both illustrate an integrated approach to preparedness where blood transfusion services work closely with health care providers and the donor community. Preparedness includes appropriate stock management and resupply from other centers. However, the introduction of alternative transfusion products, transfusion triage, and the greater use of an emergency donor panel to provide whole blood may permit greater resilience. © 2016 AABB.

  16. A critical pathway for intimate partner violence across the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Dienemann, Jacqueline; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Wiederhorn, Nancy; Laughon, Kathryn; Jordan, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    The authors developed an interdisciplinary critical pathway for intimate partner violence (IPV) assessment and intervention for use across health care settings. Intimate partner violence may be emotional, physical, and/or sexual and involves coercion and control by one partner over the other. A pathway developed with input from focus groups of battered women was subjected to a modified Delphi technique to improve the pathway's scientific accuracy and feasibility. The study was conducted in one urban, one suburban, and one rural hospital with IPV advocacy programs in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Four researchers and 13 clinicians participated in the validation, with at least one physician, one nurse, and one social worker or IPV counselor from each hospital. Each element of the pathway was analyzed for the degree of consensus on scientific accuracy and feasibility. Consensus on the scientific accuracy and feasibility of the pathway was achieved after three rounds of the Delphi process. This is the first known critical pathway for IPV. It addresses physical and mental health and safety and has content validity affirmed by an interdisciplinary panel of experts. Further process and outcome evaluation is warranted and invited.

  17. Levels and determinants of continuum of care for maternal and newborn health in Cambodia-evidence from a population-based survey.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjuan; Hong, Rathavuth

    2015-03-19

    Continuum of care throughout pregnancy, birth, and after delivery has become a key program strategy for improving the health of mothers and newborns. Successful program implementation to improve the continuum of care relies on a better understanding of where the gaps are in seeking care along the pathway and what factors contribute to the gaps. Using data from the 2010 Cambodia Demographic and Health Survey, we examine the levels of service use along the continuum of care. Three sequential regression models are fitted to identify factor(s) that affect women from getting skilled birth attendance (SBA) after receiving antenatal care (ANC), and from getting postnatal care (PNC) after having both ANC and SBA. Three of every five Cambodian women received all three types of maternal care-antenatal care, skilled birth attendance at birth and postnatal care -for their most recent birth, however with substantial regional variation ranging from 14% to 96%. The results highlight that mother's age, educational attainment, urban residence, household wealth, lower birth order are associated with women's use of antenatal care and their continuation to using skilled birth attendant. Health insurance coverage also increases use of antenatal care but not skilled birth attendant. Having four antenatal care visits and receiving better quality of antenatal care affected women's subsequent use of skilled birth attendant. The odds of having skilled birth attendant increases by 30 to 50% for women who received blood pressure measurement, urine sample taken, and blood sample taken as part of antenatal services. Household wealth status, urine sample taken, and delivery at a health facility were the only three factors significantly associated with the continuation from having skilled birth attendant to receiving postnatal care. Cambodia has made remarkable progress in extending the reach of maternal health care in most areas of the country. Future program efforts should focus on the

  18. Personalized Care in Uterine Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, David A.; Bodurka, Diane C.

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer typically presents at an early stage when surgery alone, with or without radiotherapy, is often curative. However, in women who present with advanced disease or who develop disease recurrence, long-term prognosis is poor. While surgical cytoreduction remains the mainstay of initial therapy, over the last several decades, the roles of cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy have been evaluated in both the adjuvant and recurrent setting in an attempt to improve long-term survival while also minimizing associated toxicities. Unfortunately, response rates remain poor and survival is limited in these settings. More recently, with the introduction of personalized cancer treatment, several biologic agents have been developed that target specific pathways critical to tumor initiation and growth. Molecular studies have found that many endometrial cancers are driven by some of these tumorigenic pathways, which has led to early clinical studies evaluating the role of these targeted agents in patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. This review describes existing treatment options for patients with early and advanced endometrioid endometrial cancer, as well as for patients with uterine serous cancers. Furthermore, this review examines the growing body of literature involving targeted biologic agents as treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. PMID:23271352

  19. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals.

  20. Practical multimodal care for cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Matthew; Hopkinson, Jane; Conibear, John; Reeves, Annie; Shaw, Clare; Fearon, Ken C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Cancer cachexia is common and reduces function, treatment tolerability and quality of life. Given its multifaceted pathophysiology a multimodal approach to cachexia management is advocated for, but can be difficult to realise in practice. We use a case-based approach to highlight practical approaches to the multimodal management of cachexia for patients across the cancer trajectory. Recent findings Four cases with lung cancer spanning surgical resection, radical chemoradiotherapy, palliative chemotherapy and no anticancer treatment are presented. We propose multimodal care approaches that incorporate nutritional support, exercise, and anti-inflammatory agents, on a background of personalized oncology care and family-centred education. Collectively, the cases reveal that multimodal care is part of everyone's remit, often focuses on supported self-management, and demands buy-in from the patient and their family. Once operationalized, multimodal care approaches can be tested pragmatically, including alongside emerging pharmacological cachexia treatments. Summary We demonstrate that multimodal care for cancer cachexia can be achieved using simple treatments and without a dedicated team of specialists. The sharing of advice between health professionals can help build collective confidence and expertise, moving towards a position in which every team member feels they can contribute towards multimodal care. PMID:27635765

  1. How can we deliver high-quality cancer care in a healthcare system in crisis?

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K

    2014-08-01

    This provocative question was addressed in a report from the Institute of Medicine ([IOM], 2013), Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis. An interdisciplinary committee synthesized many of the changes that are occurring in our society and health care that will challenge our existing cancer care system. These changes are familiar to many of us: an aging population along with the resulting increase in the number of cancer survivors, an inadequate number of and increased demand for trained healthcare providers, and rising healthcare costs. The IOM report recommended a framework of six interconnected components for improving the quality of cancer care (see Figures 1 and 2). Each of these components is worthy of an editorial and more. I would like to focus, however, on one of them: an adequately staffed, trained, and coordinated workforce. And, for good reason, as I want to retire someday and know that others will be taking my place in caring for cancer survivors across the care continuum. So let's explore this one component in more detail.

  2. The Gynecologist Has a Unique Role in Providing Oncofertility Care to Young Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Francesca E; Jozefik, Jennifer K; Kim, Alison M; Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jennifer; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2011-01-01

    Facing a cancer diagnosis at any age is devastating. However, young cancer patients have the added burden that life-preserving cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, may compromise their future fertility. The possibility of reproductive dysfunction as a consequence of cancer treatment has a negative impact on the quality of life of cancer survivors. The field of oncofertility, which merges the clinical specialties of oncology and reproductive endocrinology, was developed to explore and expand fertility preservation options and to better manage the reproductive status of cancer patients. Fertility preservation for females has proved to be a particular challenge because mature female gametes are rare and difficult to acquire. The purpose of this article is to provide the gynecologist with a comprehensive overview of how cancer treatments affect the female reproductive axis, delineate the diverse fertility preservation options that are currently available or being developed for young women, and describe current measures of ovarian reserve that can be used pre- and post-cancer treatment. As a primary care provider, the gynecologist will likely interact with patients throughout the cancer care continuum. Thus, the gynecologist is in a unique position to join the oncofertility team in providing young cancer patients with up-to-date fertility preservation information and referrals to specialists. PMID:21927621

  3. The economic role of the Emergency Department in the health care continuum: applying Michael Porter's five forces model to Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M

    2006-05-01

    Emergency Medicine plays a vital role in the health care continuum in the United States. Michael Porters' five forces model of industry analysis provides an insight into the economics of emergency care by showing how the forces of supplier power, buyer power, threat of substitution, barriers to entry, and internal rivalry affect Emergency Medicine. Illustrating these relationships provides a view into the complexities of the emergency care industry and offers opportunities for Emergency Departments, groups of physicians, and the individual emergency physician to maximize the relationship with other market players.

  4. Molecular imaging for personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Moritz F; Hricak, Hedvig; Larson, Steven M

    2012-04-01

    Molecular imaging is rapidly gaining recognition as a tool with the capacity to improve every facet of cancer care. Molecular imaging in oncology can be defined as in vivo characterization and measurement of the key biomolecules and molecularly based events that are fundamental to the malignant state. This article outlines the basic principles of molecular imaging as applied in oncology with both established and emerging techniques. It provides examples of the advantages that current molecular imaging techniques offer for improving clinical cancer care as well as drug development. It also discusses the importance of molecular imaging for the emerging field of theranostics and offers a vision of how molecular imaging may one day be integrated with other diagnostic techniques to dramatically increase the efficiency and effectiveness of cancer care.

  5. LUMBAR SURGERY IN WORK-RELATED CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN: CAN A CONTINUUM OF CARE ENHANCE OUTCOMES?

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Tom G.; Gatchel, Robert J.; Brede, Emily; Theodore, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Context Systematic reviews of lumbar fusion outcomes in purely workers’ compensation (WC) patient populations have indicated mixed results for efficacy. Recent studies on lumbar fusions in the WC setting have reported return-to-work rates of 26–36%, re-operation rates of 22–27%, and high rates of persistent opioid use two years post-surgery. Other types of lumbar surgery in WC populations are also acknowledged to have poorer outcomes than in non-WC. The possibility of improving outcomes by employing a biopsychosocial model with a continuum of care, including post-operative functional restoration in this “at risk” population, has been suggested as a possible solution. Purpose To compare objective socioeconomic and patient-reported outcomes for WC patients with different lumbar surgeries followed by functional restoration, relative to matched comparison patients without surgery. Study Design/Setting A prospective cohort study of chronic disabling occupational lumbar spinal disorder (CDOLD) patients with WC claims treated in an interdisciplinary functional restoration program. Patient Sample A consecutive cohort of 564 patients with pre-rehab surgery completed an functional restoration and was divided into groups based on surgery type: lumbar fusion (F group, n = 331) and non-fusion lumbar spine surgery (NF group, n = 233). An unoperated comparison group was matched for length of disability (U group, n = 349). Outcome Measures Validated patient-reported measures of pain, disability and depression were administered PRE- and POST-rehab. Socioeconomic outcomes were collected via a structured one-year POST interview. Methods All patients completed an intensive, medically-supervised FRP, combining quantitatively-directed exercise progression with a multimodal disability management approach. The writing of this manuscript was supported in part by NIH Grant 1K05-MH-71892 and no conflicts of interest are noted among the authors. Results The F group had a

  6. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines.

    PubMed

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Erb, Nicole L; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer K; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cannady, Rachel S; Wong, Sandra L; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April L; Stein, Kevin D; Sharpe, Katherine B; Brooks, Durado D; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women and second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined in the United States (US). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years after diagnosis. Considering the recent decline in both incidence and mortality, the prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with the increase in rates of CRC screening, further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the US population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short-term and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns after treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The guidelines in this article are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy.

  7. [Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients. The Italian Association of Medical Oncologists published in 2013 the update of the first edition of the Psychosocial Guidelines for the care of cancer patients. The guidelines, produced by a multidisciplinary group (medical doctors, nurses, oncologists, psychologists and patients) aim at recognizing the importance of psychosocial care in helping the patients and their relatives to overcome the effects of the diagnosis and the treatments on mental health and emotional wellbeing. In some cases the evidences available are not as hard as those supporting drug treatments: many outcomes such as the effectiveness of educational interventions, the patients' wellbeing, thrust, perception of support, for their nature and complexity require both quantitative and qualitative measurements. Lack of robust evidences such as those obtained from clinical trials, does not necessarily correspond to lack of effectiveness of the intervention nor should make us forget that patients' rights (to good care, information and support) should be guaranteed.

  8. Childhood cancer survivor care: development of the Passport for Care

    PubMed Central

    Poplack, David G.; Fordis, Michael; Landier, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita; Hudson, Melissa M.; Horowitz, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    Survivors of childhood cancer are at risk of long-term adverse effects and late effects of the disease and/or its treatment. In response to national recommendations to improve evidence-based follow-up care, a web-based support system for clinical decision making, the Passport for Care (PFC), was developed for use at the point of care to produce screening recommendations individualized to the survivor. To date, the PFC has been implemented in over half of the nearly 200 clinics affiliated with the Children's Oncology Group across the USA. Most clinician users report that the PFC has been integrated into clinic workflows, and that it fosters improved conversations with survivors about the potential late effects a survivor might experience and about the screening and/or behavioural interventions recommended to improve health status. Furthermore, clinicians using the PFC have indicated that they adhered more closely to follow-up care guidelines. Perspectives on the challenges encountered and lessons learned during the development and deployment of the PFC are reviewed and contrasted with other nationwide approaches to the provision of guidance on survivor follow-up care; furthermore, the implications for the care of childhood cancer survivors are discussed. PMID:25348788

  9. Childhood cancer survivor care: development of the Passport for Care.

    PubMed

    Poplack, David G; Fordis, Michael; Landier, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita; Hudson, Melissa M; Horowitz, Marc E

    2014-12-01

    Survivors of childhood cancer are at risk of long-term adverse effects and late effects of the disease and/or its treatment. In response to national recommendations to improve evidence-based follow-up care, a web-based support system for clinical decision making, the Passport for Care (PFC), was developed for use at the point of care to produce screening recommendations individualized to the survivor. To date, the PFC has been implemented in over half of the nearly 200 clinics affiliated with the Children's Oncology Group across the USA. Most clinician users report that the PFC has been integrated into clinic workflows, and that it fosters improved conversations with survivors about the potential late effects a survivor might experience and about the screening and/or behavioural interventions recommended to improve health status. Furthermore, clinicians using the PFC have indicated that they adhered more closely to follow-up care guidelines. Perspectives on the challenges encountered and lessons learned during the development and deployment of the PFC are reviewed and contrasted with other nationwide approaches to the provision of guidance on survivor follow-up care; furthermore, the implications for the care of childhood cancer survivors are discussed.

  10. Understanding the HIV disparities between black and white men who have sex with men in the USA using the HIV care continuum: a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Eli S; Millett, Gregorio A; Sullivan, Patrick S; del Rio, Carlos; Curran, James W

    2014-01-01

    Background Black/white disparities in HIV incidence and prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States remain largely unexplained. We examined the impact on HIV prevalence and incidence of interventions that decrease disparities in HIV care. Deciding which interventions have most impact on reducing disparities is critical. Methods Using available US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates, we constructed HIV care continua for black and white MSM for 2009-2010. These estimates were used as parameters in a deterministic model to yield estimated race-specific transmissions, transmission rates, incidence rates, and rate-ratios (RR). We examined the impact of changes in the care continuum for black MSM on transmission and incidence rates. Findings Marked disparities were found throughout the care continuum: ultimately, 16% of black and 34% of white MSM achieved viral suppression. Based on these care continua, 9,833 and 9,710 new HIV transmissions were estimated annually respectively from HIV-positive black and white MSM (transmission RR=1·36 and incidence RR=7·92). In a model where black and white MSM have identical care outcomes, transmission RR=1·00 and incidence RR=5·80. Scenarios of 95% diagnosis, 95% retention, and concurrent 95% diagnosis and 95% retention respectively yield transmission RR=1·00, 1·02, 0·56, and incidence RR=5·81, 5·93, 3·28. Interpretation Disparities in HIV transmission rates may be reduced by improving the HIV care continuum outcomes, but existing racial disparities in HIV prevalence will likely continue to drive higher incidence among black MSM for decades to come. PMID:25530987

  11. Providing palliative care for the newly diagnosed cancer patient: concepts and resources.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Michelle

    2008-04-01

    Palliative care has evolved from end-of-life care following exhaustion of curative therapy to care across the cancer-management continuum. Often initiated concurrently with curative care at the time of diagnosis, palliative care ensures both effective symptom management and the best possible quality of life in four key domains-physical, psychological, social, and spiritual. The significant growth and development of palliative care in the United States is evident in that one in four hospitals now has a palliative care program, palliative medicine is now recognized as an official medical subspecialty by the American Board of Medical Specialties, and national programs offer comprehensive continuing education in palliative care for nurses and physicians. The oncology nurse who provides palliative care does so as part of a multidisciplinary team that includes not only physicians but also can involve chaplains, massage therapists, pharmacists, nutritionists, and other specialists. This article provides resources and reviews and highlights pertinent palliative care issues to guide oncology nurses managing newly diagnosed cancer patients.

  12. Preventive care in older cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, Lisa M; Ouellet, Jennifer Andreozzi; Dale, William; Fan, Lin; Gupta Mohile, Supriya

    2015-03-01

    To study factors that influence receipt of preventive care in older cancer survivors. We analyzed a nationally representative sample of 12,458 older adults from the 2003 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. Factors associated with non-receipt of preventive care were explored among cancer and non-cancer survivors, using logistic regression. Among the cancer survivors, 1883 were diagnosed >1 year at survey completion. A cancer history was independently associated with receipt of mammogram (AOR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.34-1.85), flu shot (AOR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.16-1.53), measurement of total cholesterol in the previous six months (AOR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.07-1.34), pneumonia vaccination (AOR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.18-1.49), bone mineral density (BMD) testing (AOR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.21-1.56), and lower endoscopy (AOR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.29-1.65). However, receipt of preventive care was not optimal among older cancer survivors with only 51.2% of the female cancer survivors received a mammogram, 63.8% of all the cancer survivors received colonoscopy, and 42.5% had BMD testing. Among the cancer survivors, factors associated with non-receipt of mammogram included age ≥85 years (AOR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.26-0.74), and scoring ≥three points on the Vulnerable Elders Survey-13 (AOR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.80-1.00). Factors associated with non-receipt of colonoscopy included low education (AOR= 0.43, 95% CI = 0.27-0.68) and rural residence (AOR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.34-0.77). Factors associated with non-receipt of BMD testing included age ≥70 (AOR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.39-0.90), African American race (AOR = 0.51, 95% CI= 0.27-0.95), low education (AOR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.14-0.38), and rural residence (AOR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.27-0.70). Although older cancer survivors are more likely to receive preventive care services than other older adults, factors other than health status considerations (e.g., education, rural residence) are associated with non-receipt of preventive care services. Copyright © 2014

  13. Ethical climate and missed nursing care in cancer care units.

    PubMed

    Vryonides, Stavros; Papastavrou, Evridiki; Charalambous, Andreas; Andreou, Panayiota; Eleftheriou, Christos; Merkouris, Anastasios

    2016-09-27

    Previous research has linked missed nursing care to nurses' work environment. Ethical climate is a part of work environment, but the relationship of missed care to different types of ethical climate is unknown. To describe the types of ethical climate in adult in-patient cancer care settings, and their relationship to missed nursing care. A descriptive correlation design was used. Data were collected using the Ethical Climate Questionnaire and the MISSCARE survey tool, and analyzed with descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation and analysis of variance. All nurses from relevant units in the Republic of Cyprus were invited to participate. The research protocol has been approved according to national legislation, all licenses have been obtained, and respondents participated voluntarily after they have received all necessary information. Response rate was 91.8%. Five types identified were as follows: caring (M = 3.18, standard deviation = 1.39); law and code (M = 3.18, standard deviation = 0.96); rules (M = 3.17, standard deviation = 0.73); instrumental (M = 2.88, standard deviation = 1.34); and independence (M = 2.74, standard deviation = 0.94). Reported overall missed care (range: 1-5) was M = 2.51 (standard deviation = 0.90), and this was positively (p < 0.05) related to instrumental (r = 0.612) and independence (r = 0.461) types and negatively (p < 0.05) related to caring (r = -0.695), rules (r = -0.367), and law and code (r = -0.487). The reported levels of missed care and the types of ethical climates present similarities and differences with the relevant literature. All types of ethical climate were related to the reported missed care. Efforts to reduce the influence of instrumental and independence types and fostering caring, law and code, and rules types might decrease missed nursing care. However, more robust evidence is needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Utilizing NCCN Practice Guidelines to Measure the Quality of Colorectal Cancer Care in the Veterans Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, George L.; Zullig, Leah L.; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Powell, Adam A.; Ordin, Diana L.; Gellad, Ziad. F.; Abbott, David; Schlosser, James M.; Hersh, Janis; Provenzale, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Clinical practice guidelines can be used to help develop measures of quality of cancer care. This paper describes the use of a Cancer Care Quality Measurement System (CCQMS) for monitoring these measures for colorectal cancer in the Veterans Health Administration. Methods The CCQMS assessed practice guideline concordance primarily based on colon (14 indicators) and rectal (11 indicators) cancer care guidelines of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). Indicators were developed with input from VHA stakeholders with the goal of examining the continuum of diagnosis, neoadjuvant therapy, surgery, adjuvant therapy, and survivorship surveillance and/or end-of-life care. In addition, 9 measures of timeliness of cancer care were developed. The measures/indicators formed the basis of a computerized data abstraction tool that produced reports on quality of care in real-time as data were entered. Results The tool was developed for a 28-facility learning collaborative, the Colorectal Cancer Care Collaborative (C4), aimed at improving CRC care quality. Data on 1,373 incident stage I-IV CRC cases were entered over approximately 18 months. Data were used to target and monitor quality improvement activities. The primary opportunity for improvement involved surveillance colonoscopy and services in patients after curative intent treatment. Conclusions NCCN guidelines were successfully used to develop a measurement system for VHA research-operations quality improvement partnership. PMID:23584346

  15. Policy statement on multidisciplinary cancer care.

    PubMed

    Borras, Josep M; Albreht, Tit; Audisio, Riccardo; Briers, Erik; Casali, Paolo; Esperou, Hélène; Grube, Birgitte; Hamoir, Marc; Henning, Geoffrey; Kelly, Joan; Knox, Susan; Nabal, Maria; Pierotti, Marco; Lombardo, Claudio; van Harten, Wim; Poston, Graeme; Prades, Joan; Sant, Milena; Travado, Luzia; Valentini, Vincenzo; van de Velde, Cornelis; van den Bogaert, Saskia; van den Bulcke, Marc; van Hoof, Elke; van den Neucker, Ingrid; Wilson, Robin

    2014-02-01

    Cancer care is undergoing an important paradigm shift from a disease-focused management to a patient-centred approach, in which increasingly more attention is paid to psychosocial aspects, quality of life, patients' rights and empowerment and survivorship. In this context, multidisciplinary teams emerge as a practical necessity for optimal coordination among health professionals and clear communication with patients. The European Partnership for Action Against Cancer (EPAAC), an initiative launched by the European Commission in 2009, addressed the multidisciplinary care from a policy perspective in order to define the core elements that all tumour-based multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) should include. To that effect, a working group conference was held in January 2013 within the EPAAC Work Package 7 (on Healthcare) framework. The consensus group consisted of high-level representatives from the following European scientific societies, patient associations and stakeholders: European CanCer Organisation (ECCO), European SocieTy for Radiology & Oncology (ESTRO), European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG), European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC), European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS), International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS),European Cancer Patient Coalition (ECPC), EuropaColon, Europa Donna - The European Breast Cancer Coalition, Association of European Cancer Leagues (ECL), Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI), EUSOMA - European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists, European Hospital and Healthcare Federation (HOPE) and EPAAC Work Packages 5 (Health promotion and prevention), 7, 8 (Research), 9 (Information systems) and 10 (Cancer plans). A background document with a list of 26 core issues drawn from a systematic review of the literature was used to guide the discussion. Five areas related to MDTs were covered: care objectives, organisation

  16. Palliative care for children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Elisha; Wolfe, Joanne

    2013-02-01

    Over the past two decades, paediatric palliative care has emerged as both a primary approach and as its own medical subspecialty, the overall aim of which is to ease suffering for children with life-threatening illness and their families through a concurrent model of care. However, most discussions have been focused on the transition to palliative care when no realistic hope for cure exists. We believe that, because the course of cancer is so unpredictable, this idea is misleading. Indeed, palliative care is increasingly being recognized as being about not just how to cope with the process of dying, but also about how to engage in living when faced with a life-threatening illness. This article will examine our current understanding of several areas of palliative care, with the ultimate message that palliative care is simply a novel term for the total care of a child and family, an approach that should be applied consistently and concurrently regardless of disease status. By improving familiarity with palliative care and building relationships with palliative care specialists, the paediatric oncology clinician will ensure that the best care possible for children and families is provided, regardless of outcome.

  17. The primary health care physician and the cancer patient: tips and strategies for managing sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Eric S.; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    There is a large and growing population of long-term cancer survivors. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are playing an increasingly greater role in the care of these patients across the continuum of cancer survivorship. In this role, PCPs are faced with the responsibility of managing a range of medical and psychosocial late effects of cancer treatment. In particular, the sexual side effects of treatment which are common and have significant impact on quality of life for the cancer survivor, often go unaddressed. This is an area of clinical care and research that has received increasing attention, highlighted by the presentation of this special issue on Cancer and Sexual Health. The aims of this review are 3-fold. First, we seek to overview common presentations of sexual dysfunction related to major cancer diagnoses in order to give the PCP a sense of the medical issues that the survivor may present with. Barriers to communication about sexual health issues between patient/PCPs in order are also described in order to emphasize the importance of PCPs initiating this important conversation. Next, we provide strategies and resources to help guide the PCP in the management of sexual dysfunction in cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss case examples of survivorship sexual health issues and highlight the role that a PCP can play in each of these case examples. PMID:26816826

  18. CancerLinQ and the future of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W; Miller, Robert S; Hauser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Patients, health care providers, and payers all have a similar interest in a health care system that is both efficient and intelligent. The attributes of such a system are widely recognized: we want a system that provides widespread access to consistently high-quality, science-based medical care; we want that system to be efficient, avoiding unnecessary waste, while delivering the right treatments to the right patients in a timely fashion; we want a system that allows us to both learn from our experience and generate new knowledge that will inform future treatment options; and we want a system that is compassionate and caring. What we want from a health care system often runs up against real-life obstacles and challenges: a fragmented delivery system, varying levels (or lack of) insurance, a growing burden of regulation and paperwork, and an increasingly complex understanding of tumor biology and the therapeutic approaches derived from this biology. New challenges are on the horizon-emerging genomic and imaging technology, with their enormous cognitive and data burdens, and a looming demographic challenge, where inadequate personnel resources face an aging population and an explosion of new treatments. Not all problems have technologic solutions, but many of the issues described above have potential solutions related to information technology. ASCO's CancerLinQ, described in this article, is an evolving attempt by the Society to improve the quality and efficiency of cancer care, while supporting education and research in the cancer field.

  19. Proteomic contributions to personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Koomen, John M; Haura, Eric B; Bepler, Gerold; Sutphen, Rebecca; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R; Benson, Kaaron; Hussein, Mohamad; Hazlehurst, Lori A; Yeatman, Timothy J; Hildreth, Lynne T; Sellers, Thomas A; Jacobsen, Paul B; Fenstermacher, David A; Dalton, William S

    2008-10-01

    Cancer impacts each patient and family differently. Our current understanding of the disease is primarily limited to clinical hallmarks of cancer, but many specific molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Genetic markers can be used to determine predisposition to tumor development, but molecularly targeted treatment strategies that improve patient prognosis are not widely available for most cancers. Individualized care plans, also described as personalized medicine, still must be developed by understanding and implementing basic science research into clinical treatment. Proteomics holds great promise in contributing to the prevention and cure of cancer because it provides unique tools for discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. As such, proteomics can help translate basic science discoveries into the clinical practice of personalized medicine. Here we describe how biological mass spectrometry and proteome analysis interact with other major patient care and research initiatives and present vignettes illustrating efforts in discovery of diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, development of treatment strategies in lung cancer, and monitoring prognosis and relapse in multiple myeloma patients.

  20. Antidepressant prescribing in community cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ashbury, Fredrick D; Madlensky, Lisa; Raich, Peter; Thompson, Mark; Whitney, Geoff; Hotz, Ken; Kralj, Boris; Edell, William S

    2003-05-01

    To describe patterns of antidepressant (ADs) prescribing in community oncology practice. Data were collected using an electronic medical record on all staged breast, colon, and lung cancer patients in three community-based oncology practices. The data were analyzed retrospectively, using descriptive and bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression modeling. There were 850 breast, 299 colon, and 473 lung cancer patients identified in this analysis. Overall, 19.2% of breast, 11% of colon, and 13.7% of lung cancer patients had been prescribed ADs during the 2-year period. The clinic in which cancer treatment was received predicted AD prescribing. The relationship between AD administration and age proved to be nonlinear; the pattern exhibited an "inverted U" shape. Patients with comorbidities and on pain medications were more likely to be administered ADs. Colon cancer patients on pain medications were five times more likely to be administered ADs than those not on pain medications. While some predictors of AD prescribing appear to be consistent with other studies, such as being on pain medication, there is still a great amount of variability in prescribing patterns across community practices, age groups, and cancer diagnoses. This study demonstrates that prescriptions of ADs seem to be influenced by parameters other than psychopathology. Given the importance of major depression in oncology care, diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and prescription patterns of psychotropics should be part of the routine monitoring and quality management in oncology patient care.

  1. Proteomic Contributions to Personalized Cancer Care*

    PubMed Central

    Koomen, John M.; Haura, Eric B.; Bepler, Gerold; Sutphen, Rebecca; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R.; Benson, Kaaron; Hussein, Mohamad; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Yeatman, Timothy J.; Hildreth, Lynne T.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Fenstermacher, David A.; Dalton, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer impacts each patient and family differently. Our current understanding of the disease is primarily limited to clinical hallmarks of cancer, but many specific molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Genetic markers can be used to determine predisposition to tumor development, but molecularly targeted treatment strategies that improve patient prognosis are not widely available for most cancers. Individualized care plans, also described as personalized medicine, still must be developed by understanding and implementing basic science research into clinical treatment. Proteomics holds great promise in contributing to the prevention and cure of cancer because it provides unique tools for discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. As such, proteomics can help translate basic science discoveries into the clinical practice of personalized medicine. Here we describe how biological mass spectrometry and proteome analysis interact with other major patient care and research initiatives and present vignettes illustrating efforts in discovery of diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, development of treatment strategies in lung cancer, and monitoring prognosis and relapse in multiple myeloma patients. PMID:18664563

  2. Nursing care and treatment of patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, B

    Bladder cancer is the second most common urological cancer after prostate cancer in the UK. This article aims to update nurses knowledge about the disease, focusing on diagnosis, treatment and nursing care.

  3. Paradoxes in cancer patients' advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Lamont, E B; Siegler, M

    2000-01-01

    To determine the frequency of advance care planning (ACP) in hospitalized cancer patients and to assess their reactions to a proposed policy in which medical housestaff would offer to discuss ACP at the time of hospital admission. Structured interviews with 111 consecutively admitted cancer patients on the oncology inpatient service of a tertiary care medical center. We found that 69% (77/111) of patients had discussed their advance care preferences with someone, usually a family member, and 33% (37/111) had completed at least one formal advance directive (e.g., a living will or durable power of attorney for health care); 32% (36/111) had done both; and 30% (33/111) had done neither. However, only 9% (10/111) of patients reported having discussed their advance care preferences with their clinic oncologists and only 23% (23/101) of the remaining patients stated that they wished to do so. By contrast, 58% (64/110) of patients supported a policy in which medical housestaff would offer to discuss these advance care preferences as a part of the admission history. Our data suggest that while oncology inpatients frequently have ACPs that they discuss with family and/or document in formal advance directives, they rarely discuss or wish to discuss these ACPs with clinic oncologists. We also show that most of the reticent patients would nevertheless consider discussing the same ACPs with admitting housestaff on the day of hospital admission.

  4. Along the Cancer Continuum: Integrating Therapeutic Support and Bereavement Groups for Children and Teens of Terminally Ill Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner-Lin, Allison; Biank, Nancee M.

    2009-01-01

    Family life is altered irrevocably when a young parent is diagnosed with or dies from cancer. This article tracks the genesis and transformation of a comprehensive psychoeducational support and bereavement program for children, adolescents, and parents affected by cancer. From the inception of the program, families with parents in active treatment…

  5. Along the Cancer Continuum: Integrating Therapeutic Support and Bereavement Groups for Children and Teens of Terminally Ill Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner-Lin, Allison; Biank, Nancee M.

    2009-01-01

    Family life is altered irrevocably when a young parent is diagnosed with or dies from cancer. This article tracks the genesis and transformation of a comprehensive psychoeducational support and bereavement program for children, adolescents, and parents affected by cancer. From the inception of the program, families with parents in active treatment…

  6. Role of massage therapy in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nancy C; Sumler, Sat-Siri; Beinhorn, Curtiss M; Frenkel, Moshe A

    2008-03-01

    The care of patients with cancer not only involves dealing with its symptoms but also with complicated information and uncertainty; isolation; and fear of disease progression, disease recurrence, and death. Patients whose treatments require them to go without human contact can find a lack of touch to be an especially distressing factor. Massage therapy is often used to address these patients' need for human contact, and findings support the positive value of massage in cancer care. Several reviews of the scientific literature have attributed numerous positive effects to massage, including improvements in the quality of patients' relaxation, sleep, and immune system responses and in the relief of their fatigue, pain, anxiety, and nausea. On the basis of these reviews, some large cancer centers in the United States have started to integrate massage therapy into conventional settings. In this paper, we recognize the importance of touch, review findings regarding massage for cancer patients, describe the massage therapy program in one of these centers, and outline future challenges and implications for the effective integration of massage therapy in large and small cancer centers.

  7. Models of cancer survivorship health care: moving forward.

    PubMed

    Oeffinger, Kevin C; Argenbright, Keith E; Levitt, Gill A; McCabe, Mary S; Anderson, Paula R; Berry, Emily; Maher, Jane; Merrill, Janette; Wollins, Dana S

    2014-01-01

    The population of cancer survivors in the United States and worldwide is rapidly increasing. Many survivors will develop health conditions as a direct or indirect consequence of their cancer therapy. Thus, models to deliver high-quality care for cancer survivors are evolving. We provide examples of three different models of survivorship care from a cancer center, a community setting, and a country-wide health care system, followed by a description of the ASCO Cancer Survivorship Compendium, a tool to help providers understand the various models of survivorship care available and integrate survivorship care into their practices in a way that fits their unique needs.

  8. The potency and clinical efficacy of aromatase inhibitors across the breast cancer continuum

    PubMed Central

    Lønning, P. E.

    2011-01-01

    The strategy of using estrogen suppression to treat breast cancer led to the development of aromatase inhibitors, including the third-generation nonsteroidal compounds anastrozole and letrozole, and the steroidal compound exemestane. Aromatase inhibitors potently inhibit aromatase activity and also suppress estrogen levels in plasma and tissue. In clinical studies in postmenopausal women with breast cancer, third-generation aromatase inhibitors were shown superior to tamoxifen for the treatment of metastatic disease. Studies of adjuvant therapy with aromatase inhibitors include (i) head-to-head studies of 5 years of the aromatase inhibitor versus 5 years of tamoxifen monotherapy; (ii) sequential therapy of 2–3 years of tamoxifen followed by an aromatase inhibitor (or the opposite sequence) versus 5 years of tamoxifen monotherapy; (iii) extended therapy with an aromatase inhibitor after 5 years of tamoxifen; and (iv) sequential therapy with an aromatase inhibitor versus aromatase inhibitor monotherapy. Recent results from the Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination and Breast International Group 1–98 trials advocate using an aromatase inhibitor upfront. This article examines the clinical data with aromatase inhibitors, following a brief summary of their pharmacology. PMID:20616198

  9. The financial burden of cancer: Estimates from patients undergoing cancer care in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The emotional burden associated with the diagnosis of cancer is sometimes overshadowed by financial burden sustained by patient and the family. This is especially relevant for a developing country as there is limited state support for cancer treatment. We conducted this study to estimate the cost of cancer care for two major types of cancer and to assess the perception of patients and families regarding the burden of the cost for undergoing cancer treatment at a private tertiary care hospital. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at day care and radiotherapy unit of Aga Khan University, Hospital (AKUH) Karachi, Pakistan. All adult patients with breast and head & neck cancers diagnosed for 3 months or more were included. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire and analysed using SPSS. Results Sixty seven patients were interviewed during the study period. The mean and median monthly income of these patients was 996.4 USD and 562.5 USD respectively. Comparatively the mean and median monthly cost of cancer care was 1093.13 USD and 946.42 USD respectively. The cost of the treatment either fully or partially was borne by the family in most cases (94%). The financial burden of cancer was perceived as significant by 28 (42%) patients and unmanageable by 18 (27%) patients. This perceived level of burden was associated significantly with average monthly income (p = <0.001). Conclusion Our study indicates that the financial burden of cancer care is substantial and can be overwhelming. There is a desperate need for treatment support programs either by the government or other welfare organisations to support individuals and families who are already facing a difficult and challenging situation. PMID:23061477

  10. Improving the safety and quality of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Burke, Harry B

    2017-02-15

    The cancer community is increasingly interested in improving its safety and quality. Improvement will be driven by the expansion of safety and quality research and by a commitment to publish studies that advance high-quality, safe cancer care. Cancer 2017;123:549-550. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  11. Outside the Box: Will Information Technology Be a Viable Intervention to Improve the Quality of Cancer Care?

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Christopher; Massett, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of health information technology (IT) to resolve the crisis in communication inherent within the fragmented service environment of medical care in the United States is a strategic priority for the Department of Health and Human Services. Yet the deployment of health IT alone is not sufficient to improve quality in health service delivery; what is needed is a human factors approach designed to optimize the balance between health-care users, health-care providers, policies, procedures, and technologies. An evaluation of interface issues between primary and specialist care related to cancer reveals opportunities for human factors improvement along the cancer care continuum. Applications that emphasize cognitive support for prevention recommendations and that encourage patient engagement can help create a coordinated health-care environment conducive to cancer prevention and early detection. An emphasis on reliability, transparency, and accountability can help improve the coordination of activities among multiple service providers during diagnosis and treatment. A switch in emphasis from a transaction-based approach to one emphasizing long-term support for healing relationships should help improve patient outcomes during cancer survivorship and end-of-life care. Across the entire continuum of care, an emphasis on “meaningful use” of health IT—rather than on IT as an endpoint—should help put cancer on a path toward substantive continuous quality improvement. The accompanying research questions will focus on reducing the variance between the social and technical subsystems as IT is used to improve patient outcomes across the interfaces of care. PMID:20386056

  12. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  13. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Surbone, Antonella

    2008-03-01

    Cultural competence in oncology requires the acquisition of specific knowledge, clinical skills, and attitudes that facilitate effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting, thus, leading to improved therapeutic outcomes and decreased disparities in cancer care. Cultural competence in oncology entails a basic knowledge of different cultural attitudes and practices of communication of the truth and of decision-making styles throughout the world. Cultural competence always presupposes oncology professionals' awareness of their own cultural beliefs and values. To be able to communicate with cancer patients in culturally sensitive ways, oncologists should have knowledge of the concept of culture in its complexity and of the risks of racism, classism, sexism, ageism, and stereotyping that must be avoided in clinical practice. Oncologists should develop a sense of appreciation for differences in health care values, based on the recognition that no culture can claim hegemony over others and that cultures are evolving under their reciprocal influence on each other. Medical schools and oncology training can teach communication skills and cultural competence, while fostering in all students and young doctors those attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity, and awareness that are needed to deliver effective and culturally sensitive cancer care.

  14. Palliative care in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all cancers and has the highest annual rate of mortality in men and women. The overall aim is cure or prolongation of life without evidence of disease. Almost 60% of patients at the moment of diagnosis are not eligible for radical treatment. Therefore soothing and supportive treatment is the only treatment of choice. Patients with lung cancer who have symptoms of dyspnea, chronic cough, severe pain, exhaustion and cachexia syndrome, fear and depression and significantly reduced physical and intellectual activities are qualified for inpatient or home palliative care. Knowledge about various methods used in palliative treatment allows one to alleviate symptoms that occur in an advanced stage of disease with an expected short survival period. Methods of oncological treatment that are often used in patients with advanced lung cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drawing attention to the earlier implementation of palliative care is an objective of research carried out during recent years. Advances in surgical and conservative treatment of these patients have contributed to better outcomes and longer survival time. PMID:24596508

  15. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Erb, Nicole L.; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L.; Cannady, Rachel; Wong, Sandra L.; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April; Stein, Kevin; Sharpe, Katherine; Brooks, Durado D.; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant disease in the United States (U.S.). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years following diagnosis. The prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the U.S. population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns following treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The following guidelines are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy. PMID:26348643

  16. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care: critical components in the delivery of high-quality oncology services.

    PubMed

    Silver, Julie K; Raj, Vishwa S; Fu, Jack B; Wisotzky, Eric M; Smith, Sean Robinson; Kirch, Rebecca A

    2015-12-01

    respective roles in comprehensive oncology care, and highlights how these services can contribute complementary components of essential quality care. An understanding of how cancer rehabilitation and palliative care are aligned in goal setting, but distinct in approach may help facilitate earlier integration of both into the oncology care continuum-supporting efforts to improve physical, psychological, cognitive, functional, and quality of life outcomes in patients and survivors.

  17. Navigating the Transition From Cancer Care to Primary Care: Assistance of a Survivorship Care Plan.

    PubMed

    Brant, Jeannine M; Blaseg, Karyl; Aders, Kathy; Oliver, Dona; Gray, Evan; Dudley, William N

    2016-11-01

    To examine symptom and quality-of-life (QOL) trajectories in breast cancer and lymphoma survivors enrolled in a survivorship navigation intervention and to explore patient, caregiver, and primary care provider (PCP) satisfaction with receipt of a survivorship care plan (SCP). 
. Prospective, cohort, longitudinal.
. The Billings Clinic, an integrated cancer center in Montana. 
. 67 patients with breast cancer or lymphoma who recently completed cancer treatment, along with 39 of their caregivers and 23 PCPs. 
. Data collection at one, three, and six months by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General and satisfaction surveys.
. Symptoms, QOL, and satisfaction with the survivorship navigator and the SCP.
. Symptoms persisted six months following treatment. Symptoms and QOL indicators with worst intensity were energy, sleep, coping, and satisfaction with sex life. Patients with more comorbidities reported worse QOL, telephoned the survivorship navigator more often, and were more satisfied with the SCP. Patients with lymphoma reported higher QOL, but it was not significantly different from patients with breast cancer. Patients were significantly more satisfied than caregivers with the SCP at time 1. PCPs were highly satisfied with the SCP.
. Some symptoms persist, even when cancer treatment has ended. Patients with comorbidities are at higher risk for more severe symptoms and worse QOL and may benefit from ongoing support. SCPs can facilitate patients' transition to primary care following cancer treatment. 
. Healthcare professionals who care for breast cancer survivors need to routinely assess them for the presence of comorbid conditions. Obese breast cancer survivors may benefit from weight reduction interventions to possibly decrease their risk of developing lymphedema and improve their overall health status.

  18. “The More Support You Have the Better”: Partner Support and Dyadic HIV Care Across the Continuum for Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Tamar; Stephenson, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Background Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men account for a disproportionate burden of HIV incidence in the United States, with one-third to two-thirds of these new HIV infections occurring within main partnerships. Early initiation and adherence to highly active antiretroviral treatment is a key factor in treating and preventing the transmission of HIV; however, the average rate of adherence in the United States is low. Social support has been examined as a source of improving health for people experiencing a variety of chronic health conditions. This study aims to understand perceptions of how dyadic HIV care could influence partner-specific support for same-sex male couples with a goal of improving adherence. Methods Data were collected from 5 focus group (n = 35) discussions with gay and bisexual men in same-sex male relationships in Atlanta, GA. Participants discussed perceptions of how dyadic HIV care would impact partner support among serodiscordant and seroconcordant HIV-positive same-sex male couples. Verbatim transcripts were segmented thematically and systematically analyzed to examine patterns. Results Participants described how dyadic HIV care can facilitate emotional, informational, and instrumental support at various stages across the continuum of care, depending on partner dynamics. Participants stated that dyadic HIV care can provide an additional “sense of togetherness” and “solidarity” that helps to “alleviate stress.” Conclusions Results suggest that dyadic approaches for HIV care across the continuum may be useful in promoting partner support and improving adherence. Future research should further examine dyadic interventions for HIV treatment among same-sex male couples. PMID:25867781

  19. The Value of Continuity between Primary Care and Surgical Care in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving continuity between primary care and cancer care is critical for improving cancer outcomes and curbing cancer costs. A dimension of continuity, we investigated how regularly patients receive their primary care and surgical care for colon cancer from the same hospital and whether this affects mortality and costs. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Registry (SEER)-Medicare data, we performed a retrospective cohort study of stage I-III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. There were 23,305 stage I-III colon cancer patients who received primary care in the year prior to diagnosis and underwent operative care for colon cancer. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their surgery and to their primary care provider’s main hospital, and then classified according to whether these two hospitals were same or different. Outcomes examined were hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazard for colon cancer specific mortality, and generalized linear estimate for costs at 12 months, from propensity score matched models. Results Fifty-two percent of stage I-III colon patients received primary care and surgical care from the same hospital. Primary care and surgical care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality, but was associated with lower inpatient, outpatient, and total costs of care. Total cost difference was $8,836 (95% CI $2,746–$14,577), a 20% reduction in total median cost of care at 12 months. Conclusions Receiving primary care and surgical care at the same hospital, compared to different hospitals, was associated with lower costs but still similar survival among stage I-III colon cancer patients. Nonetheless, health care policy which encourages further integration between primary care and cancer care in order to improve outcomes and decrease costs will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving health care

  20. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Surbone, A

    2006-01-01

    Cancer is increasing in incidence and prevalence worldwide, and the WHO has recently included cancer and its treatments as a health priority in developed and developing countries. The cultural diversity of oncology patients is bound to increase, and cultural sensitivity and competence are now required of all oncology professionals. A culturally competent cancer care leads to improved therapeutic outcome and it may decrease disparities in medical care. Cultural competence in medicine is a complex multilayered accomplishment, requiring knowledge, skills and attitudes whose acquisition is needed for effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting. Effective cultural competence is based on knowledge of the notion of culture; on awareness of possible biases and prejudices related to stereotyping, racism, classism, sexism; on nurturing appreciation for differences in health care values; and on fostering the attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity and awareness. Cultural competence in healthcare relates to individual professionals, but also to organizations and systems. A culturally competent healthcare system must consider in their separateness and yet in there reciprocal influences social, racial and cultural factors. By providing a framework of reference to interpret the external world and relate to it, culture affects patients' perceptions of disease, disability and suffering; degrees and expressions of concern about them; their responses to treatments and their relationship to individual physicians and to the healthcare system. Culture also influences the interpretation of ethical norms and principles, and especially of individual autonomy, which can be perceived either as synonymous with freedom or with isolation depending on the cultural context. This, in turn, determines the variability of truth-telling attitudes and practices worldwide as well as the different roles of family in the information and decision-making process of

  1. Implementing a survivorship care plan for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rita

    2008-06-01

    The growing number of cancer survivors challenges healthcare organizations to develop programs that support survivors' transition from active treatments to survivorship care. Many individuals and families continue to face complicated care issues resulting from cancer diagnosis and side effects long after completion of their treatments. This article describes a model of a survivorship care plan, Cancer Treatment Summary and Follow-Up Care Plan, piloted in an outpatient clinical setting in a community hospital for patients with breast cancer. The plan can be expanded to include other cancer types. The intent of the survivorship care plan is to strengthen the care connections and coordination of services for survivors of breast cancer to ensure that continuing care needs are met during the survivorship phase of the cancer trajectory. The survivorship care plan is a unique opportunity for oncology nurses to be catalysts for the interdisciplinary interactions that are required to develop survivorship care plans and to implement a change in oncology nursing practice. The intervention shifts the paradigm of cancer survivorship care from an acute care medical model to a wellness model for cancer survivors in the clinical setting.

  2. Improving supportive and palliative care for adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Alison

    Although many patients with cancer report positively on their experience of care, others claim they are not receiving the information and support they need at different stages of their care pathway. The national cancer patient survey (Department of Health, 2002), for example, showed wide variations in the quality of care delivered across the country.

  3. Current developments in cancer care: including the patients' perspective-3rd European Roundtable Meeting (ERTM) June 17, 2016, Berlin, Germany.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, O; Rösler, W; Helbig, U

    2017-04-01

    National Cancer Control Plans (NCCP) are necessary to improve cancer care and reduce mortality. We have reported previously on European institutional health structures and transformation of theoretical health care standards into a practical approach. For the latter consideration of the patients' perspective was considered as highly important and chosen as subject for this meeting. Several European organizations have realized deficits in this area. They promote equal and timely access to cancer care since current inequities lead to disparities in cancer survival across Europe. Patients' support working groups are focussing on employment issues, financial services, psychosocial screening and support, palliative care and rehabilitation. They also identified cancer research including patients' views as highly important. Workshops during the 3rd European Roundtable Meeting (ERTM) covered the issues transparency in patient care, implementation of new knowledge and decision making in partnership with the patient. It was concluded that patient views and perspectives have to be considered during the whole continuum of cancer care. Access to treatment, transparency and including patients into the development process are relevant aspects.

  4. Views of cancer care reviews in primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Eike; Boulton, Mary; Rose, Peter; Lund, Susi; Richardson, Alison; Wilson, Sue; Watson, Eila

    2011-01-01

    Background The Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) provides an incentive for practices to establish a cancer register and conduct a review with cancer patients within 6 months of diagnosis, but implementation is unknown. Aim To describe: (1) implementation of the QOF cancer care review; (2) patients' experiences of primary care over the first 3 years following a cancer diagnosis; (3) patients' views on optimal care; and (4) the views of primary care professionals regarding their cancer care. Design of study Qualitative study using thematic analysis and a framework approach. Setting Six general practices in the Thames Valley area. Method Semi-structured interviews with cancer patients and focus groups with primary care teams. Results Thirty-eight adults with 12 different cancer types were interviewed. Seventy-one primary care team members took part in focus groups. Most cancer care reviews are conducted opportunistically. Thirty-five patients had had a review; only two could recall this. Patients saw acknowledgement of their diagnosis and provision of general support as important and not always adequately provided. An active approach and specific review appointment would legitimise the raising of concerns. Primary care teams considered cancer care to be part of their role. GPs emphasised the importance of being able to respond to individual patients' needs and closer links with secondary care to facilitate a more involved role. Conclusion Patients and primary care teams believe primary care has an important role to play in cancer care. Cancer care reviews in their current format are not helpful, with considerable scope for improving practice in this area. An invitation to attend a specific appointment at the end of active treatment may aid transition from secondary care and improve satisfaction with follow-up in primary care. PMID:21439175

  5. Monitoring the delivery of cancer care: Commission on Cancer and National Cancer Data Base.

    PubMed

    Williams, Richelle T; Stewart, Andrew K; Winchester, David P

    2012-07-01

    The primary objective of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) is to ensure the delivery of comprehensive, high-quality care that improves survival while maintaining quality of life for patients with cancer. This article examines the initiatives of the CoC toward achieving this goal, utilizing data from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to monitor treatment patterns and outcomes, to develop quality measures, and to benchmark hospital performance. The article also highlights how these initiatives align with the Institute of Medicine's recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care and briefly explores future projects of the CoC and NCDB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    PubMed

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  7. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  8. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  9. Experiences of gynecological cancer patients receiving care from specialist nurses: a qualitative systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cook, Olivia; McIntyre, Meredith; Recoche, Katrina; Lee, Susan

    2017-08-01

    The care needs of women with gynecological cancer are complex and change over the course of their cancer journey. Specialist nurses are well positioned to play a role in meeting the needs of women with gynecological cancer although their role and scope of practice have not been well defined. As patients are a key stakeholder, understanding their experience of care is an important step in better defining the role and scope of practice of specialist nurses in gynecological oncology in Australia and New Zealand. This review sought to consider gynecological cancer patients' experiences of specialist nursing care. Exploring the patient's experience of care by a specialist nurse is one step in the process of better defining the role and scope of practice of specialist gynecological-oncology nurses in Australia and New Zealand. This review included studies with a focus on women with gynecological cancer who had been cared for by a specialist nurse. Studies of women with gynecological cancer at any point on the continuum of care from pre-diagnosis to survivorship or end of life, including those with a recurrence of the disease, were included, with no limit to the duration of care received for inclusion in the review. Studies that explored how women with gynecological cancer experience the care and interventions of specialist nurses were included. Qualitative studies including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research were considered for review. This review also considered the qualitative components of mixed method studies. Research conducted in any country was considered for inclusion in this review providing that the study was reported in English. Studies conducted in any setting including, but not limited to, acute hospitals, outpatient/ambulatory clinics, chemotherapy or radiotherapy units, support groups, palliative care units or the patient's home were included. A three-step search strategy

  10. International cancer care: what is the role of oncology nursing?

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy

    2010-10-01

    Comprehensive cancer care continues to improve in the United States, but many developing countries carry a high cancer burden. With limited resources, nurses in such countries often are unable to improve cancer detection and treatment or relieve patient suffering. The Oncology Nursing Society has developed collaborative relationships with many international organizations to educate nurses around the world. Global partnerships have the potential to improve cancer care internationally and encourage more oncology nurses to use their expertise and become "citizens of the world."

  11. Primary Health Care and Cervical Cancer Mortality Rates in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; da Silva, Núbia Cristina; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Queiroz, Rejane Christine de Sousa; de Souza, Marta Rovery; Lein, Adriana; Alvares, Viviane; de Almeida, Dante Grapiuna; Barbosa, Allan Claudius Queiroz; Thumé, Elaine; Staton, Catherine; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a common neoplasm that is responsible for nearly 230 000 deaths annually in Brazil. Despite this burden, cervical cancer is considered preventable with appropriate care. We conducted a longitudinal ecological study from 2002 to 2012 to examine the relationship between the delivery of preventive primary care and cervical cancer mortality rates in Brazil. Brazilian states and the federal district were the unit of analysis (N = 27). Results suggest that primary health care has contributed to reducing cervical cancer mortality rates in Brazil; however, the full potential of preventive care has yet to be realized. PMID:28252500

  12. Preparing for an epidemic: cancer care in an aging population.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population was charged with evaluating and proposing recommendations on how to improve the quality of cancer care, with a specific focus on the aging population. Based on their findings, the IOM committee recently released a report highlighting their 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care. Based on those recommendations, this article highlights ways to improve evidence-based care and addresses rising costs in health care for older adults with cancer. The IOM highlighted three recommendations to address the current research gaps in providing evidence-based care in older adults with cancer, which included (1) studying populations which match the age and health-risk profile of the population with the disease, (2) legislative incentives for companies to include patients that are older or with multiple morbidities in new cancer drug trials, and (3) expansion of research that contributes to the depth and breadth of data available for assessing interventions. The recommendations also highlighted the need to maintain affordable and accessible care for older adults with cancer, with an emphasis on finding creative solutions within both the care delivery system and payment models in order to balance costs while preserving quality of care. The implementation of the IOM's recommendations will be a key step in moving closer to the goal of providing accessible, affordable, evidence-based, high-quality care to all patients with cancer.

  13. A multi-level examination of the experiences of female sex workers living with HIV along the continuum of care in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Zulliger, Rose; Kennedy, Caitlin; Barrington, Clare; Perez, Martha; Donastorg, Yeycy; Kerrigan, Deanna

    2017-06-26

    Female sex workers (FSWs) are disproportionately affected by HIV, but there is limited research on their HIV care experiences. This study explored the experiences of 44 FSWs living with HIV in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic along the HIV care continuum using in-depth interviews and focus groups. Data were analysed through narrative and thematic analysis. Individual-level factors that facilitated engagement in HIV care were physical and mental health. At the interpersonal level, disclosure of HIV or sex work status and receipt of emotional and economic support were important influences on engagement. Yet, negative reactions to or lack of disclosure of these statuses compromised engagement, further highlighting the role of stigma and discrimination. At the environmental level, FSWs described considerable challenges with the health system including long waits and treatment stock-outs at their clinics, but were generally satisfied with HIV clinic staff. At the structural level, lack of economic resources complicated care and treatment adherence. Findings underscore the need for psychosocial and economic support tailored to the unique needs of FSWs to maximise the individual and public health benefits of HIV care.

  14. Delivery of psychosocial care for cancer patients: a pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Durham, Morgan; Norton, Kelli; Anderson, James G

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial distress is common in cancer patients. Although common, psychosocial distress is frequently under-diagnosed and poorly managed in the U.S. health system. This paper describes 25 in-depth telephone interviews with health care professionals working within cancer care centers. Interview questions address perception of the psychosocial services offered within their cancer care organizations. Results indicate that access to psychosocial care is frequently dependent upon the subjective judgment of busy clinicians. Information technology could improve the delivery of psychosocial care by easing the administration of psychosocial assessments and increasing clinician contact with research evidence regarding distress management.

  15. Quality of cancer follow-up care: a focus on Latina breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ashing, Kimlin; Napoles, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Receiving quality cancer follow-up care influences survivorship outcomes. Among Latinas, breast cancer is the number one cause of cancer death; yet Latinas do not receive adequate follow-up care. This study examined quality of cancer follow-up care among Latina breast cancer survivors (BCS) and whether it differs by participant language and healthcare system variables (provider specialty, and medical setting). Methods Two hundred thirty-two (95 English-speaking Latina and 137 Spanish-speaking) Latina BCS were recruited from the California Cancer Registry, hospital cancer registries, and community agencies. Results English-speaking Latina BCS were more likely to report receiving cancer follow-up care at a doctor’s office (p<0.001). BCS without a regular place for cancer follow-up care were more likely to report not seeing a primary care provider (p<0.05) or cancer specialist (p<0.001) in the past 12 months. English-speaking Latina BCS (p<0.001), BCS who saw a cancer specialist in the past 12 months (p<0.001), and received follow-up care at a doctor’s office (p<0.05) reported higher quality of care. Speaking English, having seen a cancer specialist, and receiving follow-up care at a doctor’s office were independently associated with higher quality of care, explaining 44 % of the variance. Conclusions Our study findings suggest that examining the influence of ethnic and linguistic factors on quality of cancer follow-up care is necessary to address health disparities. Improved access to cancer follow-up care for Spanish-speaking Latina BCS is of particular concern. Implication of Cancer Survivors Identifying follow-up care needs of Latina BCS may contribute to providing high-quality care and improved survivorship outcomes. PMID:24563169

  16. Integrating Primary Care Providers in the Care of Cancer Survivors: Gaps in Evidence and Future Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; O’Malley, Denalee M.; Hudson, Shawna V.

    2017-01-01

    For over a decade since the release of the Institute of Medicine report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition, there has been a focus on providing coordinated, comprehensive care for cancer survivors that emphasized the role of primary care. Several models of care have been described which primarily focused on primary care providers (PCPs) as receivers of cancer survivors and specific types of information (e.g. survivorship care plans) from oncology based care, and not as active members of the cancer survivorship team. In this paper, we reviewed survivorship models that have been described in the literature, and specifically focused on strategies aiming to integrate primary care providers in caring for cancer survivors across different settings. We offer insights differentiating primary care providers’ level of expertise in cancer survivorship and how such expertise may be utilized. We provide recommendations for education, clinical practice, research and policy initiatives that may advance the integration of primary care providers in the care of cancer survivors in diverse clinical settings. PMID:28049575

  17. Making the continuum of care work for mothers and infants: Does gender equity matter? Findings from a quasi-experimental study in Bihar, India

    PubMed Central

    McDougal, Lotus; Atmavilas, Yamini; Hay, Katherine; Silverman, Jay G.; Tarigopula, Usha K.; Raj, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Background Improvements in continuum of care (CoC) utilization are needed to address inadequate reductions in neonatal and infant mortality in India and elsewhere. This study examines the effect of Ananya, a health system training and community outreach intervention, on reproductive, maternal and newborn health continuum of care (RMNH CoC) utilization in Bihar, India, and explores whether that effect is moderated by gender equity factors (child marriage, restricted mobility and low decision-making control). Methods A two-armed quasi-experimental design compared districts in Bihar that did/did not implement Ananya. Cross-sections of married women aged 15–49 with a 0–5 month old child were surveyed at baseline and two year follow-up (baseline n = 7191 and follow-up n = 6143; response rates 88.9% and 90.7%, respectively). Difference-in-difference analyses assessed program impact on RMNH CoC co-coverage, defined by 9 health services/behaviors for the index pregnancy (e.g., antenatal care, skin-to-skin care). Three-way interactions assessed gender equity as a moderator of Ananya’s impact. Findings Participants reported low RMNH CoC co-coverage at baseline (on average 3.2 and 3.0 of the 9 RMNH services/behaviors for Ananya and control groups, respectively). The Ananya group showed a significantly greater increase in RMNH CoC co-coverage (.41 services) compared with the control group over time (p<0.001), with the primary drivers being increases in clean cord care, skin-to-skin care and postpartum contraceptive use. Gender equity interaction analyses revealed diminished intervention effects on antenatal care, skilled birth attendance and exclusive breastfeeding for women married as minors. Conclusion Ananya improved RMNH CoC co-coverage among these recent mothers, largely through positive health behavior changes. Child marriage attenuated Ananya’s impact on utilization of key health services and behaviors. Supporting the health system with training and community

  18. Making the continuum of care work for mothers and infants: Does gender equity matter? Findings from a quasi-experimental study in Bihar, India.

    PubMed

    McDougal, Lotus; Atmavilas, Yamini; Hay, Katherine; Silverman, Jay G; Tarigopula, Usha K; Raj, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Improvements in continuum of care (CoC) utilization are needed to address inadequate reductions in neonatal and infant mortality in India and elsewhere. This study examines the effect of Ananya, a health system training and community outreach intervention, on reproductive, maternal and newborn health continuum of care (RMNH CoC) utilization in Bihar, India, and explores whether that effect is moderated by gender equity factors (child marriage, restricted mobility and low decision-making control). A two-armed quasi-experimental design compared districts in Bihar that did/did not implement Ananya. Cross-sections of married women aged 15-49 with a 0-5 month old child were surveyed at baseline and two year follow-up (baseline n = 7191 and follow-up n = 6143; response rates 88.9% and 90.7%, respectively). Difference-in-difference analyses assessed program impact on RMNH CoC co-coverage, defined by 9 health services/behaviors for the index pregnancy (e.g., antenatal care, skin-to-skin care). Three-way interactions assessed gender equity as a moderator of Ananya's impact. Participants reported low RMNH CoC co-coverage at baseline (on average 3.2 and 3.0 of the 9 RMNH services/behaviors for Ananya and control groups, respectively). The Ananya group showed a significantly greater increase in RMNH CoC co-coverage (.41 services) compared with the control group over time (p<0.001), with the primary drivers being increases in clean cord care, skin-to-skin care and postpartum contraceptive use. Gender equity interaction analyses revealed diminished intervention effects on antenatal care, skilled birth attendance and exclusive breastfeeding for women married as minors. Ananya improved RMNH CoC co-coverage among these recent mothers, largely through positive health behavior changes. Child marriage attenuated Ananya's impact on utilization of key health services and behaviors. Supporting the health system with training and community outreach can be beneficial to RMNH Co

  19. Breast Cancer Screening in a Low Income Managed Care Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    to invasive beast cancer ratio, a pattern previously demonstrated for cervical cancer (9). This decline in the ratio of invasive to non- invasive...cervical carcinoma. Int. J Cancer 1978; 21:418-25. 10. Guzik DS. Efficacy of screening for cervical cancer : A review. Am J Public Health 1978; 68:125-34...and Cervical Cancer Screening in Low Income Managed Care Sample: The Efficacy of Physician Letters and Phone Calls. Am J of Public health. 85(6): 834

  20. Social media in cancer care: opportunities to improve care in locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Christine; Rajmohan, Yanchini; Poonja, Zia; Adilman, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    To examine the current data supporting use of social media in breast cancer clinical care. Although opportunities to utilize social media to increase knowledge have been commonly seized, the opportunity to improve communication among clinicians is lagging. Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) requires timely coordination of care among many specialists, and presents an excellent scenario for enhanced utilization of current IT strategies. A systematic review was conducted to assess the use of social media to enhance breast cancer care. In addition, a Web-based search using common search engines and publicly available social media was conducted to determine the prevalence of information and networking pages aimed at patients and clinicians. Over 400 articles were retrieved; 81% focused on delivery of information or online support to patients, 17% focused on delivery of information to physicians, and 1% focused on the use of social media to improve collaboration among clinicians. Web searches retrieved millions of hits, with very few hits relating to improving collaboration among clinicians. Although there is significant potential to utilize current technologies to improve care for patients and improve connectedness among clinicians, most of the currently available technologies focus solely on the delivery of information.

  1. Conference proceedings-improving the quality and efficiency of emergency care across the continuum: a systems approach.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; Asplin, Brent R

    2011-06-01

    In October 2009, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) convened a conference held in Boston, Massachusetts, to outline critical issues in emergency care quality and efficiency and to develop a series of research agendas and projects aimed at addressing important questions about how to improve acute, episodic care. The aim of the conference was to describe how hospital-based emergency department (ED) systems could provide solutions for broader delivery problems in the U.S. health care system. The conference featured keynote speakers Drs. Carolyn Clancy (Director, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) and Elliott Fisher (Director, Center for Health Policy Research at Dartmouth Medical School). Panels focused on: 1) systems and workflow redesign to improve health care and 2) improving coordination of care for high-cost patients. Additional sessions were conducted to develop five research agendas on the following topics: 1) health information technology; 2) demand for acute care services; 3) frequent, high-cost users of emergency care; 4) critical pathways for post-emergency care diagnosis and treatment; and 5) end-of-life and palliative care in the ED.

  2. The Parasol Protocol: An Implementation Science Study of HIV Continuum of Care Interventions for Gay Men and Transgender Women in Burma/Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Naing, Soe; Clouse, Emily; Thu, Kaung Htet; Mon, Sandra Hsu Hnin; Tun, Zin Min; Baral, Stefan; Paing, Aung Zayar; Beyrer, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Background Efforts to improve HIV diagnosis and antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation among people living with HIV and reduce onward transmission of HIV rely on innovative interventions along multiple steps of the HIV care continuum. These innovative methods are particularly important for key populations, including men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TW). The HIV epidemic in Myanmar is concentrated among key populations, and national efforts now focus on reducing stigma and improving engagement of MSM and TW in HIV prevention and care. Objective This study aims to test the use of several innovations to address losses in the HIV care continuum: (1) use of respondent-driven sampling (RDS) to reach and engage MSM and TW in HIV testing, (2) HIV self-testing (HIVST) to increase HIV testing uptake and aid early diagnosis of infection, (3) community-based CD4 point-of-care (POC) technology to rapidly stage HIV disease for those who are HIV infected, and (4) peer navigation support to increase successful health system navigation for HIV-infected MSM and TW in need of ART or HIV engagement in care. Methods To assess the effect of HIVST, we will implement a randomized trial in which MSM and TW adults in the greater Yangon metropolitan area who are HIV uninfected will be recruited via RDS (N=366). Participants will complete a baseline socio-behavioral survey and will be randomized to standard, voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) or to HIVST. Biologic specimens will be collected during this baseline visit for confirmatory testing using dried blood spots. Participants will be asked to return to the study office to complete a second study visit in which they will report their HIV test result and answer questions on the acceptability of the assigned testing method. Aim 1 participants with confirmed HIV infection and who are not engaged in care (N=49) will be offered direct enrollment into Aims 2 and 3, which include immediate CD4 POC and the option for

  3. Skin cancer: increasing awareness and screening in primary care.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Randy

    2014-05-12

    Skin cancer screening (SCS) promotes early detection and improves treatment. Primary care providers are strategically positioned to provide screenings, yet the frequency is low. Strategies to improve SCS include increasing skin cancer awareness, targeting high-risk patient populations, and advocating for primary care providers to conduct screenings.

  4. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Effective cancer communication between the health care team, cancer patients, and their family is important. Learn about communication skills that support a patient-centered practice and how to talk with adults and children about their diagnosis, prognosis, and transition to end-of-life care in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. Cancer Survivors Gain from Web-Based Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163535.html Cancer Survivors Gain From Web-Based Health Care But some patients reported missing face-to-face ... 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Online- and phone-based health care offers a number of benefits for cancer survivors, ...

  6. Primary care physicians' cancer screening recommendation practices and perceptions of cancer risk of Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Harry T; Ma, Grace X; Gold, Robert S; Atkinson, Nancy L; Wang, Min Qi

    2013-01-01

    Asian Americans experience disproportionate incidence and mortality rates of certain cancers, compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Primary care physicians are a critical source for cancer screening recommendations and play a significant role in increasing cancer screening of their patients. This study assessed primary care physicians' perceptions of cancer risk in Asians and screening recommendation practices. Primary care physicians practicing in New Jersey and New York City (n=100) completed a 30-question survey on medical practice characteristics, Asian patient communication, cancer screening guidelines, and Asian cancer risk. Liver cancer and stomach cancer were perceived as higher cancer risks among Asian Americans than among the general population, and breast and prostate cancer were perceived as lower risks. Physicians are integral public health liaisons who can be both influential and resourceful toward educating Asian Americans about specific cancer awareness and screening information.

  7. Comparisons of patient and physician expectations for cancer survivorship care.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Winson Y; Neville, Bridget A; Cameron, Danielle B; Cook, E Francis; Earle, Craig C

    2009-05-20

    To compare expectations for cancer survivorship care between patients and their physicians and between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncologists. Survivors and their physicians were surveyed to evaluate for expectations regarding physician participation in primary cancer follow-up, screening for other cancers, general preventive health, and management of comorbidities. Of 992 eligible survivors and 607 physicians surveyed, 535 (54%) and 378 (62%) were assessable, respectively. Among physician respondents, 255 (67%) were PCPs and 123 (33%) were oncologists. Comparing patients with their oncologists, expectations were highly discrepant for screening for cancers other than the index one (agreement rate, 29%), with patients anticipating significantly more oncologist involvement. Between patients and their PCPs, expectations were most incongruent for primary cancer follow-up (agreement rate, 35%), with PCPs indicating they should contribute a much greater part to this aspect of care. Expectations between patients and their PCPs were generally more concordant than between patients and their oncologists. PCPs and oncologists showed high discordances in perceptions of their own roles for primary cancer follow-up, cancer screening, and general preventive health (agreement rates of 3%, 44%, and 51%, respectively). In the case of primary cancer follow-up, both PCPs and oncologists indicated they should carry substantial responsibility for this task. Patients and physicians have discordant expectations with respect to the roles of PCPs and oncologists in cancer survivorship care. Uncertainties around physician roles and responsibilities can lead to deficiencies in care, supporting the need to make survivorship care planning a standard component in cancer management.

  8. Health Reforms as Examples of Multilevel Interventions in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Mary L.; Devers, Kelly J.

    2012-01-01

    To increase access and improve system quality and efficiency, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act with sweeping changes to the nation’s health-care system. Although not intended to be specific to cancer, the act's implementation will profoundly impact cancer care. Its components will influence multiple levels of the health-care environment including states, communities, health-care organizations, and individuals seeking care. To illustrate these influences, two reforms are considered: 1) accountable care organizations and 2) insurance-based reforms to gather evidence about effectiveness. We discuss these reforms using three facets of multilevel interventions: 1) their intended and unintended consequences, 2) the importance of timing, and 3) their implications for cancer. The success of complex health reforms requires understanding the scientific basis and evidence for carrying out such multilevel interventions. Conversely and equally important, successful implementation of multilevel interventions depends on understanding the political setting and goals of health-care reform. PMID:22623600

  9. Health reforms as examples of multilevel interventions in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Flood, Ann B; Fennell, Mary L; Devers, Kelly J

    2012-05-01

    To increase access and improve system quality and efficiency, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act with sweeping changes to the nation's health-care system. Although not intended to be specific to cancer, the act's implementation will profoundly impact cancer care. Its components will influence multiple levels of the health-care environment including states, communities, health-care organizations, and individuals seeking care. To illustrate these influences, two reforms are considered: 1) accountable care organizations and 2) insurance-based reforms to gather evidence about effectiveness. We discuss these reforms using three facets of multilevel interventions: 1) their intended and unintended consequences, 2) the importance of timing, and 3) their implications for cancer. The success of complex health reforms requires understanding the scientific basis and evidence for carrying out such multilevel interventions. Conversely and equally important, successful implementation of multilevel interventions depends on understanding the political setting and goals of health-care reform.

  10. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Ruth C.; Simon, Melissa A.; Madden, Debra L.; Gradishar, William J.; Benson, Al B.; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Weiss, Elisa S.; Gareen, Ilana F.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Khan, Seema A.; Bunce, Mikele M.; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. We examined challenges faced by a patient with early-stage breast cancer that resulted from difficulties in understanding and managing task interdependence across clinical domains involved in this patient’s care. We used team science supported by the project management discipline to discuss how various task interdependence aspects can be recognized, deliberately designed, and systematically managed to prevent care breakdowns. This case highlights how effective task interdependence management facilitated by project management methods could markedly improve the course of a patient’s care. This work informs efforts of cancer centers and practices to redesign cancer care delivery through innovative, practical, and patient-centered approaches to management of task interdependence in cancer care. Future patient-reported outcomes research will help to determine optimal ways to engage patients, including those who are medically underserved, in managing task interdependence in their own care. PMID:27577619

  11. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Trosman, Julia R; Carlos, Ruth C; Simon, Melissa A; Madden, Debra L; Gradishar, William J; Benson, Al B; Rapkin, Bruce D; Weiss, Elisa S; Gareen, Ilana F; Wagner, Lynne I; Khan, Seema A; Bunce, Mikele M; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B

    2016-11-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. We examined challenges faced by a patient with early-stage breast cancer that resulted from difficulties in understanding and managing task interdependence across clinical domains involved in this patient's care. We used team science supported by the project management discipline to discuss how various task interdependence aspects can be recognized, deliberately designed, and systematically managed to prevent care breakdowns. This case highlights how effective task interdependence management facilitated by project management methods could markedly improve the course of a patient's care. This work informs efforts of cancer centers and practices to redesign cancer care delivery through innovative, practical, and patient-centered approaches to management of task interdependence in cancer care. Future patient-reported outcomes research will help to determine optimal ways to engage patients, including those who are medically underserved, in managing task interdependence in their own care.

  12. Area-level variations in cancer care and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Keating, Nancy L; Landrum, Mary Beth; Lamont, Elizabeth B; Bozeman, Samuel R; McNeil, Barbara J

    2012-05-01

    : Substantial regional variations in health-care spending exist across the United States; yet, care and outcomes are not better in higher-spending areas. Most studies have focused on care in fee-for-service Medicare; whether spillover effects exist in settings without financial incentives for more care is unknown. : We studied care for cancer patients in fee-for-service Medicare and the Veterans Health Administration (VA) to understand whether processes and outcomes of care vary with area-level Medicare spending. : An observational study using logistic regression to assess care by area-level measures of Medicare spending. : Patients with lung, colorectal, or prostate cancers diagnosed during 2001-2004 in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) areas or the VA. The SEER cohort included fee-for-service Medicare patients aged older than 65 years. : Recommended and preference-sensitive cancer care and mortality. : In fee-for-service Medicare, higher-spending areas had higher rates of recommended care (curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer and chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer) and preference-sensitive care (chemotherapy for stage IV lung and colon cancer and primary treatment of local/regional prostate cancer) and had lower lung cancer mortality. In the VA, we observed minimal variation in care by area-level Medicare spending. : Our findings suggest that intensity of care for Medicare beneficiaries is not driving variations in VA care, despite some overlap in physician networks. Although the Dartmouth Atlas work has been of unprecedented importance in demonstrating variations in Medicare spending, new measures may be needed to better understand variations in other populations.

  13. Challenges in volunteering from cancer care volunteers perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kamaludin, Kauthar Mohamad; Muhammad, Mazanah; Wahat, Nor Wahiza Abdul; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of non-government organizations (NGOs) and support groups has helped strengthen public health services in addressing cancer care burden. Owing to the contribution of volunteers in cancer care, this article documents a qualitative study that examined challenges in attracting and retaining cancer care volunteers as part of the effort to develop a volunteer recruitment model. Data were collected through three focus group discussions involving 19 cancer support group members in Malaysia. Findings of the study revealed that mobility and locality appeared to be significant in Malaysian context, while the need for financial support and time flexibility are challenges faced by cancer support groups to attract and retain volunteers. The findings imply that cancer care initiatives can benefit from more local volunteers but at the same time these volunteers require flexibility and financial support to sustain their engagement.

  14. PALLIATIVE CARE AND SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT IN OLDER CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Older cancer patients are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with Palliative Care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of the cancer patient with an emphasis on quality of life. In this article, we discuss the evaluation and management of pain and other common non-pain symptoms that occur in the elderly cancer patient, as well as end of life care. PMID:26614860

  15. Palliative Care and Symptom Management in Older Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    Older patients with cancer are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with palliative care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of patients with cancer with an emphasis on quality of life. This article discusses the evaluation and management of pain and other common nonpain symptoms that occur in elderly patients with cancer, as well as end-of-life care.

  16. Impact of health care reform on the cancer patient: a view from cancer executives.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Linda W; Farber, Matthew; Guidi, Teri Ursin; Laffey, William J

    2010-01-01

    Cancer leaders assess the impact on the cancer patient of the historic passage of Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (HR 3590) (PPACA). The Association of Cancer Executives, a national organization for leadership development of oncology executives and improvements in patient care delivery, and the Association of Community Cancer Centers, a leading education and advocacy organization for the cancer team, weigh in on the impact of PPACA. Oncology leaders assess the impact of PPACA on cancer patients and families, cancer programs in the United States, and provider relations. The provisions of PPACA most impacting cancer patients are reviewed, including reimbursement changes, expansion of prevention and screening services, the development of accountable care organizations, physician relations, and the implementation of integrated electronic health records. Cancer executives prepare their programs for PPACA by changing the care delivery model to ensure the economic survival of private practices and hospital-based programs.

  17. [Integration of nutritional care into cancer treatment: need for improvement].

    PubMed

    Joly, Caroline; Jacqueline-Ravel, Nathalie; Pugliesi-Rinaldi, Angela; Bigler-Perrotin, Lucienne; Chikhi, Marinette; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Dulguerov, Pavel; Miralbell, Raymond; Picard-Kossovsky, Michel; Seium, Yodit; Thériault, Michel; Pichard, Claude

    2011-11-16

    Progresses in cancer treatment transformed cancer into a chronic disease associated with growing nutritional problems. Poor nutritional status of cancer patients worsens morbidity, mortality, overall cost of care and decreases patients' quality of life, oncologic treatments tolerance and efficacy. These adverse effects lead to treatment modifications or interruptions, reducing the chances to control or cure cancer. Implementation of an interdisciplinary and longitudinal integration of nutritional care and nutritional information into cancer treatment (The OncoNut Program) could prevent or treat poor nutritional status and its adversely side effects.

  18. Detecting cancer: Pearls for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Simon B; Montero, Alberto J

    2016-07-01

    Five-year survival rates have improved over the past 40 years for nearly all types of cancer, partially thanks to early detection and prevention. Since patients typically present to their primary care physician with initial symptoms, it is vital for primary care physicians to accurately diagnose common cancers and to recognize unusual presentations of highly curable cancers such as Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancers, for which the 5-year overall survival rates are greater than 85%. This paper reviews these cancers and provides clinically relevant pearls from an oncologic perspective for physicians who are the first point of contact. Copyright © 2016 Cleveland Clinic.

  19. Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0540 TITLE: Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nina Bickell CONTRACTING...11-1-0540 Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care 5b. GRANT NUMBER PC101939 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have completed all the milestones for the study. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quality indicators, locally advanced prostate cancer

  20. Palliative care in cancer: managing patients' expectations.

    PubMed

    Ghandourh, Wsam A

    2016-12-01

    Advanced cancer patients commonly have misunderstandings about the intentions of treatment and their overall prognosis. Several studies have shown that large numbers of patients receiving palliative radiation or chemotherapy hold unrealistic hopes of their cancer being cured by such therapies, which can affect their ability to make well-informed decisions about treatment options. This review aimed to explore this discrepancy between patients' and physicians' expectations by investigating three primary issues: (1) the factors associated with patients developing unrealistic expectations; (2) the implications of having unrealistic hopes and the effects of raising patients' awareness about prognosis; and (3) patients' and caregivers' perspective on disclosure and their preferences for communication styles. Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic databases including Pubmed, EMBASE and ScienceDirect using multiple combinations of keywords, which yielded a total of 65 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The discrepancy between patients' and doctors' expectations was associated with many factors including doctors' reluctance to disclose terminal prognoses and patients' ability to understand or accept such information. The majority of patients and caregivers expressed a desire for detailed prognostic information; however, varied responses have been reported on the preferred style of conveying such information. Communication styles have profound effects on patients' experience and treatment choices. Patients' views on disclosure are influenced by many cultural, psychological and illness-related factors, therefore individuals' needs must be considered when conveying prognostic information. More research is needed to identify communication barriers and the interventions that could be used to increase patients' satisfaction with palliative care.

  1. Risk-Based Health Care, the Cancer Survivor, the Oncologist and the Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Mary S.; Partridge, Ann; Grunfeld, Eva; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face substantial risks for morbidity, reduced quality of life, and premature mortality related to the cancer itself and/or the interventions undertaken to control cancer. Risk-based care that involves a personalized systematic plan of periodic screening, surveillance, and prevention relevant to the cancer experience is recommended to address the comprehensive health needs of the growing population of cancer survivors. Risk-based care and coordination between oncology and primary care providers have been identified as important metrics of quality cancer survivorship care. Various models of survivorship care, treatment summaries and survivorship care plans have been promoted as methods to facilitate communication among providers across care transitions and improve survivor access to quality survivorship care. However, research supporting the feasibility of implementing these practices and their effectiveness in enhancing health outcomes is limited. This article reviews key concepts underpinning clinical and research initiatives endeavoring to improve access to quality care among long-term survivors and summarizes results of intervention studies implementing these elements in transitioning survivors from oncology to primary care providers for long-term follow-up care. PMID:24331199

  2. Quantifying and addressing losses along the continuum of care for people living with HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kranzer, Katharina; Govindasamy, Darshini; Ford, Nathan; Johnston, Victoria; Lawn, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Recent years have seen an increasing recognition of the need to improve access and retention in care for people living with HIV/AIDS. This review aims to quantify patients along the continuum of care in sub-Saharan Africa and review possible interventions. Methods We defined the different steps making up the care pathway and quantified losses at each step between acquisition of HIV infection and retention in care on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We conducted a systematic review of data from studies conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and published between 2000 and June 2011 for four of these steps and performed a meta-analysis when indicated; existing data syntheses were used for the remaining two steps. Results The World Health Organization estimates that only 39% of HIV-positive individuals are aware of their status. Among patients who know their HIV-positive status, just 57% (95% CI, 48 to 66%) completed assessment of ART eligibility. Of eight studies using an ART eligibility threshold of≤200 cells/µL, 41% of patients (95% CI, 27% to 55%) were eligible for treatment, while of six studies using an ART eligibility threshold of≤350 cells/µL, 57% of patients (95% CI, 50 to 63%) were eligible. Of those not yet eligible for ART, the median proportion remaining in pre-ART care was 45%. Of eligible individuals, just 66% (95% CI, 58 to 73%) started ART and the proportion remaining on therapy after three years has previously been estimated as 65%. However, recent studies highlight that this is not a simple linear pathway, as patients cycle in and out of care. Published studies of interventions have mainly focused on reducing losses at HIV testing and during ART care, whereas few have addressed linkage and retention during the pre-ART period. Conclusions Losses occur throughout the care pathway, especially prior to ART initiation, and for some patients this is a transient event, as they may re-engage in care at a later time. However, data regarding

  3. Vietnam: integrating palliative care into HIV/AIDS and cancer care.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, Eric L; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Minh; Green, Kimberly; Van Kham, Le; Khue, Luong Ngoc

    2007-05-01

    Vietnam is struggling to meet the growing need for both disease-modifying and palliative care for people with life-threatening chronic diseases such as HIV/AIDS and cancer. Recently, Vietnam initiated rapid development of a national palliative care program for HIV/AIDS and cancer patients that builds on existing palliative care programs and experience and integrates palliative care into standard HIV/AIDS and cancer care. National palliative care guidelines have been issued by the Ministry of Health based on a rapid situation analysis. Plans now call for review and revision of opioid laws and regulations to increase availability of opioids for medical use, training in palliative care for clinicians throughout the country, and development of palliative care programs both in the community and in inpatient referral centers.

  4. The terminal care of patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Twycross, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest form of malignant disease seen at St Christopher's Hospice. More than 35% of the male and about 8% of the female cancer patients are admitted with this diagnosis. This means that each year approximately 100 patients with lung cancer are amitted and cared for at the hospice. The more common symptoms experienced by 185 consecutive terminal lung cancer patients admitted to St Christopher's Hospice are listed in Table 1. PMID:4132166

  5. Addressing the Global Burden of Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The US National Cancer Institute’s Center for Global Health (CGH) has been a key partner in a multi-institutional expert team that has developed a set of publications to address foundational concerns in breast cancer care across the cancer care continuum and within limited resource settings.

  6. Mortality of patients with cancer admitted to intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A; González-Herrera, María O; Herrera-Gómez, Angel

    2013-03-01

    Outcomes of critically ill cancer patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) had improved; it could be associated with medical advances in critical care, introduction of new anticancer treatments, and better supportive care. Recent reports have described ICU mortality for critically ill cancer patients ranged from 15.9% to 32%. During the period 2007 to 2011, a total of 1418 critically ill cancer patients were admitted to our ICU with a mortality rate lower (17.5%) than that reported by other centers. The ICUs around the world should consider the improvement in the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients who require critical care and they should not be denied ICU admission only on the basis of a patient having cancer.

  7. Efficacy and acceptability of antidepressants on the continuum of depressive experiences in patients with cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ostuzzi, Giovanni; Benda, Laura; Costa, Enrico; Barbui, Corrado

    2015-09-01

    Patients with cancer are particularly vulnerable to depressive experiences, ranging from severe emotional reactions to proper depressive syndromes, including major depression. These experiences may deeply affect the course and outcome of the disease. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy acceptability of antidepressants on the continuum of depressive experiences in patients suffering from cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CENTRAL, as well as websites of regulatory agencies, clinical trial repositories and pharmaceutical companies, were systematically searched for published and unpublished randomised trials assessing the efficacy of antidepressants versus placebo in patients with cancer. Efficacy of antidepressants at the end of the study was the primary outcome. The review protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42014013440). A total of 19 studies contributed to the analysis. Antidepressants (particularly the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors and mianserin) were more effective than placebo in relieving depressive experiences in both patients with major depression or depressive symptoms (standardised mean difference -0.596, 95% confidence interval -1.041 to -0.150), as well as in patients with other cancer-related distressing symptoms (standardised mean difference -0.229, 95% confidence interval -0.419 to -0.039). We found evidence that efficacy was positively associated with length of treatment. No differences between antidepressants and placebo were found in terms of overall acceptability. Antidepressants should be considered as one treatment option for relieving the burden of depressive experiences in patients with cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A perfect storm: How tumor biology, genomics, and health care delivery patterns collide to create a racial survival disparity in breast cancer and proposed interventions for change.

    PubMed

    Daly, Bobby; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that there is a significant racial divide in breast cancer incidence and mortality rates. African American women are less likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than white women but are more likely to die from it. This review explores the factors that may contribute to the racial survival disparity. Consideration is paid to what is known about the role of differences in tumor biology, genomics, cancer screening, and quality of cancer care. It is argued that it is the collision of 2 forces, tumor biology and genomics, with patterns of care that leads to the breast cancer mortality gap. The delays, misuse, and underuse of treatment for African American patients are of increased significance when these patients are presenting with more aggressive forms of breast cancer. In the current climate of health care reform ushered in by the Affordable Care Act, this article also evaluates interventions to close the disparity gap. Prior interventions have been too narrowly focused on the patient rather than addressing the system and improving care across the continuum of breast cancer evaluation and treatment. Lastly, areas of future investigation and policy initiatives aimed at reducing the racial survival disparity in breast cancer are discussed. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  9. Using a supportive care framework to understand and improve palliative care among cancer patients in Africa.

    PubMed

    Busolo, David S; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2016-06-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality are increasing in Africa, which is leading to greater demands for palliative care. There has been little progress in terms of research, pain management, and policies related to palliative care. Palliative care in Africa is scarce and scattered, with most African nations lacking the basic services. To address these needs, a guiding framework that identifies care needs and directs palliative care services could be utilized. Therefore, using the supportive care framework developed by Fitch (Fitch, 2009), we here review the literature on palliative care for patients diagnosed with cancer in Africa and make recommendations for improvement. The PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, Embase, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index, and Medline databases were searched. Some 25 English articles on research from African countries published between 2004 and 2014 were selected and reviewed. The reviewed literature was analyzed and presented using the domains of the supportive care framework. Palliative care patients with cancer in Africa, their families, and caregivers experience increasing psychological, physical, social, spiritual, emotional, informational, and practical needs. Care needs are often inadequately addressed because of a lack of awareness as well as deficient and scattered palliative care services and resources. In addition, there is sparse research, education, and policies that address the dire situation in palliative care. Our review findings add to the existing body of knowledge demonstrating that palliative care patients with cancer in Africa experience disturbing care needs in all domains of the supportive care framework. To better assess and address these needs, holistic palliative care that is multidomain and multi-professional could be utilized. This approach needs to be individualized and to offer better access to services and information. In addition, research, education, and policies around palliative care for cancer

  10. Health care professionals' perspectives of the experiences of family caregivers during in-patient cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ekstedt, Mirjam; Stenberg, Una; Olsson, Mariann; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-11-01

    Being a family member of a patient who is being treated in an acute care setting for cancer often involves a number of challenges. Our study describes Norwegian cancer care health professionals' perceptions of family members who served as family caregivers (FCs) and their need for support during the in-hospital cancer treatment of their ill family member. Focus group discussions were conducted with a multidisciplinary team of 24 experienced social workers, physicians, and nurses who were closely involved in the patients' in-hospital cancer treatment and care. Drawing on qualitative hermeneutic analysis, four main themes describe health professionals' perceptions of FCs during the patient's in-hospital cancer care: an asset and additional burden, infinitely strong and struggling with helplessness, being an outsider in the center of care, and being in different temporalities. We conclude that it is a challenge for health care professionals to support the family and create room for FC's needs in acute cancer care. System changes are needed in health care, so that the patient/FC dyad is viewed as a unit of care in a dual process of caregiving, which would enable FCs to be given space and inclusion in care, with their own needs simultaneously considered alongside those of the patient.

  11. The opioid epidemic and neonatal abstinence syndrome in the USA: a review of the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Jason R; Maalouf, Faouzi I; Krans, Elizabeth E; Schumacher, Robert E; Cooper, William O; Patrick, Stephen W

    2017-03-01

    As the prescription opioid epidemic grew in the USA, its impact extended to pregnant women and their infants. This review summarises how increasing rates of neonatal abstinence syndrome resulted in a need to improve care to pregnant women and opioid-exposed infants. We discuss the variations in care delivery with particular emphasis on screening at-risk mothers, scoring systems for neonatal drug withdrawal, type and duration of pharmacotherapy, and discharge safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Personalized prostate cancer care: from screening to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Conran, Carly A; Brendler, Charles B; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Unprecedented progress has been made in genomic personalized medicine in the last several years, allowing for more individualized healthcare assessments and recommendations than ever before. However, most of this progress in prostate cancer (PCa) care has focused on developing and selecting therapies for late-stage disease. To address this issue of limited focus, we propose a model for incorporating genomic-based personalized medicine into all levels of PCa care, from prevention and screening to diagnosis, and ultimately to the treatment of both early-stage and late-stage cancers. We have termed this strategy the “Pyramid Model” of personalized cancer care. In this perspective paper, our objective is to demonstrate the potential application of the Pyramid Model to PCa care. This proactive and comprehensive personalized cancer care approach has the potential to achieve three important medical goals: reducing mortality, improving quality of life and decreasing both individual and societal healthcare costs. PMID:27184548

  13. The role of hospitals in bridging the care continuum: a systematic review of coordination of care and follow-up for adults with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    De Regge, Melissa; De Pourcq, Kaat; Meijboom, Bert; Trybou, Jeroen; Mortier, Eric; Eeckloo, Kristof

    2017-08-09

    Multiple studies have investigated the outcome of integrated care programs for chronically ill patients. However, few studies have addressed the specific role hospitals can play in the downstream collaboration for chronic disease management. Our objective here is to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of the hospitals by synthesizing the advantages and disadvantages of hospital interference in the chronic discourse for chronically ill patients found in published empirical studies. Systematic literature review. Two reviewers independently investigated relevant studies using a standardized search strategy. Thirty-two articles were included in the systematic review. Overall, the quality of the included studies is high. Four important themes were identified: the impact of transitional care interventions initiated from the hospital's side, the role of specialized care settings, the comparison of inpatient and outpatient care, and the effect of chronic care coordination on the experience of patients. Our results show that hospitals can play an important role in transitional care interventions and the coordination of chronic care with better outcomes for the patients by taking a leading role in integrated care programs. Above that, the patient experiences are positively influenced by the coordinating role of a specialist. Specialized care settings, as components of the hospital, facilitate the coordination of the care processes. In the future, specialized care centers and primary care could play a more extensive role in care for chronic patients by collaborating.

  14. Patient Satisfaction With Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Brian L.; Dittus, Kim L.; Pace, Claire M.; Dulko, Dorothy; Pollack, Lori A.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Geller, Berta M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face several challenges following the completion of active treatment, including uncertainty about late effects of treatment and confusion about coordination of follow-up care. The authors evaluated patient satisfaction with personalized survivorship care plans designed to clarify those issues. The authors enrolled 48 patients with breast cancer and 10 patients with colorectal cancer who had completed treatment in the previous two months from an urban academic medical center and a rural community hospital. Patient satisfaction with the care plan was assessed by telephone interview. Overall, about 80% of patients were very or completely satisfied with the care plan, and 90% or more agreed that it was useful, it was easy to understand, and the length was appropriate. Most patients reported that the care plan was very or critically important to understanding an array of survivorship issues. However, only about half felt that it helped them better understand the roles of primary care providers and oncologists in survivorship care. The results provide evidence that patients with cancer find high value in personalized survivorship care plans, but the plans do not eliminate confusion regarding the coordination of follow-up care. Future efforts to improve care plans should focus on better descriptions of how survivorship care will be coordinated. PMID:23722604

  15. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, illness understanding, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We also discuss how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available.

  16. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We end by discussing how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available. PMID:26598947

  17. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice Relating to Hazardous Alcohol Use across the Continuum of Care in a Community Healthcare Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishore, Vimal; Lynch, Sara; Pichon, Jamilia; Theall, Katherine; Johnson, Sandy; Roberson, Emily; Hinton, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol screening and intervention in community health settings places a great time demand on practitioners. Thus, implementation of practitioner-delivered intervention is challenging. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of incorporating a brief alcohol intervention into daily practices of a community health care centre by…

  18. Enhancing Collaboration between School Nurses and School Psychologists When Providing a Continuum of Care for Children with Medical Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernández Finch, Maria E.; Finch, W. Holmes; Mcintosh, Constance E.; Thomas, Cynthia; Maughan, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Students who are medically involved often require sustained related services, regular care coordination, and case management to ensure that they are receiving a free and appropriate public education. Exploring the collaboration efforts of school psychologists and school nurses for meeting the educational and related services needs of these…

  19. Enhancing Collaboration between School Nurses and School Psychologists When Providing a Continuum of Care for Children with Medical Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernández Finch, Maria E.; Finch, W. Holmes; Mcintosh, Constance E.; Thomas, Cynthia; Maughan, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Students who are medically involved often require sustained related services, regular care coordination, and case management to ensure that they are receiving a free and appropriate public education. Exploring the collaboration efforts of school psychologists and school nurses for meeting the educational and related services needs of these…

  20. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice Relating to Hazardous Alcohol Use across the Continuum of Care in a Community Healthcare Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishore, Vimal; Lynch, Sara; Pichon, Jamilia; Theall, Katherine; Johnson, Sandy; Roberson, Emily; Hinton, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol screening and intervention in community health settings places a great time demand on practitioners. Thus, implementation of practitioner-delivered intervention is challenging. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of incorporating a brief alcohol intervention into daily practices of a community health care centre by…

  1. Educating Health Care Professionals to Provide Institutional Changes in Cancer Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Uman, Gwen

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2006 report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition (In M. Hewitt, S. Greenfield and E. Stovall (Eds.), (pp. 9–186). Washington DC: The National Academies Press, 2006) identifies the key components of care that contribute to quality of life for the cancer survivor. As cancer survivorship care becomes an important part of quality cancer care oncology professionals need education to prepare themselves to provide this care. Survivorship care requires a varied approach depending on the survivor population, treatment regimens and care settings. The goal of this program was to encourage institutional changes that would integrate survivorship care into participating centers. An NCI-funded educational program: Survivorship Education for Quality Cancer Care provided multidiscipline two-person teams an opportunity to gain this important knowledge using a goal-directed, team approach. Educational programs were funded for yearly courses from 2006 to 2009. Survivorship care curriculum was developed using the Quality of Life Model as the core around the IOM recommendations. Baseline data was collected for all participants. Teams were followed-up at 6, 12 and 18 months postcourse for goal achievement and institutional evaluations. Comparison data from baseline to 18 months provided information on the 204 multidiscipline teams that participated over 4 years. Teams attended including administrators, social workers, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, physicians and others. Participating centers included primarily community cancer centers and academic centers followed by pediatric centers, ambulatory/physician offices and free standing cancer centers. Statistically significant changes at p=<0.05 levels were seen by 12 months postcourse related to the effectiveness, receptiveness and comfort of survivorship care in participant settings. Institutional assessments found improvement in seven domains of care that related to

  2. The role of home-based records in the establishment of a continuum of care for mothers, newborns, and children in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Keiko; Hattori, Tomoko; Kosen, Soewarta

    2013-01-01

    Background The provision of appropriate care along the continuum of maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) service delivery is a challenge in developing countries. To improve this, in the 1990s, Indonesia introduced the maternal and child health (MCH) handbook, as an integrated form of parallel home-based records. Objective This study aimed to identify the roles of home-based records both before and after childbirth, especially in provinces where the MCH handbook (MCHHB) was extensively promoted, by examining their association with MNCH service uptake. Design This was a cross-sectional study using nationally representative data sets, the Indonesia Demographic and Health Surveys (IDHSs) from 1997, 2002–2003, and 2007. The IDHS identifies respondents’ ownership of home-based records before and after childbirth. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between record ownership and service utilisation in national data and data from two provinces, West Sumatra and North Sulawesi, where ownership of pre- and post-natal records served as a proxy for MCHHB ownership. Results Pre- and post-natal record ownership increased from 1997 to 2007. Provincial data from 2007 showed that handbook ownership was associated with having delivery assisted by trained personnel [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.12, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–4.25], receiving maternal care (aOR: 3.92, 95% CI: 2.35–6.52), completing 12 doses of child immunisation for seven diseases (aOR: 4.86, 95% CI: 2.37–9.95), and having immunisation before and after childbirth (aOR: 5.40, 95% CI: 2.28–12.76), whereas national data showed that service utilisation was associated with ownership of both records compared with owning a single record or none. Conclusion Our results suggest that pre- and post-natal home-based record use may be effective for ensuring service utilisation. In addition, since the handbook is an efficient home-based record for use throughout children's life

  3. Palliative care -- an essential component of cancer control

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, N

    1998-01-01

    Unlike in other nations, in Canada palliative care has its origins in university hospitals. It has subsequently developed in a few Canadian schools as an academic discipline closely linked with oncology programs. Although this model is successful, other faculties of medicine and cancer centres have been slow to emulate it. Today, the situation is rapidly changing, and both palliative care and oncology professionals are re-examining the manifest need for collaborative efforts in patient care, research and education. Palliative care must be regarded as an essential component of cancer care, its principles must be applied throughout the course of the illness and, as in other phases of cancer control, palliative care should be regarded as an exercise in prevention--prevention of suffering. This article discusses practical applications that flow from acceptance of these concepts. PMID:9676548

  4. Analysis of cancer patients admitted to intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Yakup; Kaydu, Ayhan; Sahin, Omer Fatih; Kacar, Cem Kivilcim

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study is an analysis of cancer patients who received follow-up treatment for either cancer-related complications or treatment-associated side effects while hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: Records of cancer patients treated at Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital ICU between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic data and type of cancer were recorded in prepared forms and subsequently analyzed. RESULTS: Among 2240 ICU patients treated and hospitalized between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012, 482 cancer patients were identified and included in the study. Percentage of cancer patients in ICU was 23.9%. Male to female ratio was determined to be 1.55. First 3 most common cancers found were colorectal (19.7%), lung (15.7%), and stomach cancers (11.6%). Mortality rate of cancer patients hospitalized in ICU was 46.6%. Larynx, lung, urinary bladder, skin, rectosigmoid, hematological, and kidney cancer were more prevalent in male patients, whereas esophageal cancer was seen in more female patients than male patients. Incidence of stomach, brain, and pancreatic cancers, as well as unclassified tumors, was found to be unrelated to gender. CONCLUSION: Rectosigmoid cancer was most common type of cancer observed in our ICU. Esophageal cancer was observed in more females than males, while larynx cancer was more frequently present in males. PMID:28275754

  5. Social Network Strategies to Address HIV Prevention and Treatment Continuum of Care Among At-risk and HIV-infected Substance Users: A Systematic Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debarchana; Krishnan, Archana; Gibson, Britton; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Latkin, Carl A; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-04-01

    Social network analysis (SNA) and social network-based interventions (SNI) are important analytical tools harnessing peer and family influences critical for HIV prevention and treatment among substance users. While SNA is an effective way to measure social network influences, SNI directly or indirectly involves network members in interventions. Even though these methods have been applied in heterogeneous ways, leading to extensive evidence-based practices, systematic reviews are however, lacking. We searched five bibliographic databases and identified 58 studies involving HIV in substance users that had utilized SNA or SNI as part of their methodology. SNA was used to measure network variables as inputs in statistical/mathematical models in 64 % of studies and only 22 % of studies used SNI. Most studies focused on HIV prevention and few addressed diagnosis (k = 4), care linkage and retention (k = 5), ART adherence (k = 2), and viral suppression (k = 1). This systematic review highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of social network approaches for HIV prevention and treatment and gaps in its use for HIV care continuum.

  6. Integrating dietary supplements into cancer care.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe; Abrams, Donald I; Ladas, Elena J; Deng, Gary; Hardy, Mary; Capodice, Jillian L; Winegardner, Mary F; Gubili, J K; Yeung, K Simon; Kussmann, Heidi; Block, Keith I

    2013-09-01

    Many studies confirm that a majority of patients undergoing cancer therapy use self-selected forms of complementary therapies, mainly dietary supplements. Unfortunately, patients often do not report their use of supplements to their providers. The failure of physicians to communicate effectively with patients on this use may result in a loss of trust within the therapeutic relationship and in the selection by patients of harmful, useless, or ineffective and costly nonconventional therapies when effective integrative interventions may exist. Poor communication may also lead to diminishment of patient autonomy and self-efficacy and thereby interfere with the healing response. To be open to the patient's perspective, and sensitive to his or her need for autonomy and empowerment, physicians may need a shift in their own perspectives. Perhaps the optimal approach is to discuss both the facts and the uncertainty with the patient, in order to reach a mutually informed decision. Today's informed patients truly value physicians who appreciate them as equal participants in making their own health care choices. To reach a mutually informed decision about the use of these supplements, the Clinical Practice Committee of The Society of Integrative Oncology undertook the challenge of providing basic information to physicians who wish to discuss these issues with their patients. A list of leading supplements that have the best suggestions of benefit was constructed by leading researchers and clinicians who have experience in using these supplements. This list includes curcumin, glutamine, vitamin D, Maitake mushrooms, fish oil, green tea, milk thistle, Astragalus, melatonin, and probiotics. The list includes basic information on each supplement, such as evidence on effectiveness and clinical trials, adverse effects, and interactions with medications. The information was constructed to provide an up-to-date base of knowledge, so that physicians and other health care providers would

  7. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlin, Kathy L.; Long, Margaret E.; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. Methods: This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Results: Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. Conclusions: A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health. PMID:26208166

  8. Bridging Gaps in Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Care: Nursing Coordination and Case Management

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederholt, Peggy A. Connor, Nadine P.; Hartig, Gregory K.; Harari, Paul M.

    2007-10-01

    Patients with advanced head and neck cancer face not only a life-threatening malignancy, but also a remarkably complex treatment regimen that can affect their cosmetic appearance and ability to speak, breathe, and swallow. These patients benefit from the coordinated interaction of a multidisciplinary team of specialists and a comprehensive plan of care to address their physical and psychosocial concerns, manage treatment-related toxicities, and prevent or limit long-term morbidities affecting health-related quality of life. Although little has been published on patient-provider communication with a multidisciplinary team, evidence has suggested that gaps often occur in communication between patients and providers, as well as between specialists. These communication gaps can hinder the multidisciplinary group from working toward common patient-centered goals in a coordinated 'interdisciplinary' manner. We discuss the role of a head-and-neck oncology nurse coordinator at a single institution in bridging gaps across the continuum of care, promoting an interdisciplinary team approach, and enhancing the overall quality of patient-centered head-and-neck cancer care.

  9. Continuum in HIV care from entry to ART initiation in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Plazy, Mélanie; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Dabis, François; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2014-06-01

    To quantify time from entry in HIV care until Antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and identify factors associated with ART initiation in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Adults ≥16 years entering the decentralised Hlabisa ART programme between 2007 and 2011 were followed until June 2013. Median survival times to ART initiation from date of programme entry and from date of ART eligibility were estimated with Kaplan-Meier methods. Associated factors were evaluated in Cox regressions, censoring for deaths. Of 37 749 adults (71.6% female), 17 638 (46.7%) initiated ART. Nearly half (46.9%) met the CD4 criteria for treatment eligibility at programme entry. Among the 20 039 individuals not yet ART-eligible at entry, only 62.5% were retained in care with at least one further CD4 measurement, of whom 6688 subsequently became ART-eligible. Overall, 65.5% of the 24 398 ART-eligible individuals initiated ART over the study period. ART initiation was more likely in women (P < 0.001), in individuals ≥ 25 years old (P < 0.001) and in patients with low CD4 count (P < 0.001). Patients who became eligible during follow up were significantly more likely to initiate ART than those eligible at programme entry (72.6% vs. 62.9%, Adjusted Hazard Ratio = 1.46; 95% Confidence Interval [1.41-1.51]), adjusting for sex, age, year and CD4 count at eligibility. In this rural programme, continuation of care remains challenging, especially in men and younger adults. ART initiation is more likely in those engaged prior eligibility than in those entering HIV care only late in their HIV disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Racial and ethnic differences in beliefs about lung cancer care.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, Sirisha; Lin, Jenny J; Nelson, Judith E; Powell, Charles A; Salazar-Schicchi, John; Berman, Andrew R; Keller, Steven M; Smith, Cardinale B; Lurslurchachai, Linda; Halm, Ethan A; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2012-11-01

    Disparities in lung cancer treatment and palliative care are well documented. However,the mechanisms underlying these disparities are not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated racial and ethnic differences in beliefs and attitudes about lung cancer treatment and palliative care among patients receiving a new diagnosis of lung cancer. Patients were recruited from four medical centers in New York City and surveyed about their beliefs regarding lung cancer care, including disease-directed treatments, palliative and end-of-life care, and fatalistic and spiritual beliefs. We used univariate and multiple regression analyses to compare the distribution of beliefs among minority (black and Hispanic) and nonminority patients. Of the 335 patients, 21% were black, 20% were Hispanic, and 59% were nonminority. Beliefs about chemotherapy and radiotherapy were similar across the three groups ( P > .05),whereas black patients were more likely to believe that surgery might cause lung cancer to spread( P =.008). Fatalistic beliefs potentially affecting cancer treatment were more common among both minority groups ( P ≤ .02). No signifi cant differences were found in attitudes toward clinician communication about cancer prognosis ( P > .05). However, both blacks and Hispanics were more likely to have misconceptions about advance directives and hospice care ( P ≤ .02). Similarities and differences in beliefs about disease-directed treatment were observed between minority and nonminority patients with lung cancer. Minority patients hold more fatalistic views about the disease and misperceptions about advance care planning and hospice care. Further research is needed to assess the impact of these beliefs on decisions about lung cancer care and patient outcomes.

  11. End-of-Life Care at a Community Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Cowall, David E.; Yu, Bennett W.; Heineken, Sandra L.; Lewis, Elizabeth N.; Chaudhry, Vishal; Daugherty, Joan M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The evidence-based use of resources for cancer care at end of life (EOL) has the potential to relieve suffering, reduce health care costs, and extend life. Internal benchmarks need to be established within communities to achieve these goals. The purpose for this study was to evaluate data within our community to determine our EOL cancer practices. Methods: A random sample of 390 patients was obtained from the 942 cancer deaths in Wicomico County, Maryland, for calendar years 2004 to 2008. General demographic, clinical event, and survival data were obtained from that sample using cancer registry and hospice databases as well as manual medical record reviews. In addition, the intensity of EOL cancer care was assessed using previously proposed indicator benchmarks. The significance of potential relationships between variables was explored using χ2 analyses. Results: Mean age at death was 70 years; 52% of patients were male; 34% died as a result of lung cancer. Median survival from diagnosis to death was 8.4 months with hospice admission and 5.8 months without hospice (P = .11). Four of eight intensity-of-care indicators (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission within last month of life, > one hospitalization within last month of life, hospital death, and hospice referral < 3 days before death) all significantly exceeded the referenced benchmarks. Hospice versus nonhospice admissions were associated (P < .001) with ICU admissions (2% v 13%) and hospital deaths (2% v 54%). Conclusion: These data suggest opportunities to improve community cancer center EOL care. PMID:23180997

  12. End-of-life care at a community cancer center.

    PubMed

    Cowall, David E; Yu, Bennett W; Heineken, Sandra L; Lewis, Elizabeth N; Chaudhry, Vishal; Daugherty, Joan M

    2012-07-01

    The evidence-based use of resources for cancer care at end of life (EOL) has the potential to relieve suffering, reduce health care costs, and extend life. Internal benchmarks need to be established within communities to achieve these goals. The purpose for this study was to evaluate data within our community to determine our EOL cancer practices. A random sample of 390 patients was obtained from the 942 cancer deaths in Wicomico County, Maryland, for calendar years 2004 to 2008. General demographic, clinical event, and survival data were obtained from that sample using cancer registry and hospice databases as well as manual medical record reviews. In addition, the intensity of EOL cancer care was assessed using previously proposed indicator benchmarks. The significance of potential relationships between variables was explored using χ(2) analyses. Mean age at death was 70 years; 52% of patients were male; 34% died as a result of lung cancer. Median survival from diagnosis to death was 8.4 months with hospice admission and 5.8 months without hospice (P = .11). Four of eight intensity-of-care indicators (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission within last month of life, > one hospitalization within last month of life, hospital death, and hospice referral < 3 days before death) all significantly exceeded the referenced benchmarks. Hospice versus nonhospice admissions were associated (P < .001) with ICU admissions (2% v 13%) and hospital deaths (2% v 54%). These data suggest opportunities to improve community cancer center EOL care.

  13. Lung cancer physicians' referral practices for palliative care consultation.

    PubMed

    Smith, C B; Nelson, J E; Berman, A R; Powell, C A; Fleischman, J; Salazar-Schicchi, J; Wisnivesky, J P

    2012-02-01

    Integration of palliative care with standard oncologic care improves quality of life and survival of lung cancer patients. We surveyed physicians to identify factors influencing their decisions for referral to palliative care. We provided a self-administered questionnaire to physicians caring for lung cancer patients at five medical centers. The questionnaire asked about practices and views with respect to palliative care referral. We used multiple regression analysis to identify predictors of low referral rates (<25%). Of 155 physicians who returned survey responses, 75 (48%) reported referring <25% of patients for palliative care consultation. Multivariate analysis, controlling for provider characteristics, found that low referral rates were associated with physicians' concerns that palliative care referral would alarm patients and families [odds ratio (OR) 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21-0.98], while the belief that palliative care specialists have more time to discuss complex issues (OR 3.07, 95% CI 1.56-6.02) was associated with higher rates of referral. Although palliative care consultation is increasingly available and recommended throughout the trajectory of lung cancer, our data indicate it is underutilized. Understanding factors influencing decisions to refer can be used to improve integration of palliative care as part of lung cancer management.

  14. Learning the landscape: implementation challenges of primary care innovators around cancer survivorship care.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Denalee; Hudson, Shawna V; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Howard, Jenna; Rubinstein, Ellen; Lee, Heather S; Overholser, Linda S; Shaw, Amy; Givens, Sarah; Burton, Jay S; Grunfeld, Eva; Parry, Carly; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2017-02-01

    This study describes the experiences of early implementers of primary care-focused cancer survivorship delivery models. Snowball sampling was used to identify innovators. Twelve participants (five cancer survivorship primary care innovators and seven content experts) attended a working conference focused on cancer survivorship population strategies and primary care transformation. Data included meeting discussion transcripts/field notes, transcribed in-depth innovator interviews, and innovators' summaries of care models. We used a multistep immersion/crystallization analytic approach, guided by a primary care organizational change model. Innovative practice models included: (1) a consultative model in a primary care setting; (2) a primary care physician (PCP)-led, blended consultative/panel-based model in an oncology setting; (3) an oncology nurse navigator in a primary care practice; and (4) two subspecialty models where PCPs in a general medical practice dedicated part of their patient panel to cancer survivors. Implementation challenges included (1) lack of key stakeholder buy-in; (2) practice resources allocated to competing (non-survivorship) change efforts; and (3) competition with higher priority initiatives incentivized by payers. Cancer survivorship delivery models are potentially feasible in primary care; however, significant barriers to widespread implementation exist. Implementation efforts would benefit from increasing the awareness and potential value-add of primary care-focused strategies to address survivors' needs. Current models of primary care-based cancer survivorship care may not be sustainable. Innovative strategies to provide quality care to this growing population of survivors need to be developed and integrated into primary care settings.

  15. Advancing survivorship care through the National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center: developing American Cancer Society guidelines for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca; Sharpe, Katherine; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi; Willis, Anne; Gansler, Ted; Ganz, Patricia A; Edge, Stephen B; McCabe, Mary S; Stein, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    The National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center (The Survivorship Center) began in 2010 as a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the George Washington University Cancer Institute and was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Survivorship Center aims to improve the overall health and quality of life of posttreatment cancer survivors. One key to addressing the needs of this ever-growing population is to develop clinical follow-up care guidelines that emphasize not only the importance of surveillance for cancer recurrence, but also address the assessment and management of the physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects that may result from having cancer and undergoing cancer treatment as well as highlight the importance of healthy behaviors that can reduce the risk of cancer recurrence, second primary cancers, and other chronic diseases. Currently, The Survivorship Center is coordinating the work of experts in oncology, primary care, and other health care professions to develop follow-up care guidelines for 10 priority cancer sites.

  16. Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program: impact on patterns of terminal cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Bruera, E; Neumann, C M; Gagnon, B; Brenneis, C; Kneisler, P; Selmser, P; Hanson, J

    1999-01-01

    The Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program was established in July 1995 to measure the access of patients with terminal cancer to palliative care services, decrease the number of cancer-related deaths in acute care facilities and increase the participation of family physicians in the care of terminally ill patients. In this retrospective study the authors compared the pattern of care and site of deaths before establishment of the program (1992/93) and during its second year of operation (1996/97). Significantly more cancer-related deaths occurred in acute care facilities in 1992/93 than in 1996/97 (86% [1119/1304] v. 49% [633/1279]) (p < or = 0.001). The number of inpatient days decreased, from 24,566 in 1992/93 to 6960 in 1996/97. More cancer patients saw a palliative care consult team in 1996/97 than in 1992/93 (82% v. 22%). The shift from deaths in acute care facilities to palliative hospices suggests that the establishment of an integrated palliative care program has increased access of patients with terminal cancer to palliative care. PMID:10463053

  17. Comorbid condition care quality in cancer survivors: role of primary care and specialty providers and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Claire F; Frick, Kevin D; Herbert, Robert J; Blackford, Amanda L; Neville, Bridget A; Lemke, Klaus W; Carducci, Michael A; Wolff, Antonio C; Earle, Craig C

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate provider specialty, care coordination, and cancer survivors' comorbid condition care. This retrospective cross-sectional Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare study included cancer survivors diagnosed in 2004, 2-3 years post-cancer diagnosis, in fee-for-service Medicare. We examined (1) provider specialties (primary care providers (PCPs), oncology specialists, other specialists) visited post-hospitalization, (2) role of provider specialties in chronic and acute condition management, and (3) an ambulatory care coordination measure. Outcome measures covered (1) visits post-hospitalization for nine conditions, (2) chronic disease management (lipid profile, diabetic eye exam, diabetic monitoring), and (3) acute condition management (electrocardiogram (EKG) for congestive heart failure (CHF), imaging for CHF, EKG for transient ischemic attack, cholecystectomy, hip fracture repair). Among 8661 cancer survivors, patients were more likely to visit PCPs than oncologists or other specialists following hospitalizations for 8/9 conditions. Patients visiting a PCP (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care for 3/3 chronic and 1/5 acute condition indicators. Patients visiting a nother specialist (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care for 3/3 chronic and 2/5 acute condition indicators. Patients visiting an oncology specialist (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care on 2/3 chronic indicators and less likely to receive recommended care on 1/5 acute indicators. Patients at greatest risk for poor coordination were more likely to receive appropriate care on 4/6 indicators. PCPs are central to cancer survivors' non-cancer comorbid condition care quality. Implications for Cancer Survivors PCP involvement in cancer survivors' care should be promoted.

  18. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Duman-Lubberding, Sanne; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-10-21

    Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors' needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals' perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients' perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but indicated that it should be incorporated in the

  19. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors’ needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals’ perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Methods Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Results Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients’ perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but

  20. Ensuring Quality Cancer Care: A Follow-Up Review of the Institute of Medicine’s Ten Recommendations for Improving the Quality of Cancer Care in America

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, Tracy; Albright, Heidi W.; Feeley, Thomas W.; Walters, Ron; Burke, Thomas W.; Aloia, Thomas; Bruera, Eduardo; Buzdar, Aman; Foxhall, Lewis; Hui, David; Summers, Barbara; Rodriguez, Alma; DuBois, Raymond; Shine, Kenneth I.

    2011-01-01

    Responding to growing concerns regarding the safety, quality, and efficacy of cancer care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences commissioned a comprehensive review of cancer care delivery in the US healthcare system in the late 1990s. The National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), a twenty-member board with broad representation, performed this review. In its review, the NCPB focused on the state of cancer care delivery at that time, its shortcomings, and ways to measure and improve the quality of cancer care. The NCPB described an ideal cancer care system, where patients would have equitable access to coordinated, guideline-based care and novel therapies throughout the course of their disease. In 1999, the IOM published the results of this review in its influential report, Ensuring Quality Cancer Care. This report outlined ten recommendations, which, when implemented, would: 1) improve the quality of cancer care; 2) increase our understanding of quality cancer care; and, 3) reduce or eliminate access barriers to quality cancer care. Despite the fervor generated by this report, there are lingering doubts regarding the safety and quality of cancer care in the United States today. Increased awareness of medical errors and barriers to quality care, coupled with escalating healthcare costs, has prompted national efforts to reform the healthcare system. These efforts by healthcare providers and policymakers should bridge the gap between the ideal state described in Ensuring Quality Cancer Care and the current state of cancer care in the United States. PMID:22045610

  1. The Organization of Multidisciplinary Care Teams: Modeling Internal and External Influences on Cancer Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu Das, Irene; Clauser, Steven; Petrelli, Nicholas; Salner, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Quality cancer treatment depends upon careful coordination between multiple treatments and treatment providers, the exchange of technical information, and regular communication between all providers and physician disciplines involved in treatment. This article will examine a particular type of organizational structure purported to regularize and streamline the communication between multiple specialists and support services involved in cancer treatment: the multidisciplinary treatment care (MDC) team. We present a targeted review of what is known about various types of MDC team structures and their impact on the quality of treatment care, and we outline a conceptual model of the connections between team context, structure, process, and performance and their subsequent effects on cancer treatment care processes and patient outcomes. Finally, we will discuss future research directions to understand how MDC teams improve patient outcomes and how characteristics of team structure, culture, leadership, and context (organizational setting and local environment) contribute to optimal multidisciplinary cancer care. PMID:20386055

  2. The organization of multidisciplinary care teams: modeling internal and external influences on cancer care quality.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Mary L; Das, Irene Prabhu; Clauser, Steven; Petrelli, Nicholas; Salner, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Quality cancer treatment depends upon careful coordination between multiple treatments and treatment providers, the exchange of technical information, and regular communication between all providers and physician disciplines involved in treatment. This article will examine a particular type of organizational structure purported to regularize and streamline the communication between multiple specialists and support services involved in cancer treatment: the multidisciplinary treatment care (MDC) team. We present a targeted review of what is known about various types of MDC team structures and their impact on the quality of treatment care, and we outline a conceptual model of the connections between team context, structure, process, and performance and their subsequent effects on cancer treatment care processes and patient outcomes. Finally, we will discuss future research directions to understand how MDC teams improve patient outcomes and how characteristics of team structure, culture, leadership, and context (organizational setting and local environment) contribute to optimal multidisciplinary cancer care.

  3. Oncologists' perspectives on post-cancer treatment communication and care coordination with primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, C N; Haggstrom, D; Kahn, K L; Gray, S W; Kim, B; Liu, B; Eisenstein, J; Keating, N L

    2017-01-10

    Post-treatment cancer care is often fragmented and of suboptimal quality. We explored factors that may affect cancer survivors' post-treatment care coordination, including oncologists' use of electronic technologies such as e-mail and integrated electronic health records (EHRs) to communicate with primary care physicians (PCPs). We used data from a survey (357 respondents; participation rate 52.9%) conducted in 2012-2013 among medical oncologists caring for patients in a large US study of cancer care delivery and outcomes. Oncologists reported their frequency and mode of communication with PCPs, and role in providing post-treatment care. Seventy-five per cent said that they directly communicated with PCPs about post-treatment status and care recommendations for all/most patients. Among those directly communicating with PCPs, 70% always/usually used written correspondence, while 36% always/usually used integrated EHRs; telephone and e-mail were less used. Eighty per cent reported co-managing with PCPs at least one post-treatment general medical care need. In multivariate-adjusted analyses, neither communication mode nor intensity were associated with co-managing survivors' care. Oncologists' reliance on written correspondence to communicate with PCPs may be a barrier to care coordination. We discuss new research directions for enhancing communication and care coordination between oncologists and PCPs, and to better meet the needs of cancer survivors post-treatment.

  4. EPICC study: evaluation of pharmaceutical intervention in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Vantard, N; Ranchon, F; Schwiertz, V; Gourc, C; Gauthier, N; Guedat, M-G; He, S; Kiouris, E; Alloux, C; You, B; Souquet, P-J; Freyer, G; Salles, G; Trillet-Lenoir, V; Rioufol, C

    2015-04-01

    In cancer care, clinical pharmacists contribute to improving prevention and management of drug-related problems (DRPs). The 3-year EPICC study (Evaluation of Pharmaceutical Intervention in Cancer Care) aimed to collect and analyse pharmaceutical interventions (PIs) in oncology. The free online version of the French Society of Clinical Pharmacy (SFPC) coding system, ACT-IP, was used, supplemented by a standardized dedicated cancer-care decision tree. A total of 29,589 medication orders (77,004 anticancer drug preparations) were analysed. Eight hundred and ninety-four PIs were recorded. ACT-IP identified 54·1% of DRPs as concerning over- or underdosage. The standardized dedicated cancer-care decision tree identified the three principal causes of dosage problems: 50·2% due to miscalculation, 20% to omission of dose adjustment and 12% to poor choice of antineoplastic regimen. About 13·8% of DRPs were adverse effects and 3·9% were drug-drug interactions. The decision tree showed that 22% of adverse events could be circumvented by a switch within the same drug family and 72% of drug-drug interactions would have led to increased neoplastic toxicity. Pharmaceutical analysis of prescription forms contributes to medication safety in cancer care, and the present dedicated decision tree highlights additional information about DRPs and PIs. The DRP rate (3% of prescriptions) was consistent with the literature. The pharmacist has a role to play in optimizing the management of patients with cancer in terms of dose adjustment, drug toxicity management, improvement of administration and drug-drug interactions. This study, highlighting PIs in cancer care, is the first of this scale in terms of number of prescriptions analysed (nearly 30 000). Results demonstrated the specificity of DRPs and PIs for patients with cancer and the value of a dedicated coding system in cancer care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. An innovative path to improving cancer care in Indian country.

    PubMed Central

    Burhansstipanov, L.; Gilbert, A.; LaMarca, K.; Krebs, L. U.

    2001-01-01

    The Native American Cancer Survivors' Support Network is an innovative public health program designed to improve survival from cancer and the quality of life after a cancer diagnosis for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Canadian Aboriginal patients and their loved ones. The Network, initiated in 1999, now has more than 300 survivors enrolled as members. This article briefly describes the process that led to its formation and preliminary findings, primarily for breast cancer survivors, of ongoing qualitative and quantitative research. Network data show patterns of cancer care that are partially responsible for poor survivorship outcomes. PMID:12042607

  6. Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    0802 TITLE: Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Alfred I. Neugut, MD, PhD...Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0802 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...increasingly available. There has been very little research on the use of palliative treatments. Our team has developed the tools/methods for

  7. Value of cancer care: ethical considerations for the practicing oncologist.

    PubMed

    Jagsi, Reshma; Sulmasy, Daniel P; Moy, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    The value of cancer care has emerged at the center of a national discourse on fiscal responsibility and resource allocation. The cost of cancer care is rising at a higher pace than any other area of health care. As we struggle to address this unsustainable rise in cancer expenditures, oncology providers are forced to examine our practice patterns and our contributions to the overall health care cost burden. This article provides an oncologist-centered examination of our duties to individual patients and how they may seem at odds with our duties to society. It also discusses how oncology providers can do their part to contain health care costs while honoring their professional obligation to do their best for each patient.

  8. Corruption in health-care systems and its effect on cancer care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Saskia; Njuguna, Festus; Olbara, Gilbert; Sindano, Solomon; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Supriyadi, Eddy; Kaspers, Gertjan

    2015-08-01

    At the government, hospital, and health-care provider level, corruption plays a major role in health-care systems in Africa. The returns on health investments of international financial institutions, health organisations, and donors might be very low when mismanagement and dysfunctional structures of health-care systems are not addressed. More funding might even aggravate corruption. We discuss corruption and its effects on cancer care within the African health-care system in a sociocultural context. The contribution of high-income countries in stimulating corruption is also described. Corrupt African governments cannot be expected to take the initiative to eradicate corruption. Therefore, international financial institutions, health organisations, and financial donors should use their power to demand policy reforms of health-care systems in Africa troubled by the issue of corruption. These modifications will ameliorate the access and quality of cancer care for patients across the continent, and ultimately improve the outcome of health care to all patients.

  9. Variation in Networks and Forms of Support for Care-Seeking Across the HIV Care Continuum in the Rural Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Hill, Miranda; Huff, Amber; Chumbler, Neale

    2017-03-14

    In spite of progress in understanding the importance of social support for health outcomes in Persons Living with HIV (PLWH), more remains to be known about mechanisms of support most beneficial at each stage of HIV treatment. In this study, we use a qualitative analytic approach to investigate the forms and sources of social support deemed most integral to the diagnosis, care engagement, and medication adherence behaviors of a diverse sample of PLWH in a mostly rural health district in the Southeastern United States. In-depth interviews (N = 18) were collected during the qualitative phase of a larger mixed methods needs assessment for the Northeast Georgia Health District. A deductive-inductive analysis of participant narratives revealed variation in the perceived importance of particular forms and sources of social support during the initial versus advanced stages of HIV care. PLWH identified the emotional, informational, and appraisal support provided by family as especially critical for emotional stability, coping, and care linkage during the initial stages of diagnosis and treatment. However, once in care, PLWH emphasized informational and instrumental forms of support from care providers and appraisal support from peers as key influences in care engagement and retention behaviors. Increased understanding of the social support mechanisms that contribute to the HIV treatment behaviors of PLWH can fill knowledge gaps in research and inform the efforts of health care providers seeking to leverage various aspects of the social support toward improving the care retention, health, and wellness outcomes of PLWH. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  10. Delivery of affordable and equitable cancer care in India.

    PubMed

    Pramesh, C S; Badwe, Rajendra A; Borthakur, Bibhuti B; Chandra, Madhu; Raj, Elluswami Hemanth; Kannan, T; Kalwar, Ashok; Kapoor, Sanjay; Malhotra, Hemant; Nayak, Sukdev; Rath, Goura K; Sagar, T G; Sebastian, Paul; Sarin, Rajiv; Shanta, V; Sharma, Suresh C; Shukla, Shilin; Vijayakumar, Manavalan; Vijaykumar, D K; Aggarwal, Ajay; Purushotham, Arnie; Sullivan, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The delivery of affordable and equitable cancer care is one of India's greatest public health challenges. Public expenditure on cancer in India remains below US$10 per person (compared with more than US$100 per person in high-income countries), and overall public expenditure on health care is still only slightly above 1% of gross domestic product. Out-of-pocket payments, which account for more than three-quarters of cancer expenditures in India, are one of the greatest threats to patients and families, and a cancer diagnosis is increasingly responsible for catastrophic expenditures that negatively affect not only the patient but also the welfare and education of several generations of their family. We explore the complex nature of cancer care systems across India, from state to government levels, and address the crucial issues of infrastructure, manpower shortages, and the pressing need to develop cross-state solutions to prevention and early detection of cancer, in addition to governance of the largely unregulated private sector and the cost of new technologies and drugs. We discuss the role of public insurance schemes, the need to develop new political mandates and authority to set priorities, the necessity to greatly improve the quality of care, and the drive to understand and deliver cost-effective cancer care programmes.

  11. NCCN Task Force Report: Bone Health In Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Gralow, Julie R; Biermann, J Sybil; Farooki, Azeez; Fornier, Monica N; Gagel, Robert F; Kumar, Rashmi; Litsas, Georgia; McKay, Rana; Podoloff, Donald A; Srinivas, Sandy; Van Poznak, Catherine H

    2013-08-01

    Bone health and maintenance of bone integrity are important components of comprehensive cancer care. Many patients with cancer are at risk for therapy-induced bone loss, with resultant osteoporotic fractures, or skeletal metastases, which may result in pathologic fractures, hypercalcemia, bone pain, and decline in motility and performance status. Effective screening and timely interventions are essential for reducing bone-related morbidity. Management of long-term bone health requires a broad knowledge base. A multidisciplinary health care team may be needed for optimal assessment and treatment of bone-related issues in patients with cancer. Since publication of the previous NCCN Task Force Report: Bone Health in Cancer Care in 2009, new data have emerged on bone health and treatment, prompting NCCN to convene this multidisciplinary task force to discuss the progress made in optimizing bone health in patients with cancer. In December 2012, the panel members provided didactic presentations on various topics, integrating expert judgment with a review of the key literature. This report summarizes issues surrounding bone health in cancer care presented and discussed during this NCCN Bone Health in Cancer Care Task Force meeting.

  12. Managed Care Market Share and Primary Treatment for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Nancy L; Landrum, Mary Beth; Meara, Ellen; Ganz, Patricia A; Guadagnoli, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Objective Increases in the market share of managed care are associated with decreases in expenditures in the fee-for-service sector. To understand utilization patterns responsible for such savings, we assessed whether increases in managed care market share were related to increases in receipt of equally effective but less costly primary cancer therapies. Data Sources Cancer registry data linked to Medicare administrative data for a population-based sample of fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries 66 years and older who were diagnosed with breast or prostate cancer during 1993–1999. Study Design We used fixed-effects regression models to assess whether county-level increases in the market share of managed care were associated with differences in receipt of cancer therapies that are similar in effectiveness but vary in cost. Principal Findings Increases in the market share of managed care were not associated with differences in the receipt of mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery with radiation for women with early stage breast cancer (p = .47) or with the receipt of conservative therapy (versus surgery or radiation therapy) for men with local or regional prostate cancer (p = .30). Conclusions Increases in the market share of managed care do not appear to influence the receipt of equally effective primary treatments for cancer in the fee-for-service sector. PMID:16430598

  13. The American Cancer Society and the American Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Otis W

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is in critical condition. Costs are rising to the point that the high price of health care is a threat to the U.S. economy. In 2010, health care was more than 17% of the gross domestic product, and if it continues to rise at current rates, health care will become more than 25% of the overall U.S. economy. This growth rate is not sustainable. While U.S. per capita costs are the highest of any country worldwide, quality is varied. Indeed, American health care outcomes for cancer and other diseases are inferior to several European countries with far lower per capita costs. The truth is many Americans cannot afford adequate health care, and health care is rationed in the U.S. While many do not get the health care they need, some are actually harmed by overconsumption of unnecessary health care. These Americans are treated outside of established guidelines and get unnecessary procedures and take unnecessary medications. A substantial number of Americans are supportive of health care reform with the goal of getting needed, high-quality health care to those Americans who currently do not get it. The American Cancer Society is committed to using the established scientific methods of epidemiology to define the problems and identify possible solutions. We are committed proponents of the rational, evidence-based use of health care to avoid the wasteful and inefficient rationing of health care.

  14. The American Cancer Society and the American Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is in critical condition. Costs are rising to the point that the high price of health care is a threat to the U.S. economy. In 2010, health care was more than 17% of the gross domestic product, and if it continues to rise at current rates, health care will become more than 25% of the overall U.S. economy. This growth rate is not sustainable. While U.S. per capita costs are the highest of any country worldwide, quality is varied. Indeed, American health care outcomes for cancer and other diseases are inferior to several European countries with far lower per capita costs. The truth is many Americans cannot afford adequate health care, and health care is rationed in the U.S. While many do not get the health care they need, some are actually harmed by overconsumption of unnecessary health care. These Americans are treated outside of established guidelines and get unnecessary procedures and take unnecessary medications. A substantial number of Americans are supportive of health care reform with the goal of getting needed, high-quality health care to those Americans who currently do not get it. The American Cancer Society is committed to using the established scientific methods of epidemiology to define the problems and identify possible solutions. We are committed proponents of the rational, evidence-based use of health care to avoid the wasteful and inefficient rationing of health care. PMID:21804069

  15. The Role of Mobile Technologies in Health Care Processes: The Case of Cancer Supportive Care

    PubMed Central

    Cucciniello, Maria; Guerrazzi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care systems are gradually moving toward new models of care based on integrated care processes shared by different care givers and on an empowered role of the patient. Mobile technologies are assuming an emerging role in this scenario. This is particularly true in care processes where the patient has a particularly enhanced role, as is the case of cancer supportive care. Objective This paper aims to review existing studies on the actual role and use of mobile technology during the different stages of care processes, with particular reference to cancer supportive care. Methods We carried out a review of literature with the aim of identifying studies related to the use of mHealth in cancer care and cancer supportive care. The final sample size consists of 106 records. Results There is scant literature concerning the use of mHealth in cancer supportive care. Looking more generally at cancer care, we found that mHealth is mainly used for self-management activities carried out by patients. The main tools used are mobile devices like mobile phones and tablets, but remote monitoring devices also play an important role. Text messaging technologies (short message service, SMS) have a minor role, with the exception of middle income countries where text messaging plays a major role. Telehealth technologies are still rarely used in cancer care processes. If we look at the different stages of health care processes, we can see that mHealth is mainly used during the treatment of patients, especially for self-management activities. It is also used for prevention and diagnosis, although to a lesser extent, whereas it appears rarely used for decision-making and follow-up activities. Conclusions Since mHealth seems to be employed only for limited uses and during limited phases of the care process, it is unlikely that it can really contribute to the creation of new care models. This under-utilization may depend on many issues, including the need for it to be embedded

  16. Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care: A Metropolitan Area Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cowen, Virginia S; Miccio, Robin Streit; Parikh, Bijal

    2017-01-01

    Massage offers cancer patients general quality of life benefits as well as alleviation of cancer-related symptoms/cancer-treatment-related symptoms including pain, anxiety, and fatigue. Little is known about whether massage is accessible to cancer patients who receive treatment in the outpatient setting and how massage is incorporated into the overall cancer treatment plan. Outpatient cancer centers (n = 78) in a single metropolitan area were included this mixed-methods project that included a systematic analysis of website information and a telephone survey. Massage was offered at only 40 centers (51.3% of total). A range of massage modalities were represented, with energy-based therapies (Reiki and Therapeutic Touch) most frequently provided. Although massage therapists are licensed health care providers in the states included in this analysis, massage was also provided by nurses, physical therapists, and other health care professionals.

  17. Fragmentation in specialist care and stage III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Veenstra, Christine M.; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with cancer frequently transition between different types of specialists and across care settings. We explored how frequently the medical and surgical oncologic care of stage III colon cancer patients occurs across more than one hospital and whether this is associated with mortality and costs. Methods This is a retrospective SEER-Medicare cohort study of 9,075 stage III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 receiving both surgical and medical oncologic care within one year of diagnosis. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their cancer surgery and to their oncologist's primary hospital, and then characterized according to whether these hospitals were same or different. Outcomes included all-cause mortality, subhazards for colon cancer specific mortality, and cost of care at 12 months. Results 37% of patients received their surgical and medical oncologic care from different hospitals. Rural patients were less likely than urban patients to receive medical oncologic care from the same hospital (OR 0.62, 95%CI 0.43-0.90). Care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality but resulted in lower costs at 12 months (dollars saved $5493, 95%CI $1799, $9525), 8% of median cost. Conclusions Delivery of surgical and medical oncology care at the same hospital was associated with lower costs; however, reforms which seek to improve outcomes and cost through integrating complex care will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving care across more than one hospital. PMID:26043368

  18. CARE Track for Advanced Cancer: Impact and Timing of an Outpatient Palliative Care Clinic.

    PubMed

    Blackhall, Leslie J; Read, Paul; Stukenborg, George; Dillon, Patrick; Barclay, Joshua; Romano, Andrew; Harrison, James

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest that outpatient palliative care can reduce hospitalization and increase hospice utilization for patients with cancer, however there are insufficient resources to provide palliative care to all patients from time of diagnosis. It is also unclear whether inpatient consultation alone provides similar benefits. A better understanding of the timing, setting, and impact of palliative care for patients with cancer is needed. The purpose of this study was to measure timing of referral to outpatient palliative care and impact on end-of-life (EOL) care. The Comprehensive Assessment with Rapid Evaluation and Treatment (CARE Track) program is a phased intervention integrating outpatient palliative care into cancer care. In Year 1 patients were referred at the discretion of their oncologist. Academic medical center. We compared EOL hospitalization, hospice utilization, and costs of care for CARE Track patients compared to those never seen by palliative care or seen only in hospital. Patients were referred a median of 72.5 days prior to death. CARE Track patients had few hospitalizations at end of life, were less likely to die in hospital, had increased hospice utilization, and decreased costs of care; these results were significant even after controlling for differences between groups. Inpatient consultation alone did not impact these variables. However, only approximately half of patients with incurable cancers were referred to this program. Referral outpatient palliative care within 3 months of death improved EOL care and reduced costs, benefits not seen with inpatient care only. However, many patients were never referred, and methods of systematically identifying appropriate patients are needed.

  19. CARE Track for Advanced Cancer: Impact and Timing of an Outpatient Palliative Care Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Read, Paul; Stukenborg, George; Dillon, Patrick; Barclay, Joshua; Romano, Andrew; Harrison, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Studies suggest that outpatient palliative care can reduce hospitalization and increase hospice utilization for patients with cancer, however there are insufficient resources to provide palliative care to all patients from time of diagnosis. It is also unclear whether inpatient consultation alone provides similar benefits. A better understanding of the timing, setting, and impact of palliative care for patients with cancer is needed. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure timing of referral to outpatient palliative care and impact on end-of-life (EOL) care. Design: The Comprehensive Assessment with Rapid Evaluation and Treatment (CARE Track) program is a phased intervention integrating outpatient palliative care into cancer care. In Year 1 patients were referred at the discretion of their oncologist. Setting: Academic medical center. Measurements: We compared EOL hospitalization, hospice utilization, and costs of care for CARE Track patients compared to those never seen by palliative care or seen only in hospital. Results: Patients were referred a median of 72.5 days prior to death. CARE Track patients had few hospitalizations at end of life, were less likely to die in hospital, had increased hospice utilization, and decreased costs of care; these results were significant even after controlling for differences between groups. Inpatient consultation alone did not impact these variables. However, only approximately half of patients with incurable cancers were referred to this program. Conclusion: Referral outpatient palliative care within 3 months of death improved EOL care and reduced costs, benefits not seen with inpatient care only. However, many patients were never referred, and methods of systematically identifying appropriate patients are needed. PMID:26624851

  20. African Americans’ and Hispanics’ Information Needs About Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Ung, Danielle; Montiel-Ishino, F. Alejandro; Nelson, Alison; Canales, Jorge; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have reported on African American and Hispanic (AA and H) populations’ informational needs when seeking cancer care at an institution that offers clinical trials. Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) sought to identify and examine the decision making process, the perceptions, and the preferred channels of communication about cancer care services for AA and H communities in order to develop a list of marketing recommendations. Five focus groups (N=45) consisting of two AA and three H were conducted in four counties of the MCC catchment area in Tampa, FL. Participants were asked about their perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer care and MCC. Focus groups were audio-recorded and verbatim transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Similarities in responses were found between AA and H participants. Participants received general health and cancer information from media sources and word of mouth and preferred to hear patient testimonials. There were concerns about costs, insurance coverage, and the actual geographic location of the cancer center. In general, H participants were not opposed to participating in cancer clinical trials/research, whereas, AA participants were more hesitant. A majority of participants highly favored an institution that offered standard care and clinical trials. AA and H participants shared similar concerns and preferences in communication channels, but each group had specific informational needs. The perceptions and preferences of AA and H must be explored in order to successfully and efficiently increase cancer clinical trial participation. PMID:25189798

  1. African Americans' and Hispanics' information needs about cancer care.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Ung, Danielle; Montiel-Ishino, F Alejandro; Nelson, Alison; Canales, Jorge; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have reported on African American and Hispanic (AA and H) populations' informational needs when seeking cancer care at an institution that offers clinical trials. Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) sought to identify and examine the decision making process, the perceptions, and the preferred channels of communication about cancer care services for AA and H communities in order to develop a list of marketing recommendations. Five focus groups (N = 45) consisting of two AA and three H were conducted in four counties of the MCC catchment area in Tampa, FL. Participants were asked about their perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer care and MCC. Focus groups were audio-recorded and verbatim transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Similarities in responses were found between AA and H participants. Participants received general health and cancer information from media sources and word of mouth and preferred to hear patient testimonials. There were concerns about costs, insurance coverage, and the actual geographic location of the cancer center. In general, H participants were not opposed to participating in cancer clinical trials/research, whereas, AA participants were more hesitant. A majority of participants highly favored an institution that offered standard care and clinical trials. AA and H participants shared similar concerns and preferences in communication channels, but each group had specific informational needs. The perceptions and preferences of AA and H must be explored in order to successfully and efficiently increase cancer clinical trial participation.

  2. Evidence-Based Interventions to Enhance Assessment, Treatment, and Adherence in the Chronic Hepatitis C Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Jaimie P.; Moghimi, Yavar; Marcus, Ruthanne; Lim, Joseph K.; Litwin, Alain H.; Altice, Frederick L.

    2015-01-01

    Background With the explosion of newly available, direct acting antiviral (DAA) Hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatments that demonstrate 95% sustained virologic response (SVR) rates, evidence-based strategies are urgently needed to achieve real-world effectiveness in challenging patient populations. While HIV is incurable, lessons from over 30 years of experience overcoming obstacles to the HIV treatment cascade could be applied to the HCV context. Methods Using Institute of Medicine guidelines, we conducted a systematic review of published interventions from PubMed, Medline, GoogleScholar, EmBASE, and PsychInfo bibliographic databases and citation indices. Abstracts were first screened by three independent reviewers and studies were included if they involved original research, described a specific intervention, were published in English in a peer-reviewed journal between 2001 and 2014, and had full text available. Results Evidence-based interventions to enhance HCV assessment, treatment, and adherence generally fell into one of 4 categories, including those involving: 1) Diagnosis or case-finding; 2) Linkage to HCV care; 3) Pre-therapeutic evaluation or treatment initiation; or 4) Treatment adherence. While most available eligible studies described interventions using non-contemporary interferon-based HCV treatments, future research will need to address how these interventions apply to the context of well-tolerated, simple, oral treatment regimens. In some cases, we explored how HIV-specific interventions might be modified to fit the HCV spectrum of care engagement. Conclusions Evidence-based interventions should be strategically incorporated into HCV treatment implementation efforts to most effectively deliver treatment and maximize treatment outcomes. PMID:26077144

  3. Communication in cancer care: discussing complementary and alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe; Ben-Arye, Eran; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among people with cancer. Many are looking for informed advice and desire communication with their physicians about CAM use. Communication is crucial in establishing trust with patients, gathering information, addressing patient emotions, and assisting patients in decisions about care. The quality of communication in cancer care has been shown to affect patient satisfaction, decision making, patient distress and well-being, compliance, and even malpractice litigation. Communication is now recognized as a core clinical skill in medicine, including cancer care, and is important to the delivery of high-quality care. A communication approach that fosters a collaborative relationship that includes adequate information exchange, responds to emotional needs, and manages uncertainty can lead to informed decisions about CAM use. This type of communication can help facilitate an open discussion with cancer patients and their families about integrating CAM use into their care and help physicians fulfill their roles in caring, comforting, and healing, even when cure is not possible. In this article, the authors discuss a possible model of effective patient-physician communication about CAM use in cancer care based on a comprehensive overview of the literature.

  4. Value-Based Care in the Worldwide Battle Against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Christobel M

    2017-01-01

    Globally, an increasing and aging population is contributing to the prevalence of cancer. To be effective, cancer care needs to involve the coordination of multidisciplinary specialties, and also needs to be affordable, accessible, and capable of producing optimal patient outcomes. Porter and Teisberg (2006) have postulated that shifting current healthcare strategies from volume-based to patient-centric care redirects economic competition to providing treatments which promote the best patient outcomes while driving down costs. Therefore, the value in value-based healthcare (VBH) is defined as patient outcome per currency spent on providing care. Based on the experiences of healthcare organizations currently transitioning to the value-based system, this review details actionable guidelines to transition current cancer care practices to the value-based system in four main steps: by defining universal clinical and patient-reported measures, creating cancer-specific units that provide the full care cycle, establishing a data capture model to routinely determine the value of the care delivered, and continually improving treatment strategies through research. As healthcare providers in more developed countries move to value-based care, those located in less developed countries should also be assisted in their transition to relieve the cancer burden globally. PMID:28357171

  5. Integration of palliative medicine into comprehensive cancer care.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth; Walsh, Declan

    2005-04-01

    Because of the advent of disease-modifying agents for patients with malignancies, cancer is now a chronic illness. However, most cancer patients will experience significant symptoms and complications during the course of their illness or its treatment. In addition to their physical symptoms, patient and families are burdened with psychological, social, and spiritual difficulties. Palliative medicine addresses all these issues and complements attempts to cure the disease; it is an essential part of modern comprehensive cancer care.

  6. Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Supportive and palliative care research includes studies to prevent or treat the acute and chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer and its treatment, and to examine the effects of cancer and its treatment on quality of life and psychosocial issues and treatment strategies at the end of life. Active Projects can range from caregiver issues to geriatrics, physical functioning to cognitive dysfunction. | Examining symptoms and morbidities related to cancer, its treatment, quality of life and end of life.

  7. Cancer screening and preventative care among long-term cancer survivors in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Khan, N F; Carpenter, L; Watson, E; Rose, P W

    2010-01-01

    Background: Long-term cancer survivors in the United Kingdom are mostly followed up in a primary care setting by their general practitioner; however, there is little research on the use of services. This study examines whether cancer survivors receive adequate screening and preventative care in UK primary care. Patients and methods: We identified a cohort of long-term survivors of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer with at least a 5-year survival using the General Practice Research Database, with controls matched for age, gender and practice. We compared adherence with cancer screening and the use of preventative care between cancer survivors and controls. Results: The cancer survivors' cohort consisted of 18 612 breast, 5764 colorectal and 4868 prostate cancer survivors. Most cancer survivors receive cancer screening at the same levels as controls, except for breast cancer survivors who were less likely to receive a mammogram than controls (OR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.66–0.92). Long-term cancer survivors received comparable levels of influenza vaccinations and cholesterol tests, but breast (OR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74–0.87) and prostate cancer survivors (OR=0.70, 95% CI: 0.57–0.87) were less likely to receive a blood pressure test. All survivors were more likely to receive bone densitometry. Conclusion: The provision and uptake of preventive care in a primary care setting in the United Kingdom is comparable between the survivors of three common cancers and those who have not had cancer. However, long-term breast cancer survivors in this cohort were less likely to receive a mammogram. PMID:20234361

  8. Safety hazards in cancer care: findings using three different methods.

    PubMed

    Lipczak, Henriette; Knudsen, Janne Lehmann; Nissen, Aase

    2011-12-01

    Patients with cancer are at risk of injury during treatment. Some injuries are preventable, but prevention requires knowledge about the hazards. Aims To identify hazards and injuries relating to Danish patients with cancer (types and severity) and to test three different methods of identifying cancer-specific hazards. Adverse events in cancer care were identified through reports from healthcare staff to the Danish Patient Safety Database, a retrospective chart review using the Global Trigger Tool, and reports to the Danish Cancer Society from patients with cancer and their relatives. Events were typed using the draft International Classification for Patient Safety. Severity was assessed by Safety Assessment Coding, the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP) and qualitative assessment. 2429 cancer-related adverse event reports were found on the Danish Patient Safety Database, 260 adverse events were identified using the Global Trigger Tool, and 151 safety events were reported by patients and their relatives. Cancer-specific adverse events and general safety problems were identified. In most cases injury to patients was temporary but severe and permanent injury occurred with a relatively high frequency. Patients with cancer are at risk of injury from cancer treatment procedures and as a consequence of problems related to administrative processes and communication. Types of identified events varied according to the methods used, and each method added new information. Further research on patient safety in cancer care and safety-enhancing activities is needed.

  9. Key elements of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Maex, E; De Valck, C

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter the "communication compass" is introduced. It defines the key elements of communication and provides a language with which to communicate about communication in cancer care. The communication compass consists of two axes. One axis defines the associated perspectives of the clinician and the patient, the other axis the content of information and emotional experience. "Two lovers sat on a park bench with their bodies touching each other, holding hands in the moonlight. There was silence between them. So profound was their love for each other, they needed no words to express it." (Samuel Johnson). Sometimes communication just flows. There are these special moments, as fleeting as they are intense. Often communication is stuck. It is as if we speak another language and never manage to understand one another. The lovers on the park bench need no words to express what they feel, neither do they need words to speak about communication. Where communication gets stuck, we need a suitable language to speak about communication. Professional communication cannot be learned from a cookbook. Most of all it implies a readiness to communicate, which means openness to the other. The old adage that it is impossible not to communicate is only true if no criterion of quality is applied. As soon as some mutual understanding is implied in the definition of communication, the fact that it is at all possible to communicate becomes a miracle. Since there is an important gap between theory and practice, we created a tool that aims to bridge that gap. We call it the communication compass. It does not propose a model of "ideal communication," but provides a language with which to examine and analyze specific situations and to determine what the pitfalls and possibilities are. It is useful as a tool for identifying communicational difficulties in daily clinical practice and it can serve as a model for training basic communication skills.

  10. Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care: improvements on colorectal cancer quality of care indicators during a 3-year interval.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Erin M; Jacobsen, Paul B; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Malafa, Mokenge; Fulp, William; Fletcher, Michelle; Smith, Jesusa Corazon R; Brown, Richard; Levine, Richard; Cartwright, Thomas; Abesada-Terk, Guillermo; Kim, George; Alemany, Carlos; Faig, Douglas; Sharp, Philip; Markham, Merry-Jennifer; Shibata, David

    2014-01-01

    The quality of cancer care has become a national priority; however, there are few ongoing efforts to assist medical oncology practices in identifying areas for improvement. The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care is a consortium of 11 medical oncology practices that evaluates the quality of cancer care across Florida. Within this practice-based system of self-assessment, we determined adherence to colorectal cancer quality of care indicators (QCIs) in 2006, disseminated results to each practice and reassessed adherence in 2009. The current report focuses on evaluating the direction and magnitude of change in adherence to QCIs for colorectal cancer patients between the 2 assessments. Medical records were reviewed for all colorectal cancer patients seen by a medical oncologist in 2006 (n = 489) and 2009 (n = 511) at 10 participating practices. Thirty-five indicators were evaluated individually and changes in QCI adherence over time and by site were examined. Significant improvements were noted from 2006 to 2009, with large gains in surgical/pathological QCIs (eg, documenting rectal radial margin status, lymphovascular invasion, and the review of ≥ 12 lymph nodes) and medical oncology QCIs (documenting planned treatment regimen and providing recommended neoadjuvant regimens). Documentation of perineural invasion and radial margins significantly improved; however, adherence remained low (47% and 71%, respectively). There was significant variability in adherence for some QCIs across institutions at follow-up. The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care practices conducted self-directed quality-improvement efforts during a 3-year interval and overall adherence to QCIs improved. However, adherence remained low for several indicators, suggesting that organized improvement efforts might be needed for QCIs that remained consistently low over time. Findings demonstrate how efforts such as the Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care are useful for evaluating and

  11. Building Bridges to Integrate Care (BRIDGES): Incubating Health Service Innovation across the Continuum of Care for Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Onil; Schull, Michael; Shojania, Kaveh; Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Naglie, Gary; Webster, Fiona; Brandao, Ricardo; Mohammed, Tamara; Christian, Jennifer; Hawker, Gillian; Wilson, Lynn; Levinson, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Integrating care for people with complex needs is challenging. Indeed, evidence of solutions is mixed, and therefore, well-designed, shared evaluation approaches are needed to create cumulative learning. The Toronto-based Building Bridges to Integrate Care (BRIDGES) collaborative provided resources to refine and test nine new models linking primary, hospital and community care. It used mixed methods, a cross-project meta-evaluation and shared outcome measures. Given the range of skills required to develop effective interventions, a novel incubator was used to test and spread opportunities for system integration that included operational expertise and support for evaluation and process improvement.

  12. A Mobile Breast Cancer Survivorship Care App: Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Baseman, Janet; Revere, Debra; Baldwin, Laura-Mae

    2017-09-26

    Cancer survivors living in rural areas experience unique challenges due to additional burdens, such as travel and limited access to specialists. Rural survivors of breast cancer have reported poorer outcomes, poorer mental health and physical functioning, and lower-than-average quality of life compared to urban survivors. To explore the feasibility and acceptability of developing a mobile health survivorship care app to facilitate care coordination; support medical, psychosocial, and practical needs; and improve survivors' long-term health outcomes. An interactive prototype app, SmartSurvivor, was developed that included recommended survivorship care plan components. The prototype's feasibility and acceptability were tested by a sample of breast cancer survivors (n=6), primary care providers (n=4), and an oncologist (n=1). Overall, both survivors and providers felt that SmartSurvivor was a potentially valuable tool to support long-term survivorship care plan objectives. Portability, accessibility, and having one place for all contact, treatment, symptom tracking, and medication summaries was highly valued. Our pilot study indicates that SmartSurvivor is a feasible and acceptable approach to meeting survivorship care objectives and the needs of both breast cancer survivors and their health care providers. Exploration of mobile health options for supporting survivorship care plan needs is a promising area of research.

  13. The potential consequences for cancer care and cancer research of Brexit.

    PubMed

    Selby, Peter; Lawler, Mark; Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Johnston, Patrick; Nurse, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Following the UK "Brexit" vote in June 2016, there are many uncertainties and risks for cancer research and cancer care in the UK. These are summarised and the importance of sustained engagement and influence from the cancer community on UK governments is emphasised.

  14. The potential consequences for cancer care and cancer research of Brexit

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Peter; Lawler, Mark; Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Johnston, Patrick; Nurse, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Following the UK “Brexit” vote in June 2016, there are many uncertainties and risks for cancer research and cancer care in the UK. These are summarised and the importance of sustained engagement and influence from the cancer community on UK governments is emphasised. PMID:28275394

  15. Creating Systems Change to Support Goals for HIV Continuum of Care: The Role of Community Coalitions to Reduce Structural Barriers for Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Cherrie B.; Walker, Bendu C.; Chutuape, Kate S.; Roy, Jessica; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Routine population-wide HIV screening, early linkage and long-term retention in healthcare for HIV-infected individuals are key nodes of the HIV continuum of care and are essential elements of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy. Despite this, up to 80% of youth are unaware of their HIV infection status and only 29% are linked to HIV healthcare; less than half are engaged in long-term HIV healthcare, and far fewer maintain viral suppression. To fill this gap and to address the national call to action to establish a seamless system for immediate linkage to continuous and coordinated quality healthcare after diagnosis, this paper describes the processes and mechanisms by which the SMILE Program worked within the infrastructure of the ATN-affiliated Connect to Protect® (C2P) community coalitions to address structural barriers that hindered youth in their communities from being tested for HIV infection or linked and engaged in healthcare after an HIV positive diagnosis. PMID:27239165

  16. Disease management: a continuum approach.

    PubMed

    Harvey, N; DePue, D M

    1997-06-01

    Disease management is a comprehensive, integrated approach to managing the health of populations through the use of disease-specific standards and protocols and population segmentation. It has been increasing in popularity among integrated delivery systems (IDSs) and payers alike as a way to respond to competitive pressures and to shift care delivery from inpatient to alternative care sites. To successfully implement disease-management programs, IDSs must develop an organizational mind-set that stresses information-driven, evidence-based standards of care that are adhered to across a tightly integrated continuum of care.

  17. Spiritual care by nurses in curative cancer care: Protocol for a national, multicentre, mixed method study.

    PubMed

    Groot, Marieke; Ebenau, Anne F; Koning, Helen; Visser, Anja; Leget, Carlo; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; van Leeuwen, René; Ruben, Riet; Wulp, Marijke; Garssen, Bert

    2017-09-01

    To gain insight into the quantity and quality of spiritual care provided by nurses in curative cancer care, from the perspectives of both patients and nurses. Cancer causes patients to suffer from diverse symptoms related to their illness. Nurses play an important role in the care for people with cancer. Next to paying attention to physical and psychosocial needs, caring for spiritual needs of patients also belongs to good nursing. Most of the research concerning spirituality and spiritual care in relation to cancer has focused on palliative care. A mixed methods design will be used in two sub-phases. First, we will conduct semi-structured interviews with 72-90 patients coming from nine hospitals. Subsequently, approximately the same number of nurses working on oncology wards of these hospitals will be interviewed. We meticulously composed both interview guides so that only near the end of the interview explicit terms like spirituality and spiritual care are explicitly mentioned. Until that point, we will use other words to define the concepts. Next to the interviews, demographics, answers to some statements and several questionnaires will be gathered. Content analysis supported by DEDOOSE will be used to answer the research questions. The insight we will gain in this study enables us to compare experiences from the perspective of both patients and nurses. This can also provide us with suggestions for the improvement of nursing care for people with cancer who are treated with curative intent, a topic until now hardly addressed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Financial Burden of Cancer Care | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  19. A Subacute Care Intervention for Short Stay Cancer Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    entry into the formal health care system for adjuvant therapy . Data were collected by a one hour telephone interview with the participant which was...women were using complementary therapies in addition to customary medical care . We realize that CT use is becoming more common practice among cancer...their care with CTs since they had the highest proportion using one or more therapies . This higher use may be an attempt to supplement conventional

  20. Myths and realities in cancer care: another point of view.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Lee N

    2014-10-01

    Cancer care is advancing, and the cancer community is right to celebrate that progress. Simultaneously, however, the cost of cancer therapy is rising along with all medical costs. In a matter of just a few years, the cost of health coverage is projected to reach heights that are simply unsustainable for most American families, overshadowing every other daily expense. Such an overwhelming burden will continue to undermine the progress made in developing new, more effective treatment and care for cancer patients. There cannot be a celebration of discoveries if there is no way to pay for them. It is from that perspective that I react and respond here to the commentary of Dana Goldman and Tomas Philipson, who debunk five myths in cancer care. I concur with the authors' assessment of the value and impact of progress in cancer care. However, I also argue that researchers and policy makers must pay more attention to the impact of cost on patients' adherence and experience and the speed with which new treatment and care are being developed. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  1. Deterministic and Probabilistic Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancement to CARES/Creep: Multiaxial Creep Life Prediction of Ceramic Structures Using Continuum Damage Mechanics and the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep ripture criterion However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of stress, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of this methodology and

  2. Clarifying perspectives: Ethics case reflection sessions in childhood cancer care.

    PubMed

    Bartholdson, Cecilia; Lützén, Kim; Blomgren, Klas; Pergert, Pernilla

    2016-06-01

    Childhood cancer care involves many ethical concerns. Deciding on treatment levels and providing care that infringes on the child's growing autonomy are known ethical concerns that involve the whole professional team around the child's care. The purpose of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' experiences of participating in ethics case reflection sessions in childhood cancer care. Data collection by observations, individual interviews, and individual encounters. Data analysis were conducted following grounded theory methodology. Healthcare professionals working at a publicly funded children's hospital in Sweden participated in ethics case reflection sessions in which ethical issues concerning clinical cases were reflected on. The children's and their parents' integrity was preserved through measures taken to protect patient identity during ethics case reflection sessions. The study was approved by a regional ethical review board. Consolidating care by clarifying perspectives emerged. Consolidating care entails striving for common care goals and creating a shared view of care and the ethical concern in the specific case. The inter-professional perspectives on the ethical aspects of care are clarified by the participants' articulated views on the case. Different approaches for deliberating ethics are used during the sessions including raising values and making sense, leading to unifying interactions. The findings indicate that ethical concerns could be eased by implementing ethics case reflection sessions. Conflicting perspectives can be turned into unifying interactions in the healthcare professional team with the common aim to achieve good pediatric care. Ethics case reflection sessions is valuable as it permits the discussion of values in healthcare-related issues in childhood cancer care. Clarifying perspectives, on the ethical concerns, enables healthcare professionals to reflect on the most reasonable and ethically defensible care for the child

  3. Multidisciplinary care and management selection in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Aizer, Ayal A; Paly, Jonathan J; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2013-07-01

    The management of prostate cancer is complicated by the multitude of treatment options, the lack of proven superiority of one modality of management, and the presence of physician bias. Care at a multidisciplinary prostate cancer clinic offers patients the relative convenience of consultation with physicians of multiple specialties within the confines of a single visit and appears to serve as a venue in which patients can be counseled regarding the risks and benefits of available therapies in an open and interactive environment. Physician bias may be minimized in such an environment, and patient satisfaction rates are high. Available data suggest that low-risk patients who are seen at a multidisciplinary prostate cancer clinic appear to select active surveillance in greater proportion. However, relatively few studies have investigated the other added value that multidisciplinary clinics provide to the patient or health care system, and therefore, additional studies assessing the impact of multidisciplinary care in the management of patients with prostate cancer are needed.

  4. Cancer education among primary care physicians in an underserved community.

    PubMed

    Sheinfeld Gorin, S; Gemson, D; Ashford, A; Bloch, S; Lantigua, R; Ahsan, H; Neugut, A

    2000-07-01

    Urban minority groups, such as those living in north Manhattan, are generally underserved with regard to cancer prevention and screening practices. Primary care physicians are in a critical position to counsel their patients on these subjects and to order screening tests for their patients. Eighty-four primary care physicians in two intervention communities who received educational visits about cancer screening and prevention were compared with 38 physicians in a nearby community who received no intervention. With pre- and post-test interviews over an 18-month period, the physicians were asked about their attitudes toward, knowledge of (relative to American Cancer Society guidelines), and likelihood of counseling and screening for breast, cervical, colorectal, and prostate cancers. Comparison of the two surveys of physicians indicated no statistically significant differences in knowledge of cancer prevention or screening. At post-test, however, intervention group physicians identified significantly fewer barriers to practice than control physicians (p<0.05). While overall, the educational visits to inner-city primary care physicians did not appear to significantly alter cancer prevention practices, there was a positive dose-response relationship among the subgroup of participants who received three or more project contacts. We uncovered significant changes in attitude due to academic detailing among urban primary care physicians practicing in north Manhattan. A significant pre-test sensitization effect and small numbers may have masked overall changes in cancer prevention and screening behaviors among physicians due to the intervention.

  5. Cancer Survivors' Reported Discussions with Health Care Providers About Follow-Up Care and Receipt of Written Care Plans.

    PubMed

    Reed, Sarah C; Walker, Rod; Ziebell, Rebecca; Rabin, Borsika; Nutt, Stephanie; Chubak, Jessica; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2017-05-08

    Prior studies reveal gaps in cancer survivors' discussions with health care providers about follow-up care and receipt of care plans; however, whether survivorship care planning may vary by cancer type is not known. We surveyed 615 survivors of breast, colorectal, prostate, lung cancer, and melanoma enrolled in three health plans to examine cancer survivors' self-reported discussions of follow-up care, including the need for surveillance, late and long-term effects, emotional needs, and health behaviors. We assessed whether cancer survivors received a written treatment summary and post-treatment care instructions. Most (92%) survivors reported having a discussion about the need for surveillance; 75%, late and long-term effects; 69%, lifestyle and health behaviors; and 53%, emotional and social needs. Most (88%) reported receiving post-treatment care instructions and 47%, a treatment summary. While there was little difference among survivors' receipt of surveillance or health behavior recommendations by cancer type (p = 0.85 and p = 0.66, respectively), discussions of late and long-term effects occurred among 82% of prostate, 78% of breast, 73% of melanoma, 72% of colorectal, and 67% of lung survivors (p = 0.06). Approximately half of survivors reported discussions of emotional needs, with modest differences by cancer type (p = 0.08). Our findings indicate that most patient-provider discussions cover information on surveillance, with less emphasis on late and long-term effects, lifestyle and health behaviors, and substantially less focusing on emotional and social needs. No or modest differences in discussions occurred by cancer type. Whether tailoring information to individual cancer survivor needs is beneficial should be examined.

  6. The global state of palliative care-progress and challenges in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Reville, Barbara; Foxwell, Anessa M

    2014-07-01

    All persons have a right to palliative care during cancer treatment and at the end-of-life. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines palliative care as a medical specialty that addresses physical, psychological, social, legal, and spiritual domains of care by an interdisciplinary team of professional and lay health care providers. Widespread adoption of this universal definition will aid policy development and educational initiatives on a national level. The need for palliative care is expanding due to the aging of the world's population and the increase in the rate of cancer in both developed and developing countries. However, in one third of the world there is no access to palliative care for persons with serious or terminal illness. Palliative care improves symptoms, most frequently pain, and improves quality of life for patients and their families, especially in the terminal disease phase. Accessibility to palliative care services, adequately trained health care professionals, availability of essential medicines, and gaps in education vary greatly throughout the world. Pain management is an integral concept in the practice of palliative care; however, opioiphobia, insufficient supply of opioids, and regulatory restrictions contribute to undue suffering for millions. Ongoing advocacy efforts call for increased awareness, palliative care integration with cancer care, and public and professional education. Enacting necessary change will require the engagement of health ministries and the recognition of the unique needs and resources of each country. The aim of this review is to examine progress in palliative care development and explore some of the barriers influencing cancer care across the globe.

  7. Indonesia: status of cancer pain and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Soebadi, R D; Tejawinata, S

    1996-08-01

    Indonesia is a large archipelago with an estimated 203,000-365,400 new cancer cases a year. Most cases present in the advanced stage. Pain is the chief complaint in 89% of the patients of the palliative care unit at Dr. Soetomo hospital. The program is a community-based, family-oriented, and culturally adapted home care, widely applicable throughout the country. The service and medication should be affordable, simple, and available. The WHO three-step ladder has been adopted as the method of choice in cancer pain relief. Facilities supportive for the program are the existing health-care delivery system and non-formal support system (Indonesian Cancer Foundation and Organization for Family Welfare Promotion, PKK). The chief constraints for program implementation are the geographical and population problems, lack of resources and funding for the training of health-care workers, and limited availability of oral morphine.

  8. A Dyadic Behavioral Intervention to Optimize Same Sex Male Couples’ Engagement Across the HIV Care Continuum: Development of and Protocol for an Innovative Couples-based Approach (Partner Steps)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background An estimated one- to two-thirds of new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections among US men who have sex with men (MSM) occur within the context of primary partnerships. Thus, HIV interventions that recognize and harness the power of relationships are needed. Increasingly, HIV prevention efforts are being directed toward improving engagement across the HIV care continuum from testing to linkage to care, antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, engagement in care, and viral suppression. However, to our knowledge, no behavioral interventions have attempted to address the HIV care continuum using a dyadic approach. Objective The objective of this paper is to describe the development of and protocol for an innovative couples-based approach to improving treatment adherence and engagement in care among HIV serodiscordant and concordant HIV-positive same sex male couples in the United States. Methods We developed the Partner Steps intervention by drawing from relationship-oriented theory, existing efficacious individual-level ART adherence interventions, couple-focused HIV prevention interventions, and expert consultation. We incorporated new content to address all aspects of the HIV care continuum (eg, linkage to and retention in care) and to draw on relationship strengths through interactive activities. Results The resulting theory-based Partner Steps intervention is delivered by a trained bachelors-level counselor (interventionist) over 2 in-person sessions with male-male dyads in which at least 1 partner has recent suboptimal engagement in HIV care. Each session is designed to use relationship strengths to increase motivation for HIV care and treatment, and cover sequential intervention “steps” relating to specific challenges in HIV care engagement and barriers to ART adherence. For each step, couples work with a trained interventionist to identify their unique challenges, actively problem-solve with the interventionist, and articulate and commit

  9. Palliative Care in Iran: Moving Toward the Development of Palliative Care for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rassouli, Maryam; Sajjadi, Moosa

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is the third leading cause of death in Iran and its incidence has been increasing in recent years. Patients' quality of life is altered rather enormously due to cancer, which doubles the importance of and the need for providing palliative care in Iran. Although many steps have been taken toward the development and providing of palliative care in Iran, there is still a large gap between the status quo and the desirable state. This study presents the current state of palliative care for cancer patients and discusses the barriers, challenges and outlook of palliative care in Iran. If infrastructural projects that have recently been launched prove successful, proper advancement toward the providing of palliative care services in Iran will then not far on the horizon. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. [Update on current care guidelines: ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Leminen, Arto; Auranen, Annika; Bützow, Ralf; Hietanen, Sakari; Komulainen, Marja; Kuoppala, Tapio; Mäenpää, Johanna; Puistola, Ulla; Vuento, Maarit; Vuorela, Piia; Yliskoski, Merja

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. It appears that seemingly ovarian or primary peritoneal carcinomas, in fact, originate from fimbriae. BRCA1/2 mutation carriers are recommended for the removal of ovaries and fimbriae, to reduce the risk of cancer. Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer is based on the combination of surgery and chemotherapy. The residual tumour volume at the primary operation is the most important predictive factor of survival. The best response at the primary treatment is observed with combination chemotherapy with taxane and platinum. Adding bevacitzumab to first line chemotherapy may improve survival.

  11. Lack of Needs Assessment in Cancer Survivorship Care and Rehabilitation in Hospitals and Primary Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Handberg, Charlotte; Jensen, Charlotte Maria; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Formalized and systematic assessment of survivorship care and rehabilitation needs is prerequisite for ensuring cancer patients sufficient help and support through their cancer trajectory. Patients are often uncertain as to how to express and address their survivorship care and rehabilitation needs, and little is known about specific, unmet needs and the plans necessary to meet them. There is a call for both ensuring survivorship care and rehabilitation for cancer patients in need and further for documenting the specific needs related to the cancer disease and its treatment. Thus the aim of this study was to describe specific survivorship care and rehabilitation needs and plans as stated by patients with cancer at hospitals when diagnosed and when primary care survivorship care and rehabilitation begins. Needs assessment forms from cancer patients at two hospitals and two primary care settings were analyzed. The forms included stated needs and survivorship care and rehabilitation plans. All data were categorized using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Eighty-nine patients at hospitals and 99 in primary care, stated their needs. Around 50% of the patients completed a survivorship care and rehabilitation plan. In total, 666 (mean 7.5) needs were stated by hospital patients and 836 (mean 8.0) by those in primary care. The needs stated were primarily within the ICF component "body functions and structure", and the most frequent needs were (hospitals/primary care) fatigue (57%/67%), reduced muscle strength (55%/67%) and being worried (37%/36%). The results underpin an urgent need for a systematic procedure to assess needs in clinical practice where cancer patients are being left without survivorship care and rehabilitation needs assessment. Gaining knowledge on needs assessment and the detailed description of needs and plans can facilitate targeted interventions. The findings indicate an urgent need to change the practice

  12. Nursing care dependence in the experiences of advanced cancer inpatients.

    PubMed

    Piredda, Michela; Bartiromo, Chiara; Capuzzo, Maria Teresa; Matarese, Maria; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Increasing burden of cancer in Europe and socio-demographic trends imply that more cancer patients will face high levels of dependency. Care dependency is often perceived as a distressing experience by cancer patients who are concerned about becoming a burden to others. The experience of care dependence has been scarcely investigated in advanced cancer patients, especially in the hospital setting. This study aimed at describing advanced cancer patients' experiences of care dependence in hospital and of the factors perceived by them as contributing to decrease or increase this dependence. The study used a descriptive phenomenological approach based on Husserl's (1913) life world perspective. Data collection and analysis followed Giorgi's (1997) five basic methodological steps. Data were gathered by semi-structured interviews with thirteen advanced cancer adult inpatients of a teaching hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded and the recordings transcribed word for word. Three themes emerged: 'dependency discovers new meanings of life', 'active coping with dependency' and 'the care cures the dependent person'. The essential meaning of care dependency was the possibility to become aware of being a person as both an object and subject of care. Dependence appears as an experience with strong relational connotations, which enable patients to see differently their life, themselves, the world and others. Dependency is revealed as a natural experience, only partly in accordance with previous studies. Deeper insight into the meaning patients attach to care dependency can enable nurses to better meet the patient's needs, e.g. by improving caring relationships with patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Are primary care providers implementing evidence-based care for breast cancer survivors?

    PubMed Central

    Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Aiken, Alice; McColl, Mary Ann; Tranmer, Joan; Langley, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the implementation of key best practice guideline recommendations for posttreatment breast cancer survivorship care by primary care providers (PCPs). Design Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Setting Southeastern Ontario. Participants Eighty-two PCPs: 62 family physicians (FPs) and 20 primary health care nurse practitioners (PHCNPs). Main outcome measures Twenty-one “need-to-know” breast cancer survivorship care guideline recommendations rated by participants as “implemented routinely,” “aware of guideline recommendation but not implemented routinely,” or “not aware of guideline recommendation.” Results Overall, FPs and PHCNPs in our sample reported similar practice patterns in terms of implementation of breast cancer survivorship guideline recommendations. The PCPs reported routinely implementing approximately half (46.4%, 9.7 of 21) of the key guideline recommendations with breast cancer survivors in their practices. Implementation rates were higher for recommendations related to prevention and surveillance aspects of survivorship care, such as mammography and weight management. Knowledge and practice gaps were highest for recommendations related to screening for and management of long-term effects such as fatigue and distress. There were only a few minor differences reported between FPs and PHCNPs. Conclusion There are knowledge and practice gaps related to implementation of the key guideline recommendations for breast cancer survivorship care in the primary care setting that could be targeted for improvement through educational or other interventions. PMID:26889509

  14. Are primary care providers implementing evidence-based care for breast cancer survivors?

    PubMed

    Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Aiken, Alice; McColl, Mary Ann; Tranmer, Joan; Langley, Hugh

    2015-11-01

    To describe the implementation of key best practice guideline recommendations for posttreatment breast cancer survivorship care by primary care providers (PCPs). Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Southeastern Ontario. Eighty-two PCPs: 62 family physicians (FPs) and 20 primary health care nurse practitioners (PHCNPs). Twenty-one “need-to-know” breast cancer survivorship care guideline recommendations rated by participants as “implemented routinely,” “aware of guideline recommendation but not implemented routinely,” or “not aware of guideline recommendation.” Overall, FPs and PHCNPs in our sample reported similar practice patterns in terms of implementation of breast cancer survivorship guideline recommendations. The PCPs reported routinely implementing approximately half (46.4%, 9.7 of 21) of the key guideline recommendations with breast cancer survivors in their practices. Implementation rates were higher for recommendations related to prevention and surveillance aspects of survivorship care, such as mammography and weight management. Knowledge and practice gaps were highest for recommendations related to screening for and management of long-term effects such as fatigue and distress. There were only a few minor differences reported between FPs and PHCNPs. There are knowledge and practice gaps related to implementation of the key guideline recommendations for breast cancer survivorship care in the primary care setting that could be targeted for improvement through educational or other interventions.

  15. End-of-Life Place of Care, Health Care Settings, and Health Care Transitions Among Cancer Patients: Impact of an Integrated Cancer Palliative Care Plan.

    PubMed

    Casotto, Veronica; Rolfini, Maria; Ferroni, Eliana; Savioli, Valentina; Gennaro, Nicola; Avossa, Francesco; Cancian, Maurizio; Figoli, Franco; Mantoan, Domenico; Brambilla, Antonio; Ghiotto, Maria Cristina; Fedeli, Ugo; Saugo, Mario

    2017-08-01

    Frequent end-of-life health care setting transitions can lead to an increased risk of fragmented care and exposure to unnecessary treatments. We assessed the relationship between the presence and the intensity of an Integrated Cancer Palliative Care (ICPC) plan and the occurrence of multiple transitions during the last month of life. Decedents of cancer aged 18-85 years residents in two regions of Italy were investigated accessing their integrated administrative data (death certificates, hospital discharges, hospice, and home care records). The principal outcome was defined as having 3+ health care setting transitions during the last month of life. The ICPC plans instituted 90-31 days before death represented the main exposure of interest. Of the 17,604 patients, 6698 included in an ICPC, although spending in hospital a median number of only two days (interquartile range 1-2), experienced 1+ (59.8%), 2+ (21.1%), or 3+ (5.9%) health care transitions. Among the latter group, the most common trajectory of care is home-hospital-home-hospital (36.0%). The intensity of the ICPC plan showed a marked protective effect toward the event of 3+ health care setting transitions; the effect is already evident from an intensity of at least one home visit/week (odds ratio 0.73; 95% confidence interval 0.62-0.87). A well-integrated palliative care approach can be effective in further reducing the percentage of patients who spent many days in hospital and/or undergo frequent and inopportune changes of their care setting during their last month of life. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Unresolved pain interference among colorectal cancer survivors: Implications for patient care and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kenzik, Kelly; Pisu, Maria; Johns, Shelley A.; Baker, Tamara; Oster, Robert A.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Fouad, Mona N.; Martin, Michelle Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Using a large sample of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors we 1) describe pain interference (PI) prevalence across the cancer continuum; 2) identify demographic and clinical factors associated with PI and changes in PI; and 3) examine PI’s relationship with survivors’ job changes. Methods CRC participants of the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium completed surveys during the initial phase of care (baseline, <1 year, n=2,961) and follow-up (about 1-year post-diagnosis, n=2,303). PI was measured using the SF-12 item. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors of PI. Model 1 evaluated moderate/high PI at baseline, Model 2 evaluated new/continued/increasing PI post-diagnosis follow-up, and Model 3 restricted to participants with baseline PI (N=603) and evaluated predictors of equivalent/increasing PI. Multivariable logistic regression was also used to examine whether PI predicted job change. Results At baseline and follow-up, 24.7% and 23.7% of participants reported moderate/high PI, respectively. Among those with baseline PI, 46% had equivalent/increasing PI at follow-up. Near diagnosis and at follow-up, female gender, comorbidities, depression, chemotherapy and radiation were associated with moderate/high PI while older age was protective of PI. Pulmonary disease and heart failure comorbidities were associated with equivalent/increasing PI. PI was significantly associated with no longer having a job at follow-up among employed survivors. Conclusion Almost half of survivors with PI during the initial phase of care had continued PI into post-treatment. Comorbidities, especially cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions, contributed to continued PI. PI may be related to continuing normal activities, i.e., work, after completed treatment. PMID:25799885

  17. Ensuring quality cancer care: a follow-up review of the Institute of Medicine's 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care in America.

    PubMed

    Spinks, Tracy; Albright, Heidi W; Feeley, Thomas W; Walters, Ron; Burke, Thomas W; Aloia, Thomas; Bruera, Eduardo; Buzdar, Aman; Foxhall, Lewis; Hui, David; Summers, Barbara; Rodriguez, Alma; Dubois, Raymond; Shine, Kenneth I

    2012-05-15

    Responding to growing concerns regarding the safety, quality, and efficacy of cancer care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences commissioned a comprehensive review of cancer care delivery in the US health care system in the late 1990s. The National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), a 20-member board with broad representation, performed this review. In its review, the NCPB focused on the state of cancer care delivery at that time, its shortcomings, and ways to measure and improve the quality of cancer care. The NCPB described an ideal cancer care system in which patients would have equitable access to coordinated, guideline-based care and novel therapies throughout the course of their disease. In 1999, the IOM published the results of this review in its influential report, Ensuring Quality Cancer Care. The report outlined 10 recommendations, which, when implemented, would: 1) improve the quality of cancer care, 2) increase the current understanding of quality cancer care, and 3) reduce or eliminate access barriers to quality cancer care. Despite the fervor generated by this report, there are lingering doubts regarding the safety and quality of cancer care in the United States today. Increased awareness of medical errors and barriers to quality care, coupled with escalating health care costs, has prompted national efforts to reform the health care system. These efforts by health care providers and policymakers should bridge the gap between the ideal state described in Ensuring Quality Cancer Care and the current state of cancer care in the United States.

  18. Development of the cancer survivorship care plan: what's next? Life after cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jody M; Scheid, Kathy; Rolnick, Sharon J

    2013-06-01

    Long-term information needs are increasingly important as more people are diagnosed with cancer and living well beyond initial diagnosis and treatment. Consequently, cancer is joining the ranks of chronic conditions (e.g., asthma, diabetes) for which ongoing, long-term surveillance and management should be the model of care. However, the post-treatment period is fraught with uncertainty for patients and care providers. The "who, what, and when" of follow-up care, in particular, can be complex and confusing. Therefore, survivorship care plans (SCPs) are recommended. The Minnesota Cancer Alliance, a coalition working to improve quality of life for cancer survivors, developed a patient-focused SCP. This user-friendly SCP could be considered for use in patient care--particularly by nurses, who are well suited and positioned to implement SCPs.

  19. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  20. Conceptual Models for Integrating Palliative Care at Cancer Centers

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Palliative care programs are rapidly evolving in acute care facilities. Increased and earlier access has been advocated for patients with life-threatening illnesses. Existing programs would need major growth to accommodate the increased utilization. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the current structures, processes, and outcomes of the Supportive and Palliative Care Program at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (UTMDACC), and to use the update as a platform to discuss the challenges and opportunities in integrating palliative and supportive services in a tertiary care cancer center. Our interprofessional program consists of a mobile consultation team, an acute palliative care unit, and an outpatient supportive care clinic. We will discuss various metrics including symptom outcomes, quality of end-of-life care, program growth, and financial issues. Despite the growing evidence to support early palliative care involvement, referral to palliative care remains heterogeneous and delayed. To address this issue, we will discuss various conceptual models and practical recommendations to optimize palliative care access. PMID:22925157

  1. Primary Care Physician Perceptions of Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Jody L.; Perkins, Susan M.; Haggstrom, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing cure rates for childhood cancers have resulted in a population of adult childhood cancer survivors (CCS) that are at risk for late effects of cancer-directed therapy. Our objective was to identify facilitators and barriers to primary care physicians (PCPs) providing late effects screening and evaluate information tools PCPs perceive as useful. We analyzed surveys from 351 practicing internal medicine and family practice physicians nationwide. A minority of PCPs perceived that their medical training was adequate to recognize late effects of chemotherapy (27.6%), cancer surgery (36.6%), and radiation therapy (38.1%). Most PCPs (93%) had never used Children’s Oncology Group guidelines, but 86% would follow their recommendations. Most (84–86%) PCPs stated that they had never received a cancer treatment summary or survivorship care plan but (>90%) thought these documents would be useful. PCPs have a low level of awareness and receive inadequate training to recognize late effects. Overall, PCPs infrequently utilize guidelines, cancer treatment summaries, and survivorship care plans, although they perceive such tools as useful. We have identified gaps to address when providing care for CCS in routine general medical practice. PMID:24309612

  2. Continuum of Care Services for Maternal and Child Health using mobile technology - a health system strengthening strategy in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Ramkrishnan; Gopichandran, Vijayaprasad; Chaturvedi, Sharadprakash; Chatterjee, Rahul; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Chaudhuri, Indrajit

    2016-07-07

    Mobile phone technology is utilized for better delivery of health services worldwide. In low-and-middle income countries mobile phones are now ubiquitous. Thus leveraging mHealth applications in health sector is becoming popular rapidly in these countries. To assess the effectiveness of the Continuum of Care Services (CCS) mHealth platform in terms of strengthening the delivery of maternal and child health (MCH) services in a district in Bihar, a resource-poor state in India. The CommCare mHealth platform was customized to CCS as one of the innovations under a project funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to improve the maternal and newborn health services in Bihar. The intervention was rolled out in one project district in Bihar, during July 2012. More than 550 frontline workers out of a total of 3000 including Accredited Social Health Activists, Anganwadi Workers, Auxilliary Nurse Midwives and Lady Health Supervisors were trained to use the mHealth platform. The service delivery components namely early registration of pregnant women, three antenatal visits, tetanus toxoid immunization of the mother, iron and folic acid tablet supply, institutional delivery, postnatal home visits and early initiation of breastfeeding were used as indicators for good quality services. The resultant coverage of these services in the implementation area was compared with rest of Bihar and previous year statistics of the same area. The time lag between delivery of a service and its record capture in the maternal and child tracking system (MCTS) database was computed in a random sample of 16,000 beneficiaries. The coverage of services among marginalized and non-marginalized castes was compared to indicate equity of service delivery. Health system strengthening was viewed from the angle of coverage, quality, equity and efficiency of services. The implementation blocks had higher coverage of all the eight indicator services compared to rest of Bihar and the previous year. There

  3. Prostate Cancer Mortality-To-Incidence Ratios Are Associated with Cancer Care Disparities in 35 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sung-Lang; Wang, Shao-Chuan; Ho, Cheng-Ju; Kao, Yu-Lin; Hsieh, Tzuo-Yi; Chen, Wen-Jung; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Pei-Ru; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Lee, Huei; Sung, Wen-Wei

    2017-01-01

    The variation in mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs) among countries reflects the clinical outcomes and the available interventions for colorectal cancer treatments. The association between MIR of prostate cancer and cancer care disparities among countries is an interesting issue that is rarely investigated. For the present study, cancer incidence and mortality rates were obtained from the GLOBOCAN 2012 database. The rankings and total expenditures on health of various countries were obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO). The association between variables was analyzed by linear regression analyses. In this study, we estimated the role of MIRs from 35 countries that had a prostate cancer incidence greater than 5,000 cases per year. As expected, high prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates were observed in more developed regions, such as Europe and the Americas. However, the MIRs were 2.5 times higher in the less developed regions. Regarding the association between MIR and cancer care disparities, countries with good WHO ranking and high total expenditures on health/gross domestic product (GDP) were significant correlated with low MIR. The MIR variation for prostate cancer correlates with cancer care disparities among countries further support the role of cancer care disparities in clinical outcome. PMID:28051150

  4. Providing Coordinated Cancer Care-A Qualitative Study of Norwegian Cancer Coordinators' Experiences of Their Role.

    PubMed

    Lie, Nataskja-Elena Kersting; Hauken, May Aasebø; Solvang, Per Koren

    2017-05-23

    There is a growing need for strategies to improve coordinated, tailored services in cancer care to meet the comprehensive needs of cancer patients. In Norway, cancer coordinators (CCs) have been established to improve coordination and patient-centeredness of services. Little is known about how CCs engage to provide patients with the needed services and support throughout the treatment. The aim of this study was to explore how Norwegian CCs experience their role and how they enact it in order to enhance coordinated cancer care. The study encompasses a qualitative, hermeneutic approach, conducting semistructured in-depth interviews of 26 Norwegian CCs. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis and discussed in the light of the salutogenic theory. Cancer coordinators take a holistic approach to patient care, including both patient- and system-level activities. "Providing coordinated cancer care" emerged as an overarching topic for their role. This topic was elaborated by 3 main themes: (1) finding their place and creating their function, (2) meeting the needs of cancer patients and helping them cope, (3) promoting well-functioning cancer care systems. Cancer coordinators evolved diversely, in adaption to the local context and patients' needs. The functions' diversity challenged the implementation and external role recognition. Cancer coordinators seemed to apply a salutogenic, resource-focused orientation in order to support a positive development at both the patient and the system levels. The findings reinforce the call for holistic, patient-centered services in cancer care. Cancer coordinators need appropriate support from the local management to establish the role and local collaborations.

  5. Preparing professional staff to care for cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Bhatia, Smita

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Oncology health care professionals frequently lack the background to implement needed survivorship activities and follow-up care. The purpose of this project is to assist providers in the clarification and initiation of potentially durable changes in survivorship care by developing a health professional curriculum, recruiting participants, implementing the course, conducting course evaluation and following participants’ defined goals over time. Materials and methods The curriculum was developed based on recommendations from the Institute of Medicine Report-From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor—Lost in Transition. Three concepts were used to structure the course: cancer survivorship quality of life, changing practice via performance improvement, and principles of adult education. Expert faculty designed and implemented the curriculum and teaching methods using adult learning principles and an interactive approach. Competitively-selected, two-person interdisciplinary teams for the first course (July 12–15, 2006, Pasadena, California) were selected based on stated interests, three projected goals, and letters of commitment from administrators. Results Participants represented 52 cancer care settings from 28 states. Teams included Nurses (48.1%), Social Workers (20.7%), Physicians (18.8%), Directors/Administrators (6.6%), Psychologists (2.8%), and others (3%). The institutional barriers identified by teams were lack of survivorship knowledge (94 %), financial constraints (61%), lack of administrative support (6%), and staff philosophy that excluded survivorship (15%). Evaluation of content from the first course was consistently positive. Conclusions Dissemination of survivorship education for health care professionals stimulates participants to define and begin to implement goals for improving survivors’ care. Implications for cancer survivors A training program such as the one described provides professional knowledge regarding survivorship that

  6. Quality of Breast Cancer Care: Perception Versus Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bickell, Nina A.; Neuman, Jennifer; Fei, Kezhen; Franco, Rebeca; Joseph, Kathie-Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Because insurers use performance and quality metrics to inform reimbursement, identifying remediable causes of poor-quality cancer care is imperative. We undertook this descriptive cohort study to assess key predictors of women's perceived quality of their breast cancer care and actual guideline-concordant quality of care received. Patients and Methods We surveyed inner-city women with newly diagnosed and surgically treated early-stage breast cancer requiring adjuvant treatment who were enrolled onto a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of patient assistance to reduce disparities in care. We assessed women's perceived quality of care and perceived quality of the process of getting care, such as getting referrals, test results, and treatments; we abstracted records to determine the actual quality of care. Results Of the 374 new patients with early-stage breast cancer enrolled onto the RCT, only a slight majority of women (55%) perceived their quality of care as excellent; 88% actually received good-quality, guideline-concordant care. Excellent perceived quality (P < .001) was significantly associated with patients' perception of the quality of the process of getting care (adjusted relative risk [RR], 1.78; 95% CI, 1.65 to 1.87). Also associated with perceived quality—and mediated by race—were trust in one's physician (adjusted RR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.64) and perceived racism, which affected black women more than women of other races/ethnicities (black race–adjusted RR for perceived racism, 0.33 [95% CI, 0.10 to 0.87]; black race–adjusted RR for trust, 1.61 [95% CI, 0.97 to 1.90]; c = 0.82 for the model; P < .001). Actual quality of care provided did not affect perceived quality of care received. Conclusion Patients' perceived quality of care differs from their receipt of high-quality care. Mutable targets to improve perceived quality of care include the processes of getting care and trusting their physician. PMID:22493417

  7. Primary care and communication in shared cancer care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sada, Yvonne; Street, Richard L.; Singh, Hardeep; Shada, Rachel; Naik, Aanand D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore perceptions of primary care physicians’ (PCPs) and oncologists’ roles, responsibilities, and patterns of communication related to shared cancer care in three integrated health systems that used electronic health records (EHRs). Study design Qualitative study. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with ten early stage colorectal cancer patients and fourteen oncologists and PCPs. Sample sizes were determined by thematic saturation. Dominant themes and codes were identified and subsequently applied to all transcripts. Results Physicians reported that EHRs improved communication within integrated systems, but communication with physicians outside their system was still difficult. PCPs expressed uncertainty about their role during cancer care, even though medical oncologists emphasized the importance of co-morbidity control during cancer treatment. Both patients and physicians described additional roles for PCPs, including psychological distress support and behavior modification. Conclusions Integrated systems that use EHRs likely facilitate shared cancer care through improved PCP-oncologist communication. However, strategies to facilitate a more active role for PCPs in managing co-morbidities, psychological distress and behavior modification, as well as to overcome communication challenges between physicians not practicing within the same integrated system, are still needed to improve shared cancer care. PMID:21615196

  8. Barriers to cancer care, perceived social support, and patient navigation services for Korean breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Won

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the relationships among barriers to cancer care, perceived social support, and patient navigation services (PNS) for Korean breast cancer patients. For Korean breast cancer patients, PNS are comprised of five services, including emotional, financial, information, transportation, and disease management. The study findings demonstrated that transportation and disease management barriers were directly associated with PNS, whereas emotional and financial barriers were indirectly associated with PNS through perceived social support. The current study provides a preliminary Korean patient navigation model to identify how barriers to cancer care can be reduced through social support and PNS.

  9. [Breast care nurse. A new specialist in the multidisciplinary care of breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Tóth, László; Sávolt, Akos; Péley, Gábor; Tínusz, Anikó; Palla, Eva; Bartal, Alexandra; Horti, Ildikó; Kásler, Miklós

    2012-09-01

    The uniform European structure and professional standards for high quality breast cancer care were established in conjunction with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment, the European Society of Mastology and the European Breast Cancer Coalition with the support of the European Parliament. Well-prepared professional teams including a new member called the breast care nurse serve as ground for special breast cancer centers with international accreditation that provide modern, evidence based, patient centered multidisciplinary oncological care. The responsibilities of the new qualified professional staff member include the psycho-social support of the patient and carers from the moment of diagnosis throughout the whole oncological treatment, the fostering of delivering information and communication between patients and specialists. As a result of the curriculum founded by the European Oncology Nursing Society, breast care nurses have become key members of the practice of holistic breast cancer care in countries where the European recommendations have already been implemented. Considering the expected rearrangement of national oncological care, the new sub-specialty is outlined for the first time in the light of the experiences gained at the National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, a comprehensive cancer center.

  10. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  11. 77 FR 64340 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge AGENCY... Cancer Care Video Challenge is an opportunity for members of the public to create short, erin.poetter@hhs... ability manage care. The Cancer Care Video Challenge is an ] opportunity for members of the public...

  12. 75 FR 9913 - Request for Measures of Patient Experiences of Cancer Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Cancer Care AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. ACTION: Notice of request. SUMMARY... respondents to assess the care delivered by cancer care providers. AHRQ is seeking these items and measures from researchers, survey firms, cancer care providers, patient advocacy groups, individual...

  13. Raising the standard of brain cancer care.

    PubMed

    Mason, Mary-Claire

    2015-04-15

    Survival rates for people with brain cancer are poor, and some patients do not receive the specialist support they need. Nurse specialist Ingela Oberg calls for earlier diagnosis and improved access to nurse-led clinics and rehabilitation services.

  14. Different Points of a Continuum? Cross Sectional Comparison of the Current and Pre-contact Psychosocial Problems among the Different Categories of Adolescents in Institutional Care in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The combination of adverse social indicators and a predominantly youthful population puts Nigeria, and indeed many countries of sub-Sahara Africa, at the risk of explosion in the number of youth coming in contact with the juvenile justice system. Despite this risk, custodial childcare systems in the region are still poorly developed with both juvenile offenders and neglected adolescents coming in contact with the systems being kept in the same incarcerating facility. The needs of these different groups of adolescents may be different. Knowing their common and unique needs can inform common prevention strategies and ensure that specific service-needs of different categories of adolescents in institutional custody are met. Methods Data on the family background, pre-contact social circumstance, neurological and anthropometric profiles, and certain aspects of mental health of adolescents drawn from two juvenile justice institutions in Nigeria were obtained. The results for the adolescents on ‘criminal code’ and those admitted as a case of child neglect were compared using chi-square and odd ratios. Results Participants were 211 adolescents comprising of 158 on ‘criminal code’ and 53 declared as ‘neglected’. A lot of similarities were found. For instance, the prevalence of parental separation, family transition, experience of street-life and lifetime exposure to traumatic events and posttraumatic stress was equally high among the two groups of adolescents. The adolescents on ‘criminal code’ however had significantly higher prevalence of conduct and alcohol/substance use disorders while the child neglect group had poorer anthropometric profiles and higher prevalence of neurological disorders. Conclusions Child neglect and juvenile delinquency in Nigeria may truly be different points of a continuum. There are however fundamental differences that can warrant specific prevention strategies and tailor-made service provision while in custodial care

  15. Different points of a continuum? Cross sectional comparison of the current and pre-contact psychosocial problems among the different categories of adolescents in institutional care in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Atilola, Olayinka

    2012-07-26

    The combination of adverse social indicators and a predominantly youthful population puts Nigeria, and indeed many countries of sub-Sahara Africa, at the risk of explosion in the number of youth coming in contact with the juvenile justice system. Despite this risk, custodial childcare systems in the region are still poorly developed with both juvenile offenders and neglected adolescents coming in contact with the systems being kept in the same incarcerating facility. The needs of these different groups of adolescents may be different. Knowing their common and unique needs can inform common prevention strategies and ensure that specific service-needs of different categories of adolescents in institutional custody are met. Data on the family background, pre-contact social circumstance, neurological and anthropometric profiles, and certain aspects of mental health of adolescents drawn from two juvenile justice institutions in Nigeria were obtained. The results for the adolescents on 'criminal code' and those admitted as a case of child neglect were compared using chi-square and odd ratios. Participants were 211 adolescents comprising of 158 on 'criminal code' and 53 declared as 'neglected'. A lot of similarities were found. For instance, the prevalence of parental separation, family transition, experience of street-life and lifetime exposure to traumatic events and posttraumatic stress was equally high among the two groups of adolescents. The adolescents on 'criminal code' however had significantly higher prevalence of conduct and alcohol/substance use disorders while the child neglect group had poorer anthropometric profiles and higher prevalence of neurological disorders. Child neglect and juvenile delinquency in Nigeria may truly be different points of a continuum. There are howev