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Sample records for cancer care flexible

  1. A Palliative Cancer Care Flexible Education Program for Australian Community Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Jennifer L.; Beattie, Jill; Nation, Roger L.; Dooley, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To implement and evaluate a flexible palliative care education program for Australian community pharmacists. Design After identifying pharmacists' education needs, the program content and format were developed. This included identifying expert writers to create modules, assigning education and palliative care specialists to review content, and designing Web hosting of materials. The program was comprised of 11 modules and 79 activities. Assessment An average of 28 responses was posted for each of the 20 noticeboard activities. Of the 60 pharmacists who began the program, 15 contributed to the discussion group, with an average of 3 posts each. Participants' responses to an online questionnaire indicated the program addressed their education needs and improved their knowledge and confidence in providing palliative cancer care. Conclusion A program that pharmacists could access at a time and place convenient to them via the Internet was developed. Pharmacists indicated the program positively impacted their practice. PMID:20414437

  2. Managed care demands flexibility, creativity.

    PubMed

    1996-05-01

    The definition of hospice care is changing as home care providers come under managed care regulations. Hospice care for AIDS patients is demanding, requiring extra time from home care providers. The managed care cost-cutting measures require creativitity and patience. The Visiting Nurses and Hospice of San Francisco (VNH) has held seminars to help providers adapt to managed care.

  3. Managed care demands flexibility, creativity.

    PubMed

    1996-05-01

    The definition of hospice care is changing as home care providers come under managed care regulations. Hospice care for AIDS patients is demanding, requiring extra time from home care providers. The managed care cost-cutting measures require creativitity and patience. The Visiting Nurses and Hospice of San Francisco (VNH) has held seminars to help providers adapt to managed care. PMID:11363252

  4. Cancer care in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat; Attiga, Fadwa; Mansour, Asem

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in Jordan after cardiovascular diseases. Due to increase in life expectancy and prolonged exposure to risk factors, cancer mortality and morbidity are expected to increase as the young population ages. This increase will constitute a challenging burden on healthcare systems in Jordan and many other neighboring countries. Planning is key to managing the expected rise in the demand for cancer care, and this will require public health initiatives to guarantee access to quality cancer care. Over the past decade, cancer care in Jordan has witnessed remarkable improvement through access to advanced diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we address the history of cancer care in Jordan, including cancer statistics, infrastructure, workforce as well as cancer care outcomes. We also discuss many of the challenges that we face and offer suggestions for the improvement of cancer management in Jordan and the region.

  5. Your cancer care team

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your cancer treatment plan, you will likely work with a team of health care providers. Learn about the types ... your cancer care from diagnosis through recovery. They work with you and your whole care team to help make sure you have the health ...

  6. CancerCare

    MedlinePlus

    ... led by an oncology social worker » Cancer Care ® E-News and E-Alerts Get news and updates from Cancer Care ® ... Stories of Help and Hope Video Library Blog E-News and E-Alerts Calendar Open Portals For ...

  7. Your cancer survivorship care plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000822.htm Your cancer survivorship care plan To use the sharing features on this page, ... get one. What Is a Cancer Survivorship Care Plan? A cancer survivorship care plan is a document ...

  8. Implementing personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Schilsky, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Implementing personalized cancer care requires a sound understanding of cancer genomics, familiarity with the analytical methods used to study cancer, knowledge of the mechanisms of action of targeted drugs, and ways to assimilate and understand complex data sets. Perhaps the greatest challenge is obtaining the drugs predicted to be beneficial based on the genomic profile of a patient's tumour. A potential solution is creation of a national facilitated access programme and registry for off-label use of targeted anti-cancer drugs. Within such a programme, patients could receive the targeted agent matched to the genomic profile of their tumour. Physicians would receive guidance in interpretation of complex genomic tests and access to drugs. Pharmaceutical companies, payers and regulators would receive data on off-label drug and test use and clinical outcomes to inform their research and development plans and coverage decisions and to track real-world safety. Although recently launched prospective clinical trials will determine the true benefit of matching drugs to genomic alterations, the approach proposed here will facilitate delivery of personalized medicine services to participating patients while at the same time making observations that allow us to learn from each patient to inform clinical care and future research initiatives.

  9. Challenges in volunteering from cancer care volunteers perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kamaludin, Kauthar Mohamad; Muhammad, Mazanah; Wahat, Nor Wahiza Abdul; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of non-government organizations (NGOs) and support groups has helped strengthen public health services in addressing cancer care burden. Owing to the contribution of volunteers in cancer care, this article documents a qualitative study that examined challenges in attracting and retaining cancer care volunteers as part of the effort to develop a volunteer recruitment model. Data were collected through three focus group discussions involving 19 cancer support group members in Malaysia. Findings of the study revealed that mobility and locality appeared to be significant in Malaysian context, while the need for financial support and time flexibility are challenges faced by cancer support groups to attract and retain volunteers. The findings imply that cancer care initiatives can benefit from more local volunteers but at the same time these volunteers require flexibility and financial support to sustain their engagement.

  10. Personalized cancer care conference.

    PubMed

    Zänker, Kurt S; Mihich, Enrico; Huber, Hans-Peter; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The Oslo University Hospital (Norway), the K.G. Jebsen Centre for Breast Cancer Research (Norway), The Radiumhospital Foundation (Norway) and the Fritz-Bender-Foundation (Germany) designed under the conference chairmen (E. Mihich, K.S. Zänker, A.L. Borresen-Dale) and advisory committee (A. Borg, Z. Szallasi, O. Kallioniemi, H.P. Huber) a program at the cutting edge of "PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE: Risk prediction, early diagnosis, progression and therapy resistance." The conference was held in Oslo from September 7 to 9, 2012 and the science-based presentations concerned six scientific areas: (1) Genetic profiling of patients, prediction of risk, late side effects; (2) Molecular profiling of tumors and metastases; (3) Tumor-host microenvironment interaction and metabolism; (4) Targeted therapy; (5) Translation and (6) Informed consent, ethical challenges and communication. Two satellite workshops on (i) Ion Ampliseq-a novel tool for large scale mutation detection; and (ii) Multiplex RNA ISH and tissue homogenate assays for cancer biomarker validation were additionally organized. The report concludes that individual risk prediction in carcinogenesis and/or metastatogenesis based on polygenic profiling may be useful for intervention strategies for health care and therapy planning in the future. To detect distinct and overlapping DNA sequence alterations in tumor samples and adjacent normal tissues, including point mutations, small insertions or deletions, copy number changes and chromosomal rearrangements will eventually make it possible to design personalized management plans for individualized patients. However, large individualized datasets need a new approach in bio-information technology to reduce this enormous data dimensionally to simply working hypotheses about health and disease for each individual. PMID:25562519

  11. Personalized Cancer Care Conference

    PubMed Central

    Zänker, Kurt S.; Mihich, Enrico; Huber, Hans-Peter; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The Oslo University Hospital (Norway), the K.G. Jebsen Centre for Breast Cancer Research (Norway), The Radiumhospital Foundation (Norway) and the Fritz-Bender-Foundation (Germany) designed under the conference chairmen (E. Mihich, K.S. Zänker, A.L. Borresen-Dale) and advisory committee (A. Borg, Z. Szallasi, O. Kallioniemi, H.P. Huber) a program at the cutting edge of “PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE: Risk prediction, early diagnosis, progression and therapy resistance.” The conference was held in Oslo from September 7 to 9, 2012 and the science-based presentations concerned six scientific areas: (1) Genetic profiling of patients, prediction of risk, late side effects; (2) Molecular profiling of tumors and metastases; (3) Tumor-host microenvironment interaction and metabolism; (4) Targeted therapy; (5) Translation and (6) Informed consent, ethical challenges and communication. Two satellite workshops on (i) Ion Ampliseq—a novel tool for large scale mutation detection; and (ii) Multiplex RNA ISH and tissue homogenate assays for cancer biomarker validation were additionally organized. The report concludes that individual risk prediction in carcinogenesis and/or metastatogenesis based on polygenic profiling may be useful for intervention strategies for health care and therapy planning in the future. To detect distinct and overlapping DNA sequence alterations in tumor samples and adjacent normal tissues, including point mutations, small insertions or deletions, copy number changes and chromosomal rearrangements will eventually make it possible to design personalized management plans for individualized patients. However, large individualized datasets need a new approach in bio-information technology to reduce this enormous data dimensionally to simply working hypotheses about health and disease for each individual. PMID:25562519

  12. Palliative Care in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Arvind M; Dashti, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the USA. Symptom burden in patients with advanced lung cancer is very high and has a negative impact on their quality of life (QOL). Palliative care with its focus on the management of symptoms and addressing physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and existential suffering, as well as medically appropriate goal setting and open communication with patients and families, significantly adds to the quality of care received by advanced lung cancer patients. The Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) as well as the National Cancer Care Network's (NCCN) clinical practice guidelines recommends early integration of palliative care into routine cancer care. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of palliative care in lung cancer and will examine the evidence and recommendations with regard to a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to symptom management, as well as discussions of goals of care, advance care planning, and care preferences. PMID:27535397

  13. Flexible kinship: caring for AIDS orphans in rural Lesotho

    PubMed Central

    Block, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has devastated families in rural Lesotho, leaving many children orphaned. Families have adapted to the increase in the number of orphans and HIV-positive children in ways that provide children with the best possible care. Though local ideas about kinship and care are firmly rooted in patrilineal social organization, in practice, maternal caregivers, often grandmothers, are increasingly caring for orphaned children. Negotiations between affinal kin capitalize on flexible kinship practices in order to legitimate new patterns of care, which have shifted towards a model that often favours matrilocal practices of care in the context of idealized patrilineality. PMID:25866467

  14. Survivorship care in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sally L.; Murchison, Sonja; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Alexander, Cheryl; Wai, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the perceptions of breast cancer survivors and primary care physicians (PCPs) about PCPs’ ability to deliver survivorship care in breast cancer. Design Mailed survey. Setting British Columbia. Participants A total of 1065 breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer within the previous year, and 587 PCPs who had patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer discharged to their care within the preceding 18 months. Main outcome measures Breast cancer survivors’ and PCPs’ confidence ratings of PCPs’ ability to deliver the following aspects of care: screening for recurrence; managing osteoporosis, lymphedema, endocrine therapy, menopausal symptoms, and anxiety about or fear of recurrence; and providing nutrition and exercise counseling, sex and body image counseling, and family counseling. Response options for each question included low, adequate, or good. Responses were summarized as frequencies and compared using χ2 tests. Results Response rates for breast cancer survivors and PCPs were 47% and 59%, respectively. Responses were statistically different in all categories (P < .05). Both groups were most confident in the ability of PCPs to screen for recurrence, but breast cancer survivors were 10 times as likely to indicate low confidence (10% of breast cancer survivors vs 1% of PCPs) in this aspect of care. More breast cancer survivors (23%) expressed low confidence in PCPs’ ability to provide counseling about fear of recurrence compared with PCPs (3%). Aspects of care in which both breast cancer survivors and PCPs were most likely to express low confidence included sex and body image counseling (35% of breast cancer survivors vs 26% of PCPs) and family counseling (33% of breast cancer survivors vs 24% of PCPs). Primary care physicians (24%) described low confidence in their ability to manage lymphedema. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors and PCPs are reasonably confident in a PCP-based model

  15. Cancer genetics in primary care.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, Kent D; Evans, James P

    2003-11-01

    Primary care physicians are in a unique position to apply recent advances in cancer genetics to the improved care of their patients. Although the impact of our burgeoning knowledge in this area is significant and growing, it is often incompletely understood by the general practitioner. In this article we review the genetic basis of cancer and focus attention on inherited forms of cancer using breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) and breast cancer gene 2 (BRCA2) as examples. Specific attributes of family and personal history are the most significant indicators of an increased risk of cancer in the individual patient. Genetic testing can be used to further assess risk and guide strategies for cancer screening, prevention, and treatment. However, the decision of whether to pursue genetic testing and the interpretation of results are complex. We review factors involved in these decisions as well as the implications, risks, and benefits of genetic testing for the individual and the family.

  16. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help, they can give the patient better care. Language and culture can affect communication. Communication can be ... You Love Has Advanced Cancer: Support for Caregivers Current Clinical Trials Check the list of NCI-supported ...

  17. Palliative Care in Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... palliative care is beneficial? Yes. Research shows that palliative care and its many components are beneficial to patient and family health and well-being. A number of studies in recent years have shown that patients who ...

  18. Caring for breast cancer survivors in primary care.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Kathryn; Stouder, April

    2016-10-01

    Women with a history of breast cancer compose the largest group of cancer survivors. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners can play a key role in caring for cancer survivors in primary care settings. This article provides a brief overview and synthesis of current breast cancer guidelines, other resources, and clinical observations that may help primary care providers to translate plans developed by oncology specialists into primary care delivery. PMID:27623290

  19. Spirituality in childhood cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nádia Nara Rolim; do Nascimento, Vânia Barbosa; de Carvalho, Sionara Melo Figueiredo; Neto, Modesto Leite Rolim; Moreira, Marcial Moreno; Brasil, Aline Quental; Junior, Francisco Telésforo Celestino; de Oliveira, Gislene Farias; Reis, Alberto Olavo Advíncula

    2013-01-01

    To deal with the suffering caused by childhood cancer, patients and their families use different coping strategies, among which, spirituality appears a way of minimizing possible damage. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of spirituality in childhood cancer care, involving biopsychosocial aspects of the child, the family, and the health care team facing the disease. To accomplish this purpose, a nonsystematic review of literature of articles on national and international electronic databases (Scientific Electronic Library Online [SciELO], PubMed, and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS]) was conducted using the search terms “spirituality,” “child psychology,” “child,” and “cancer,” as well as on other available resources. After the search, 20 articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final sample. Our review showed that the relation between spirituality and health has lately become a subject of growing interest among researchers, as a positive influence of spirituality in the people’s welfare was noted. Studies that were retrieved using the mentioned search strategy in electronic databases, independently assessed by the authors according to the systematic review, showed that spirituality emerges as a driving force that helps pediatric patients and their families in coping with cancer. Health care workers have been increasingly attentive to this dimension of care. However, it is necessary to improve their knowledge regarding the subject. The search highlighted that spirituality is considered a source of comfort and hope, contributing to a better acceptance of his/her chronic condition by the child with cancer, as well as by the family. Further up-to-date studies facing the subject are, thus, needed. It is also necessary to better train health care practitioners, so as to provide humanized care to the child with cancer. PMID:24133371

  20. Reviewing Cancer Care Team Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, Stephen H.; Weaver, Sallie; Salas, Eduardo; Chollette, Veronica; Edwards, Heather M.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Kosty, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The management of cancer varies across its type, stage, and natural history. This necessitates involvement of a variety of individuals and groups across a number of provider types. Evidence from other fields suggests that a team-based approach helps organize and optimize tasks that involve individuals and groups, but team effectiveness has not been fully evaluated in oncology-related care. Methods: We undertook a systematic review of literature published between 2009 and 2014 to identify studies of all teams with clear membership, a comparator group, and patient-level metrics of cancer care. When those teams included two or more people with specialty training relevant to the care of patients with cancer, we called them multidisciplinary care teams (MDTs). After reviews and exclusions, 16 studies were thoroughly evaluated: two addressing screening and diagnosis, 11 addressing treatment, two addressing palliative care, and one addressing end-of-life care. The studies included a variety of end points (eg, adherence to quality indicators, patient satisfaction with care, mortality). Results: Teams for screening and its follow-up improved screening use and reduced time to follow-up colonoscopy after an abnormal screen. Discussion of cases within MDTs improved the planning of therapy, adherence to recommended preoperative assessment, pain control, and adherence to medications. We did not see convincing evidence that MDTs affect patient survival or cost of care, or studies of how or which MDT processes and structures were associated with success. Conclusion: Further research should focus on the association between team processes and structures, efficiency in delivery of care, and mortality. PMID:25873056

  1. Cannabis in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I; Guzman, M

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis has been used in medicine for thousands of years prior to achieving its current illicit substance status. Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, mimic the effects of the endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), activating specific cannabinoid receptors, particularly CB1 found predominantly in the central nervous system and CB2 found predominantly in cells involved with immune function. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main bioactive cannabinoid in the plant, has been available as a prescription medication approved for treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and anorexia associated with the AIDS wasting syndrome. Cannabinoids may be of benefit in the treatment of cancer-related pain, possibly synergistic with opioid analgesics. Cannabinoids have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that they may be worthy of study in patients with other neuropathic symptoms. Cannabinoids have a favorable drug safety profile, but their medical use is predominantly limited by their psychoactive effects and their limited bioavailability. PMID:25777363

  2. Multidisciplinary Care of Laryngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Salvador-Coloma, Carmen; Cohen, Ezra

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of larynx cancer has changed dramatically over the past several years. Novel modalities of treatment have been introduced as organ preservation has been developed. In addition, new targeted therapies have appeared, and improvements in radiotherapeutic and surgical techniques have been introduced. Thus, a large variety of treatment options is increasing local control rates and overall survival; however, selecting the most appropriate treatment remains a challenging decision. This article focuses on the multidisciplinary care of early-stage and locally advanced larynx cancer and attempts to sum up different approaches. Moreover, it reviews state-of-the-art treatment in larynx preservation, which has been consolidated in recent years. PMID:27511718

  3. Flexible 16 Antenna Array for Microwave Breast Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Bahramiabarghouei, Hadi; Porter, Emily; Santorelli, Adam; Gosselin, Benoit; Popović, Milica; Rusch, Leslie A

    2015-10-01

    Radar-based microwave imaging has been widely studied for breast cancer detection in recent times. Sensing dielectric property differences of tissues has been studied over a wide frequency band for this application. We design single- and dual-polarization antennas for wireless ultrawideband breast cancer detection systems using an inhomogeneous multilayer model of the human breast. Antennas made from flexible materials are more easily adapted to wearable applications. Miniaturized flexible monopole and spiral antennas on a 50-μm Kapton polyimide are designed, using a high-frequency structure simulator, to be in contact with biological breast tissues. The proposed antennas are designed to operate in a frequency range of 2-4 GHz (with reflection coefficient (S11) below -10 dB). Measurements show that the flexible antennas have good impedance matching when in different positions with different curvature around the breast. Our miniaturized flexible antennas are 20 mm × 20 mm. Furthermore, two flexible conformal 4 × 4 ultrawideband antenna arrays (single and dual polarization), in a format similar to that of a bra, were developed for a radar-based breast cancer detection system. By using a reflector for the arrays, the penetration of the propagated electromagnetic waves from the antennas into the breast can be improved by factors of 3.3 and 2.6, respectively.

  4. Translating genomics in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Bombard, Yvonne; Bach, Peter B; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    There is increasing enthusiasm for genomics and its promise in advancing personalized medicine. Genomic information has been used to personalize health care for decades, spanning the fields of cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, endocrinology, metabolic medicine, and hematology. However, oncology has often been the first test bed for the clinical translation of genomics for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Notable hereditary cancer examples include testing for mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in unaffected women to identify those at significantly elevated risk for developing breast and ovarian cancers, and screening patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer for mutations in 4 mismatch repair genes to reduce morbidity and mortality in their relatives. Somatic genomic testing is also increasingly used in oncology, with gene expression profiling of breast tumors and EGFR testing to predict treatment response representing commonly used examples. Health technology assessment provides a rigorous means to inform clinical and policy decision-making through systematic assessment of the evidentiary base, along with precepts of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and consideration of risks and benefits for health care delivery and society. Although this evaluation is a fundamental step in the translation of any new therapeutic, procedure, or diagnostic test into clinical care, emerging developments may threaten this standard. These include "direct to consumer" genomic risk assessment services and the challenges posed by incidental results generated from next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. This article presents a review of the evidentiary standards and knowledge base supporting the translation of key cancer genomic technologies along the continuum of validity, utility, cost-effectiveness, health service impacts, and ethical and societal issues, and offers future research considerations to guide the responsible introduction of

  5. Translating genomics in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Bombard, Yvonne; Bach, Peter B; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    There is increasing enthusiasm for genomics and its promise in advancing personalized medicine. Genomic information has been used to personalize health care for decades, spanning the fields of cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, endocrinology, metabolic medicine, and hematology. However, oncology has often been the first test bed for the clinical translation of genomics for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Notable hereditary cancer examples include testing for mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in unaffected women to identify those at significantly elevated risk for developing breast and ovarian cancers, and screening patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer for mutations in 4 mismatch repair genes to reduce morbidity and mortality in their relatives. Somatic genomic testing is also increasingly used in oncology, with gene expression profiling of breast tumors and EGFR testing to predict treatment response representing commonly used examples. Health technology assessment provides a rigorous means to inform clinical and policy decision-making through systematic assessment of the evidentiary base, along with precepts of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and consideration of risks and benefits for health care delivery and society. Although this evaluation is a fundamental step in the translation of any new therapeutic, procedure, or diagnostic test into clinical care, emerging developments may threaten this standard. These include "direct to consumer" genomic risk assessment services and the challenges posed by incidental results generated from next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. This article presents a review of the evidentiary standards and knowledge base supporting the translation of key cancer genomic technologies along the continuum of validity, utility, cost-effectiveness, health service impacts, and ethical and societal issues, and offers future research considerations to guide the responsible introduction of

  6. Coping with Cancer - Survivorship Care for Children

    Cancer.gov

    Survivorship care for children who have been treated for cancer is important. Get your child's treatment summary, survivorship plan, and recommendation on follow-up care clinics. Learn about long-term and late effects.

  7. Primary care physician use across the breast cancer care continuum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Lofters, Aisha; Moineddin, Rahim; Decker, Kathleen; Groome, Patti; Kendell, Cynthia; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Li, Dongdong; McBride, Mary L.; Mittmann, Nicole; Porter, Geoff; Turner, Donna; Urquhart, Robin; Winget, Marcy; Zhang, Yang; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe primary care physician (PCP) use and continuity of PCP care across the breast cancer care continuum. Design Population-based, retrospective cohort study using provincial cancer registries linked to health administrative databases. Setting British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. Participants All women with incident invasive breast cancer from 2007 to 2012 in Manitoba and Ontario and from 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia. Main outcome measures The number and proportions of visits to PCPs were determined. Continuity of care was measured using the Usual Provider of Care index calculated as the proportion of visits to the most-often-visited PCP in the 6 to 30 months before a breast cancer diagnosis (baseline) and from 1 to 3 years following a breast cancer diagnosis (survivorship). Results More than three-quarters of patients visited their PCPs 2 or more times during the breast cancer diagnostic period, and more than 80% of patients had at least 1 PCP visit during breast cancer adjuvant treatment. Contact with the PCP decreased over time during breast cancer survivorship. Of the 3 phases, women appeared to be most likely to not have PCP contact during adjuvant treatment, with 10.7% (Ontario) to 18.7% (British Columbia) of women having no PCP visits during this phase. However, a sizable minority of women had at least monthly visits during the treatment phase, particularly in Manitoba and Ontario, where approximately a quarter of women saw a PCP at least monthly. We observed higher continuity of care with PCPs in survivorship (compared with baseline) in all provinces. Conclusion Primary care physicians were generally involved throughout the breast cancer care continuum, but the level of involvement varied across care phases and by province. Future interventions will aim to further integrate primary and oncology care. PMID:27737994

  8. Flexible sixteen monopole antenna array for microwave breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, H; Porter, E; Santorelli, A; Gosselin, B; Popovic, M; Rusch, L A

    2014-01-01

    Radar based microwave imaging (MI) has been widely studied for breast cancer detection in recent times. Sensing dielectric property differences of tissues over a wide frequency band has been made possible by ultra-wideband (UWB) techniques. In this paper, a flexible, compact monopole antenna on a 100 μm Kapton polyimide is designed, using a high frequency structure simulator (HFSS), to be in contact with biological breast tissues over the 2-5GHz frequency range. The antenna parameters are optimized to obtain a good impedance match over the required frequency range. The designed antenna size is 18mm × 18mm. Further, a flexible conformal 4×4 ultra-wideband antenna array, in a format similar to that of a bra, was developed for a radar-based breast cancer detection system.

  9. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Flexible Endoscopy for Laryngeal Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Regeling, Bianca; Thies, Boris; Gerstner, Andreas O H; Westermann, Stephan; Müller, Nina A; Bendix, Jörg; Laffers, Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is increasingly gaining acceptance in the medical field. Up until now, HSI has been used in conjunction with rigid endoscopy to detect cancer in vivo. The logical next step is to pair HSI with flexible endoscopy, since it improves access to hard-to-reach areas. While the flexible endoscope's fiber optic cables provide the advantage of flexibility, they also introduce an interfering honeycomb-like pattern onto images. Due to the substantial impact this pattern has on locating cancerous tissue, it must be removed before the HS data can be further processed. Thereby, the loss of information is to minimize avoiding the suppression of small-area variations of pixel values. We have developed a system that uses flexible endoscopy to record HS cubes of the larynx and designed a special filtering technique to remove the honeycomb-like pattern with minimal loss of information. We have confirmed its feasibility by comparing it to conventional filtering techniques using an objective metric and by applying unsupervised and supervised classifications to raw and pre-processed HS cubes. Compared to conventional techniques, our method successfully removes the honeycomb-like pattern and considerably improves classification performance, while preserving image details. PMID:27529255

  10. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Flexible Endoscopy for Laryngeal Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Regeling, Bianca; Thies, Boris; Gerstner, Andreas O. H.; Westermann, Stephan; Müller, Nina A.; Bendix, Jörg; Laffers, Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is increasingly gaining acceptance in the medical field. Up until now, HSI has been used in conjunction with rigid endoscopy to detect cancer in vivo. The logical next step is to pair HSI with flexible endoscopy, since it improves access to hard-to-reach areas. While the flexible endoscope’s fiber optic cables provide the advantage of flexibility, they also introduce an interfering honeycomb-like pattern onto images. Due to the substantial impact this pattern has on locating cancerous tissue, it must be removed before the HS data can be further processed. Thereby, the loss of information is to minimize avoiding the suppression of small-area variations of pixel values. We have developed a system that uses flexible endoscopy to record HS cubes of the larynx and designed a special filtering technique to remove the honeycomb-like pattern with minimal loss of information. We have confirmed its feasibility by comparing it to conventional filtering techniques using an objective metric and by applying unsupervised and supervised classifications to raw and pre-processed HS cubes. Compared to conventional techniques, our method successfully removes the honeycomb-like pattern and considerably improves classification performance, while preserving image details. PMID:27529255

  11. Improving Modern Cancer Care Through Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Steven B.; Wagner, Edward H.; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; Tuzzio, Leah; Greene, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer care system is increasingly complex, marked by multiple hand-offs between primary care and specialty providers, inadequate communication among providers, and lack of clarity about a “medical home” (the ideal accountable care provider) for cancer patients. Patients and families often cite such difficulties as information deficits, uncoordinated care, and insufficient psychosocial support. This article presents a review of the challenges of delivering well coordinated, patient-centered cancer care in a complex modern healthcare system. An examination is made of the potential role of information technology (IT) advances to help both providers and patients. Using the published literature as background, a review is provided of selected work that is underway to improve communication, coordination, and quality of care. Also discussed are additional challenges and opportunities to advancing understanding of how patient data, provider and patient involvement, and informatics innovations can support high-quality cancer care. PMID:21521595

  12. Flexibility as a Management Principle in Dementia Care: The Adards Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Bester, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Flexibility is an essential ingredient of person-centered care. We illustrate the potential impact of flexibility by portraying a nursing home that uses flexibility in its approach to residents and staff members. Designs and Methods: The paper describes the management strategies, principles, and environmental features used by the Adards…

  13. Integrating cancer rehabilitation into medical care at a cancer hospital.

    PubMed

    Grabois, M

    2001-08-15

    In spite of national health care legislative and model program initiatives, cancer rehabilitation has not kept pace with rehabilitation for patients with other medical problems. This article discusses, from a historical perspective, unsuccessful health care legislation related to cancer and problems in establishing and expanding cancer rehabilitation programs. The attempts to establish a cancer rehabilitation program at the Texas Medical Center and the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center are reviewed. Lessons learned over past 40 years and strategies for maintaining the success of a cancer rehabilitation program are discussed. PMID:11519034

  14. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  15. Cancer Survivorship for Primary Care Annotated Bibliography

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Matthew Y.; Overholser, Linda; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term cancer survivorship care is a relatively new and rapidly advancing field of research. Increasing cancer survivorship rates have created a huge population of long-term cancer survivors whose cancer-specific needs challenge healthcare infrastructure and highlight a significant deficit of knowledge and guidelines in transitional care from treatment to normalcy/prolonged survivorship. As the paradigm of cancer care has changed from a fixation on the curative to the maintenance on long-term overall quality of life, so to, has the delineation of responsibility between oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). As more patients enjoy long-term survival, PCPs play a more comprehensive role in cancer care following acute treatment. To this end, this annotated bibliography was written to provide PCPs and other readers with an up-to-date and robust base of knowledge on long-term cancer survivorship, including definitions and epidemiological information as well as specific considerations and recommendations on physical, psychosocial, sexual, and comorbidity needs of survivors. Additionally, significant information is included on survivorship care, specifically Survivorship Care Plans (SPCs) and their evolution, utilization by oncologists and PCPs, and current gaps, as well as an introduction to patient navigation programs. Given rapid advancements in cancer research, this bibliography is meant to serve as current baseline reference outlining the state of the science. PMID:26114091

  16. Cancer care for individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Kelly E; Henderson, David C; Knight, Helen P; Pirl, William F

    2014-02-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia are a vulnerable population that has been relatively neglected in health disparities research. Despite having an equivalent risk of developing most cancers, patients with schizophrenia are more likely to die of cancer than the general population. Cancer care disparities are likely the result of patient-, provider-, and systems-level factors and influenced by the pervasive stigma of mental illness. Individuals with schizophrenia have higher rates of health behaviors linked with cancer mortality including cigarette smoking. They also have significant medical comorbidity, are less likely to have up-to-date cancer screening, and may present at more advanced stages of illness. Patients with schizophrenia may be less likely to receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, have more postoperative complications, and have less access to palliative care. However, opportunities exist for the interdisciplinary team, including medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists; psychiatrists; and primary care physicians, to intervene throughout the continuum of cancer care to promote survival and quality of life. This review summarizes data on overall and cancer-specific mortality for individuals with schizophrenia and reviews specific disparities across the cancer care continuum of screening, diagnosis, treatment, and end-of-life care. Using a case, the authors illustrate clinical challenges for this population including communication, informed consent, and risk of suicide, and provide suggestions for care. Finally, recommendations for research to address the disparities in cancer care for individuals with schizophrenia are discussed. Despite significant challenges, with collaboration between oncology and mental health teams, individuals with schizophrenia can receive high-quality cancer care.

  17. American Cancer Society prostate cancer survivorship care guidelines.

    PubMed

    Skolarus, Ted A; Wolf, Andrew M D; Erb, Nicole L; Brooks, Durado D; Rivers, Brian M; Underwood, Willie; Salner, Andrew L; Zelefsky, Michael J; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Slovin, Susan F; Wittmann, Daniela A; Hoyt, Michael A; Sinibaldi, Victoria J; Chodak, Gerald; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer survivors approach 2.8 million in number and represent 1 in 5 of all cancer survivors in the United States. While guidelines exist for timely treatment and surveillance for recurrent disease, there is limited availability of guidelines that facilitate the provision of posttreatment clinical follow-up care to address the myriad of long-term and late effects that survivors may face. Based on recommendations set forth by a National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center expert panel, the American Cancer Society developed clinical follow-up care guidelines to facilitate the provision of posttreatment care by primary care clinicians. These guidelines were developed using a combined approach of evidence synthesis and expert consensus. Existing guidelines for health promotion, surveillance, and screening for second primary cancers were referenced when available. To promote comprehensive follow-up care and optimal health and quality of life for the posttreatment survivor, the guidelines address health promotion, surveillance for prostate cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, long-term and late effects assessment and management, psychosocial issues, and care coordination among the oncology team, primary care clinicians, and nononcology specialists. A key challenge to the development of these guidelines was the limited availability of published evidence for management of prostate cancer survivors after treatment. Much of the evidence relies on studies with small sample sizes and retrospective analyses of facility-specific and population databases.

  18. Flexible compensation of uniparental care: female poison frogs take over when males disappear

    PubMed Central

    Pašukonis, Andrius; Fitch, W. Tecumseh; Huber, Ludwig; Hödl, Walter; Ringler, Max

    2015-01-01

    Parental care systems are shaped by costs and benefits to each sex of investing into current versus future progeny. Flexible compensatory parental care is mainly known in biparental species, particularly where parental desertion or reduction of care by 1 parent is common. The other parent can then compensate this loss by either switching parental roles and/or by increasing its own parental effort. In uniparental species, desertion of the caregiver usually leads to total brood loss. In the poison frog, Allobates femoralis, obligatory tadpole transport (TT) is generally performed by males, whereas females abandon their clutches after oviposition. Nevertheless, in a natural population we previously observed 7.8% of TT performed by females, which we could link to the absence of the respective fathers. In the following experiment, under laboratory conditions, all tested A. femoralis females flexibly took over parental duties, but only when their mates were removed. Our findings provide clear evidence for compensatory flexibility in a species with unisexual parental care. Contrary to the view of amphibian parental care as being stereotypical and fixed, these results demonstrate behavioral flexibility as an adaptive response to environmental and social uncertainty. Behavioral flexibility might actually represent a crucial step in the evolutionary transition from uniparental to biparental care in poison frogs. We suspect that across animal species flexible parental roles are much more common than previously thought and suggest the idea of a 3-dimensional continuum regarding flexibility, parental involvement, and timing, when thinking about the evolution of parental care. PMID:26167099

  19. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; Manca, Donna P.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. Methods This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Main findings Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Conclusion Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still

  20. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Frontiers of cancer care in Asia-Pacific region: cancer care in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Koh, ES; Do, VT; Barton, MB

    2008-01-01

    Cancer has a significant impact on the Australian community. One in three men and one in four women will develop cancer by the age of 75. The estimated annual health expenditure due to cancer in 2000-1 in Australia was $2.7 billion, representing 5.5% of the country’s total healthcare expenditure. An historical overview of the national cancer control strategies in Australia is provided. In males, the five most common cancers in order of decreasing incidence are: prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, melanoma and lymphoma, while for Australian women, breast cancer is the most common cancer. Key epidemiologic information about these common cancers, current management issues and comprehensive national clinical practice guidelines (where available) are highlighted. Aspects of skin cancer, a particularly common cancer in the Australian environment – with a focus on melanoma – are also included. Cancer outcomes in Australia, measured by selected outcomes, are among the best in the world. However, there is still evidence of health inequalities, especially among patients residing in regional and remote areas, the indigenous population and people from lower socio-economic classes. Limitations of current cancer care practices in Australia, including provision of oncology services, resources and other access issues, as well as suggested improvements for future cancer care, are summarised. Ongoing implementation of national and state cancer control plans and evaluation of their effectiveness will be needed to pursue the goal of optimal cancer care in Australia. PMID:21611000

  2. Ageism in cancer care of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Derby, S E

    1991-07-01

    This paper explores the existence and effects of ageism on cancer care of the elderly. Cancer-related care for the elderly patient has not been given appropriate attention. Many of our present attitudes are based on how history has treated the elderly. Screening programs often neglect individuals over 65 despite the increased prevalence of cancers in this age group. Little research evaluating age-related toxicities has been conducted, and no age-related guidelines for chemotherapy administration are available. Of the three modalities (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery), surgery has made the greatest change in practice based on an understanding of the aging process. Increasing prevalence of cancer in patients over 65, coupled with a projected increase in the numbers of uninsured, will change the demographics and the economics of cancer care dramatically. Early detection and prevention programs targeted toward tomorrow's elderly, who are today in their middle years, have the potential to significantly decrease both morbidity and mortality.

  3. Biomarkers, Bundled Payments, and Colorectal Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Patrick; Raju, Gottumukkala; Rodriguez, Alma; Burke, Thomas; Hafemeister, Lisa; Hawk, Ernest; Wu, Xifeng; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the management of cancers such as colorectal cancer (CRC) are urgently needed, as such cancers continue to be one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers; CRC accounts for 21% of all cancers and is responsible for mortalities second only to lung cancer in the United States. A comprehensive science-driven approach towards markedly improved early detection/screening to efficacious targeted therapeutics with clear diagnostic and prognostic markers is essential. In addition, further changes addressing rising costs, stemming from recent health care reform measures, will be brought about in part by changes in how care is reimbursed. For oncology, the advances in genomics and biomarkers have the potential to define subsets of patients who have a prognosis or response to a particular type of therapy that differs from the mean. Better definition of a cancer’s behavior will facilitate developing care plans tailored to the patient. One method under study is episode-based payment or bundling, where one payment is made to a provider organization to cover all expenses associated with a discrete illness episode. Payments will be based on the average cost of care, with providers taking on a risk for overutilization and outliers. For providers to thrive in this environment, they will need to know what care a patient will require and the costs of that care. A science-driven “personalized approach” to cancer care has the potential to produce better outcomes with reductions in the use of ineffectual therapies and costs. This promising scenario is still in the future, but progress is being made, and the shape of things to come for cancer care in the age of genomics is becoming clearer. PMID:22893787

  4. Nutrition in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... energy. Anorexia and cachexia are common causes of malnutrition in cancer patients. Anorexia (the loss of appetite ... anorexia. Anorexia is the most common cause of malnutrition in cancer patients. Cachexia is a condition marked ...

  5. Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer, may cause spiritual distress. Religious and spiritual values are important to patients coping with cancer. Studies have shown that religious and spiritual values are important to Americans. Most American adults say that they ...

  6. Smoking in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep smoking increase their risk of having a second cancer. You have a higher risk of a second cancer if you keep smoking, whether you have ... or not smoking-related. The risk of a second cancer may last for up to 20 years, ...

  7. Primary Care of the Prostate Cancer Survivor.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Erika M; Farrell, Timothy W

    2016-05-01

    This summary of the American Cancer Society Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines targets primary care physicians who coordinate care of prostate cancer survivors with subspecialists. Prostate cancer survivors should undergo prostate-specific antigen screening every six to 12 months and digital rectal examination annually. Surveillance of patients who choose watchful waiting for their prostate cancer should be conducted by a subspecialist. Any hematuria or rectal bleeding must be thoroughly evaluated. Prostate cancer survivors should be screened regularly for urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Patients with predominant urge incontinence symptoms, which can occur after surgical and radiation treatments, may benefit from an anticholinergic agent. If there is difficulty with bladder emptying, a trial of an alpha blocker may be considered. A phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor can effectively treat sexual dysfunction following treatment for prostate cancer. Osteoporosis screening should occur before initiation of androgen deprivation therapy, and patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy should be monitored for anemia, metabolic syndrome, and vasomotor symptoms. Healthy lifestyle choices should be encouraged, including weight management, regular physical activity, proper nutrition, and smoking cessation. Primary care physicians should be vigilant for psychosocial distress, including depression, among prostate cancer survivors, as well as the potential impact of this distress on patients' family members and partners. PMID:27175954

  8. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27002678

  9. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  10. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals.

  11. Polyaniline modified flexible conducting paper for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Sen, Anindita; Kumar, Suveen; Augustine, Shine; Yadav, Birendra K.; Mishra, Sandeep; Malhotra, Bansi D.

    2016-05-01

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a flexible, disposable, and label free biosensing platform for detection of the cancer biomarker (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). Polyaniline (PANI) has been electrochemically deposited over gold sputtered paper (Au@paper) for covalent immobilization of monoclonal carcinoembryonic antibodies (anti-CEA). The bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been used for blocking nonspecific binding sites at the anti-CEA conjugated PANI/Au@Paper. The PANI/Au@Paper, anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper, and BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper platforms have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance techniques. The results of the electrochemical response studies indicate that this BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@paper electrode has sensitivity of 13.9 μA ng-1 ml cm2, shelf life of 22 days, and can be used to estimate CEA in the range of 2-20 ng ml-1. This paper sensor has been validated by detection of CEA in serum samples of cancer patients via immunoassay technique.

  12. Childhood cancer survivor care: development of the Passport for Care.

    PubMed

    Poplack, David G; Fordis, Michael; Landier, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita; Hudson, Melissa M; Horowitz, Marc E

    2014-12-01

    Survivors of childhood cancer are at risk of long-term adverse effects and late effects of the disease and/or its treatment. In response to national recommendations to improve evidence-based follow-up care, a web-based support system for clinical decision making, the Passport for Care (PFC), was developed for use at the point of care to produce screening recommendations individualized to the survivor. To date, the PFC has been implemented in over half of the nearly 200 clinics affiliated with the Children's Oncology Group across the USA. Most clinician users report that the PFC has been integrated into clinic workflows, and that it fosters improved conversations with survivors about the potential late effects a survivor might experience and about the screening and/or behavioural interventions recommended to improve health status. Furthermore, clinicians using the PFC have indicated that they adhered more closely to follow-up care guidelines. Perspectives on the challenges encountered and lessons learned during the development and deployment of the PFC are reviewed and contrasted with other nationwide approaches to the provision of guidance on survivor follow-up care; furthermore, the implications for the care of childhood cancer survivors are discussed.

  13. [Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients. The Italian Association of Medical Oncologists published in 2013 the update of the first edition of the Psychosocial Guidelines for the care of cancer patients. The guidelines, produced by a multidisciplinary group (medical doctors, nurses, oncologists, psychologists and patients) aim at recognizing the importance of psychosocial care in helping the patients and their relatives to overcome the effects of the diagnosis and the treatments on mental health and emotional wellbeing. In some cases the evidences available are not as hard as those supporting drug treatments: many outcomes such as the effectiveness of educational interventions, the patients' wellbeing, thrust, perception of support, for their nature and complexity require both quantitative and qualitative measurements. Lack of robust evidences such as those obtained from clinical trials, does not necessarily correspond to lack of effectiveness of the intervention nor should make us forget that patients' rights (to good care, information and support) should be guaranteed. PMID:24441468

  14. [Palliative Care for Non-cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Ikegaki, Junichi

    2016-03-01

    Although palliative care has been developed and implemented as care for cancer pain, it is holistic care for suffering that includes physical, psychosocial and spiritual pain of life-threatening illness. It turned out that non-cancer patients in the end-stage are also suffering from various pain that should be treated as cancer patients. Trajectories of illness in non-cancer patients are with more gradual decline than those of cancer patients with steady progression and it is often difficult to make decision about end-of-life. The purpose of advance care planning was originally to help describe legal documents. This process is proved to contribute to improving QOL of patients and their families to discuss preference, hope, economic problems, spiritual question as well as medical treatment In Japan guideline of decision making process in end-of-life stage has been established. A program of communication training in end-of-life discussion has been made. Under current situation some comments on the role of anesthesiologists are also mentioned. PMID:27097506

  15. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines.

    PubMed

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Erb, Nicole L; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer K; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cannady, Rachel S; Wong, Sandra L; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April L; Stein, Kevin D; Sharpe, Katherine B; Brooks, Durado D; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women and second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined in the United States (US). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years after diagnosis. Considering the recent decline in both incidence and mortality, the prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with the increase in rates of CRC screening, further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the US population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short-term and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns after treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The guidelines in this article are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy. PMID:26348643

  16. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines.

    PubMed

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Erb, Nicole L; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer K; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cannady, Rachel S; Wong, Sandra L; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April L; Stein, Kevin D; Sharpe, Katherine B; Brooks, Durado D; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women and second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined in the United States (US). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years after diagnosis. Considering the recent decline in both incidence and mortality, the prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with the increase in rates of CRC screening, further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the US population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short-term and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns after treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The guidelines in this article are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy.

  17. Cancer care management through a mobile phone health approach: key considerations.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2013-01-01

    Greater use of mobile phone devices seems inevitable because the health industry and cancer care are facing challenges such as resource constraints, rising care costs, the need for immediate access to healthcare data of types such as audio video texts for early detection and treatment of patients and increasing remote aids in telemedicine. Physicians, in order to study the causes of cancer, detect cancer earlier, act in prevention measures, determine the effectiveness of treatment and specify the reasons for the treatment ineffectiveness, need to access accurate, comprehensive and timely cancer data. Mobile devices provide opportunities and can play an important role in consulting, diagnosis, treatment, and quick access to health information. There easy carriage make them perfect tools for healthcare providers in cancer care management. Key factors in cancer care management systems through a mobile phone health approach must be considered such as human resources, confidentiality and privacy, legal and ethical issues, appropriate ICT and provider infrastructure and costs in general aspects and interoperability, human relationships, types of mobile devices and telecommunication related points in specific aspects. The successful implementation of mobile-based systems in cancer care management will constantly face many challenges. Hence, in applying mobile cancer care, involvement of users and considering their needs in all phases of project, providing adequate bandwidth, preparation of standard tools that provide maximum mobility and flexibility for users, decreasing obstacles to interrupt network communications, and using suitable communication protocols are essential. It is obvious that identifying and reducing barriers and strengthening the positive points will have a significant role in appropriate planning and promoting the achievements of mobile cancer care systems. The aim of this article is to explain key points which should be considered in designing

  18. CancerLinQ and the future of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W; Miller, Robert S; Hauser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Patients, health care providers, and payers all have a similar interest in a health care system that is both efficient and intelligent. The attributes of such a system are widely recognized: we want a system that provides widespread access to consistently high-quality, science-based medical care; we want that system to be efficient, avoiding unnecessary waste, while delivering the right treatments to the right patients in a timely fashion; we want a system that allows us to both learn from our experience and generate new knowledge that will inform future treatment options; and we want a system that is compassionate and caring. What we want from a health care system often runs up against real-life obstacles and challenges: a fragmented delivery system, varying levels (or lack of) insurance, a growing burden of regulation and paperwork, and an increasingly complex understanding of tumor biology and the therapeutic approaches derived from this biology. New challenges are on the horizon-emerging genomic and imaging technology, with their enormous cognitive and data burdens, and a looming demographic challenge, where inadequate personnel resources face an aging population and an explosion of new treatments. Not all problems have technologic solutions, but many of the issues described above have potential solutions related to information technology. ASCO's CancerLinQ, described in this article, is an evolving attempt by the Society to improve the quality and efficiency of cancer care, while supporting education and research in the cancer field.

  19. CancerLinQ and the future of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W; Miller, Robert S; Hauser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Patients, health care providers, and payers all have a similar interest in a health care system that is both efficient and intelligent. The attributes of such a system are widely recognized: we want a system that provides widespread access to consistently high-quality, science-based medical care; we want that system to be efficient, avoiding unnecessary waste, while delivering the right treatments to the right patients in a timely fashion; we want a system that allows us to both learn from our experience and generate new knowledge that will inform future treatment options; and we want a system that is compassionate and caring. What we want from a health care system often runs up against real-life obstacles and challenges: a fragmented delivery system, varying levels (or lack of) insurance, a growing burden of regulation and paperwork, and an increasingly complex understanding of tumor biology and the therapeutic approaches derived from this biology. New challenges are on the horizon-emerging genomic and imaging technology, with their enormous cognitive and data burdens, and a looming demographic challenge, where inadequate personnel resources face an aging population and an explosion of new treatments. Not all problems have technologic solutions, but many of the issues described above have potential solutions related to information technology. ASCO's CancerLinQ, described in this article, is an evolving attempt by the Society to improve the quality and efficiency of cancer care, while supporting education and research in the cancer field. PMID:23714566

  20. Proteomic contributions to personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Koomen, John M; Haura, Eric B; Bepler, Gerold; Sutphen, Rebecca; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R; Benson, Kaaron; Hussein, Mohamad; Hazlehurst, Lori A; Yeatman, Timothy J; Hildreth, Lynne T; Sellers, Thomas A; Jacobsen, Paul B; Fenstermacher, David A; Dalton, William S

    2008-10-01

    Cancer impacts each patient and family differently. Our current understanding of the disease is primarily limited to clinical hallmarks of cancer, but many specific molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Genetic markers can be used to determine predisposition to tumor development, but molecularly targeted treatment strategies that improve patient prognosis are not widely available for most cancers. Individualized care plans, also described as personalized medicine, still must be developed by understanding and implementing basic science research into clinical treatment. Proteomics holds great promise in contributing to the prevention and cure of cancer because it provides unique tools for discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. As such, proteomics can help translate basic science discoveries into the clinical practice of personalized medicine. Here we describe how biological mass spectrometry and proteome analysis interact with other major patient care and research initiatives and present vignettes illustrating efforts in discovery of diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, development of treatment strategies in lung cancer, and monitoring prognosis and relapse in multiple myeloma patients.

  1. Challenges of Rural Cancer Care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Mary; Schlichting, Jennifer; Chioreso, Catherine; Ward, Marcia; Vikas, Praveen

    2015-09-01

    Rural cancer patients face many challenges in receiving care, including limited availability of cancer treatments and cancer support providers (oncologists, social workers, mental healthcare providers, palliative care specialists, etc), transportation barriers, financial issues, and limited access to clinical trials. Oncologists and other cancer care providers experience parallel challenges in delivering care to their rural cancer patients. Although no one approach fully addresses the many challenges of rural cancer care, a number of promising strategies and interventions have been developed that transcend the issues associated with long travel distances. These include outreach clinics, virtual tumor boards, teleoncology and other telemedicine applications, workforce recruitment and retention initiatives, and provider and patient education programs. Given the projected increase in demand for cancer care due to the aging population and increasing number of Americans with health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, expansion of these efforts and development of new approaches are critical to ensure access to high-quality care. PMID:26384798

  2. Private payers and cancer care: land of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ira; Kolodziej, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The costs of cancer care are unsustainable in the present US health care system. Private payers have taken a leading role in oncology payment reform. This benefits all payers, including the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Private payers' ability to set up systems of measurement and quality improvement is a strategy to support pay-for-value contracting. This facilitates workflow changes in oncology office practice as a way to bend the cost trends while enhancing patient care. Oncology practitioners demand speed and flexibility in deploying customized information technology solutions in exchange for new contracting terms. Pathway and guideline support tools have been proven effective in validating the use of evidence-based medicine and in systematizing office operations to reduce avoidable costs. The future of oncology practice should see further enhancement of these capabilities. A common health information exchange pipeline will allow patients, physicians, and other health care providers to share structured information from multiple electronic medical record/electronic health record platforms. By allowing multiple payers, including CMS, to access commonly accepted clinical decision support rules, any payer can create contracts and relationships with oncology practices. In this manner, future changes in payment for oncology services mandated by CMS can be sustained within the infrastructures being built today through payer-provider collaborations. PMID:24084888

  3. Patients’ experiences with continuity of cancer care in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Manca, Donna P.; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore patient perspectives on and experiences with the coordination and continuity of cancer care. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants Thirty-eight breast and colorectal cancer survivors 1 to 4 years after diagnosis. Methods Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with the participants. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and proofread. Transcripts were reviewed to create a focused coding scheme that was used to develop categories for participants’ experiences. Main findings Although this study focused on the continuity of cancer care, patients described their experiences with cancer care in general, concentrating predominantly on their relationships with individual health care providers (HCPs). Based on patients’ experiences, several themes were identified as the core components of providing good continuity and well coordinated care. The most important overarching theme was communication, which overlapped with 4 other themes: patient-HCP relationships, the role of HCPs, lack of access to care, and timely and tailored information. Conclusion Patients believed that good communication between HCPs and patients was key to improving the overall continuity of cancer care. Continuity of care is an important theoretical concept in cancer care, but it is not easily recognized by patients. They perceive the cancer care continuum and continuity of care as cancer care in general, which is typically framed by the individual relationships with their HCPs. Future research and interventions need to focus on finding and testing ways to improve communication to enhance continuity of cancer care. PMID:27737982

  4. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Surbone, Antonella

    2008-03-01

    Cultural competence in oncology requires the acquisition of specific knowledge, clinical skills, and attitudes that facilitate effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting, thus, leading to improved therapeutic outcomes and decreased disparities in cancer care. Cultural competence in oncology entails a basic knowledge of different cultural attitudes and practices of communication of the truth and of decision-making styles throughout the world. Cultural competence always presupposes oncology professionals' awareness of their own cultural beliefs and values. To be able to communicate with cancer patients in culturally sensitive ways, oncologists should have knowledge of the concept of culture in its complexity and of the risks of racism, classism, sexism, ageism, and stereotyping that must be avoided in clinical practice. Oncologists should develop a sense of appreciation for differences in health care values, based on the recognition that no culture can claim hegemony over others and that cultures are evolving under their reciprocal influence on each other. Medical schools and oncology training can teach communication skills and cultural competence, while fostering in all students and young doctors those attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity, and awareness that are needed to deliver effective and culturally sensitive cancer care.

  5. Virtual multidisciplinary teams for cancer care.

    PubMed

    Axford, A T; Askill, C; Jones, A J

    2002-01-01

    A recent report on cancer services in Wales recommended an integrated cancer service. The proposed model was difficult to introduce in rural areas, where health-care sites and staff are far apart. Videoconferencing equipment was installed in the Singleton Hospital, Swansea, and the Bronglais General Hospital, Aberystwyth, 120 km away. During the first year, 42 videoconferencing multidisciplinary team meetings were held using ISDN at 384 kbit/s. A total of 202 cases were reviewed. The cancers were colorectal, breast and lung. There was only one aborted session, which was due to an ISDN line fault. The average attendance at the meetings was 15 staff, of whom eight were essential team members. Regular multidisciplinary team meetings reduced the need for patients to travel. They also increased access to expert opinion and reduced the delay in implementing treatment.

  6. Palliative care in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all cancers and has the highest annual rate of mortality in men and women. The overall aim is cure or prolongation of life without evidence of disease. Almost 60% of patients at the moment of diagnosis are not eligible for radical treatment. Therefore soothing and supportive treatment is the only treatment of choice. Patients with lung cancer who have symptoms of dyspnea, chronic cough, severe pain, exhaustion and cachexia syndrome, fear and depression and significantly reduced physical and intellectual activities are qualified for inpatient or home palliative care. Knowledge about various methods used in palliative treatment allows one to alleviate symptoms that occur in an advanced stage of disease with an expected short survival period. Methods of oncological treatment that are often used in patients with advanced lung cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drawing attention to the earlier implementation of palliative care is an objective of research carried out during recent years. Advances in surgical and conservative treatment of these patients have contributed to better outcomes and longer survival time. PMID:24596508

  7. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  8. The Value of Continuity between Primary Care and Surgical Care in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving continuity between primary care and cancer care is critical for improving cancer outcomes and curbing cancer costs. A dimension of continuity, we investigated how regularly patients receive their primary care and surgical care for colon cancer from the same hospital and whether this affects mortality and costs. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Registry (SEER)-Medicare data, we performed a retrospective cohort study of stage I-III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. There were 23,305 stage I-III colon cancer patients who received primary care in the year prior to diagnosis and underwent operative care for colon cancer. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their surgery and to their primary care provider’s main hospital, and then classified according to whether these two hospitals were same or different. Outcomes examined were hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazard for colon cancer specific mortality, and generalized linear estimate for costs at 12 months, from propensity score matched models. Results Fifty-two percent of stage I-III colon patients received primary care and surgical care from the same hospital. Primary care and surgical care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality, but was associated with lower inpatient, outpatient, and total costs of care. Total cost difference was $8,836 (95% CI $2,746–$14,577), a 20% reduction in total median cost of care at 12 months. Conclusions Receiving primary care and surgical care at the same hospital, compared to different hospitals, was associated with lower costs but still similar survival among stage I-III colon cancer patients. Nonetheless, health care policy which encourages further integration between primary care and cancer care in order to improve outcomes and decrease costs will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving health care

  9. The intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the causes of cancer, early detection, prevention or treatment need accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The clinical laboratory provides important cancer information needed for physicians which influence clinical decisions regarding treatment, diagnosis and patient monitoring. Poor communication between health care providers and clinical laboratory personnel can lead to medical errors and wrong decisions in providing cancer care. Because of the key impact of laboratory information on cancer diagnosis and treatment the quality of the tests, lab reports, and appropriate lab management are very important. A laboratory information management system (LIMS) can have an important role in diagnosis, fast and effective access to cancer data, decrease redundancy and costs, and facilitate the integration and collection of data from different types of instruments and systems. In spite of significant advantages LIMS is limited by factors such as problems in adaption to new instruments that may change existing work processes. Applications of intelligent software simultaneously with existing information systems, in addition to remove these restrictions, have important benefits including adding additional non-laboratory-generated information to the reports, facilitating decision making, and improving quality and productivity of cancer care services. Laboratory systems must have flexibility to change and have the capability to develop and benefit from intelligent devices. Intelligent laboratory information management systems need to benefit from informatics tools and latest technologies like open sources. The aim of this commentary is to survey application, opportunities and necessity of intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

  10. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Surbone, A

    2006-01-01

    Cancer is increasing in incidence and prevalence worldwide, and the WHO has recently included cancer and its treatments as a health priority in developed and developing countries. The cultural diversity of oncology patients is bound to increase, and cultural sensitivity and competence are now required of all oncology professionals. A culturally competent cancer care leads to improved therapeutic outcome and it may decrease disparities in medical care. Cultural competence in medicine is a complex multilayered accomplishment, requiring knowledge, skills and attitudes whose acquisition is needed for effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting. Effective cultural competence is based on knowledge of the notion of culture; on awareness of possible biases and prejudices related to stereotyping, racism, classism, sexism; on nurturing appreciation for differences in health care values; and on fostering the attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity and awareness. Cultural competence in healthcare relates to individual professionals, but also to organizations and systems. A culturally competent healthcare system must consider in their separateness and yet in there reciprocal influences social, racial and cultural factors. By providing a framework of reference to interpret the external world and relate to it, culture affects patients' perceptions of disease, disability and suffering; degrees and expressions of concern about them; their responses to treatments and their relationship to individual physicians and to the healthcare system. Culture also influences the interpretation of ethical norms and principles, and especially of individual autonomy, which can be perceived either as synonymous with freedom or with isolation depending on the cultural context. This, in turn, determines the variability of truth-telling attitudes and practices worldwide as well as the different roles of family in the information and decision-making process of

  11. Cancer care. Still no sign of winning tickets in cancer care lottery.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alison

    2005-02-01

    Postcode prescribing is still a reality in cancer services, says a public accounts committee report. Critics claim the large number of small primary care trusts is not a good model for commissioning and that money should be 'fast-tracked' through cancer networks. The report calls for a deadline to be imposed for stopping variations in drug prescribing as well as a timetable for implementing NICE guidelines.

  12. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    PubMed

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  13. Mind-body practices in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Chaoul, Alejandro; Milbury, Kathrin; Sood, Anil K; Prinsloo, Sarah; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    Being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network states that all patients be screened with the single-item distress thermometer and to also indicate the source of distress and to get appropriate referral. In addition to the many conventional approaches for managing distress from the fields of psychology and psychiatry, many patients are seeking strategies to manage their distress that are outside conventional medicine such as mind-body techniques. Mind-body techniques such as meditation, yoga, tai chi, and qigong have been found to lower distress and lead to improvements in different aspects of quality of life. It is essential that the standard of care in oncology include distress screening and the delivery of different techniques to help patients manage the psychosocial challenges of diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  14. Mind-Body Practices in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Chaoul, Alejandro; Milbury, Kathrin; Sood, Anil K.; Prinsloo, Sarah; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Being diagnosed with a life threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network states that all patients be screened with the single-item Distress Thermometer and to also indicate the source of distress and to get appropriate referral. In addition to the many conventional approaches for managing distress from the fields of psychology and psychiatry, many patients are seeking strategies to manage their distress that are outside conventional medicine such as mind-body techniques. Mind-body techniques such as meditation, yoga, tai chi, and qigong have been found to lower distress and lead to improvements in different aspects of quality of life. It is essential that the standard of care in oncology include distress screening and the delivery of different techniques to help patients manage the psychosocial challenges of diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:25325936

  15. Accountable care organizations: the case for flexible partnerships between health plans and providers.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Under the Affordable Care Act, the new Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation will guide a number of experimental programs in health care payment and delivery. Among the most ambitious of the reform models is the accountable care organization (ACO), which will offer providers economic rewards if they can reduce Medicare's cost growth in their communities. However, the dismal history of provider-led attempts to manage costs suggests that this program is unlikely to accomplish its objectives. What's more, if ACOs foster more market concentration among providers, they have the potential to shift costs onto private insurers. This paper proposes a more flexible payment model for providers and private insurers that would divide health care services into three categories: long-term, low-intensity primary care; unscheduled care, including unscheduled emergency services; and major clinical interventions that usually involve hospitalization or organized outpatient care. Each category of care would be paid for differently, with each containing different elements of financial risk for the providers. Health plans would then be encouraged to provide logistical and analytic support to providers in managing health costs in these categories. PMID:21209435

  16. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  17. Preparing for an epidemic: cancer care in an aging population.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population was charged with evaluating and proposing recommendations on how to improve the quality of cancer care, with a specific focus on the aging population. Based on their findings, the IOM committee recently released a report highlighting their 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care. Based on those recommendations, this article highlights ways to improve evidence-based care and addresses rising costs in health care for older adults with cancer. The IOM highlighted three recommendations to address the current research gaps in providing evidence-based care in older adults with cancer, which included (1) studying populations which match the age and health-risk profile of the population with the disease, (2) legislative incentives for companies to include patients that are older or with multiple morbidities in new cancer drug trials, and (3) expansion of research that contributes to the depth and breadth of data available for assessing interventions. The recommendations also highlighted the need to maintain affordable and accessible care for older adults with cancer, with an emphasis on finding creative solutions within both the care delivery system and payment models in order to balance costs while preserving quality of care. The implementation of the IOM's recommendations will be a key step in moving closer to the goal of providing accessible, affordable, evidence-based, high-quality care to all patients with cancer.

  18. [Breast cancer: patient care, rehabilitation, psychooncology].

    PubMed

    Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, István; Molnár, Mária; Rohánszky, Magda; Koncz, Zsuzsa; Mailáth, Mónika; Kapitány, Zsuzsanna; Dudás, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The development of a recommendation was intended for the follow-up of breast cancer patients treated with curative intent in Hungary. Follow-up includes the permanent contact with and health education of the patient, the surveillance and control of the adverse effects of oncological therapies or radiotherapy, the screening of metachron cancers, and the comprehensive (physical, psychological and social) rehabilitation of the patient. The early detection of local/regional tumor relapse is essential with careful follow-up, but there is no need for screening of distant metastases by means of imaging studies or tumor marker tests. If adjuvant endocrine therapy is needed, optimal adherence should be ensured with supportive therapy. In rare cases, special issues such as breast cancer risk/genetic mutation, pregnancy are raised, which should be thoughtfully discussed in view of recent advances in oncology. Follow-up is generally practised by the oncologist, however, in some cases the social worker, the physiotherapist, the psychooncologist, or in special cases, the lymphoedema expert is to be involved. The follow-up approach should be comprehensive and holistic. PMID:27579724

  19. Health reforms as examples of multilevel interventions in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Flood, Ann B; Fennell, Mary L; Devers, Kelly J

    2012-05-01

    To increase access and improve system quality and efficiency, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act with sweeping changes to the nation's health-care system. Although not intended to be specific to cancer, the act's implementation will profoundly impact cancer care. Its components will influence multiple levels of the health-care environment including states, communities, health-care organizations, and individuals seeking care. To illustrate these influences, two reforms are considered: 1) accountable care organizations and 2) insurance-based reforms to gather evidence about effectiveness. We discuss these reforms using three facets of multilevel interventions: 1) their intended and unintended consequences, 2) the importance of timing, and 3) their implications for cancer. The success of complex health reforms requires understanding the scientific basis and evidence for carrying out such multilevel interventions. Conversely and equally important, successful implementation of multilevel interventions depends on understanding the political setting and goals of health-care reform.

  20. Quality measurement and system change of cancer care delivery.

    PubMed

    Haggstrom, David A; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2011-12-01

    Cancer care quality measurement and system change may serve as a case example for larger possibilities in the health care system related to other diseases. Cancer care quality gaps and variation exist across both technical and patient-centered cancer quality measures, especially among vulnerable populations. There is a need to develop measures that address the following dimensions of quality and its context: disparities, overuse, patient-centeredness, and uncertainty. Developments that may promote system change in cancer care delivery include changes in the information market, organizational accountability, and consumer empowerment. Information market changes include public cancer care quality reporting, enabled by health information exchange, and incentivized by pay-for-performance. Moving organizational accountability, reimbursement, and quality measurement from individual episodes of care to multiple providers providing coordinated cancer care may address quality gaps associated with the fragmentation of care delivery. Consumer empowerment through new technologies, such as personal health records, may lead to the collection of patient-centered quality measures and promote patient self-management. Across all of these developments, leadership and ongoing research to guide informed system changes will be necessary to transform the cancer care delivery system.

  1. Flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy training for primary care physicians: results of a 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Schertz, R D; Baskin, W N; Frakes, J T

    1989-01-01

    The first 5 years of a flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy (FFS) training program for primary care physicians was analyzed in an attempt to assess clinical competence and develop a procedure learning curve. A total of 47 primary care physicians (26 third-year family practice residents, 15 family practitioners, and 6 internists) were successfully trained in 60-cm FFS by five gastroenterologists. Didactic teaching methods included 5 hours of videotapes, slides, endoscopic models, and the use of a photo atlas. Following a patient demonstration, each trainee completed 25 examinations supervised with a teaching attachment. Criteria used to assess trainee competence included unassisted length of scope insertion and examination duration. Mean depth of scope insertion was 35.9 cm for the first five examinations, increasing to a mean of 51.7 cm for the final five examinations. Average examination duration decreased from 19.1 min for examinations 1 through 5 to 17.0 min for examinations 21 through 25. Out of 1236 examinations, one or more polyps were found in 222 patients (18.0%). Carcinoma was found in 15 of 1236 examinations (1.4%). In summary, experienced endoscopists can teach primary care physicians to perform 60-cm FFS. Completion of 25 supervised cases appears to be adequate for achieving technical competence in flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy.

  2. Interpretive Flexibility in Mobile Health: Lessons From a Government-Sponsored Home Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Mathiassen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile technologies have emerged as important tools that health care personnel can use to gain easy access to client data anywhere. This is particularly useful for nurses and care workers in home health care as they provide services to clients in many different settings. Although a growing body of evidence supports the use of mobile technologies, the diverse implications of mobile health have yet to be fully documented. Objective Our objective was to examine a large-scale government-sponsored mobile health implementation program in the Danish home care sector and to understand how the technology was used differently across home care agencies. Methods We chose to perform a longitudinal case study with embedded units of analysis. We included multiple data sources, such as written materials, a survey to managers across all 98 Danish municipalities, and semistructured interviews with managers, care workers, and nurses in three selected home care agencies. We used process models of change to help analyze the overall implementation process from a longitudinal perspective and to identify antecedent conditions, key events, and practical outcomes. Results Strong collaboration between major stakeholders in the Danish home care sector (government bodies, vendors, consultants, interest organizations, and managers) helped initiate and energize the change process, and government funding supported quick and widespread technology adoption. However, although supported by the same government-sponsored program, mobile technology proved to have considerable interpretive flexibility with variation in perceived nature of technology, technology strategy, and technology use between agencies. What was first seen as a very promising innovation across the Danish home care sector subsequently became the topic of debate as technology use arrangements ran counter to existing norms and values in individual agencies. Conclusions Government-sponsored programs can have both positive and

  3. [Palliative Care for Rectal Cancer Complicated with Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takeshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kei; Muto, Takaaki

    2015-11-01

    Medical advancements have led to an increase in the number of elderly people. However, standard treatments may sometimes be difficult to use in elderly people. Here, we report the case of an elderly patient with rectal and gastric cancer who refused radical surgery. The patient was an 83-year-old man who had type-2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperuricemia, mitral valve regurgitation, and mild dementia. Furthermore, he was blind in both eyes owing to glaucoma. He first visited our hospital in 2005. In 2010, he was diagnosed with anemia, but he refused a thorough examination; however, he did consent to take iron supplements. In July 2011, he consulted our hospital for symptoms of frequent diarrhea, and agreed to an examination. After colonoscopy, he was diagnosed with rectal cancer that was becoming obstructive. There were no metastases to other organs, but he was also diagnosed with gastric cancer. As he and his family refused radical surgery, a stoma was constructed. After the operation, he received palliative care but died in September 2013. PMID:26805335

  4. Nurse Navigators in Early Cancer Care: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Edward H.; Ludman, Evette J.; Aiello Bowles, Erin J.; Penfold, Robert; Reid, Robert J.; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Chubak, Jessica; McCorkle, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether a nurse navigator intervention improves quality of life and patient experience with care for people recently given a diagnosis of breast, colorectal, or lung cancer. Patients and Methods Adults with recently diagnosed primary breast, colorectal, or lung cancer (n = 251) received either enhanced usual care (n = 118) or nurse navigator support for 4 months (n = 133) in a two-group cluster randomized, controlled trial with primary care physicians as the units of randomization. Patient-reported measures included the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–General (FACT-G) Quality of Life scale, three subscales of the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC), and selected subscales from a cancer adaptation of the Picker Institute's patient experience survey. Self-report measures were collected at baseline, 4 months, and 12 months. Automated administrative data were used to assess time to treatment and total health care costs. Results There were no significant differences between groups in FACT-G scores. Nurse navigator patients reported significantly higher scores on the PACIC and reported significantly fewer problems with care, especially psychosocial care, care coordination, and information, as measured by the Picker instrument. Cumulative costs after diagnosis did not differ significantly between groups, but lung cancer costs were $6,852 less among nurse navigator patients. Conclusion Compared with enhanced usual care, nurse navigator support for patients with cancer early in their course improves patient experience and reduces problems in care, but did not differentially affect quality of life. PMID:24276777

  5. Diet and Nutrition in Cancer Survivorship and Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Bazzan, Anthony J.; Newberg, Andrew B.; Cho, William C.; Monti, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of palliative cancer care is typically to relieve suffering and improve quality of life. Most approaches to diet in this setting have focused only on eating as many calories as possible to avoid cachexia. However, as the concept of palliative care has evolved to include all aspects of cancer survivorship and not just end of life care, there is an increasing need to thoughtfully consider diet and nutrition approaches that can impact not only quality of life but overall health outcomes and perhaps even positively affect cancer recurrence and progression. In this regard, there has been a recent emphasis in the literature on nutrition and cancer as an important factor in both quality of life and in the pathophysiology of cancer. Hence, the primary purpose of this paper is to review the current data on diet and nutrition as it pertains to a wide range of cancer patients in the palliative care setting. PMID:24288570

  6. Detecting cancer: Pearls for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Simon B; Montero, Alberto J

    2016-07-01

    Five-year survival rates have improved over the past 40 years for nearly all types of cancer, partially thanks to early detection and prevention. Since patients typically present to their primary care physician with initial symptoms, it is vital for primary care physicians to accurately diagnose common cancers and to recognize unusual presentations of highly curable cancers such as Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancers, for which the 5-year overall survival rates are greater than 85%. This paper reviews these cancers and provides clinically relevant pearls from an oncologic perspective for physicians who are the first point of contact.

  7. Detecting cancer: Pearls for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Simon B; Montero, Alberto J

    2016-07-01

    Five-year survival rates have improved over the past 40 years for nearly all types of cancer, partially thanks to early detection and prevention. Since patients typically present to their primary care physician with initial symptoms, it is vital for primary care physicians to accurately diagnose common cancers and to recognize unusual presentations of highly curable cancers such as Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancers, for which the 5-year overall survival rates are greater than 85%. This paper reviews these cancers and provides clinically relevant pearls from an oncologic perspective for physicians who are the first point of contact. PMID:27399864

  8. Cancer Risk Assessment for the Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    Korde, Larissa A.; Gadalla, Shahinaz M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Cancer risk assessment can be divided into two major categories: assessment of familial or genetic risk and assessment of environmental factors that may be causally related to cancer. Identification of individuals with a suspected heritable cancer syndrome can lead to additional evaluation and to interventions that can substantially decrease cancer risk. Special attention should also be paid to potentially modifiable cancer risk factors in the course of advising primary care patients regarding a healthy lifestyle. Clinical guidelines targeting both genetic and modifiable cancer risk factors are available, and can facilitate applying these health care principles in the primary care setting. PMID:19616151

  9. Vietnam: integrating palliative care into HIV/AIDS and cancer care.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, Eric L; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Minh; Green, Kimberly; Van Kham, Le; Khue, Luong Ngoc

    2007-05-01

    Vietnam is struggling to meet the growing need for both disease-modifying and palliative care for people with life-threatening chronic diseases such as HIV/AIDS and cancer. Recently, Vietnam initiated rapid development of a national palliative care program for HIV/AIDS and cancer patients that builds on existing palliative care programs and experience and integrates palliative care into standard HIV/AIDS and cancer care. National palliative care guidelines have been issued by the Ministry of Health based on a rapid situation analysis. Plans now call for review and revision of opioid laws and regulations to increase availability of opioids for medical use, training in palliative care for clinicians throughout the country, and development of palliative care programs both in the community and in inpatient referral centers. PMID:17482051

  10. Cancer Core Europe: a consortium to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum challenge.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, Alexander M M; Caldas, Carlos; Ringborg, Ulrik; Medema, René; Tabernero, Josep; Wiestler, Otmar

    2014-11-01

    European cancer research for a transformative initiative by creating a consortium of six leading excellent comprehensive cancer centres that will work together to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum. Prerequisites for joint translational and clinical research programs are very demanding. These require the creation of a virtual single 'e-hospital' and a powerful translational platform, inter-compatible clinical molecular profiling laboratories with a robust underlying computational biology pipeline, standardised functional and molecular imaging, commonly agreed Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for liquid and tissue biopsy procurement, storage and processing, for molecular diagnostics, 'omics', functional genetics, immune-monitoring and other assessments. Importantly also it requires a culture of data collection and data storage that provides complete longitudinal data sets to allow for: effective data sharing and common database building, and to achieve a level of completeness of data that is required for conducting outcome research, taking into account our current understanding of cancers as communities of evolving clones. Cutting edge basic research and technology development serve as an important driving force for innovative translational and clinical studies. Given the excellent track records of the six participants in these areas, Cancer Core Europe will be able to support the full spectrum of research required to address the cancer research- cancer care continuum. Cancer Core Europe also constitutes a unique environment to train the next generation of talents in innovative translational and clinical oncology. PMID:25263570

  11. Socioeconomic Considerations and Shared-Care Models of Cancer Care for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Dale, William; Chow, Selina; Sajid, Saleha

    2016-02-01

    Older adults with cancer require a geriatrics approach to treatment. Such an approach targets appropriate treatments based on physiologic, not chronologic, age. Patients older than 65 years of age constitute the largest group of patients with cancer, making them the most expensive group of patients with cancer, especially with the advent of expensive new treatments with minimal impact on overall survival. Geriatric assessment, combined with targeted inventions, can optimize the value propositions in caring for older patients with cancer. Over the past 20 years, geriatric oncology care models have emerged applying these care principles in clinical practice.

  12. Socioeconomic Considerations and Shared-Care Models of Cancer Care for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Dale, William; Chow, Selina; Sajid, Saleha

    2016-02-01

    Older adults with cancer require a geriatrics approach to treatment. Such an approach targets appropriate treatments based on physiologic, not chronologic, age. Patients older than 65 years of age constitute the largest group of patients with cancer, making them the most expensive group of patients with cancer, especially with the advent of expensive new treatments with minimal impact on overall survival. Geriatric assessment, combined with targeted inventions, can optimize the value propositions in caring for older patients with cancer. Over the past 20 years, geriatric oncology care models have emerged applying these care principles in clinical practice. PMID:26614859

  13. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, illness understanding, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We also discuss how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available.

  14. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We end by discussing how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available. PMID:26598947

  15. The expanding role of primary care in cancer control.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Greg; Berendsen, Annette; Crawford, S Michael; Dommett, Rachel; Earle, Craig; Emery, Jon; Fahey, Tom; Grassi, Luigi; Grunfeld, Eva; Gupta, Sumit; Hamilton, Willie; Hiom, Sara; Hunter, David; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Macleod, Una; Mason, Robert; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Neal, Richard D; Peake, Michael; Roland, Martin; Seifert, Bohumil; Sisler, Jeff; Sussman, Jonathan; Taplin, Stephen; Vedsted, Peter; Voruganti, Teja; Walter, Fiona; Wardle, Jane; Watson, Eila; Weller, David; Wender, Richard; Whelan, Jeremy; Whitlock, James; Wilkinson, Clare; de Wit, Niek; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2015-09-01

    The nature of cancer control is changing, with an increasing emphasis, fuelled by public and political demand, on prevention, early diagnosis, and patient experience during and after treatment. At the same time, primary care is increasingly promoted, by governments and health funders worldwide, as the preferred setting for most health care for reasons of increasing need, to stabilise health-care costs, and to accommodate patient preference for care close to home. It is timely, then, to consider how this expanding role for primary care can work for cancer control, which has long been dominated by highly technical interventions centred on treatment, and in which the contribution of primary care has been largely perceived as marginal. In this Commission, expert opinion from primary care and public health professionals with academic and clinical cancer expertise—from epidemiologists, psychologists, policy makers, and cancer specialists—has contributed to a detailed consideration of the evidence for cancer control provided in primary care and community care settings. Ranging from primary prevention to end-of-life care, the scope for new models of care is explored, and the actions needed to effect change are outlined. The strengths of primary care—its continuous, coordinated, and comprehensive care for individuals and families—are particularly evident in prevention and diagnosis, in shared follow-up and survivorship care, and in end-of-life care. A strong theme of integration of care runs throughout, and its elements (clinical, vertical, and functional) and the tools needed for integrated working are described in detail. All of this change, as it evolves, will need to be underpinned by new research and by continuing and shared multiprofessional development.

  16. Personalized prostate cancer care: from screening to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Conran, Carly A; Brendler, Charles B; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Unprecedented progress has been made in genomic personalized medicine in the last several years, allowing for more individualized healthcare assessments and recommendations than ever before. However, most of this progress in prostate cancer (PCa) care has focused on developing and selecting therapies for late-stage disease. To address this issue of limited focus, we propose a model for incorporating genomic-based personalized medicine into all levels of PCa care, from prevention and screening to diagnosis, and ultimately to the treatment of both early-stage and late-stage cancers. We have termed this strategy the “Pyramid Model” of personalized cancer care. In this perspective paper, our objective is to demonstrate the potential application of the Pyramid Model to PCa care. This proactive and comprehensive personalized cancer care approach has the potential to achieve three important medical goals: reducing mortality, improving quality of life and decreasing both individual and societal healthcare costs. PMID:27184548

  17. Patient Satisfaction With Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Brian L.; Dittus, Kim L.; Pace, Claire M.; Dulko, Dorothy; Pollack, Lori A.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Geller, Berta M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face several challenges following the completion of active treatment, including uncertainty about late effects of treatment and confusion about coordination of follow-up care. The authors evaluated patient satisfaction with personalized survivorship care plans designed to clarify those issues. The authors enrolled 48 patients with breast cancer and 10 patients with colorectal cancer who had completed treatment in the previous two months from an urban academic medical center and a rural community hospital. Patient satisfaction with the care plan was assessed by telephone interview. Overall, about 80% of patients were very or completely satisfied with the care plan, and 90% or more agreed that it was useful, it was easy to understand, and the length was appropriate. Most patients reported that the care plan was very or critically important to understanding an array of survivorship issues. However, only about half felt that it helped them better understand the roles of primary care providers and oncologists in survivorship care. The results provide evidence that patients with cancer find high value in personalized survivorship care plans, but the plans do not eliminate confusion regarding the coordination of follow-up care. Future efforts to improve care plans should focus on better descriptions of how survivorship care will be coordinated. PMID:23722604

  18. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2012 Steering Committee Report

    PubMed Central

    Beed, Gene; Owens, Gary M.; Benson, Al B.; Klein, Ira M.; Silver, Samuel M.; Beveridge, Roy A.; Malin, Jennifer; Sprandio, John D.; Deligdish, Craig K.; Mitchell, Matthew; Vogenberg, F. Randy; Fox, John; Newcomer, Lee N.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 200 oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, pharmacy benefit managers, and other healthcare stakeholders convened in Houston, TX, on March 28–31, 2012, for the Second Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The mission of the conference was to align the various perspectives around the growing need of defining value in cancer care and developing strategies to enhance patient outcomes. The AVBCC conference presented a forum for the various viewpoints from all the stakeholders across the cancer care continuum, featuring more than 20 sessions and symposia led by nearly 30 oncology leaders. The discussions focused on current trends and challenges in optimizing value in oncology by reducing or controlling cost while improving care quality and patient outcomes, introducing emerging approaches to management and tools that providers and payers are using to enhance cancer care collaboratively. The AVBCC Second Annual Conference was opened by a Steering Committee discussion of 11 panel members who attempted to define value in cancer care and articulated action steps that can help to implement value into cancer care delivery. The following summary represents highlights from the Steering Committee discussion, which was moderated by Gene Beed, MD, and Gary M. Owens, MD. PMID:24991320

  19. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2012 Steering Committee Report.

    PubMed

    Beed, Gene; Owens, Gary M; Benson, Al B; Klein, Ira M; Silver, Samuel M; Beveridge, Roy A; Malin, Jennifer; Sprandio, John D; Deligdish, Craig K; Mitchell, Matthew; Vogenberg, F Randy; Fox, John; Newcomer, Lee N

    2012-07-01

    Approximately 200 oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, pharmacy benefit managers, and other healthcare stakeholders convened in Houston, TX, on March 28-31, 2012, for the Second Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The mission of the conference was to align the various perspectives around the growing need of defining value in cancer care and developing strategies to enhance patient outcomes. The AVBCC conference presented a forum for the various viewpoints from all the stakeholders across the cancer care continuum, featuring more than 20 sessions and symposia led by nearly 30 oncology leaders. The discussions focused on current trends and challenges in optimizing value in oncology by reducing or controlling cost while improving care quality and patient outcomes, introducing emerging approaches to management and tools that providers and payers are using to enhance cancer care collaboratively. The AVBCC Second Annual Conference was opened by a Steering Committee discussion of 11 panel members who attempted to define value in cancer care and articulated action steps that can help to implement value into cancer care delivery. The following summary represents highlights from the Steering Committee discussion, which was moderated by Gene Beed, MD, and Gary M. Owens, MD. PMID:24991320

  20. Educating Health Care Professionals to Provide Institutional Changes in Cancer Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Uman, Gwen

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2006 report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition (In M. Hewitt, S. Greenfield and E. Stovall (Eds.), (pp. 9–186). Washington DC: The National Academies Press, 2006) identifies the key components of care that contribute to quality of life for the cancer survivor. As cancer survivorship care becomes an important part of quality cancer care oncology professionals need education to prepare themselves to provide this care. Survivorship care requires a varied approach depending on the survivor population, treatment regimens and care settings. The goal of this program was to encourage institutional changes that would integrate survivorship care into participating centers. An NCI-funded educational program: Survivorship Education for Quality Cancer Care provided multidiscipline two-person teams an opportunity to gain this important knowledge using a goal-directed, team approach. Educational programs were funded for yearly courses from 2006 to 2009. Survivorship care curriculum was developed using the Quality of Life Model as the core around the IOM recommendations. Baseline data was collected for all participants. Teams were followed-up at 6, 12 and 18 months postcourse for goal achievement and institutional evaluations. Comparison data from baseline to 18 months provided information on the 204 multidiscipline teams that participated over 4 years. Teams attended including administrators, social workers, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, physicians and others. Participating centers included primarily community cancer centers and academic centers followed by pediatric centers, ambulatory/physician offices and free standing cancer centers. Statistically significant changes at p=<0.05 levels were seen by 12 months postcourse related to the effectiveness, receptiveness and comfort of survivorship care in participant settings. Institutional assessments found improvement in seven domains of care that related to

  1. NCCN Task Force Report: Bone Health in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Gralow, Julie R.; Biermann, J. Sybil; Farooki, Azeez; Fornier, Monica N.; Gagel, Robert F.; Kumar, Rashmi N.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Shields, Andrew; Smith, Matthew R.; Srinivas, Sandy; Van Poznak, Catherine H.

    2011-01-01

    Bone health and maintenance of bone integrity are important components of comprehensive cancer care in both early and late stages of disease. Risk factors for osteoporosis are increased in patients with cancer, including women with chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure, those treated with aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer, men receiving androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer, and patients undergoing glucocorticoid therapy. The skeleton is a common site of metastatic cancer recurrence, and skeletal-related events are the cause of significant morbidity. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) convened a multidisciplinary task force on Bone Health in Cancer Care to discuss the progress made in identifying effective screening and therapeutic options for management of treatment-related bone loss; understanding the factors that result in bone metastases; managing skeletal metastases; and evolving strategies to reduce bone recurrences. This report summarizes presentations made at the meeting. PMID:19555589

  2. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors’ needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals’ perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Methods Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Results Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients’ perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but

  3. Documenting coordination of cancer care between primary care providers and oncology specialists in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Brouwers, Melissa C.; Vukmirovic, Marija; Tomasone, Jennifer R.; Grunfeld, Eva; Urquhart, Robin; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Walker, Melanie; Webster, Fiona; Fitch, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To report on the findings of the CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum) Casebook project, which systematically documented Canadian initiatives (ie, programs and projects) designed to improve or support coordination and continuity of cancer care between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncology specialists. Design Pan-Canadian environmental scan. Setting Canada. Participants Individuals representing the various initiatives provided data for the analysis. Methods Initiatives included in the Casebook met the following criteria: they supported coordination and collaboration between PCPs and oncology specialists; they were related to diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, or personalized medicine; and they included breast or colorectal cancer or both. Data were collected on forms that were compiled into summaries (ie, profiles) for each initiative. Casebook initiatives were organized based on the targeted stage of the cancer care continuum, jurisdiction, and strategy (ie, model of care or type of intervention) employed. Thematic analysis identified similarities and differences among employed strategies, the level of primary care engagement, implementation barriers and facilitators, and initiative evaluation. Main findings The CanIMPACT Casebook profiles 24 initiatives. Eleven initiatives targeted the survivorship stage of the cancer care continuum and 15 focused specifically on breast or colorectal cancer or both. Initiative teams implemented the following strategies: nurse patient navigation, multidisciplinary care teams, electronic communication or information systems, PCP education, and multicomponent initiatives. Initiatives engaged PCPs at various levels. Implementation barriers included lack of care standardization across jurisdictions and incompatibility among electronic communication systems. Implementation facilitators included having clinical and program leaders publicly support the initiative

  4. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Beliefs About Lung Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Jonnalagadda, Sirisha; Lin, Jenny J.; Nelson, Judith E.; Powell, Charles A.; Salazar-Schicchi, John; Berman, Andrew R.; Keller, Steven M.; Smith, Cardinale B.; Lurslurchachai, Linda; Halm, Ethan A.; Leventhal, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Background: Disparities in lung cancer treatment and palliative care are well documented. However, the mechanisms underlying these disparities are not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated racial and ethnic differences in beliefs and attitudes about lung cancer treatment and palliative care among patients receiving a new diagnosis of lung cancer. Methods: Patients were recruited from four medical centers in New York City and surveyed about their beliefs regarding lung cancer care, including disease-directed treatments, palliative and end-of-life care, and fatalistic and spiritual beliefs. We used univariate and multiple regression analyses to compare the distribution of beliefs among minority (black and Hispanic) and nonminority patients. Results: Of the 335 patients, 21% were black, 20% were Hispanic, and 59% were nonminority. Beliefs about chemotherapy and radiotherapy were similar across the three groups (P > .05), whereas black patients were more likely to believe that surgery might cause lung cancer to spread (P = .008). Fatalistic beliefs potentially affecting cancer treatment were more common among both minority groups (P ≤ .02). No significant differences were found in attitudes toward clinician communication about cancer prognosis (P > .05). However, both blacks and Hispanics were more likely to have misconceptions about advance directives and hospice care (P ≤ .02). Conclusions: Similarities and differences in beliefs about disease-directed treatment were observed between minority and nonminority patients with lung cancer. Minority patients hold more fatalistic views about the disease and misperceptions about advance care planning and hospice care. Further research is needed to assess the impact of these beliefs on decisions about lung cancer care and patient outcomes. PMID:22700777

  5. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlin, Kathy L.; Long, Margaret E.; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. Methods: This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Results: Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. Conclusions: A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health. PMID:26208166

  6. Advancing survivorship care through the National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center: developing American Cancer Society guidelines for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca; Sharpe, Katherine; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi; Willis, Anne; Gansler, Ted; Ganz, Patricia A; Edge, Stephen B; McCabe, Mary S; Stein, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    The National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center (The Survivorship Center) began in 2010 as a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the George Washington University Cancer Institute and was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Survivorship Center aims to improve the overall health and quality of life of posttreatment cancer survivors. One key to addressing the needs of this ever-growing population is to develop clinical follow-up care guidelines that emphasize not only the importance of surveillance for cancer recurrence, but also address the assessment and management of the physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects that may result from having cancer and undergoing cancer treatment as well as highlight the importance of healthy behaviors that can reduce the risk of cancer recurrence, second primary cancers, and other chronic diseases. Currently, The Survivorship Center is coordinating the work of experts in oncology, primary care, and other health care professions to develop follow-up care guidelines for 10 priority cancer sites.

  7. The organization of multidisciplinary care teams: modeling internal and external influences on cancer care quality.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Mary L; Das, Irene Prabhu; Clauser, Steven; Petrelli, Nicholas; Salner, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Quality cancer treatment depends upon careful coordination between multiple treatments and treatment providers, the exchange of technical information, and regular communication between all providers and physician disciplines involved in treatment. This article will examine a particular type of organizational structure purported to regularize and streamline the communication between multiple specialists and support services involved in cancer treatment: the multidisciplinary treatment care (MDC) team. We present a targeted review of what is known about various types of MDC team structures and their impact on the quality of treatment care, and we outline a conceptual model of the connections between team context, structure, process, and performance and their subsequent effects on cancer treatment care processes and patient outcomes. Finally, we will discuss future research directions to understand how MDC teams improve patient outcomes and how characteristics of team structure, culture, leadership, and context (organizational setting and local environment) contribute to optimal multidisciplinary cancer care.

  8. Delivering Flexible Education and Training to Health Professionals: Caring for Older Adults in Disasters.

    PubMed

    Altman, Brian A; Gulley, Kelly H; Rossi, Carlo; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Schor, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    The National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health (NCDMPH), in collaboration with over 20 subject matter experts, created a competency-based curriculum titled Caring for Older Adults in Disasters: A Curriculum for Health Professionals. Educators and trainers of health professionals are the target audience for this curriculum. The curriculum was designed to provide breadth of content yet flexibility for trainers to tailor lessons, or select particular lessons, for the needs of their learners and organizations. The curriculum covers conditions present in the older adult population that may affect their disaster preparedness, response, and recovery; issues related to specific types of disasters; considerations for the care of older adults throughout the disaster cycle; topics related to specific settings in which older adults receive care; and ethical and legal considerations. An excerpt of the final capstone lesson is included. These capstone activities can be used in conjunction with the curriculum or as part of stand-alone preparedness training. This article describes the development process, elements of each lesson, the content covered, and options for use of the curriculum in education and training for health professionals. The curriculum is freely available online at the NCDMPH website at http://ncdmph.usuhs.edu (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:633-637). PMID:27109606

  9. Delivering Flexible Education and Training to Health Professionals: Caring for Older Adults in Disasters.

    PubMed

    Altman, Brian A; Gulley, Kelly H; Rossi, Carlo; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Schor, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    The National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health (NCDMPH), in collaboration with over 20 subject matter experts, created a competency-based curriculum titled Caring for Older Adults in Disasters: A Curriculum for Health Professionals. Educators and trainers of health professionals are the target audience for this curriculum. The curriculum was designed to provide breadth of content yet flexibility for trainers to tailor lessons, or select particular lessons, for the needs of their learners and organizations. The curriculum covers conditions present in the older adult population that may affect their disaster preparedness, response, and recovery; issues related to specific types of disasters; considerations for the care of older adults throughout the disaster cycle; topics related to specific settings in which older adults receive care; and ethical and legal considerations. An excerpt of the final capstone lesson is included. These capstone activities can be used in conjunction with the curriculum or as part of stand-alone preparedness training. This article describes the development process, elements of each lesson, the content covered, and options for use of the curriculum in education and training for health professionals. The curriculum is freely available online at the NCDMPH website at http://ncdmph.usuhs.edu (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:633-637).

  10. [Palliative care to adolescents with cancer: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Remedi, Patrícia Pereira; Mello, Débora Faleiros de; Menossi, Maria José; Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia de

    2009-01-01

    Providing care to adolescents with cancer in the process of death and dying has been a great challenge for health professionals. This challenge is marked by a high emotional burden and specificities of this stage of human development. The purpose of the present study was to review the scientific literature regarding palliative care to adolescents with cancer. This study is a literature review, which data collection was performed using Lilacs, Medline, and PsycInfo, in addition to non-systematic databases. An analysis of the manuscripts revealed three themes: adolescence and its different definitions; the particularities of adolescents with cancer; and palliative care to adolescents with cancer. The study showed there is a scarcity of evidenced-based research defining the panorama of symptoms affecting the quality of life during palliative care and an absence of specific programs in the stage of fast changes that, alone, demand for adaptive efforts.

  11. Corruption in health-care systems and its effect on cancer care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Saskia; Njuguna, Festus; Olbara, Gilbert; Sindano, Solomon; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Supriyadi, Eddy; Kaspers, Gertjan

    2015-08-01

    At the government, hospital, and health-care provider level, corruption plays a major role in health-care systems in Africa. The returns on health investments of international financial institutions, health organisations, and donors might be very low when mismanagement and dysfunctional structures of health-care systems are not addressed. More funding might even aggravate corruption. We discuss corruption and its effects on cancer care within the African health-care system in a sociocultural context. The contribution of high-income countries in stimulating corruption is also described. Corrupt African governments cannot be expected to take the initiative to eradicate corruption. Therefore, international financial institutions, health organisations, and financial donors should use their power to demand policy reforms of health-care systems in Africa troubled by the issue of corruption. These modifications will ameliorate the access and quality of cancer care for patients across the continent, and ultimately improve the outcome of health care to all patients. PMID:26248847

  12. Corruption in health-care systems and its effect on cancer care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Saskia; Njuguna, Festus; Olbara, Gilbert; Sindano, Solomon; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Supriyadi, Eddy; Kaspers, Gertjan

    2015-08-01

    At the government, hospital, and health-care provider level, corruption plays a major role in health-care systems in Africa. The returns on health investments of international financial institutions, health organisations, and donors might be very low when mismanagement and dysfunctional structures of health-care systems are not addressed. More funding might even aggravate corruption. We discuss corruption and its effects on cancer care within the African health-care system in a sociocultural context. The contribution of high-income countries in stimulating corruption is also described. Corrupt African governments cannot be expected to take the initiative to eradicate corruption. Therefore, international financial institutions, health organisations, and financial donors should use their power to demand policy reforms of health-care systems in Africa troubled by the issue of corruption. These modifications will ameliorate the access and quality of cancer care for patients across the continent, and ultimately improve the outcome of health care to all patients.

  13. The Role of Mobile Technologies in Health Care Processes: The Case of Cancer Supportive Care

    PubMed Central

    Cucciniello, Maria; Guerrazzi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care systems are gradually moving toward new models of care based on integrated care processes shared by different care givers and on an empowered role of the patient. Mobile technologies are assuming an emerging role in this scenario. This is particularly true in care processes where the patient has a particularly enhanced role, as is the case of cancer supportive care. Objective This paper aims to review existing studies on the actual role and use of mobile technology during the different stages of care processes, with particular reference to cancer supportive care. Methods We carried out a review of literature with the aim of identifying studies related to the use of mHealth in cancer care and cancer supportive care. The final sample size consists of 106 records. Results There is scant literature concerning the use of mHealth in cancer supportive care. Looking more generally at cancer care, we found that mHealth is mainly used for self-management activities carried out by patients. The main tools used are mobile devices like mobile phones and tablets, but remote monitoring devices also play an important role. Text messaging technologies (short message service, SMS) have a minor role, with the exception of middle income countries where text messaging plays a major role. Telehealth technologies are still rarely used in cancer care processes. If we look at the different stages of health care processes, we can see that mHealth is mainly used during the treatment of patients, especially for self-management activities. It is also used for prevention and diagnosis, although to a lesser extent, whereas it appears rarely used for decision-making and follow-up activities. Conclusions Since mHealth seems to be employed only for limited uses and during limited phases of the care process, it is unlikely that it can really contribute to the creation of new care models. This under-utilization may depend on many issues, including the need for it to be embedded

  14. The American Cancer Society and the American Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Otis W

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is in critical condition. Costs are rising to the point that the high price of health care is a threat to the U.S. economy. In 2010, health care was more than 17% of the gross domestic product, and if it continues to rise at current rates, health care will become more than 25% of the overall U.S. economy. This growth rate is not sustainable. While U.S. per capita costs are the highest of any country worldwide, quality is varied. Indeed, American health care outcomes for cancer and other diseases are inferior to several European countries with far lower per capita costs. The truth is many Americans cannot afford adequate health care, and health care is rationed in the U.S. While many do not get the health care they need, some are actually harmed by overconsumption of unnecessary health care. These Americans are treated outside of established guidelines and get unnecessary procedures and take unnecessary medications. A substantial number of Americans are supportive of health care reform with the goal of getting needed, high-quality health care to those Americans who currently do not get it. The American Cancer Society is committed to using the established scientific methods of epidemiology to define the problems and identify possible solutions. We are committed proponents of the rational, evidence-based use of health care to avoid the wasteful and inefficient rationing of health care.

  15. NCCN Task Force Report: Bone Health In Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Gralow, Julie R; Biermann, J Sybil; Farooki, Azeez; Fornier, Monica N; Gagel, Robert F; Kumar, Rashmi; Litsas, Georgia; McKay, Rana; Podoloff, Donald A; Srinivas, Sandy; Van Poznak, Catherine H

    2013-08-01

    Bone health and maintenance of bone integrity are important components of comprehensive cancer care. Many patients with cancer are at risk for therapy-induced bone loss, with resultant osteoporotic fractures, or skeletal metastases, which may result in pathologic fractures, hypercalcemia, bone pain, and decline in motility and performance status. Effective screening and timely interventions are essential for reducing bone-related morbidity. Management of long-term bone health requires a broad knowledge base. A multidisciplinary health care team may be needed for optimal assessment and treatment of bone-related issues in patients with cancer. Since publication of the previous NCCN Task Force Report: Bone Health in Cancer Care in 2009, new data have emerged on bone health and treatment, prompting NCCN to convene this multidisciplinary task force to discuss the progress made in optimizing bone health in patients with cancer. In December 2012, the panel members provided didactic presentations on various topics, integrating expert judgment with a review of the key literature. This report summarizes issues surrounding bone health in cancer care presented and discussed during this NCCN Bone Health in Cancer Care Task Force meeting.

  16. Delivery of affordable and equitable cancer care in India.

    PubMed

    Pramesh, C S; Badwe, Rajendra A; Borthakur, Bibhuti B; Chandra, Madhu; Raj, Elluswami Hemanth; Kannan, T; Kalwar, Ashok; Kapoor, Sanjay; Malhotra, Hemant; Nayak, Sukdev; Rath, Goura K; Sagar, T G; Sebastian, Paul; Sarin, Rajiv; Shanta, V; Sharma, Suresh C; Shukla, Shilin; Vijayakumar, Manavalan; Vijaykumar, D K; Aggarwal, Ajay; Purushotham, Arnie; Sullivan, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The delivery of affordable and equitable cancer care is one of India's greatest public health challenges. Public expenditure on cancer in India remains below US$10 per person (compared with more than US$100 per person in high-income countries), and overall public expenditure on health care is still only slightly above 1% of gross domestic product. Out-of-pocket payments, which account for more than three-quarters of cancer expenditures in India, are one of the greatest threats to patients and families, and a cancer diagnosis is increasingly responsible for catastrophic expenditures that negatively affect not only the patient but also the welfare and education of several generations of their family. We explore the complex nature of cancer care systems across India, from state to government levels, and address the crucial issues of infrastructure, manpower shortages, and the pressing need to develop cross-state solutions to prevention and early detection of cancer, in addition to governance of the largely unregulated private sector and the cost of new technologies and drugs. We discuss the role of public insurance schemes, the need to develop new political mandates and authority to set priorities, the necessity to greatly improve the quality of care, and the drive to understand and deliver cost-effective cancer care programmes.

  17. Delivery of affordable and equitable cancer care in India.

    PubMed

    Pramesh, C S; Badwe, Rajendra A; Borthakur, Bibhuti B; Chandra, Madhu; Raj, Elluswami Hemanth; Kannan, T; Kalwar, Ashok; Kapoor, Sanjay; Malhotra, Hemant; Nayak, Sukdev; Rath, Goura K; Sagar, T G; Sebastian, Paul; Sarin, Rajiv; Shanta, V; Sharma, Suresh C; Shukla, Shilin; Vijayakumar, Manavalan; Vijaykumar, D K; Aggarwal, Ajay; Purushotham, Arnie; Sullivan, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The delivery of affordable and equitable cancer care is one of India's greatest public health challenges. Public expenditure on cancer in India remains below US$10 per person (compared with more than US$100 per person in high-income countries), and overall public expenditure on health care is still only slightly above 1% of gross domestic product. Out-of-pocket payments, which account for more than three-quarters of cancer expenditures in India, are one of the greatest threats to patients and families, and a cancer diagnosis is increasingly responsible for catastrophic expenditures that negatively affect not only the patient but also the welfare and education of several generations of their family. We explore the complex nature of cancer care systems across India, from state to government levels, and address the crucial issues of infrastructure, manpower shortages, and the pressing need to develop cross-state solutions to prevention and early detection of cancer, in addition to governance of the largely unregulated private sector and the cost of new technologies and drugs. We discuss the role of public insurance schemes, the need to develop new political mandates and authority to set priorities, the necessity to greatly improve the quality of care, and the drive to understand and deliver cost-effective cancer care programmes. PMID:24731888

  18. Integration of Palliative Care Principles into the Ongoing Care of Children with Cancer: Individualized Care Planning and Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Justin N; Hinds, Pamela S; Spunt, Sheri L; Barfield, Raymond C; Allen, Caitlin; Powell, Brent C; Anderson, Lisa H; Kane, Javier R

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis The Individualized Care Planning and Coordination Model is designed to integrate palliative care principles and practices into the ongoing care of children with cancer. Application of the model helps clinicians to generate a comprehensive individualized care plan that is implemented through Individualized Care Coordination processes as detailed here. Clinicians’ strong desire to provide compassionate, competent and sensitive care to the seriously ill child and the child’s family can be effectively translated into clinical practice through these processes. “To cure sometimes, to relieve often, to comfort always -- this is our work.” Author Unknown PMID:18242323

  19. African Americans' and Hispanics' information needs about cancer care.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Ung, Danielle; Montiel-Ishino, F Alejandro; Nelson, Alison; Canales, Jorge; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have reported on African American and Hispanic (AA and H) populations' informational needs when seeking cancer care at an institution that offers clinical trials. Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) sought to identify and examine the decision making process, the perceptions, and the preferred channels of communication about cancer care services for AA and H communities in order to develop a list of marketing recommendations. Five focus groups (N = 45) consisting of two AA and three H were conducted in four counties of the MCC catchment area in Tampa, FL. Participants were asked about their perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer care and MCC. Focus groups were audio-recorded and verbatim transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Similarities in responses were found between AA and H participants. Participants received general health and cancer information from media sources and word of mouth and preferred to hear patient testimonials. There were concerns about costs, insurance coverage, and the actual geographic location of the cancer center. In general, H participants were not opposed to participating in cancer clinical trials/research, whereas, AA participants were more hesitant. A majority of participants highly favored an institution that offered standard care and clinical trials. AA and H participants shared similar concerns and preferences in communication channels, but each group had specific informational needs. The perceptions and preferences of AA and H must be explored in order to successfully and efficiently increase cancer clinical trial participation. PMID:25189798

  20. African Americans' and Hispanics' information needs about cancer care.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Ung, Danielle; Montiel-Ishino, F Alejandro; Nelson, Alison; Canales, Jorge; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have reported on African American and Hispanic (AA and H) populations' informational needs when seeking cancer care at an institution that offers clinical trials. Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) sought to identify and examine the decision making process, the perceptions, and the preferred channels of communication about cancer care services for AA and H communities in order to develop a list of marketing recommendations. Five focus groups (N = 45) consisting of two AA and three H were conducted in four counties of the MCC catchment area in Tampa, FL. Participants were asked about their perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer care and MCC. Focus groups were audio-recorded and verbatim transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Similarities in responses were found between AA and H participants. Participants received general health and cancer information from media sources and word of mouth and preferred to hear patient testimonials. There were concerns about costs, insurance coverage, and the actual geographic location of the cancer center. In general, H participants were not opposed to participating in cancer clinical trials/research, whereas, AA participants were more hesitant. A majority of participants highly favored an institution that offered standard care and clinical trials. AA and H participants shared similar concerns and preferences in communication channels, but each group had specific informational needs. The perceptions and preferences of AA and H must be explored in order to successfully and efficiently increase cancer clinical trial participation.

  1. African Americans’ and Hispanics’ Information Needs About Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Ung, Danielle; Montiel-Ishino, F. Alejandro; Nelson, Alison; Canales, Jorge; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have reported on African American and Hispanic (AA and H) populations’ informational needs when seeking cancer care at an institution that offers clinical trials. Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) sought to identify and examine the decision making process, the perceptions, and the preferred channels of communication about cancer care services for AA and H communities in order to develop a list of marketing recommendations. Five focus groups (N=45) consisting of two AA and three H were conducted in four counties of the MCC catchment area in Tampa, FL. Participants were asked about their perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer care and MCC. Focus groups were audio-recorded and verbatim transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Similarities in responses were found between AA and H participants. Participants received general health and cancer information from media sources and word of mouth and preferred to hear patient testimonials. There were concerns about costs, insurance coverage, and the actual geographic location of the cancer center. In general, H participants were not opposed to participating in cancer clinical trials/research, whereas, AA participants were more hesitant. A majority of participants highly favored an institution that offered standard care and clinical trials. AA and H participants shared similar concerns and preferences in communication channels, but each group had specific informational needs. The perceptions and preferences of AA and H must be explored in order to successfully and efficiently increase cancer clinical trial participation. PMID:25189798

  2. Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Supportive and palliative care research includes studies to prevent or treat the acute and chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer and its treatment, and to examine the effects of cancer and its treatment on quality of life and psychosocial issues and treatment strategies at the end of life. Active Projects can range from caregiver issues to geriatrics, physical functioning to cognitive dysfunction.  | Examining symptoms and morbidities related to cancer, its treatment, quality of life and end of life.

  3. Programmable bio-nano-chip system: a flexible point-of-care platform for bioscience and clinical measurements

    PubMed Central

    McRae, Michael. P.; Simmons, Glennon. W.; Wong, Jorge; Shadfan, Basil; Gopalkrishnan, Sanjiv; Christodoulides, Nicolaos

    2015-01-01

    The development of integrated instrumentation for universal bioassay systems serves as a key goal for the lab-on-a-chip community. The programmable bio-nano-chip (p-BNC) system is a versatile multiplexed and multiclass chemical- and bio-sensing system for bioscience and clinical measurements. The system is comprised of two main components, a disposable cartridge and a portable analyzer. The customizable single-use plastic cartridges, which now can be manufactured in high volumes using injection molding, are designed for analytical performance, ease of use, reproducibility, and low cost. These labcard devices implement high surface area nano-structured biomarker capture elements that enable high performance signaling and are index matched to real-world biological specimens. This detection modality, along with the convenience of on-chip fluid storage in blisters and self-contained waste, represents a standard process to digitize biological signatures at the point-of-care. A companion portable analyzer prototype has been developed to integrate fluid motivation, optical detection, and automated data analysis, and it serves as the human interface for complete assay automation. In this report, we provide a systems-level perspective of the p-BNC universal biosensing platform with an emphasis on flow control, device integration, and automation. To demonstrate the flexibility of the p-BNC, we distinguish diseased and non-case patients across three significant disease applications: prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and acute myocardial infarction. Progress towards developing a rapid 7 minute myoglobin assay is presented using the fully automated p-BNC system. PMID:26308851

  4. Programmable bio-nano-chip system: a flexible point-of-care platform for bioscience and clinical measurements.

    PubMed

    McRae, Michael P; Simmons, Glennon W; Wong, Jorge; Shadfan, Basil; Gopalkrishnan, Sanjiv; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; McDevitt, John T

    2015-10-21

    The development of integrated instrumentation for universal bioassay systems serves as a key goal for the lab-on-a-chip community. The programmable bio-nano-chip (p-BNC) system is a versatile multiplexed and multiclass chemical- and bio-sensing system for bioscience and clinical measurements. The system is comprised of two main components, a disposable cartridge and a portable analyzer. The customizable single-use plastic cartridges, which now can be manufactured in high volumes using injection molding, are designed for analytical performance, ease of use, reproducibility, and low cost. These labcard devices implement high surface area nano-structured biomarker capture elements that enable high performance signaling and are index-matched to real-world biological specimens. This detection modality, along with the convenience of on-chip fluid storage in blisters and self-contained waste, represents a standard process to digitize biological signatures at the point-of-care. A companion portable analyzer prototype has been developed to integrate fluid motivation, optical detection, and automated data analysis, and it serves as the human interface for complete assay automation. In this report, we provide a systems-level perspective of the p-BNC universal biosensing platform with an emphasis on flow control, device integration, and automation. To demonstrate the flexibility of the p-BNC, we distinguish diseased and non-case patients across three significant disease applications: prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and acute myocardial infarction. Progress towards developing a rapid 7 minute myoglobin assay is presented using the fully automated p-BNC system. PMID:26308851

  5. Programmable bio-nano-chip system: a flexible point-of-care platform for bioscience and clinical measurements.

    PubMed

    McRae, Michael P; Simmons, Glennon W; Wong, Jorge; Shadfan, Basil; Gopalkrishnan, Sanjiv; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; McDevitt, John T

    2015-10-21

    The development of integrated instrumentation for universal bioassay systems serves as a key goal for the lab-on-a-chip community. The programmable bio-nano-chip (p-BNC) system is a versatile multiplexed and multiclass chemical- and bio-sensing system for bioscience and clinical measurements. The system is comprised of two main components, a disposable cartridge and a portable analyzer. The customizable single-use plastic cartridges, which now can be manufactured in high volumes using injection molding, are designed for analytical performance, ease of use, reproducibility, and low cost. These labcard devices implement high surface area nano-structured biomarker capture elements that enable high performance signaling and are index-matched to real-world biological specimens. This detection modality, along with the convenience of on-chip fluid storage in blisters and self-contained waste, represents a standard process to digitize biological signatures at the point-of-care. A companion portable analyzer prototype has been developed to integrate fluid motivation, optical detection, and automated data analysis, and it serves as the human interface for complete assay automation. In this report, we provide a systems-level perspective of the p-BNC universal biosensing platform with an emphasis on flow control, device integration, and automation. To demonstrate the flexibility of the p-BNC, we distinguish diseased and non-case patients across three significant disease applications: prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and acute myocardial infarction. Progress towards developing a rapid 7 minute myoglobin assay is presented using the fully automated p-BNC system.

  6. Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care: Improvements on Colorectal Cancer Quality of Care Indicators during a 3-Year Interval

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M; Jacobsen, Paul B; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Malafa, Mokenge; Fulp, William; Fletcher, Michelle; Smith, Jesusa Corazon R; Brown, Richard; Levine, Richard; Cartwright, Thomas; Abesada-Terk, Guillermo; Kim, George; Alemany, Carlos; Faig, Douglas; Sharp, Philip; Markham, Merry-Jennifer; Shibata, David

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The quality of cancer care has become a national priority; however, there are few ongoing efforts to assist medical oncology practices in identifying areas for improvement. The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care is a consortium of 11 medical oncology practices that evaluates the quality of cancer care across Florida. Within this practice-based system of self-assessment, we determined adherence to colorectal cancer quality of care indicators (QCIs) in 2006, disseminated results to each practice and reassessed adherence in 2009. The current report focuses on evaluating the direction and magnitude of change in adherence to QCIs for colorectal cancer patients between the 2 assessments. STUDY DESIGN Medical records were reviewed for all colorectal cancer patients seen by a medical oncologist in 2006 (n = 489) and 2009 (n = 511) at 10 participating practices. Thirty-five indicators were evaluated individually and changes in QCI adherence over time and by site were examined. RESULTS Significant improvements were noted from 2006 to 2009, with large gains in surgical/pathological QCIs (eg, documenting rectal radial margin status, lymphovascular invasion, and the review of ≥12 lymph nodes) and medical oncology QCIs (documenting planned treatment regimen and providing recommended neoadjuvant regimens). Documentation of perineural invasion and radial margins significantly improved; however, adherence remained low (47% and 71%, respectively). There was significant variability in adherence for some QCIs across institutions at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care practices conducted self-directed quality-improvement efforts during a 3-year interval and overall adherence to QCIs improved. However, adherence remained low for several indicators, suggesting that organized improvement efforts might be needed for QCIs that remained consistently low over time. Findings demonstrate how efforts such as the Florida Initiative for

  7. Palliative and hospice care in gynecologic cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Acevedo, Micael; Lowery, William J; Lowery, Ashlei W; Lee, Paula S; Havrilesky, Laura J

    2013-10-01

    Despite the increasing availability of palliative care, oncology providers often misunderstand and underutilize these resources. The goals of palliative care are relief of suffering and provision of the best possible quality of life for both the patient and her family, regardless of where she is in the natural history of her disease. Lack of understanding and awareness of the services provided by palliative care physicians underlie barriers to referral. Oncologic providers spend a significant amount of time palliating the symptoms of cancer and its treatment; involvement of specialty palliative care providers can assist in managing the complex patient. Patients with gynecologic malignancies remain an ideal population for palliative care intervention. This review of the literature explores the current state of palliative care in the treatment of gynecologic cancers and its implications for the quality and cost of this treatment.

  8. The global state of palliative care-progress and challenges in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Reville, Barbara; Foxwell, Anessa M

    2014-07-01

    All persons have a right to palliative care during cancer treatment and at the end-of-life. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines palliative care as a medical specialty that addresses physical, psychological, social, legal, and spiritual domains of care by an interdisciplinary team of professional and lay health care providers. Widespread adoption of this universal definition will aid policy development and educational initiatives on a national level. The need for palliative care is expanding due to the aging of the world's population and the increase in the rate of cancer in both developed and developing countries. However, in one third of the world there is no access to palliative care for persons with serious or terminal illness. Palliative care improves symptoms, most frequently pain, and improves quality of life for patients and their families, especially in the terminal disease phase. Accessibility to palliative care services, adequately trained health care professionals, availability of essential medicines, and gaps in education vary greatly throughout the world. Pain management is an integral concept in the practice of palliative care; however, opioiphobia, insufficient supply of opioids, and regulatory restrictions contribute to undue suffering for millions. Ongoing advocacy efforts call for increased awareness, palliative care integration with cancer care, and public and professional education. Enacting necessary change will require the engagement of health ministries and the recognition of the unique needs and resources of each country. The aim of this review is to examine progress in palliative care development and explore some of the barriers influencing cancer care across the globe. PMID:25841689

  9. Determinants of survivorship care plan use in US cancer programs.

    PubMed

    Birken, Sarah A; Deal, Allison M; Mayer, Deborah K; Weiner, Bryan J

    2014-12-01

    Cancer programs are increasingly required to use survivorship care plans (SCPs). Compliance with SCP use requirements will be evaluated at the cancer program level. Cancer program-level determinants of SCP use may suggest strategies for compliance. The objective of this study was to describe SCP use and identify its cancer program-level determinants. We surveyed employees knowledgeable about survivorship practices in cancer programs throughout the USA with a wide range of annual incident cancers, program types, and cancer care quality improvement organization memberships (81/100 response rate). We used descriptive statistics to describe SCP use and bivariate statistics to identify its cancer program-level determinants. Most respondents (56 %) reported that SCPs were not used. In programs reporting use, SCP use is restricted primarily to breast (82 %) and colorectal (55 %) cancer survivors, and few providers use SCPs. When developed, SCPs seldom reach survivors and their primary care providers. Most respondents (78 %) reported beginning to use SCPs because of requirements. Frequently cited barriers included insufficient resources (76 %), perceived difficulty using SCPs (29 %), and lack of advocacy for SCP use from influential people (24 %). SCP use was positively associated with academic program type (p = .009) and membership in the National Cancer Institute's Community Cancer Centers Program (p = .009) and negatively associated with freestanding program type (p = .02). SCP use in the US cancer programs is highly inconsistent. Many cancer programs plan to implement SCPs to comply with SCP use requirements. Support specifically intended to facilitate SCP use may be more effective than non-specific resources.

  10. Delivering affordable cancer care in high-income countries.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Sikora, Karol; Zalcberg, John; Meropol, Neal J; Amir, Eitan; Khayat, David; Boyle, Peter; Autier, Philippe; Tannock, Ian F; Fojo, Tito; Siderov, Jim; Williamson, Steve; Camporesi, Silvia; McVie, J Gordon; Purushotham, Arnie D; Naredi, Peter; Eggermont, Alexander; Brennan, Murray F; Steinberg, Michael L; De Ridder, Mark; McCloskey, Susan A; Verellen, Dirk; Roberts, Terence; Storme, Guy; Hicks, Rodney J; Ell, Peter J; Hirsch, Bradford R; Carbone, David P; Schulman, Kevin A; Catchpole, Paul; Taylor, David; Geissler, Jan; Brinker, Nancy G; Meltzer, David; Kerr, David; Aapro, Matti

    2011-09-01

    The burden of cancer is growing, and the disease is becoming a major economic expenditure for all developed countries. In 2008, the worldwide cost of cancer due to premature death and disability (not including direct medical costs) was estimated to be US$895 billion. This is not simply due to an increase in absolute numbers, but also the rate of increase of expenditure on cancer. What are the drivers and solutions to the so-called cancer-cost curve in developed countries? How are we going to afford to deliver high quality and equitable care? Here, expert opinion from health-care professionals, policy makers, and cancer survivors has been gathered to address the barriers and solutions to delivering affordable cancer care. Although many of the drivers and themes are specific to a particular field-eg, the huge development costs for cancer medicines-there is strong concordance running through each contribution. Several drivers of cost, such as over-use, rapid expansion, and shortening life cycles of cancer technologies (such as medicines and imaging modalities), and the lack of suitable clinical research and integrated health economic studies, have converged with more defensive medical practice, a less informed regulatory system, a lack of evidence-based sociopolitical debate, and a declining degree of fairness for all patients with cancer. Urgent solutions range from re-engineering of the macroeconomic basis of cancer costs (eg, value-based approaches to bend the cost curve and allow cost-saving technologies), greater education of policy makers, and an informed and transparent regulatory system. A radical shift in cancer policy is also required. Political toleration of unfairness in access to affordable cancer treatment is unacceptable. The cancer profession and industry should take responsibility and not accept a substandard evidence base and an ethos of very small benefit at whatever cost; rather, we need delivery of fair prices and real value from new technologies

  11. Palliative Care in Iran: Moving Toward the Development of Palliative Care for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rassouli, Maryam; Sajjadi, Moosa

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is the third leading cause of death in Iran and its incidence has been increasing in recent years. Patients' quality of life is altered rather enormously due to cancer, which doubles the importance of and the need for providing palliative care in Iran. Although many steps have been taken toward the development and providing of palliative care in Iran, there is still a large gap between the status quo and the desirable state. This study presents the current state of palliative care for cancer patients and discusses the barriers, challenges and outlook of palliative care in Iran. If infrastructural projects that have recently been launched prove successful, proper advancement toward the providing of palliative care services in Iran will then not far on the horizon.

  12. Creating a continuum of care: integrating obstetricians and gynecologists in the care of young cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Betty Y.; Skory, Robin M.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer therapy can be lifesaving but significantly diminish female reproductive potential. This review provides an overview of the deleterious effects of cancer treatments on reproductive function, the fertility preservation options currently available for young women and the outcomes of pregnancy after cancer treatment. In addition, special considerations for women who are diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy are discussed. To optimize the continuum of care for the patient, new corridors of communication between obstetricians, gynecologists and oncology specialists must be developed to ensure the best outcomes for the patient, both in terms of cancer treatment and fertility preservation. PMID:22031251

  13. Developing Successful Models of Cancer Palliative Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Bakitas, Marie; Bishop, Margaret Firer; Caron, Paula; Stephens, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This article describes successful institutionally-based programs for providing high quality palliative care to people with cancer and their family members. Challenges and opportunities for program development are also described. Data Sources Published literature from 2000 to present describing concurrent oncology palliative care clinical trials, standards and guidelines were reviewed. Conclusion Clinical trials have demonstrated feasibility and positive outcomes and formed the basis for consensus guidelines that support concurrent oncology palliative care models. Implications for nursing practice Oncology nurses should advocate for all patients with advanced cancer and their families to have access to concurrent oncology palliative oncology care from the time of diagnosis with a life-limiting cancer. PMID:20971407

  14. Are Primary Care Providers Prepared To Care For Breast Cancer Survivors In The Safety Net?

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Aaron J.; Hemmelgarn, Marian; Nguyen, David K.; Sacks, Greg D.; Clayton, Sheilah; Cope, Jacqueline; Ganz, Patricia A.; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With the growing number of breast cancer survivors outpacing the capacity of oncology providers, there is pressure to transition patients back to primary care. Primary care providers (PCPs) working in safety-net settings may have less experience treating survivors, and little is known about their knowledge and views on survivorship care. Objective To determine the knowledge, attitudes, and confidence of PCPs in the safety net at delivering care to breast cancer survivors. Participants A modified version of the National Cancer Institute’s Survey of Physician Attitudes Regarding Care of Cancer Survivors (SPARCCS) was given to providers at 2 county hospitals and 5 associated clinics (n=59). Focus groups were held to understand barriers to survivorship care. Results While most providers believed PCPs have the skills necessary to provide cancer-related follow-up, the vast majority were not comfortable providing these services themselves. Providers were adherent to American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations for mammography (98%) and physical exam (87%); less than 1/3 were guideline-concordant for lab testing and only 6 providers (10%) met all recommendations. PCPs universally requested additional training on clinical guidelines and the provision of written survivorship care plans prior to transfer. Concerns voiced in qualitative sessions included unfamiliarity with the management of endocrine therapy and confusion regarding who would be responsible for certain aspects of care. Conclusion Safety-net providers currently lack knowledge and confidence at providing survivorship care to breast cancer patients. Opportunities exist for additional training in evidence-based guidelines and improved coordination of care between PCPs and oncology specialists. PMID:25536301

  15. Lung Cancer Care Before and After Medicare Eligibility.

    PubMed

    Huesch, Marco D; Ong, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Uninsured and underinsured near-elderly may not have timely investigation, diagnosis, or care of cancer. Prior studies suggest Medicare eligibility confers significant and substantial reductions in mortality and increases in health service utilization. We compared 2245 patients diagnosed with lung cancer at ages 64.5 to 65 years and 2512 patients aged 65 to 65.5 years, with 2492 patients aged 65.5 to 66 years (controls) in 2000 to 2005. Compared with controls, patients diagnosed with lung cancer before Medicare eligibility had no statistically significant differences in cancer stage, time to treatment, type of treatment, and survival. Study power was sufficient to exclude mortality reductions and health service utilization changes of the magnitude found in prior work, suggesting that typically, appropriate lung cancer care may be sought and delivered regardless of insurance status. PMID:27166413

  16. Lung Cancer Care Before and After Medicare Eligibility.

    PubMed

    Huesch, Marco D; Ong, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Uninsured and underinsured near-elderly may not have timely investigation, diagnosis, or care of cancer. Prior studies suggest Medicare eligibility confers significant and substantial reductions in mortality and increases in health service utilization. We compared 2245 patients diagnosed with lung cancer at ages 64.5 to 65 years and 2512 patients aged 65 to 65.5 years, with 2492 patients aged 65.5 to 66 years (controls) in 2000 to 2005. Compared with controls, patients diagnosed with lung cancer before Medicare eligibility had no statistically significant differences in cancer stage, time to treatment, type of treatment, and survival. Study power was sufficient to exclude mortality reductions and health service utilization changes of the magnitude found in prior work, suggesting that typically, appropriate lung cancer care may be sought and delivered regardless of insurance status.

  17. Performance measurement in cancer care: uses and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lazar, G S; Desch, C E

    1998-05-15

    Unnecessary, inappropriate, and futile care are given in all areas of health care including cancer care. Not only does such care increase costs and waste precious resources, but patients may have adverse outcomes when the wrong care is given. One of the ways to address this issue is to measure performance with the use of administrative data sets. Through performance measurement, the best providers can be chosen, providers can be rewarded on the basis of the quality of their performance, opportunities for improvement can be identified, and variation in practice can be minimized. Purchasers should take leadership role in creating data sets that will enhance, clinical performance. Specifically, purchasers should require the following from payers: 1) staging information; 2) requirements and/or incentives for proper International Classification of Diseases coding, including other important (comorbid) conditions; 3) incentives or requirements for proper data collection if the payer is using a reimbursement strategy that places the risk on the provider; and 4) a willingness to collect and report information to providers of care, with a view toward increasing quality and decreasing the costs of cancer care. Demanding better clinical performance can lead to better outcomes. Once good data is presented to patients and providers, better clinical behavior and improved cancer care systems will quickly follow.

  18. Ensuring quality cancer care: a follow-up review of the Institute of Medicine's 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care in America.

    PubMed

    Spinks, Tracy; Albright, Heidi W; Feeley, Thomas W; Walters, Ron; Burke, Thomas W; Aloia, Thomas; Bruera, Eduardo; Buzdar, Aman; Foxhall, Lewis; Hui, David; Summers, Barbara; Rodriguez, Alma; Dubois, Raymond; Shine, Kenneth I

    2012-05-15

    Responding to growing concerns regarding the safety, quality, and efficacy of cancer care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences commissioned a comprehensive review of cancer care delivery in the US health care system in the late 1990s. The National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), a 20-member board with broad representation, performed this review. In its review, the NCPB focused on the state of cancer care delivery at that time, its shortcomings, and ways to measure and improve the quality of cancer care. The NCPB described an ideal cancer care system in which patients would have equitable access to coordinated, guideline-based care and novel therapies throughout the course of their disease. In 1999, the IOM published the results of this review in its influential report, Ensuring Quality Cancer Care. The report outlined 10 recommendations, which, when implemented, would: 1) improve the quality of cancer care, 2) increase the current understanding of quality cancer care, and 3) reduce or eliminate access barriers to quality cancer care. Despite the fervor generated by this report, there are lingering doubts regarding the safety and quality of cancer care in the United States today. Increased awareness of medical errors and barriers to quality care, coupled with escalating health care costs, has prompted national efforts to reform the health care system. These efforts by health care providers and policymakers should bridge the gap between the ideal state described in Ensuring Quality Cancer Care and the current state of cancer care in the United States.

  19. [Cystoscopy in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: when and how (rigid or flexible)].

    PubMed

    Cicione, Antonio; Cantiello, Francesco; Damiano, Rocco

    2013-01-01

    Cystoscopy is a common procedure in the urological practice due to its ability to survey the bladder for a variety of indications. It is the principal means of diagnosis and surveillance of bladder tumors. Hematuria is the most common finding of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), as a consequence of that it is one of the most frequent reasons to perform cystoscopy. The follow-up of patients treated for NMIBC is of great importance because of the high incidence of recurrence and progression of the disease, whereby patients with NMIBC undergo cystoscopy repeatedly (every three months generally). At present, the schedule and methods of follow-up is a sign of patient's progression and recurrence risk, which has to be rated for each patient when follow-up begins. Moreover, before the development of flexible cystoscopy, patients underwent rigid cystoscopy with greater discomfort. The advance of flexible cystoscopy has significantly decreased the pain and discomfort associated with the procedure, and the flexible instrument is currently considered the standard tool to perform cystoscopy. However, controversies exist about the use of anesthetic gel during cystoscopy. The aim of this study is to report some short evidence about cystoscopy in particularly about the follow-up timing for NMIBC and the use of rigid or flexible cystoscopy.

  20. Cancer prevention and care: a national sample from Jordan.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa Ali; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-06-01

    This survey was designed to enhance cancer prevention and care in a sample from the Arab world. A descriptive survey research design was adopted. A representative sample of 3,196 individuals from the three main regions of Jordan (north, middle, and south) was used. Data were collected through interviews. The tool for the study included the following aspects: identification and background information; health status; participant's lifestyle; general beliefs about cancer prevention; screening and early detection; and communication channels and seeking information about cancer. The participants believed that the three greatest factors related to cancer specifically in Jordan were active cigarette smoking, exposure to radiation, and exposure to chemicals. The majority of the participants agreed that getting regular cancer checkup helps diagnose the disease early with a good prognosis. Interestingly, cancer checkup was about seven times greater among females than males. Married individuals performed checkup four times more than singles. The findings indicate that knowledge gaps and improper practices toward cancer existed among the participants and, if corrected, could facilitate the care, prevention, and early detection of cancer. The findings help in defining key areas that should be addressed in national cancer policies in Jordan.

  1. Caring and uncaring encounters within nursing and health care from the cancer patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Halldórsdóttir, S; Hamrin, E

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this phenomenological study was to explore caring and uncaring encounters with nurses and other health professionals from the perspective of the person who has been diagnosed and treated for cancer. Through thematic analysis of in-depth dialogues with five women and four men in the remission or recovery phase of cancer, three major categories regarding caring and uncaring encounters were identified. The essential structure of a caring encounter was found to be threefold: 1. the nurse/health professional perceived as caring: an indispensable companion on the cancer trajectory; 2. the resulting mutual trust and caring connection; and 3. the perceived effect of the caring encounter: a sense of solidarity, empowerment, well-being, and healing. The essential structure of an uncaring encounter is also threefold: 1. the nurse/health professional perceived as uncaring: an unfortunate hindrance to the perception of well-being and healing; 2. the resulting sense of mistrust and disconnection; and 3. the perceived effect of the uncaring encounter: a sense of uneasiness, discouragement, and a sense of being broken down. The findings emphasize the primacy of competence in professional caring, as well as that of genuine concern, openness and a willingness to connect with others. The often devastating effects of uncaring encounters on the recipient of nursing and health care raises the question whether uncaring as an ethical and a professional problem should perhaps be dealt with as malpractice in nursing and health care.

  2. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  3. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee Report

    PubMed Central

    Zweigenhaft, Burt; Bosserman, Linda; Kenney, James T.; Lawless, Grant D.; Marsland, Thomas A.; Deligdish, Craig K.; Burgoyne, Douglas S.; Knopf, Kevin B.; Long, Douglas M.; McKercher, Patrick; Owens, Gary M.; Hennessy, John E.; Lang, James R.; Malin, Jennifer; Natelson, Leonard; Palmgren, Matthew C.; Slotnik, Jayson; Shockney, Lillie D.; Vogenberg, F. Randy

    2013-01-01

    The AVBCC Annual Meeting experiences exponential growth in attendance and participation as oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, patient advocates, and drug manufacturers convened in Hollywood, FL, on May 2–5, 2013, for the Third Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The conference presented an all-inclusive open forum for stakeholder dialogue and integration across the cancer care continuum, facilitating an open dialogue among the various healthcare stakeholders to align their perspectives around the urgent need to address value in cancer care, costs, patient education, safety, outcomes, and quality. The AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee was held on the first day of the conference to define value in cancer care. The committee was divided into 7 groups, each representing a key stakeholder in oncology. The goal of the Steering Committee was to define value from the particular point of view of each of the stakeholder groups and to suggest how that particular perspective can contribute to the value proposition in oncology, by balancing cost, quality, and access to care to improve overall patient outcomes. The following summary highlights the major points addressed by each group. PMID:24991360

  4. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made. PMID:26641959

  5. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  6. 75 FR 9913 - Request for Measures of Patient Experiences of Cancer Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Cancer Care AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. ACTION: Notice of request. SUMMARY... respondents to assess the care delivered by cancer care providers. AHRQ is seeking these items and measures from researchers, survey firms, cancer care providers, patient advocacy groups, individual...

  7. 77 FR 64340 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge AGENCY... Cancer Care Video Challenge is an opportunity for members of the public to create short, erin.poetter@hhs... ability manage care. The Cancer Care Video Challenge is an ] opportunity for members of the public...

  8. Follow-up Care After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts Training Cancer Training at NCI Funding for ... Closeout NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grant Management Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small ...

  9. Teleoncology: Current and future applications for improving cancer care globally

    PubMed Central

    Hazin, Ribhi; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Access to quality cancer care is often unavailable not only in low- and middle-income countries but also in rural or remote areas of high-income countries. Teleoncology (oncology applications of medical telecommunications, including pathology, radiology, and other related disciplines) has the potential to enhance both access to and the quality of clinical cancer care as well as education and training. Its implementation in the developing world requires an approach tailored to priorities, resources, and needs. We believe that teleoncology can best achieve its proposed goals through programmatic, consistent, and long-term application. Here we review teleoncology initiatives that have the potential to decrease cancer care inequality between resource-poor and resource-rich institutions and offer guidelines for the development of teleoncology programs in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:20152772

  10. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Sherri G.; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy. PMID:26258794

  11. A flexible cold microplasma jet using biocompatible dielectric tubes for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-O; Wei Yanzhang; Li Jinhua

    2010-05-17

    This paper describes a flexible microplasma jet device using a Tygon S-54-HL tube as a biocompatible tube and its potential in developing cancer therapies. The optical and physical properties of the plasma jets and preliminary apoptosis data of cultured murine tumor cells and nontumor fibroblast cells treated with these plasma jets are presented. Microplasma jets were observed to induce apoptosis in cultured murine cells in a dose-dependent manner. The murine melanoma tumor cells were more sensitive to plasma treatment than fibroblast cells. These features allow the direct and precise application of this microplasma jet device to tumor cells.

  12. Adolescent and young adult cancer: principles of care

    PubMed Central

    Ramphal, R.; Aubin, S.; Czaykowski, P.; De Pauw, S.; Johnson, A.; McKillop, S.; Szwajcer, D.; Wilkins, K.; Rogers, P.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (ayas) with cancer in active treatment face a number of barriers to optimal care. In the present article, we focus on the 3 critical domains of care for ayas—medical, psychosocial, and research—and how changes to the system could overcome barriers. We summarize the current literature, outline recommended principles of care, raise awareness of barriers to optimal care, and suggest specific changes to the system to overcome those barriers in the Canadian context. Many of the recommendations can nevertheless be applied universally. These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Task Force on Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer and build on outcomes from two international workshops held by that group. PMID:27330350

  13. Financial Toxicity of Cancer Care: It's Time to Intervene.

    PubMed

    Zafar, S Yousuf

    2016-05-01

    Evidence suggests that a considerably large proportion of cancer patients are affected by treatment-related financial harm. As medical debt grows for some with cancer, the downstream effects can be catastrophic, with a recent study suggesting a link between extreme financial distress and worse mortality. At least three factors might explain the relationship between extreme financial distress and greater risk of mortality: 1) overall poorer well-being, 2) impaired health-related quality of life, and 3) sub-par quality of care. While research has described the financial harm associated with cancer treatment, little has been done to effectively intervene on the problem. Long-term solutions must focus on policy changes to reduce unsustainable drug prices and promote innovative insurance models. In the mean time, patients continue to struggle with high out-of-pocket costs. For more immediate solutions, we should look to the oncologist and patient. Oncologists should focus on the value of care delivered, encourage patient engagement on the topic of costs, and be better educated on financial resources available to patients. For their part, patients need improved cost-related health literacy so they are aware of potential costs and resources, and research should focus on how patients define high-value care. With a growing list of financial side effects induced by cancer treatment, the time has come to intervene on the "financial toxicity" of cancer care.

  14. Pharmacopuncture for Cancer Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Lee, In-Seon; Cho, Seung-Hun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyangsook

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture's effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14–1.44). The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12–2.89). Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation. PMID:24899911

  15. Breast cancer genetics and managed care. The Kaiser Permanente experience.

    PubMed

    Kutner, S E

    1999-12-01

    In 1996, with evolution of the science of cancer genetics and the advent of commercially available BRCA1 and later BRCA2 testing, Kaiser Permanente began to apply these advances in clinical practice. Recommendations for referral to genetic counseling were developed in 1997 as the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Referral for Genetic Counseling for Inherited Susceptibility for Breast and Ovarian Cancer. Implementation of these guidelines with associated protocols in Kaiser Permanente's Northern California Region has occupied the ensuing years and includes dissemination of the high-risk guidelines for breast and ovarian cancer, dissemination of patient and physician educational materials on the breast cancer guidelines, monthly classes and taped healthphone messages for patients, interactive videoconferencing for physicians, a training seminar for medical geneticists who will counsel patients at risk, publication of articles on breast cancer and genetic risk in health plan member- and physician-directed magazines, identification and training of clinical specialists and supporting clinicians to care for patients before and after counseling, individual counseling and testing of patients and families, and development of a data registry. Implementing the guidelines helped us communicate the uncertainty surrounding breast cancer testing, and we were obliged to learn more about ethical, legal, societal, and insurance controversies surrounding genetic testing. Given the lack of effective prevention for breast or ovarian cancer and the difficulty of treatment, the appropriate use of genetics in patient care is essential. In the near future, we will see the need for cancer genetics to become an integral part of practice throughout the spectrum of health care. We at Kaiser Permanente feel that the breast cancer guideline project is the first step in this process.

  16. A Flexible Reporter System for Direct Observation and Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Binwu; Raviv, Asaf; Esposito, Dominic; Flanders, Kathleen C.; Daniel, Catherine; Nghiem, Bao Tram; Garfield, Susan; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Robles, Ana I.; Smith, William I.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Ravin, Rea; Wakefield, Lalage M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many tumors are hierarchically organized with a minority cell population that has stem-like properties and enhanced ability to initiate tumorigenesis and drive therapeutic relapse. These cancer stem cells (CSCs) are typically identified by complex combinations of cell-surface markers that differ among tumor types. Here, we developed a flexible lentiviral-based reporter system that allows direct visualization of CSCs based on functional properties. The reporter responds to the core stem cell transcription factors OCT4 and SOX2, with further selectivity and kinetic resolution coming from use of a proteasome-targeting degron. Cancer cells marked by this reporter have the expected properties of self-renewal, generation of heterogeneous offspring, high tumor- and metastasis-initiating activity, and resistance to chemotherapeutics. With this approach, the spatial distribution of CSCs can be assessed in settings that retain microenvironmental and structural cues, and CSC plasticity and response to therapeutics can be monitored in real time. PMID:25497455

  17. A flexible reporter system for direct observation and isolation of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Binwu; Raviv, Asaf; Esposito, Dominic; Flanders, Kathleen C; Daniel, Catherine; Nghiem, Bao Tram; Garfield, Susan; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Robles, Ana I; Smith, William I; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Ravin, Rea; Wakefield, Lalage M

    2015-01-13

    Many tumors are hierarchically organized with a minority cell population that has stem-like properties and enhanced ability to initiate tumorigenesis and drive therapeutic relapse. These cancer stem cells (CSCs) are typically identified by complex combinations of cell-surface markers that differ among tumor types. Here, we developed a flexible lentiviral-based reporter system that allows direct visualization of CSCs based on functional properties. The reporter responds to the core stem cell transcription factors OCT4 and SOX2, with further selectivity and kinetic resolution coming from use of a proteasome-targeting degron. Cancer cells marked by this reporter have the expected properties of self-renewal, generation of heterogeneous offspring, high tumor- and metastasis-initiating activity, and resistance to chemotherapeutics. With this approach, the spatial distribution of CSCs can be assessed in settings that retain microenvironmental and structural cues, and CSC plasticity and response to therapeutics can be monitored in real time.

  18. Shared Decision Making in Cancer Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butow, Phyllis; Tattersall, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Cancer treatment outcomes have improved over the past 20 years, but treatment decision making in this context remains complex. There are often a number of reasonable treatment alternatives, including no treatment in some circumstances. Patients and doctors often have to weigh up uncertain benefits against uncertain costs. Shared decision making…

  19. Forces of change in the health care system. Implications for cancer care in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, W H

    1991-03-15

    Dramatic changes will occur in the health care system during the 1990s which will profoundly affect the delivery of care for cancer. Perhaps the most important factor is the aging of the population. As the proportion of people who achieve old age increases, the absolute prevalence and incidence of cancer will increase despite improved treatment techniques. This phenomenon will increase health care expenditures despite ongoing efforts to control costs. Second, there will be continuing efforts at cost control and increased emphasis on quality assurance and outcomes by third party payers. Providers will be scrutinized and compared with one another. The large payers of the nation's health care bills will demand proof of outcome and cost leading to bidding by providers and payment only to those who have the best outcome for the least money. Third, there will be an increasing emphasis on prevention and screening, in public health policy, an approach that may conflict with personal freedom. Fourth, there will be increasing deliberations and questions about the ethics of the health care system and treatment decisions. There will be continuing debate about the need for a rationing of health care and the right of individual privacy versus the states' right to preserve life. These changes will impact on all health care professionals whose practice includes patients with cancer. PMID:2001566

  20. Supportive care considerations for older adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Naeim, Arash; Aapro, Matti; Subbarao, Rashmi; Balducci, Lodovico

    2014-08-20

    The treatment of cancer presents specific concerns that are unique to the growing demographic of elderly patients. Because the incidence of cancer is strongly correlated with aging, the expansion of supportive care and other age-appropriate therapies will be of great importance as the population of elderly patients with cancer increases in the coming years. Elderly patients are especially likely to experience febrile neutropenia, complications from chemotherapy-induced nausea, anemia, osteoporosis (especially in patients diagnosed with breast or prostate cancer), depression, insomnia, and fatigue. These issues are often complicated by other chronic conditions related to age, such as diabetes and cardiac disease. For many patients, symptoms may be addressed both through lifestyle management and pharmaceutical approaches. Therefore, the key to improving quality of life for the elderly patient with cancer is an awareness of their specific needs and a familiarity with emergent treatment options. PMID:25071112

  1. Evolving Paradigms in Research and Care in Ovarian Cancers.

    PubMed

    Karlan, Beth Y; Alvarez, Ronald D; Strauss, Jerome F

    2016-10-01

    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened an expert committee to examine and summarize the state of the science in ovarian cancer research. An Executive Summary of the recently released report describing the key findings and specific recommendations to reduce the incidence of and morbidity and mortality from ovarian cancers is presented. Highlights include the recognition that ovarian cancer is not just one disease, but rather a constellation of distinct cancer types, some of which originate outside of the ovary. Furthermore, it was noted that our incomplete understanding of the basic biology of each subtype of ovarian cancer is an impediment to advances in prevention, screening, early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care. PMID:27607869

  2. Improving the care of cancer patients: holistic needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Young, Jenny; Cund, Audrey; Renshaw, Marian; Quigley, Angela; Snowden, Austyn

    This discussion paper presents a review of holistic needs assessments (HNAs) in the care of patients with cancer. HNAs entail a structured review of patient needs as articulated by the patient. This discussion then leads to a care plan grounded in issues pertinent to that patient. Despite policy guidance advocating its use, there are barriers to overcome in order to integrate HNAs into routine care. This article discusses what role communication skills and clinician confidence may have on the use of HNAs in practice, and suggests a strategy to support HNAs becoming the norm. PMID:25723367

  3. Improving the care of cancer patients: holistic needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Young, Jenny; Cund, Audrey; Renshaw, Marian; Quigley, Angela; Snowden, Austyn

    This discussion paper presents a review of holistic needs assessments (HNAs) in the care of patients with cancer. HNAs entail a structured review of patient needs as articulated by the patient. This discussion then leads to a care plan grounded in issues pertinent to that patient. Despite policy guidance advocating its use, there are barriers to overcome in order to integrate HNAs into routine care. This article discusses what role communication skills and clinician confidence may have on the use of HNAs in practice, and suggests a strategy to support HNAs becoming the norm.

  4. Wound care issues in the patient with cancer.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Mary A

    2005-06-01

    As cancer continues to represent a major health problem in the United States and in other developed countries, MCWs will continue to represent a complex problem for patients and health care professionals alike. Goals of care may range from healing to palliation, depending on the underlying pathology and patient preferences regarding their personal goals of wound or disease management. Palliative wound care should focus on patient comfort and quality of life as the goals, instead of wound. As evidence related to wound healing, products, and technology continues to increase,nurses can be at the forefront of putting into practice the science of wound healing for the benefit of patients.

  5. Implications of New Colorectal Cancer Screening Technologies for Primary Care Practice

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Ann G.; Levin, Theodore R; Jaffe, C. Carl; Galen, Barbara A.; Ransohoff, David F.; Brown, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening reduces the risk of CRC mortality but is currently not well utilized, with adherence only 50% in the eligible U.S. population and rates that lag behind those for breast and cervical cancer. The primary care physician has the pivotal role of facilitating patient adherence to CRC screening by informed choice of the screening tests, follow up of positive tests, and coordination of medical resources when diagnostic intervention is required. Consequently, the primary care setting is where significant improvements can be made in CRC screening adherence. This article provides a summary of the newer CRC screening technologies that can be used by primary care physicians in shared decision making with their patients. There are now multiple CRC screening tests which vary in their ability to detect the different stages in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence. Current guidelines of the Multi-Society (Gastroenterology) Task Force (1997, 2003, 2006, 2008), the American Cancer Society (2001, 2003, 2007, 2008), and the United States Preventive Services Task Force (2002) recommend a menu of CRC screening options, including fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) (Hemoccult II, Hemoccult SENSA, fecal immunochemical tests (FIT)), double contrast barium enema (DCBE), flexible sigmoidoscopy with or without annual FOBT’s, and colonoscopy. In this report, we assess the options of fecal immunochemical tests, colonoscopy, CT-colonography (CTC or virtual colonoscopy), and fecal DNA tests. The tests are discussed with respect to the evidence in support of their use and within the context of how they could be managed and implemented in primary care practice. Primary care physicians will want to understand the tradeoffs among accuracy, costs, and patient preferences for the current and emerging CRC tests. PMID:18725826

  6. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  7. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  8. What Should You Ask Your Health Care Team About Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pancreatic cancer survivor What should you ask your health care team about pancreatic cancer? It’s important to have ... only ones who can give you information. Other health care professionals, such as nurses and social workers, can ...

  9. What Should You Ask Your Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid cancer survivor What should you ask your health care team about thyroid cancer? As you deal with ... only ones who can give you information. Other health care professionals, such as nurses and social workers, may ...

  10. What Should You Ask Your Health Care Team About Endometrial Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... endometrial cancer survivor What should you ask your health care team about endometrial cancer? As you cope with ... only ones who can give you information. Other health care professionals, such as nurses and social workers, can ...

  11. Nano-engineered flexible pH sensor for point-of-care urease detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardarinejad, A.; Maurya, D. K.; Tay, C. Y.; Marshall, B. J.; Alameh, K.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate pH monitoring is crucial for many applications, such as, water quality monitoring, blood monitoring, chemical and biological analyses, environmental monitoring and clinical diagnostic. The most common technique for pH measurement is based on the use of conventional glass pH electrodes. Glass electrodes have several limitations, such as mechanical fragility, large size, limited shapes and high cost, making them impractical for implementation as Lab-onchips and pH sensor capsules. Various metal oxides, such as RuO2, IrO2, TiO2, SnO2, Ta2O5 and PdO have recently been proposed for the realization of pH sensing electrodes. Specifically, ruthenium oxide exhibits unique properties including thermal stability, excellent corrosion resistance, low hysteresis high sensitivity, and low resistivity. In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of a miniaturized ion selective electrode (ISE) based pH sensor for point-of-care urease monitoring. The sensor comprises a thin film RuO2 on platinum sensing electrode, deposited using E-beam and R.F. magnetron sputtering, in conjunction with an integrated Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The performance and characterization of the developed pH/urea sensors in terms of sensitivity, resolution, reversibility and hysteresis are investigated. Experimental results show a linear potential-versus-urea-concentration response for urea concentrations in the range 0 - 180 mg/ml. Experimental results demonstrate super-Nernstian slopes in the range of 64.33 mV/pH - 73.83 mV/pH for RF sputtered RuO2 on platinum sensing electrode using a 80%:20% Ar:O2 gas ratio. The RuO2 sensor exhibits stable operation and fast dynamic response, making it attractive for in vivo use, wearable and flexible biomedical sensing applications.

  12. [Development and current utility of infobases in Czech cancer care].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality and effectiveness of health care is an integral part of modern health care. It can only be performed with sufficiently detailed data sources describing each segment of care. In case of significant heterogeneity and lack of standardization of hospital information systems it is necessary to fully exploit existing parametric data sources. The valid systems for Czech cancer care: the National Cancer Registry, clinical registries of Czech Society for Oncology of the Czech Medical Association of J.E. Purkyne, registries of screening programs and administrative data form healthcare payers. From these registries we can obtain a very complex and detailed view on prevention, diagnosis and cancer treatment in the Czech Republic. To achieve this goal, which means more integrated and comprehensive utilization of national registries, surveys and administrative data, it is necessary to fully utilize and apply the current legislative framework, in particular provision of the Act no. 372/2011 Sb.Key words: clinical registry - evaluation of health care - information system - legislation - malignant tumor - population. PMID:25389092

  13. The Edinburgh Malawi Cancer Partnership: helping to establish multidisciplinary cancer care in Blantyre, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Brown, E; Gorman, D; Knowles, G; Taylor, F; Jere, Y; Bates, J; Masamba, L

    2016-03-01

    In response to the growing incidence of cancer in Malawi, a new oncology unit was established at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre. The unit opened in 2010, the first in the country, and is led by a single consultant oncologist. In 2012, a healthcare partnership was formed between the oncology and palliative care unit at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital and the Edinburgh Cancer Centre, UK. The principal objective of the partnership is to help develop high quality multidisciplinary cancer care in Malawi. Methods A needs assessment identified three priority areas for further improvement of cancer services: nurse-led treatment delivery; management of clinical data; and multidisciplinary working. The partnership received grant funding from the Scottish Government Malawi Development Programme in 2013 and a three year project plan was implemented. This has been conducted through a series of reciprocal training visits. Results Key achievements have been completion of a programme of oncology nursing education attended by 32 oncology nurses and other healthcare professionals, which has resulted in increased experience in cancer practice and standardisation of chemotherapy delivery procedures; development of a clinical database that enables prospective collection of data of all new patients with cancer and which links to the Malawi Cancer Registry; development of weekly multidisciplinary meetings involving oncology, gynaecology and surgery that has enabled a cross-specialty approach to patient care. Conclusion The Edinburgh Malawi Cancer Partnership is supporting nursing education, data use and cross-specialty collaboration that we are confident will improve cancer care in Malawi. Future work will focus on the further development of multidisciplinary breast cancer care and the development of a radiotherapy service for patients in Malawi.

  14. “Being Flexible and Creative”: A Qualitative Study on Maternity Care Assistants' Experiences with Non-Western Immigrant Women

    PubMed Central

    Boerleider, Agatha W.; Francke, Anneke L.; van de Reep, Merle; Manniën, Judith; Wiegers, Therese A.; Devillé, Walter L. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies conducted in developed countries have explored postnatal care professionals' experiences with non-western women. These studies reported different cultural practices, lack of knowledge of the maternity care system, communication difficulties, and the important role of the baby's grandmother as care-giver in the postnatal period. However, not much attention has been paid in existing literature to postnatal care professionals' approaches to these issues. Our main objective was to gain insight into how Dutch postnatal care providers - ‘maternity care assistants’ (MCA) - address issues encountered when providing care for non-western women. Methods A generic qualitative research approach was used. Two researchers interviewed fifteen MCAs individually, analysing the interview material separately and then comparing and discussing their results. Analytical codes were organised into main themes and subthemes. Results MCAs perceive caring for non-western women as interesting and challenging, but sometimes difficult too. To guarantee the health and safety of mother and baby, they have adopted flexible and creative approaches to address issues concerning traditional practices, socioeconomic status and communication. Furthermore, they employ several other strategies to establish relationships with non-western clients and their families, improve women's knowledge of the maternity care system and give health education. Conclusion Provision of postnatal care to non-western clients may require special skills and measures. The quality of care for non-western clients might be improved by including these skills in education and retraining programmes for postnatal care providers on top of factual knowledge about traditional practices. PMID:24622576

  15. Psychosocial Assessment as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kazak, Anne E; Abrams, Annah N; Banks, Jaime; Christofferson, Jennifer; DiDonato, Stephen; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Kabour, Marianne; Madan-Swain, Avi; Patel, Sunita K; Zadeh, Sima; Kupst, Mary Jo

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the evidence for a standard of care for psychosocial assessment in pediatric cancer. An interdisciplinary group of investigators utilized EBSCO, PubMed, PsycINFO, Ovid, and Google Scholar search databases, focusing on five areas: youth/family psychosocial adjustment, family resources, family/social support, previous history/premorbid functioning, and family structure/function. Descriptive quantitative studies, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses (n = 149) were reviewed and evaluated using grading of recommendations, assessment development, and evaluation (GRADE) criteria. There is high quality evidence to support a strong recommendation for multifaceted, systematic assessments of psychosocial health care needs of youth with cancer and their families as a standard of care in pediatric oncology.

  16. [Update of breast cancer in primary care (IV/V)].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Hernández, C; Brusint, B; Vich, P; Díaz-García, N; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Hernández-García, M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians must thoroughly understand this pathology in order to optimize the health care services and make the best use of available resources, for these patients. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. This fourth article deals with the treatment of the disease, the role of the primary care physician, and management of major complications. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to support their patients and care for them throughout their illness.

  17. [Update of breast cancer in primary care (IV/V)].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Hernández, C; Brusint, B; Vich, P; Díaz-García, N; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Hernández-García, M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians must thoroughly understand this pathology in order to optimize the health care services and make the best use of available resources, for these patients. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. This fourth article deals with the treatment of the disease, the role of the primary care physician, and management of major complications. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to support their patients and care for them throughout their illness. PMID:24837185

  18. Free-standing cancer centers: rationale for improving cancer care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J J; Silvers, S; Brereton, H; Byfield, J; Bick, R

    1989-10-01

    Free-standing cancer centers (FSCC) represent a growing trend in cancer care delivery within community practice. The critical components to FSCC are multidisciplinary cancer care, a complete menu of direct care and support services, a commitment to clinical trials and clinical investigation, and a comprehensive program for quality assurance. The advantages of FSCC to the community, to hospital programs, to the practicing surgical, medical, and radiation oncologists, and to the third-party carriers, including health maintenance organizations, are detailed. The development of an FSCC depends on the resolution of issues of (a) competition (between hospitals, hospitals and physicians, therapeutic disciplines, regional comprehensive cancer centers and FSCCs) and (b) concerns about conflict of interest. The ideal model of FSCC may well be represented by the joint venture of community hospital(s) and the community oncologists.

  19. Complementary medicine in palliative care and cancer symptom management.

    PubMed

    Mansky, Patrick J; Wallerstedt, Dawn B

    2006-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients varies according to geographical area, gender, and disease diagnosis. The prevalence of CAM use among cancer patients in the United States has been estimated to be between 7% and 54%. Most cancer patients use CAM with the hope of boosting the immune system, relieving pain, and controlling side effects related to disease or treatment. Only a minority of patients include CAM in the treatment plan with curative intent. This review article focuses on practices belonging to the CAM domains of mind-body medicine, CAM botanicals, manipulative practices, and energy medicine, because they are widely used as complementary approaches to palliative cancer care and cancer symptom management. In the area of cancer symptom management, auricular acupuncture, therapeutic touch, and hypnosis may help to manage cancer pain. Music therapy, massage, and hypnosis may have an effect on anxiety, and both acupuncture and massage may have a therapeutic role in cancer fatigue. Acupuncture and selected botanicals may reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis, and hypnosis and guided imagery may be beneficial in anticipatory nausea and vomiting. Transcendental meditation and the mindfulness-based stress reduction can play a role in the management of depressed mood and anxiety. Black cohosh and phytoestrogen-rich foods may reduce vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women. Most CAM approaches to the treatment of cancer are safe when used by a CAM practitioner experienced in the treatment of cancer patients. The potential for many commonly used botanical to interact with prescription drugs continues to be a concern. Botanicals should be used with caution by cancer patients and only under the guidance of an oncologist knowledgeable in their use.

  20. Psychosexual care in prostate cancer survivorship: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Persad, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men. Due to improvements in medical care, the number of PC survivors is increasing. Current literature demonstrates survivors have significant unmet needs including psychosexual care. We assess patients psychosexual needs by systematic review of literature over the past 20 years up to May 2015 in order to see what issues need to be addressed within psychosexual care. Methods A systematic review was conducted on PC survivorship and psychosexual care. The search strategy aimed to identify all references related to PC survivorship programme components (parts of survivorship programmes) AND survivorship AND psychosexual concerns. Search terms used were as follows: (PC OR prostate neoplasms) AND (survivorship OR survivor*) OR [psychosexual impairment or sexual dysfunction or erectile dysfunction (ED)] AND [comorbidity or quality of life (QoL)]. Results The systematic review identified 17 papers, examining unmet needs in psychosexual care post PC therapy. Conclusions These findings of this review may change psychosexual care of PC survivors, as national and international guidance is needed. PMID:26816840

  1. Cancer patients with oral mucositis: challenges for nursing care1

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sarah Nilkece Mesquita; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; da Silva, Grazielle Roberta Freitas; Andrade, Elaine Maria Leite Rangel; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; Moura, Renata Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze nursing care provided to cancer patients with oral mucositis based on the Nursing Process (NP). METHOD: this exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted with 213 patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in two cancer facilities: one philanthropic and one private service. RESULTS: the participants were mainly female, aged 45.8 years old on average, with up to 11 years of schooling and income of up to one times the minimum wage. Severe mucositis was related to chemotherapy associated with radiotherapy. Only 25.3% of the patients reported having received guidance from nurses during their treatment concerning self-care. The perceptions of patients regarding quality of care did not significantly differ between the private and public facilities. The basic human needs mainly affected were comfort, eating, and hygiene. Based on this finding, one NP was established listing the diagnoses, interventions and expected results to establish an ideal, though individualized, standard of nursing care to be provided to these patients. CONCLUSION: to understand oral mucositis is crucial to establish nursing care that includes prevention based on the implementation of an oral care plan. PMID:26039297

  2. Liver cancer: Approaching a personalized care

    PubMed Central

    Bruix, Jordi; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Gores, Gregory; Llovet, Josep Maria; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Summary The knowledge and understanding of all aspects of liver cancer [this including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA)] have experienced a major improvement in the last decades. New laboratory technologies have identified several molecular abnormalities that, at the very end, should provide an accurate stratification and optimal treatment of patients diagnosed with liver cancer. The seminal discovery of the TP53 hotspot mutation [1,2] was an initial landmark step for the future classification and treatment decision using conventional clinical criteria blended with molecular data. At the same time, the development of ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) has been instrumental for earlier diagnosis, accurate staging and treatment advances. Several treatment options with proven survival benefit if properly applied are now available. Major highlights include: i) acceptance of liver transplantation for HCC if within the Milan criteria [3], ii) recognition of ablation as a potentially curative option [4,5], iii) proof of benefit of chemoembolization (TACE), [6] and iv) incorporation of sorafenib as an effective systemic therapy [7]. These options are part of the widely endorsed BCLC staging and treatment model (Fig. 1) [8,9]. This is clinically useful and it will certainly keep evolving to accommodate new scientific evidence. This review summarises the data which are the basis for the current recommendations for clinical practice, while simultaneously exposes the areas where more research is needed to fulfil the still unmet needs (Table 1). PMID:25920083

  3. [Breast cancer update in primary care: (V/V)].

    PubMed

    Díaz García, Noiva; Cuadrado Rouco, Carmen; Vich, Pilar; Alvarez-Hernandez, Cristina; Brusint, Begoña; Redondo Margüello, Esther

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians ought to know thoroughly this pathology to optimize the health care services for these patients making the best use of available resources. A series of five articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last ten years. In this final section, the social, psychological, occupational and family issues related to the disease will be reviewed, as well as presenting some special situations of breast cancer, including breast cancer in men, during pregnancy and last stages of life. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this disease, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to be by the patients for their benefit throughout their illness.

  4. Lung cancer care: the impact of facilities and area measures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality in the US, and while treatment disparities by race and class have been well described in the literature, the impact of social determinates of health, and specific characteristics of the treatment centers have been less well characterized. As the treatment of lung cancer relies more upon a precision and personalized medicine approach, where patients obtain treatment has an impact on outcomes and could be a major factor in treatment disparities. The purpose of this manuscript is to discuss the manner in which lung cancer care can be impacted by poor access to high quality treatment centers, and how the built environment can be a mitigating factor in the pursuit of treatment equity. PMID:26380179

  5. [Breast cancer update in primary care: (V/V)].

    PubMed

    Díaz García, Noiva; Cuadrado Rouco, Carmen; Vich, Pilar; Alvarez-Hernandez, Cristina; Brusint, Begoña; Redondo Margüello, Esther

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians ought to know thoroughly this pathology to optimize the health care services for these patients making the best use of available resources. A series of five articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last ten years. In this final section, the social, psychological, occupational and family issues related to the disease will be reviewed, as well as presenting some special situations of breast cancer, including breast cancer in men, during pregnancy and last stages of life. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this disease, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to be by the patients for their benefit throughout their illness. PMID:25002350

  6. Cancer Phenotype Diagnosis and Drug Efficacy within Japanese Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Toshihide; Kato, Harubumi; Ikeda, Norihiko; Kihara, Makoto; Nomura, Masaharu; Kato, Yasufumi; Marko-Varga, György

    2012-01-01

    An overview on targeted personalized medicine is given describing the developments in Japan of lung cancer patients. These new targeted therapies with novel personalized medicine drugs require new implementations, in order to follow and monitor drug efficacy and outcome. Examples from IRESSA (Gefitinib) and TARCEVA (Erlotinib) treatments used in medication of lung cancer patients are presented. Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality in the world. The importance of both the quantification of disease progression, where diagnostic-related biomarkers are being implemented, in addition to the actual measurement of disease-specific mechanisms relating to pathway signalling activation of disease-progressive protein targets is summarised. An outline is also presented, describing changes and adaptations in Japan, meeting the rising costs and challenges. Today, urgent implementation of programs to address these needs has led to a rebuilding of the entire approach of medical evaluation and clinical care. PMID:22685658

  7. Breast cancer in young women: special considerations in multidisciplinary care

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, Chantal; Lee, Marie Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in females, and 5%–7% of breast cancer cases occur in women under 40 years of age. Breast cancer in the young has gained increased attention with an attempt to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Young patients tend to have different epidemiology, presenting with later stages and more aggressive phenotypes. Diagnostic imaging is also more difficult in this age group. Multidisciplinary care generally encompasses surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and social workers. Other special considerations include reconstruction options, fertility, genetics, and psychosocial issues. These concerns enlarge the already diverse multidisciplinary team to incorporate new expertise, such as reproductive specialists and genetic counselors. This review encompasses an overview of the current multimodal treatment regimens and the unique challenges in treating this special population. Integration of diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues should be addressed and understood by each member in the interdisciplinary team in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25300196

  8. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  9. Health professional's perspectives of the barriers and enablers to cancer care for Indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Meiklejohn, J A; Adams, J; Valery, P C; Walpole, E T; Martin, J H; Williams, H M; Garvey, G

    2016-03-01

    To investigate health professionals' perspectives about factors that impede or facilitate cancer care for Indigenous people. Semi-structured interviews with 22 health professionals involved in Indigenous cancer care. Data were interpreted using an inductive thematic analysis approach. Participants presented their perspectives on a number of barriers and enablers to Indigenous cancer care. Barriers were related to challenges with communication, the health system and coordination of care, issues around individual and community priorities and views of cancer treatment and health professional judgement. Enablers to cancer care were related to the importance of trust and rapport as well as health care system and support factors. The findings highlighted the need for recording of Indigenous status in medical records and a coordinated approach to the provision of evidence-based and culturally appropriate cancer care. This could go some way to improving Indigenous patient's engagement with tertiary cancer care services.

  10. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: The Impact on Urologic Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Kirk A.; Penson, David F.

    2012-01-01

    In March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as well as its amendments were signed into law. This sweeping legislation was aimed at controlling spiraling healthcare costs and redressing significant disparities in healthcare access and quality. Cancer diagnoses and their treatments constitute a large component of rising healthcare expenditures and, not surprisingly, the legislation will have a significant influence on cancer care in the United States. Because genitourinary malignancies represent an impressive 25% of all cancer diagnoses per year, this legislation could have a profound impact on urologic oncology. To this end, we will present key components of this landmark legislation, including the proposed expansion to Medicaid coverage, the projected role of Accountable Care Organizations, the expected creation of quality reporting systems, the formation of an independent Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and enhanced regulation on physician-owned practices. We will specifically address the anticipated effect of these changes on urological cancer care. Briefly, the legal ramifications and current barriers to the statutes will be examined. PMID:22819697

  11. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Symptom Management in Cancer Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Vincent C.H.; Wu, Xinyin; Lu, Ping; Hui, Edwin P.; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Anthony L.; Lau, Alexander Y.L.; Zhao, Junkai; Fan, Min; Ziea, Eric T.C.; Ng, Bacon F.L.; Wong, Samuel Y.S.; Wu, Justin C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Use of Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) in symptom management for cancer palliative care is very common in Chinese populations but clinical evidence on their effectiveness is yet to be synthesized. To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis to summarize results from CHM randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on symptoms that are undertreated in conventional cancer palliative care. Five international and 3 Chinese databases were searched. RCTs evaluating CHM, either in combination with conventional treatments or used alone, in managing cancer-related symptoms were considered eligible. Effectiveness was quantified by using weighted mean difference (WMD) using random effect model meta-analysis. Fourteen RCTs were included. Compared with conventional intervention alone, meta-analysis showed that combined CHM and conventional treatment significantly reduced pain (3 studies, pooled WMD: −0.90, 95% CI: −1.69 to −0.11). Six trials comparing CHM with conventional medications demonstrated similar effect in reducing constipation. One RCT showed significant positive effect of CHM plus chemotherapy for managing fatigue, but not in the remaining 3 RCTs. The additional use of CHM to chemotherapy does not improve anorexia when compared to chemotherapy alone, but the result was concluded from 2 small trials only. Adverse events were infrequent and mild. CHM may be considered as an add-on to conventional care in the management of pain in cancer patients. CHM could also be considered as an alternative to conventional care for reducing constipation. Evidence on the use of CHM for treating anorexia and fatigue in cancer patients is uncertain, warranting further research. PMID:26886628

  12. Evaluation of the impact of interdisciplinarity in cancer care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Teamwork is a key component of the health care renewal strategy emphasized in Quebec, elsewhere in Canada and in other countries to enhance the quality of oncology services. While this innovation would appear beneficial in theory, empirical evidences of its impact are limited. Current efforts in Quebec to encourage the development of local interdisciplinary teams in all hospitals offer a unique opportunity to assess the anticipated benefits. These teams working in hospital outpatient clinics are responsible for treatment, follow-up and patient support. The study objective is to assess the impact of interdisciplinarity on cancer patients and health professionals. Methods/Design This is a quasi-experimental study with three comparison groups distinguished by intensity of interdisciplinarity: strong, moderate and weak. The study will use a random sample of 12 local teams in Quebec, stratified by intensity of interdisciplinarity. The instrument to measure the intensity of the interdisciplinarity, developed in collaboration with experts, encompasses five dimensions referring to aspects of team structure and process. Self-administered questionnaires will be used to measure the impact of interdisciplinarity on patients (health care utilization, continuity of care and cancer services responsiveness) and on professionals (professional well-being, assessment of teamwork and perception of teamwork climate). Approximately 100 health professionals working on the selected teams and 2000 patients will be recruited. Statistical analyses will include descriptive statistics and comparative analysis of the impact observed according to the strata of interdisciplinarity. Fixed and random multivariate statistical models (multilevel analyses) will also be used. Discussion This study will pinpoint to what extent interdisciplinarity is linked to quality of care and meets the complex and varied needs of cancer patients. It will ascertain to what extent interdisciplinary teamwork

  13. [Current Status and Effectiveness of Perioperative Oral Health Care Management for Lung Cancer and Esophageal Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Nishino, Takeshi; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Takahiro; Inui, Tomohiro; Takasugi, Haruka; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Kawakita, Naoya; Inoue, Seiya; Sakiyama, Shoji; Tangoku, Akira; Azuma, Masayuki; Yamamura, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of perioperative oral health care management to decrease the risk of postoperative pneumonia have been reported lately. Since 2014, we introduced perioperative oral health care management for lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients. We report current status and effectiveness of perioperative oral health care management for lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients. Every 100 cases of lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients treated by surgery were classified 2 group with or without perioperative oral health care management and compared about postoperative complications retrospectively. In the lung cancer patients, the group with oral health care management could prevent postoperative pneumonia significantly and had shorter length of hospital stay than the group without oral health care management. In the esophageal cancer patients, there was little occurrence of postoperative pneumonia without significant difference between both group with or without oral health care management. A large number of esophageal cancer patients received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and some patients developed oral mucositis and received oral care treatment before surgery. Treatment for oral mucositis probably improved oral environment and affected prevention of postoperative pneumonia. Perioperative oral health care management can prevent postoperative pneumonia of lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients by improvement of oral hygiene.

  14. Appropriateness of cardiovascular care in elderly adult cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Winson Y; Levin, Raisa; Setoguchi, Soko

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that the quality of non-cancer-related care among cancer survivors (CS) is suboptimal. Secondary disease prevention is an important component of survivorship care that has not been previously evaluated. Our aims were (1) to assess the utilization of and adherence to medications and treatments for the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI) in CS versus non-cancer patients (NCP) and (2) to compare temporal trends in cardiovascular care between these two patient cohorts. Linking data from Medicare, pharmacy assistance programs, and cancer registries, we calculated the percentage of individuals receiving preventive medications (statins, β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors) and revascularization interventions (angioplasty, stent, bypass surgery) within 90 days after acute MI in CS and propensity score-matched NCP. We assessed trends over time and determined predictors of appropriate preventive care using modified Poisson regression. We identified 1,119 CS and 7,886 NCP. Compared to NCP, more survivors received statins (38 vs. 31 %) and β-blockers (67 vs. 59 %), but fewer underwent bypass surgery (1.5 vs. 2.8 %) after MI. From 1997 to 2004, both survivors and NCP were increasingly prescribed medications to prevent future coronary events. Over the same time period, receipt of bypass surgery was significantly lower among survivors. Co-morbidities, such as depression and lung disease, and demographic factors, such as advanced age and female, were associated with underuse of preventive care among survivors when compared to NCP. Use of preventive medications and procedures has generally improved, but uptake of bypass surgery among CS still lags behind NCP.

  15. From state care to self-care: cancer screening behaviours among Russian-speaking Australian women.

    PubMed

    Team, Victoria; Manderson, Lenore H; Markovic, Milica

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report on a small qualitative scale study with immigrant Russian-speaking Australian women, carers of dependent family members. Drawing on in-depth interviews, we explore women's health-related behaviours, in particular their participation in breast and cervical cancer screening. Differences in preventive health care policies in country of origin and Australia explain their poor participation in cancer screening. Our participants had grown up in the former Soviet Union, where health checks were compulsory but where advice about frequency and timing was the responsibility of doctors. Following migration, women continued to believe that the responsibility for checks was their doctor's, and they maintained that, compared with their experience of preventive medicine in the former Soviet Union, Australian practice was poor. Women argued that if reproductive health screening were important in cancer prevention, then health care providers would take a lead role to ensure that all women participated. Data suggest how women's participation in screening may be improved.

  16. Initial experiments with flexible conductive electrodes for potential applications in cancer tissue screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Daehan; Seyfollahi, Sam; Khosla, Ajit; Gray, Bonnie; Parameswaran, Ash; Ramaseshan, Ramani; Kohli, Kirpal

    2011-02-01

    We present initial results on the fabrication and testing of micropatternable conductive nanocomposite polymer (C-NCP) electrodes for tissue impedance measurements. We present these proof-of-concept results as a first step toward the realization of our goal: an improved Electrical Impedance Scanning (EIS) system, whereby tissue can be scanned for cancerous tissue and other anomalies using large arrays of highly flexible microfabricated electrodes. Previous limitations of existing EIS system are addressed by applying polymer based microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology. In particular, we attempt to minimize mechanical skin contact issues through the use of highly compliant elastomeric polymers, and increase the spatial resolution of measurements through the development of microelectrodes that can be micropatterned into large, highly dense arrays. We accomplish these improvements through the development of C-NCP electrodes that employ silver nanoparticle fillers in an elastomer polymer base that can be easily patterned using conventional soft lithography techniques. These new electrodes are tested on conventional tissue phantoms that mimic the electrical characteristics of human tissue. We characterize the conductivity of the electrodes (average resistivity of 7x10-5 ohm-m +/- 14.3% at 60 wt-% of silver nanoparticles), and further employ the electrodes for impedance characterization via Cole-Cole plots to show that measurements employing C-NCP electrodes are comparable to those obtained with normal macroscopic metal electrodes. We also demonstrate anomaly detection using our highly flexible Ag/AgCl C-NCP electrodes on a tissue phantom.

  17. Flexible positions, managed hopes: the promissory bioeconomy of a whole genome sequencing cancer study.

    PubMed

    Haase, Rachel; Michie, Marsha; Skinner, Debra

    2015-04-01

    Genomic research has rapidly expanded its scope and ambition over the past decade, promoted by both public and private sectors as having the potential to revolutionize clinical medicine. This promissory bioeconomy of genomic research and technology is generated by, and in turn generates, the hopes and expectations shared by investors, researchers and clinicians, patients, and the general public alike. Examinations of such bioeconomies have often focused on the public discourse, media representations, and capital investments that fuel these "regimes of hope," but also crucial are the more intimate contexts of small-scale medical research, and the private hopes, dreams, and disappointments of those involved. Here we examine one local site of production in a university-based clinical research project that sought to identify novel cancer predisposition genes through whole genome sequencing in individuals at high risk for cancer. In-depth interviews with 24 adults who donated samples to the study revealed an ability to shift flexibly between positioning themselves as research participants on the one hand, and as patients or as family members of patients, on the other. Similarly, interviews with members of the research team highlighted the dual nature of their positions as researchers and as clinicians. For both parties, this dual positioning shaped their investment in the project and valuing of its possible outcomes. In their narratives, all parties shifted between these different relational positions as they managed hopes and expectations for the research project. We suggest that this flexibility facilitated study implementation and participation in the face of potential and probable disappointment on one or more fronts, and acted as a key element in the resilience of this local promissory bioeconomy. We conclude that these multiple dimensions of relationality and positionality are inherent and essential in the creation of any complex economy, "bio" or otherwise. PMID

  18. Design and fabrication of a flexible MEMS-based electromechanical sensor array for breast cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hardik J.; Park, Kihan; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of flexible micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based device provides a unique opportunity in bio-medical robotics such as characterization of normal and malignant tissues. This paper reports on design and development of a flexible MEMS-based sensor array integrating mechanical and electrical sensors on the same platform to enable the study of the change in electro-mechanical properties of the benign and cancerous breast tissues. In this work, we present the analysis for the electrical characterization of the tissue specimens and also demonstrate the feasibility of using the sensor for mechanical characterization of the tissue specimens. Eight strain gauges acting as mechanical sensors were fabricated using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conducting polymer on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as the substrate material. Eight electrical sensors were fabricated using SU-8 pillars on gold (Au) pads which were patterned on the strain gauges separated by a thin insulator (SiO2 1.0μm). These pillars were coated with gold to make it conducting. The electromechanical sensors are integrated on the same substrate. The sensor array covers 180μm × 180μm area and the size of the complete device is 20mm in diameter. The diameter of each breast tissue core used in the present study was 1mm and the thickness was 8μm. The region of interest was 200μm × 200μm. Microindentation technique was used to characterize the mechanical properties of the breast tissues. The sensor is integrated with conducting SU-8 pillars to study the electrical property of the tissue. Through electro-mechanical characterization studies using this MEMS-based sensor, we were able to measure the accuracy of the fabricated device and ascertain the difference between benign and cancer breast tissue specimens. PMID:26526747

  19. Flexible Positions, Managed Hopes: The Promissory Bioeconomy of a Whole Genome Sequencing Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Rachel; Michie, Marsha; Skinner, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Genomic research has rapidly expanded its scope and ambition over the past decade, promoted by both public and private sectors as having the potential to revolutionize clinical medicine. This promissory bioeconomy of genomic research and technology is generated by, and in turn generates, the hopes and expectations shared by investors, researchers and clinicians, patients, and the general public alike. Examinations of such bioeconomies have often focused on the public discourse, media representations, and capital investments that fuel these “regimes of hope,” but also crucial are the more intimate contexts of small-scale medical research, and the private hopes, dreams, and disappointments of those involved. Here we examine one local site of production in a university-based clinical research project that sought to identify novel cancer predisposition genes through whole genome sequencing in individuals at high risk for cancer. In-depth interviews with 24 adults who donated samples to the study revealed an ability to shift flexibly between positioning themselves as research participants on the one hand, and as patients or as family members of patients, on the other. Similarly, interviews with members of the research team highlighted the dual nature of their positions as researchers and as clinicians. For both parties, this dual positioning shaped their investment in the project and valuing of its possible outcomes. In their narratives, all parties shifted between these different relational positions as they managed hopes and expectations for the research project. We suggest that this flexibility facilitated study implementation and participation in the face of potential and probable disappointment on one or more fronts, and acted as a key element in the resilience of this local promissory bioeconomy. We conclude that these multiple dimensions of relationality and positionality are inherent and essential in the creation of any complex economy, “bio” or

  20. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects.

  1. Improving Cancer Care Through Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K

    2015-09-01

    Nursing research and nurse researchers have been an integral and significant part of the Oncology Nursing Society's (ONS's) history, as evidenced by the development of the Nursing Research Committee within a few years of ONS's establishment. Ruth McCorkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, was the committee's first chairperson in 1979. This was followed by the creation of the Advanced Nursing Research Special Interest Group in 1989 under the leadership of Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN. ONS also began to recognize nurse researchers in 1994 by creating the annual ONS Distinguished Researcher Award to recognize the contributions of a member who has conducted or promoted research that has enhanced the science and practice of oncology nursing. The list of recipients and of their work is impressive and reflects the wide range of our practice areas (see http://bit.ly/1MTC5cp for the recipient list). In addition, the ONS Foundation began funding research in 1981 and has distributed more than $24 million in research grants, research fellowships, and other scholarships, lectures, public education projects, and career development awards (ONS Foundation, 2015). And, in 2006, the Putting Evidence Into Practice resource was unveiled, which provides evidence-based intervention reviews for the 20 most common problems experienced by patients with cancer and their caregivers (www.ons
.org/practice-resources/pep)
.

  2. Case study: Transforming cancer care at a community oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Sanghavi, Darshak; Samuels, Kate; George, Meaghan; Patel, Kavita; Bleiberg, Sarah; McStay, Frank; Thoumi, Andrea; McClellan, Mark

    2015-09-01

    To assist practices and institutions throughout the country in implementing clinical redesign supported by - and aligned with - payment reform, we present a case study of the New Mexico Cancer Center (NMCC) based on numerous stakeholder interviews, literature reviews, and a comprehensive site visit. This study explores the complex barriers oncologists face in improving the quality and outcomes of cancer care and reducing overall costs in a sustainable way. This case will explore the following questions: How did the NMCC redesign care to improve quality, enhance patient experience and results, and reduce costs? How can an organization demonstrate they are improving quality to enable new payment contracts that enable sustainability? Are alternative payment models sustainable for an independent, community oncology practice? PMID:26384229

  3. PROSTATE CANCER SURVIVORSHIP: LESSONS FROM CARING FOR THE UNINSURED

    PubMed Central

    Chamie, Karim; Connor, Sarah E.; Maliski, Sally L.; Fink, Arlene; Kwan, Lorna; Litwin, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2001, UCLA has operated IMPACT: Improving Access, Counseling and Treatment for Californians with prostate cancer. Funded by the California Department of Public Health, with a cumulative budget of over $80 million, the program provides comprehensive care for low-income, uninsured Californian men with biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Health services research conducted with program enrollees, through the UCLA Men’s Health Study, yields an opportunity to perform qualitative and quantitative assessments of patient-reported outcomes in these men, all members of historically underserved, primarily minority populations. This review summarizes data from several studies in which validated instruments were administered longitudinally in 727 participants, prospectively measuring health-related quality of life (HRQOL), self-efficacy in interactions with physician interactions, social and emotional health, symptom distress, satisfaction with care, and other patient-reported outcomes. PMID:22127017

  4. Colorectal cancer care in elderly patients: Unsolved issues.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Thomas; Pamoukdjian, Frederic; Quero, Laurent; Manfredi, Sylvain; Wind, Philippe; Paillaud, Elena

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancers are common in elderly patients. However, cancer screening is poorly used after 75. Elderly patients form a heterogeneous population with specific characteristics. Standards of care cannot therefore be transposed from young to elderly patients. Tumour resection is frequently performed but adjuvant chemotherapy is rarely prescribed as there are no clearly established standards of care. In a metastatic setting, recent phase III studies have demonstrated that doublet front-line chemotherapy provided no survival benefit. Moreover, several studies have established the benefit of bevacizumab in association with chemotherapy. There is a lack of evidence for the efficacy of anti-epidermal growth factor antibodies in elderly patients. Geriatric assessments could help to select the adequate treatment strategy for individual patients. Geriatric oncology is now the challenge we have to face, and more specific trials are needed.

  5. [Update of breast cancer in Primary Care (II/V)].

    PubMed

    Brusint, B; Vich, P; Ávarez-Hernández, C; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Díaz-García, N; Redondo-Margüello, E

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family doctors need to thoroughly understand this disease in order to optimize the health care services for these patients, making the best use of available resources. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. The second one deals with population screening and its controversies, screening in high-risk women, and the current recommendations. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors, and helping them to be able to care for their patients for their benefit throughout their illness.

  6. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, D.I.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  7. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  8. Geographic access to cancer care: a disparity and a solution.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Anesa

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND The rising cancer incidence in developing countries outpaces easy access to care. Time and effort spent on travel for care is a burden to patients and detracts from patient centredness, efficiency, and equitability. In Trinidad and Tobago, significant distress was observed among patients who made long journeys to the single public cancer clinic. The journey time among non-radiotherapy patients was measured. METHODS Over 19 weekdays in June 2007, the study assessed estimated travel time per visit (ETT), reason for visit for care, and number of visits per patient during their treatment course up to the time of study, and compared the findings with ETT to nearest centres for the US population. RESULTS 1447 episodes of care utilised 5296 h of patient travel time. Median ETT was 3.75 h (IQR 2-5 h, range 0.5-9 h). 74.1% of patients spent 2.25-9 h ETT. 44% of patients spent >4 h ETT. Median number of visits per patient was 34 (IQR 23-43; range 13-62). Median total ETT per patient was 127.5 h. Median ETT to the centre (1.75 h) was eight times greater than in the USA (13 min). More than 70% of patients attended for reasons other than chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS Cancer patients endured a burden of long travel times in 2007. The prevailing policy of the Ministry of Health to build a single centralised modern centre would not have alleviated this burden. Based on these findings, three outlying cancer clinics were created which now provide non-radiotherapy oncology management of patients nearer their homes.

  9. Models of care for persons with progressive cancer.

    PubMed

    Saunders, J M; McCorkle, R

    1985-06-01

    A need exists for a living-dying model that encompasses hospice care and alternative programs of care for the terminally ill. The existing medical and rehabilitative models are focused in directions that do not allow implementation of continuity of care directed toward supporting patients during the plateaus of their illnesses. Today, society has evolved to value the patient as a consumer of health care who can participate through making informed choices among the rich alternatives of care available. Yet the knowledge and technology base of health care delivery today increases at such a rapid rate that it almost seems out of control. This paradox makes it difficult for the patient-consumer to have access to information necessary for involvement in informed decision making. Greater numbers of consumers of health care are active in assuming responsibility for maintaining wellness. At the same time, they are seeking health care programs outside the medical model, as well as within the medical model. The "high-tech" atmosphere has been tempered with an emphasis on humanism, perhaps as a response to the infusion of machinery into our lives. As health care costs have escalated, concern has mounted that health care costs be contained, and that the poor and the elderly not be further curtailed in access to health care resources. There is tremendous potential among nurses for leadership in the creation of services that support quality of life for cancer patients and families. Nurses, as a collective, must be willing to engage in the politics of negotiation for reallocation of health care resources toward person-centered services and to establish a power base for influencing these decisions at the local, state, and national level of government and within various organizations offering health care services. As person-centered services are established, nurses must also move toward formalizing emergent practices into standards of care. Consumers deserve the protection of

  10. Outpatient treatment costs and their potential impact on cancer care.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    Cancer creates a tremendous financial burden. Cancer-related costs are categorized into direct, indirect, and psychosocial costs. Although there have been many reports on medical care costs, which are direct, those on other costs are extremely scarce. We estimated travel time and costs required for cancer patients to receive outpatient treatment. We studied 521 cancer patients receiving anti-cancer treatment between February 2009 and December 2012 at the Outpatient Chemotherapy Center of Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center. Address data were extracted from Data Warehouse electronic medical records, and travel distance and time required for outpatient treatment were calculated via MapInfo and ACT Distance Calculator Package. Transportation costs were estimated on the basis of ¥274 (=$3.00) per kilometer. The study design was approved by an ethics review board of Teikyo University (12-851). Average round-trip travel distance, time, and cost for all patients were 26.7 km, 72.5 min, and ¥7,303 ($79.99), respectively. Cancer patients incurred a travel cost of ¥4000-¥9000 ($40.00 to $100.00) for each outpatient treatment. With population aging, seniors living alone and senior households are increasing, and outpatient visits are becoming a common burden.

  11. [Update of breast cancer in primary care (I/V)].

    PubMed

    Vich, P; Brusint, B; Alvarez-Hernández, C; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Diaz-García, N; Redondo-Margüello, E

    2014-09-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of the patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians should have a thorough knowledge of this disease in order to optimize the health care services for these patients, and making the best use of available resources. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. The first article reviews the epidemiology, risk factors, and protective factors in this disease This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review on breast cancer, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to support the patients for their benefit throughout their illness.

  12. Fighting Global Disparities in Cancer Care: A Surgical Oncology View.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Harald J; Wobbes, Theo; Heineman, Erik; Haryono, Samuel; Aryandono, Teguh; Balch, Charles M

    2016-07-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death globally after cardiovascular disease. Long-term cancer survival has improved in the Western world due to early detection and the use of effective combined treatment modalities, as well as the development of effective immunotherapy and drug-targeted therapy. Surgery is still the mainstay for most solid tumors; however, low- and middle-income countries are facing an increasing lack of primary surgical care for easily treatable conditions, including breast, colon, and head and neck cancers. In this paper, a surgical oncology view is presented to elaborate how the Western surgical oncologist can take part in the 'surgical fight' against global disparities in cancer care, and a plea is made to strive for structural solutions, such as a partnership in surgical oncology training. The pros and cons of the use of eHealth and mHealth technologies and education programs for schools and the community are discussed as these create an opportunity to reach a large portion of the population in these countries, at low cost and with high impact. PMID:27038459

  13. Caring and curing: paediatric cancer services since 1960.

    PubMed

    Barnes, E

    2005-09-01

    This paper traces the history of the specialist meanings of 'cure' in paediatric oncology in the UK, how they have changed with increasing organization of the discipline, ever-rising survival rates for all childhood cancers, and with feedback from patients and families. It examines the differing ways in which those involved in researching, treating, and raising funds for work on childhood cancers have understood and used the language of cure, and speculates as to why talking about the 'cure' of survivors of childhood cancers is so problematic. The paper discusses the particular importance of holistic care in the development of paediatric oncology. Psychosocial support is delivered alongside surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The focus for support is the patient's whole family, building a tenet of palliative care into curative treatment. The concept of the 'truly cured child' is argued to have been crucial in the discipline's decision in the 1970s and 1980s to make the psychosocial needs of patients and their families central in the programme of curing children with cancer. PMID:16098123

  14. Professionalism in global, personalized cancer care: restoring authenticity and integrity.

    PubMed

    Surbone, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine is revolutionizing cancer care and creating new expectations among oncologists and patients. At present the benefit is still marginal, however, and must be understood as incremental. In addition, cultural and resource disparities limit the sustainability of new cancer therapies on a global scale. Adequate instruments are needed to enable our exercise of sound and honest judgment in distinguishing breakthrough treatments from those that yield only marginal or doubtful improvements, and to develop strategies for formulation and correct application of balanced guidelines for sustainable cancer care. Professionalism requires that the acquisition of knowledge and skills go hand in hand with moral education in the intellectual virtues of humility, perseverance, adaptability, communicativeness, and commitment to resist self-deception or conflicts of interest. Hidden curricula undermine the moral values of medicine: these must be understood and uncovered. We should possess a special body of knowledge, skills, and values that allow us to change our practices when appropriate and to be stewards of society's limited resources through proper communication with our patients and families. In the era of personalized oncology and global issues of sustainability, professional authenticity and integrity in cancer clinical practice are key to bridging the gaps between true and false expectations of patients and the public.

  15. Latin American Cancer Research Coalition. Community primary care/academic partnership model for cancer control.

    PubMed

    Kreling, Barbara A; Cañar, Janet; Catipon, Ericson; Goodman, Michelle; Pallesen, Nancy; Pomeroy, Jyl; Rodriguez, Yosselyn; Romagoza, Juan; Sheppard, Vanessa B; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Huerta, Elmer E

    2006-10-15

    The Latin American Cancer Research Coalition (LACRC) was funded by NCI as a Special Populations Network to 1) provide training to clinic staff in cancer control and foster development of Latino faculty training, 2) conduct a needs assessment with the community clinics, 3) enhance the ability of the clinics to promote healthy lifestyles, 4) collaborate on research projects to improve use of early detection, and 5) explore partnerships to increase access to culturally competent cancer care. The LACRC developed a model for cancer control focused on community-based clinics as the focal point for in-reach and community outreach targeted to Latinos to reduce cancer disparities. This framework was designed to link the community to local hospitals and academic centers, build capacity, and promote diffusion of innovations directly into delivery systems. Eight research projects submitted by junior investigator/clinic teams have been funded by NCI. These research projects range from recruiting for clinical trials to prevention to survivorship. The LACRC has trained 6 cancer control coordinators from partner sites and educated 59 undergraduate minority student interns in aspects of cancer control research. Central to LACRC's success to date has been the creation and maintenance of an infrastructure of trusting relationships, especially those developed between clinician/investigators and individuals within the greater Latino community. Community clinics can be effective agents for cancer control among Latinos. Latinos are likely to participate in research conducted by culturally representative teams of researchers using culturally appropriate recruiting strategies. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society. PMID:16986105

  16. Palliative Care Improves Survival, Quality of Life in Advanced Lung Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Results from the first randomized clinical trial of its kind have revealed a surprising and welcome benefit of early palliative care for patients with advanced lung cancer—longer median survival. Although several researchers said that the finding needs to be confirmed in other trials of patients with other cancer types, they were cautiously optimistic that the trial results could influence oncologists’ perceptions and use of palliative care. |

  17. Improving outcomes in lung cancer: the value of the multidisciplinary health care team

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Eve; Conron, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major worldwide health burden, with high disease-related morbidity and mortality. Unlike other major cancers, there has been little improvement in lung cancer outcomes over the past few decades, and survival remains disturbingly low. Multidisciplinary care is the cornerstone of lung cancer treatment in the developed world, despite a relative lack of evidence that this model of care improves outcomes. In this article, the available literature concerning the impact of multidisciplinary care on key measures of lung cancer outcomes is reviewed. This includes the limited observational data supporting improved survival with multidisciplinary care. The impact of multidisciplinary care on other benchmark measures of quality lung cancer treatment is also examined, including staging accuracy, access to diagnostic investigations, improvements in clinical decision making, better utilization of radiotherapy and palliative care services, and improved quality of life for patients. Health service research suggests that multidisciplinary care improves care coordination, leading to a better patient experience, and reduces variation in care, a problem in lung cancer management that has been identified worldwide. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the multidisciplinary model of care overcomes barriers to treatment, promotes standardized treatment through adherence to guidelines, and allows audit of clinical services and for these reasons is more likely to provide quality care for lung cancer patients. While there is strengthening evidence suggesting that the multidisciplinary model of care contributes to improvements in lung cancer outcomes, more quality studies are needed. PMID:27099511

  18. Improving outcomes in lung cancer: the value of the multidisciplinary health care team.

    PubMed

    Denton, Eve; Conron, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major worldwide health burden, with high disease-related morbidity and mortality. Unlike other major cancers, there has been little improvement in lung cancer outcomes over the past few decades, and survival remains disturbingly low. Multidisciplinary care is the cornerstone of lung cancer treatment in the developed world, despite a relative lack of evidence that this model of care improves outcomes. In this article, the available literature concerning the impact of multidisciplinary care on key measures of lung cancer outcomes is reviewed. This includes the limited observational data supporting improved survival with multidisciplinary care. The impact of multidisciplinary care on other benchmark measures of quality lung cancer treatment is also examined, including staging accuracy, access to diagnostic investigations, improvements in clinical decision making, better utilization of radiotherapy and palliative care services, and improved quality of life for patients. Health service research suggests that multidisciplinary care improves care coordination, leading to a better patient experience, and reduces variation in care, a problem in lung cancer management that has been identified worldwide. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the multidisciplinary model of care overcomes barriers to treatment, promotes standardized treatment through adherence to guidelines, and allows audit of clinical services and for these reasons is more likely to provide quality care for lung cancer patients. While there is strengthening evidence suggesting that the multidisciplinary model of care contributes to improvements in lung cancer outcomes, more quality studies are needed. PMID:27099511

  19. Cancer care coordination: building a platform for the development of care coordinator roles and ongoing evaluation.

    PubMed

    Freijser, Louise; Naccarella, Lucio; McKenzie, Rosemary; Krishnasamy, Meinir

    2015-01-01

    Continuity of care is integral to the quality and safety of care provided to people with cancer and their carers. Further evidence is required to examine the contribution Nurse Cancer Care Coordinator (NCCC) roles make in improving the continuity. The aim of the present study was to clarify the assumptions underpinning the NCCC roles and provide a basis for ongoing evaluation. The project comprised a literature review and a qualitative study to develop program logic. The participants who were purposively sampled included policy makers, practitioners, patient advocates, and researchers. Both the literature and participant reports found that NCCC roles are diverse and responsive to contextual influences to coordinate care at the individual (patient), organisational, and systems levels. The application of the program logic for the development of NCCC roles was explored. The conceptualisation of NCCC roles was also examined in relation to Boundary Spanning and Relational Coordination theory. Further research is required to examine how NCCCs contribute to improving equity, safety, quality and coordination of care. The project has implications for research, policy and practice, and makes explicit existing assumptions to provide a platform for further development and evaluation of these roles. PMID:26509202

  20. Perceptions of lung cancer and potential impacts on funding and patient care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kim; Delicaet, Kendra; Tang, Theresa; Ashley, Leslie Beard; Morra, Dante; Abrams, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore health-care professionals', health administrators', and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives' perceptions of lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and the perceived impacts on funding and patient care. This is a qualitative descriptive study using semi-structured interviews, which was conducted in Ontario, Canada. Seventy-four individuals from medical oncology, radiation oncology, thoracic surgery, respirology, pathology, radiology, primary care, palliative care, nursing, pharmacy, social work, genetics, health administration, and not-for-profit cancer organizations participated in this study. Participants described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and its negative impact on patients' psychological health, lung cancer funding, and patient care. The feeling of guilt and shame experienced by lung cancer patients as a result of the stigma associated with the disease was described. In terms of lung cancer funding, stigma was described as a reason lung cancer receives significantly less research funding compared to other cancers. In terms of patient care, lung cancer-related nihilism was credited with negatively impacting physician referral patterns with the belief that lung cancer patients were less likely to receive referrals for medical treatment. Health-care professionals, health administrators, and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism with far-reaching consequences. Further work is needed to increase education and awareness about lung cancer to reduce the stigma and nihilism associated with the disease. PMID:24882441

  1. A data mining approach for grouping and analyzing trajectories of care using claim data: the example of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the increasing burden of chronic diseases, analyzing and understanding trajectories of care is essential for efficient planning and fair allocation of resources. We propose an approach based on mining claim data to support the exploration of trajectories of care. Methods A clustering of trajectories of care for breast cancer was performed with Formal Concept Analysis. We exported Data from the French national casemix system, covering all inpatient admissions in the country. Patients admitted for breast cancer surgery in 2009 were selected and their trajectory of care was recomposed with all hospitalizations occuring within one year after surgery. The main diagnoses of hospitalizations were used to produce morbidity profiles. Cumulative hospital costs were computed for each profile. Results 57,552 patients were automatically grouped into 19 classes. The resulting profiles were clinically meaningful and economically relevant. The mean cost per trajectory was 9,600€. Severe conditions were generally associated with higher costs. The lowest costs (6,957€) were observed for patients with in situ carcinoma of the breast, the highest for patients hospitalized for palliative care (26,139€). Conclusions Formal Concept Analysis can be applied on claim data to produce an automatic classification of care trajectories. This flexible approach takes advantages of routinely collected data and can be used to setup cost-of-illness studies. PMID:24289668

  2. Associations among survivorship care plans, experiences of survivorship care, and functioning in older breast cancer survivors: CALGB/Alliance 369901

    PubMed Central

    Luta, Gheorghe; Sheppard, Vanessa; Isaacs, Claudine; Cohen, Harvey J.; Muss, Hyman B.; Yung, Rachel; Clapp, Jonathan D.; Winer, Eric; Hudis, Clifford; Tallarico, Michelle; Wang, Julhy; Barry, William T.; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Survivorship care plans (SCP) are recommended for all cancer patients and could be especially useful to survivors 65 years and over (“older”). This study examined receipt of SCPs among older breast cancer survivors and whether SCPs were associated with improved patient-reported outcomes. Methods Three hundred and twenty-eight older women diagnosed with invasive, nonmetastatic breast cancer between 2007–2011 were recruited from 78 cooperative-group sites. Participants completed telephone interviews at baseline and 1-year posttreatment. Regression analyses examined SCP receipt (yes/no) and functioning (EORTC-QLQ-C30), cancer worry, and experiences of survivorship care (care coordination, knowledge). Results Only 35 % of women received SCPs. For each 1-year increase in age, there was a 5 % lower odds of receiving an SCP (odds ratio (OR)=0.94, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.91–0.98, p=0.007). Besides age, no other factor predicted SCPs. SCP receipt was associated with greater knowledge and understanding of requisite follow-up care (p<0.05); however, functioning was not significantly different among those with vs. without SCPs. Conclusions Receipt of care plans was limited. SCPs improved understanding of breast cancer follow-up care among older survivors, but did not impact functioning one year post-treatment. Implications for Cancer Survivors To impact functioning and salient needs of the growing cohort of older survivors, survivorship care plans likely should be tailored to geriatric-specific issues. To improve functioning, SCP content should expand to include exercise, nutrition, polypharmacy, social support and management of symptom burden from cancer, and other comorbid conditions. To improve follow-up care for cancer survivors, SCPs should delineate shared care roles between oncology and primary care in managing recurrence surveillance, screening, and cancer sequelae. PMID:24917307

  3. The Inclusion of the Care of the Cancer Survivor in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietmann, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    As the number of individuals surviving cancer continues to rise, short and long term effects of cancer and its treatment that result in physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs unique to the care of the cancer survivor has not been addressed in nursing curricula. The Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2005) recommends that all health care providers…

  4. New analysis reexamines the value of cancer care in the United States compared to Western Europe.

    PubMed

    Soneji, Samir; Yang, JaeWon

    2015-03-01

    Despite sharp increases in spending on cancer treatment since 1970 in the United States compared to Western Europe, US cancer mortality rates have decreased only modestly. This has raised questions about the additional value of US cancer care derived from this additional spending. We calculated the number of US cancer deaths averted, compared to the situation in Western Europe, between 1982 and 2010 for twelve cancer types. We also assessed the value of US cancer care, compared to that in Western Europe, by estimating the ratio of additional spending on cancer to the number of quality-adjusted life-years saved. Compared to Western Europe, for three of the four costliest US cancers-breast, colorectal, and prostate-there were approximately 67,000, 265,000, and 60,000 averted US deaths, respectively, and for lung cancer there were roughly 1,120,000 excess deaths in the study period. The ratio of incremental cost to quality-adjusted life-years saved equaled $402,000 for breast cancer, $110,000 for colorectal cancer, and $1,979,000 for prostate cancer-amounts that exceed most accepted thresholds for cost-effective medical care. The United States lost quality-adjusted life-years despite additional spending for lung cancer: -$19,000 per quality-adjusted life-year saved. Our results suggest that cancer care in the United States may provide less value than corresponding cancer care in Western Europe for many leading cancers.

  5. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tralongo, Paolo; Ferraù, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Verderame, Francesco; Caruso, Michele; Giuffrida, Dario; Butera, Alfredo; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients’ needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients’ needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective. PMID:21941445

  6. Integrality in cervical cancer care: evaluation of access

    PubMed Central

    Brito-Silva, Keila; Bezerra, Adriana Falangola Benjamin; Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate integrity of access to uterine cervical cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment services. METHODS The tracer condition was analyzed using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach. The quantitative approach was based on secondary data from the analysis of cytology and biopsy exams performed between 2008 and 2010 on 25 to 59 year-old women in a municipality with a large population and with the necessary technological resources. Data were obtained from the Health Information System and the Regional Cervical Cancer Information System. Statistical analysis was performed using PASW statistic 17.0 software. The qualitative approach involved semi-structured interviews with service managers, health care professionals and users. NVivo 9.0 software was used for the content analysis of the primary data. RESULTS Pap smear coverage was low, possible due to insufficient screening and the difficulty of making appointments in primary care. The numbers of biopsies conducted are similar to those of abnormal cytologies, reflecting easy access to the specialized services. There was higher coverage among younger women. More serious diagnoses, for both cytologies and biopsies, were more prevalent in older women. CONCLUSIONS Insufficient coverage of cytologies, reported by the interviewees allows us to understand access difficulties in primary care, as well as the fragility of screening strategies. PMID:24897045

  7. Incorporating Geriatric Medicine Providers into the Care of the Older Adult with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Allison; Canin, Beverly; van Londen, G J; Edwards, Beatrice; Bakalarski, Pamela; Parker, Ira

    2016-11-01

    A significant proportion of cancer patients and survivors are age 65 and over. Older adults with cancer often have more complex medical and social needs than their younger counterparts. Geriatric medicine providers (GMPs) such as geriatricians, geriatric-trained advanced practice providers, and geriatric certified registered nurses have expertise in caring for older adults, managing complex medical situations, and optimizing function and independence for this population. GMPs are not routinely incorporated into cancer care for older adults; however, their particular skill set may add benefit at many points along the cancer care continuum. In this article, we review the role of geriatric assessment in the care of older cancer patients, highlight specific case scenarios in which GMPs may offer additional understanding and insight in the care of older adults with cancer, and discuss specific mechanisms for incorporating GMPs into oncology care. PMID:27613166

  8. Nurses in cancer care--stress when encountering existential issues.

    PubMed

    Ekedahl, Marieanne; Wengström, Yvonne

    2007-07-01

    Previous research related to stress among health care staff has highlighted several complex issues; however, a deeper analysis of the existential components has been lacking. The purpose of this paper is to study the stress of registered nurses who work with terminally ill and dying cancer patients, according to an earlier model developed by Ekedahl [2001. How can you bear the Challenge of Working at the Edges of Life and Death? Coping Processes with Hospital Chaplains Encountering Existential Confrontation: a Study in Psychology of Religion., Uppsala University, Thesis Uppsala]. The present study is qualitative and hypothesis-generating. The material analyzed are based on a life story approach and interviews carried out with 15 Swedish nurses working in hospices, oncology wards, and outpatient services for patients with advanced cancer. The nurses' stress levels ranged from low to severe, including multifaceted stress with existential dimensions. Different types of stress appear to be related with the individual, group, institutional, and cultural level.

  9. [Update of breast cancer in Primary Care (III/V)].

    PubMed

    Álvarez Hernández, C; Vich Pérez, P; Brusint, B; Cuadrado Rouco, C; Díaz García, N; Robles Díaz, L

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease with implications in all aspects of patientś life, therefore, family doctors must know this pathology in depth, in order to optimize the health care provided to these patients with the best available resources. This series of five articles on breast cancer is based on a review of the scientific literature of the last ten years. This third article will review the clinical context and the staging and prognostic factors of the disease. This summary report aims to provide a global, current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to be by the patients for their benefit throughout their illness.

  10. Care for the cancer caregiver: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    APPLEBAUM, ALLISON J.; BREITBART, WILLIAM

    2016-01-01

    Objective Informal caregivers (ICs) are relatives, friends, and partners who have a significant relationship with and provide assistance (i.e., physical, emotional) to a patient with a life-threatening, incurable illness. The multidimensional burden that results from providing care to a patient with cancer is well documented, and as a result, a growing number of psychosocial interventions have been developed specifically to address this burden. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the state of the science of psychosocial interventions for informal cancer caregivers. Method A comprehensive systematic review of interventions for cancer caregivers was conducted via an electronic literature search of publications between 1980 and January 13, 2011. A final sample of 49 interventions was reviewed in detail. Results The interventions, which varied in terms of modality and patient population, fell into the following eight categories: psychoeducation, problem-solving/skills building interventions, supportive therapy, family/couples therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, complementary and alternative medicine interventions, and existential therapy. Benefits and disadvantages of each of the categories are discussed, with special attention given to studies that produced null findings. Significance of results Beyond specific techniques, structured, goal-oriented, and time-limited interventions that are integrative appear to be the most feasible and offer the greatest benefits for ICs of cancer patients. Future studies are needed to examine the specific benefits and challenges of delivering interventions in alternative modalities (Internet, Skype) so that the needs of a greater number of ICs may be addressed. PMID:23046977

  11. Cancer care critical pathways: implementing a successful program.

    PubMed

    Patton, M D; Katterhagen, J G

    1995-08-01

    Change in any form creates stress on systems, yet there is growing awareness within the health care field that change must come as cost-conscious insurers and employers refuse to pay for overextended processes that grew out of the charge-based reimbursement era. Short-term solutions, such as discounted charges and staff cuts, are not the answer when the entire system needs an overhaul. The cost of care escalates and the quality of patient care suffers because the system lacks the appropriate mechanisms to reduce redundancy, eliminate waste, improve effectiveness, and provide the high-quality care that a community expects from its hospital. The outcomes-based critical pathway approach discussed here has been used with great success and differs from classic pathway writing in that only elements related to the specific outcome are allowed on the order set. The critical pathway process starts with a review of historical patient records, which yields information about both historical practice patterns and the provider team. Using this information, a work group is formed and patient goals or outcomes are established for the population in question. The entire system is informed and educated, with special attention given to the medical staff, clinical outcome and financial data are developed and provided to individuals in the process, and a feedback loop is established. Cancer care is an attractive target for critical pathways, because it is an area with high cost and expensive technology, and physician practice patterns and patient outcomes can vary widely. On the flip side, the historically multidisciplinary nature of cancer care offers a good starting point for the collaborative culture needed to successfully implement critical pathways. When done right, critical pathways can decrease morbidity and mortality, reduce redundancy and cost, increase patient satisfaction, and improve patient outcomes. Shifting practice and eliminating variation in practice patterns, without

  12. Flexible gold electrode array for multiplexed immunoelectrochemical measurement of three protein biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Lu, Cai-Yu; Zhou, Hong; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2014-11-26

    In this work, we report a simple and novel electrochemical multiplexed immunosensor on a flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) slice deposited with 8 × 8 nano-Au film electrodes for simultaneous detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA), prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Primary antibodies linked with magnetic beads (Ab1-MBs) were modified on the nano-Au film electrodes via magnetic force. In the presence of corresponding antigen, horse radish peroxidase-secondary antibody-conjugated gold nanorods (HRP-Ab2-gold NRs) were brought into the surface of electrodes, generating obvious electrochemical signals of H2O2 reduction reactions. Based on this, the designed immunosensor provide good performance in sensitivity and specificity during the detection of above three biomarkers for prostate cancer. The electrochemical multiplexed immunosensor was verified for selective and accurate detection of complex samples in human serum. Data suggested that the reported multiplexed immunosensing strategy holds great promise for applications in clinical assay and diseases diagnosis. PMID:25333408

  13. Interpersonal complaints regarding cancer care through a gender lens.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Erik Masao

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate healthcare customer complaints concerning interpersonal matters in cancer care. Design/methodology/approach - Complaints from cancer patients and their relatives (n=116) that dealt with interpersonal matters registered between 2009 and 2011 at four local Patients' Advisory Committees in Western Sweden were sampled and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Findings - Complaints concerned lack of information and consideration from healthcare providers. Lack of empathy and civility also caused dissatisfaction, the latter particularly for women. Relatives complained that they did not feel included in the care process or were not offered proper support. Most complaints by relatives were filed by a female relative and concerned a male patient. Research limitations/implications - Information about patient demographics other than gender could not be investigated due to database limitations. Hence, factors such as age, country of birth, and geographical residence were not included for analysis. In addition, neither the type nor stage of cancer among the sampled patients was able to be addressed. Practical implications - Patient complaints should not only be viewed as a post-consumption judgment, but also as a service interaction activity. This may require healthcare providers to enhance their interpersonal skills, allowing patients and relatives to provide feedback during service interaction to satisfactorily address dissatisfaction. Visualizing gender disparities may help healthcare providers prevent stereotypical encounters. In addition, the provider should be invited to participate in the customer's value creating network, which may also include knowledge and skills from other sources, such as relatives. Originality/value - Value co-creation offers a different view on patient complaints. Incorporating social construction into value co-creation may reveal socially constructed disparities. The paper provides

  14. Interpersonal complaints regarding cancer care through a gender lens.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Erik Masao

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate healthcare customer complaints concerning interpersonal matters in cancer care. Design/methodology/approach - Complaints from cancer patients and their relatives (n=116) that dealt with interpersonal matters registered between 2009 and 2011 at four local Patients' Advisory Committees in Western Sweden were sampled and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Findings - Complaints concerned lack of information and consideration from healthcare providers. Lack of empathy and civility also caused dissatisfaction, the latter particularly for women. Relatives complained that they did not feel included in the care process or were not offered proper support. Most complaints by relatives were filed by a female relative and concerned a male patient. Research limitations/implications - Information about patient demographics other than gender could not be investigated due to database limitations. Hence, factors such as age, country of birth, and geographical residence were not included for analysis. In addition, neither the type nor stage of cancer among the sampled patients was able to be addressed. Practical implications - Patient complaints should not only be viewed as a post-consumption judgment, but also as a service interaction activity. This may require healthcare providers to enhance their interpersonal skills, allowing patients and relatives to provide feedback during service interaction to satisfactorily address dissatisfaction. Visualizing gender disparities may help healthcare providers prevent stereotypical encounters. In addition, the provider should be invited to participate in the customer's value creating network, which may also include knowledge and skills from other sources, such as relatives. Originality/value - Value co-creation offers a different view on patient complaints. Incorporating social construction into value co-creation may reveal socially constructed disparities. The paper provides

  15. Providing Culturally Appropriate Care to American Muslims With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mataoui, Fatma; Kennedy Sheldon, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Worldwide, Islam is the second most populous religion and, in many countries in the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, and Africa, it is the predominant religion. The population of Muslims in the United States is projected to dramatically increase in the next few decades. Understanding the role of Islam for people who believe in and follow Islam-Muslims-will provide nurses with important perspectives that affect health behaviors, cancer screening, treatment decision-making, and end-of-life care.
. PMID:26800398

  16. Medication risk communication with cancer patients in a Middle East cancer care setting

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, Kerry; Al-Okka, Maha; Jumaat, Ebaa; Eissa, Nesma; Elbashir, Merwa; Al-Yafei, Sumaya M Al Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cancer treatments are frequently associated with adverse effects, but there may be a cultural reluctance by care providers to be forthcoming with patients regarding these risks for fear of promoting nonadherence. Conversely, research in a number of countries indicates high levels of patient desire for this information. We sought to explore cancer patient experiences, satisfaction, and preferences for medication risk communication in a Middle East care setting. Methods We developed and administered a ten-item questionnaire (Arabic and English) to a convenience sample of consenting adult patients receiving treatment at the National Center for Cancer Care and Research in Qatar. Results One hundred and forty-three patients were interviewed. Most (88%) stated that the level of side effect information they received was sufficient, with physicians (86%) followed by pharmacists (39%) as the preferred sources. The majority (97%) agreed that knowing about possible side effects would help them recognize and manage the reaction, and 92% agreed that it would help them understand how to minimize or prevent the risks. Eighteen percent indicated that this information would make them not want to take treatment. Two-thirds (65%) had previously experienced intolerance to their cancer treatment regimen. Conclusion Most patients surveyed expressed preference for the details of possible side effects they may encounter in their treatment. However, one in five considered such information a factor for nonadherence, indicating the need for patient-specific approaches when communicating medication risks. PMID:27175061

  17. Alliance Against Cancer, the network of Italian cancer centers bridging research and care.

    PubMed

    De Paoli, Paolo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Ferrarini, Manlio; Pelicci, PierGiuseppe; Dellabona, Paolo; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Mantovani, Alberto; Musto, Pellegrino; Opocher, Giuseppe; Picci, Piero; Ricciardi, Walter; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-11-14

    Alliance Against Cancer (ACC) was established in Rome in 2002 as a consortium of six Italian comprehensive cancer centers (Founders). The aims of ACC were to promote a network among Italian oncologic institutions in order to develop specific, advanced projects in clinical and translational research. During the following years, many additional full and associate members joined ACC, that presently includes the National Institute of Health, 17 research-oriented hospitals, scientific and patient organizations. Furthermore, in the last three years ACC underwent a reorganization process that redesigned the structure, governance and major activities. The present goal of ACC is to achieve high standards of care across Italy, to implement and harmonize principles of modern personalized and precision medicine, by developing cost effective processes and to provide tailored information to cancer patients. We herein summarize some of the major initiatives that ACC is currently developing to reach its goal, including tumor genetic screening programs, establishment of clinical trial programs for cancer patients treated in Italian cancer centers, facilitate their access to innovative drugs under development, improve quality through an European accreditation process (European Organization of Cancer Institutes), and develop international partnerships. In conclusion, ACC is a growing organization, trying to respond to the need of networking in Italy and may contribute significantly to improve the way we face cancer in Europe.

  18. Alliance Against Cancer, the network of Italian cancer centers bridging research and care.

    PubMed

    De Paoli, Paolo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Ferrarini, Manlio; Pelicci, PierGiuseppe; Dellabona, Paolo; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Mantovani, Alberto; Musto, Pellegrino; Opocher, Giuseppe; Picci, Piero; Ricciardi, Walter; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-01-01

    Alliance Against Cancer (ACC) was established in Rome in 2002 as a consortium of six Italian comprehensive cancer centers (Founders). The aims of ACC were to promote a network among Italian oncologic institutions in order to develop specific, advanced projects in clinical and translational research. During the following years, many additional full and associate members joined ACC, that presently includes the National Institute of Health, 17 research-oriented hospitals, scientific and patient organizations. Furthermore, in the last three years ACC underwent a reorganization process that redesigned the structure, governance and major activities. The present goal of ACC is to achieve high standards of care across Italy, to implement and harmonize principles of modern personalized and precision medicine, by developing cost effective processes and to provide tailored information to cancer patients. We herein summarize some of the major initiatives that ACC is currently developing to reach its goal, including tumor genetic screening programs, establishment of clinical trial programs for cancer patients treated in Italian cancer centers, facilitate their access to innovative drugs under development, improve quality through an European accreditation process (European Organization of Cancer Institutes), and develop international partnerships. In conclusion, ACC is a growing organization, trying to respond to the need of networking in Italy and may contribute significantly to improve the way we face cancer in Europe. PMID:26578263

  19. Lung Cancer Assistant: a hybrid clinical decision support application for lung cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Peake, Michael D.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Tse, Donald; Kadir, Timor; Stanley, Roz; Gleeson, Fergus; Brady, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are becoming the model of care for cancer patients worldwide. While MDTs have improved the quality of cancer care, the meetings impose substantial time pressure on the members, who generally attend several such MDTs. We describe Lung Cancer Assistant (LCA), a clinical decision support (CDS) prototype designed to assist the experts in the treatment selection decisions in the lung cancer MDTs. A novel feature of LCA is its ability to provide rule-based and probabilistic decision support within a single platform. The guideline-based CDS is based on clinical guideline rules, while the probabilistic CDS is based on a Bayesian network trained on the English Lung Cancer Audit Database (LUCADA). We assess rule-based and probabilistic recommendations based on their concordances with the treatments recorded in LUCADA. Our results reveal that the guideline rule-based recommendations perform well in simulating the recorded treatments with exact and partial concordance rates of 0.57 and 0.79, respectively. On the other hand, the exact and partial concordance rates achieved with probabilistic results are relatively poorer with 0.27 and 0.76. However, probabilistic decision support fulfils a complementary role in providing accurate survival estimations. Compared to recorded treatments, both CDS approaches promote higher resection rates and multimodality treatments. PMID:24990290

  20. A Review and Characterization of the Various Perceptions of Quality Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Colosia, Ann D; Peltz, Gerson; Pohl, Gerhardt; Liu, Esther; Copley-Merriman, Kati; Khan, Shahnaz; Kaye, James A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is important to maintain high-quality cancer care while reducing spending. This requires an understanding of how stakeholders define “quality.” The objective of this literature review was to understand the perceptions patients, physicians, and managed care professionals have about quality cancer care, especially chemotherapy. METHODS A computerized literature search was conducted for articles concerning quality cancer care in patients who received chemotherapy. Among >1100 identified sources, 25 presented interviews/survey results from stakeholders. RESULTS Patients defined quality cancer care as being treated well by providers, having multiple treatment options, and being part of the decision-making process. Waiting to see providers, having problems with referrals, going to different locations for treatment, experiencing billing inaccuracies, and navigating managed care reimbursement negatively affected patients' quality-of-care perceptions. Providers perceived quality cancer care as making decisions based on the risks-benefits of specific chemotherapy regimens and patients' health status rather than costs. Providers objected to spending substantial time interacting with payers instead of delivering care to patients. Payers must control the costs of cancer care but do not want an adversarial relationship with providers and patients. Payers' methods of managing cancer more efficiently involved working with providers to develop assessment and decision-assist tools. CONCLUSIONS Delivering quality cancer care is increasingly difficult because of the shortage of oncologists and rising costs of chemotherapy agents, radiation therapy, and imaging tests. The definition of quality cancer care differed among stakeholders, and healthcare reform must reflect these various needs to maintain and improve quality while controlling costs. Cancer 2011. © 2010 American Cancer Society PMID:20939015

  1. Defining practice: flexibility, legitimacy, and the nature of systems of care and wraparound.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Eric J; Walker, Janet S

    2010-02-01

    In human services, clear definition of key concepts and strategies is critical to facilitating training, implementation, and research. This article reflects on methods undertaken to specify the wraparound process for children and families, and considers lessons that may be relevant to defining the system of care concept.

  2. Love, Money, or Flexibility: What Motivates People to Work in Consumer-Directed Home Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Candace

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of wages and benefits (relative to other jobs available to workers), controlling for personal characteristics, on the recruitment and retention of providers working in a consumer-directed home care program. Design and Methods: I used the results of focus groups to design a survey…

  3. Defining practice: flexibility, legitimacy, and the nature of systems of care and wraparound.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Eric J; Walker, Janet S

    2010-02-01

    In human services, clear definition of key concepts and strategies is critical to facilitating training, implementation, and research. This article reflects on methods undertaken to specify the wraparound process for children and families, and considers lessons that may be relevant to defining the system of care concept. PMID:19589600

  4. Defining Practice: Flexibility, Legitimacy, and the Nature of Systems of Care and Wraparound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruns, Eric J.; Walker, Janet S.

    2010-01-01

    In human services, clear definition of key concepts and strategies is critical to facilitating training, implementation, and research. This article reflects on methods undertaken to specify the wraparound process for children and families, and considers lessons that may be relevant to defining the system of care concept.

  5. Quality of life among immigrant Latina breast cancer survivors: realities of culture and enhancing cancer care.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Perret-Gentil, Monique; Kreling, Barbara; Caicedo, Larisa; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Graves, Kristi D

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Latinas. This study examined social, cultural, and health care system factors that impact the quality of life and survivorship experiences of Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors. We interviewed Latina breast cancer survivors (n = 19) and, based on the interview findings, conducted two focus groups (n = 9). Research staff translated transcripts from Spanish into English. Two trained raters reviewed the content and identified themes. Thematic content analysis was used to categorize and organize data. Participants were largely monolingual in Spanish, predominantly from Central and South America and most (68%) had lived in the U.S. for ten or more years. All women were diagnosed and treated in the U.S. and were an average of 3.1 years from diagnosis. Women's survivorship experiences appeared to be shaped by cultural beliefs and experiences as immigrants such as secrecy/shame about a breast cancer diagnosis, feelings of isolation, importance of family support (familism), challenges with developing social relationships in the U.S. (less personalismo), and, for some, their partner's difficulty with showing emotional support (machismo). Navigating the U.S. medical system and language barriers were additional challenges in the participants' health care interactions. Latina breast cancer survivors adhere to certain cultural values and face unique issues as immigrants, potentially influencing overall quality of life and doctor-patient communication. Efforts to improve Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors' quality of life could include increased assessment of psychosocial functioning and referral to social support services, culturally sensitive navigation programs, and consistent use of appropriately trained interpreters.

  6. The oncology pharmacy in cancer care delivery in a resource-constrained setting in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Strother, R Matthew; Rao, Kamakshi V; Gregory, Kelly M; Jakait, Beatrice; Busakhala, Naftali; Schellhase, Ellen; Pastakia, Sonak; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Loehrer, Patrick J

    2012-12-01

    The movement to deliver cancer care in resource-limited settings is gaining momentum, with particular emphasis on the creation of cost-effective, rational algorithms utilizing affordable chemotherapeutics to treat curable disease. The delivery of cancer care in resource-replete settings is a concerted effort by a team of multidisciplinary care providers. The oncology pharmacy, which is now considered integral to cancer care in resourced medical practice, developed over the last several decades in an effort to limit healthcare provider exposure to workplace hazards and to limit risk to patients. In developing cancer care services in resource-constrained settings, creation of oncology pharmacies can help to both mitigate the risks to practitioners and patients, and also limit the costs of cancer care and the environmental impact of chemotherapeutics. This article describes the experience and lessons learned in establishing a chemotherapy pharmacy in western Kenya.

  7. Bayesian Networks for Clinical Decision Support in Lung Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Nicholson, Ann E.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Kadir, Timor; Brady, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Survival prediction and treatment selection in lung cancer care are characterised by high levels of uncertainty. Bayesian Networks (BNs), which naturally reason with uncertain domain knowledge, can be applied to aid lung cancer experts by providing personalised survival estimates and treatment selection recommendations. Based on the English Lung Cancer Database (LUCADA), we evaluate the feasibility of BNs for these two tasks, while comparing the performances of various causal discovery approaches to uncover the most feasible network structure from expert knowledge and data. We show first that the BN structure elicited from clinicians achieves a disappointing area under the ROC curve of 0.75 (± 0.03), whereas a structure learned by the CAMML hybrid causal discovery algorithm, which adheres with the temporal restrictions, achieves 0.81 (± 0.03). Second, our causal intervention results reveal that BN treatment recommendations, based on prescribing the treatment plan that maximises survival, can only predict the recorded treatment plan 29% of the time. However, this percentage rises to 76% when partial matches are included. PMID:24324773

  8. Point-of-Care Rare Cell Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Issadore, David

    2015-01-01

    The sparse cells that are shed from tumors into peripheral circulation are an increasingly promising resource for noninvasive monitoring of cancer progression, early diagnosis of disease, and serve as a tool for improving our understanding of cancer metastasis. However, the extremely sparse concentration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood (~1–100 CTC in 7.5 mL of blood) as well as their heterogeneous biomarker expression has limited their detection using conventional laboratory techniques. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a microfluidic chip-based micro-Hall detector (μHD), which can directly measure single, immunomagnetically tagged cells in whole blood. The μHD can detect individual cells even in the presence of vast numbers of blood cells and unbound reactants, and does not require any washing or purification steps. Furthermore, this cost-effective, single-cell analytical technique is well suited for miniaturization into a mobile platform for low-cost point-of-care use. In this chapter, we describe the methodology used to design, fabricate, and apply these chips to cancer diagnostics. PMID:25626536

  9. Penile cancer: Perspective from a Canadian tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Beech, Benjamin; Izawa, Jonathan; Pautler, Stephen; Chin, Joseph; Power, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is rare in North America; however, the morbidity can be devastating. This analysis represents the first reported penile cancer experience at a tertiary care centre in Canada. Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of all patients who received care at our centre for penile SCC from 2005 until the present time. Epidemiological and clinical data were collected for all patients. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier methods with log-rank test and Cox regression for univariate and multivariate analysis, respectively. Results: We identified 42 patients who were treated at our centre for penile SCC. Of these, 29% underwent excisional biopsy, 38% had partial penectomy, and 33% had total penectomy. Five patients with high-risk tumours underwent modified inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND), while 7 patients had radical ILND for clinically palpable disease. Overall, the median cancer specific survival (CSS) was undefined, with a 60% survival at 102 months. However CSS was significantly correlated to pT stage, pN stage, and tumour grade. The median follow-up was 25 months (interquartile range: 11–48). Conclusion: These findings confirm the poor CSS of patients with positive lymph nodes in penile SCC. Patients with pN0 after ILND had a durable CSS. Risk factors for penile SCC were confirmed as elevated body mass index, positive smoking history, and lack of circumcision. This first epidemiologic report on penile SCC from a Canadian tertiary care centre should be expanded to other national centres. PMID:26644802

  10. Illness perceptions in relation to experiences of contemporary cancer care settings among colorectal cancer survivors and their partners

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ann-Caroline; Axelsson, Malin; Berndtsson, Ina; Brink, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Illness is constituted by subjective experiences of symptoms and their psychosocial consequences. Illness perceptions concern people's lay beliefs about understandings and interpretation of a disease and expectations as to disease outcome. Our knowledge about illness perceptions and coping in relation to the cancer care context among persons with colorectal cancer (CRC) and their partners is incomplete. The aim of the present study was to explore illness perceptions in relation to contemporary cancer care settings among CRC survivors and partners. The present research focused on illness rather than disease, implying that personal experiences are central to the methodology. The grounded theory method used is that presented by Kathy Charmaz. The present results explore illness perceptions in the early recovery phase after being diagnosed and treated for cancer in a contemporary cancer care setting. The core category outlook on the cancer diagnosis when quickly informed, treated, and discharged illustrates the illness perceptions of survivors and partners as well as the environment in which they were found. The cancer care environment is presented in the conceptual category experiencing contemporary cancer care settings. Receiving treatment quickly and without waiting was a positive experience for both partners and survivors; however partners experienced the information as massive and as causing concern. The period after discharge was being marked by uncertainty and loneliness, and partners tended to experience non-continuity in care as more problematic than the survivor did. The results showed different illness perceptions and a mismatch between illness perceptions among survivors and partners, presented in the conceptual category outlook on the cancer diagnosis. One illness perception, here presented among partners, focused on seeing the cancer diagnosis as a permanent life-changing event. The other illness perception, here presented among survivors, concentrated on

  11. Survivorship care for older adults with cancer: U13 conference report.

    PubMed

    Guerard, Emily J; Nightingale, Ginah; Bellizzi, Keith; Burhenn, Peggy; Rosko, Ashley; Artz, Andrew S; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz; Canin, Beverly; Dale, William; Ferrell, Betty

    2016-07-01

    Older adult cancer survivors currently account for almost 60% of all cancer survivors. The number of older cancer survivors will continue to increase as the population ages and as patients' live longer after a cancer diagnosis. As part of cancer center accreditation, the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer® (CoC) has placed great importance on survivorship care planning. While the CoC has set standards for general survivorship care, there is sparse evidence on how to best care for older adult cancer survivors. Concern exists among the medical community that survivorship care plans could increase paperwork without improving outcomes. Given the diverse and unique needs of older adult cancer survivors, the inter-professional team provides a structure and process for survivorship care built around the particular needs of older adults. The Cancer and Aging Research Group (CARG), in partnership with the NIA/NCI, held a U13 conference in May 2015 in part to discuss survivorship care for older adults with cancer. This report discusses four themes that emerged from one section of the conference: (1) survivorship care is a process that continually evolves to meet the needs of older adults; (2) older adult cancer survivors have unique needs and care plans should be tailored to meet these needs; (3) the inter-professional team is ideally suited to structure survivorship care of older adults; (4) patient advocacy must be encouraged throughout the cancer care continuum. As evidence based survivorship practices develop, the unique needs of older adults need to be given substantial attention. PMID:27424802

  12. Survivorship care for older adults with cancer: U13 conference report.

    PubMed

    Guerard, Emily J; Nightingale, Ginah; Bellizzi, Keith; Burhenn, Peggy; Rosko, Ashley; Artz, Andrew S; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz; Canin, Beverly; Dale, William; Ferrell, Betty

    2016-07-01

    Older adult cancer survivors currently account for almost 60% of all cancer survivors. The number of older cancer survivors will continue to increase as the population ages and as patients' live longer after a cancer diagnosis. As part of cancer center accreditation, the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer® (CoC) has placed great importance on survivorship care planning. While the CoC has set standards for general survivorship care, there is sparse evidence on how to best care for older adult cancer survivors. Concern exists among the medical community that survivorship care plans could increase paperwork without improving outcomes. Given the diverse and unique needs of older adult cancer survivors, the inter-professional team provides a structure and process for survivorship care built around the particular needs of older adults. The Cancer and Aging Research Group (CARG), in partnership with the NIA/NCI, held a U13 conference in May 2015 in part to discuss survivorship care for older adults with cancer. This report discusses four themes that emerged from one section of the conference: (1) survivorship care is a process that continually evolves to meet the needs of older adults; (2) older adult cancer survivors have unique needs and care plans should be tailored to meet these needs; (3) the inter-professional team is ideally suited to structure survivorship care of older adults; (4) patient advocacy must be encouraged throughout the cancer care continuum. As evidence based survivorship practices develop, the unique needs of older adults need to be given substantial attention.

  13. Breast Cancer Care in India: The Current Scenario and the Challenges for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Gaurav; Ramakant, Pooja

    2008-01-01

    Summary The incidence of breast cancer is low in India, but rising. Breast cancer is the commonest cancer of urban Indian women and the second commonest in the rural women. Owing to the lack of awareness of this disease and in absence of a breast cancer screening program, the majority of breast cancers are diagnosed at a relatively advanced stage. The quality of care available for breast cancer patients varies widely according to where the patient is treated. Although there are some centers of excellence providing multimodality protocol-based treatment at par with the best anywhere in the world, the vast majority of breast cancer patients undergo inadequate and inappropriate treatment due to lack of high-quality infrastructure and sometimes skills, and above all financial resources. The recent emphasis on health education, early diagnosis of cancers, and more public facilities for cancer treatment are expected to bring about the much needed improvement in breast cancer care in India. PMID:20824016

  14. Association of Early Patient-Physician Care Planning Discussions and End-of-Life Care Intensity in Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tisnado, Diana M.; Walling, Anne M.; Dy, Sydney M.; Asch, Steven M.; Ettner, Susan L.; Kim, Benjamin; Pantoja, Philip; Schreibeis-Baum, Hannah C.; Lorenz, Karl A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Early patient-physician care planning discussions may influence the intensity of end-of-life (EOL) care received by veterans with advanced cancer. Objective: The study objective was to evaluate the association between medical record documentation of patient-physician care planning discussions and intensity of EOL care among veterans with advanced cancer. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. Subjects were 665 veteran decedents diagnosed with stage IV colorectal, lung, or pancreatic cancer in 2008, and followed till death or the end of the study period in 2011. We estimated the effect of patient-physician care planning discussions documented within one month of metastatic diagnosis on the intensity of EOL care measured by receipt of acute care, intensive interventions, chemotherapy, and hospice care, using multivariate logistic regression models. Results: Veterans in our study were predominantly male (97.1%), white (74.7%), with an average age at diagnosis of 66.4 years. Approximately 31% received some acute care, 9.3% received some intensive intervention, and 6.5% had a new chemotherapy regimen initiated in the last month of life. Approximately 41% of decedents received no hospice or were admitted within three days of death. Almost half (46.8%) had documentation of a care planning discussion within the first month after diagnosis and those who did were significantly less likely to receive acute care at EOL (OR: 0.67; p=0.025). Documented discussions were not significantly associated with intensive interventions, chemotherapy, or hospice care. Conclusion: Early care planning discussions are associated with lower rates of acute care use at the EOL in a system with already low rates of intensive EOL care. PMID:26186553

  15. Rapid diagnostic pathways for suspected colorectal cancer: views of primary and secondary care clinicians on challenges and their potential solutions

    PubMed Central

    Redaniel, Maria Theresa; Ridd, Matthew; Martin, Richard M; Coxon, Fareeda; Jeffreys, Mona; Wade, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain the challenges associated with implementation of the 2-week wait referral criteria and waiting time targets for colorectal cancer and to identify recommendations for improvements to the pathway. Design Qualitative research using semistructured interviews and applying thematic analysis using the method of constant comparison. Setting 10 primary care surgeries and 6 secondary care centres from 3 geographical areas in the England. Participants Purposive sample of 24 clinicians (10 general practitioners (GPs), 7 oncologists and 7 colorectal surgeons). Results GPs and specialists highlighted delays in patient help-seeking, difficulties applying the colorectal cancer referral criteria due to their low predictive value, and concerns about the stringent application of targets because of potential impact on individual care and associated penalties for breaching. Promoting patient awareness and early presentation, clarifying predictive symptoms, allowing flexibility, optimising resources and maximising care coordination were suggested as improvements. Conclusions Challenges during diagnosis and treatment persist, with guidelines and waiting time targets producing the perception of unintended harms at individual and organisational levels. This has led to variations in how guidelines are implemented. These require urgent evaluation, so that effective practices can be adopted more widely. PMID:26493457

  16. The national database of hospital-based cancer registries: a nationwide infrastructure to support evidence-based cancer care and cancer control policy in Japan.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Takahiro; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Shibata, Akiko; Emori, Yoshiko; Nishimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the current status of cancer care is essential for effective cancer control and high-quality cancer care. To address the information needs of patients and physicians in Japan, hospital-based cancer registries are operated in 397 hospitals designated as cancer care hospitals by the national government. These hospitals collect information on all cancer cases encountered in each hospital according to precisely defined coding rules. The Center for Cancer Control and Information Services at the National Cancer Center supports the management of the hospital-based cancer registry by providing training for tumor registrars and by developing and maintaining the standard software and continuing communication, which includes mailing lists, a customizable web site and site visits. Data from the cancer care hospitals are submitted annually to the Center, compiled, and distributed as the National Cancer Statistics Report. The report reveals the national profiles of patient characteristics, route to discovery, stage distribution, and first-course treatments of the five major cancers in Japan. A system designed to follow up on patient survival will soon be established. Findings from the analyses will reveal characteristics of designated cancer care hospitals nationwide and will show how characteristics of patients with cancer in Japan differ from those of patients with cancer in other countries. The database will provide an infrastructure for future clinical and health services research and will support quality measurement and improvement of cancer care. Researchers and policy-makers in Japan are encouraged to take advantage of this powerful tool to enhance cancer control and their clinical practice.

  17. External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Emily F.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Moody, John S.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

  18. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care and Patient Related Outcomes: A Critical Review of Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Patra, Lipika; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: World Health Organization and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend early integration of specialist palliative care in patients with cancer. This paper focuses on critical review of evidence on integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient-related outcomes. Methods: The question for the literature search was – Does integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care influences patient-related outcomes? 31 articles related to literature search review question were included in this paper. Results: Ten patient-related outcomes of early specialist palliative care in adult cancer care was studied. Studies by Temel et al. (2012), Bakitas et al. (2009), Zimmermann et al. (2014), Rugno et al. (2014), Lowery et al. (2013) and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improves health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Studies by Pirl et al. (2012), Lowery et al. (2013), and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improved mood depression and anxiety. Studies by Zimmermann et al. and Rugno et al. (2014) showed symptom control benefit of early specialist palliative care. Studies by Temel (2010), Bakitas (2015) and Rugno et al. (2014) showed survival improvement with early specialist palliative care. All these studies were carried in ambulatory palliative care setting. No survival benefit of palliative care intervention was seen in inpatient palliative care setting. The studies by Geer et al. (2012), Rugno et al. (2014), and Lowery et al. (2013) showed that early palliative care intervention positively influences treatment decision making. All the studies showed that palliative care intervention group received less intravenous chemotherapy in last few weeks of life. Studies by Yoong et al. and Temel et al. (2011) shows early specialist palliative care improves advanced care planning. Studies by Temel et al. (2010), Greer et al. (2012), McNamara et al. (2013), Hui et al. (2014

  19. [Certified prostate cancer centers and second opinion centers for testicular cancer: successful models of uro-oncology cancer care].

    PubMed

    Gschwend, J E; Albers, P; Schrader, M

    2011-08-01

    Establishment of organ site-specific cancer centers by the German Cancer Society (GCS) is part of the basic politically driven reform of oncology care in Germany. Since 2007 an increasing number of prostate cancer centers have been guided toward certification by the OnkoZert GmbH of the GCS. Currently 68 centers are certified and together with ongoing certification proceedings will amount to 81 prostate cancer centers, which cover about one fourth of cases of primary prostate cancer. Urology is of particular importance in the management of these centers. For the most part, urologists belonging to a clinical unit are the initiators of the certification process, thus ensuring that uro-oncology is firmly entrenched in the specialty with involvement of outpatient service providers. Fears that authority will be lost are unfounded as long as responsibility for this task is taken seriously and active use is made of the possibilities for creativity. A similarly important function is fulfilled by the testicular cancer centers that offer second opinion services, which were initiated by urology conjointly with German Cancer Aid to pursue the goal of quality assurance for this tumor entity and therefore likewise secure the position of this tumor in the realm of urologists. By applying such strategic approaches, urologists will succeed in sustainably safeguarding their future importance in a very competitive environment and in counteracting the encroachments of other specialties by exhibiting clear orientation.

  20. Modeling Intercellular Communication as a Survival Strategy of Cancer Cells: An In Silico Approach on a Flexible Bioinformatics Framework.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-García, Maura; González-Pérez, Pedro P; Montagna, Sara; Cortés, Oscar Sánchez; Caballero, Elena Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is very important for cell development and allows a group of cells to survive as a population. Cancer cells have a similar behavior, presenting the same mechanisms and characteristics of tissue formation. In this article, we model and simulate the formation of different communication channels that allow an interaction between two cells. This is a first step in order to simulate in the future processes that occur in healthy tissue when normal cells surround a cancer cell and to interrupt the communication, thus preventing the spread of malignancy into these cells. The purpose of this study is to propose key molecules, which can be targeted to allow us to break the communication between cancer cells and surrounding normal cells. The simulation is carried out using a flexible bioinformatics platform that we developed, which is itself based on the metaphor chemistry-based model. PMID:26997867

  1. Modeling Intercellular Communication as a Survival Strategy of Cancer Cells: An In Silico Approach on a Flexible Bioinformatics Framework

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-García, Maura; González-Pérez, Pedro P.; Montagna, Sara; Cortés, Oscar Sánchez; Caballero, Elena Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is very important for cell development and allows a group of cells to survive as a population. Cancer cells have a similar behavior, presenting the same mechanisms and characteristics of tissue formation. In this article, we model and simulate the formation of different communication channels that allow an interaction between two cells. This is a first step in order to simulate in the future processes that occur in healthy tissue when normal cells surround a cancer cell and to interrupt the communication, thus preventing the spread of malignancy into these cells. The purpose of this study is to propose key molecules, which can be targeted to allow us to break the communication between cancer cells and surrounding normal cells. The simulation is carried out using a flexible bioinformatics platform that we developed, which is itself based on the metaphor chemistry-based model. PMID:26997867

  2. Increasing Physicians' and Nurses' Compliance with Treatment Guidelines in Cancer Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slenker, Suzanne E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The effect of the use of guidelines on the care of patients with breast, colon, and non-small-cell lung cancers is reported. Audits of patient records revealed an increase over time in the percentage of recommended cancer care procedures that were complied with. (Author/MLW)

  3. Influence of Place of Residence in Access to Specialized Cancer Care for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Tracy; Duell, Eric J.; Shi, Xun; Demidenko, Eugene; Goodman, David

    2010-01-01

    Context: Disparities in cancer care for rural residents and for African Americans have been documented, but the interaction of these factors is not well understood. Purpose: The authors examined the simultaneous influence of race and place of residence on access to and utilization of specialized cancer care in the United States. Methods: Access to…

  4. Initial Experience of Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated in an Oncologist Led Palliative Cancer Care Clinic at a Tertiary Cancer Care Center in Uttar Pradesh: Is the Initiative of a Full-fledged Palliative Care for Cancer Patients Justified

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Punita; Verma, Mranalini; Kumar, Gaurav; Shrivastava, Resham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Poor socioeconomic status and illiteracy attribute to the advanced presentation of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients in India and are candidates for palliation in our setup. We set up a palliative cancer care clinic (PCCC), and an audit of initial 153 HNC patients is presented. Aims and Objectives: To assess the impact of palliative cancer care services. Methodology: Data of advanced HNC patients suited for palliation were collected to document demography, symptomatology, cancer treatment, and supportive care. Results: One hundred and fifty-three patients were seen during January 2013 to March 2015 in the PCCC. Seventy-two (47%) referral cases were due to disease progression and 81 (53%) due to de novo advanced cases. Median follow-up for this group was 5.3 months. Ninety (59%) cases needed some degree of assistance for their normal activities. Sixty-seven (44%) patients belonged to poor socioeconomic status and 65 (43%) were educated up to equivalent of high school. One hundred and thirty-five (88%) patients had an adequate family support. Pain was the most common presenting symptom in 134 (87%) cases with adequate relief in 112 (84%) patients with another 13 (09%) could not be assessed. Overall median duration of symptoms was 6 months. Cancer-directed therapy was used in 143 (93%) patients. Near the end of life in 47 (73%) out of 63 documented cases, caregivers were psychologically prepared for the inevitable. Conclusion: The role of palliative care team in alleviating physical, psychosocial, and emotional issues of patient and family members was significant. PCCC seems to be a feasible working model in our setup. PMID:27803571

  5. Responding to Acute Care Needs of Patients With Cancer: Recent Trends Across Continents.

    PubMed

    Young, Alison; Marshall, Ernie; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Robinson, Bridget; Brown, Sean; Collinson, Fiona; Seligmann, Jennifer; Abbas, Afroze; Rees, Adrian; Swinson, Daniel; Neville-Webbe, Helen; Selby, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Remarkable progress has been made over the past decade in cancer medicine. Personalized medicine, driven by biomarker predictive factors, novel biotherapy, novel imaging, and molecular targeted therapeutics, has improved outcomes. Cancer is becoming a chronic disease rather than a fatal disease for many patients. However, despite this progress, there is much work to do if patients are to receive continuous high-quality care in the appropriate place, at the appropriate time, and with the right specialized expert oversight. Unfortunately, the rapid expansion of therapeutic options has also generated an ever-increasing burden of emergency care and encroaches into end-of-life palliative care. Emergency presentation is a common consequence of cancer and of cancer treatment complications. It represents an important proportion of new presentations of previously undiagnosed malignancy. In the U.K. alone, 20%-25% of new cancer diagnoses are made following an initial presentation to the hospital emergency department, with a greater proportion in patients older than 70 years. This late presentation accounts for poor survival outcomes and is often associated with poor patient experience and poorly coordinated care. The recent development of acute oncology services in the U.K. aims to improve patient safety, quality of care, and the coordination of care for all patients with cancer who require emergency access to care, irrespective of the place of care and admission route. Furthermore, prompt management coordinated by expert teams and access to protocol-driven pathways have the potential to improve patient experience and drive efficiency when services are fully established. The challenge to leaders of acute oncology services is to develop bespoke models of care, appropriate to local services, but with an opportunity for acute oncology teams to engage cancer care strategies and influence cancer care and delivery in the future. This will aid the integration of highly specialized

  6. [The university hospital palliative care team's approach to the transfer of end-stage cancer patients from hospital care to home medical care].

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kazuho; Nishiumi, Noboru; Kushino, Nobuhisa; Tsukada, Michiko; Douzono, Sachiko; Saito, Yuki; Yagame, Mitsunori; Tokuda, Yutaka

    2009-12-01

    The palliative care team's roles are to provide a symptom relief to cancer patients, help them accept their medical conditions, and offer advice regarding the selection of appropriate medical treatments to suit their needs. Seeking the comfort of their homes, patients prefer a home care of superior medical care provided at hospitals. In 2008, 25 of the end-stage cancer patients at hospitals were expressed their desires to have a home medical care, and 10 of them were allowed to do so. We considered the following contributing factors that a patient should have for a smooth transition from hospital care to home medical care: (1) life expectancy of more than 2 months, (2) no progressive breathing difficulties experienced daily, (3) good awareness of medical condition among patients and families, (4) living with someone who has a good understanding of the condition, (5) availability of an appropriate hospital in case of a sudden change in medical requirements, and (6) good collaboration between emergency care hospitals, home physicians, and visiting nurses. To treat the end-stage cancer patients at home, there is a need for information sharing and a joint training of physicians specialized in cancer therapy, palliative care teams, home physicians, and visiting nurses. This would ensure a sustainable "face-to-face collaboration" in community health care.

  7. Health-care providers' perceptions, attitudes towards and recommendation practice of cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Hweissa, N Ab; Lim, J N W; Su, T T

    2016-09-01

    In Libya, cervical cancer is ranked third as the most frequent cancer among women with early diagnosis being shown to reduce morbidity and mortality. Health-care providers can influence women's screening behaviours, and their lack of recommendations for screening can be one of the barriers that affect women's participation in screening programmes. This study aims to assess the health-care provider's perception around cervical cancer screening. In-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 16 health-care providers, from both public and private sectors in Az-Zawiya city, Libya, between February and July of 2014. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analysed using thematic analysis. Our findings suggest that health-care providers did not provide sufficient information regarding cervical cancer screening for women who attend health-care facilities. The results highlight the role played by health-care professionals in motivating women to attend cervical cancer screening programs, and the need for health education of health-care providers to offer a precious advice regarding the screening. On the other hand, health-care providers highlighted that implementation of reminding system of cervical cancer screening will support them to improve screening attendance. In addition, health-care providers stressed the necessity for educational and awareness campaigns of cervical cancer screening among Libyan women. PMID:27350095

  8. Health-care providers' perceptions, attitudes towards and recommendation practice of cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Hweissa, N Ab; Lim, J N W; Su, T T

    2016-09-01

    In Libya, cervical cancer is ranked third as the most frequent cancer among women with early diagnosis being shown to reduce morbidity and mortality. Health-care providers can influence women's screening behaviours, and their lack of recommendations for screening can be one of the barriers that affect women's participation in screening programmes. This study aims to assess the health-care provider's perception around cervical cancer screening. In-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 16 health-care providers, from both public and private sectors in Az-Zawiya city, Libya, between February and July of 2014. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analysed using thematic analysis. Our findings suggest that health-care providers did not provide sufficient information regarding cervical cancer screening for women who attend health-care facilities. The results highlight the role played by health-care professionals in motivating women to attend cervical cancer screening programs, and the need for health education of health-care providers to offer a precious advice regarding the screening. On the other hand, health-care providers highlighted that implementation of reminding system of cervical cancer screening will support them to improve screening attendance. In addition, health-care providers stressed the necessity for educational and awareness campaigns of cervical cancer screening among Libyan women.

  9. Establishing nurse-led active surveillance for men with localised prostate cancer: development and formative evaluation of a model of care in the ProtecT trial

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Julia; Holding, Peter N; Bonnington, Susan; Rooshenas, Leila; Lane, J Athene; Salter, C Elizabeth; Tilling, Kate; Speakman, Mark J; Brewster, Simon F; Evans, Simon; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a nurse-led, urologist-supported model of care for men managed by active surveillance or active monitoring (AS/AM) for localised prostate cancer and provide a formative evaluation of its acceptability to patients, clinicians and nurses. Nurse-led care, comprising an explicit nurse-led protocol with support from urologists, was developed as part of the AM arm of the Prostate testing for cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial. Design Interviews and questionnaire surveys of clinicians, nurses and patients assessed acceptability. Setting Nurse-led clinics were established in 9 centres in the ProtecT trial and compared with 3 non-ProtecT urology centres elsewhere in UK. Participants Within ProtecT, 22 men receiving AM nurse-led care were interviewed about experiences of care; 11 urologists and 23 research nurses delivering ProtecT trial care completed a questionnaire about its acceptability; 20 men managed in urology clinics elsewhere in the UK were interviewed about models of AS/AM care; 12 urologists and three specialist nurses working in these clinics were also interviewed about management of AS/AM. Results Nurse-led care was commended by ProtecT trial participants, who valued the flexibility, accessibility and continuity of the service and felt confident about the quality of care. ProtecT consultant urologists and nurses also rated it highly, identifying continuity of care and resource savings as key attributes. Clinicians and patients outside the ProtecT trial believed that nurse-led care could relieve pressure on urology clinics without compromising patient care. Conclusions The ProtecT AM nurse-led model of care was acceptable to men with localised prostate cancer and clinical specialists in urology. The protocol is available for implementation; we aim to evaluate its impact on routine clinical practice. Trial registration numbers NCT02044172; ISRCTN20141297. PMID:26384727

  10. Variations in cancer survival and patterns of care across Europe: roles of wealth and health-care organization.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Gemma; Trama, Annalisa; Capocaccia, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Cancer survival varies markedly across Europe. We analyzed variations in all-cancer 5-year relative survival in relation to macroeconomic and health-care indicators, and 5-year relative survival for three major cancers (colorectal, prostate, breast) in relation to application of standard treatments, to serve as baseline for monitoring the efficacy of new European initiatives to improve cancer survival. Five-year relative survival data were from the European cancer registry-based study of cancer patients' survival and care (EUROCARE-4). Macroeconomic and health system data were from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and European Observatory on Health Care Systems. Information on treatments given was from EUROCARE studies. Total national health spending varied widely across Europe and correlated linearly with survival (R = 0.8). Countries with high spending had high numbers of diagnostic and radiotherapy units, and 5-year relative survival was good (>50%). The treatments given for major cancers also varied; advanced stage at diagnosis was associated with poor 5-year relative survival and low odds of receiving standard treatment for breast and colorectal cancer.

  11. Identifying priority actions for improving patient satisfaction with outpatient cancer care.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Sabina B; Gregory, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In parallel to developing new cancer therapies, the healthcare community has the responsibility of creating positive treatment experiences for patients. Data from 5907 cancer outpatients treated at 23 hospitals across the United States were analyzed to identify the top priorities for service improvement in outpatient cancer treatment facilities. They included meeting patients' emotional needs, providing information to patients and family members, reducing waiting times, and providing convenience and coordinated care among physicians and other care providers.

  12. Challenges in Prevention and Care Delivery for Women with Cervical Cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas C; Ghebre, Rahel

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all cases of invasive cervical cancer are associated with infection by high-risk strains of human papilloma virus. Effective primary and secondary prevention programs, as well as effective treatment for early-stage invasive cancer have dramatically reduced the burden of cervical cancer in high-income countries; 85% of the mortality from cervical cancer now occurs in low- and middle-income countries. This article provides an overview of challenges to cervical cancer care in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and identifies areas for programmatic development to meet the global development goal to reduce cancer-related mortality. Advanced stage at presentation and gaps in prevention, screening, diagnostic, and treatment capacities contribute to reduced cervical cancer survival. Cost-effective cervical cancer screening strategies implemented in low resource settings can reduce cervical cancer mortality. Patient- and system-based barriers need to be addressed as part of any cervical cancer control program. Limited human capacity and infrastructure in SSA are major barriers to comprehensive cervical cancer care. Management of early-stage, locally advanced or metastatic cervical cancer involves multispecialty care, including gynecology oncology, medical oncology, radiology, pathology, radiation oncology, and palliative care. Investment in cervical cancer care programs in low- and middle-income countries will need to include effective recruitment programs to engage women in the community to access cancer screening and diagnosis services. Though cervical cancer is a preventable and treatable cancer, the challenges to cervical control in SSA are great and will require a broadly integrated and sustained effort by multiple stakeholders before meaningful progress can be achieved.

  13. Challenges in Prevention and Care Delivery for Women with Cervical Cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas C; Ghebre, Rahel

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all cases of invasive cervical cancer are associated with infection by high-risk strains of human papilloma virus. Effective primary and secondary prevention programs, as well as effective treatment for early-stage invasive cancer have dramatically reduced the burden of cervical cancer in high-income countries; 85% of the mortality from cervical cancer now occurs in low- and middle-income countries. This article provides an overview of challenges to cervical cancer care in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and identifies areas for programmatic development to meet the global development goal to reduce cancer-related mortality. Advanced stage at presentation and gaps in prevention, screening, diagnostic, and treatment capacities contribute to reduced cervical cancer survival. Cost-effective cervical cancer screening strategies implemented in low resource settings can reduce cervical cancer mortality. Patient- and system-based barriers need to be addressed as part of any cervical cancer control program. Limited human capacity and infrastructure in SSA are major barriers to comprehensive cervical cancer care. Management of early-stage, locally advanced or metastatic cervical cancer involves multispecialty care, including gynecology oncology, medical oncology, radiology, pathology, radiation oncology, and palliative care. Investment in cervical cancer care programs in low- and middle-income countries will need to include effective recruitment programs to engage women in the community to access cancer screening and diagnosis services. Though cervical cancer is a preventable and treatable cancer, the challenges to cervical control in SSA are great and will require a broadly integrated and sustained effort by multiple stakeholders before meaningful progress can be achieved. PMID:27446806

  14. Challenges in Prevention and Care Delivery for Women with Cervical Cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Thomas C.; Ghebre, Rahel

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all cases of invasive cervical cancer are associated with infection by high-risk strains of human papilloma virus. Effective primary and secondary prevention programs, as well as effective treatment for early-stage invasive cancer have dramatically reduced the burden of cervical cancer in high-income countries; 85% of the mortality from cervical cancer now occurs in low- and middle-income countries. This article provides an overview of challenges to cervical cancer care in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and identifies areas for programmatic development to meet the global development goal to reduce cancer-related mortality. Advanced stage at presentation and gaps in prevention, screening, diagnostic, and treatment capacities contribute to reduced cervical cancer survival. Cost-effective cervical cancer screening strategies implemented in low resource settings can reduce cervical cancer mortality. Patient- and system-based barriers need to be addressed as part of any cervical cancer control program. Limited human capacity and infrastructure in SSA are major barriers to comprehensive cervical cancer care. Management of early-stage, locally advanced or metastatic cervical cancer involves multispecialty care, including gynecology oncology, medical oncology, radiology, pathology, radiation oncology, and palliative care. Investment in cervical cancer care programs in low- and middle-income countries will need to include effective recruitment programs to engage women in the community to access cancer screening and diagnosis services. Though cervical cancer is a preventable and treatable cancer, the challenges to cervical control in SSA are great and will require a broadly integrated and sustained effort by multiple stakeholders before meaningful progress can be achieved. PMID:27446806

  15. Point-of-care test for cervical cancer in LMICs

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Sulma I.; Ren, Wen; Flowers, Lisa; Rajwa, Bartek; Chibwesha, Carla J.; Parham, Groesbeck P.; Irudayaraj, Joseph M.K.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer screening using Papanicolaou's smear test has been highly effective in reducing death from this disease. However, this test is unaffordable in low- and middle-income countries, and its complexity has limited wide-scale uptake. Alternative tests, such as visual inspection with acetic acid or Lugol's iodine and human papillomavirus DNA, are sub-optimal in terms of specificity and sensitivity, thus sensitive and affordable tests with high specificity for on-site reporting are needed. Using proteomics and bioinformatics, we have identified valosin-containing protein (VCP) as differentially expressed between normal specimens and those with cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (CIN2/CIN3+) or worse. VCP-specific immunohistochemical staining (validated by a point-of-care technology) provided sensitive (93%) and specific (88%) identification of CIN2/CIN3+ and may serve as a critical biomarker for cervical-cancer screening. Future efforts will focus on further refinements to enhance analytic sensitivity and specificity of our proposed test, as well as on prototype development. PMID:26934314

  16. Effective communication skills are the key to good cancer care.

    PubMed

    Fallowfield, L; Jenkins, V

    1999-10-01

    Communication within oncology is a core clinical skill but one in which few oncologists or specialist cancer nurses have received much formal training. Inadequate communication may cause much distress for patients and their families, who often want considerably more information than is usually provided. Many patients leave consultations unsure about the diagnosis and prognosis, confused about the meaning of--and need for--further diagnostic tests, unclear about the management plan and uncertain about the true therapeutic intent of treatment. Additionally, communication difficulties may impede the recruitment of patients to clinical trials, delaying the introduction of efficacious new treatments into clinics. Lack of effective communication between specialists and departments can also cause confusion and a loss of confidence amongst the team. Oncologists themselves acknowledge that insufficient training in communication and management skills is a major factor contributing to their own stress, lack of job satisfaction and emotional burnout. Consequently, over the past few years there have been several initiatives aimed at improving basic communication skills training for healthcare professionals in the cancer field. In this paper, some of the issues that influence communication within an oncology setting, and ultimately affect patient care, are discussed. PMID:10673967

  17. Palliative care of cancer patients: audit of current hospital procedures.

    PubMed

    Sessa, C; Pampallona, S; Carobbio, M; Neuenschwander, H; Cavalli, F

    1998-05-01

    The palliative care of cancer patients admitted for tumour-related symptoms to three different departments (medical oncology, radiotherapy, internal medicine) of a general hospital was prospectively audited. The physicians directly responsible for the patients provided prospective data by reporting both the diagnostic and therapeutic interventions performed and the degree of control achieved for each symptom. A patient form for evaluation of the control achieved in the case of each symptom by means of linear analogue scales was also provided. The appropriateness of all procedures was evaluated by two external auditors. Over 6 months, 125 such admissions were recorded: 24 patients entered the study and the management of 56 symptoms, the most common of which were pain and dyspnoea, was reviewed. A total of 72 diagnostic procedures were performed, deemed necessary for only 50% of symptoms, optional for 15%, and performed as part of a logical sequence for 38%. A total of 130 therapeutic interventions were undertaken, deemed necessary for 55% of symptoms, optional for 15% and carried out as part of a logical sequence for 44%. Re-evaluations of symptoms and physician and patient evaluations of the degree of control achieved could not be assessed because of lack of information. The audit could not be repeated owing to the low accrual of patients and incompleteness of the data collection. Reasons for failure of the study and proposals for feasible methods of auditing the management of symptoms in cancer patients are discussed.

  18. Proteomics and Ovarian Cancer: Integrating Proteomics Information Into Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Hays, John L.; Kim, Geoffrey; Giuroiu, Iulia; Kohn, Elise C.

    2010-01-01

    The power of proteomics allows unparalleled opportunity to query the molecular mechanisms of a malignant cell and the tumor microenvironment in patients with ovarian cancer and other solid tumors. This information has given us insight into the perturbations of signaling pathways within tumor cells and has aided the discovery of new drug targets for the tumor and possible prognostic indicators of outcome and disease response to therapy. Proteomics analysis of serum and ascites has also given us sources with which to discover possible early markers for the presence of new disease and for the progression of established cancer throughout the course of treatment. Unfortunately, this wealth of information has yielded little to date in changing the clinical care of these patients from a diagnostic, prognostic, or treatment perspective. The rational examination and translation of proteomics data in the context of past clinical trials and the design of future clinical trials must occur before we can march forward into the future of personalized medicine. PMID:20561909

  19. Breast cancer in limited-resource countries: health care systems and public policy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin O; Yip, Cheng-Har; Ramsey, Scott D; Bengoa, Rafael; Braun, Susan; Fitch, Margaret; Groot, Martijn; Sancho-Garnier, Helene; Tsu, Vivien D

    2006-01-01

    As the largest cancer killer of women around the globe, breast cancer adversely impacts countries at all levels of economic development. Despite major advances in the early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer, health care ministries face multitiered challenges to create and support health care programs that can improve breast cancer outcomes. In addition to the financial and organizational problems inherent in any health care system, breast health programs are hindered by a lack of recognition of cancer as a public health priority, trained health care personnel shortages and migration, public and health care provider educational deficits, and social barriers that impede patient entry into early detection and cancer treatment programs. No perfect health care system exists, even in the wealthiest countries. Based on inevitable economic and practical constraints, all health care systems are compelled to make trade-offs among four factors: access to care, scope of service, quality of care, and cost containment. Given these trade-offs, guidelines can define stratified approaches by which economically realistic incremental improvements can be sequentially implemented within the context of resource constraints to improve breast health care. Disease-specific "vertical" programs warrant "horizontal" integration with existing health care systems in limited-resource countries. The Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Health Care Systems and Public Policy Panel defined a stratified framework outlining recommended breast health care interventions for each of four incremental levels of resources (basic, limited, enhanced, and maximal). Reallocation of existing resources and integration of a breast health care program with existing programs and infrastructure can potentially improve outcomes in a cost-sensitive manner. This adaptable framework can be used as a tool by policymakers for program planning and research design to make best use of available resources

  20. Colorectal cancer screening practices of primary care providers: results of a national survey in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Norwati, Daud; Harmy, Mohamed Yusoff; Norhayati, Mohd Noor; Amry, Abdul Rahim

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing in many Asian countries including Malaysia during the past few decades. A physician recommendation has been shown to be a major factor that motivates patients to undergo screening. The present study objectives were to describe the practice of colorectal cancer screening by primary care providers in Malaysia and to determine the barriers for not following recommendations. In this cross sectional study involving 132 primary care providers from 44 Primary Care clinics in West Malaysia, self-administered questionnaires which consisted of demographic data, qualification, background on the primary care clinic, practices on colorectal cancer screening and barriers to colorectal cancer screening were distributed. A total of 116 primary care providers responded making a response rate of 87.9%. About 21% recommended faecal occult blood test (FOBT) in more than 50% of their patients who were eligible. The most common barrier was "unavailability of the test". The two most common patient factors are "patient in a hurry" and "poor patient awareness". This study indicates that colorectal cancer preventive activities among primary care providers are still poor in Malaysia. This may be related to the low availability of the test in the primary care setting and poor awareness and understanding of the importance of colorectal cancer screening among patients. More awareness programmes are required for the public. In addition, primary care providers should be kept abreast with the latest recommendations and policy makers need to improve colorectal cancer screening services in health clinics.

  1. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care: Survey of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Patra, Lipika; Usha Rani, MR; Lohitashva, SO; Rao, Raghavendra; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Vallath, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Palliative care is usually delivered late in the course of illness trajectory. This precludes patients on active disease modifying treatment from receiving the benefit of palliative care intervention. A survey was conducted to know the opinion of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients about the role of early specialist palliative care in cancer. Methods: A nonrandomized descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary cancer care center in India. Thirty oncologists, sixty oncology nurses, and sixty patients were surveyed. Results: Improvement in symptom control was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to pain (Z = −4.10, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.84, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.20, P = 0.001); nausea and vomiting (Z = −3.75, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.3, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.1, P = 0.001); constipation (Z = −3.29, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.96, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.49, P = 0.001); breathlessness (Z = −3.57, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.03, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.99, P = 0.001); and restlessness (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.23, P = 0.001), (Z = −3.22, P = 0.001). Improvement in end-of-life care management was appreciated by oncologists and oncology nurses with respect to communication of prognosis (Z = −4.04, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.20, P = 0.001); discussion on limitation of life-sustaining treatment (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.53, P = 0.001); end-of-life symptom management (Z = −4.17, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.59, P = 0.001); perimortem care (Z = −3.86, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.80, P = 0.001); and bereavement support (Z = −3-80, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.95, P = 0.001). Improvement in health-related communication was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to communicating health related information in a sensitive manner (Z = −3.74, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.47, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.12, P = 0.001); conducting family meeting (Z = −3.12, P = 0.002), (Z = −4.60, P = 0

  2. Finding Medical Care for Colorectal Cancer Symptoms: Experiences among Those Facing Financial Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Maria D.; Siminoff, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Financial barriers can substantially delay medical care seeking. Using patient narratives provided by 252 colorectal cancer patients, we explored the experience of financial barriers to care seeking. Of the 252 patients interviewed, 84 identified financial barriers as a significant hurdle to obtaining health care for their colorectal cancer…

  3. Flexible dose-response models for Japanese atomic bomb survivor data: Bayesian estimation and prediction of cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James; Little, Mark P; Richardson, Sylvia

    2004-12-01

    Generalised absolute risk models were fitted to the latest Japanese atomic bomb survivor cancer incidence data using Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, taking account of random errors in the DS86 dose estimates. The resulting uncertainty distributions in the relative risk model parameters were used to derive uncertainties in population cancer risks for a current UK population. Because of evidence for irregularities in the low-dose dose response, flexible dose-response models were used, consisting of a linear-quadratic-exponential model, used to model the high-dose part of the dose response, together with piecewise-linear adjustments for the two lowest dose groups. Following an assumed administered dose of 0.001 Sv, lifetime leukaemia radiation-induced incidence risks were estimated to be 1.11 x 10(-2) Sv(-1) (95% Bayesian CI -0.61, 2.38) using this model. Following an assumed administered dose of 0.001 Sv, lifetime solid cancer radiation-induced incidence risks were calculated to be 7.28 x 10(-2) Sv(-1) (95% Bayesian CI -10.63, 22.10) using this model. Overall, cancer incidence risks predicted by Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods are similar to those derived by classical likelihood-based methods and which form the basis of established estimates of radiation-induced cancer risk.

  4. Preventing Overdiagnosis and Overtreatment: Just the Next Step in the Evolution of Breast Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, Rita A; Wong, Jasmine M; Esserman, Laura J

    2015-06-01

    The problem of overdiagnosis and overtreatment has been highlighted in breast cancer and many other cancer types, most notably prostate cancer. Addressing this problem presents an opportunity to continue the evolution of breast cancer care. Advances in technology, such as molecular subtyping, have increased the understanding of breast cancer biology and the range of associated behavior, and have provided tools that allow greater personalization of treatment. This article identifies 3 areas of breast cancer care where opportunity currently exists to refine management strategies and help decrease overtreatment and overdiagnosis: the use of adjuvant-external beam radiation in invasive breast cancer, the application of aggressive treatment for all ductal carcinoma in situ, and the authors' approach to breast cancer screening. Personalizing treatment based on patient and tumor characteristics holds promise for minimizing harms and maximizing benefits. This approach will allow continual improvement and ultimately result in providing the right treatment for each patient.

  5. Neighbourhood Based Residential Child Care: A Local Residential Child Care Unit as a Resource for Integrated and Flexible Child and Family Care in Dublin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilligan, Robbie

    A pioneering residential child care project in inner city Dublin began operations in July 1981. The project was designed to function as a resource for seriously deprived or at-risk children and their families. The community served is one characterized by exceptionally high unemployment, a 10 percent rate of heroin addiction among local 15- to…

  6. Adherence to Survivorship Care Guidelines in Health Care Providers for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer Survivor Care

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  7. Adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer in an era of value based cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Daniel H.; Williams, Terence M.; Goldstein, Daniel A.; El-Rayes, Bassel; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    In resected pancreas cancer, adjuvant therapy improves outcomes and is considered the standard of care for patients who recover sufficiently post operatively. Chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation; CRT) are strategies used in the adjuvant setting. However, there is a lack of evidence to suggest whether the addition of RT to chemotherapy translates to an improvement in clinical outcomes. This is true even when accounting for the subset of patients with a higher risk for recurrence, such as those with R1 and lymph node positive disease. When considering the direct and indirect costs, impact on quality of life and questionable added clinical benefit, the true “net health benefit” from added RT to chemotherapy becomes more uncertain. Future directions, including the utilization of modern RT, integration of novel therapies, and intensifying chemotherapy regimens may improve outcomes in resected pancreas cancer. PMID:26620819

  8. Delays in Cancer Care Among Low-Income Minorities Despite Access

    PubMed Central

    Nonzee, Narissa J.; Ragas, Daiva M.; Ha Luu, Thanh; Phisuthikul, Ava M.; Tom, Laura; Dong, XinQi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Narrowing the racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in breast and cervical cancer requires an in-depth understanding of motivation for adherence to cancer screening and follow-up care. To inform patient-centered interventions, this study aimed to identify reasons why low-income women adhered to or delayed breast or cervical cancer screening, follow-up and treatment despite access to cancer care-related services. Methods: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted among women with access to cancer care-related services receiving care at an academic cancer center, federally qualified health centers, or free clinics in the Chicago metropolitan area. Transcripts were coded and analyzed for themes related to rationales for adherence. Results: Among 138 participants, most were African American (46%) or Hispanic (36%), English speaking (70%), and between ages 41 and 65 years (64%). Primary drivers of nonadherence included lack of knowledge of resources, denial or fear, competing obligations, and embarrassment. Facilitators included abnormality identification, patient activation, provider-initiated actions, and motivation from family or friends. Conclusions: Interventions targeting increased adherence to care among low-income and ethnic minority women should direct efforts to proactive, culturally and patient-informed education that enables patients to access resources and use the health care system, address misconceptions about cancer, ensure health care providers' communication of screening guidelines, and leverage the patient's social support network. PMID:26070037

  9. Patterns of Colorectal Cancer Care in Europe, Australia, and New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men worldwide. In this study, we used MEDLINE to conduct a systematic review of existing literature published in English between 2000 and 2010 on patterns of colorectal cancer care. Specifically, this review examined 66 studies conducted in Europe, Australia, and New Zealand to assess patterns of initial care, post-diagnostic surveillance, and end-of-life care for colorectal cancer. The majority of studies in this review reported rates of initial care, and limited research examined either post-diagnostic surveillance or end-of-life care for colorectal cancer. Older colorectal cancer patients and individuals with comorbidities generally received less surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy. Patients with lower socioeconomic status were less likely to receive treatment, and variations in patterns of care were observed by patient demographic and clinical characteristics, geographical location, and hospital setting. However, there was wide variability in data collection and measures, health-care systems, patient populations, and population representativeness, making direct comparisons challenging. Future research and policy efforts should emphasize increased comparability of data systems, promote data standardization, and encourage collaboration between and within European cancer registries and administrative databases. PMID:23962509

  10. Is There a Role for Homeopathy in Cancer Care? Questions and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe

    2015-09-01

    Patients with cancer commonly use complementary and integrative medicine, including homeopathy. Homeopathy has grown in popularity with the public but is viewed with skepticism by medical academia and is still excluded from conventionally prescribed treatments. In recent years, homeopathy has been used in cancer care in Europe and other countries worldwide. This use raised the question if there is any benefit in utilizing this type of care with cancer patients. The purpose of this manuscript is to explore the evidence related to the benefit of homeopathy in cancer care. Limited research has suggested that homeopathic remedies appear to cause cellular changes in some cancer cells. In animal models, several homeopathic remedies have had an inhibitory effect on certain tumor development. Some clinical studies of homeopathic remedies combined with conventional care have shown that homeopathic remedies improve quality of life, reduce symptom burden, and possibly improve survival in patients with cancer. The findings from several lab and clinical studies suggest that homeopathy might have some beneficial effect in cancer care; however, further large, comprehensive clinical studies are needed to determine these beneficial effects. Although additional studies are needed to confirm these findings, given the low cost, minimal risks, and the potential magnitude of homeopathy's effects, this use might be considered in certain situations as an additional tool to integrate into cancer care.

  11. Enhancing cancer care in areas of limited resources: our next steps.

    PubMed

    El Saghir, Nagi S; Farhat, Rania A; Charara, Raghid N; Khoury, Katia E

    2014-10-01

    In-depth knowledge of local conditions is necessary in order to enhance care in low- and middle-income countries. In this review we discuss: improving cancer diagnosis, optimizing patient management, increasing health awareness, prevention, early detection, eradication of causative infectious diseases and agents, tobacco control, healthy diets and lifestyles, availability of diagnostic methods, easy access to care, affordable costs, improving infrastructures, quality care measures, implementing and adapting guidelines, multidisciplinary management, supportive and survivorship care, research and optimization of medical school curriculum and training in oncology. Establishment of national cancer control plans by policy makers, physician societies, medical schools, and patient advocates is recommended. We will review evidence and controversies, and outline the next steps needed to prevent cancer and enhance care of cancer patients in LMICs.

  12. Challenges and Opportunities in Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: A 2016 Update.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Patricia A; Hassett, Michael J; Miller, David C

    2016-01-01

    Herein, both the rationale and scope of current initiatives aimed at improving the quality of cancer care delivery in the United States are described. First, we discuss a recent report from the Institute of Medicine that issued a strong call for both the development of quality measures in oncology and implementation of a learning health care system in which data and experience from clinical practice can inform continuous improvements in cancer care. Second, we review the multiple, diverse initiatives that are underway to identify, test, and validate quality measures for the entire spectrum of cancer care. Finally, we discuss regional quality improvement collaboratives as one successful approach to creating a cycle of quality measurement, identification of best practices, and implementation of changes in practice patterns that ultimately yield improved care and outcomes for patients with cancer. PMID:27249735

  13. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Noah

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This change of understanding in supportive and palliative care for patients with lung cancer can be further advanced through the understanding that there is a need to address bio-psycho-spiritual concerns and health belief models, within the context of the family socio-cultural environment, for both patients and their caregivers. There is also a need to address the psycho-spiritual effects of cancer on those health care professionals treating patients with lung cancer, in order to reduce compassion fatigue and increase resilience. Future directions for supportive care for patients with lung cancer may include the development of a patient-tailored treatment approach, assisted by the integration of a multidisciplinary team of health care providers and evidence-based complementary medicine practices, within conventional supportive care practice. PMID:26629435

  14. Effectively Communicating Colorectal Cancer Screening Information to Primary Care Providers: Application for State, Tribe or Territory Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Jennifer; Vanderpool, Robin; McClung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients are more likely to be screened for colorectal cancer if it is recommended by a health care provider. Therefore, it is imperative that providers have access to the latest screening guidelines. Purpose: This practice-based project sought to identify Kentucky primary care providers' preferred sources and methods of receiving…

  15. Awareness, Interest, and Preferences of Primary Care Providers in Using Point-of-Care Cancer Screening Technology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chloe S; Vanture, Sarah; Cho, Margaret; Klapperich, Catherine M; Wang, Catharine; Huang, Franklin W

    2016-01-01

    Well-developed point-of-care (POC) cancer screening tools have the potential to provide better cancer care to patients in both developed and developing countries. However, new medical technology will not be adopted by medical providers unless it addresses a population's existing needs and end-users' preferences. The goals of our study were to assess primary care providers' level of awareness, interest, and preferences in using POC cancer screening technology in their practice and to provide guidelines to biomedical engineers for future POC technology development. A total of 350 primary care providers completed a one-time self-administered online survey, which took approximately 10 minutes to complete. A $50 Amazon gift card was given as an honorarium for the first 100 respondents to encourage participation. The description of POC cancer screening technology was provided in the beginning of the survey to ensure all participants had a basic understanding of what constitutes POC technology. More than half of the participants (57%) stated that they heard of the term "POC technology" for the first time when they took the survey. However, almost all of the participants (97%) stated they were either "very interested" (68%) or "somewhat interested" (29%) in using POC cancer screening technology in their practice. Demographic characteristics such as the length of being in the practice of medicine, the percentage of patients on Medicaid, and the average number of patients per day were not shown to be associated with the level of interest in using POC. These data show that there is a great interest in POC cancer screening technology utilization among this population of primary care providers and vast room for future investigations to further understand the interest and preferences in using POC cancer technology in practice. Ensuring that the benefits of new technology outweigh the costs will maximize the likelihood it will be used by medical providers and patients.

  16. Survivorship after childhood cancer: PanCare: a European Network to promote optimal long-term care.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Lars; Haupt, Riccardo; Skinner, Roderick; Grabow, Desiree; Byrne, Julianne; Karner, Sabine; Levitt, Gill; Michel, Gisela; van der Pal, Helena; Bárdi, Edit; Beck, Jörn D; de Vathaire, Florent; Essig, Stefan; Frey, Eva; Garwicz, Stanislaw; Hawkins, Mike; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Jankovic, Momcilo; Kazanowska, Bernarda; Kepak, Tomas; Kremer, Leontien; Lackner, Herwig; Sugden, Elaine; Terenziani, Monica; Zaletel, Lorna Zadravec; Kaatsch, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Survival after childhood cancer has improved substantially over recent decades. Although cancer in childhood is rare increasingly effective treatments have led to a growing number of long-term survivors. It is estimated that there are between 300,000 and 500,000 childhood cancer survivors in Europe. Such good survival prospects raise important questions relating to late effects of treatment for cancer. Research has shown that the majority will suffer adverse health outcomes and premature mortality compared with the general population. While chronic health conditions are common among childhood cancer survivors, each specific type of late effect is very rare. Long-term effects must be considered particularly when addressing complex multimodality treatments, and taking into account the interaction between aspects of treatment and genotype. The PanCare Network was set up across Europe in order to effectively answer many of these questions and thereby improve the care and quality of life of survivors. The need for a structured long-term follow-up system after childhood cancer has been recognised for some time and strategies for implementation have been developed, first nationally and then trans-nationally, across Europe. Since its first meeting in Lund in 2008, the goal of the PanCare Network has been to coordinate and implement these strategies to ensure that every European survivor of childhood and adolescent cancer receives optimal long-term care. This paper will outline the structure and work of the PanCare Network, including the results of several European surveys, the start of two EU-funded projects and interactions with relevant stakeholders and related projects.

  17. Flexible opto-electronics enabled microfluidics systems with cloud connectivity for point-of-care micronutrient analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen; Aranyosi, A J; Wong, Michelle D; Hong, Ji Hyung; Lowe, Jared; Chan, Carol; Garlock, David; Shaw, Scott; Beattie, Patrick D; Kratochvil, Zachary; Kubasti, Nick; Seagers, Kirsten; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Swanson, Christina D

    2016-04-15

    In developing countries, the deployment of medical diagnostic technologies remains a challenge because of infrastructural limitations (e.g. refrigeration, electricity), and paucity of health professionals, distribution centers and transportation systems. Here we demonstrate the technical development and clinical testing of a novel electronics enabled microfluidic paper-based analytical device (EE-μPAD) for quantitative measurement of micronutrient concentrations in decentralized, resource-limited settings. The system performs immune-detection using paper-based microfluidics, instrumented with flexible electronics and optoelectronic sensors in a mechanically robust, ultrathin format comparable in size to a credit card. Autonomous self-calibration, plasma separation, flow monitoring, timing and data storage enable multiple devices to be run simultaneously. Measurements are wirelessly transferred to a mobile phone application that geo-tags the data and transmits it to a remote server for real time tracking of micronutrient deficiencies. Clinical tests of micronutrient levels from whole blood samples (n=95) show comparable sensitivity and specificity to ELISA-based tests. These results demonstrate instantaneous acquisition and global aggregation of diagnostics data using a fully integrated point of care system that will enable rapid and distributed surveillance of disease prevalence and geographical progression. PMID:26630284

  18. Flexible opto-electronics enabled microfluidics systems with cloud connectivity for point-of-care micronutrient analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen; Aranyosi, A J; Wong, Michelle D; Hong, Ji Hyung; Lowe, Jared; Chan, Carol; Garlock, David; Shaw, Scott; Beattie, Patrick D; Kratochvil, Zachary; Kubasti, Nick; Seagers, Kirsten; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Swanson, Christina D

    2016-04-15

    In developing countries, the deployment of medical diagnostic technologies remains a challenge because of infrastructural limitations (e.g. refrigeration, electricity), and paucity of health professionals, distribution centers and transportation systems. Here we demonstrate the technical development and clinical testing of a novel electronics enabled microfluidic paper-based analytical device (EE-μPAD) for quantitative measurement of micronutrient concentrations in decentralized, resource-limited settings. The system performs immune-detection using paper-based microfluidics, instrumented with flexible electronics and optoelectronic sensors in a mechanically robust, ultrathin format comparable in size to a credit card. Autonomous self-calibration, plasma separation, flow monitoring, timing and data storage enable multiple devices to be run simultaneously. Measurements are wirelessly transferred to a mobile phone application that geo-tags the data and transmits it to a remote server for real time tracking of micronutrient deficiencies. Clinical tests of micronutrient levels from whole blood samples (n=95) show comparable sensitivity and specificity to ELISA-based tests. These results demonstrate instantaneous acquisition and global aggregation of diagnostics data using a fully integrated point of care system that will enable rapid and distributed surveillance of disease prevalence and geographical progression.

  19. [Quality of life and supportive care in head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Babin, Emmanuel; Heutte, Natacha; Grandazzi, Guillaume; Prévost, Virginie; Robard, Laetitia

    2014-05-01

    The quality of life of patients treated for head and neck cancers and their carers is part of the current concerns of health care teams. Assessment tools were created and helped to highlight the severe physical effects (pain, mucositis…) and chronic (mutilation, post-radiation complications…) related to the disease or to different treatments but also to consider the psychosocial impact of this disease. Improving the quality of life through a thoughtful and comprehensive support that must be associated with somatic care, mental health care, rehabilitation and inclusion of social difficulties and suffering relatives. Supportive care shall ensure a good quality of life for patients treated and their families but also reduce the physical effects associated with the disease and treatment. They rely on coordination of care including the cancer networks established in the cancer plan to ensure comprehensive and continuous care for these patients. PMID:24886902

  20. [Cervical cancer as a tracer condition: a proposal for evaluation of primary health care].

    PubMed

    Bottari, Clarissa Moraes de Sousa; Vasconcellos, Miguel Murat; Mendonça, Maria Helena Magalhães de

    2008-01-01

    The use of tracer conditions as an evaluative technique suggests the possibility of inferring the quality of health care and setting evaluation standards for programmed actions. As a government strategy, primary health care is a key element for reorganization of the Brazilian health care model. This study analyzes the use of cervical cancer as a tracer condition for assessing primary care. Based on the results from questions on measures to control the disease from the perspective of health professionals and cervical cancer patients, we constructed a matrix of indicators relating primary care attributes to process/results indicators. The analytical plan to validate the results used triangulation of methods, associating data from qualitative and quantitative approaches, in addition to combining and cross-analyzing the various actors' points of view. The results suggest that cervical cancer is an excellent tracer condition for primary care in general, based on the similarity of such concepts as accessibility, coverage, comprehensiveness, technical and scientific quality, and effectiveness.

  1. Publicly Funded Clinical Trials and the Future of Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Publicly sponsored trials, conducted primarily by cooperative groups sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, and commercially sponsored trials are necessary to create new knowledge, improve the care of oncology patients, and develop new drugs and devices. Commercial sponsors launch clinical trials that will result in drug approval, label extension, expansion of market share, and an increase in shareholder value. Conversely, publicly sponsored trials seek to optimize therapy for a particular disease, create new knowledge, and improve public health; these trials can also result in label extension of a drug and even in initial drug approval. Publicly sponsored trials may combine and/or compare drugs developed by different commercial sponsors, develop multimodality therapies (e.g., the combination of chemotherapy and radiation), or develop novel treatment schedules or routes of drug administration (e.g., intraperitoneal chemotherapy). Publicly sponsored trials are more likely to focus on therapies for rare diseases and to study survivorship and quality of life; these areas may not be a priority for commercial entities. Screening and prevention strategies have been developed almost exclusively by the public sector given the large sample size and long follow-up period needed to complete the trial and, therefore, the lack of short-term commercial gain. Finally, given the public nature of the funding, clinical investigators are expected to publish their results even if the outcomes are unfavorable for the investigational therapy. With the ongoing reorganization of the cooperative groups to form a national clinical trials network, opportunities exist to create a robust platform for biomarker discovery and validation through the expanded collection of well-annotated biospecimens obtained from clinical trial participants. Thus, publicly funded trials are vital to developing and refining new cancer treatments and disseminating results to the medical community and the

  2. Supportive care and the use of relaxation therapy in a district cancer service.

    PubMed Central

    McIllmurray, M. B.; Holdcroft, P. E.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a cancer support organisation, CancerCare, for North Lancashire and South Lakeland is described. The use of relaxation therapy is described to illustrate the demand for supportive care. Between January 1990 and 1991, 513 patients, 243 relatives and 143 bereaved were referred to five cancer support nurses. One hundred and sixty-two (32%), 29 (12%) and 49 (34%) respectively, used relaxation therapy. The high demand for supportive care suggests that services should be made available in any district health provider unit. Measures of benefit and better definition of services are required before clear recommendations can be made. PMID:8471447

  3. Health Care of Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Mertens, Ann C.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Gurney, James G.; Casillas, Jacqueline; Chen, Hegang; Whitton, John; Yeazel, Mark; Yasui, Yutaka; Robison, Leslie L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND We wanted to determine the type of outpatient medical care reported by young adult survivors of childhood cancer and to examine factors associated with limited medical care. METHODS We analyzed data from 9,434 adult childhood cancer survivors enrolled in a retrospective cohort study who completed a baseline questionnaire. They had a mean age of 26.8 years (range 18 to 48 years), 47% were female, 12% were minorities, and 16% were uninsured. Four self-reported outcome measures were used to determine outpatient medical care in a 2-year period: general contact with the health care system, general physical examination, cancer-related medical visit, and medical visit at a cancer center. RESULTS Eighty-seven percent reported general medical contact, 71.4% a general physical examination, 41.9% a cancer-related visit, and 19.2%, a visit at a cancer center. Factors associated with not reporting a general physical examination, a cancer-related visit, or a cancer center visit included no health insurance (odds ratio [OR] = 2.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.97–2.77), male sex (OR = 1.65; 95% CI, 1.44–1.88), lack of concern for future health (OR = 1.57; 95% CI, 1.36–1.82), and age 30 years or older in comparison with those 18 to 29 years (OR = 1.56; 95% CI, 1.35–1.81). The likelihood of reporting a cancer-related visit or a general physical examination decreased significantly as the survivor aged or the time from cancer diagnosis increased. This trend was also significant for those treated with therapies associated with substantial risk for cardiovascular disease or breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS Primary care physicians provide health care for most of this growing high-risk population. To optimize risk-based care, it is critical that cancer centers and primary care physicians develop methods to communicate effectively and longitudinally. PMID:15053285

  4. Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose Computed Tomography for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Thomas B.; White, Mary C.; Caraballo, Ralph S.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an update on lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) and its implications for primary care providers. One of the unique features of lung cancer screening is the potential complexity in patient management if an LDCT scan reveals a small pulmonary nodule. Additional tests, consultation with multiple specialists, and follow-up evaluations may be needed to evaluate whether lung cancer is present. Primary care providers should know the resources available in their communities for lung cancer screening with LDCT and smoking cessation, and the key points to be addressed in informed and shared decision-making discussions with patients. PMID:24830610

  5. Flexible modeling improves assessment of prognostic value of C-reactive protein in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, B; Abrahamowicz, M; Xiao, Y; Beauchamp, M-E; MacDonald, N; Kasymjanova, G; Kreisman, H; Small, D

    2010-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) is gaining credibility as a prognostic factor in different cancers. Cox's proportional hazard (PH) model is usually used to assess prognostic factors. However, this model imposes a priori assumptions, which are rarely tested, that (1) the hazard ratio associated with each prognostic factor remains constant across the follow-up (PH assumption) and (2) the relationship between a continuous predictor and the logarithm of the mortality hazard is linear (linearity assumption). Methods: We tested these two assumptions of the Cox's PH model for CRP, using a flexible statistical model, while adjusting for other known prognostic factors, in a cohort of 269 patients newly diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results: In the Cox's PH model, high CRP increased the risk of death (HR=1.11 per each doubling of CRP value, 95% CI: 1.03–1.20, P=0.008). However, both the PH assumption (P=0.033) and the linearity assumption (P=0.015) were rejected for CRP, measured at the initiation of chemotherapy, which kept its prognostic value for approximately 18 months. Conclusion: Our analysis shows that flexible modeling provides new insights regarding the value of CRP as a prognostic factor in NSCLC and that Cox's PH model underestimates early risks associated with high CRP. PMID:20234363

  6. Oncologists’ Perspectives on Concurrent Palliative Care in an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T.; Ahles, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To understand oncology clinicians’ perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. Methods Qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Results Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: 1) treating the whole patient, 2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, 3) “some patients just want to fight”, and 4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists’ views on the complementary role of palliative care: 1) “refer early and often”, 2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals hospice; “Heme patients are different”, 3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, 4) palliative care “shares the load”, and 5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Conclusions Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care. PMID:23040412

  7. Early palliative care and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: potential mechanisms of prolonged survival.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Kelly E; Greer, Joseph A; Khatib, Jude; Temel, Jennifer S; Pirl, William F

    2013-02-01

    Patients with advanced cancer experience a significant burden of physical symptoms and psychological distress at the end of life, and many elect to receive aggressive cancer-directed therapy. The goal of palliative care is to relieve suffering and promote quality of life (QOL) for patients and families. Traditionally, both the public and medical community have conceptualized the need for patients to make a choice between pursuing curative therapy or receiving palliative care. However, practice guidelines from the World Health Organization and leadership from the oncology and palliative care communities advocate a different model of palliative care that is introduced from the point of diagnosis of life-threatening illness. Early palliative care has been shown to provide benefits in QOL, mood, and health care utilization. Additionally, preliminary research has suggested that in contrast to fears about palliative care hastening death, referral to palliative care earlier in the course of illness may have the potential to lengthen survival, particularly in patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer. This review summarizes the literature on potential survival benefits of palliative care and presents a model of how early integrated palliative care could potentially influence survival in patients with advanced cancer. PMID:23355404

  8. The Role of General Practitioners in Cancer Care: A Mixed Method Design.

    PubMed

    Suija, Kadri; Kordemets, Tanel; Annuk, Kadi; Kalda, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the current role of general practitioners (GP) and the unmet needs of cancer patients in primary care. First, we conducted individual interviews with 10 cancer patients. Next, we developed a questionnaire, which was distributed among cancer patients across Estonia. Altogether, 113 questionnaires were returned. We observed that while the patients were satisfied with their GP's work, they mostly preferred to discuss cancer-related problems with oncologists. The role of GPs in regard to other diseases was perceived as very important, also patients found it relevant to consult all investigations with their primary health care physician. The main problems experienced by the patients were a lack of proper accessible information about their disease and its inadequate presentation by doctors, as well as problems with coordination between primary and secondary health care providers. In conclusion, we can say that even treatment of cancer is centralised to oncology clinics, patients also contact their GPs during cancer care. Therefore, GPs should be aware of patients' general health and comorbid medical problems. Better communication between primary and secondary health care doctors as well as more integration of GPs in cancer care is needed. PMID:25876172

  9. New patient-centered care standards from the commission on cancer: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Fashoyin-Aje, Lola A; Martinez, Kathryn A; Dy, Sydney M

    2012-01-01

    The Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons publishes accreditation standards that hospitals and cancer treatment centers implement to ensure quality care to cancer patients. These standards address the full spectrum of cancer care, from cancer prevention to survivorship and end-of-life care. The most recent revisions of these standards included new standards in "patient-centered areas," including the provision of palliative care services, treatment and survivorship plans, psychological distress screening, and patient navigation programs. Unified by their emphasis on the early identification of patients at risk of receiving suboptimal care and the importance of ensuring that issues arising during and after completion of cancer treatment are addressed, they are a welcome expansion of the standards guiding cancer care. As with all standards, however, the next steps will be to further define how they will be implemented and to determine how success will be assessed. This will require ongoing critical evaluation of the standards and their implementation, including the need for member institutions to define successful implementation methods and measurable outcomes and identification of areas most in need of further research.

  10. Challenges in the Gynecologic Care of Premenopausal Women With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Laughlin, Shannon K.; Jensen, Jani R.; Akogyeram, Clement O.; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2011-01-01

    Premenopausal women with a new diagnosis of breast cancer are faced with many challenges. Providing health care for issues such as gynecologic comorbidities, reproductive health concerns, and vasomotor symptom control can be complicated because of the risks of hormone treatments and the adverse effects of adjuvant therapies. It is paramount that health care professionals understand and be knowledgeable about hormonal and nonhormonal treatments and their pharmacological parameters so they can offer appropriate care to women who have breast cancer, with the goal of improving quality of life. Articles for this review were identified by searching the PubMed database with no date limitations. The following search terms were used: abnormal uterine bleeding, physiologic sex steroids, endometrial ablation, hysteroscopic sterilization, fertility preservation in endometrial cancer, tranexamic acid and breast cancer, menorrhagia treatment and breast cancer, abnormal uterine bleeding and premenopausal breast cancer, levonorgestrel IUD and breast cancer, tamoxifen and gynecologic abnormalities, tamoxifen metabolism, hormones and breast cancer risk, contraception and breast cancer, pregnancy and breast cancer, and breast cancer and infertility treatment. PMID:21307388

  11. Caring for caregivers and patients: Research and clinical priorities for informal cancer caregiving.

    PubMed

    Kent, Erin E; Rowland, Julia H; Northouse, Laurel; Litzelman, Kristin; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Timura, Catherine; O'Mara, Ann; Huss, Karen

    2016-07-01

    Informal/family caregivers are a fundamental source of care for cancer patients in the United States, yet the population of caregivers and their tasks, psychosocial needs, and health outcomes are not well understood. Changes in the nature of cancer care and its delivery, along with the growing population of survivors and their caregivers, warrant increased attention to the roles and demands of caregiving. This article reviews current evidence presented at a 2-day meeting examining the state of the science of informal cancer caregiving that was convened by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Nursing Research. The meeting sought to define who is an informal cancer caregiver, summarize the state of the science in informal cancer caregiving, and describe both the kinds of interventions developed to address caregiving challenges and the various outcomes used to evaluate their impact. This article offers recommendations for moving science forward in 4 areas: 1) improving the estimation of the prevalence and burden of informal cancer caregiving; 2) advancing the development of interventions designed to improve outcomes for cancer patients, caregivers, and patient-caregiver dyads; 3) generating and testing strategies for integrating caregivers into formal health care settings; and 4) promoting the use of technology to support informal cancer caregivers. Cancer 2016;122:1987-95. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. Emerging concepts in bioenergetics and cancer research: metabolic flexibility, coupling, symbiosis, switch, oxidative tumors, metabolic remodeling, signaling and bioenergetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Obre, Emilie; Rossignol, Rodrigue

    2015-02-01

    The field of energy metabolism dramatically progressed in the last decade, owing to a large number of cancer studies, as well as fundamental investigations on related transcriptional networks and cellular interactions with the microenvironment. The concept of metabolic flexibility was clarified in studies showing the ability of cancer cells to remodel the biochemical pathways of energy transduction and linked anabolism in response to glucose, glutamine or oxygen deprivation. A clearer understanding of the large-scale bioenergetic impact of C-MYC, MYCN, KRAS and P53 was obtained, along with its modification during the course of tumor development. The metabolic dialog between different types of cancer cells, but also with the stroma, also complexified the understanding of bioenergetics and raised the concepts of metabolic symbiosis and reverse Warburg effect. Signaling studies revealed the role of respiratory chain-derived reactive oxygen species for metabolic remodeling and metastasis development. The discovery of oxidative tumors in human and mice models related to chemoresistance also changed the prevalent view of dysfunctional mitochondria in cancer cells. Likewise, the influence of energy metabolism-derived oncometabolites emerged as a new means of tumor genetic regulation. The knowledge obtained on the multi-site regulation of energy metabolism in tumors was translated to cancer preclinical studies, supported by genetic proof of concept studies targeting LDHA, HK2, PGAM1, or ACLY. Here, we review those different facets of metabolic remodeling in cancer, from its diversity in physiology and pathology, to the search of the genetic determinants, the microenvironmental regulators and pharmacological modulators.

  13. CCC meets ICU: Redefining the role of critical care of cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Currently the majority of cancer patients are considered ineligible for intensive care treatment and oncologists are struggling to get their patients admitted to intensive care units. Critical care and oncology are frequently two separate worlds that communicate rarely and thus do not share novel developments in their fields. However, cancer medicine is rapidly improving and cancer is eventually becoming a chronic disease. Oncology is therefore characterized by a growing number of older and medically unfit patients that receive numerous novel drug classes with unexpected side effects. Discussion All of these changes will generate more medically challenging patients in acute distress that need to be considered for intensive care. An intense exchange between intensivists, oncologists, psychologists and palliative care specialists is warranted to communicate the developments in each field in order to improve triage and patient treatment. Here, we argue that "critical care of cancer patients" needs to be recognized as a medical subspecialty and that there is an urgent need to develop it systematically. Conclusion As prognosis of cancer improves, novel therapeutic concepts are being introduced and more and more older cancer patients receive full treatment the number of acutely ill patients is growing significantly. This development a major challenge to current concepts of intensive care and it needs to be redefined who of these patients should be treated, for how long and how intensively. PMID:21059210

  14. Increased consultation frequency in primary care, a risk marker for cancer: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Marcela; Naredi, Peter; Nemes, Szilard; Zhang, Chenyang; Månsson, Jörgen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify early diagnostic profiles such as diagnostic codes and consultation patterns of cancer patients in primary care one year prior to cancer diagnosis. Design Total population-based case–control study. Setting and subjects 4562 cancer patients and 17,979 controls matched by age, sex, and primary care unit. Data were collected from the Swedish Cancer Register and the Regional Healthcare Database. Method We identified cancer patients in the Västra Götaland Region of Sweden diagnosed in 2011 with prostate, breast, colorectal, lung, gynaecological, and skin cancers including malignant melanoma. We studied the symptoms and diagnoses identified by diagnostic codes during a diagnostic interval of 12 months before the cancer diagnosis. Main outcome measures Consultation frequency, symptom density by cancer type, prevalence and odds ratios (OR) for the diagnostic codes in the cancer population as a whole. Results The diagnostic codes with the highest OR were unspecified lump in breast, neoplasm of uncertain behaviour, and abnormal serum enzyme levels. The codes with the highest prevalence were hyperplasia of prostate, other skin changes and abdominal and pelvic pain. The frequency of diagnostic codes and consultations in primary care rose in tandem 50 days before diagnosis for breast and gynaecological cancer, 60 days for malignant melanoma and skin cancer, 80 days for prostate cancer and 100 days for colorectal and lung cancer. Conclusion Eighty-seven percent of patients with the most common cancers consulted a general practitioner (GP) a year before their diagnosis. An increase in consultation frequency and presentation of any symptom should raise the GP’s suspicion of cancer. Key pointsKnowledge about the prevalence of early symptoms and other clinical signs in cancer patients in primary care remains insufficient.• Eighty-seven percent of the patients with the seven most common cancers consulted a general practitioner 12 months prior to cancer

  15. [Kampo Medicine in Perioperative Care for Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Koji; Nishimura, Genichi

    2015-12-01

    Operative stress causes various changes in the body, and immunological hypofunction and malnutrition increase complications and adversely affect long-term prognosis. Therefore, reducing operative stress as much as possible, minimizing complications after surgery, and aiming for a satisfactory postoperative course are important. However, difficult and unresolvable situations often arise when only the conventional Western medicine approach is used because the situation and condition varies for each patient. We believe that Kampo medicine is very useful in diverse situations. Particularly, Kampo medicine has been used more frequently in recent years, with the expectation of numerous effects, because the effectiveness of Kampo medicine on various disease states has been proven and the pharmacological ingredients and the mechanisms by which Kampo medicine exerts its effects have been better clarified scientifically. Kampo medicine will have an effect in various situations, and we think that Kampo medicine occupies an important position in team-based medical care with multiple specialists. Kampo medicine compounds have been reported to be useful for the following conditions: Hochuekkito and Juzentaihoto for improving immunocompetence after operative stress, Daikenchuto and Rikkunshito for improving postoperative gastrointestinal motility, Shakuyakukanzoto for postoperative wound pain control, Yokukansan for postoperative delirium, and Inchinkoto for postoperative liver dysfunction. The availability of numerous treatment choices that work well in specific situations would be useful for cancer patients during the perioperative period. PMID:26809301

  16. Quality of Life and Care Needs of Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Anxiety; Fatigue; Nausea and Vomiting; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  17. Social support, self-care, and quality of life in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy in Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Hanucharurnkul, S.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: (1) to examine the relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life in adult cancer patients receiving radiotherapy while the selected basic conditioning factors of age, marital and socio-economic status, living arrangement, stage and site of cancer were statistically controlled; and (2) to test a theoretical model which postulated that (a) quality of life was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors, social support and self-care, and (b) self-care was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors and social support. A convenience sample of 112 adult cervical and head/neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy was obtained from radiotherapy outpatient clinic in three hospitals located in Bangkok, Thailand. Results of the study indicated positive relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life. Socio-economic status, site of cancer, and self-care were significant predictors for reported quality of life. Social support appeared to be a significant predictor of quality of life indirectly through self-care. Socio-economic status and social support were also significant predictors of self-care, whereas, stage and site of cancer seemed to predict self-care indirectly through social support.

  18. Monitoring and evaluating the quality of cancer care in Japan using administrative claims data.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Momoko; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Higashi, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The importance of measuring the quality of cancer care has been well recognized in many developed countries, but has never been successfully implemented on a national level in Japan. We sought to establish a wide-scale quality monitoring and evaluation program for cancer by measuring 13 process-of-care quality indicators (QI) using a registry-linked claims database. We measured two QI on pre-treatment testing, nine on adherence to clinical guidelines on therapeutic treatments, and two on supportive care, for breast, prostate, colorectal, stomach, lung, liver and cervical cancer patients who were diagnosed in 2011 from 178 hospitals. We further assessed the reasons for non-adherence for patients who did not receive the indicated care in 26 hospitals. QI for pretreatment testing were high in most hospitals (above 80%), but scores on adjuvant radiation and chemoradiation therapies were low (20-37%), except for breast cancer (74%). QI for adjuvant chemotherapy and supportive care were more widely distributed across hospitals (45-68%). Further analysis in 26 hospitals showed that most of the patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy had clinically valid reasons for not receiving the specified care (above 70%), but the majority of the patients did not have sufficient reasons for not receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (52-69%) and supportive care (above 80%). We present here the first wide-scale quality measurement initiative of cancer patients in Japan. Patients without clinically valid reasons for non-adherence should be examined further in future to improve care.

  19. Caring for the breast cancer survivor’s health and well-being

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Petra M; Faubion, Stephanie S; MacLaughlin, Kathy L; Long, Margaret E; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer care continuum entails detection, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship. During this time, focus on the whole woman and medical concerns beyond the breast cancer diagnosis itself is essential. In this comprehensive review, we critically review and evaluate recent evidence regarding several topics pertinent to and specific for the woman living with a prior history of breast cancer. More specifically, we discuss the most recent recommendations for contraceptive options including long-acting reversible contraception and emergency contraception, fertility and pregnancy considerations during and after breast cancer treatment, management of menopausal vasomotors symptoms and vulvovaginal atrophy which often occurs even in young women during treatment for breast cancer. The need to directly query the patient about these concerns is emphasized. Our focus is on non-systemic hormones and non-hormonal options. Our holistic approach to the care of the breast cancer survivor includes such preventive health issues as sexual and bone health,which are important in optimizing quality of life. We also discuss strategies for breast cancer recurrence surveillance in the setting of a prior breast cancer diagnosis. This review is intended for primary care practitioners as well as specialists caring for female breast cancer survivors and includes key points for evidence-based best practice recommendations. PMID:25302171

  20. A Health Services Research Agenda for Cellular, Molecular and Genomic Technologies in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Wideroff, Louise; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Randhawa, Gurvaneet; Ambs, Anita; Armstrong, Katrina; Bennett, Charles L.; Brown, Martin L.; Donaldson, Molla S.; Follen, Michele; Goldie, Sue J.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Khoury, Muin J.; Lewis, Graham; McLeod, Howard L.; Piper, Margaret; Powell, Isaac; Schrag, Deborah; Schulman, Kevin A.; Scott, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent decades, extensive resources have been invested to develop cellular, molecular and genomic technologies with clinical applications that span the continuum of cancer care. Methods In December 2006, the National Cancer Institute sponsored the first workshop to uniquely examine the state of health services research on cancer-related cellular, molecular and genomic technologies and identify challenges and priorities for expanding the evidence base on their effectiveness in routine care. Results This article summarizes the workshop outcomes, which included development of a comprehensive research agenda that incorporates health and safety endpoints, utilization patterns, patient and provider preferences, quality of care and access, disparities, economics and decision modeling, trends in cancer outcomes, and health-related quality of life among target populations. Conclusions Ultimately, the successful adoption of useful technologies will depend on understanding and influencing the patient, provider, health care system and societal factors that contribute to their uptake and effectiveness in ‘real-world’ settings. PMID:19367091

  1. The Cancer Survivorship Journey: Models of Care, Disparities, Barriers, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Michael T; McCabe, Mary S; Burg, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Although the number of long-term cancer survivors has increased substantially over past years, the journey of survivorship does not always include high-quality, patient-centered care. A variety of survivorship care models have evolved based on who provides this care, the survivor population, the site of care, and/or the capacity for delivering specific services. Other areas of survivorship care being explored include how long follow-up care is needed, application of a risk-based approach to survivorship care, and the role of the survivor in his or her own recovery. However, there is little evidence indicating whether any models improve clinical or patient-reported outcomes. A newer focus in survivorship care has included assessment of potential disparities; the sociodemographic characteristics of population subgroups associated with barriers to receiving high-quality cancer treatment may also affect the survivorship period. Developing policies and programs to address disparities in survivorship care is not simple, and examining how financial hardship affects cancer outcomes, reducing economic barriers to care, and increasing incorporation of patient-centered strategies may be important components. Here too, there is little evidence regarding the best strategies to address these disparities. Barriers to providing high-quality, patient-centered survivorship care include lack of evidence, lack of a trained survivorship workforce, lack of reimbursement structures/insurance coverage, and lack of a health care system that reduces fragmented care. Future research needs to focus on developing a survivorship care evidence base, exploring strategies to facilitate provision of survivorship care, and disseminating best survivorship care practices to diverse and international audiences. PMID:27249703

  2. Mindfulness and psychosocial care in cancer: historical context and review of current and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Greene, Paul B; Philip, Errol J; Poppito, Shannon R; Schnur, Julie B

    2012-12-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions and mindfulness techniques have become increasingly popular in psychosocial care.  These interventions have also been increasingly used with cancer patients and survivors. However, more attention is due to issues such as how these techniques may be specifically relevant for an oncology population and whether the religious derivation of mindfulness should be considered by frontline psychosocial clinicians. This article provides a history and overview of the use of mindfulness in psychosocial cancer care.

  3. Exploring the barriers to health care and psychosocial challenges in cervical cancer management in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ngutu, Mariah; Nyamongo, Isaac K

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women aged between 15 years and 44 years in Kenya, resulting in an estimated 4,802 women being diagnosed with cervical cancer and 2,451 dying from the disease annually. It is often detected at its advanced invasive stages, resulting in a protracted illness upon diagnosis. This qualitative study looked at the illness trajectories of women living with cervical cancer enrolled for follow-up care at Kenyatta National Hospital cancer treatment center and the Nairobi Hospice, both in Nairobi county, Kenya. Using the qualitative phenomenological approach, data were collected through 18 in-depth interviews with women living with cervical cancer between April and July 2011. In-depth interviews with their caregivers, key informant interviews with health care workers, and participant observation field notes were used to provide additional qualitative data. These data were analyzed based on grounded theory’s inductive approach. Two key themes on which the data analysis was then anchored were identified, namely, psychosocial challenges of cervical cancer and structural barriers to quality health care. Findings indicated a prolonged illness trajectory with psychosocial challenges, fueled by structural barriers that women were faced with after a cervical cancer diagnosis. To address issues relevant to the increasing numbers of women with cervical cancer, research studies need to include larger samples of these women. Also important are studies that allow in-depth understanding of the experiences of women living with cervical cancer. PMID:26346001

  4. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A.; Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors' unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight

  5. Mortality and cancer morbidity of production workers in the United Kingdom flexible polyurethane foam industry.

    PubMed Central

    Sorahan, T; Pope, D

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To describe cause specific mortality and site specific cancer morbidity among workers employed in factories that produce polyurethane foams, and to determine if any part of the experience may be due to occupation, and in particular to exposure to diisocyanates. DESIGN--Historical prospective cohort study. SETTING--11 factories in England and Wales. SUBJECTS--8288 male and female production employees with some employment in the period 1958-79, and with a minimum period of employment of six months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Observed and expected numbers of deaths for the period 1958-88, and corresponding figures for cancer registrations for the period 1971-86. RESULTS--Compared with the general population of England and Wales, standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) for all causes and all neoplasms were 97 (observed deaths (Obs) 816) and 88 (Obs 221) respectively. Statistically significant excesses were found among women for cancer of the pancreas (expected deaths (Exp) 2.2, Obs 6, SMR 271, 95% CI 100-595) and cancer of the lung (Exp 9.1, Obs 16, SMR 176, 95% CI 100-285). Similar excesses were not found among male employees, and the SMRs for cancers of the lung and pancreas among the total study population were 100 (Obs 81) and 136 (Obs 14) respectively. Overall incidence of cancer was also below expectation (SRR 94, Obs 277), although statistically significant excesses among women were found for cancers of the larynx and kidney, based on three and four cases respectively. Incident cancers of the lung and pancreas among women were also in excess, although these findings were not independent of the findings for mortality. Poison regression did not indicate that ever having been employed in jobs attracting either higher or lower exposure to isocyanates was a risk factor for the mentioned cancers. A nested case-control design was used to investigate any associations with nine other occupational exposures. No statistically significant association was found

  6. Differences in Breast Cancer Survival between Public and Private Care in New Zealand: Which Factors Contribute?

    PubMed Central

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Elwood, J. Mark; Lawrenson, Ross; Campbell, Ian; Harvey, Vernon; Seneviratne, Sanjeewa

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients who received private health care appear to have better survival from breast cancer compared to those who received public care. This study investigated if this applied to New Zealand women and identified factors that could explain such disparities. Methods This study involved all women who were diagnosed with primary breast cancer in two health regions in New Zealand, covering about 40% of the national population, between June 2000 and May 2013. Patients who received public care for primary treatment, mostly surgical treatment, were compared with those who received private care in terms of demographics, mode of presentation, disease factors, comorbidity index and treatment factors. Cox regression modelling was performed with stepwise adjustments, and hazards of breast cancer specific mortality associated with the type of health care received was assessed. Results Of the 14,468 patients, 8,916 (61.6%) received public care. Compared to patients treated in private care facilities, they were older, more likely to be Māori, Pacifika or Asian and to reside in deprived neighbourhoods and rural areas, and less likely to be diagnosed with early staged cancer and to receive timely cancer treatments. They had a higher risk of mortality from breast cancer (hazard ratio: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.75, 2.17), of which 80% (95% CI: 63%, 100%) was explained by baseline differences, particularly related to ethnicity, stage at diagnosis and type of loco-regional therapy. After controlling for these demographic, disease and treatment factors, the risk of mortality was still 14% higher in the public sector patients. Conclusions Ethnicity, stage at diagnosis and type of loco-regional therapy were the three key contributors to survival disparities between patients treated in public and private health care facilities in New Zealand. The findings underscore the need for more efforts to improve the quality, timeliness and equitability of public cancer care services. PMID:27054698

  7. Importance of cost-effectiveness and value in cancer care and healthcare policy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ravinder; Goodney, Philip P.; Wong, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    The cost of cancer care in the U.S. has increased by fivefold over the last three decades. Rising cancer prevalence, costly pharmaceuticals, physician and facility fees have all contributed to the expenditure. As our healthcare system shifts from volume to value, greater scrutiny of interventions with clinical equipoise is required. Traditionally, quality adjusted life years (QALYs) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) have served as surrogate markers for value. However, these calculations fail to incorporate population or patient preferences. The diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer, breast cancer and thyroid cancer are used as a framework to discuss value and cost-effectiveness. PMID:27334052

  8. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family, including unique aspects of communication with cancer patients, factors affecting communication, and training in communication skills.

  9. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family, including unique aspects of communication with cancer patients, factors affecting communication, and training in communication skills.

  10. Intended care seeking for ovarian cancer symptoms among U.S. women.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Trivers, Katrina F; Stewart, Sherri L

    2016-06-01

    To investigate U.S. women's intended care seeking for symptoms associated with ovarian cancer, data from the 2012 HealthStyles Fall survey of U.S. adults were examined. Analyses were limited to women with no history of gynecologic cancer (N = 1726). Logistic regression models for intended care seeking within 2 weeks of symptom onset were developed. A minority of women recognized that unexplained pelvic or abdominal pain (29.9%), unexplained bloating (18.1%), and feeling full after eating a small amount of food (10.1%) can indicate ovarian cancer, and 31.1% mistakenly believed that the Papanicolaou (Pap) test screens for the disease. In the multivariate regression models, the most consistent, significant predictors (p < 0.01) of intended care seeking within 2 weeks of symptom onset were age (older women were more likely to seek care) and awareness that symptoms could signal ovarian cancer. Care seeking in response to ovarian cancer symptoms may be delayed among younger women and those who do not recognize the potential significance of symptoms. Raising awareness of ovarian cancer symptoms may promote early detection. However, educational efforts should emphasize that symptoms associated with ovarian cancer may also result from benign conditions. PMID:27419020

  11. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience.

    PubMed

    Kilsdonk, Melvin J; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, Rene; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-03-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews were held with clinicians, oncology nurses, and managers from fifteen general hospitals that participated in three rounds of peer review over a period of 16 years. Interviewees reflected on the goals and expectations, experiences, perceived impact, and future role of external peer review. Transcriptions of the interviews were coded to discover recurrent themes. Improving clinical care and organization were the main motives for participation. Positive impact was perceived on multiple aspects of care such as shared responsibilities, internal prioritization of cancer care, improved communication, and a clear structure and position of cancer care within general hospitals. Establishing a direct relationship between the external peer review and organizational or clinical impact proved to be difficult. Criticism was raised on the content of the program being too theoretical and organization-focussed after three rounds. According to most stakeholders, external peer review can improve multidisciplinary team work in cancer care; however, the acceptance is threatened by a perceived disbalance between effort and visible clinical impact. Leaner and more clinically focused programs are needed to keep repeated peer reviews challenging and worthwhile. PMID:26714788

  12. Acupuncture care for breast cancer patients during chemotherapy: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Price, Sarah; Lewith, George; Thomas, Kate

    2006-12-01

    Acupuncture care delivered pragmatically as an adjunct to conventional care may lead to improvements in quality of life and alleviation of conventional treatment-related side effects among breast cancer patients. Patient perceptions and expectations of treatment and the therapeutic relationship inherent to acupuncture care could modify treatment effects. The aim of this study was to design a rigorous feasibility study in preparation for trial to evaluate the effects of acupuncture care (a whole system) on the fatigue experienced by patients undergoing conventional treatment of their breast cancer. Phase 1 included the development of a treatment protocol for a short course of acupuncture care for patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Defining best practice in this context will ensure that the intervention tested will have meaning and validity for all professional acupuncturists. Phase 2 will be a randomized feasibility pilot study using the acupuncture treatment protocol for 40 patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The study will use a mixed-methods approach involving both qualitative and quantitative assessments. Outcome assessment will include validated measures for fatigue, quality of life, and depression. The proposed study will tell us what effects of acupuncture care are important to the patient and address acupuncture as it is practiced in the real world. Results from thisstudy will enable a definitive randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of accupuncture care for fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:17101759

  13. Cultural perceptions in cancer care among African-American and Caucasian patients.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Robin K.; Grange, Christina; Lyckholm, Laurie J.; Utsey, Shawn O.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: This exploratory study examined perceptions and beliefs of African Americans and Caucasians related to cancer care. Understanding belief systems and cultures optimizes cancer treatment and care delivery to ethnic minority individuals. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Focus groups were conducted with 39 African-American and Caucasian cancer patients. Data analysis included whole group analysis with a team of five researchers. RESULTS: Regardless of ethnicity, cancer patients share many of the same emotions and experiences, and want complete information and quality care. Differences were also apparent. African-American participants were more likely to report increased religious behaviors, believe that healthcare providers demonstrate care with simple actions and provision of practical assistance, and use church and community information sources. Caucasian participants were more likely to report spiritual but not overtly religious changes, and depend on healthcare providers for information. CONCLUSION: Understanding how culture colors perceptions, communication and information requirements is critical to providing effective care to ethnically diverse cancer patients. Findings have implications for professionals understanding ways patients seek information, the role of spirituality and religion in care, and ways healthcare providers demonstrate care. PMID:17987914

  14. Managing risk in cancer presentation, detection and referral: a qualitative study of primary care staff views

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Neil; Thomson, Gillian; Dey, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In the UK, there have been a number of national initiatives to promote earlier detection and prompt referral of patients presenting to primary care with signs and symptoms of cancer. The aim of the study was to explore the experiences of a range of primary care staff in promoting earlier presentation, detection and referral of patients with symptoms suggestive of cancer. Setting Six primary care practices in northwest England. Participants: 39 primary care staff from a variety of disciplines took part in five group and four individual interviews. Results The global theme to emerge from the interviews was ‘managing risk’, which had three underpinning organising themes: ‘complexity’, relating to uncertainty of cancer diagnoses, service fragmentation and plethora of guidelines; ‘continuity’, relating to relationships between practice staff and their patients and between primary and secondary care; ‘conflict’ relating to policy drivers and staff role boundaries. A key concern of staff was that policymakers and those implementing cancer initiatives did not fully understand how risk was managed within primary care. Conclusions Primary care staff expressed a range of views and opinions on the benefits of cancer initiatives. National initiatives did not appear to wholly resolve issues in managing risk for all practitioners. Staff were concerned about the number of guidelines and priorities they were expected to implement. These issues need to be considered by policymakers when developing and implementing new initiatives. PMID:24928585

  15. Effectiveness of palliative care for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiqin; Li, Jianing

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Despite increases in the survival rate for various types of cancer over the past several decades, lung cancer remains an overwhelmingly lethal disease and the majority of patients succumb to the disease in a short period of time. A number of treatment options are available depending on the stage of lung cancer. The present review focused on palliative care and is associated with stage IIIB and IV of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Stage IIIB disease is not amenable to curative treatment and for stage IV disease, treatment is palliative in nature, with a focus on increasing survival time, controlling symptoms and improving or maintaining quality of life. Palliative treatment options include chemotherapy, radiotherapy and supportive care. The present review examines the important aspects of palliative therapy with regard to NSCLC.

  16. Exercise in clinical cancer care: a call to action and program development description

    PubMed Central

    Santa Mina, D.; Alibhai, S.M.H.; Matthew, A.G.; Guglietti, C.L.; Steele, J.; Trachtenberg, J.; Ritvo, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    A large and convincing body of evidence demonstrates the benefits of exercise for cancer survivors during and after treatment. Based on that literature, more cancer survivors should be offered exercise support and programming. Unfortunately, exercise programs remain an exception rather than the norm in cancer care. Not surprisingly, common barriers to the implementation of exercise programs in oncology include limited resources, expertise, and awareness of benefits on the part of patients and clinicians. To improve the accessibility and cost-effectiveness of cancer exercise programs, one proposed strategy is to combine the resources of hospital and community-based programs with home-based exercise instruction. The present paper highlights current literature regarding exercise programming for cancer survivors, describes the development of an exercise program for cancer patients in Toronto, Canada, and offers experiential insights into the integration of exercise into oncologic care. PMID:22670103

  17. Patterns of seeking medical care among Egyptian breast cancer patients: relationship to late-stage presentation.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Shimaa M; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A; Hablas, Ahmed; Elbana, Eman S; Soliman, Amr S

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Egyptian women, accounting for 37.6% of female tumors, and is often diagnosed at later stages. The objective of this study was to investigate breast cancer patient navigation through the health care system in the Nile Delta. Interviews were conducted with 163 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients at the Tanta Cancer Center (TCC), the major cancer center of the region. Patients described their medical care pathway from the initial symptom experienced until their arrival at TCC. Patients whose initial contact was with a general surgeon (OR: 7.6, 95% CI: 2.1, 27.6), primary care provider (OR: 12.2, 95% CI: 2.9, 51.0), or gynecologist (OR: 8.6, 95% CI: 1.4, 53.4) were significantly more likely to experience a delay in reaching the TCC as compared to those visiting a surgical oncologist. Overcoming health care system and patient navigation barriers in developing countries may reduce the time for breast cancer patients to reach a cancer center for early management. PMID:21807518

  18. The international cancer expert corps: a unique approach for sustainable cancer care in low and lower-middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Coleman, C Norman; Formenti, Silvia C; Williams, Tim R; Petereit, Daniel G; Soo, Khee C; Wong, John; Chao, Nelson; Shulman, Lawrence N; Grover, Surbhi; Magrath, Ian; Hahn, Stephen; Liu, Fei-Fei; DeWeese, Theodore; Khleif, Samir N; Steinberg, Michael; Roth, Lawrence; Pistenmaa, David A; Love, Richard R; Mohiuddin, Majid; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2014-01-01

    The growing burden of non-communicable diseases including cancer in low- and lower-middle income countries (LMICs) and in geographic-access limited settings within resource-rich countries requires effective and sustainable solutions. The International Cancer Expert Corps (ICEC) is pioneering a novel global mentorship-partnership model to address workforce capability and capacity within cancer disparities regions built on the requirement for local investment in personnel and infrastructure. Radiation oncology will be a key component given its efficacy for cure even for the advanced stages of disease often encountered and for palliation. The goal for an ICEC Center within these health disparities settings is to develop and retain a high-quality sustainable workforce who can provide the best possible cancer care, conduct research, and become a regional center of excellence. The ICEC Center can also serve as a focal point for economic, social, and healthcare system improvement. ICEC is establishing teams of Experts with expertise to mentor in the broad range of subjects required to establish and sustain cancer care programs. The Hubs are cancer centers or other groups and professional societies in resource-rich settings that will comprise the global infrastructure coordinated by ICEC Central. A transformational tenet of ICEC is that altruistic, human-service activity should be an integral part of a healthcare career. To achieve a critical mass of mentors ICEC is working with three groups: academia, private practice, and senior mentors/retirees. While in-kind support will be important, ICEC seeks support for the career time dedicated to this activity through grants, government support, industry, and philanthropy. Providing care for people with cancer in LMICs has been a recalcitrant problem. The alarming increase in the global burden of cancer in LMICs underscores the urgency and makes this an opportune time fornovel and sustainable solutions to transform cancer care

  19. The international cancer expert corps: a unique approach for sustainable cancer care in low and lower-middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Coleman, C Norman; Formenti, Silvia C; Williams, Tim R; Petereit, Daniel G; Soo, Khee C; Wong, John; Chao, Nelson; Shulman, Lawrence N; Grover, Surbhi; Magrath, Ian; Hahn, Stephen; Liu, Fei-Fei; DeWeese, Theodore; Khleif, Samir N; Steinberg, Michael; Roth, Lawrence; Pistenmaa, David A; Love, Richard R; Mohiuddin, Majid; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2014-01-01

    The growing burden of non-communicable diseases including cancer in low- and lower-middle income countries (LMICs) and in geographic-access limited settings within resource-rich countries requires effective and sustainable solutions. The International Cancer Expert Corps (ICEC) is pioneering a novel global mentorship-partnership model to address workforce capability and capacity within cancer disparities regions built on the requirement for local investment in personnel and infrastructure. Radiation oncology will be a key component given its efficacy for cure even for the advanced stages of disease often encountered and for palliation. The goal for an ICEC Center within these health disparities settings is to develop and retain a high-quality sustainable workforce who can provide the best possible cancer care, conduct research, and become a regional center of excellence. The ICEC Center can also serve as a focal point for economic, social, and healthcare system improvement. ICEC is establishing teams of Experts with expertise to mentor in the broad range of subjects required to establish and sustain cancer care programs. The Hubs are cancer centers or other groups and professional societies in resource-rich settings that will comprise the global infrastructure coordinated by ICEC Central. A transformational tenet of ICEC is that altruistic, human-service activity should be an integral part of a healthcare career. To achieve a critical mass of mentors ICEC is working with three groups: academia, private practice, and senior mentors/retirees. While in-kind support will be important, ICEC seeks support for the career time dedicated to this activity through grants, government support, industry, and philanthropy. Providing care for people with cancer in LMICs has been a recalcitrant problem. The alarming increase in the global burden of cancer in LMICs underscores the urgency and makes this an opportune time fornovel and sustainable solutions to transform cancer care

  20. The International Cancer Expert Corps: A Unique Approach for Sustainable Cancer Care in Low and Lower-Middle Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, C. Norman; Formenti, Silvia C.; Williams, Tim R.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Soo, Khee C.; Wong, John; Chao, Nelson; Shulman, Lawrence N.; Grover, Surbhi; Magrath, Ian; Hahn, Stephen; Liu, Fei-Fei; DeWeese, Theodore; Khleif, Samir N.; Steinberg, Michael; Roth, Lawrence; Pistenmaa, David A.; Love, Richard R.; Mohiuddin, Majid; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2014-01-01

    The growing burden of non-communicable diseases including cancer in low- and lower-middle income countries (LMICs) and in geographic-access limited settings within resource-rich countries requires effective and sustainable solutions. The International Cancer Expert Corps (ICEC) is pioneering a novel global mentorship–partnership model to address workforce capability and capacity within cancer disparities regions built on the requirement for local investment in personnel and infrastructure. Radiation oncology will be a key component given its efficacy for cure even for the advanced stages of disease often encountered and for palliation. The goal for an ICEC Center within these health disparities settings is to develop and retain a high-quality sustainable workforce who can provide the best possible cancer care, conduct research, and become a regional center of excellence. The ICEC Center can also serve as a focal point for economic, social, and healthcare system improvement. ICEC is establishing teams of Experts with expertise to mentor in the broad range of subjects required to establish and sustain cancer care programs. The Hubs are cancer centers or other groups and professional societies in resource-rich settings that will comprise the global infrastructure coordinated by ICEC Central. A transformational tenet of ICEC is that altruistic, human-service activity should be an integral part of a healthcare career. To achieve a critical mass of mentors ICEC is working with three groups: academia, private practice, and senior mentors/retirees. While in-kind support will be important, ICEC seeks support for the career time dedicated to this activity through grants, government support, industry, and philanthropy. Providing care for people with cancer in LMICs has been a recalcitrant problem. The alarming increase in the global burden of cancer in LMICs underscores the urgency and makes this an opportune time fornovel and sustainable solutions to transform cancer care

  1. Explaining variation in cancer survival between 11 jurisdictions in the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership: a primary care vignette survey

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter W; Rubin, Greg; Perera-Salazar, Rafael; Almberg, Sigrun Saur; Barisic, Andriana; Dawes, Martin; Grunfeld, Eva; Hart, Nigel; Neal, Richard D; Pirotta, Marie; Sisler, Jeffrey; Konrad, Gerald; Toftegaard, Berit Skjødeberg; Thulesius, Hans; Vedsted, Peter; Young, Jane; Hamilton, Willie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP) is a collaboration between 6 countries and 12 jurisdictions with similar primary care-led health services. This study investigates primary care physician (PCP) behaviour and systems that may contribute to the timeliness of investigating for cancer and subsequently, international survival differences. Design A validated survey administered to PCPs via the internet set out in two parts: direct questions on primary care structure and practice relating to cancer diagnosis, and clinical vignettes, assessing management of scenarios relating to the diagnosis of lung, colorectal or ovarian cancer. Participants 2795 PCPs in 11 jurisdictions: New South Wales and Victoria (Australia), British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario (Canada), England, Northern Ireland, Wales (UK), Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Primary and secondary outcome measures Analysis compared the cumulative proportion of PCPs in each jurisdiction opting to investigate or refer at each phase for each vignette with 1-year survival, and conditional 5-year survival rates for the relevant cancer and jurisdiction. Logistic regression was used to explore whether PCP characteristics or system differences in each jurisdiction affected the readiness to investigate. Results 4 of 5 vignettes showed a statistically significant correlation (p<0.05 or better) between readiness to investigate or refer to secondary care at the first phase of each vignette and cancer survival rates for that jurisdiction. No consistent associations were found between readiness to investigate and selected PCP demographics, practice or health system variables. Conclusions We demonstrate a correlation between the readiness of PCPs to investigate symptoms indicative of cancer and cancer survival rates, one of the first possible explanations for the variation in cancer survival between ICBP countries. No specific health system features consistently explained these findings. Some

  2. Predictors of Health Care Use of Women with Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N N; Sitnikova, Kate; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; de Haes, Hanneke C J M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of health care use among women with breast cancer by conducting a systematic review. Potentially relevant studies were identified by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases. Also, backward and forward citation searches were performed. Studies were selected if they addressed associations between (a) sociodemographic, enabling (e.g., income), clinical and health related, or psychosocial predictors, and (b) medical, psychosocial, or paramedical health care use of adult women with breast cancer. The health care types of interest were hospital utilization and provider visits. An evaluation of aggregated findings was performed to determine consistency of findings between studies. Sixteen studies were included in the review. Higher age, a more advanced cancer stage, more comorbid disorders, having a mastectomy, a lymph node dissection, and breast reconstruction were consistently associated with higher hospital utilization. None of the patient characteristics were consistently associated with medical, psychosocial, or paramedical health care use-but psychosocial or paramedical associations were also less examined. In conclusion, sociodemographic, medical, and treatment-related factors were consistently associated with (higher) health care use of breast cancer patients. Practitioners may use this information to anticipate future use of subgroups of patients. Results may also be used in the development of interventions that target relevant predictors, to reduce patients' health care use and accompanying health care costs. Furthermore, more research is needed to identify predictors of psychosocial and paramedical health care use.

  3. A case report: caring for a golden retriever with nasal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Tamara S

    2011-05-01

    This article is a case report of a veterinarian caring for a golden retriever with nasal cancer. It addresses the 5-step strategy for comprehensive palliative and hospice care protocol, which organizes examinations, consultations, and conversations with clients. The case report presents diagnosis, treatment, and euthanasia. PMID:21601757

  4. Marshalling Social Support: A Care-Getting Model for Persons Living with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahana, Eva; Kahana, Boaz; Wykle, May; Kulle, Diana

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a stress theory-based conceptual framework for understanding proactive options for care-getting for patients living with cancer that is also relevant to patients living with other chronic or life-threatening illnesses. Barriers and facilitators to active efforts for obtaining responsive care from both informal and formal…

  5. Cancer Care Delivery Research: Building the Evidence Base to Support Practice Change in Community Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Erin E.; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Castro, Kathleen M.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Kaluzny, Arnold D.; Hautala, Judith A.; Grad, Oren; Ballard, Rachel M.; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta J.; Kramer, Barnett S.; Clauser, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how health care system structures, processes, and available resources facilitate and/or hinder the delivery of quality cancer care is imperative, especially given the rapidly changing health care landscape. The emerging field of cancer care delivery research (CCDR) focuses on how organizational structures and processes, care delivery models, financing and reimbursement, health technologies, and health care provider and patient knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors influence cancer care quality, cost, and access and ultimately the health outcomes and well-being of patients and survivors. In this article, we describe attributes of CCDR, present examples of studies that illustrate those attributes, and discuss the potential impact of CCDR in addressing disparities in care. We conclude by emphasizing the need for collaborative research that links academic and community-based settings and serves simultaneously to accelerate the translation of CCDR results into practice. The National Cancer Institute recently launched its Community Oncology Research Program, which includes a focus on this area of research. PMID:26195715

  6. Young Adult Cancer Survivors’ Experience with Cancer Treatment and Follow-Up Care and Perceptions of Barriers to Engaging in Recommended Care

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Erin; Esiashvili, Natia; Mertens, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We examined correlates of low engagement in the healthcare system, experiences with survivorship care, barriers to follow-up care, and potential resources for promoting follow-up care among young adult survivors of childhood cancers. We conducted a mixed-method study involving surveys of 106 survivors of childhood cancer aged 18–34 recruited from a university-affiliated children’s hospital and an NCI-designated cancer center in the Southeastern USA. Phone-based semistructured interviews were then conducted in a subset of 26. Assessments included health factors, psychosocial factors, healthcare system interaction, and interest in resources to promote engagement in healthcare. Survey participants were on average 22.14(SD=3.16) years old, 50.0 % female, and 77.4 % White. Overall, 46.0 % had attended survivorship clinic, 47.2 % reported receiving a treatment summary, 68.9 % had a primary care provider, and 17.0 % reported no interaction with healthcare in the past 2 years. Correlates of less than annual healthcare provider visits included being older (p=0.003), being male (p<0.001), lack of insurance (p=0.002), and having had chemotherapy (p=0.05). Participants reported varied experiences in terms of how health and treatment information was presented, from none or too little to overwhelming or anxiety-provoking amounts. Barriers to engaging in survivorship care included no/limited insurance, time, or transportation; major life changes; anxiety; and difficulty transitioning from pediatrics to adult care. Participants highlighted the need for educational and psychosocial resources, particularly technology-based resources. Multilevel interventions are needed to increase engagement in survivor-ship care among young adult cancer survivors. Technology-based resources addressing social support and mental well-being are intervention possibilities. PMID:25948413

  7. Filling the Gap for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Follow-Up: An Overview for Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Bond-Bero, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Earlier detection and newer treatments now make breast cancer highly survivable, and breast cancer survivors are the largest female cancer survivor group in the United States. With earlier detection, more women are being diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer and need follow-up care. With the increasing number of breast cancer survivors, there is a projected shortage in the workforce of oncology specialists to care for these women. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends that breast cancer follow-up care can be provided by an oncologist or primary care provider, as long as the primary care provider has spoken to the oncologist about appropriate follow-up care. Several studies have shown that primary care providers and oncologists have comparable outcomes for follow-up care of women with early-stage breast cancer. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) are considered the gold standard for breast cancer treatment and follow-up. These guidelines are clear and straightforward. Using knowledge of the NCCN Guidelines, primary care providers can fill the gap for follow-up care of women with early-stage breast cancer.

  8. Emergency Point-of-Care Ultrasound Detection of Cancer in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, Roaa S; Etoom, Yousef; Solano, Tanya; Desjardins, Marie-Pier; Fischer, Jason W

    2015-08-01

    The use of point-of-care ultrasound in the pediatric emergency department is evolving beyond conventional applications as users become more expert with the technology. In this case series, we describe the potential utility of recognizing abnormal anatomy to impact care in the context of possible cancer in pediatric patients. We describe 4 patients with Langerhans histiocytosis, neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, and rhabdomyosarcoma, in which point-of-care ultrasound was used to facilitate the diagnoses.

  9. Measuring quality in cancer care: overview of initiatives in selected countries.

    PubMed

    Wild, C; Patera, N

    2013-11-01

    To inform the Austrian National Cancer Plan on possible generic quality indicators that might be derived from routine data a systematic literature search in three databases, followed by extensive hand-searching to locate initiatives and their publications was carried out in spring 2011. Twenty-one initiatives that developed indicators for measuring quality of cancer care were identified: longer standing and decentralised initiatives are characteristics of the USA. The Canadian province of Ontario publishes the Cancer System Quality Index, centralised audit and peer review programmes are undertaken in the National Health Service in the UK. Methodologically sound cancer type-specific pilot projects in Belgium have been implemented, the Netherlands and Denmark are running national initiatives. Germany recently started quality measurement activities, too. Generic indicators often focus on end-of-life care, multidisciplinarity, advance care planning and documentation. Indicators measuring the quality of care during an entire episode of cancer are rare, as are those for less common cancers and for care in the outpatient setting. Access, equity and the patient's perspective are only beginning to be incorporated into indicators. After having identified a range of candidate indicators that can be implemented with routinely collected data alone, piloting them in Austria would be the next step to go. PMID:23808585

  10. Measuring improvement in populations: implementing and evaluating successful change in lung cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Klesges, Lisa M.; Smeltzer, Mathew P.; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U.

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of care in lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and in the United States, is a major public health challenge. Such improvement requires accurate and meaningful measurement of quality of care. Preliminary indicators have been derived from clinical practice guidelines and expert opinions, but there are few standard sets of quality of care measures for lung cancer in the United States or elsewhere. Research to develop validated evidence-based quality of care measures is critical in promoting population improvement initiatives in lung cancer. Furthermore, novel research designs beyond the traditional randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are needed for wide-scale applications of quality improvement and should extend into alternative designs such as quasi-experimental designs, rigorous observational studies, population modeling, and other pragmatic study designs. We discuss several study design options to aid the development of practical, actionable, and measurable quality standards for lung cancer care. We also provide examples of ongoing pragmatic studies for the dissemination and implementation of lung cancer quality improvement interventions in community settings. PMID:26380178

  11. Pyruvate and Metabolic Flexibility: Illuminating a Path Toward Selective Cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Olson, Kristofor A; Schell, John C; Rutter, Jared

    2016-03-01

    Dysregulated metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer, and there is abundant interest in developing therapies to selectively target these aberrant metabolic phenotypes. Sitting at the decision-point between mitochondrial carbohydrate oxidation and aerobic glycolysis (i.e., the 'Warburg effect'), the synthesis and consumption of pyruvate is tightly controlled and is often differentially regulated in cancer cells. This review examines recent efforts toward understanding and targeting mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism, and addresses some of the successes, pitfalls, and significant challenges of metabolic therapy to date. PMID:26873641

  12. Supportive nursing care around breast cancer surgery: an evaluation of the 1997 status in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Thijs-Boer, F M; de Kruif, A T; van de Wiel, H B

    1999-04-01

    This study aimed to assess nurses' involvement in the supportive care of patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer in Dutch hospitals. A questionnaire used to evaluate various aspects of nursing care for breast cancer patients was sent to the surgical nursing teams in all 120 Dutch hospitals that provide surgical treatment for these patients. Nursing care was defined to be optimal if it met the following criteria: (a) Specialized nursing support is provided to all patients during admission and in the outpatient departments both before and after surgery. (b) A protocol is in place outlining standard nursing procedures for breast cancer patients. (c) Formal communication about each breast cancer patient exists between the nurses involved. On the basis of this definition, it was found that optimal nursing care was provided in only 6% of the hospitals. Nursing care fell short mainly in the outpatient setting. This shortcoming also was recognized by most respondents, and many were already planning improvements. Nurses had varying opinions about their responsibility to provide the patient with information about the disease and its treatment, and consensus was lacking. In summary, nursing care for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients in Dutch hospitals needs improvement, especially in the outpatient setting. PMID:10217034

  13. Systematic review of guidelines for the management of suspected lung cancer in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, M. Elisabeth Del; Young, Sheila-Mae; Vella, Emily T.; Ash, Marla; Bansal, Praveen; Robinson, Andrew; Skrastins, Roland; Ung, Yee; Zeldin, Robert; Levitt, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To systematically review the literature and provide an update and integration of existing peer-reviewed guidelines with recent systematic reviews and with primary studies related to the early recognition and management of lung cancer in primary care. Data sources MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for relevant articles. The quality of the evidence to support existing guideline recommendations, and the consistency of recommendations with updated evidence, were assessed. Applicability in a Canadian primary care setting was also evaluated. Study selection All studies that explored signs or symptoms of or risk factors for lung cancer in the primary care setting were included. All diagnostic studies in which symptomatic primary care patients underwent 1 or more investigations were also searched. Synthesis Recommendations were consistent among guidelines despite a paucity of supporting evidence. Updated evidence provided further support for the recommendations. Recommendations for identifying signs and symptoms of lung cancer presenting in primary care and for initial management can be adopted and applied within a Canadian primary care setting. Conclusion This updated review of recommendations might help promote evidence-based practice and, ultimately, more timely management and improved prognosis for lung cancer patients. It might also assist in the development of lung cancer diagnostic assessment programs. PMID:25122830

  14. Assessment of cancer care in Indian elderly cancer patients: A single center study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Anindya; Shahi, UP

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This prospective study aimed to assess the profiles of elderly cancer patient to optimize cancer care in Indian setup. The profiles have been compared with that of younger patients in terms of epidemiological, clinical data, co-morbidity, treatment, toxicity, clinical outcome, and survival pattern. Materials and Methods: The study comprised cancer patients attending radiotherapy outdoor (November 2005 to June 2006). There were 104 patients of age ≥60 years (elderly group) and 121 patients of 45-59 years (younger group). Results: Elderly group had median age 65 years (60-88 years) with M:F = 1:1. The younger group had median age 50 years (45-59 years) with M:F = 1:2. Elderly had higher proportion of gastrointestinal and genito-urinary tract malignancies. Younger group had higher proportion of breast, lymphoma, and brain tumor. 13% had co-morbidity, 50% received treatment, 27% were treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery, and two-third of these cases belong to elderly group. Majority tolerated treatment well. 10% had significant grade of toxicity. 57% of elderly patients did not accept and one-fourth of all cases did not complete the prescribed treatment. 88% cases were responders of which 70% showed complete response. There were no differences between two groups. At 12 months 35% of treated patients came for follow-up. At first 12 months, 60-70% were alive without disease. Conclusion: There were differences between two groups in terms of performance status, treatment acceptance, and treatment modality prescribed. Elderly patients deserve same opportunity as younger patients for treatment and survival options from the oncologist. PMID:24455630

  15. Pre-referral general practitioner consultations and subsequent experience of cancer care: evidence from the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, S C; Abel, G A; Saunders, C L; Wardle, J; Lyratzopoulos, G

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged diagnostic intervals may negatively affect the patient experience of subsequent cancer care, but evidence about this assertion is sparse. We analysed data from 73 462 respondents to two English Cancer Patient Experience Surveys to examine whether patients with three or more (3+) pre-referral consultations were more likely to report negative experiences of subsequent care compared with patients with one or two consultations in respect of 12 a priori selected survey questions. For each of 12 experience items, logistic regression models were used, adjusting for prior consultation category, cancer site, socio-demographic case-mix and response tendency (to capture potential variation in critical response tendencies between individuals). There was strong evidence (P < 0.01 for all) that patients with 3+ pre-referral consultations reported worse care experience for 10/12 questions, with adjusted odds ratios compared with patients with 1-2 consultations ranging from 1.10 (95% confidence intervals 1.03-1.17) to 1.68 (1.60-1.77), or between +1.8% and +10.6% greater percentage reporting a negative experience. Associations were stronger for processes involving primary as opposed to hospital care; and for evaluation than report items. Considering 1, 2, 3-4 and '5+' pre-referral consultations separately a 'dose-response' relationship was apparent. We conclude that there is a negative association between multiple pre-diagnostic consultations with a general practitioner and the experience of subsequent cancer care.

  16. Valuing end-of-life care in the United States: the case of new cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, Corinna

    2012-10-01

    New cancer therapies offer the hope of improved diagnosis to patients with life-threatening disease. Over the past 5-10 years, a number of specialty drugs have entered clinical practice to provide better systemic therapy for advanced cancers that respond to few therapeutic alternatives. To date, however, such advances have been only modestly effective in extending life and come with a high price tag, raising questions about their value for money, patient access and implications for health care costs. This article explores some of the key issues present in valuing end-of-life care in the United States in the case of advanced cancer drugs, from the difficult trade-offs between their limited health benefits and high costs to the technical, political and social challenges in assessing their value and applying such evidence to inform policy and practice. A number of initial steps are discussed that could be pursued to improve the value of advanced cancer care. PMID:23079300

  17. Perspectives on preventive health care and barriers to breast cancer screening among Iraqi women refugees.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Altaf; Bond, Barbara; Percac-Lima, Sanja

    2012-08-01

    Since the Iraq war began in 2003, over 4 million Iraqis have been displaced. Little is known about preventive cancer care in this population, but stark disparities have been documented. The purpose of this study was to assess the perspectives of Iraqi women refugees on preventive care and perceived barriers to breast cancer screening. Interviews were conducted in Arabic with twenty Iraqi refugee women by a bilingual (English/Arabic) medical student, transcribed, translated and coded according to established qualitative content and thematic analysis procedures. Psychosocial barriers, culturally mediated beliefs, and health consequences of war were identified as major themes, ultimately showing what factors, alone and collectively, have impeded Iraqi refugee women's ability and motivation to obtain breast cancer screening. To improve cancer prevention and decrease disparities in care in this most vulnerable population, culturally appropriate health education and outreach programs, as well as further community-level targeted studies, are needed.

  18. Perceptions of palliative care among patients with advanced cancer and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Camilla; Swami, Nadia; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Leighl, Natasha; Rydall, Anne; Rodin, Gary; Tannock, Ian; Hannon, Breffni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early palliative care is increasingly recommended but seldom practised. We sought to examine perceptions of palliative care among patients with advanced cancer and their caregivers. Methods: After conducting a cluster randomized controlled trial of early palliative care versus standard care for patients with advanced cancer, we approached patients and their caregivers to participate in semistructured interviews seeking to assess, qualitatively, their attitudes and perceptions about palliative care. We used the grounded theory method for data collection and analysis. Results: A total of 48 patients (26 intervention, 22 control) and 23 caregivers (14 intervention, 9 control) completed interviews. Participants’ initial perceptions of palliative care in both trial arms were of death, hopelessness, dependency and end-of-life comfort care for inpatients. These perceptions provoked fear and avoidance, and often originated from interactions with health care professionals. During the trial, those in the intervention arm developed a broader concept of palliative care as “ongoing care” that improved their “quality of living” but still felt that the term itself carried a stigma. Participants in the intervention group emphasized the need for palliative care to be reframed and better explained by health care professionals. Participants in the control group generally considered it pointless to rename palliative care, but many in the intervention group stated emphatically that a different name was necessary in the early outpatient setting. Interpretation: There is a strong stigma attached to palliative care, which may persist even after positive experiences with an early palliative care intervention. Education of the public, patients and health care providers is paramount if early integration of palliative care is to be successful. PMID:27091801

  19. Treatment preference and patient centered prostate cancer care: Design and rationale.

    PubMed

    Jayadevappa, Ravishankar; Chhatre, Sumedha; Gallo, Joseph J; Wittink, Marsha; Morales, Knashawn H; Bruce Malkowicz, S; Lee, David; Guzzo, Thomas; Caruso, Adele; Van Arsdalen, Keith; Wein, Alan J; Sanford Schwartz, J

    2015-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a slow progressing cancer that affects millions of men in the US. Due to uncertainties in outcomes and treatment complications, it is important that patients engage in informed decision making to choose the "optimal treatment". Patient centered care that encompasses informed decision-making can improve treatment choice and quality of care. Thus, assessing patient treatment preferences is critical for developing an effective decision support system. The objective of this patient-centered randomized clinical trial was to study the comparative effectiveness of a conjoint analysis intervention compared to usual care in improving subjective and objective outcomes in prostate cancer patients. We identified preferred attributes of alternative prostate cancer treatments that will aid in evaluating attributes of treatment options. In this two-phase study, in Phase 1 we used mixed methods to develop an adaptive conjoint task instrument. The conjoint task required the patients to trade-off attributes associated with treatments by assessing their relative importance. Phase 2 consisted of a randomized controlled trial of men with localized prostate cancer. We analyzed the effect of conjoint task intervention on the association between preferences, treatment and objective and subjective outcomes. Our conjoint task instrument can lead to a values-based patient-centered decision aid tool and help tailor treatment decision making to the values of prostate cancer patients. This will ultimately improve clinical decision making, clinical policy process, enhance patient centered care and improve prostate cancer outcomes.

  20. Health care and cancer screening experience of chinese immigrants in New York City: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Kenny; Mak, Agnes

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to assess the health care and cancer screening experience of Chinese immigrants in New York City and identify health care delivery system barriers to cancer education and screening activities. A qualitative, exploratory research methodology based on a grounded theory approach was used. Thirty-nine low-income and medically underserved Chinese men and women participated in 4 focus group sessions and 14 in-depth interviews. Findings revealed numerous barriers experienced by participants: red tape and bureaucracy in the health care system, provider insensitivity to their concerns, lack of availability in doctor schedule, long waiting time in clinics, and fragmentation of the medical care system. This study highlighted the importance of cultural relevancy and appropriateness in the design and implementation of effective cancer screening programs for this population.

  1. Guideline-Concordant Cancer Care and Survival Among American Indian/Alaskan Native Patients

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Sara H.; Varghese, Thomas K.; Morris, Arden M.; Porter, Michael P.; He, Hao; Buchwald, Dedra; Flum, David R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND American Indians/Alaskan Natives (AI/ANs) have the worst 5-year cancer survival of all racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Causes for this disparity are unknown. The authors of this report examined the receipt of cancer treatment among AI/AN patients compared with white patients. METHODS This was a retrospective cohort study of 338,204 patients who were diagnosed at age ≥65 years with breast, colon, lung, or prostate cancer between 1996 and 2005 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. Nationally accepted guidelines for surgical and adjuvant therapy and surveillance were selected as metrics of optimal, guideline-concordant care. Treatment analyses compared AI/ANs with matched whites. RESULTS Across cancer types, AI/ANs were less likely to receive optimal cancer treatment and were less likely to undergo surgery (P ≤ .025 for all cancers). Adjuvant therapy rates were significantly lower for AI/AN patients with breast cancer (P <.001) and colon cancer (P = .001). Rates of post-treatment surveillance also were lower among AI/ANs and were statistically significantly lower for AI/AN patients with breast cancer (P = .002) and prostate cancer (P <.001). Nonreceipt of optimal cancer treatment was associated with significantly worse survival across cancer types. Disease-specific survival for those who did not undergo surgery was significantly lower for patients with breast cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 0.62), colon cancer (HR, 0.74), prostate cancer (HR, 0.52), and lung cancer (HR, 0.36). Survival rates also were significantly lower for those patients who did not receive adjuvant therapy for breast cancer (HR, 0.56), colon cancer (HR, 0.59), or prostate cancer (HR, 0.81; all 95% confidence intervals were <1.0). CONCLUSIONS Fewer AI/AN patients than white patients received guideline-concordant cancer treatment across the 4 most common cancers. Efforts to explain these differences are critical to improving cancer care and

  2. Prostate Cancer Care Before and After Medicare Eligibility.

    PubMed

    Huesch, Marco D; Ong, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies suggest Medicare eligibility confers significant and substantial reductions in mortality and beneficial increases in health service utilization. We compared 13,882 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer at ages 63 to 64 years with 14,774 patients diagnosed at ages 65 to 66 (controls) in 2004 to 2007. Compared with controls, patients diagnosed with prostate cancer before Medicare eligibility had no statistically significant or meaningful differences in cancer stage, time to treatment, or type of treatment.

  3. Cancer Care Inequity for Women in Resource-Poor Countries

    PubMed Central

    Varughese, Joyce; Richman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Cervical, endometrial, and breast cancers are paradigms for global health disparity. The paucity of well-designed and -used cancer registries obstructs accurate assessment and planning for international agency resource allocation. Increasing rates of both smoking and obesity in resource-poor nations will lead to increases in the incidence of cancers in developing nations. Women residing in the developing world continue to present in later stages of disease and have fewer options for treatment than those in developed countries. PMID:21364864

  4. Multi-agent systems: effective approach for cancer care information management.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2013-01-01

    Physicians, in order to study the causes of cancer, detect cancer earlier, prevent or determine the effectiveness of treatment, and specify the reasons for the treatment ineffectiveness, need to access accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The cancer care environment has become more complex because of the need for coordination and communication among health care professionals with different skills in a variety of roles and the existence of large amounts of data with various formats. The goals of health care systems in such a complex environment are correct health data management, providing appropriate information needs of users to enhance the integrity and quality of health care, timely access to accurate information and reducing medical errors. These roles in new systems with use of agents efficiently perform well. Because of the potential capability of agent systems to solve complex and dynamic health problems, health care system, in order to gain full advantage of E- health, steps must be taken to make use of this technology. Multi-agent systems have effective roles in health service quality improvement especially in telemedicine, emergency situations and management of chronic diseases such as cancer. In the design and implementation of agent based systems, planning items such as information confidentiality and privacy, architecture, communication standards, ethical and legal aspects, identification opportunities and barriers should be considered. It should be noted that usage of agent systems only with a technical view is associated with many problems such as lack of user acceptance. The aim of this commentary is to survey applications, opportunities and barriers of this new artificial intelligence tool for cancer care information as an approach to improve cancer care management. PMID:24460364

  5. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care: critical components in the delivery of high-quality oncology services.

    PubMed

    Silver, Julie K; Raj, Vishwa S; Fu, Jack B; Wisotzky, Eric M; Smith, Sean Robinson; Kirch, Rebecca A

    2015-12-01

    Palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are important collaborative referral sources for each other who can work together to improve the lives of cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers by improving both quality of care and quality of life. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care involve the delivery of important but underutilized medical services to oncology patients by interdisciplinary teams. These subspecialties are similar in many respects, including their focus on improving cancer-related symptoms or cancer treatment-related side effects, improving health-related quality of life, lessening caregiver burden, and valuing patient-centered care and shared decision-making. They also aim to improve healthcare efficiencies and minimize costs by means such as reducing hospital lengths of stay and unanticipated readmissions. Although their goals are often aligned, different specialized skills and approaches are used in the delivery of care. For example, while each specialty prioritizes goal-concordant care through identification of patient and family preferences and values, palliative care teams typically focus extensively on using patient and family communication to determine their goals of care, while also tending to comfort issues such as symptom management and spiritual concerns. Rehabilitation clinicians may tend to focus more specifically on functional issues such as identifying and treating deficits in physical, psychological, or cognitive impairments and any resulting disability and negative impact on quality of life. Additionally, although palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are trained to diagnose and treat medically complex patients, rehabilitation clinicians also treat many patients with a single impairment and a low symptom burden. In these cases, the goal is often cure of the underlying neurologic or musculoskeletal condition. This report defines and describes cancer rehabilitation and palliative care, delineates their

  6. Rural Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Their Role in the Breast Cancer Care Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Kathleen M.; Edwards, Joellen

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rural women in the United States experience disparity in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment when compared to their urban counterparts. Given the 11% chance of lifetime occurrence of breast cancer for women overall, the continuum of breast cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery are of legitimate concern to rural women and…

  7. Integrated oncology and palliative care: five years experience at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Allende-Pérez, Silvia; Verástegui-Avilés, Emma; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro; Meneses-García, Abelardo; Herrera-Gómez, Angel

    2016-04-01

    Under the national plan for addressing cancer, prevention and detection play important roles. However, the cost of treatments and late diagnosis represent a significant burden on health services. At the National Cancer Institute, more than half of patients present with tumors in advanced stages, and approximately 10% of patients seen for the first time exhibit terminal-stage malignancies, where there are no feasible cancer treatment options, and the patients are instead admitted to the hospital exclusively for palliative symptomatic management. In 2010, the National Cancer Plan began implementing a model of integrative management of palliative care in oncology that has gradually come to include symptomatic palliative care, involving ambulatory, distant and hospitalized management of patients with cancer, in its final stages and, more recently, in earlier stages. PMID:27557392

  8. Health care professionals' familiarity with non-pharmacological strategies for managing cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Zaza, C; Sellick, S M; Willan, A; Reyno, L; Browman, G P

    1999-01-01

    Many studies have confirmed unnecessary suffering among cancer patients, due to the inadequate use of analgesic medication and other effective interventions. While pharmacological treatments are appropriately the central component of cancer pain management, the under-utilization of effective nonpharmacological strategies (NPS) may contribute to the problem of pain and suffering among cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to determine health care professionals' familiarity with, and perceptions regarding, NPS for managing cancer pain, and to assess their interest in learning more about NPS as adjuncts to pharmacological analgesics. Two-hundred and fourteen health care professionals were surveyed at two cancer treatment centres in Ontario, Canada. The self-report questionnaire included questions regarding 11 psychological strategies (e.g. imagery) and eight other NPS (e.g. acupuncture). The response rate was 67% (141/214). Subjects were found to be the least familiar with autogenic training, operant conditioning, and cognitive therapy. Other than radiation and surgery, subjects most commonly reported recommending support groups (67%), imagery (54%), music or art therapy (49%) and meditation (43%) for managing cancer pain. Participants were most interested in learning more about acupuncture, massage therapy, therapeutic touch, hypnosis, and biofeedback. Participants were somewhat familiar with most of the 19 NPS presented; however, they use or recommend few NPS for managing cancer pain. Health professionals' interest in NPS has important implications for the supportive care of cancer patients.

  9. Health care professionals' familiarity with non-pharmacological strategies for managing cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Zaza, C; Sellick, S M; Willan, A; Reyno, L; Browman, G P

    1999-01-01

    Many studies have confirmed unnecessary suffering among cancer patients, due to the inadequate use of analgesic medication and other effective interventions. While pharmacological treatments are appropriately the central component of cancer pain management, the under-utilization of effective nonpharmacological strategies (NPS) may contribute to the problem of pain and suffering among cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to determine health care professionals' familiarity with, and perceptions regarding, NPS for managing cancer pain, and to assess their interest in learning more about NPS as adjuncts to pharmacological analgesics. Two-hundred and fourteen health care professionals were surveyed at two cancer treatment centres in Ontario, Canada. The self-report questionnaire included questions regarding 11 psychological strategies (e.g. imagery) and eight other NPS (e.g. acupuncture). The response rate was 67% (141/214). Subjects were found to be the least familiar with autogenic training, operant conditioning, and cognitive therapy. Other than radiation and surgery, subjects most commonly reported recommending support groups (67%), imagery (54%), music or art therapy (49%) and meditation (43%) for managing cancer pain. Participants were most interested in learning more about acupuncture, massage therapy, therapeutic touch, hypnosis, and biofeedback. Participants were somewhat familiar with most of the 19 NPS presented; however, they use or recommend few NPS for managing cancer pain. Health professionals' interest in NPS has important implications for the supportive care of cancer patients. PMID:10335554

  10. How Do Integrated Health Care Systems Address Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Colon Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, Kim F.; Patel, Manali I.; Ma, Yifei; Schmidt, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (CRC) disparities have persisted over the last two decades. CRC is a complex disease requiring multidisciplinary care from specialists who may be geographically separated. Few studies have assessed the association between integrated health care system (IHS) CRC care quality, survival, and disparities. The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to an IHS positively affects quality of care, risk of mortality, and disparities. Patients and Methods This retrospective secondary-data analysis study, using the California Cancer Registry linked to state discharge abstracts of patients treated for colon cancer (2001 to 2006), compared the rates of National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline–based care, the hazard of mortality, and racial/ethnic disparities in an IHS versus other settings. Results More than 30,000 patient records were evaluated. The IHS had overall higher rates of adherence to NCCN guidelines. Propensity score–matched Cox models showed an independent and protective association between care in the IHS and survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.87; 95% CI, 0.85 to 0.90). This advantage persisted across stage groups. Black race was associated with increased hazard of mortality in all other settings (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.27); however, there was no disparity within the IHS for any minority group (P > .11 for all groups) when compared with white race. Conclusion The IHS delivered higher rates of evidence-based care and was associated with lower 5-year mortality. Racial/ethnic disparities in survival were absent in the IHS. Integrated systems may serve as the cornerstone for developing accountable care organizations poised to improve cancer outcomes and eliminate disparities under health care reform. PMID:25624437

  11. Following through: the consistency of survivorship care plan use in United States cancer programs.

    PubMed

    Birken, Sarah A; Deal, Allison M; Mayer, Deborah K; Weiner, Bryan J

    2014-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine suggests that consistent survivorship care plan (SCP) use involves developing and delivering SCPs to all cancer survivors and their primary care providers (PCPs). We describe the consistency of SCP use in US cancer programs and assess its relationship with cancer-program-level determinants. We surveyed employees knowledgeable about survivorship practices in cancer programs reporting current SCP use (n = 36, 81 % response rate). We operationalized consistent SCP use as whether SCPs were (1) developed for ≥75 % survivors, (2) delivered to ≥75 % survivors, (3) delivered to ≥75 % PCPs, and (4) all of the above. We use descriptive statistics to report SCP use consistency and evaluate associations using Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. SCPs were developed for ≥75 % survivors in five programs (15 %), eight (25 %) delivered ≥75 % SCPs to survivors, seven (23 %) delivered ≥75 % SCPs to PCPs, and only one program (4 %) met all three criteria. We found relationships between SCP use consistency and geographic region (p = .05), initiating SCP use in response to survivors' requests (p = .03), and membership in the National Cancer Institute's National Community Cancer Centers Program (p = .01). SCP use is highly inconsistent. Survivors and cancer care quality improvement organizations may play a key role in improving the consistency of SCP use in US cancer programs. Survivors can initiate SCP use. Cancer care quality improvement organizations can specify how cancer programs' compliance with SCP guidelines will be assessed. Future research should identify mechanisms underlying the relationships that we found.

  12. Following through: the consistency of survivorship care plan use in United States cancer programs.

    PubMed

    Birken, Sarah A; Deal, Allison M; Mayer, Deborah K; Weiner, Bryan J

    2014-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine suggests that consistent survivorship care plan (SCP) use involves developing and delivering SCPs to all cancer survivors and their primary care providers (PCPs). We describe the consistency of SCP use in US cancer programs and assess its relationship with cancer-program-level determinants. We surveyed employees knowledgeable about survivorship practices in cancer programs reporting current SCP use (n = 36, 81 % response rate). We operationalized consistent SCP use as whether SCPs were (1) developed for ≥75 % survivors, (2) delivered to ≥75 % survivors, (3) delivered to ≥75 % PCPs, and (4) all of the above. We use descriptive statistics to report SCP use consistency and evaluate associations using Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. SCPs were developed for ≥75 % survivors in five programs (15 %), eight (25 %) delivered ≥75 % SCPs to survivors, seven (23 %) delivered ≥75 % SCPs to PCPs, and only one program (4 %) met all three criteria. We found relationships between SCP use consistency and geographic region (p = .05), initiating SCP use in response to survivors' requests (p = .03), and membership in the National Cancer Institute's National Community Cancer Centers Program (p = .01). SCP use is highly inconsistent. Survivors and cancer care quality improvement organizations may play a key role in improving the consistency of SCP use in US cancer programs. Survivors can initiate SCP use. Cancer care quality improvement organizations can specify how cancer programs' compliance with SCP guidelines will be assessed. Future research should identify mechanisms underlying the relationships that we found. PMID:24577781

  13. Sepsis following cancer surgery: the need for early recognition and standardised clinical care.

    PubMed

    Hiong, A; Thursky, K A; Teh, B W; Haeusler, G M; Slavin, M A; Worth, L J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the implementation of multimodal bundles of care in hospitalised patients, post-operative sepsis in patients with cancer still accounts for a significant burden of illness and substantial healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for cancer are at particular risk of sepsis due to underlying malignancy, being immunocompromised associated with cancer management and the complexity of surgical procedures performed. In this review, we evaluate the burden of illness and risks for sepsis following surgery for cancer. Current evidence supporting standardised strategies for sepsis management (including early recognition and resuscitation) is examined together with challenges in implementing quality improvement programs.

  14. Current and future care of patients with the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Del Fabbro, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    Many important advances have occurred in the field of cancer cachexia over the past decade, including progress in understanding the mechanisms of the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS) and the development of promising pharmacologic and supportive care interventions. However, no approved agents for cancer cachexia currently exist, emphasizing the unmet need for an effective pharmacologic therapy. This article reviews the key elements of CACS assessment in daily practice, the contribution of nutritional impact symptoms (NIS), the evidence for current pharmacologic options, and promising anticachexia agents in perclinical and clinical trials. It also proposes a model for multimodality therapy and highlights issues pertinent to CACS in patients with pancreatic, gastric, and esophageal cancer.

  15. [Nursing in palliative care to children and adolescents with cancer: integrative literature review].

    PubMed

    da Costa, Thailly Faria; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2010-12-01

    Pediatric palliative care is a challenge for nursing because it requires emotional balance and knowledge about its specific features. This study is an integrative literature review that aims to identify nursing actions in palliative care for children and adolescents with cancer, considering peculiarities of the disease and dying process. The review was performed by searching for articles indexed in Biblioteca Virtual da Adolescência (Adolec), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) and PubMed databases from January 2004 till May 2009. From 29 references found, six met inclusion criteria. Results show teamwork, home care, pain management, dialogue, family support and particularities of childhood cancer fundamental tools for nursing in palliative care. The complexity of care in this situation requires solidarity, compassion, support and relieving suffering. PMID:21805890

  16. [Nursing in palliative care to children and adolescents with cancer: integrative literature review].

    PubMed

    da Costa, Thailly Faria; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2010-12-01

    Pediatric palliative care is a challenge for nursing because it requires emotional balance and knowledge about its specific features. This study is an integrative literature review that aims to identify nursing actions in palliative care for children and adolescents with cancer, considering peculiarities of the disease and dying process. The review was performed by searching for articles indexed in Biblioteca Virtual da Adolescência (Adolec), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) and PubMed databases from January 2004 till May 2009. From 29 references found, six met inclusion criteria. Results show teamwork, home care, pain management, dialogue, family support and particularities of childhood cancer fundamental tools for nursing in palliative care. The complexity of care in this situation requires solidarity, compassion, support and relieving suffering.

  17. Follow-up and care of childhood cancer survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, A.T. )

    1991-02-15

    More children than ever before are being cured of cancer, thanks to aggressive use of multimodal therapy. Of prime concern are the potential long-term deleterious effects of such treatment. Sequelae may include impairment of growth or other aspects of development, damage to various organ systems, or a second cancer. Guidelines for surveillance and counseling are described.15 references.

  18. About Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The program supports research in three areas: prevention or treatment of acute or chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer, its treatment and caregiving (symptom management research); effects on quality of life from cancer, its treatment and caregiving (quality of life research); and end-of-life psychosocial issues, caregiving and treatment strategies (end-of-life research). |

  19. Quality palliative care for cancer and dementia in five European countries: some common challenges

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Nathan; Maio, Laura; van Riet Paap, Jasper; Mariani, Elena; Jaspers, Birgit; Sommerbakk, Ragni; Grammatico, Daniela; Manthorpe, Jill; Ahmedzai, Sam; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Iliffe, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There is a growing consensus worldwide that palliative care needs to be both more inclusive of conditions other than cancer and to improve. This paper explores some common challenges currently faced by professionals providing palliative care for patients with either cancer or dementia across five countries. Method One focus group (n = 7) and 67 interviews were conducted in 2012 across five countries: England, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Norway, with professionals from dementia, cancer and palliative care settings. Results The interviews revealed five common challenges faced across the five countries: communication difficulties (between services; and between professionals, and patients and their families); the variable extent of structural/functional integration of services; the difficulties in funding of palliative care services; problematic processes of care (boundaries, definitions, knowledge, skills and inclusiveness) and, finally, time constraints. Conclusion These are not problems distinct to palliative care, but they may have different origins and explanations compared to other areas of health care. This paper explored deeper themes hidden behind a discourse about barriers and facilitators to improving care. PMID:24131061

  20. 78 FR 25448 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for “Crowds Care for Cancer: Supporting Survivors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ...The number of cancer survivors in the United States is currently estimated at 14 million and is expected to increase significantly with the aging of the United States population. Cancer survivors may experience a host of long-term and late effects that require coordinated follow-up care after completion of primary treatment for cancer. Despite significant progress in cancer treatment, the......

  1. MDT lung cancer care: input from the Surgical Oncologist.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Biniam; Toyooka, Shinichi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Although there have been many advancements in the multidisciplinary management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery remains the primary modality of choice for resectable lung cancer when the patient is able to tolerate lung resection physiologically. There have been recent advances in surgical diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Increasing use of low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer has resulted in increased detection of small peripheral nodules or semi-solid ground glass opacities. Here, we review different modalities of localization techniques that have been used to aid surgical excisional biopsy when needle biopsy has failed to provide tissue diagnosis. We also report on the current debates regarding the use of sublobar resections for Stage I NSCLC as well as the surgical management of locally advanced NSCLC. Finally, we discuss the complex surgical management of T4 NSCLC lung cancers.

  2. Cancer predisposition genes: molecular mechanisms and clinical impact on personalized cancer care: examples of Lynch and HBOC syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of cancers occur through the inherited mutation of a group of genes called cancer predisposition genes. Individuals who carry a mutant allele of these genes have an increased susceptibility to cancer. A growing number of cancer susceptibility genes are being identified, and the physiopathology of germline mutation-based cancer development is also being elucidated with accumulating clinical and molecular data. More importantly, the identification of familial mutations has become routine practice, which is a perfect example of bench-to-bed translational medicine. Recently, other clinical applications of predisposition genes have been exploited, especially as efficient biomarkers predicting prognosis or response to treatment. Thus, it appears interesting to give an overview of the advances and impacts of predisposition genes in personalized cancer care by taking representative and common cancer syndromes as examples: Lynch syndrome for the first example, which is related to cancer susceptibility, and breast and ovary cancer syndrome for the second example, which involves BRCA deficiency-related targeted therapy. PMID:26616728

  3. The benchmark analysis of gastric, colorectal and rectal cancer pathways: toward establishing standardized clinical pathway in the cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Munemasa; Hamano, Masaaki; Nakagawara, Akira; Shinoda, Masayuki; Shimizu, Hideaki; Miura, Takeshi; Yoshida, Isao; Nemoto, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Aki

    2011-01-01

    Most clinical pathways in treating cancers in Japan are based on individual physician's personal experiences rather than on an empirical analysis of clinical data such as benchmark comparison with other hospitals. Therefore, these pathways are far from being standardized. By comparing detailed clinical data from five cancer centers, we have observed various differences among hospitals. By conducting benchmark analyses, providing detailed feedback to the participating hospitals and by repeating the benchmark a year later, we strive to develop more standardized clinical pathways for the treatment of cancers. The Cancer Quality Initiative was launched in 2007 by five cancer centers. Using diagnosis procedure combination data, the member hospitals benchmarked their pre-operative and post-operative length of stays, the duration of antibiotics administrations and the post-operative fasting duration for gastric, colon and rectal cancers. The benchmark was conducted by disclosing hospital identities and performed using 2007 and 2008 data. In the 2007 benchmark, substantial differences were shown among five hospitals in the treatment of gastric, colon and rectal cancers. After providing the 2007 results to the participating hospitals and organizing several brainstorming discussions, significant improvements were observed in the 2008 data study. The benchmark analysis of clinical data is extremely useful in promoting more standardized care and, thus in improving the quality of cancer treatment in Japan. By repeating the benchmark analyses, we can offer truly clinical evidence-based higher quality standardized cancer treatment to our patients.

  4. Child perceptions of parental care and overprotection in children with cancer and healthy children.

    PubMed

    Tillery, Rachel; Long, Alanna; Phipps, Sean

    2014-06-01

    The primary aims of this study were to: (a) examine child perceptions of overprotection; and (b) explore how these perceptions relate to child health and adjustment. Children with a prior diagnosis of cancer (n = 205) and children without a history of serious illness (n = 76) reported on parental overprotective and caring behaviors. Children with cancer were recruited from one of four strata based on the elapsed time since their cancer diagnosis (1-6 months; 6-24 months; 2-5 years; >5 years) Children also reported on symptoms of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress. Children with cancer did not differ from healthy children in their perceptions of parental care or overprotection. Child distress was more strongly related to perceptions of care and overprotection than child's health status. Children with cancer do not report their parents approach to care and protection differently than children without a cancer history. These findings mirror prior research examining parental perceptions of overprotection and suggest that, despite the challenges of parenting a child with serious illness, parental protection is not significantly altered.

  5. Child perceptions of parental care and overprotection in children with cancer and healthy children.

    PubMed

    Tillery, Rachel; Long, Alanna; Phipps, Sean

    2014-06-01

    The primary aims of this study were to: (a) examine child perceptions of overprotection; and (b) explore how these perceptions relate to child health and adjustment. Children with a prior diagnosis of cancer (n = 205) and children without a history of serious illness (n = 76) reported on parental overprotective and caring behaviors. Children with cancer were recruited from one of four strata based on the elapsed time since their cancer diagnosis (1-6 months; 6-24 months; 2-5 years; >5 years) Children also reported on symptoms of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress. Children with cancer did not differ from healthy children in their perceptions of parental care or overprotection. Child distress was more strongly related to perceptions of care and overprotection than child's health status. Children with cancer do not report their parents approach to care and protection differently than children without a cancer history. These findings mirror prior research examining parental perceptions of overprotection and suggest that, despite the challenges of parenting a child with serious illness, parental protection is not significantly altered. PMID:24682801

  6. Child Perceptions of Parental Care and Overprotection in Children with Cancer and Healthy Children

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, Rachel; Long, Alanna; Phipps, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Objective The primary aims of this study were to: a) examine child perceptions of overprotection; and b) explore how these perceptions relate to child health and adjustment. Method Children with a prior diagnosis of cancer (n = 205) and children without a history of serious illness (n = 76) reported on parental overprotective and caring behaviors. Children with cancer were recruited from one of four strata based on the elapsed time since their cancer diagnosis (1–6 months; 6–24 months; 2–5 years; > 5 years) Children also reported on symptoms of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress. Results Children with cancer did not differ from healthy children in their perceptions of parental care or overprotection. Child distress was more strongly related to perceptions of care and overprotection than child’s health status. Conclusions Children with cancer do not report their parents approach to care and protection differently than children without a cancer history. These findings mirror prior research examining parental perceptions of overprotection and suggest that, despite the challenges of parenting a child with serious illness, parental protection is not significantly altered. PMID:24682801

  7. The Association of Ambulatory Care with Breast Cancer Stage at Diagnosis Among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Nancy L; Landrum, Mary Beth; Ayanian, John Z; Winer, Eric P; Guadagnoli, Edward

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although nearly all elderly Americans are insured through Medicare, there is substantial variation in their use of services, which may influence detection of serious illnesses. We examined outpatient care in the 2 years before breast cancer diagnosis to identify women at high risk for limited care and assess the relationship of the physicians seen and number of visits with stage at diagnosis. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study using cancer registry and Medicare claims data. PATIENTS Population-based sample of 11,291 women aged ≥67 diagnosed with breast cancer during 1995 to 1996. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Ten percent of women had no visits or saw only physicians other than primary care physicians or medical specialists in the 2 years before diagnosis. Such women were more often unmarried, living in urban areas or areas with low median incomes (all P≥.01). Overall, 11.2% were diagnosed with advanced (stage III/IV) cancer. The adjusted rate was highest among women with no visits (36.2%) or with visits to physicians other than primary care physicians or medical specialists (15.3%) compared to women with visits to either a primary care physician (8.6%) or medical specialist (9.4%) or both (7.8%) (P <.001). The rate of advanced cancer also decreased with increasing number of visits (P <.001). CONCLUSIONS Even within this insured population, many elderly women had limited or no outpatient care in the 2 years before breast cancer diagnosis, and these women had a markedly increased risk of advanced-stage diagnosis. These women, many of whom were unmarried and living in poor and urban areas, may benefit from targeted outreach or coverage for preventive care visits. PMID:15693926

  8. My Cancer Care Plan as a Web-Solution.

    PubMed

    Westman, Bodil; Cornelius, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    The Swedish National Cancerplan states that patients should be offered an Individual Care Plan (ICP) for the treatment and survivorship care and rehabilitation planning. As there is no web-solution for ICP available, the project aim is to develop a non-commercial web-solution based on communication between the contact nurse and the patient. PMID:27332410

  9. One-Year Experience Managing a Cancer Survivorship Clinic Using a Shared-Care Model for Gastric Cancer Survivors in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Given the rapid growth of the population of cancer survivors, increased attention has been paid to their health problems. Although gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers, empirical evidence of survivorship care is limited. The objectives of this study were to describe the health care status of gastric cancer survivors and to report the experience of using the shared-care model during a one-year experience at the cancer survivorship clinic in Seoul National University Hospital. This is a descriptive, single-center study of 250 long-term gastric cancer survivors who were referred to the survivorship clinic. The status of their health behaviors, comorbid conditions, secondary cancer screenings, and survivorship care status were investigated through questionnaires and examining the medical records. Among the survivors, 7.2% were current smokers, 8.8% were at-risk drinkers, and 32.4% were physically inactive. Among the patients who did not know their bone density status, the majority were in the osteopenic (37.1%) or osteoporotic range (24.1%). Screening among the eligible population within the recommended time intervals were 76.3% for colorectal cancer, but only 13.6% for lung cancer. All of the survivors were provided with counseling and medical management at the survivorship clinic, as appropriate. In conclusion, Long-term gastric cancer survivors have various unmet needs. Shared-care through survivorship clinics can be an effective solution for providing comprehensive care to cancer survivors. PMID:27247493

  10. One-Year Experience Managing a Cancer Survivorship Clinic Using a Shared-Care Model for Gastric Cancer Survivors in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Eun; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Hyejin; Son, Ki Young; Kim, Warrick Junsuk; Suh, Yun-Suhk; Kong, Seong-Ho; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Cho, Belong; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-06-01

    Given the rapid growth of the population of cancer survivors, increased attention has been paid to their health problems. Although gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers, empirical evidence of survivorship care is limited. The objectives of this study were to describe the health care status of gastric cancer survivors and to report the experience of using the shared-care model during a one-year experience at the cancer survivorship clinic in Seoul National University Hospital. This is a descriptive, single-center study of 250 long-term gastric cancer survivors who were referred to the survivorship clinic. The status of their health behaviors, comorbid conditions, secondary cancer screenings, and survivorship care status were investigated through questionnaires and examining the medical records. Among the survivors, 7.2% were current smokers, 8.8% were at-risk drinkers, and 32.4% were physically inactive. Among the patients who did not know their bone density status, the majority were in the osteopenic (37.1%) or osteoporotic range (24.1%). Screening among the eligible population within the recommended time intervals were 76.3% for colorectal cancer, but only 13.6% for lung cancer. All of the survivors were provided with counseling and medical management at the survivorship clinic, as appropriate. In conclusion, Long-term gastric cancer survivors have various unmet needs. Shared-care through survivorship clinics can be an effective solution for providing comprehensive care to cancer survivors.

  11. The use of biofield therapies in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Beverly

    2007-04-01

    Biofield therapies form a subcategory of the domain of energy therapies, as defined by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Specific biofield therapies addressed in this article include Therapeutic Touch, Healing Touch, Polarity Therapy, Reiki, and Qigong. This article will identify core concepts in biofield therapies, review controlled trials of the use of biofield therapies with patients with cancer, describe the process of biofield therapies implementation in one cancer center, and suggest research to benefit not only patients with cancer but also family members and oncology professionals.

  12. The Performance of mHealth in Cancer Supportive Care: A Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the advent of smartphones, mHealth has risen to the attention of the health care system as something that could radically change the way health care has been viewed, managed, and delivered to date. This is particularly relevant for cancer, as one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and for cancer supportive care, since patients and caregivers have key roles in managing side effects. Given adequate knowledge, they are able to expect appropriate assessments and interventions. In this scenario, mHealth has great potential for linking patients, caregivers, and health care professionals; for enabling early detection and intervention; for lowering costs; and achieving better quality of life. Given its great potential, it is important to evaluate the performance of mHealth. This can be considered from several perspectives, of which organizational performance is particularly relevant, since mHealth may increase the productivity of health care providers and as a result even the productivity of health care systems. Objective This paper aims to review studies on the evaluation of the performance of mHealth, with particular focus on cancer care and cancer supportive care processes, concentrating on its contribution to organizational performance, as well as identifying some indications for a further research agenda. Methods We carried out a review of literature, aimed at identifying studies related to the performance of mHealth in general or focusing on cancer care and cancer supportive care. Results Our analysis revealed that studies are almost always based on a single dimension of performance. Any evaluations of the performance of mHealth are based on very different methods and measures, with a prevailing focus on issues linked to efficiency. This fails to consider the real contribution that mHealth can offer for improving the performance of health care providers, health care systems, and the quality of life in general. Conclusions Further research

  13. The primary health care physician and the cancer patient: tips and strategies for managing sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Eric S.; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    There is a large and growing population of long-term cancer survivors. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are playing an increasingly greater role in the care of these patients across the continuum of cancer survivorship. In this role, PCPs are faced with the responsibility of managing a range of medical and psychosocial late effects of cancer treatment. In particular, the sexual side effects of treatment which are common and have significant impact on quality of life for the cancer survivor, often go unaddressed. This is an area of clinical care and research that has received increasing attention, highlighted by the presentation of this special issue on Cancer and Sexual Health. The aims of this review are 3-fold. First, we seek to overview common presentations of sexual dysfunction related to major cancer diagnoses in order to give the PCP a sense of the medical issues that the survivor may present with. Barriers to communication about sexual health issues between patient/PCPs in order are also described in order to emphasize the importance of PCPs initiating this important conversation. Next, we provide strategies and resources to help guide the PCP in the management of sexual dysfunction in cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss case examples of survivorship sexual health issues and highlight the role that a PCP can play in each of these case examples. PMID:26816826

  14. Performance care practices in complementary and alternative medicine by Thai breast cancer survivors: an ethnonursing study.

    PubMed

    Wanchai, Ausanee; Armer, Jane M; Stewart, Bob R

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how Thai breast cancer survivors perform care practices in complementary and alternative medicine to promote their health and well-being. Research was conducted using an ethnonursing method. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 Thai breast cancer survivors in Thailand. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using the ethnonursing analysis method. The findings showed Thai breast cancer survivors started their care practices in complementary and alternative medicine immediately following a diagnosis of breast cancer. They sought out and gathered alternative medicine information from several sources, such as the people around them, media resources, books, magazines, or newspapers. After gathering information, Thai breast cancer survivors would try out various types of complementary medicines rather than use only one type because of information from other people and their own evaluation. The findings of this study indicate the need for a conversation about complementary medicine use between healthcare providers and Thai breast cancer survivors as an on-going process throughout the cancer trajectory to ensure that safe and holistic care is provided. PMID:22950615

  15. Reimagining care for adolescent and young adult cancer programs: Moving with the times.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abha A; Papadakos, Janet K; Jones, Jennifer M; Amin, Leila; Chang, Eugene K; Korenblum, Chana; Santa Mina, Daniel; McCabe, Lianne; Mitchell, Laura; Giuliani, Meredith E

    2016-04-01

    Literature regarding the development of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer programs has been dominantly informed by pediatric centers and practitioners. However, the majority of young adults are seen and treated at adult cancer centers, in which cancer volumes afford the development of innovative supportive care services. Although the supportive care services in adult cancer centers are helpful to AYAs, some of the most prominent and distinct issues faced by AYAs are not adequately addressed through these services alone. This article describes how the AYA Program at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre has collaborated with existing supportive care services in addition to supplying its own unique services to meet the comprehensive needs of AYAs in the domains of: symptom management (sexuality and fatigue), behavior modification (return to work and exercise), and health services (advanced cancer and survivorship). These collaborations are augmented by patient education interventions and timely referrals. The objective of this article was to assist other centers in expanding existing services to address the needs of AYA patients with cancer.

  16. Effectiveness of acupuncture and related therapies for palliative care of cancer: overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinyin; Chung, Vincent C H; Hui, Edwin P; Ziea, Eric T C; Ng, Bacon F L; Ho, Robin S T; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Wong, Samuel Y S; Wu, Justin C Y

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture and related therapies such as moxibustion and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are often used to manage cancer-related symptoms, but their effectiveness and safety are controversial. We conducted this overview to summarise the evidence on acupuncture for palliative care of cancer. Our systematic review synthesised the results from clinical trials of patients with any type of cancer. The methodological quality of the 23 systematic reviews in this overview, assessed using the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews Instrument, was found to be satisfactory. There is evidence for the therapeutic effects of acupuncture for the management of cancer-related fatigue, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and leucopenia in patients with cancer. There is conflicting evidence regarding the treatment of cancer-related pain, hot flashes and hiccups, and improving patients' quality of life. The available evidence is currently insufficient to support or refute the potential of acupuncture and related therapies in the management of xerostomia, dyspnea and lymphedema and in the improvement of psychological well-being. No serious adverse effects were reported in any study. Because acupuncture appears to be relatively safe, it could be considered as a complementary form of palliative care for cancer, especially for clinical problems for which conventional care options are limited.

  17. Effectiveness of acupuncture and related therapies for palliative care of cancer: overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinyin; Chung, Vincent C H; Hui, Edwin P; Ziea, Eric T C; Ng, Bacon F L; Ho, Robin S T; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Wong, Samuel Y S; Wu, Justin C Y

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture and related therapies such as moxibustion and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are often used to manage cancer-related symptoms, but their effectiveness and safety are controversial. We conducted this overview to summarise the evidence on acupuncture for palliative care of cancer. Our systematic review synthesised the results from clinical trials of patients with any type of cancer. The methodological quality of the 23 systematic reviews in this overview, assessed using the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews Instrument, was found to be satisfactory. There is evidence for the therapeutic effects of acupuncture for the management of cancer-related fatigue, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and leucopenia in patients with cancer. There is conflicting evidence regarding the treatment of cancer-related pain, hot flashes and hiccups, and improving patients' quality of life. The available evidence is currently insufficient to support or refute the potential of acupuncture and related therapies in the management of xerostomia, dyspnea and lymphedema and in the improvement of psychological well-being. No serious adverse effects were reported in any study. Because acupuncture appears to be relatively safe, it could be considered as a complementary form of palliative care for cancer, especially for clinical problems for which conventional care options are limited. PMID:26608664

  18. Refining the care of patients with pancreatic cancer: the AGITG Pancreatic Cancer Workshop consensus.

    PubMed

    Gandy, Robert C; Barbour, Andrew P; Samra, Jaswinder; Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; Haghighi, Koroush; Kench, James G; Saxena, Payal; Goldstein, David

    2016-06-20

    A meeting of the Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group (AGITG) was held to develop a consensus statement defining when a patient with pancreatic cancer has disease that is clearly operable, is borderline, or is locally advanced/inoperable. Key issues included the need for multidisciplinary team consensus for all patients considered for surgical resection. Staging investigations, to be completed within 4 weeks of presentation, should include pancreatic protocol computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and, when possible, biopsy. Given marked differences in outcomes, the operability of tumours should be clearly identified by categories: those clearly resectable by standard means (group 1a), those requiring vascular resection but which are clearly operable (group 1b), and those of borderline operability requiring vascular resection (groups 2a and 2b). Patients who may require vascular reconstruction should be referred, before exploration, to a specialist unit. All patients should have a structured pathology report with standardised reporting of all seven surgical margins, which identifies an R0 (no tumour cells within a defined distance of the margin) if all surgical margins are clear from 1 mm. Neo-adjuvant therapy is increasingly recommended for borderline operable disease, while chemotherapy is recommended as initial therapy for patients with unresectable loco-regional pancreatic cancer. The value of adding radiation after initial chemotherapy remains uncertain. A small number of patients may be downstaged by chemoradiation, and trimodality therapy should only be considered as part of a clinical trial. Instituting these recommendations nationally will be an integral part of the process of improving quality of care and reducing geographic variation between centres in outcomes for patients. PMID:27318402

  19. Availability of palliative care services for children with cancer in economically diverse regions of the world

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Eduardo; Barfield, Raymond C.; Baker, Justin N.; Hinds, Pamela S.; Yang, Jie; Nambayan, Ayda; Quintana, Yuri; Kane, Javier R

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the availability and quality of palliative care for children with cancer according to national income per capita. Methods We surveyed physicians who care for children with cancer using the Cure4Kids website (http://www.cure4kids.org). Queries addressed oncology practice site; reimbursement; specialized palliative care, pain management, and bereavement care; location of death; decision-making support; and perceived quality of care. Responses were categorized by low -, middle-, and high-income country (LIC, MIC, HIC). Results Of 262 completed questionnaires from 58 countries (response rate, 59.8%), 242 were evaluable (55%). Out-of-pocket payment for oncology (14.8%), palliative care (21.9%), and comfort care medications (24.3%) was most likely to be required in LIC (p<0.001). Availability of specialized palliative care services, pain management, bereavement care, and institutional or national decision-making support was inversely related to income level. Availability of high-potency opioids (p=0.018) and adjuvant drugs (p=0.006) was significantly less likely in LIC. Physicians in LIC were significantly less likely than others to report high-quality pain control (p<0.001), non-pain symptom control (p=0.003), and emotional support (p=0.001); bereavement support (p=0.035); interdisciplinary care (p<0.001); and parental participation in decisions (p=0.013). Conclusion Specialized palliative care services are unavailable to children with cancer in economically diverse regions, but particularly in LIC. Access to adequate palliation is associated with national income. Program development strategies and collaborations less dependent on a single country’s economy are suggested. PMID:20541395

  20. The Cancer Experience Map: An Approach to Including the Patient Voice in Supportive Care Solutions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The perspective of the patient, also called the “patient voice”, is an essential element in materials created for cancer supportive care. Identifying that voice, however, can be a challenge for researchers and developers. A multidisciplinary team at a health information company tasked with addressing this issue created a representational model they call the “cancer experience map”. This map, designed as a tool for content developers, offers a window into the complex perspectives inside the cancer experience. Informed by actual patient quotes, the map shows common overall themes for cancer patients, concerns at key treatment points, strategies for patient engagement, and targeted behavioral goals. In this article, the team members share the process by which they created the map as well as its first use as a resource for cancer support videos. The article also addresses the broader policy implications of including the patient voice in supportive cancer content, particularly with regard to mHealth apps. PMID:26022846

  1. The cancer experience map: an approach to including the patient voice in supportive care solutions.

    PubMed

    Hall, Leslie Kelly; Kunz, Breanne F; Davis, Elizabeth V; Dawson, Rose I; Powers, Ryan S

    2015-05-28

    The perspective of the patient, also called the "patient voice", is an essential element in materials created for cancer supportive care. Identifying that voice, however, can be a challenge for researchers and developers. A multidisciplinary team at a health information company tasked with addressing this issue created a representational model they call the "cancer experience map". This map, designed as a tool for content developers, offers a window into the complex perspectives inside the cancer experience. Informed by actual patient quotes, the map shows common overall themes for cancer patients, concerns at key treatment points, strategies for patient engagement, and targeted behavioral goals. In this article, the team members share the process by which they created the map as well as its first use as a resource for cancer support videos. The article also addresses the broader policy implications of including the patient voice in supportive cancer content, particularly with regard to mHealth apps.

  2. Preoperative oral health care reduces postoperative inflammation and complications in oral cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Ohta, Kouji; Fujimoto, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Mizuta, Kuniko; Ono, Shigehiro; Shimasue, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Yoshiaki; Higashikawa, Koichiro; Tada, Misato; Ishida, Fumi; Okui, Gaku; Okumura, Toshiya; Fukui, Akiko; Kubozono, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Yoko; Seino, Sayaka; Hashikata, Miho; Sasaki, Kazuki; Naruse, Takako; Rahman, Mohammad Zeshaan; Uetsuki, Ryo; Nimiya, Akiko; Takamoto, Megumi; Dainobu, Kana; Tokikazu, Tomoko; Nishi, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Takechi, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The records of 70 patients with oral cancer who were treated at a single institution between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. The body temperature, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared between those who had received preoperative oral care (oral care group) and those who had not received any (non-oral care group). When the patients were divided into those who underwent minimally invasive surgery and those who underwent severely invasive surgery, the mean CRP level in the early postoperative period was lower in the oral care group as compared with the non-oral care group in those who underwent minimally invasive surgery as well as those who underwent severely invasive surgery. However, the mean CRP level was most evidently reduced in the severely invasive group on days 1 and 3–5. However, no significant differences were observed with regard to the percentage of postoperative infectious complications (for example, surgical site infection, anastomotic leak and pneumonia) between the oral care (13.6%) and non-oral care (20.8%) groups, though a reduced prevalence of postoperative complications following preoperative oral care was noted. The results of the present study suggest that preoperative oral care can decrease inflammation during the early postoperative stage in patients with oral cancer who undergo severely invasive surgery. PMID:27588111

  3. Survivorship Care in Reducing Symptoms in Young Adult Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Breast Carcinoma; Cancer Survivor; Depression; Fatigue; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Malignant Bone Neoplasm; Malignant Digestive System Neoplasm; Malignant Female Reproductive System Neoplasm; Malignant Male Reproductive System Neoplasm; Pain; Sleep Disorder; Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  4. Using a Mystery-Caller Approach to Examine Access to Prostate Cancer Care in Philadelphia

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Craig Evan; Ross, Michelle E.; Armstrong, Katrina; Branas, Charles C.; Rhodes, Karin V.; Bekelman, Justin E.; Wentz, Alicia; Stillson, Christian; Radhakrishnan, Archana; Oyeniran, Enny; Grande, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prior work suggests that access to health care may influence the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Mystery-caller methods have been used previously to measure access to care for health services such as primary care, where patients’ self-initiate requests for care. We used a mystery-caller survey for specialized prostate cancer care to assess dimensions of access to prostate cancer care. Materials and Methods We created an inventory of urology and radiation oncology practices in southeastern Pennsylvania. Using a ‘mystery caller’ approach, a research assistant posing as a medical office scheduler in a primary care office, attempted to make a new patient appointment on behalf of a referred patient. Linear regression was used to determine the association between time to next available appointment with practice and census tract characteristics. Results We successfully obtained information on new patient appointments from 198 practices out of the 223 in the region (88.8%). Radiation oncology practices were more likely to accept Medicaid compared to urology practices (91.3% vs 36.4%) and had shorter mean wait times for new patient appointments (9.0 vs 12.8 days). We did not observe significant differences in wait times according to census tract characteristics including neighborhood socioeconomic status and the proportion of male African American residents. Conclusions Mystery-caller methods that reflect real-world referral processes from primary care offices can be used to measure access to specialized cancer care. We observed significant differences in wait times and insurance acceptance between radiation oncology and urology practices. PMID:27723780

  5. Stakeholder engagement for comparative effectiveness research in cancer care: experience of the DEcIDE Cancer Consortium.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Caprice C; Wind, Jennifer K; Chang, George J; Chen, Ronald C; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    Stakeholder input is a critical component of comparative effectiveness research. To ensure that the research activities of the Developing Evidence to Inform Decisions about Effectiveness (DEcIDE) Network, supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, translate into the greatest impact for everyday practice and policy-making in cancer, we were tasked with soliciting stakeholder input regarding priority areas in cancer-related comparative effectiveness research for the DEcIDE Cancer Consortium. Given the increasing emphasis on stakeholder engagement in research, many investigators are facing a similar task, yet there is limited literature to guide such efforts, particularly in cancer care. To help fill this gap, we present our approach to operationalizing stakeholder engagement and discuss it in the context of other recent developments in the area. We describe challenges encountered in convening stakeholders from multiple vantage points to prioritize topics and strategies used to mitigate these barriers. We offer several recommendations regarding how to best solicit stakeholder input to inform comparative effectiveness research in cancer care. These recommendations can inform other initiatives currently facing the challenges of engaging stakeholders in priority setting for cancer.

  6. Changes in the Laboratory Data for Cancer Patients Treated with Korean-medicine-based Inpatient Care

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeungwon; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Shin, Ji-Eun; Yoo, Hwa-Seung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to determine changes in laboratory data for cancer patients receiving Korean medicine (KM) care, with a focus on patients’ functional status, cancer-coagulation factors and cancer immunity. Methods: We conducted an observational study of various cancer patients in all stages admitted to the East-West Cancer Center (EWCC), Dunsan Korean Hospital of Daejeon University, from Mar. 2011 to Aug. 2011. All patients were under the center’s multi-modality Korean-medicine-based inpatient cancer care program. The hospitalization stay at EWCC ranged from 9 to 34 days. A total of 80 patients were followed in their routine hematologic laboratory screenings performed before and after hospitalization. Patients were divided into three groups depending on the status of their treatment: prevention of recurrence and metastasis group, Korean medicine (KM) treatment only group, and combination of conventional and KM treatment group. The lab reports included natural killer (NK) cell count (CD16 + CD56), fibrinogen, white blood cell (WBC), lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophil, red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin, platelet, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status. Results: With a Focus on patients’ functional status, cancer-coagulation factors and cancer immunity, emphasis was placed on the NK cell count, fibrinogen count, and ECOG scores. Data generally revealed decreased fibrinogen count, fluctuating NK cell count and decreased ECOG, meaning improved performance status in all groups. The KM treatment only group showed the largest decrease in mean fibrinogen count and the largest increase in mean NK cell count. However, the group’s ECOG score showed the smallest decrease, which may be due to the concentration of late-cancer-stage patients in that particular group. Conclusions: Multi-modality KM inpatient care may have positive effect on lowering the cancer coagulation factor fibrinogen, but its

  7. A unique interactive cognitive behavioral training program for front-line cancer care professionals.

    PubMed

    Clark, Karen; Greene, Paul; DuHamel, Kate; Loscalzo, Matthew; Grant, Marcia; Glazier, Kim; Redd, William

    2012-12-01

    For between one third and one half of all cancer survivors, disturbances in mood and cognition do not end with the conclusion of treatment. Recognizing this problem, the Institute of Medicine emphasized in its 2008 report, the importance of addressing psychosocial issues, such as distress, to providing quality cancer care. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recognized that there is a severe lack of trained professionals who can address these needs. In response to this need, an interactive training program was developed and implemented to teach frontline cancer care professionals Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) skills. This training includes a structured curriculum, centered around a 3-day training workshop that includes didactic discussion, small group interactive sessions, role playing, post course support, and follow-up evaluation. Four of the planned eight workshops have been conducted thus far and indicate successful recruitment and implementation of a unique training model related to the CBT skills learned.

  8. Risk Factors, Preventive Practices, and Health Care Among Breast Cancer Survivors, United States, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Kayani, Noaman; Yun, Shumei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We compared behavioral risk factors and preventive measures among female breast cancer survivors, female survivors of other types of cancers, and women without a history of cancer. Survivorship health care indicators for the 2 groups of cancer survivors were compared. Methods Using data from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we calculated the proportion of women with risk factors and their engagement in preventive practices, stratified by cancer status (cancer survivors or women with no history of cancer), and compared the proportions after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Results A significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors had mammography in the previous year (79.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76.0%–83.0%) than did other cancer survivors (68.1%; 95% CI, 65.6%–70.7%) or women with no history of cancer (66.4%; 95% CI, 65.5%–67.3%). Breast cancer survivors were also more likely to have had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test within the previous 3 years than women with no history of cancer (89.4%; 95% CI, 85.9%–93.0 vs 85.1%; 95% CI, 84.4%–85.8%) and a colonoscopy within the previous 10 years (75.4%; 95% CI, 71.7%–79.0%) than women with no history of cancer (60.0%; 95% CI, 59.0%–61.0%). Current smoking was significantly lower among survivors of breast cancer (10.3%; 95% CI, 7.4%–13.2%) than other cancer survivors (20.8%; 95% CI, 18.4%–23.3%) and women with no history of cancer (18.3%; 95% CI, 17.5%–19.1%). After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, we found that breast cancer survivors were significantly more likely to have had mammography, a Pap test, and colonoscopy, and less likely to be current smokers. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors are more likely to engage in cancer screening and less likely to be current smokers than female survivors of other types of cancer or women with no history of cancer. PMID:26796517

  9. Design and fabrication of a flexible MEMS-based electro-mechanical sensor array for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Hardik J.; Park, Kihan; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2015-07-01

    The use of flexible micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based devices provides a unique opportunity in bio-medical robotics such as the characterization of normal and malignant tissues. This paper reports on the design and development of a flexible MEMS-based sensor array integrating mechanical and electrical sensors on the same platform to enable the study of the change in electro-mechanical properties of benign and cancerous breast tissues. In this work, we present the analysis of the electrical characterization of the tissue specimens and also demonstrate the feasibility of using the sensor for the mechanical characterization of tissue specimens. Eight strain gauges acting as mechanical sensors were fabricated using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conducting polymer on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as the substrate material. Eight electrical sensors were fabricated using SU-8 pillars on gold (Au) pads which were patterned on the strain gauges separated by a thin insulator (SiO2 1.0 μm). These pillars were coated with gold to make them conducting. The electro-mechanical sensors are integrated on the same substrate. The sensor array covers a 180 μm  ×  180 μm area and the size of the complete device is 20 mm in diameter. The diameter of each breast tissue core used in the present study was 1 mm and the thickness was 8 μm. The region of interest was 200 μm  ×  200 μm. A microindentation technique was used to characterize the mechanical properties of the breast tissues. The sensor is integrated with conducting SU-8 pillars to study the electrical property of the tissue. Through electro-mechanical characterization studies using this MEMS-based sensor, we were able to measure the accuracy of the fabricated device and ascertain the difference between benign and cancers breast tissue specimens.

  10. Achieving optimal delivery of follow-up care for prostate cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Shawna V; O’Malley, Denalee M; Miller, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men in the US, and the second most prevalent cancer in men worldwide. High incidence and survival rates for prostate cancer have resulted in a large and growing population of long-term prostate cancer survivors. Long-term follow-up guidelines have only recently been developed to inform approaches to this phase of care for the prostate cancer population. Methods A PubMed search of English literature through August 2014 was performed. Articles were retrieved and reviewed to confirm their relevance. Patient-reported measures that were used in studies of long-term prostate cancer survivors (ie, at least 2 years posttreatment) were reviewed and included in the review. Results A total of 343 abstracts were initially identified from the database search. After abstract review, 105 full-text articles were reviewed of which seven met inclusion criteria. An additional 22 articles were identified from the references of the included articles, and 29 were retained. From the 29 articles, 68 patient-reported outcome measures were identified. The majority (75%) were multi-item scales that had been previously validated in existing literature. We identified four main areas of assessment: 1) physical health; 2) quality of life – general, physical, and psychosocial; 3) health promotion – physical activity, diet, and tobacco cessation; and 4) care quality outcomes. Conclusion There are a number of well-validated measures that assess patient-reported outcomes that document key aspects of long-term follow-up with respect to patient symptoms and quality of life. However, there are fewer patient-reported outcomes related to health promotion and care quality within the prevention, surveillance, and care coordination components of cancer survivorship. Future research should focus on development of additional patient-centered and patient-related outcomes that enlarge the assessment portfolio. PMID:25834471

  11. Primary Care Use before Cancer Diagnosis in Adolescents and Young Adults – A Nationwide Register Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahrensberg, Jette Møller; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Vedsted, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Survival rates of cancer patients have generally improved in recent years. However, children and older adults seem to have experienced more significant clinical benefits than adolescents and young adults (AYAs). Previous studies suggest a prolonged diagnostic pathway in AYAs, but little is known about their pre-diagnostic healthcare use. This study investigates the use of primary care among AYAs during the two years preceding a cancer diagnosis. Methods The study is a retrospective population-based matched cohort study using Danish nationwide registry data. All persons diagnosed with cancer during 2002–2011 in the age group 15–39 years were included (N = 12,306); each participant was matched on gender, age and general practice with 10 randomly selected references (N = 123,060). The use of primary healthcare services (face-to-face contacts, blood tests and psychometric tests) was measured during the two years preceding the diagnosis (index date), and collected data were analysed in a negative binomial regression model. Results The cases generally increased their use of primary care already from 8 months before a cancer diagnosis, whereas a similar trend was not found for controls. The increase was observed for all cancer types, but it started at different times: 17 months before a diagnosis of CNS tumour, 12 months before a diagnosis of soft tissue sarcoma, 9 months before a diagnosis of lymphoma, 5–6 months before a diagnosis of leukaemia, bone tumour or GCT, and 3 months before a diagnosis of malignant melanoma. Conclusion The use of primary care among AYAs increase several months before a cancer diagnosis. The diagnostic intervals are generally short for malignant melanomas and long for brain tumours. A prolonged diagnostic pathway may indicate non-specific or vague symptomatology and low awareness of cancer among AYAs primary-care personnel. The findings suggest potential of faster cancer diagnosis in AYAs. PMID:27203083

  12. Dental care access for low-income and immigrant cancer patients in New York City.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jocelyn R; Ramirez, Julia; Li, Yuelin; Gany, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    This exploratory study assesses the dental care needs and access of low-income, mostly immigrant cancer patients enrolled in New York City's Integrated Cancer Care Action Network (ICCAN). A nested cohort of patients from ICCAN responded to a dental needs assessment that surveyed current dental health as well as access to, and use of, dental services. 373 patients participated. Self-report of having a dentist to visit, current dental problems, income, and insurance most significantly predicted a dentist visit in the past year. Discussing treatment-related oral side effects with the oncologist greatly increased the likelihood of seeing a dentist, but few patients reported having had this conversation. There is a lack of oral care information flowing from oncologists to low income patients. We found a high number of reported dental problems: concerning because of potential treatment interference and risk for infection. Finally, ability to pay largely determined dental care access in our study participants.

  13. Caring for carers: how community nurses can support carers of people with cancer.

    PubMed

    Argyle, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    There are more than 1 million people in the UK looking after a family member or friend with cancer, but half the number of these carers do not receive support to care. Providing this care significantly affects cancer carers emotionally, physically, and financially. Community and district nurses have a vital role to play in reaching out to these hidden carers and signposting them to the correct support. This article provides tips on identifying carers, including who they are, the challenges they face, and how health professionals can approach and speak to them. It also provides guidance on signposting carers to national and local sources of support in the UK. PMID:27282503

  14. Advance care planning for cancer patients in primary care: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Kirsty; Mason, Bruce; Kendall, Marilyn; Barclay, Stephen; Chinn, David; Thomas, Keri; Sheikh, Aziz; Murray, Scott A

    2010-01-01

    Background Advance care planning is being promoted as a central component of end-of-life policies in many developed countries, but there is concern that professionals find its implementation challenging. Aim To assess the feasibility of implementing advance care planning in UK primary care. Design of study Mixed methods evaluation of a pilot educational intervention. Setting Four general practices in south-east Scotland. Method Interviews with 20 GPs and eight community nurses before and after a practice-based workshop; this was followed by telephone interviews with nine other GPs with a special interest in palliative care from across the UK. Results End-of-life care planning for patients typically starts as an urgent response to clear evidence of a short prognosis, and aims to achieve a ‘good death’. Findings suggest that there were multiple barriers to earlier planning: prognostic uncertainty; limited collaboration with secondary care; a desire to maintain hope; and resistance to any kind of ‘tick-box’ approach. Following the workshop, participants' knowledge and skills were enhanced but there was little evidence of more proactive planning. GPs from other parts of the UK described confusion over terminology and were concerned about the difficulties of implementing inflexible, policy-driven care. Conclusion A clear divide was found between UK policy directives and delivery of end-of-life care in the community that educational interventions targeting primary care professionals are unlikely to address. Advance care planning has the potential to promote autonomy and shared decision making about end-of-life care, but this will require a significant shift in attitudes. PMID:21144189

  15. [The patient with lung cancer in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Meert, A-P; Berghmans, T; Sculier, J-P

    2014-12-01

    In Western countries, lung cancer (LC) is the most common cause of cancer death. It is present in 15-20% of patients admitted to the ICU with a neoplastic condition. The purpose of this article is to review the causes of admission to ICU of patients with LC, their prognosis and the results of different life-support techniques. Most studies include mixed populations of non-small cell (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancers (SCLC). However, there is preponderance of NSCLC (70%) and LC of advanced or metastatic stages, reflecting the distribution in the general population of LC. The cause of admission of LC patients to ICU is most often of respiratory origin. The ICU mortality rate currently ranges from 13 to 47% and the hospital mortality rate from 24 to 65%. The predictors of in-hospital mortality are mainly severity scores, organ dysfunction, general condition (performance status), respiratory distress and the need for mechanical ventilation or vasopressor drugs. When considering the long-term mortality, it is the features of the cancer (presence of metastases, cancer progression) that are important predictive factors.

  16. PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer: Why Saying No is a High-Value Health Care Choice.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J; Dahm, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    Enthusiasm for cancer screening and treatment of screen-detected cancer has led to widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, a marked increase in prostate cancer incidence, and high use of surgical, radiation, and androgen deprivation treatment for screen-detected disease. This has occurred in advance of a full understanding of the clinical and financial tradeoffs. Although questions remain whether lifetime benefits outweigh harms and costs, data indicate that this balance is not favorable through at least 15 years. This article outlines a conceptual framework for determining the value of screening strategies according to screening and treatment intensity. We describe 4 main cancer screening goals and examine whether PSA screening and treatment achieve these goals and thus provide high-value care. Available evidence demonstrates that PSA screening provides at best a small reduction in prostate cancer mortality, and no reduction in all-cause mortality. High-intensity PSA screening and treatment currently practiced in the United States result in substantial harms and large health care expenditures-it is low-value care. The health importance of prostate cancer and the financial costs to patients and society require improved detection and treatment strategies that produce greater value to patients. We propose lower-intensity, higher-value options. However, until evidence supports a higher-value alternative to current PSA screening strategies, physicians should recommend against PSA screening, policymakers should encourage reduced screening, and most men should say no to the PSA test.

  17. Embedding cancer care within pre-registration nurse education programmes: policy, practice and opportunities for change.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Stephen J; Fitzsimmons, Deborah

    2005-12-01

    This paper discusses policy and professional drivers which outline the need for, and inclusion of cancer education within pre-registration nursing curricula within the UK. It also evaluates arguments in favour of the development of separate and distinctive cancer modules within nurse training programmes against those advocating a more integrated or thematic approach. The authors suggest that there are advantages and disadvantages to each strategy, and argue that the most important factor irrespective of the approach taken, is that cancer learning outcomes are clearly enunciated within all pre-registration nursing curricula and constructively aligned against teaching, learning and assessment strategies which may encompass a single module or entire programme. The authors then discuss their personal experience of teaching cancer care using both approaches and posit one suggestion for an embedded pre-registration cancer-care curriculum developed as the catalyst for a broader debate on the scope and content of cancer-care education within pre-registration nursing curricula. PMID:16303330

  18. The Nursing Dimension of Providing Palliative Care to Children and Adolescents with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Sharron L.; Thaxton, Cheryl; Allison, Courtney; Barfield, Raymond C.; Tamburro, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Palliative care for children and adolescents with cancer includes interventions that focus on the relief of suffering, optimization of function, and improvement of quality of life at any and all stages of disease. This care is most effectively provided by a multidisciplinary team. Nurses perform an integral role on that team by identifying symptoms, providing care coordination, and assuring clear communication. Several basic tenets appear essential to the provision of optimal palliative care. First, palliative care should be administered concurrently with curative therapy beginning at diagnosis and assuming a more significant role at end of life. This treatment approach, recommended by many medical societies, has been associated with numerous benefits including longer survival. Second, realistic, objective goals of care must be developed. A clear understanding of the prognosis by the patient, family, and all members of the medical team is essential to the development of these goals. The pediatric oncology nurse is pivotal in developing these goals and assuring that they are adhered to across all specialties. Third, effective therapies to prevent and relieve the symptoms of suffering must be provided. This can only be accomplished with accurate and repeated assessments. The pediatric oncology nurse is vital in providing these assessments and must possess a working knowledge of the most common symptoms associated with suffering. With a basic understanding of these palliative care principles and competency in the core skills required for this care, the pediatric oncology nurse will optimize quality of life for children and adolescents with cancer. PMID:23641169

  19. The Caring Connections Project: Providing palliative care to Medicaid patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Mark P; Ritchie, Christine; Scharfenberger, Jennifer; Keeney, Cynthia; Hermann, Carla; Berwick, Marilyn; Head, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Palliative care, with its focus on symptom management, patient-centered goals, preparation for life's end, and preservation of quality of life in the face of advancing illness, is a rapidly advancing component of mainstream American medicine. Yet, access to palliative care is often lacking in the community setting and may be further hindered by the presence of healthcare disparities that impact the poor. This article presents a unique approach to assuring the availability of palliative care to Medicaid patients receiving case management services. This descriptive article describes the evolution of a palliative care management pilot program, the Caring Connections Program, beginning with the initial planning and progressing through implementation and provision of services to 56 persons. "Lessons learned" are shared to enable other providers to develop similar programs with success. Patient profiles and intervention strategies are offered to illustrate the work accomplished.

  20. Biomarkers along the continuum of care in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Holdenrieder, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Blood-based biomarkers are valuable diagnostic tools for the management of lung cancer patients. They support not only differential diagnosis and histological subtyping, but are also applied for estimation of prognosis, stratification for specific therapies, monitoring of therapy response, surveillance monitoring and early detection of residual or progressive disease. Early diagnosis of lung cancer in high risk populations (screening) is a promising future indication but poses high medical and economic challenges to marker performance. The five mostly used classical 'tumor markers' show characteristic profiles of sensitivity and specificity for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) like cytokeratin 19-fragments (CYFRA 21-1), carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) and squamous cancer cell antigen (SCCA) as well as for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) like progastrin-releasing peptide (ProGRP) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE). Combined use and pattern recognition approaches enable highly accurate diagnosis, subtyping and therapy monitoring. For the interpretation of serial measurements on an individual level, marker-specific algorithms have to be developed. So-called companion diagnostics identify druggable molecular changes in signaling pathways of tumor tissue that can be addressed by targeted therapies. New highly sensitive technologies enable the convenient and serial molecular characterization on circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the blood, too. This approach is helpful when biopsies are not available and to overcome tumor molecular heterogeneity and plasticity. As only a portion of patients have such druggable molecular changes, future strategies will imply the combined use of classical and new ctDNA-based biomarkers to optimize the management of lung cancer patients during the course of disease. PMID:27542002

  1. Standards of Psychosocial Care for Parents of Children With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Julia A; Salley, Christina G; Muriel, Anna C

    2015-12-01

    Parents and caregivers of children with cancer are both resilient and deeply affected by the child's cancer. A systematic review of published research since 1995 identified 138 studies of moderate quality indicating that parent distress increases around diagnosis, then returns to normal levels. Post-traumatic symptoms are common. Distress may be impairing for vulnerable parents and may impact a child's coping and adjustment. Moderate quality evidence and expert consensus informed a strong recommendation for parents and caregivers to receive early and ongoing assessment of their mental health needs with access to appropriate interventions facilitated to optimize parent, child, and family well being.

  2. Outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Alice Mânica; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Silva, Denise Rossato

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units and assess their clinical and demographic profiles. Methods Retrospective, analytical, observational study, wherein the outcomes for patients diagnosed with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit of university hospital from January 2010 until February 2011 were evaluated. Results Thirty-four patients' medical records were included. Twenty-six (76.5%) patients received some type of ventilatory support, of whom 21 (61.8%) used invasive mechanical ventilation and 11 (32.4%) used noninvasive ventilation at some point during their stay at the intensive care unit. Regarding mortality, 12 (35.3%) patients died during hospitalization at the intensive care unit, totaling 15 (44.1%) deaths during the entire hospitalization period; 19 (55.9%) patients were discharged from the hospital. The analysis of the variables showed that the patients who died had remained on invasive mechanical ventilation for a longer period 5.0 (0.25 to 15.0) days than the survivors (1.0 (0 to 1.0) days) (p=0.033) and underwent dialysis during their stay at the intensive care unit (p=0.014). Conclusions The mortality of patients with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit is associated with the time spent on invasive mechanical ventilation and the need for dialysis. PMID:23887754

  3. Improving lung cancer outcomes by improving the quality of surgical care

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the most important curative treatment modality for non-small cell lung cancer, but variations in short- and long-term surgical outcomes jeopardize the benefit of surgery for certain patients, operated on by certain types of surgeons, at certain types of institutions. We discuss current understanding of surgical quality measures, and their role in promoting understanding of the causes of outcome disparities after lung cancer surgery. We also discuss the use of minimally invasive surgical resection approaches to expand the playing field for surgery in lung cancer care, and end with a discussion of the future role of surgery in a world of alternative treatment possibilities. PMID:26380183

  4. Health care delivery for head-and-neck cancer patients in Alberta: a practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J.R.; Lau, H.; Surgeoner, B.V.; Chua, N.; Dobrovolsky, W.; Dort, J.C.; Kalaydjian, E.; Nesbitt, M.; Scrimger, R.A.; Seikaly, H.; Skarsgard, D.; Webster, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The treatment of head-and-neck cancer is complex and requires the involvement of various health care professionals with a wide range of expertise. We describe the process of developing a practice guideline with recommendations about the organization and delivery of health care services for head-and-neck cancer patients in Alberta. Methods Outcomes of interest included composition of the health care team, qualification requirements for team members, cancer centre and team member volumes, infrastructure needs, and wait times. A search for existing practice guidelines and a systematic review of the literature addressing the organization and delivery of health care services for head-and-neck cancer patients were conducted. The search included the Standards and Guidelines Evidence (sage) directory of cancer guidelines and PubMed. Results One practice guideline was identified for adaptation. Three additional practice guidelines provided supplementary evidence to inform guideline recommendations. Members of the Alberta Provincial Head and Neck Tumour Team (consisting of various health professionals from across the province) provided expert feedback on the adapted recommendations through an online and in-person review process. Selected experts in head-and-neck cancer from outside the province participated in an external online review. SUMMARY The recommendations outlined in this practice guideline are based on existing guidelines that have been modified to fit the Alberta context. Although specific to Alberta, the recommendations lend credence to similar published guidelines and could be considered for use by groups lacking the resources of appointed guideline panels. The recommendations are meant to be a guide rather than a fixed protocol. The implementation of this practice guideline will depend on many factors, including but not limited to availability of trained personnel, adequate funding of infrastructure, and collaboration with other associations of

  5. Clinical features of kidney cancer in primary care: a case-control study using primary care records

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, Elizabeth; Neal, Richard; Rose, Peter; Walter, Fiona; Hamilton, William T

    2013-01-01

    Background Kidney cancer accounts for over 4000 UK deaths annually, and is one of the cancer sites with a poor mortality record compared with Europe. Aim To identify and quantify all clinical features of kidney cancer in primary care. Design Case-control study, using General Practice Research Database records. Method A total of 3149 patients aged ≥40 years, diagnosed with kidney cancer between 2000 and 2009, and 14 091 age, sex and practice-matched controls, were selected. Clinical features associated with kidney cancer were identified, and analysed using conditional logistic regression. Positive predictive values for features of kidney cancer were estimated. Results Cases consulted more frequently than controls in the year before diagnosis: median 16 consultations (interquartile range 10–25) versus 8 (4–15): P<0.001. Fifteen features were independently associated with kidney cancer: visible haematuria, odds ratio 37 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 28 to 49), abdominal pain 2.8 (95% CI = 2.4 to 3.4), microcytosis 2.6 (95% CI = 1.9 to 3.4), raised inflammatory markers 2.4 (95% CI = 2.1 to 2.8), thrombocytosis 2.2 (95% CI = 1.7 to 2.7), low haemoglobin 1.9 (95% CI = 1.6 to 2.2), urinary tract infection 1.8 (95% CI = 1.5 to 2.1), nausea 1.8 (95% CI = 1.4 to 2.3), raised creatinine 1.7 (95% CI = 1.5 to 2.0), leukocytosis 1.5 (95% CI = 1.2 to 1.9), fatigue 1.5 (95% CI = 1.2 to 1.9), constipation 1.4 (95% CI = 1.1 to 1.7), back pain 1.4 (95% CI = 1.2 to 1.7), abnormal liver function 1.3 (95% CI = 1.2 to 1.5), and raised blood sugar 1.2 (95% CI = 1.1 to 1.4). The positive predictive value for visible haematuria in patients aged ≥60 years was 1.0% (95% CI = 0.8 to 1.3). Conclusion Visible haematuria is the commonest and most powerful single predictor of kidney cancer, and the risk rises when additional symptoms are present. When considered alongside the risk of bladder cancer, the overall risk of urinary tract cancer from haematuria warrants referral. PMID:23540481

  6. Enteral feeding in critical care, gastrointestinal diseases, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirby, D F; Teran, J C

    1998-07-01

    This article discusses the many advantages and changes that have occurred in the nutritional management of critically-ill patients, patients with gastrointestinal diseases, and patients with selected cancers. Mechanical obstruction is the only absolute contraindication to enteral nutrition. This article reviews the present aggressive approach to the use of enteral nutrition. PMID:9654573

  7. Music Therapy in the Interdisciplinary Care of Children with Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Valerie Kalsbeck

    Music therapy, the systematic application of music and musical activities to elicit specific changes in emotional, physical, or social behavior, can help pediatric cancer patients to decrease their anxiety and cope with hospitalization. Because music is a nonverbal means of expression, it is an especially effective medium for young children who…

  8. [Psychological care of patients with head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Moya, Mélanie

    2015-09-01

    Treatments for head and neck cancers are generally complex and debilitating. Surgery, often mutilating, profoundly affects the relationship between oneself and others and causes verbal communication, breathing and swallowing difficulties. The functional and aesthetic sequelae are a constant reminder to the patient of the disease and make them conscious of their appearance.

  9. Case management used to optimize cancer care pathways: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Christian N; Thygesen, Marianne; Søndergaard, Jens; Vedsted, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Reports of inadequate cancer patient care have given rise to various interventions to support cancer care pathways which, overall, seem poorly studied. Case management (CM) is one method that may support a cost-effective, high-quality patient-centred treatment and care. The purpose of this article was to summarise intervention characteristics, outcomes of interest, results, and validity components of the published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining CM as a method for optimizing cancer care pathways. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, CINAHL and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were systematically searched for RCTs published all years up to August 2008. Identified papers were included if they passed the following standards. Inclusion criteria: 1) The intervention should meet the criteria for CM which includes multidisciplinary collaboration, care co-ordination, and it should include in-person meetings between patient and the case manager aimed at supporting, informing and educating the patient. 2) The intervention should focus on cancer patient care. 3) The intervention should aim to improve subjective or objective quality outcomes, and effects should be reported in the paper. Exclusion criteria: Studies centred on cancer screening or palliative cancer care. Data extraction was conducted in order to obtain a descriptive overview of intervention characteristics, outcomes of interest and findings. Elements of CONSORT guidelines and checklists were used to assess aspects of study validity. Results The searches identified 654 unique papers, of which 25 were retrieved for scrutiny. Seven papers were finally included. Intervention characteristics, outcomes studied, findings and methodological aspects were all very diverse. Conclusion Due to the scarcity of papers included (seven), significant heterogeneity in target group, intervention setting, outcomes measured and methodologies applied, no conclusions can be drawn about the

  10. Transitioning to routine breast cancer risk assessment and management in primary care: what can we learn from cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Steel, Emma J; Collins, Ian; Emery, Jon; Pirotta, Marie; Mann, G Bruce; Butow, Phyllis; Hopper, John L; Trainer, Alison; Moreton, Jane; Antoniou, Antonis C; Cuzick, Jack; Keogh, Louise

    2016-01-01

    To capitalise on advances in breast cancer prevention, all women would need to have their breast cancer risk formally assessed. With ~85% of Australians attending primary care clinics at least once a year, primary care is an opportune location for formal breast cancer risk assessment and management. This study assessed the current practice and needs of primary care clinicians regarding assessment and management of breast cancer risk. Two facilitated focus group discussions were held with 17 primary care clinicians (12 GPs and 5 practice nurses (PNs)) as part of a larger needs assessment. Primary care clinicians viewed assessment and management of cardiovascular risk as an intrinsic, expected part of their role, often triggered by practice software prompts and facilitated by use of an online tool. Conversely, assessment of breast cancer risk was not routine and was generally patient- (not clinician-) initiated, and risk management (apart from routine screening) was considered outside the primary care domain. Clinicians suggested that routine assessment and management of breast cancer risk might be achieved if it were widely endorsed as within the remit of primary care and supported by an online risk-assessment and decision aid tool that was integrated into primary care software. This study identified several key issues that would need to be addressed to facilitate the transition to routine assessment and management of breast cancer risk in primary care, based largely on the model used for cardiovascular disease.

  11. Panitumumab: the evidence of its therapeutic potential in metastatic colorectal cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Erika; Morgillo, Floriana; Troiani, Teresa; Tortora, Giampaolo; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common malignant disease. Of newly diagnosed patients, 40% have metastatic disease at diagnosis, and approximately 25% of patients with localized disease at diagnosis will ultimately develop metastatic disease. The benefits of systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer over best supportive care have been established. Panitumumab (ABX-EGF) is the first fully human monoclonal antibody developed for use in colorectal cancer that targets the extracellular domains of epidermal growth factor receptor. Aims: The goal of this article is to review the published evidence for the use of panitumumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer to define its therapeutic potential. Evidence review: The major evidence of panitumumab activity in colorectal cancer has appeared in meeting report abstracts. One phase II study in monotherapy, one in combination with chemotherapy, and one phase III study have included only patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Clinical potential: To date, in phase II clinical studies panitumumab has demonstrated antitumor activity in advanced, refractory colorectal cancer. As monotherapy it resulted in a 10% response rate with 38% of patients having stable disease, and a 36% response rate with 46% stable disease when combined with chemotherapy. A phase III study indicates a clinically significant advantage of panitumumab as third-line monotherapy over best supportive care. Panitumumab appears to have a good tolerability profile, with no maximum tolerated dose yet defined. PMID:21221177

  12. “My cancer is not my deepest concern”: life course disruption influencing patient pathways and health care needs among persons living with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salamonsen, Anita; Kiil, Mona A; Kristoffersen, Agnete Egilsdatter; Stub, Trine; Berntsen, Gro R

    2016-01-01

    Background The concept of “patient pathways” in cancer care is most commonly understood as clinical pathways, operationalized as standardized packages of health care based on guidelines for the condition in question. In this understanding, patient pathways do not address multimorbidity or patient experiences and preferences. This study explored patient pathways understood as the individual and cultural life course, which includes both life and health events. The overall aim was to contribute to supportive and targeted cancer care. Materials and methods Nine Norwegian patients recently diagnosed with rectal cancer Tumor-Node-Metastasis stage I–III participated in qualitative interviews, five times over 1 year. Five patients later participated in a workshop where they made illustrations of and discussed patient pathways. Results Patient pathways including both health and life events were illustrated and described as complex and circular. Stress, anxiety, and depression caused by life events had significant disruptive effects and influenced patient-defined health care needs. The participants experienced the Norwegian public health service as focused on hospital-based standardized cancer care. They expressed unmet health care needs in terms of emotional and practical support in their everyday life with cancer, and some turned to complementary and alternative medicine. Conclusion This study suggests that acknowledging life course disruption before cancer diagnosis may have significant relevance for understanding complex patient pathways and individual health care needs. Approaching patient pathways as individual and socially constructed may contribute important knowledge to support targeted cancer care. PMID:27574408

  13. Risk factors and costs of oral cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sandeep; Tiwari, Vijay Kumar; Nair, Kesavan Sreekantan; Raj, Sherin

    2014-01-01

    The present study conducted with 100 oral cancer patients at a private tertiary care hospital in Delhi demonstrated that stage III cancer was associated with longer use of tobacco and poor oral hygiene. There was also statistically significant association (p<.05) between consumption of tobacco and alcohol. More than 60% treatment expenditure was on surgery followed by accommodation (9%) and investigations (8%). The effect of tobacco was well known among patients as 76% of the patients knew that common cancer in tobacco chewer is 'oral cancer', 22% of the patients however responded that they did not know which cancer is common in tobacco chewers. 58% said that they learnt about ill effects of tobacco from media while 24% said they learnt from family and friends. Out of 78 tobacco users, 60 (77%) said that they never received help to quit tobacco while 18(23%) have received help to quit.

  14. Do specialist palliative care teams improve outcomes for cancer patients? A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Hearn, J; Higginson, I J

    1998-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether teams providing specialist palliative care improve the health outcomes of patients with advanced cancer and their families or carers when compared to conventional services. The study involved a systematic literature review of published research. The source of the data included studies identified from a systematic search of computerized databases (Medline, psychINFO, CINAHL and BIDS to the end of 1996), hand-searching specialist palliative care journals, and studying bibliographies and reference lists. The inclusion criteria for articles were that the study considered the use of specialist palliative care teams caring for patients with advanced cancer. Articles were assessed and data extracted and synthesized, with studies graded according to design. A variety of outcomes were considered by the authors. These addressed aspects of symptom control, patient and family or carer satisfaction, health care utilization and cost, place of death, psychosocial indices and quality of life. Overall, 18 relevant studies were identified, including five randomized controlled trials. Improved outcomes were seen in the amount of time spent at home by patients, satisfaction by both patients and their carers, symptom control, a reduction in the number of inpatient hospital days, a reduction in overall cost, and the patients' likelihood of dying where they wished to for those receiving specialist care from a multiprofessional palliative care team. It was concluded that all evaluations were of services considered to be leading the field, or were pioneering training and treatments. However, when compared to conventional care, there is evidence that specialist teams in palliative care improve satisfaction and identify and deal with more patient and family needs. Moreover, multiprofessional approaches to palliative care reduce the overall cost of care by reducing the amount of time patients spend in acute hospital settings.

  15. Patients’ and Family Members’ Views on Patient-Centered Communication During Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Beard, Renee L.; Alexander, Gwen L.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Firneno, Cassandra; Gaglio, Bridget; Greene, Sarah M.; Lemay, Celeste A.; Robinson, Brandi E.; Roblin, Douglas W.; Walsh, Kathleen; Street, Richard L.; Gallagher, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To explore patients’ and family members’ views on communication during cancer care, and to identify those aspects of clinician-patient communication which were most important to patients and family members. Methods We conducted a secondary data analysis of qualitative data from 137 patients with cancer and family members of patients with cancer. We used a modified version of the constant comparative method and coding paradigm of grounded theory. Results Patients want sensitive, caring clinicians who provide information that they need, when they need it, in a way that they can understand; who listen and respond to questions and concerns, and who attempt to understand the patient’s experience. Effective information exchange and a positive interpersonal relationship with the clinician were of fundamental importance to patients and family members. These were interrelated; for instance, failure to provide information a patient needed could damage the relationship, while excellent listening could foster the relationship. Information exchange and relationship were also integral to decision making, managing uncertainty, responding to emotions, and self-management. Clinicians who were responsive to patients’ needs beyond the immediate medical encounter were valued. Conclusions The complexity of cancer care today suggest that efforts to improve communication must be multi-level, acknowledging and addressing patient, clinician, organizational and policy barriers and facilitators. Measurement tools are needed to assess cancer patients’ and family members’ experiences with communication over the course of cancer care in order to provide meaningful, actionable feedback to those seeking to optimize their effectiveness in communicating with patients with cancer. PMID:23780672

  16. Periodontal Health, Perceived Oral Health and Dental Care Utilization of Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Griggs, Jennifer J.; Inglehart, Marita R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This population-based analysis examined the prevalence of periodontal diseases along with the self-perceived oral health and patterns of dental care utilization of breast cancer survivors in the U.S. METHODS Data from the 1999–2004 NHANES were utilized, examining information from 3,354 women between 50–85 years of age. Primary outcomes were gingivitis and periodontitis, self-perceived oral health and dental care utilization. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate relationships of breast cancer diagnosis and primary outcomes, while controlling for confounding factors. RESULTS Breast cancer survivors were more likely to be older than 55 years, white, non-smokers, have higher levels of education and income and a higher prevalence of osteoporosis. Breast cancer survivors were significantly less likely to have dental insurance (p=0.04). Utilization of dental services and reason for last dental visit did not significantly differ between groups. A history of a breast cancer diagnosis did not increase the odds of gingivitis (OR=1.32; 95% CI: 0.53–3.63), periodontitis (OR=1.82; 95% CI = 0.89–4.01) or poor self-perceived oral health (OR=0.89; 95% CI: 0.61–1.33) after adjusting for age, race, education, dental care utilization, and smoking status. CONCLUSIONS In this sample, a history of breast cancer does not significantly impact periodontal health, self-perceived oral health and dental care utilization. However, efforts should be made to assure that breast cancer survivors have dental insurance. PMID:25648337

  17. Clinician-led improvement in cancer care (CLICC) - testing a multifaceted implementation strategy to increase evidence-based prostate cancer care: phased randomised controlled trial - study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines have been widely developed and disseminated with the aim of improving healthcare processes and patient outcomes but the uptake of evidence-based practice remains haphazard. There is a need to develop effective implementation methods to achieve large-scale adoption of proven innovations and recommended care. Clinical networks are increasingly being viewed as a vehicle through which evidence-based care can be embedded into healthcare systems using a collegial approach to agree on and implement a range of strategies within hospitals. In Australia, the provision of evidence-based care for men with prostate cancer has been identified as a high priority. Clinical audits have shown that fewer than 10% of patients in New South Wales (NSW) Australia at high risk of recurrence after radical prostatectomy receive guideline recommended radiation treatment following surgery. This trial will test a clinical network-based intervention to improve uptake of guideline recommended care for men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods/Design In Phase I, a phased randomised cluster trial will test a multifaceted intervention that harnesses the NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI) Urology Clinical Network to increase evidence-based care for men with high-risk prostate cancer following surgery. The intervention will be introduced in nine NSW hospitals over 10 months using a stepped wedge design. Outcome data (referral to radiation oncology for discussion of adjuvant radiotherapy in line with guideline recommended care or referral to a clinical trial of adjuvant versus salvage radiotherapy) will be collected through review of patient medical records. In Phase II, mixed methods will be used to identify mechanisms of provider and organisational change. Clinicians’ knowledge and attitudes will be assessed through surveys. Process outcome measures will be assessed through document review. Semi-structured interviews will be conducted to elucidate

  18. Pain medicine and palliative care as an alternative to euthanasia in end-of-life cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Erdek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There exists support for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS) in cases of terminal cancer. One of the premises for this approach is the goal of the alleviation of suffering. Do current means of pain control in the greater overall setting of palliative care serve as a desirable alternative? A contrast comparison may be drawn between the above approaches using both theological and medical sources to show that the enlightened use of both interventional and non-interventional pain medicine approaches in an integrated palliative care setting are a theologically grounded and medically feasible alternative to euthanasia or PAS in this population. Lay summary: Patients suffering from terminal cancer often have pain. Some have advocated euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide as a potential way of alleviating this suffering. Further examination of this topic, however, shows this approach may be essentially utilitarian and fail to consider the inherent value of human life. There has been significant development in recent years in the fields of pain medicine and palliative care, which afford alternate means of addressing suffering in this patient population. PMID:25999611

  19. Pain medicine and palliative care as an alternative to euthanasia in end-of-life cancer care.

    PubMed

    Erdek, Michael

    2015-05-01

    There exists support for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS) in cases of terminal cancer. One of the premises for this approach is the goal of the alleviation of suffering. Do current means of pain control in the greater overall setting of palliative care serve as a desirable alternative? A contrast comparison may be drawn between the above approaches using both theological and medical sources to show that the enlightened use of both interventional and non-interventional pain medicine approaches in an integrated palliative care setting are a theologically grounded and medically feasible alternative to euthanasia or PAS in this population. Lay summary: Patients suffering from terminal cancer often have pain. Some have advocated euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide as a potential way of alleviating this suffering. Further examination of this topic, however, shows this approach may be essentially utilitarian and fail to consider the inherent value of human life. There has been significant development in recent years in the fields of pain medicine and palliative care, which afford alternate means of addressing suffering in this patient population. PMID:25999611

  20. The role of urologists in the care of children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jonathan H

    2016-01-01

    At most institutions, pediatric urologists play a limited role in the care of children with cancer. Pediatric urologists have a unique experience and skill set to contribute to the care of these patients. Interested pediatric urologists should become experts in pediatric urologic oncology and demonstrate this interest by participating in tumor board and relevant academic activities. They should advocate for a collaborative approach with pediatric general surgeons in the surgical management of children with genitourinary as such an approach benefits patient care, contributes to professional development of all parties, and develops relationships that contribute to programmatic development for the institution in oncology and other areas.

  1. "That word, cancer": breast care behavior of Hispanic women in new Mexico background and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ginossar, Tamar; De Vargas, Felicia; Sanchez, Christina; Oetzel, John

    2010-01-01

    Despite international efforts, national and ethnic disparities in utilization of breast cancer (BC) screenings prevail. In the United States, Hispanic women have one of the lowest BC screening rates. The purpose of our study was to examine how Hispanic women in New Mexico described their breast care behavior (BCB; BC screening practices, motivation to act, and breast care information behavior). Analysis of focus groups revealed five types of approaches to BCB. These findings have global implications for health care practitioners in directing attention toward the complexity of BC preventive behavior. Implications for other ethnic groups are discussed.

  2. Ultrasensitive and low-volume point-of-care diagnostics on flexible strips – a study with cardiac troponin biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Nandhinee Radha; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a flexible, mechanically stable, and disposable electrochemical sensor platform for monitoring cardiac troponins through the detection and quantification of cardiac Troponin-T (cTnT). We designed and fabricated nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO) sensing electrodes on flexible porous polyimide substrates. We demonstrate ultrasensitive detection is capable at very low sample volumes due to the confinement phenomenon of target species within the ZnO nanostructures leading to enhancement of biomolecular binding on the sensor electrode surface. The performance of the ZnO nanostructured sensor electrode was evaluated against gold and nanotextured ZnO electrodes. The electrochemical sensor functions on affinity based immunoassay principles whereby monoclonal antibodies for cTnT were immobilized on the sensor electrodes using thiol based chemistry. Detection of cTnT in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) buffers was achieved at low sample volumes of 20 μL using non-faradaic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Limit of detection (LOD) of 1E-4 ng/mL (i.e. 1 pg/mL) at 7% CV (coefficient of variation) for cTnT in HS was demonstrated on nanostructured ZnO electrodes. The mechanical integrity of the flexible biosensor platform was demonstrated with cyclic bending tests. The sensor performed within 12% CV after 100 bending cycles demonstrating the robustness of the nanostructured ZnO electrochemical sensor platform. PMID:27634488

  3. Ultrasensitive and low-volume point-of-care diagnostics on flexible strips – a study with cardiac troponin biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, Nandhinee Radha; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a flexible, mechanically stable, and disposable electrochemical sensor platform for monitoring cardiac troponins through the detection and quantification of cardiac Troponin-T (cTnT). We designed and fabricated nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO) sensing electrodes on flexible porous polyimide substrates. We demonstrate ultrasensitive detection is capable at very low sample volumes due to the confinement phenomenon of target species within the ZnO nanostructures leading to enhancement of biomolecular binding on the sensor electrode surface. The performance of the ZnO nanostructured sensor electrode was evaluated against gold and nanotextured ZnO electrodes. The electrochemical sensor functions on affinity based immunoassay principles whereby monoclonal antibodies for cTnT were immobilized on the sensor electrodes using thiol based chemistry. Detection of cTnT in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) buffers was achieved at low sample volumes of 20 μL using non-faradaic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Limit of detection (LOD) of 1E-4 ng/mL (i.e. 1 pg/mL) at 7% CV (coefficient of variation) for cTnT in HS was demonstrated on nanostructured ZnO electrodes. The mechanical integrity of the flexible biosensor platform was demonstrated with cyclic bending tests. The sensor performed within 12% CV after 100 bending cycles demonstrating the robustness of the nanostructured ZnO electrochemical sensor platform.

  4. Ultrasensitive and low-volume point-of-care diagnostics on flexible strips - a study with cardiac troponin biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Nandhinee Radha; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a flexible, mechanically stable, and disposable electrochemical sensor platform for monitoring cardiac troponins through the detection and quantification of cardiac Troponin-T (cTnT). We designed and fabricated nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO) sensing electrodes on flexible porous polyimide substrates. We demonstrate ultrasensitive detection is capable at very low sample volumes due to the confinement phenomenon of target species within the ZnO nanostructures leading to enhancement of biomolecular binding on the sensor electrode surface. The performance of the ZnO nanostructured sensor electrode was evaluated against gold and nanotextured ZnO electrodes. The electrochemical sensor functions on affinity based immunoassay principles whereby monoclonal antibodies for cTnT were immobilized on the sensor electrodes using thiol based chemistry. Detection of cTnT in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) buffers was achieved at low sample volumes of 20 μL using non-faradaic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Limit of detection (LOD) of 1E-4 ng/mL (i.e. 1 pg/mL) at 7% CV (coefficient of variation) for cTnT in HS was demonstrated on nanostructured ZnO electrodes. The mechanical integrity of the flexible biosensor platform was demonstrated with cyclic bending tests. The sensor performed within 12% CV after 100 bending cycles demonstrating the robustness of the nanostructured ZnO electrochemical sensor platform. PMID:27634488

  5. [Evaluation of a home care program for children with cancer].

    PubMed

    Fernández Navarro, J M; Pozuelo Muñoz, B; Ortí Martínez, P; López Ferrer, L; Cañete Nieto, A; Verdeguer Miralles, V; Castel Sánchez, V

    2000-01-01

    The home care team dependent from the pediatric oncology unit in our institution started working in April, 1997. We evaluate in this paper the medical activities accomplished in seventeen month experience. The team is constituted by a pediatric oncologist, two pediatric nurses and a clinical assistant with experience in the specialty. The geographic area we cover is la Communidad Valenciana. We directly attend children living in Valencia city and its metropolitan area. For the rest of patients, we coordinate the interventions of the local primary care teams and local hospitals. 127 patients have been admitted in the home care unit in 433 occasions. The immediate reasons for the admission were: early discharge from the hospital (61%), followed by the administration of antibiotics (18%) and chemotherapy (12%) at home. We attended 17 children in the terminal phase of their diseases. Five of them required opioid treatment for pain control. Six out of eight patients living in the area of direct intervention of the home care team died at home. The most common cause of discharge (73%) was the achievement of the goals planned when the patient was included in the program. Only in two cases (0.5%) we did not found enough cooperation from the parents and the treatment was completed in the hospital. This program has been well accepted by our patients and their parents and permits to shorten the stay in the hospital.

  6. Communication in cancer care: psycho-social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Strohschein, Fay J; Saraf, Gayatri; Loiselle, Carmen G

    2014-01-01

    Communication is a core aspect of psycho-oncology care. This article examines key psychosocial, cultural, and technological factors that affect this communication. Drawing from advances in clinical work and accumulating bodies of empirical evidence, the authors identify determining factors for high quality, efficient, and sensitive communication and support for those affected by cancer. Cancer care in India is highlighted as a salient example. Cultural factors affecting cancer communication in India include beliefs about health and illness, societal values, integration of spiritual care, family roles, and expectations concerning disclosure of cancer information, and rituals around death and dying. The rapidly emerging area of e-health significantly impacts cancer communication and support globally. In view of current globalization, understanding these multidimensional psychosocial, and cultural factors that shape communication are essential for providing comprehensive, appropriate, and sensitive cancer care.

  7. Estimation of an optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate for cancer: setting an evidence-based benchmark for quality cancer care.

    PubMed

    Jacob, S A; Ng, W L; Do, V

    2015-02-01

    There is wide variation in the proportion of newly diagnosed cancer patients who receive chemotherapy, indicating the need for a benchmark rate of chemotherapy utilisation. This study describes an evidence-based model that estimates the proportion of new cancer patients in whom chemotherapy is indicated at least once (defined as the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate). The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can act as a benchmark for measuring and improving the quality of care. Models of optimal chemotherapy utilisation were constructed for each cancer site based on indications for chemotherapy identified from evidence-based treatment guidelines. Data on the proportion of patient- and tumour-related attributes for which chemotherapy was indicated were obtained, using population-based data where possible. Treatment indications and epidemiological data were merged to calculate the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate. Monte Carlo simulations and sensitivity analyses were used to assess the effect of controversial chemotherapy indications and variations in epidemiological data on our model. Chemotherapy is indicated at least once in 49.1% (95% confidence interval 48.8-49.6%) of all new cancer patients in Australia. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rates for individual tumour sites ranged from a low of 13% in thyroid cancers to a high of 94% in myeloma. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can serve as a benchmark for planning chemotherapy services on a population basis. The model can be used to evaluate service delivery by comparing the benchmark rate with patterns of care data. The overall estimate for other countries can be obtained by substituting the relevant distribution of cancer types. It can also be used to predict future chemotherapy workload and can be easily modified to take into account future changes in cancer incidence, presentation stage or chemotherapy indications.

  8. Estimation of an optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate for cancer: setting an evidence-based benchmark for quality cancer care.

    PubMed

    Jacob, S A; Ng, W L; Do, V

    2015-02-01

    There is wide variation in the proportion of newly diagnosed cancer patients who receive chemotherapy, indicating the need for a benchmark rate of chemotherapy utilisation. This study describes an evidence-based model that estimates the proportion of new cancer patients in whom chemotherapy is indicated at least once (defined as the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate). The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can act as a benchmark for measuring and improving the quality of care. Models of optimal chemotherapy utilisation were constructed for each cancer site based on indications for chemotherapy identified from evidence-based treatment guidelines. Data on the proportion of patient- and tumour-related attributes for which chemotherapy was indicated were obtained, using population-based data where possible. Treatment indications and epidemiological data were merged to calculate the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate. Monte Carlo simulations and sensitivity analyses were used to assess the effect of controversial chemotherapy indications and variations in epidemiological data on our model. Chemotherapy is indicated at least once in 49.1% (95% confidence interval 48.8-49.6%) of all new cancer patients in Australia. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rates for individual tumour sites ranged from a low of 13% in thyroid cancers to a high of 94% in myeloma. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can serve as a benchmark for planning chemotherapy services on a population basis. The model can be used to evaluate service delivery by comparing the benchmark rate with patterns of care data. The overall estimate for other countries can be obtained by substituting the relevant distribution of cancer types. It can also be used to predict future chemotherapy workload and can be easily modified to take into account future changes in cancer incidence, presentation stage or chemotherapy indications. PMID:25455844

  9. A flexible system for vital signs monitoring in hospital general care wards based on the integration of UNIX-based workstations, standard networks and portable vital signs monitors.

    PubMed

    Welch, J P; Sims, N; Ford-Carlton, P; Moon, J B; West, K; Honore, G; Colquitt, N

    1991-01-01

    The article describes a study conducted on general surgical and thoracic surgical floors of a 1000-bed hospital to assess the impact of a new network for portable patient care devices. This network was developed to address the needs of hospital patients who need constant, multi-parameter, vital signs surveillance, but do not require intensive nursing care. Bedside wall jacks were linked to UNIX-based workstations using standard digital network hardware, creating a flexible system (for general care floors of the hospital) that allowed the number of monitored locations to increase and decrease as patient census and acuity levels varied. It also allowed the general care floors to provide immediate, centralized vital signs monitoring for patients who unexpectedly became unstable, and permitted portable monitors to travel with patients as they were transferred between hospital departments. A disk-based log within the workstation automatically collected performance data, including patient demographics, monitor alarms, and network status for analysis. The log has allowed the developers to evaluate the use and performance of the system.

  10. American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical expert statement on cancer survivorship care planning.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Snyder, Claire F; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Shulman, Lawrence N

    2014-11-01

    The seminal report from the Institute of Medicine, "From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition," identified four essential components of survivorship care and recommended that a survivorship care plan (SCP), consisting of a treatment summary and follow-up care plan, be developed and used as a tool to deliver patient-centered care by enhancing communication between the oncology team and the patient as well as communication and coordination of care between the oncology team and the primary care provider (PCP). Nearly a decade ago, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) initiated a series of activities to promote chemotherapy treatment plans and summaries and SCPs. Unfortunately, there has been limited success in implementing SCPs in oncology practice because of barriers including, but not limited to, the time-consuming process of completing an SCP, lack of role clarity, and lack of reimbursement for preparation time. ASCO developed this statement and revised template to provide a framework for completing and sharing SCPs and to set clear expectations for survivorship care planning in the oncology setting. This statement is intended to help clinicians recognize the importance of developing patient-centered SCPs and delivering the information to both the patient and PCP and to identify barriers that may exist in completing and delivering these documents effectively.

  11. Survivorship care planning in a comprehensive cancer center using an implementation framework.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Sofia F; Kircher, Sheetal M; Oden, Megan; Veneruso, Aubri; McKoy, June M; Pearman, Timothy; Penedo, Frank J

    2016-05-01

    Cancer survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been recommended to improve clinical care and patient outcomes. Research is needed to establish their efficacy and identify best practices. Starting in 2015, centers accredited by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer must deliver SCPs to patients completing primary cancer treatment with curative intent. We describe how we established routine SCP delivery at the Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chicago, Illinois, using the Quality Implementation Framework. We evaluated local practices, gathered clinician and patient stakeholder input, developed customized SCP templates within the electronic health record (EHR), and implemented 2 complementary delivery models. Clinician interviews (n = 41) and survey responses (n = 12), along with input from patients (n = 68) and a patient advisory board (n = 15), indicated support for SCPs and survivorship services. To promote feasible implementation and leverage existing workflows, we harmonized 2 SCP delivery models: integrated care within clinics where patients received treatment, and referral to a centralized survivorship clinic. We are implementing SCP delivery with prominent disease sites and will extend services to survivors of other cancers in the future. We developed four electronic disease-specific SCP templates for breast, colorectal, lung, and prostate cancers and a fifth, generic template that can be used for other malignancies. The templates reduced free-text clinician entry by auto-populating 20% of the fields from existing EHR data, and using drop-down menus for another 65%. Mean SCP completion time is 12 minutes (range, 10-15; n = 64). We designed our framework to facilitate ongoing evaluation of implementation and quality improvement. Funding/sponsorship Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Coleman Foundation, and the Lynn Sage Cancer Research Foundation.

  12. Young Cancer Patients' Perceptions of a Video Game Used to Promote Self Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Ivan L.; Marin-Bowling, Veronica M.; Guthrie, Nicole: Kato, Pamela M.

    2006-01-01

    A video game called "Re-Mission" has recently been investigated with adolescent and young adult cancer patients enrolled in a multi-site randomized controlled evaluation of the game as a psycho-educational intervention. The main focus of the trial was to determine effects of the game on self-care and other health-related outcomes. It was also…

  13. Social Support, a Mediator in Collaborative Depression Care for Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hyunsung; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed whether perceived social support (PSS) is a factor in improving physical and functional well-being observed among cancer patients receiving collaborative depression care. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted of data collected in a randomized clinical trial testing the effectiveness of collaborative depression…

  14. Attitudes about Cancer Medicine among Primary Care Residents and Their Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Richard R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A cancer attitude survey is analyzed that was administered to residents and faculty physicians in the departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Human Oncology at the University of Wisconsin. Categories surveyed include opinions about the benefits of prevention, risk management, early detection and screening, treatment and care, and…

  15. Marshalling Social Support: A “Care-Getting” Model for Persons Living with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, Eva; Kahana, Boaz; Wykle, May; Kulle, Diana

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers a stress theory based conceptual framework for understanding proactive options for care-getting for patients living with cancer that is also relevant to patients living with other chronic or life threatening illnesses. Barriers and facilitators to active efforts for obtaining responsive care from both informal and formal sources are discussed. This “Care-Getting” model explores benefits of proactive care-getting for diminishing physical discomfort/suffering, burden of illness and disability, and psychological distress. We highlight unique issues in care-getting that patients face at different stages of the life course. Implications of prior research related to the model for practice and intervention are discussed. PMID:20107524

  16. [Spiritual care of a terminal liver cancer patient: a nursing experience].

    PubMed

    Chien, Hui-Chi

    2010-04-01

    Death, an unavoidable event in the human experience, causes physical as well as mental and spiritual suffering. This paper reports on a nursing experience giving spiritual care to a terminal liver cancer patient between January 17 and February 9, 2009. Eleven nursing logs were used as the source of data for daily information. During the care period, patient religious needs featured prominently, including his desire to become a Christian and his eagerness to know about and help in the arrangement of his funeral. Taking the initiative, the nurse helped link him with religious resources, arranged a minister for his baptism ceremony, had the priest explain funeral proceedings, and assisted with the completion of his entrusted plans. The function of this nursing care intervention was to provide a personal touch to a patient who was in desperate need of warm spiritual care. It is hoped that this report can help caregivers increase their sensitivity toward patient spiritual needs and enhance routine nursing care quality.

  17. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  18. Geriatric assessment with management in cancer care: Current evidence and potential mechanisms for future research

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, Allison; Allore, Heather; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Mohile, Supriya G.; Williams, Grant R.; Chapman, Andrew; Extermann, Martine; Olin, Rebecca L.; Targia, Valerie; Mackenzie, Amy; Holmes, Holly M.; Hurria, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Older adults with cancer represent a complex patient population. Geriatric assessment (GA) is recommended to evaluate the medical and supportive care needs of this group. “GA with management” is a term encompassing the resultant medical decisions and interventions implemented in response to vulnerabilities identified on GA. In older, non-cancer patients, GA with management has been shown to improve a variety of outcomes, such as reducing functional decline and health care utilization. However, the role of GA with management in the older adult with cancer is less well established. Rigorous clinical trials of GA with management are necessary to develop an evidence base and support its use in the routine oncology care of older adults. At the recent U-13 conference, “Design and Implementation of Intervention Studies to Improve or Maintain Quality of Survivorship in Older and/or Frail Adults with Cancer,” a session was dedicated to developing research priorities in GA with management. Here we summarize identified knowledge gaps in GA with management studies for older patients with cancer and propose areas for future research. PMID:27197915

  19. Breast cancer center: improving access to patient care.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jatinder; Edge, Stephen B; Bonaccio, Ermelinda; Schwert, Kathleen Trapp; Braun, Brian

    2014-02-01

    To improve access for patients to the Breast Cancer Center at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the Opportunities for Improvement Project team defined 3 goals: reduce the delay to initial appointment, reduce delays in treatment at the Breast Cancer Center, and reduce delays in the start of endocrine therapy. The team developed a set of tools using Lean methodology that helped to address variables contributing to inefficiencies that result in delays. The idea behind these tools was to integrate all the business variables, such as volume, clinical space, physician availability, services offered in the Breast Program, and patient types, to produce a system or schedule that is more predictable. A new schedule for physicians, independent mid-level clinics, a survivorship program, a primary nursing model, and new roles and responsibilities were defined and implemented. Mean scores in a Press Ganey survey for wait-time questions improved by 10 points, and patient complaints decreased by almost 40%. The team concluded that delays in the Breast Program were symptoms of a larger dysfunction in systems. Fixing the problems required a comprehensive approach to review all the variables that resulted in delays. PMID:24614049

  20. Pattern and quality of care of cancer pain management. Results from the Cancer Pain Outcome Research Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Apolone, G; Corli, O; Caraceni, A; Negri, E; Deandrea, S; Montanari, M; Greco, M T

    2009-01-01

    Most patients with advanced or metastatic cancer experience pain and despite several guidelines, undertreatment is well documented. A multicenter, open-label, prospective, non-randomised study was launched in Italy in 2006 to evaluate the epidemiology, patterns and quality of pain care of cancer patients. To assess the adequacy of analgesic care, we used a standardised measure, the pain management index (PMI), that compares the most potent analgesic prescribed for a patient with the reported level of the worst pain of that patient together with a selected list of clinical indicators. A total of 110 centres recruited 1801 valid cases. 61% of cases were received a WHO-level III opioid; 25.3% were classified as potentially undertreated, with wide variation (9.8–55.3%) according to the variables describing patients, centres and pattern of care. After adjustment with a multivariable logistic regression model, type of recruiting centre, receiving adjuvant therapy or not and type of patient recruited (new or already on follow-up) had a significant association with undertreatment. Non-compliance with the predefined set of clinical indicators was generally high, ranging from 41 to 76%. Despite intrinsic limitations of the PMI that may be considered as an indicator of the poor quality of cancer pain care, results suggest that the recourse to WHO third-level drugs still seems delayed in a substantial percentage of patients. This delay is probably related to several factors affecting practice in participating centres and suggests that the quality of cancer pain management in Italy deserves specific attention and interventions aimed at improving patients' outcomes. PMID:19401688

  1. Supportive care needs of rural individuals living with cancer: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Loughery, Joanne; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of geographic location, the cancer journey is an extremely difficult experience for both patients and their families. The aim of this literature review is to explore the impact of rural or remote residence on the supportive care needs of individuals living with cancer. This review included ten qualitative, seven quantitative, and six mixed design studies. Data collection, analysis, and evaluation were guided using a multi-domain supportive care framework based on seven domains: physical, emotional, informational, psychological, spiritual, social, and practical (Fitch, 2009). This review will suggest that there are distinct experiences that present both challenges and benefits to individuals living with cancer in rural areas. These findings will be detailed with recommendations, and grounding for future research outlined. PMID:26638285

  2. Evaluation of Effectiveness of Herbal Medication in Cancer Care: A Review Study

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Javad; Miar, Solaleh; Majid Zadehzare, Mohammad; Akbari, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Based on a common belief, herbal medicine with the least possible side effects should be the center of attention in cancer care; however, in many cases they have not been properly studied with reliable clinical trials in human subjects. In this review, it was attempted to identify the available evidence on the use and clinical effects of herbs in cancer care. The research consists of two major parts including immunomodulator and chemopreventive herbal compounds whose mechanism, biological response, anticancer element of extract and related benefits were completely studied. Also, the safety of herbal anticancer compounds was discussed. Although the use of herbal medicines in treating cancer shows less chemotherapy-induced, toxicity, more researches are required to reach their full therapeutic potentials. PMID:25628834

  3. Lung cancer management in limited resource settings: guidelines for appropriate good care.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Fergus R; Abratt, Raymond P; Cho, Kwan H; Stephens, Richard J; Jeremic, Branislav

    2007-02-01

    Lung cancer is a major cause of cancer death worldwide and is becoming an increasing problem in developing countries. It is important that, in countries where health care resources are limited, these resources are used most effectively and cost-effectively. The authors, with the support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, drew on existing evidence-based clinical guidelines, published systematic reviews and meta-analyses, as well as recent research publications, to summarise the current evidence and to make broad recommendations on the non-surgical treatment of patients with lung cancer. Tables were constructed which summarise the different treatment options for specific groups of patients, the increase in resource use for and the likely additional clinical benefit from each option. These tables can be used to assess the cost-effectiveness and appropriateness of different interventions in a particular health care system and to develop local clinical guidelines.

  4. Cancer Care in East and Central Harlem: Community Partnership Needs Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jandorf, Lina; Freemantle, Hurdley; Sly, Jamilia; Ellison, Jennie; Wong, Carrie R.; Villagra, Cristina; Hong, Joseph; Kaleya, Sara; Poultney, Madrid; Villegas, Carmen; Brenner, Barbara; Bickell, Nina

    2015-01-01

    In the largely African American and Hispanic communities of East and Central Harlem in New York City (NYC), health inequities are glaring. Mortality from cancer is 20–30 % higher than in Manhattan and 30–40 % higher than rates in the general population in NYC. Despite advances in risk assessment, early detection, treatment, and survivorship, individuals in Harlem and similar urban communities are not benefiting equally. Guided by community-based participatory research, this study serves as an important step in understanding cancer care needs and the range of factors that impact the disparate rates of cancer in East and Central Harlem. Forty individual interviews were conducted with community leaders and residents. Major themes included: need for appropriate supportive services; health care access and financial challenges; beliefs related to stigma, trust, and accountability; and the impact of the physical environment on health. Education was seen as a critical area of need and intervention. PMID:23108854

  5. Arab American immigrants in New York: health care and cancer knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Susan M; Ayash, Claudia; Pharaon, Nora Alarifi; Gany, Francesca M

    2008-10-01

    Arab immigrants living in the United States total between 1.5 million and 3.5 million, and have been growing in number each decade. New York's Arab population, at 405,000, ranks third in the U.S. after California and Michigan. Despite the large numbers, little health research has focused on this population. Data about the cancer incidence, mortality, and screening practices of Arab Americans is overwhelmingly lacking. To better understand the health care and cancer knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of Arab American immigrants, five single-gender focus groups were convened with Arab men and women in New York City. Attention was given to factors that act as barriers to utilization of general health care services, and of cancer prevention, treatment, and support services. The data revealed the importance of providing culturally and linguistically appropriate health interventions in partnership with trusted community leaders, and the need for follow-up research of this understudied immigrant population.

  6. [Access to cancer care: the cost of treatment matters].

    PubMed

    Tirelli, Umberto

    2014-05-01

    The approval of new antiviral agents and the wide-ranging costs of ophthalmic therapies with comparable efficacy have renewed the debate over the cost-effectiveness of novel drugs. In oncology, more expensive treatments do not always substantially change the outcome of the disease, but they merely prolong life expectancy by a few weeks even at the cost of significant side effects. Treatment costs are a key factor the physician should consider when sharing care decisions with the patient. In addition, fund allocation for purchasing high cost medications results in limited investment in clinical research and human resources - doctors, nurses and other healthcare staff - that play a central role in patient care. Regulatory agencies should be more demanding, reimbursing pharmaceutical companies on the basis of treatment outcome.

  7. Patient Navigators: Agents of Creating Community-Nested Patient-Centered Medical Homes for Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Melissa A.; Samaras, Athena T.; Nonzee, Narissa J.; Hajjar, Nadia; Frankovich, Carmi; Bularzik, Charito; Murphy, Kara; Endress, Richard; Tom, Laura S.; Dong, XinQi

    2016-01-01

    Patient navigation is an internationally utilized, culturally grounded, and multifaceted strategy to optimize patients’ interface with the health-care team and system. The DuPage County Patient Navigation Collaborative (DPNC) is a campus–community partnership designed to improve access to care among uninsured breast and cervical cancer patients in DuPage County, IL. Importantly, the DPNC connects community-based social service delivery with the patient-centered medical home to achieve a community-nested patient-centered medical home model for cancer care. While the patient navigator experience has been qualitatively documented, the literature pertaining to patient navigation has largely focused on efficacy outcomes and program cost effectiveness. Here, we uniquely highlight stories of women enrolled in the DPNC, told from the perspective of patient navigators, to shed light on the myriad barriers that DPNC patients faced and document the strategies DPNC patient navigators implemented.

  8. Model of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: The Youth Project in Milan

    PubMed Central

    Magni, Chiara; Veneroni, Laura; Silva, Matteo; Casanova, Michela; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Massimino, Maura; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Ferrari, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer form a particular group of patients with unique characteristics, who inhabit a so-called “no man’s land” between pediatric and adult services. In the last 10 years, the scientific oncology community has started to pay attention to these patients, implementing dedicated programs. A standardized model of care directed toward patients in this age range has yet to be developed and neither the pediatric nor the adult oncologic systems perfectly fit these patients’ needs. The Youth Project of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, dedicated to AYA with pediatric-type solid tumors, can be seen as a model of care for AYA patients, with its heterogeneous multidisciplinary staff and close cooperation with adult medical oncologists and surgeons. Further progress in the care of AYA cancer patients is still needed to