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Sample records for cancer care flexible

  1. A Palliative Cancer Care Flexible Education Program for Australian Community Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Jennifer L.; Beattie, Jill; Nation, Roger L.; Dooley, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To implement and evaluate a flexible palliative care education program for Australian community pharmacists. Design After identifying pharmacists' education needs, the program content and format were developed. This included identifying expert writers to create modules, assigning education and palliative care specialists to review content, and designing Web hosting of materials. The program was comprised of 11 modules and 79 activities. Assessment An average of 28 responses was posted for each of the 20 noticeboard activities. Of the 60 pharmacists who began the program, 15 contributed to the discussion group, with an average of 3 posts each. Participants' responses to an online questionnaire indicated the program addressed their education needs and improved their knowledge and confidence in providing palliative cancer care. Conclusion A program that pharmacists could access at a time and place convenient to them via the Internet was developed. Pharmacists indicated the program positively impacted their practice. PMID:20414437

  2. Primary Care Physicians’ Decisions to Perform Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James D; Asch, David A; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Hoops, Timothy C; Kochman, Michael L; Bilker, Warren B; Strom, Brian L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study was designed to identify factors that influence primary care physicians’ willingness to perform flexible sigmoidoscopy. MEASUREMENTS Using a mailed questionnaire, we surveyed all 161 primary care physicians participating in a large health care system. We obtained information on training, current practice patterns, beliefs about screening for colorectal cancer, and the influence of various factors on their decision whether or not to perform flexible sigmoidoscopy in practice. MAIN RESULTS Of the 131 physicians included in the analysis, 68 (52%) reported training in flexible sigmoidoscopy, of whom 36 (53%) were currently performing flexible sigmoidoscopy in practice. Time required to perform flexible sigmoidoscopy, availability of adequately trained staff, and availability of flexible sigmoidoscopy services provided by other clinicians were identified most often as reasons not to perform the procedure in practice. Male physicians were more likely than female physicians to report either performing flexible sigmoidoscopy or desiring to train to perform flexible sigmoidoscopy (odds ratio 2.61; 95% confidence interval 1.10, 6.23). This observed difference appears to be mediated through different weighting of decision criteria by male and female physicians. CONCLUSIONS Approximately half of these primary care physicians trained in flexible sigmoidoscopy chose not to perform this procedure in practice. Self-perceived inefficiency in performing office-based flexible sigmoidoscopy deterred many of these physicians from providing this service for their patients. PMID:10337039

  3. Social support, flexible resources, and health care navigation.

    PubMed

    Gage-Bouchard, Elizabeth A

    2017-10-01

    Recent research has focused attention on the role of patients' and clinicians' cultural skills and values in generating inequalities in health care experiences. Yet, examination of how social structural factors shape people's abilities to build, refine, and leverage strategies for navigating the health care system have received less attention. In this paper I place focus on one such social structural factor, social support, and examine how social support operates as a flexible resource that helps people navigate the health care system. Using the case of families navigating pediatric cancer care this study combines in-depth interviews with parents of pediatric cancer patients (N = 80), direct observation of clinical interactions between families and physicians (N = 73), and in-depth interviews with pediatric oncologists (N = 8). Findings show that physicians assess parental visibility in the hospital, medical vigilance, and adherence to their child's treatment and use these judgments to shape clinical decision-making. Parents who had help from their personal networks had more agility in balancing competing demands, and this allowed parents to more effectively meet institutional expectations for appropriate parental involvement in the child's health care. In this way, social support served as a flexible resource for some families that allowed parents to more quickly adapt to the demands of caring for a child with cancer, foster productive interpersonal relationships with health care providers, and play a more active role in their child's health care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality with screening flexible sigmoidoscopy.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Robert E; Pinsky, Paul F; Weissfeld, Joel L; Yokochi, Lance A; Church, Timothy; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Bresalier, Robert; Andriole, Gerald L; Buys, Saundra S; Crawford, E David; Fouad, Mona N; Isaacs, Claudine; Johnson, Christine C; Reding, Douglas J; O'Brien, Barbara; Carrick, Danielle M; Wright, Patrick; Riley, Thomas L; Purdue, Mark P; Izmirlian, Grant; Kramer, Barnett S; Miller, Anthony B; Gohagan, John K; Prorok, Philip C; Berg, Christine D

    2012-06-21

    The benefits of endoscopic testing for colorectal-cancer screening are uncertain. We evaluated the effect of screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy on colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality. From 1993 through 2001, we randomly assigned 154,900 men and women 55 to 74 years of age either to screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy, with a repeat screening at 3 or 5 years, or to usual care. Cases of colorectal cancer and deaths from the disease were ascertained. Of the 77,445 participants randomly assigned to screening (intervention group), 83.5% underwent baseline flexible sigmoidoscopy and 54.0% were screened at 3 or 5 years. The incidence of colorectal cancer after a median follow-up of 11.9 years was 11.9 cases per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (1012 cases), as compared with 15.2 cases per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (1287 cases), which represents a 21% reduction (relative risk, 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72 to 0.85; P<0.001). Significant reductions were observed in the incidence of both distal colorectal cancer (479 cases in the intervention group vs. 669 cases in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.80; P<0.001) and proximal colorectal cancer (512 cases vs. 595 cases; relative risk, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.97; P=0.01). There were 2.9 deaths from colorectal cancer per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (252 deaths), as compared with 3.9 per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (341 deaths), which represents a 26% reduction (relative risk, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.87; P<0.001). Mortality from distal colorectal cancer was reduced by 50% (87 deaths in the intervention group vs. 175 in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.64; P<0.001); mortality from proximal colorectal cancer was unaffected (143 and 147 deaths, respectively; relative risk, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.22; P=0.81). Screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy was associated with a significant decrease in

  5. Colorectal-Cancer Incidence and Mortality with Screening Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Robert E.; Pinsky, Paul F.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Yokochi, Lance A.; Church, Timothy; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Bresalier, Robert; Andriole, Gerald L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Crawford, E. David; Fouad, Mona N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Johnson, Christine C.; Reding, Douglas J.; O'Brien, Barbara; Carrick, Danielle M.; Wright, Patrick; Riley, Thomas L.; Purdue, Mark P.; Izmirlian, Grant; Kramer, Barnett S.; Miller, Anthony B.; Gohagan, John K.; Prorok, Philip C.; Berg, Christine D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The benefits of endoscopic testing for colorectal-cancer screening are uncertain. We evaluated the effect of screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy on colorectal-cancer incidence and mortality. Methods From 1993 through 2001, we randomly assigned 154,900 men and women 55 to 74 years of age either to screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy, with a repeat screening at 3 or 5 years, or to usual care. Cases of colorectal cancer and deaths from the disease were ascertained. Results Of the 77,445 participants randomly assigned to screening (intervention group), 83.5% underwent baseline flexible sigmoidoscopy and 54.0% were screened at 3 or 5 years. The incidence of colorectal cancer after a median follow-up of 11.9 years was 11.9 cases per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (1012 cases), as compared with 15.2 cases per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (1287 cases), which represents a 21% reduction (relative risk, 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72 to 0.85; P<0.001). Significant reductions were observed in the incidence of both distal colorectal cancer (479 cases in the intervention group vs. 669 cases in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.80; P<0.001) and proximal colorectal cancer (512 cases vs. 595 cases; relative risk, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.97; P = 0.01). There were 2.9 deaths from colorectal cancer per 10,000 person-years in the intervention group (252 deaths), as compared with 3.9 per 10,000 person-years in the usual-care group (341 deaths), which represents a 26% reduction (relative risk, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.87; P<0.001). Mortality from distal colorectal cancer was reduced by 50% (87 deaths in the intervention group vs. 175 in the usual-care group; relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.64; P<0.001); mortality from proximal colorectal cancer was unaffected (143 and 147 deaths, respectively; relative risk, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.22; P = 0.81). Conclusions Screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy was

  6. CancerCare

    MedlinePlus

    ... social worker » Cancer Care ® E-News and E-Alerts Get news and updates from Cancer Care ® right ... Hope Video Library Blog E-News and E-Alerts Calendar Resource Database Open Portals For Patients and ...

  7. CancerCare

    MedlinePlus

    ... social worker » Cancer Care ® E-News and E-Alerts Get news and updates from Cancer Care ® right ... Hope Video Library Blog E-News and E-Alerts Calendar Resource Database Open Portals For Patients and ...

  8. Your cancer survivorship care plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000822.htm Your cancer survivorship care plan To use the sharing features on this page, ... get one. What Is a Cancer Survivorship Care Plan? A cancer survivorship care plan is a document ...

  9. Cancer care in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat; Attiga, Fadwa; Mansour, Asem

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in Jordan after cardiovascular diseases. Due to increase in life expectancy and prolonged exposure to risk factors, cancer mortality and morbidity are expected to increase as the young population ages. This increase will constitute a challenging burden on healthcare systems in Jordan and many other neighboring countries. Planning is key to managing the expected rise in the demand for cancer care, and this will require public health initiatives to guarantee access to quality cancer care. Over the past decade, cancer care in Jordan has witnessed remarkable improvement through access to advanced diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we address the history of cancer care in Jordan, including cancer statistics, infrastructure, workforce as well as cancer care outcomes. We also discuss many of the challenges that we face and offer suggestions for the improvement of cancer management in Jordan and the region. Copyright © 2015 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Homeopathy in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    Homeopathy is a controversial system of care that is practiced extensively in Europe, Asia, and South America primarily for functional and minor ailments. In this review, published studies on homeopathic remedies and cancer were examined. Data were obtained from multiple research disciplines, ranging from basic science to scientifically valid animal and clinical studies. The data from a few laboratory experiments in cancer models show some beneficial effect of homeopathic remedies on selected cancer cell lines. However, in the clinical arena, this effect is not clear. Several published outcome studies and some randomized controlled trials have shown that there may be a role for homeopathy in symptom relief and improving quality of life in patients touched by cancer. Such effects have not been demonstrated unequivocally, and specific antitumor effects have not been shown in any controlled clinical research to date, which raises the need for further clinical trials to investigate the use of homeopathy in cancer care.

  11. Health care spending accounts: a flexible solution for Canadian employers.

    PubMed

    Smithies, R; Steeves, L

    1996-01-01

    Flexible benefits plans have grown more slowly in Canada than in the United States, largely because of certain legal and regulatory considerations. Health care spending accounts (HCSAs) provide a cost-effective way for Canadian employers to address the health care benefit needs of a diverse workforce. A flexible health care spending account is a versatile and cost-effective instrument that can be used by Canadian employers that wish to provide a full range of health care benefits to employees. The health care alternatives available through an HCSA can provide employees with an opportunity to customize and optimize their benefits program. Regulatory requirements that an HCSA must meet in order to qualify for available tax advantages are discussed, as are the range of health care services that may be covered.

  12. Flexible kinship: caring for AIDS orphans in rural Lesotho

    PubMed Central

    Block, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has devastated families in rural Lesotho, leaving many children orphaned. Families have adapted to the increase in the number of orphans and HIV-positive children in ways that provide children with the best possible care. Though local ideas about kinship and care are firmly rooted in patrilineal social organization, in practice, maternal caregivers, often grandmothers, are increasingly caring for orphaned children. Negotiations between affinal kin capitalize on flexible kinship practices in order to legitimate new patterns of care, which have shifted towards a model that often favours matrilocal practices of care in the context of idealized patrilineality. PMID:25866467

  13. Challenges in volunteering from cancer care volunteers perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kamaludin, Kauthar Mohamad; Muhammad, Mazanah; Wahat, Nor Wahiza Abdul; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of non-government organizations (NGOs) and support groups has helped strengthen public health services in addressing cancer care burden. Owing to the contribution of volunteers in cancer care, this article documents a qualitative study that examined challenges in attracting and retaining cancer care volunteers as part of the effort to develop a volunteer recruitment model. Data were collected through three focus group discussions involving 19 cancer support group members in Malaysia. Findings of the study revealed that mobility and locality appeared to be significant in Malaysian context, while the need for financial support and time flexibility are challenges faced by cancer support groups to attract and retain volunteers. The findings imply that cancer care initiatives can benefit from more local volunteers but at the same time these volunteers require flexibility and financial support to sustain their engagement.

  14. Hypnosis in Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Wortzel, Joshua; Spiegel, David

    2017-07-01

    Cancer affects a growing proportion of the population as survival improves. The illness and its treatment brings a substantial burden of symptoms, including pain, anxiety, insomnia, and grief. Here, the uses of hypnosis in the treatment of these cancer-related problems will be reviewed. The utility of measuring hypnotizability in the clinical setting will be discussed. The current neurobiology of hypnotizability and hypnosis will be reviewed. Methods and results of using hypnosis for pain control in acute and chronic settings will be presented. Effects of hypnotic analgesia in specific brain regions associated with pain reduction, notably the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and the somatosensory cortex, underlies its utility as a potent and side-effect free analgesic. Methods for helping those with cancer to better manage their anxiety, insomnia, and grief will be described. These involve facing disease-related stressors while dissociating the experience from somatic arousal. Given the serious complications of medications widely used to treat pain, anxiety, and insomnia, this article provides methods and an evidence base for wider use of techniques involving hypnosis in cancer care. Altering patients' perception of pain, disease-related stress, and anxiety can help change the reality of their life with cancer.

  15. A randomised controlled trial of flexibility in routine antenatal care.

    PubMed

    Jewell, D; Sharp, D; Sanders, J; Peters, T J

    2000-10-01

    To assess changes in satisfaction associated with a flexible approach to antenatal care schedules offered to women at low obstetric risk. Randomised controlled trial. Eleven primary care centres providing midwifery care in Avon. Six hundred and nine women at low risk of obstetric complications presenting for antenatal care. A standard antenatal care schedule ('traditional care') was compared with a schedule based on a minimum number of visits and additional visits with timing agreed between women and midwives ('flexible care'). Women's attitudes to pregnancy and motherhood using a subscale of the Maternal Adjustment and Maternal Attitudes scale, satisfaction with antenatal care, and perception of the speed of recognition of antenatal complications. There was no difference between the two groups in terms of attitudes to pregnancy and motherhood (mean difference on Maternal Adjustment and Maternal Attitudes scale -0.64, 95% CI -1.39 to 0.11, P = 0.068) and no difference in the proportions of women reporting antenatal problems as soon as possible (traditional group 74.5%, flexible group 76.4%, difference -2%, 95% CI -12.1 to 8.2, P = 0.70). Women receiving traditional care reported higher levels of satisfaction for the care provided by community midwives (P < 0.01). Women receiving flexible care were more likely to report having a choice over the number and timing of their antenatal visits (P < 0.001), but were also more likely to report that they would like to have been seen more often (P < 0.01). There was no difference between the groups in rates of obstetric complications. An imposed reduction in antenatal visits has been reported to increase dissatisfaction in other studies. In this study, encouraging women to adopt a flexible approach to antenatal care resulted in a similar finding. Successful implementation of such approaches may depend on more careful selection of women who welcome such an approach, more encouragement to pregnant women to express their own

  16. Ultrathin flexible bronchoscopy in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed Central

    de Blic, J; Delacourt, C; Scheinmann, P

    1991-01-01

    Thirty seven flexible bronchoscopies were performed in 33 infants in a neonatal intensive care unit, using a 2.2 mm flexible ultrathin bronchoscope. Twenty eight procedures were performed via an endotracheal tube or tracheostomy and nine in spontaneously breathing infants. Indications for endoscopy included persistent atelectasis and/or emphysema (n = 21), unexplained acute respiratory distress (n = 10), stridor (n = 3), assessment of congenital abnormalities of the tracheobronchial tree (n = 2), and follow up of an endobronchial granuloma during the course of corticosteroid treatment (n = 1). Abnormal airway dynamics and/or abnormal structure were seen in 23 of 37 cases. In 54% of the procedures, the results of bronchoscopy had a direct effect on further management. The procedure was well tolerated and completed in less than two minutes. Our results suggest that the ultrathin flexible bronchoscope improves airway exploration and the understanding of respiratory disorders during the first months of life, particularly in ventilated infants. PMID:1776881

  17. Cancer patient satisfaction with care.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, J H; Donovan, K O; Redman, S; Sanson-Fisher, R W

    1990-08-01

    A diagnosis of cancer places considerable stress on patients and requires them to make major adjustments in many areas of their lives. As a consequence, considerable demands are placed on health care providers to satisfy the complex care needs of cancer patients. Currently, there is little available information to indicate the extent to which cancer patients are satisfied with the quality of care they receive. The present study assessed the perceptions of 232 ambulatory cancer patients about the importance of and satisfaction with the following aspects of care: doctors technical competence and interpersonal and communication skills, accessibility and continuity of care, hospital and clinic care, nonmedical care, family care, and finances. The results indicate that all 60 questionnaire items used were considered to reflect important aspects of care, but that greater importance was given to the technical quality of medical care, the interpersonal and communication skills of doctors, and the accessibility of care. Most patients were satisfied with the opportunities provided to discuss their needs with doctors, the interpersonal support of doctors, and the technical competence of doctors. However, few patients were satisfied with the provision of information concerning their disease, treatment, and symptom control and the provision of care in the home and to family and friends.

  18. Cell hierarchy, metabolic flexibility and systems approaches to cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Herst, Patries M; Berridge, Michael V

    2013-01-01

    The proliferative cancer cell paradigm that has driven cancer drug development for the past 50 years has failed to generate treatments that cure most metastatic adult cancers. This view is supported not only by cumulative experience with conventional cytotoxic anticancer drugs, but also by the application of highly-targeted anticancer compounds against, for example, BCR-ABL in CML and mutant BRAF in metastatic melanoma. Such drugs often send their respective cancers into complete molecular remission but fail to effect cures because a small population of quiescent or slowly selfrenewing cancer cells that are drug and radiation resistant survive treatment indefinitely. This review explores the grounds for an emerging cancer paradigm that views cancer as a disorganized tissue with hierarchical cellular compartments in which the boudaries are less well-defined than in normal tissues with plasticity controlled by epigenetic changes mediated by the local microenvironment. Increased metabolic flexibility and adaptability give cancer cells an additional survival advantage that may be able to be targeted with drugs like metformin. Combining approaches that target the increased metabolic flexibility of cancer cells as well as ablating rapidly-proliferating cells and self-renewing cancer stem cells in individual cancers are needed to address the holy grail of cancer cure.

  19. Flexible learning to support safe, person-centred care.

    PubMed

    Rae, Ann

    2012-02-01

    Effective Practitioner is an educational initiative that supports nurses, midwives and allied health professionals to deliver person-centred, safe and effective care. It offers access to flexible work-based learning and development resources. This article describes the progress of the initiative and sets out the expected effects on service delivery, as well as exploring the Scottish context and the initiative's relevance to the rest of the UK and abroad.

  20. Your cancer care team

    MedlinePlus

    Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Nutrition during and after cancer treatment. Updated June 2016. www.eatright.org/resource/health/diseases-and-conditions/cancer/nutrition-during-and-after-cancer-treatment . Accessed July 15, ...

  1. Palliative care in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Suhatno

    2000-05-01

    1. Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer in females and also the most frequent among female genital cancers. 2. Ever though the modality of diagnostic procedures for early detection has improved, in fact most of the patients present in the late stages, so the disease is already incurable, and palliative care is really needed. 3. Palliative care is needed not only for the terminally ill patients, but can be started at the time the cancer is diagnosed. 4. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach requiring teamwork. 5. Palliative care in Indonesia, especially in Dr. Soetomo Hospital, is a new modality in the fight against cancer, so we suffer many disadvantages, e.g., disability, limitation, lack of experience. However, such problems will stimulate the team to learn more.

  2. Postacute Care in Cancer Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Fu, Jack B; Guo, Hong; Camp, Jennifer; Shin, Ki Y; Tu, Shi-Ming; Palmer, Lynn J; Yadav, Rajesh

    2017-02-01

    Acute care is usually associated with disease progression, treatments for cancer, and medical comorbidities. Patients with cancer may develop sudden functional deficits that require rehabilitation. Some of these patients benefit from acute rehabilitation, others benefit from subacute rehabilitation. After acute rehabilitation, continuous care for these patients has not been well described. Three studies are presented to demonstrate that cancer rehabilitation is a continuous process. Rehabilitation professionals should know how to detect fall risk, monitor symptoms, and render symptom management. Patients with cancer often require rehabilitation services during their entire disease trajectory.

  3. Flexible 16 Antenna Array for Microwave Breast Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Bahramiabarghouei, Hadi; Porter, Emily; Santorelli, Adam; Gosselin, Benoit; Popović, Milica; Rusch, Leslie A

    2015-10-01

    Radar-based microwave imaging has been widely studied for breast cancer detection in recent times. Sensing dielectric property differences of tissues has been studied over a wide frequency band for this application. We design single- and dual-polarization antennas for wireless ultrawideband breast cancer detection systems using an inhomogeneous multilayer model of the human breast. Antennas made from flexible materials are more easily adapted to wearable applications. Miniaturized flexible monopole and spiral antennas on a 50-μm Kapton polyimide are designed, using a high-frequency structure simulator, to be in contact with biological breast tissues. The proposed antennas are designed to operate in a frequency range of 2-4 GHz (with reflection coefficient (S11) below -10 dB). Measurements show that the flexible antennas have good impedance matching when in different positions with different curvature around the breast. Our miniaturized flexible antennas are 20 mm × 20 mm. Furthermore, two flexible conformal 4 × 4 ultrawideband antenna arrays (single and dual polarization), in a format similar to that of a bra, were developed for a radar-based breast cancer detection system. By using a reflector for the arrays, the penetration of the propagated electromagnetic waves from the antennas into the breast can be improved by factors of 3.3 and 2.6, respectively.

  4. Colorectal cancer detection with the 60 cm flexible sigmoidoscope in a solo general internist's office.

    PubMed

    Yao, Y

    1988-10-01

    Emphasis is placed on the importance of early detection of colorectal cancer by the primary care physician using the 60 cm flexible sigmoidoscope. A training format for this procedure is proposed. The author, trained according to this format, found 49 polyps and three carcinomas among his first 365 randomly chosen patients. Of these 317 (87%) were asymptomatic, having no risk factors. The average distance of insertion was 53 cm and the average examination time was 20 minutes. The calculated cost for these 365 patients was approximately +60,000, and the estimated average cost for a potentially curable colorectal cancer detection was approximately +20,000. Although a relatively long examination time may be necessary for the beginner, the author concludes that the primary care physician can be readily trained to handle the 60 cm flexible sigmoidoscope safely and cost effectively.

  5. Point-of-Care Test Equipment for Flexible Laboratory Automation.

    PubMed

    You, Won Suk; Park, Jae Jun; Jin, Sung Moon; Ryew, Sung Moo; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol

    2014-08-01

    Blood tests are some of the core clinical laboratory tests for diagnosing patients. In hospitals, an automated process called total laboratory automation, which relies on a set of sophisticated equipment, is normally adopted for blood tests. Noting that the total laboratory automation system typically requires a large footprint and significant amount of power, slim and easy-to-move blood test equipment is necessary for specific demands such as emergency departments or small-size local clinics. In this article, we present a point-of-care test system that can provide flexibility and portability with low cost. First, the system components, including a reagent tray, dispensing module, microfluidic disk rotor, and photometry scanner, and their functions are explained. Then, a scheduler algorithm to provide a point-of-care test platform with an efficient test schedule to reduce test time is introduced. Finally, the results of diagnostic tests are presented to evaluate the system. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  6. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

    PubMed

    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2017-10-09

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  7. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  8. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  9. Palliative Care in Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approvals Annual Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Contact Overview & Mission History of NCI Contributing to ...

  10. Spirituality in childhood cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nádia Nara Rolim; do Nascimento, Vânia Barbosa; de Carvalho, Sionara Melo Figueiredo; Neto, Modesto Leite Rolim; Moreira, Marcial Moreno; Brasil, Aline Quental; Junior, Francisco Telésforo Celestino; de Oliveira, Gislene Farias; Reis, Alberto Olavo Advíncula

    2013-01-01

    To deal with the suffering caused by childhood cancer, patients and their families use different coping strategies, among which, spirituality appears a way of minimizing possible damage. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of spirituality in childhood cancer care, involving biopsychosocial aspects of the child, the family, and the health care team facing the disease. To accomplish this purpose, a nonsystematic review of literature of articles on national and international electronic databases (Scientific Electronic Library Online [SciELO], PubMed, and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS]) was conducted using the search terms “spirituality,” “child psychology,” “child,” and “cancer,” as well as on other available resources. After the search, 20 articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final sample. Our review showed that the relation between spirituality and health has lately become a subject of growing interest among researchers, as a positive influence of spirituality in the people’s welfare was noted. Studies that were retrieved using the mentioned search strategy in electronic databases, independently assessed by the authors according to the systematic review, showed that spirituality emerges as a driving force that helps pediatric patients and their families in coping with cancer. Health care workers have been increasingly attentive to this dimension of care. However, it is necessary to improve their knowledge regarding the subject. The search highlighted that spirituality is considered a source of comfort and hope, contributing to a better acceptance of his/her chronic condition by the child with cancer, as well as by the family. Further up-to-date studies facing the subject are, thus, needed. It is also necessary to better train health care practitioners, so as to provide humanized care to the child with cancer. PMID:24133371

  11. Prediction models in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Prediction is ubiquitous across the spectrum of cancer care from screening to hospice. Indeed, oncology is often primarily a prediction problem; many of the early stage cancers cause no symptoms, and treatment is recommended because of a prediction that tumor progression would ultimately threaten a patient's quality of life or survival. Recent years have seen attempts to formalize risk prediction in cancer care. In place of qualitative and implicit prediction algorithms, such as cancer stage, researchers have developed statistical prediction tools that provide a quantitative estimate of the probability of a specific event for an individual patient. Prediction models generally have greater accuracy than reliance on stage or risk groupings, can incorporate novel predictors such as genomic data, and can be used more rationally to make treatment decisions. Several prediction models are now widely used in clinical practice, including the Gail model for breast cancer incidence or the Adjuvant! Online prediction model for breast cancer recurrence. Given the burgeoning complexity of diagnostic and prognostic information, there is simply no realistic alternative to incorporating multiple variables into a single prediction model. As such, the question should not be whether but how prediction models should be used to aid decision-making. Key issues will be integration of models into the electronic health record and more careful evaluation of models, particularly with respect to their effects on clinical outcomes.

  12. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Flexible Endoscopy for Laryngeal Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Regeling, Bianca; Thies, Boris; Gerstner, Andreas O H; Westermann, Stephan; Müller, Nina A; Bendix, Jörg; Laffers, Wiebke

    2016-08-13

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is increasingly gaining acceptance in the medical field. Up until now, HSI has been used in conjunction with rigid endoscopy to detect cancer in vivo. The logical next step is to pair HSI with flexible endoscopy, since it improves access to hard-to-reach areas. While the flexible endoscope's fiber optic cables provide the advantage of flexibility, they also introduce an interfering honeycomb-like pattern onto images. Due to the substantial impact this pattern has on locating cancerous tissue, it must be removed before the HS data can be further processed. Thereby, the loss of information is to minimize avoiding the suppression of small-area variations of pixel values. We have developed a system that uses flexible endoscopy to record HS cubes of the larynx and designed a special filtering technique to remove the honeycomb-like pattern with minimal loss of information. We have confirmed its feasibility by comparing it to conventional filtering techniques using an objective metric and by applying unsupervised and supervised classifications to raw and pre-processed HS cubes. Compared to conventional techniques, our method successfully removes the honeycomb-like pattern and considerably improves classification performance, while preserving image details.

  13. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Flexible Endoscopy for Laryngeal Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Regeling, Bianca; Thies, Boris; Gerstner, Andreas O. H.; Westermann, Stephan; Müller, Nina A.; Bendix, Jörg; Laffers, Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is increasingly gaining acceptance in the medical field. Up until now, HSI has been used in conjunction with rigid endoscopy to detect cancer in vivo. The logical next step is to pair HSI with flexible endoscopy, since it improves access to hard-to-reach areas. While the flexible endoscope’s fiber optic cables provide the advantage of flexibility, they also introduce an interfering honeycomb-like pattern onto images. Due to the substantial impact this pattern has on locating cancerous tissue, it must be removed before the HS data can be further processed. Thereby, the loss of information is to minimize avoiding the suppression of small-area variations of pixel values. We have developed a system that uses flexible endoscopy to record HS cubes of the larynx and designed a special filtering technique to remove the honeycomb-like pattern with minimal loss of information. We have confirmed its feasibility by comparing it to conventional filtering techniques using an objective metric and by applying unsupervised and supervised classifications to raw and pre-processed HS cubes. Compared to conventional techniques, our method successfully removes the honeycomb-like pattern and considerably improves classification performance, while preserving image details. PMID:27529255

  14. Reviewing Cancer Care Team Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, Stephen H.; Weaver, Sallie; Salas, Eduardo; Chollette, Veronica; Edwards, Heather M.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Kosty, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The management of cancer varies across its type, stage, and natural history. This necessitates involvement of a variety of individuals and groups across a number of provider types. Evidence from other fields suggests that a team-based approach helps organize and optimize tasks that involve individuals and groups, but team effectiveness has not been fully evaluated in oncology-related care. Methods: We undertook a systematic review of literature published between 2009 and 2014 to identify studies of all teams with clear membership, a comparator group, and patient-level metrics of cancer care. When those teams included two or more people with specialty training relevant to the care of patients with cancer, we called them multidisciplinary care teams (MDTs). After reviews and exclusions, 16 studies were thoroughly evaluated: two addressing screening and diagnosis, 11 addressing treatment, two addressing palliative care, and one addressing end-of-life care. The studies included a variety of end points (eg, adherence to quality indicators, patient satisfaction with care, mortality). Results: Teams for screening and its follow-up improved screening use and reduced time to follow-up colonoscopy after an abnormal screen. Discussion of cases within MDTs improved the planning of therapy, adherence to recommended preoperative assessment, pain control, and adherence to medications. We did not see convincing evidence that MDTs affect patient survival or cost of care, or studies of how or which MDT processes and structures were associated with success. Conclusion: Further research should focus on the association between team processes and structures, efficiency in delivery of care, and mortality. PMID:25873056

  15. [Bereavement Care in Cancer].

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideki; Ishida, Mayumi; Tanahashi, Iori

    2015-01-01

    Bereavement may become the most severe stressor in the lives of bereaved families, and it has a variety of influences on their psychological and physical aspects. Physical effects include worsening of physical conditions and an increase in the mortality, and psychological ones include increases in the suicide rate and morbidity of depression. Bereavement also has a social influence, such as causing changes in relationships. Therefore, it is necessary to provide bereaved families requiring support with appropriate intervention. Since bereaved families experience various types of distress, assessment of grief-related problems alone is inadequate. It is essential to assess the psychological, physical, social, and other aspects of bereaved families. Intervention can be expressed using the concept of postvention. There are various types of intervention : from care provided by non-specialists to psychiatric treatment provided by mental care specialists. Although bereavement is the strongest risk factor for depression, depressive symptoms following bereavement are often overlooked. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to such depression. Support is provided by not only health care professionals but also the general public in society, and it is essential to obtain knowledge of bereavement care in society. It should be noted that support not based on established knowledge may have an adverse effect on bereaved families (unhelpful support).

  16. Flexibility as a Management Principle in Dementia Care: The Adards Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Bester, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Flexibility is an essential ingredient of person-centered care. We illustrate the potential impact of flexibility by portraying a nursing home that uses flexibility in its approach to residents and staff members. Designs and Methods: The paper describes the management strategies, principles, and environmental features used by the Adards…

  17. Flexibility as a Management Principle in Dementia Care: The Adards Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Bester, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Flexibility is an essential ingredient of person-centered care. We illustrate the potential impact of flexibility by portraying a nursing home that uses flexibility in its approach to residents and staff members. Designs and Methods: The paper describes the management strategies, principles, and environmental features used by the Adards…

  18. Continuing care after cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Pateman, Brian; Wilson, Kate; McHugh, Gretl; Luker, Karen A

    2003-10-01

    Despite nearly three decades of debate and policy guidance there is evidence that, in the United Kingdom, patient hospital discharge remains problematic. District nurses, who deliver skilled home nursing care, receive referrals from hospitals for continuing nursing care needs. However, district nurses' expectations of appropriate patient referral from hospitals are not always achieved. In an attempt to improve services after hospital discharge, government policy has emphasized partnership between care providers, highlighting the need for smooth transition between care settings. To explore hospital discharge and referral procedures for patients with cancer, with particular emphasis on referrals made by hospital nurses to district nurses. In-depth interviews were carried out with nurses actively involved in the discharge process as both referrers and recipients of referrals. Twenty nurses from a regional cancer centre and 20 district nurses from three adjacent primary care trusts were interviewed. Interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically, and themes compared between the two care settings. We conclude that competing sets of expectations, not only between hospital and community nursing settings, but amongst district nurses themselves, are a major factor impeding agreement on referral criteria and satisfaction with the referral process.

  19. Cannabis in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I; Guzman, M

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis has been used in medicine for thousands of years prior to achieving its current illicit substance status. Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, mimic the effects of the endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), activating specific cannabinoid receptors, particularly CB1 found predominantly in the central nervous system and CB2 found predominantly in cells involved with immune function. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main bioactive cannabinoid in the plant, has been available as a prescription medication approved for treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and anorexia associated with the AIDS wasting syndrome. Cannabinoids may be of benefit in the treatment of cancer-related pain, possibly synergistic with opioid analgesics. Cannabinoids have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that they may be worthy of study in patients with other neuropathic symptoms. Cannabinoids have a favorable drug safety profile, but their medical use is predominantly limited by their psychoactive effects and their limited bioavailability. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  20. Controversies in terminal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Diehl, V

    1994-03-01

    In the long term, about 75% of all cancer patients will need palliative care, but the curricula in courses of study leading to qualifications in the caring professions take no account of this, being concerned exclusively with curative strategies. Precise definition of palliative care as a medical discipline is needed, followed by an insistence on proper funding and instruction. In addition, palliation should be integrated into the early stages of patient contact, e.g., prevention, diagnosis, treatment planning, and not only implemented when attempts at curative therapy have failed. Public and political awareness must be promoted; in particular it should be recognized that the care givers themselves need support. There is a growing need for well-run hospices with purpose-trained staff. While "mercy killing" might be considered out of charity and humanity, the death of a terminally ill patient should be neither hastened nor postponed.

  1. Straight to flexible sigmoidoscopy: rationalization of 2-week wait referrals in suspected colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, D G; Murphy, J H; Boyle, K M; Hemingway, D M

    2015-11-01

    The 2-week wait pathway was designed to decrease the time from presentation to primary care of patients with 'red flag' symptoms of suspected cancer for review by a specialist for the diagnosis or exclusion of cancer. In our tertiary referral centre we have found that 968 colonoscopies per year are required to satisfy the demand for the 2-week wait, leading to limited colonoscopy availability for other services. We sought to determine the yield of colorectal cancer found at colonoscopy referred via the 2-week wait and referenced to the original red flag symptoms. This was in order to select the most efficacious alternative primary investigation based upon presenting symptoms. Electronic records were retrospectively analysed. All patients who went through the 2-week wait for suspicion of colorectal cancer in 2013 and were found to have colorectal cancer on colonoscopy were included. Patients not undergoing colonoscopy as the first investigation were excluded. The splenic flexure was deemed to be within the range of a flexible sigmoidoscope. In all, 2950 referrals were made. 968 colonoscopies were performed as the primary investigation of which 35 were found to have colorectal cancer. No patients referred with rectal bleeding and another symptom had a tumour more proximal to the range of flexible sigmoidoscopy. 80% of tumours proximal to the splenic flexure were suitable for CT diagnosis alone. Our data support the use of flexible sigmoidoscopy alone as an initial investigation for patients presenting with rectal bleeding with or without additional colorectal symptoms. Patients with anaemia (without bleeding) or change in bowel habit (without bleeding) may be investigated with CT colonography alone; colonoscopy may then be used selectively prior to surgery. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  2. Translating genomics in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Bombard, Yvonne; Bach, Peter B; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    There is increasing enthusiasm for genomics and its promise in advancing personalized medicine. Genomic information has been used to personalize health care for decades, spanning the fields of cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, endocrinology, metabolic medicine, and hematology. However, oncology has often been the first test bed for the clinical translation of genomics for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Notable hereditary cancer examples include testing for mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in unaffected women to identify those at significantly elevated risk for developing breast and ovarian cancers, and screening patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer for mutations in 4 mismatch repair genes to reduce morbidity and mortality in their relatives. Somatic genomic testing is also increasingly used in oncology, with gene expression profiling of breast tumors and EGFR testing to predict treatment response representing commonly used examples. Health technology assessment provides a rigorous means to inform clinical and policy decision-making through systematic assessment of the evidentiary base, along with precepts of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and consideration of risks and benefits for health care delivery and society. Although this evaluation is a fundamental step in the translation of any new therapeutic, procedure, or diagnostic test into clinical care, emerging developments may threaten this standard. These include "direct to consumer" genomic risk assessment services and the challenges posed by incidental results generated from next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. This article presents a review of the evidentiary standards and knowledge base supporting the translation of key cancer genomic technologies along the continuum of validity, utility, cost-effectiveness, health service impacts, and ethical and societal issues, and offers future research considerations to guide the responsible introduction of

  3. Sexual minority cancer survivors' satisfaction with care.

    PubMed

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Kamen, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Satisfaction with care is important to cancer survivors' health outcomes. Satisfaction with care is not equal for all cancer survivors, and sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) cancer survivors may experience poor satisfaction with care. Data were drawn from the 2010 LIVESTRONG national survey. The final sample included 207 sexual minority cancer survivors and 4,899 heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care was compared by sexual orientation, and a Poisson regression model was computed to test the associations between sexual orientation and satisfaction with care, controlling for other relevant variables. Sexual minority cancer survivors had lower satisfaction with care than did heterosexual cancer survivors (B = -0.12, SE = 0.04, Wald χ(2) = 9.25, p< .002), even controlling for demographic and clinical variables associated with care. Sexual minorities experience poorer satisfaction with care compared to heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care is especially relevant to cancer survivorship in light of the cancer-related health disparities reported among sexual minority cancer survivors.

  4. Regional Multiteam Systems in Cancer Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Monson, John R.T.; Rizvi, Irfan; Savastano, Ann; Green, James S.A.; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Teamwork is essential for addressing many of the challenges that arise in the coordination and delivery of cancer care, especially for the problems that are presented by patients who cross geographic boundaries and enter and exit multiple health care systems at various times during their cancer care journeys. The problem of coordinating the care of patients with cancer is further complicated by the growing number of treatment options and modalities, incompatibilities among the vast variety of technology platforms that have recently been adopted by the health care industry, and competing and misaligned incentives for providers and systems. Here we examine the issue of regional care coordination in cancer through the prism of a real patient journey. This article will synthesize and elaborate on existing knowledge about coordination approaches for complex systems, in particular, in general and cancer care multidisciplinary teams; define elements of coordination derived from organizational psychology and human factors research that are applicable to team-based cancer care delivery; and suggest approaches for improving multidisciplinary team coordination in regional cancer care delivery and avenues for future research. The phenomenon of the mobile, multisystem patient represents a growing challenge in cancer care. Paradoxically, development of high-quality, high-volume centers of excellence and the ease of virtual communication and data sharing by using electronic medical records have introduced significant barriers to effective team-based cancer care. These challenges urgently require solutions. PMID:27650833

  5. Regional Multiteam Systems in Cancer Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Rizvi, Irfan; Savastano, Ann; Green, James S A; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-11-01

    Teamwork is essential for addressing many of the challenges that arise in the coordination and delivery of cancer care, especially for the problems that are presented by patients who cross geographic boundaries and enter and exit multiple health care systems at various times during their cancer care journeys. The problem of coordinating the care of patients with cancer is further complicated by the growing number of treatment options and modalities, incompatibilities among the vast variety of technology platforms that have recently been adopted by the health care industry, and competing and misaligned incentives for providers and systems. Here we examine the issue of regional care coordination in cancer through the prism of a real patient journey. This article will synthesize and elaborate on existing knowledge about coordination approaches for complex systems, in particular, in general and cancer care multidisciplinary teams; define elements of coordination derived from organizational psychology and human factors research that are applicable to team-based cancer care delivery; and suggest approaches for improving multidisciplinary team coordination in regional cancer care delivery and avenues for future research. The phenomenon of the mobile, multisystem patient represents a growing challenge in cancer care. Paradoxically, development of high-quality, high-volume centers of excellence and the ease of virtual communication and data sharing by using electronic medical records have introduced significant barriers to effective team-based cancer care. These challenges urgently require solutions.

  6. Flexible compensation of uniparental care: female poison frogs take over when males disappear.

    PubMed

    Ringler, Eva; Pašukonis, Andrius; Fitch, W Tecumseh; Huber, Ludwig; Hödl, Walter; Ringler, Max

    2015-01-01

    Parental care systems are shaped by costs and benefits to each sex of investing into current versus future progeny. Flexible compensatory parental care is mainly known in biparental species, particularly where parental desertion or reduction of care by 1 parent is common. The other parent can then compensate this loss by either switching parental roles and/or by increasing its own parental effort. In uniparental species, desertion of the caregiver usually leads to total brood loss. In the poison frog, Allobates femoralis, obligatory tadpole transport (TT) is generally performed by males, whereas females abandon their clutches after oviposition. Nevertheless, in a natural population we previously observed 7.8% of TT performed by females, which we could link to the absence of the respective fathers. In the following experiment, under laboratory conditions, all tested A. femoralis females flexibly took over parental duties, but only when their mates were removed. Our findings provide clear evidence for compensatory flexibility in a species with unisexual parental care. Contrary to the view of amphibian parental care as being stereotypical and fixed, these results demonstrate behavioral flexibility as an adaptive response to environmental and social uncertainty. Behavioral flexibility might actually represent a crucial step in the evolutionary transition from uniparental to biparental care in poison frogs. We suspect that across animal species flexible parental roles are much more common than previously thought and suggest the idea of a 3-dimensional continuum regarding flexibility, parental involvement, and timing, when thinking about the evolution of parental care.

  7. Flexible compensation of uniparental care: female poison frogs take over when males disappear

    PubMed Central

    Pašukonis, Andrius; Fitch, W. Tecumseh; Huber, Ludwig; Hödl, Walter; Ringler, Max

    2015-01-01

    Parental care systems are shaped by costs and benefits to each sex of investing into current versus future progeny. Flexible compensatory parental care is mainly known in biparental species, particularly where parental desertion or reduction of care by 1 parent is common. The other parent can then compensate this loss by either switching parental roles and/or by increasing its own parental effort. In uniparental species, desertion of the caregiver usually leads to total brood loss. In the poison frog, Allobates femoralis, obligatory tadpole transport (TT) is generally performed by males, whereas females abandon their clutches after oviposition. Nevertheless, in a natural population we previously observed 7.8% of TT performed by females, which we could link to the absence of the respective fathers. In the following experiment, under laboratory conditions, all tested A. femoralis females flexibly took over parental duties, but only when their mates were removed. Our findings provide clear evidence for compensatory flexibility in a species with unisexual parental care. Contrary to the view of amphibian parental care as being stereotypical and fixed, these results demonstrate behavioral flexibility as an adaptive response to environmental and social uncertainty. Behavioral flexibility might actually represent a crucial step in the evolutionary transition from uniparental to biparental care in poison frogs. We suspect that across animal species flexible parental roles are much more common than previously thought and suggest the idea of a 3-dimensional continuum regarding flexibility, parental involvement, and timing, when thinking about the evolution of parental care. PMID:26167099

  8. Sexual Minority Cancer Survivors’ Satisfaction with Care

    PubMed Central

    Jabson, Jennifer; Kamen, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Satisfaction with care is important to cancer survivors’ health outcomes. Satisfaction with care is not equal for all cancer survivors and sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) cancer survivors may experience poor satisfaction with care. Methods Data were drawn from the 2010 LIVESTRONG national survey. The final sample included 207 sexual minority and 4,899 heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care was compared by sexual orientation and a Poisson regression model was computed to test the associations between sexual orientation and satisfaction with care, controlling for other relevant variables. Results Sexual minority cancer survivors had lower satisfaction with care than heterosexual cancer survivors (B=−0.12, SE=0.04, Wald χ2=9.25, p<0.002), even controlling for demographic and clinical variables associated with care. Conclusions Sexual minorities experience poorer satisfaction with care compared to heterosexual cancer survivors. Clinical Implications: Satisfaction with care is especially relevant to cancer survivorship in light of the cancer-related health disparities reported among sexual minority cancer survivors. PMID:26577277

  9. Integrating yoga into cancer care.

    PubMed

    DiStasio, Susan A

    2008-02-01

    Although yoga has been practiced in Eastern culture for thousands of years as part of life philosophy, classes in the United States only recently have been offered to people with cancer. The word yoga is derived from the Sanskrit root yuj, meaning to bind, join, and yoke. This reflection of the union of the body, mind, and spirit is what differentiates yoga from general exercise programs. Yoga classes in the United States generally consist of asanas (postures), which are designed to exercise every muscle, nerve, and gland in the body. The postures are combined with pranayama, or rhythmic control of the breath. As a complementary therapy, yoga integrates awareness of breath, relaxation, exercise, and social support--elements that are key to enhancing quality of life in patients with cancer. Yoga practice may assist cancer survivors in managing symptoms such as depression, anxiety, insomnia, pain, and fatigue. As with all exercise programs, participants need to be aware of potential risks and their own limitations. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with yoga as a complementary therapy, including current research findings, types of yoga, potential benefits, safety concerns, teacher training, and ways to integrate yoga into cancer care.

  10. Severe Obesity in Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Streu, Erin

    2016-05-01

    Increasing weight and body fat composition has an impact on cancer detection and staging. Obese women are less likely to engage in breast and cervical screening practices. Excessive adipose tissue makes physical assessment more difficult, and patients with a BMI greater than 35 kg/m2 may have deeper and wider pelvic structures, which make internal examinations problematic. A retrospective review of 324 primary surgical patients found that patients with a BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 are seven times less likely to undergo complete surgical staging for endometrial cancer compared with individuals with a BMI less than 40 kg/m2. In addition, healthcare provider bias against the need for screening, feelings of discomfort and embarrassment, as well as patient's fears of guilt, humiliation, and shame pose significant barriers to addressing the issue of obesity in clinical care with patients and family members. 
.

  11. Survivorship and Supportive Care - Cancer Currents Blog

    Cancer.gov

    A catalog of posts from NCI’s Cancer Currents blog on research related to survivorship and supportive care. Includes posts on the physical, psychosocial, and economic issues faced by cancer survivors and their caregivers.

  12. Coping - Care for Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Cancer.gov

    Survivorship care for children who have been treated for cancer is important. Get your child's treatment summary, survivorship plan, and recommendations on follow-up care clinics. Learn about long-term and late effects.

  13. Coping with Cancer - Survivorship Care for Children

    Cancer.gov

    Survivorship care for children who have been treated for cancer is important. Get your child's treatment summary, survivorship plan, and recommendation on follow-up care clinics. Learn about long-term and late effects.

  14. Integrating oral health throughout cancer care.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Erin

    2015-10-01

    Oral health is often not a priority during cancer treatment; however, patients with cancer are at increased risk for oral complications during and after treatment. This article focuses on the importance of oral health care before, during, and after cancer treatment using the head, eyes, ears, nose, oral cavity, and throat, or HEENOT, approach. AT A GLANCE: Oral health is linked to overall health, and healthcare providers must be cognizant of the oral-systemic connection with patients undergoing cancer treatment, which may cause acute and chronic oral health problems. 
Oral assessment, prevention, early recognition, and treatment of oral problems must be incorporated into cancer care, particularly with the aid of an interprofessional team to meet patients' oral care needs. 
The head, eyes, ears, nose, oral cavity, and throat, or HEENOT, approach integrates oral care into patients' history taking, physical examination, and plan of cancer care.
.

  15. Breast cancer risk assessment in primary care.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shannon Lynn; Kartoz, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer (when excluding skin cancers) in women and the second most common cause of cancer death in women, with a lifetime prevalence of 12.5% (, ; ). Breast cancer screening reduces risk of cancer death, thereby increasing rate of survival to up to 89% for women with stage 1 and 2 breast cancer (; ). Despite these data, undue harm may occur with unnecessary screening because overidentification of risk, and excessive, costly biopsies may result. Costs and benefits of screening must be weighed. Nurses at all levels can play a pivotal role in promotion of appropriate breast cancer screening and subsequently breast cancer prevention by using accurate screening tools, such as the Tyrer-Cuzick model. Although there are some limitations with this tool, screening at the primary care level has demonstrated improved clinical outcomes (). Its use can help nurses accurately assess a woman's breast cancer risk, by promoting appropriate screening at the primary care level ().

  16. Understanding Fragmentation of Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Skolarus, Ted A.; Zhang, Yun; Hollenbeck, Brent K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancer survivors are particularly prone to the effects of a fragmented health care delivery system. The implications of fragmented cancer care across providers likely include greater spending and worse quality of care. For this reason, the authors measured relations between increasing fragmentation of cancer care, expenditures, and quality of care among prostate cancer survivors. METHODS A total of 67,736 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1992 and 2005 were identified using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data. Using the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index and a measure of the average number of prostate cancer providers over time, patients were sorted into 3 fragmentation groups (low, intermediate, and high). The authors then examined annual per capita survivorship expenditures and a measure of quality (ie, repetitive prostate-specific antigen [PSA] testing within 30 days) according to their fragmentation exposure using multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS Patients with highly fragmented cancer care tended to be younger, white, and of higher socioeconomic status (all P < .001). Prostate cancer survivorship interventions were most common among patients with the highest fragmentation of care across providers (P < .001). After adjustment for clinical characteristics and prostate cancer survivorship interventions, higher degrees of fragmentation continued to be associated with repetitive PSA testing (13.6% for high vs 7.0% for low fragmentation; P < .001) and greater spending, particularly among patients not treated with androgen deprivation therapy. CONCLUSIONS Fragmented prostate cancer survivorship care is expensive and associated with potentially unnecessary services. Efforts to improve care coordination via current policy initiatives, electronic medical records, and the implementation of cancer survivorship tools may help to decrease fragmentation of care and mitigate downstream consequences for prostate cancer

  17. Primary care physician use across the breast cancer care continuum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Lofters, Aisha; Moineddin, Rahim; Decker, Kathleen; Groome, Patti; Kendell, Cynthia; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Li, Dongdong; McBride, Mary L.; Mittmann, Nicole; Porter, Geoff; Turner, Donna; Urquhart, Robin; Winget, Marcy; Zhang, Yang; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe primary care physician (PCP) use and continuity of PCP care across the breast cancer care continuum. Design Population-based, retrospective cohort study using provincial cancer registries linked to health administrative databases. Setting British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. Participants All women with incident invasive breast cancer from 2007 to 2012 in Manitoba and Ontario and from 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia. Main outcome measures The number and proportions of visits to PCPs were determined. Continuity of care was measured using the Usual Provider of Care index calculated as the proportion of visits to the most-often-visited PCP in the 6 to 30 months before a breast cancer diagnosis (baseline) and from 1 to 3 years following a breast cancer diagnosis (survivorship). Results More than three-quarters of patients visited their PCPs 2 or more times during the breast cancer diagnostic period, and more than 80% of patients had at least 1 PCP visit during breast cancer adjuvant treatment. Contact with the PCP decreased over time during breast cancer survivorship. Of the 3 phases, women appeared to be most likely to not have PCP contact during adjuvant treatment, with 10.7% (Ontario) to 18.7% (British Columbia) of women having no PCP visits during this phase. However, a sizable minority of women had at least monthly visits during the treatment phase, particularly in Manitoba and Ontario, where approximately a quarter of women saw a PCP at least monthly. We observed higher continuity of care with PCPs in survivorship (compared with baseline) in all provinces. Conclusion Primary care physicians were generally involved throughout the breast cancer care continuum, but the level of involvement varied across care phases and by province. Future interventions will aim to further integrate primary and oncology care. PMID:27737994

  18. Improving Modern Cancer Care Through Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Steven B.; Wagner, Edward H.; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; Tuzzio, Leah; Greene, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer care system is increasingly complex, marked by multiple hand-offs between primary care and specialty providers, inadequate communication among providers, and lack of clarity about a “medical home” (the ideal accountable care provider) for cancer patients. Patients and families often cite such difficulties as information deficits, uncoordinated care, and insufficient psychosocial support. This article presents a review of the challenges of delivering well coordinated, patient-centered cancer care in a complex modern healthcare system. An examination is made of the potential role of information technology (IT) advances to help both providers and patients. Using the published literature as background, a review is provided of selected work that is underway to improve communication, coordination, and quality of care. Also discussed are additional challenges and opportunities to advancing understanding of how patient data, provider and patient involvement, and informatics innovations can support high-quality cancer care. PMID:21521595

  19. Best practice in colorectal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Claire

    Nurses need up-to-date knowledge of colorectal cancer. This article provides an overview of the aetiology and risk factors for this disease, diagnostic and staging investigations, treatment options and future care. Managing colorectal cancer is complex. Patients can have a range of healthcare needs. Nurses play an increasingly important role in informing, supporting and coordinating care to improve patients' quality of life.

  20. Polyaniline modified flexible conducting paper for cancer detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Saurabh; Sen, Anindita; Kumar, Suveen; Augustine, Shine; Malhotra, Bansi D.; Yadav, Birendra K.; Mishra, Sandeep

    2016-05-16

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a flexible, disposable, and label free biosensing platform for detection of the cancer biomarker (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). Polyaniline (PANI) has been electrochemically deposited over gold sputtered paper (Au@paper) for covalent immobilization of monoclonal carcinoembryonic antibodies (anti-CEA). The bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been used for blocking nonspecific binding sites at the anti-CEA conjugated PANI/Au@Paper. The PANI/Au@Paper, anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper, and BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper platforms have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance techniques. The results of the electrochemical response studies indicate that this BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@paper electrode has sensitivity of 13.9 μA ng{sup −1} ml cm{sup 2}, shelf life of 22 days, and can be used to estimate CEA in the range of 2–20 ng ml{sup −1}. This paper sensor has been validated by detection of CEA in serum samples of cancer patients via immunoassay technique.

  1. Polyaniline modified flexible conducting paper for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Sen, Anindita; Kumar, Suveen; Augustine, Shine; Yadav, Birendra K.; Mishra, Sandeep; Malhotra, Bansi D.

    2016-05-01

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a flexible, disposable, and label free biosensing platform for detection of the cancer biomarker (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). Polyaniline (PANI) has been electrochemically deposited over gold sputtered paper (Au@paper) for covalent immobilization of monoclonal carcinoembryonic antibodies (anti-CEA). The bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been used for blocking nonspecific binding sites at the anti-CEA conjugated PANI/Au@Paper. The PANI/Au@Paper, anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper, and BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper platforms have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance techniques. The results of the electrochemical response studies indicate that this BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@paper electrode has sensitivity of 13.9 μA ng-1 ml cm2, shelf life of 22 days, and can be used to estimate CEA in the range of 2-20 ng ml-1. This paper sensor has been validated by detection of CEA in serum samples of cancer patients via immunoassay technique.

  2. Office Home Care Workers' Occupational Health: Associations with Workplace Flexibility and Worker Insecurity

    PubMed Central

    Zeytinoglu, Isik U.; Denton, Margaret; Davies, Sharon; Plenderleith, Jennifer Millen

    2009-01-01

    Office home care workers provide support to visiting staff, although their work tends to be invisible in many respects. This paper focuses on managers, supervisors, coor dinators, case managers and office administrative staff in home care. We examine the effects of workplace flexibility and worker insecurity on office home care workers' occupational health, particularly their self-reported stress and musculoskeletal disorders. Data come from our survey of 300 home care office staff in a mid-sized city in Ontario. Results show that workers' perceptions of insecurity are positively associated with musculoskeletal disorders but not workplace flexibility measures. We recommend that managers and other decision-makers in the home care field pay attention to the perceptions of workers' insecurity in initiating workplace flexibility measures. PMID:20436813

  3. Office home care workers' occupational health: associations with workplace flexibility and worker insecurity.

    PubMed

    Zeytinoglu, Isik U; Denton, Margaret; Davies, Sharon; Plenderleith, Jennifer Millen

    2009-05-01

    Office home care workers provide support to visiting staff, although their work tends to be invisible in many respects. This paper focuses on managers, supervisors, coor dinators, case managers and office administrative staff in home care. We examine the effects of workplace flexibility and worker insecurity on office home care workers' occupational health, particularly their self-reported stress and musculoskeletal disorders. Data come from our survey of 300 home care office staff in a mid-sized city in Ontario. Results show that workers' perceptions of insecurity are positively associated with musculoskeletal disorders but not workplace flexibility measures. We recommend that managers and other decision-makers in the home care field pay attention to the perceptions of workers' insecurity in initiating workplace flexibility measures.

  4. Optimizing Cancer Care Delivery through Implementation Science

    PubMed Central

    Adesoye, Taiwo; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 Institute of Medicine report investigating cancer care concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to an increased demand for care, increasing complexity of treatment, decreasing work force, and rising costs. Engaging patients and incorporating evidence-based care into routine clinical practice are essential components of a high-quality cancer delivery system. However, a gap currently exists between the identification of beneficial research findings and the application in clinical practice. Implementation research strives to address this gap. In this review, we discuss key components of high-quality implementation research. We then apply these concepts to a current cancer care delivery challenge in women’s health, specifically the implementation of a surgery decision aid for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. PMID:26858933

  5. Contribution of imaging to cancer care costs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Czernin, Johannes

    2011-12-01

    Health care costs in the United States are increasing faster than the gross domestic product (GDP), and the growth rate of costs related to diagnostic imaging exceeds those of overall health care expenditures. Here we show that the contribution of imaging to cancer care costs pales in comparison to those of other key cost components, such as cancer drugs. Specifically, we estimate that (18)F-FDG PET or PET/CT accounted for approximately 1.5% of overall Medicare cancer care costs in 2009. Moreover, we propose that the appropriate use of (18)F-FDG PET or PET/CT could reduce the costs of cancer care. Because the U.S. health care system is complex and because it is difficult to find accurate data elsewhere, most cost and use assessments are based on published data from the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

  6. [Spiritual care model for terminal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ju-Fen; Lin, Ya-Ching; Huang, Pai-Ho; Wei, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Jia-Ling

    2014-12-01

    Providing spiritual care to patients with advanced cancer may improve the quality of life of these patients and help them experience a good death. Cancer patients are eager for additional spiritual care and for a sense of peace at the end of their life. However, spirituality is an abstract concept. The literature on spiritual care focuses primarily on elaborations of spirituality theory. Thus, first-line medical care professionals lack clear guidelines for managing the spiritual needs of terminal cancer patients. The purposes of this article were to: 1) introduce a spiritual care model based on the concept of repair and recovery of relationships that addresses the relationship between the self and God, others, id, and objects and 2) set out a four-step strategy for this model that consists of understanding, empathizing, guiding, and growing. This article provides operational guidelines for the spiritual care of terminal cancer patients.

  7. Factors associated with inadequate colorectal cancer screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy.

    PubMed

    Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Doubeni, Chyke; Pinsky, Paul F; Doria-Rose, V Paul; Sanderson, Andrew K; Bresalier, Robert; Weissfeld, Joel; Schoen, Robert E; Marcus, Pamela M; Prorok, Philip C; Berg, Christine D

    2012-08-01

    Inadequate colorectal cancer screening wastes limited endoscopic resources. We examined patients factors associated with inadequate flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSG) screening at baseline screening and repeat screening 3-5 years later in 10 geographically-dispersed screening centers participating in the ongoing Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. A total of 64,554 participants (aged 55-74) completed baseline questionnaires and underwent FSG at baseline. Of these, 39,385 participants returned for repeat screening. We used logistic regression models to assess factors that are associated with inadequate FSG (defined as a study in which the depth of insertion of FSG was <50 cm or visual inspection was limited to <90% of the mucosal surface but without detection of a polyp or mass). Of 7084 (11%) participants with inadequate FSG at baseline, 6496 (91.7%) had <50 cm depth of insertion (75.3% due to patient discomfort) and 500 (7.1%) participants had adequate depth of insertion but suboptimal bowel preparation. Compared to 55-59 year age group, advancing age in 5-year increments (odds ratios (OR) from 1.08 to 1.51) and female sex (OR = 2.40; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.27-2.54) were associated with inadequate FSG. Obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m(2)) was associated with reduced odds (OR = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.62-0.72). Inadequate FSG screening at baseline was associated with inadequate FSG at repeat screening (OR = 6.24; 95% CI: 5.78-6.75). Sedation should be considered for patients with inadequate FSG or an alternative colorectal cancer screening method should be recommended. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Survival following a diagnosis of cancer is contingent upon an interplay of factors, some non-modifiable (e.g., age, sex, genetics) and some modifiable (e.g., volitional choices) but the majority determined by circumstance (personal, social, health system context and capacity, and health policy). Accordingly, mortality and survival rates vary considerably as a function of geography, opportunity, wealth and development. Quality of life is impacted similarly, such that aspects of care related to coordination and integration of care across primary, community and specialist environments; symptom control, palliative and end-of-life care for those who will die of cancer; and survivorship challenges for those who will survive cancer, differs greatly across low, middle and high-income resource settings. Session 3 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on cancer care and treatment through three plenary presentations and five interactive workshop discussions: 1) establishing, implementing, operating and sustaining the capacity for quality cancer care; 2) the role of primary, community, and specialist care in cancer care and treatment; 3) the economics of affordable and sustainable cancer care; 4) issues around symptom control, support, and palliative/end-of-life care; and 5) issues around survivorship. A number of recommendations were proposed relating to capacity-building (standards and guidelines, protocols, new technologies and training and deployment) for safe, appropriate evidence-informed care; mapping and analysis of variations in primary, community and specialist care across countries with identification of models for effective, integrated clinical practice; the importance of considering the introduction, or expansion, of evidence-supported clinical practices from the perspectives of health economic impact, the value for health resources expended, and sustainability; capacity-building for palliative, end-of-life care and symptom control and

  9. Perspectives on personalized cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Dancik, Garrett M.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Summary Sir William Osler has been quoted as saying “If it were not for the great variability among individuals, medicine might as well be a science and not an art”. Molecular profiles, be they host or those providing insight into the genomic changes that define a cancerous cell, together possess the predictive ability required for the various aspects of individualized care: risk assessment, patient prognosis, and prediction of therapeutic responses. Such profiles, obtained by RNA, DNA and protein microarrays, SNP arrays, methylation screens, and high throughput or targeted gene sequencing can provide patient- and tumor-specific information that details the biological complexity of a particular cancer and can be exploited to understand its clinical implications and glean therapeutic insights. This knowledge is also being combined with host factors to begin formulating an understanding at the system level of how the tumor interacts with the host and how this relationship can be exploited therapeutically or for biomarker development. Here we discuss these advances and how they may relate to urologic oncology. PMID:22489325

  10. Cancer Survivorship for Primary Care Annotated Bibliography.

    PubMed

    Westfall, Matthew Y; Overholser, Linda; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M

    2015-06-01

    Long-term cancer survivorship care is a relatively new and rapidly advancing field of research. Increasing cancer survivorship rates have created a huge population of long-term cancer survivors whose cancer-specific needs challenge healthcare infrastructure and highlight a significant deficit of knowledge and guidelines in transitional care from treatment to normalcy/prolonged survivorship. As the paradigm of cancer care has changed from a fixation on the curative to the maintenance on long-term overall quality of life, so to, has the delineation of responsibility between oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). As more patients enjoy long-term survival, PCPs play a more comprehensive role in cancer care following acute treatment. To this end, this annotated bibliography was written to provide PCPs and other readers with an up-to-date and robust base of knowledge on long-term cancer survivorship, including definitions and epidemiological information as well as specific considerations and recommendations on physical, psychosocial, sexual, and comorbidity needs of survivors. Additionally, significant information is included on survivorship care, specifically Survivorship Care Plans (SPCs) and their evolution, utilization by oncologists and PCPs, and current gaps, as well as an introduction to patient navigation programs. Given rapid advancements in cancer research, this bibliography is meant to serve as current baseline reference outlining the state of the science.

  11. Nutrition in Renal Supportive Care: Patient-driven and flexible.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jessica; Meade, Anthony; Randall, Ann-Maree; Manley, Karen; Notaras, Stephanie; Heaney, Susan; Chan, Maria; Smyth, Alison; Josland, Elizabeth; Brennan, Frank Patrick; Brown, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    Renal Supportive Care is an alternative treatment pathway in advanced chronic kidney disease that is being increasingly adopted, particularly in the elderly. Renal Supportive Care uses principles of palliative care and has been developed to enhance the care for dialysis patients with a high symptom burden and those being managed on a non-dialysis pathway. Nutrition management is often an under-recognized component of care and can play an important role in improving patients' quality of life to reduce symptom burden, support physical function and independence and provide appropriate counselling to patients and their families to ensure the goals of Renal Supportive Care are met. Nutrition interventions need to target patient and treatment goals, with frequent monitoring to ensure patient needs are being met. This review outlines available literature on this topic and suggests some practical ways in which nutrition can be enhanced for these patients. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  12. Cancer care for individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Kelly E; Henderson, David C; Knight, Helen P; Pirl, William F

    2014-02-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia are a vulnerable population that has been relatively neglected in health disparities research. Despite having an equivalent risk of developing most cancers, patients with schizophrenia are more likely to die of cancer than the general population. Cancer care disparities are likely the result of patient-, provider-, and systems-level factors and influenced by the pervasive stigma of mental illness. Individuals with schizophrenia have higher rates of health behaviors linked with cancer mortality including cigarette smoking. They also have significant medical comorbidity, are less likely to have up-to-date cancer screening, and may present at more advanced stages of illness. Patients with schizophrenia may be less likely to receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, have more postoperative complications, and have less access to palliative care. However, opportunities exist for the interdisciplinary team, including medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists; psychiatrists; and primary care physicians, to intervene throughout the continuum of cancer care to promote survival and quality of life. This review summarizes data on overall and cancer-specific mortality for individuals with schizophrenia and reviews specific disparities across the cancer care continuum of screening, diagnosis, treatment, and end-of-life care. Using a case, the authors illustrate clinical challenges for this population including communication, informed consent, and risk of suicide, and provide suggestions for care. Finally, recommendations for research to address the disparities in cancer care for individuals with schizophrenia are discussed. Despite significant challenges, with collaboration between oncology and mental health teams, individuals with schizophrenia can receive high-quality cancer care.

  13. Global health from a cancer care perspective.

    PubMed

    Pesec, Madeline; Sherertz, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is now recognized as one of the four leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and incidence is expected to rise significantly in the next two decades. Unfortunately, low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) suffer disproportionately from the world's cancer cases. The growing burden of cancer and maldistribution of cancer care resources in LMIC warrant a massive re-evaluation of the structural inequalities that produce global oncological disparities and a worldwide commitment to improve both prevention and treatment strategies. Efforts to improve cancer care capacity should focus on horizontal strengthening of healthcare systems that provide safe, affordable, effective and sustainable care. In response to current deficiencies, many international organizations have started to partner with LMIC to create solutions. Telemedicine and international collaboration are also promising ways to effect change and improve global oncological care.

  14. American Cancer Society prostate cancer survivorship care guidelines.

    PubMed

    Skolarus, Ted A; Wolf, Andrew M D; Erb, Nicole L; Brooks, Durado D; Rivers, Brian M; Underwood, Willie; Salner, Andrew L; Zelefsky, Michael J; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Slovin, Susan F; Wittmann, Daniela A; Hoyt, Michael A; Sinibaldi, Victoria J; Chodak, Gerald; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer survivors approach 2.8 million in number and represent 1 in 5 of all cancer survivors in the United States. While guidelines exist for timely treatment and surveillance for recurrent disease, there is limited availability of guidelines that facilitate the provision of posttreatment clinical follow-up care to address the myriad of long-term and late effects that survivors may face. Based on recommendations set forth by a National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center expert panel, the American Cancer Society developed clinical follow-up care guidelines to facilitate the provision of posttreatment care by primary care clinicians. These guidelines were developed using a combined approach of evidence synthesis and expert consensus. Existing guidelines for health promotion, surveillance, and screening for second primary cancers were referenced when available. To promote comprehensive follow-up care and optimal health and quality of life for the posttreatment survivor, the guidelines address health promotion, surveillance for prostate cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, long-term and late effects assessment and management, psychosocial issues, and care coordination among the oncology team, primary care clinicians, and nononcology specialists. A key challenge to the development of these guidelines was the limited availability of published evidence for management of prostate cancer survivors after treatment. Much of the evidence relies on studies with small sample sizes and retrospective analyses of facility-specific and population databases.

  15. PALLIATIVE CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Alan; Ezzat, Adnan

    1997-01-01

    The increasing life expectancy in Saudi Arabia will be accompanied by an alteration of the patterns of disease similar to that in Western countries. One of these will be cancer, the second leading cause of death in the west at present, where 1:3 people develop cancer during their lifetime and 1:4 die of it. Cancer deaths are rarely easy. The distress particularly the pain it can cause is legendary. Palliative care is the care and study of patients with active progressive far advanced disease, where cure is impossible, the prognosis predictably short, and the focus of care is the patient's quality of life. A Palliative Care Program has been developed at KFSH&RC, since 1991. This has broadened the spectrum of health services available to cancer patients. Palliative care needs to be more widely available in the kingdom to relieve an important cause of human suffering. PMID:23008572

  16. Undermining the rules in home care services for the elderly in Norway: flexibility and cooperation.

    PubMed

    Wollscheid, Sabine; Eriksen, John; Hallvik, Jørgen

    2013-06-01

    This study explores the provision of home care services (home nursing and domiciliary help) for the elderly in Norwegian municipalities with purchaser-provider split model. The study draws on the assumption that flexibility in adjusting services to the care receivers' needs, and cooperation between provider and purchasers are indicators of good quality of care. Data were collected through semi-structured telephone interviews with 22 team leaders of provider units in nine municipalities. Data were collected in 2008-2009. The study has been approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. We identified four different ways of organising home care services under a purchaser-provider split model: Provider empowerment, New Public Management, Vague instructions and undermining the rules. High flexibility in providing care and cooperation with the purchaser unit were identified by the team leaders as characteristics for good care. Our findings suggest that the care providers use individual strategies that allow flexibility and cooperation rather than rigidly abiding to the regulations the purchaser-provider split models implies. Ironically, in provider units where the 'rules were undermined', the informants (team leaders of provider units) seemed to be most satisfied with the quality of home care that they delivered. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  17. Shared care involving cancer specialists and primary care providers - What do cancer survivors want?

    PubMed

    Lawn, Sharon; Fallon-Ferguson, Julia; Koczwara, Bogda

    2017-10-01

    Cancer survivors are living longer, prompting greater focus on managing cancer as a chronic condition. Shared care between primary care providers (PCPs) and cancer specialists, involving explicit partnership in how care is communicated, could ensure effective transitions between services. However, little is known about cancer patients' and survivors' preferences regarding shared care. To explore Australian cancer survivors' views on shared care: what cancer survivors need from shared care; enablers and barriers to advancing shared care; and what successful shared care looks like. Community forum held in Adelaide, Australia, in 2015 with 21 participants: 11 cancer survivors, 2 family caregivers, and 8 clinicians and researchers (members of PC4-Primary Care Collaborative Cancer Clinical Trials Group). Qualitative data from group discussion of the objectives. Participants stressed that successful shared care required patients being at the centre, ensuring accurate communication, ownership, and access to their medical records. PCPs were perceived to lack skills and confidence to lead complex cancer care. Patients expressed burden in being responsible for navigating information sharing and communication processes between health professionals and services. Effective shared care should include: shared electronic health records, key individuals as care coordinators; case conferences; shared decision making; preparing patients for self-management; building general practitioners' skills; and measuring outcomes. There was clear support for shared care but a lack of good examples to help guide it for this population. Recognizing cancer as a chronic condition requires a shift in how care is provided to these patients. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; Manca, Donna P.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. Methods This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Main findings Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Conclusion Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still

  19. Optimizing cancer care through mobile health.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Bassel; Kayyali, Reem; Nabhani-Gebara, Shereen; Philip, Nada

    2015-07-01

    The survival rates for patients living with cancer are increasing, due to recent advances in detection, prevention and treatment. It has been estimated that there were 28 million cancer survivors around the world in 2012. In the UK, for patients diagnosed in 2007, it is predicted that more than half of them will survive their cancer for 5 years or more. A large majority of cancer survivors report unmet supportive care needs and distressing symptoms and adverse long-term consequences related to their cancer. Cancer management could be optimized to better meet patients demand through technology, including mobile health (m-Health). m-Health is defined as the use of mobile communications and network technologies for health care. m-Health can help both patients and health-care professionals and play an important part in managing and delivering cancer care including managing side effects, supporting drug adherence, providing cancer information, planning and follow up and detecting and diagnosing cancer. Health authorities have already published guidelines regulating m-Health to insure patient safety and improve the accountability of its applications.

  20. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Time to benefit for colorectal cancer screening: survival meta-analysis of flexible sigmoidoscopy trials.

    PubMed

    Tang, Victoria; Boscardin, W John; Stijacic-Cenzer, Irena; Lee, Sei J

    2015-04-16

    To determine the time to benefit of using flexible sigmoidoscopy for colorectal cancer screening. Survival meta-analysis. A Cochrane Collaboration systematic review published in 2013, Medline, and Cochrane Library databases. Randomized controlled trials comparing screening flexible sigmoidoscopy with no screening. Trials with fewer than 100 flexible sigmoidoscopy screenings were excluded. Four studies were eligible (total n = 459,814). They were similar for patients' age (50-74 years), length of follow-up (11.2-11.9 years), and relative risk for colorectal cancer related mortality (0.69-0.78 with flexible sigmoidoscopy screening). For every 1000 people screened at five and 10 years, 0.3 and 1.2 colorectal cancer related deaths, respectively, were prevented. It took 4.3 years (95% confidence interval 2.8 to 5.8) to observe an absolute risk reduction of 0.0002 (one colorectal cancer related death prevented for every 5000 flexible sigmoidoscopy screenings). It took 9.4 years (7.6 to 11.3) to observe an absolute risk reduction of 0.001 (one colorectal cancer related death prevented for every 1000 flexible sigmoidoscopy screenings). Our findings suggest that screening flexible sigmoidoscopy is most appropriate for older adults with a life expectancy greater than approximately 10 years. © Tang et al 2015.

  2. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. Music therapy in supportive cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy is a part of a complementary medicine program in supportive cancer care which accompanies medical treatment. There are many benefits of music therapy for cancer patients—interactive music therapy techniques (instrumental improvisation, singing) as well as receptive music therapy techniques (listening to recorded or live music, music and imaginary) can be used to improve mood, decrease stress, pain, anxiety level and enhance relaxation. Music therapy is an effective form of supporting cancer care for patients during the treatment process. It may be also basic for planning effective programs of rehabilitation to promote wellness, improve physical and emotional well-being and the quality of life. PMID:24376975

  4. Music therapy in supportive cancer care.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-06-08

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy is a part of a complementary medicine program in supportive cancer care which accompanies medical treatment. There are many benefits of music therapy for cancer patients-interactive music therapy techniques (instrumental improvisation, singing) as well as receptive music therapy techniques (listening to recorded or live music, music and imaginary) can be used to improve mood, decrease stress, pain, anxiety level and enhance relaxation. Music therapy is an effective form of supporting cancer care for patients during the treatment process. It may be also basic for planning effective programs of rehabilitation to promote wellness, improve physical and emotional well-being and the quality of life.

  5. Building regulatory and operational flexibility into accountable care organizations and 'shared savings'.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Steven M; Bertko, John M

    2011-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act created accountable care organizations (ACOs), which will be a new part of Medicare as of January 2012, together with a "shared savings program" that will modify how these organizations will be paid to care for patients. Accountable care organizations have the potential to lower costs, improve the quality of care, facilitate delivery system reform, and promote innovation in health care. The federal government is set to create rules to regulate these organizations and has broad discretion to allow them to pursue a variety of approaches. Drawing on experience from some ACO pilot programs and the Medicare Part D prescription drug coverage program, we argue that regulations governing accountable care organizations should be flexible, encouraging of diversity and innovation and allowing for changes over time based on lessons learned. We recommend using regulations as a general framework, while relying on notices and other guidance below the regulatory level to spell out specific requirements.

  6. Personalized Care in Uterine Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, David A.; Bodurka, Diane C.

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer typically presents at an early stage when surgery alone, with or without radiotherapy, is often curative. However, in women who present with advanced disease or who develop disease recurrence, long-term prognosis is poor. While surgical cytoreduction remains the mainstay of initial therapy, over the last several decades, the roles of cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy have been evaluated in both the adjuvant and recurrent setting in an attempt to improve long-term survival while also minimizing associated toxicities. Unfortunately, response rates remain poor and survival is limited in these settings. More recently, with the introduction of personalized cancer treatment, several biologic agents have been developed that target specific pathways critical to tumor initiation and growth. Molecular studies have found that many endometrial cancers are driven by some of these tumorigenic pathways, which has led to early clinical studies evaluating the role of these targeted agents in patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. This review describes existing treatment options for patients with early and advanced endometrioid endometrial cancer, as well as for patients with uterine serous cancers. Furthermore, this review examines the growing body of literature involving targeted biologic agents as treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. PMID:23271352

  7. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals.

  8. Practical multimodal care for cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Matthew; Hopkinson, Jane; Conibear, John; Reeves, Annie; Shaw, Clare; Fearon, Ken C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Cancer cachexia is common and reduces function, treatment tolerability and quality of life. Given its multifaceted pathophysiology a multimodal approach to cachexia management is advocated for, but can be difficult to realise in practice. We use a case-based approach to highlight practical approaches to the multimodal management of cachexia for patients across the cancer trajectory. Recent findings Four cases with lung cancer spanning surgical resection, radical chemoradiotherapy, palliative chemotherapy and no anticancer treatment are presented. We propose multimodal care approaches that incorporate nutritional support, exercise, and anti-inflammatory agents, on a background of personalized oncology care and family-centred education. Collectively, the cases reveal that multimodal care is part of everyone's remit, often focuses on supported self-management, and demands buy-in from the patient and their family. Once operationalized, multimodal care approaches can be tested pragmatically, including alongside emerging pharmacological cachexia treatments. Summary We demonstrate that multimodal care for cancer cachexia can be achieved using simple treatments and without a dedicated team of specialists. The sharing of advice between health professionals can help build collective confidence and expertise, moving towards a position in which every team member feels they can contribute towards multimodal care. PMID:27635765

  9. Cancer Patient Navigator Tasks across the Cancer Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Holden, Alan E. C.; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Tran, Jacqueline H.; Seals, Brenda F.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Tsark, JoAnn U.; Harjo, Lisa; Foo, Mary Anne; Ramirez, Amelie G.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patient navigation (PN) programs have been shown to increase access to and utilization of cancer care for poor and underserved individuals. Despite mounting evidence of its value, cancer patient navigation is not universally understood or provided. We describe five PN programs and the range of tasks their navigators provide across the cancer care continuum (education and outreach, screening, diagnosis and staging, treatment, survivorship, and end-of-life). Tasks are organized by their potential to make cancer services understandable, available, accessible, affordable, appropriate, and accountable. Although navigators perform similar tasks across the five programs, their specific approaches reflect differences in community culture, context, program setting, and funding. Task lists can inform the development of programs, job descriptions, training, and evaluation. They also may be useful in the move to certify navigators and establish mechanisms for reimbursement for navigation services. PMID:22423178

  10. Molecular imaging for personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Moritz F; Hricak, Hedvig; Larson, Steven M

    2012-04-01

    Molecular imaging is rapidly gaining recognition as a tool with the capacity to improve every facet of cancer care. Molecular imaging in oncology can be defined as in vivo characterization and measurement of the key biomolecules and molecularly based events that are fundamental to the malignant state. This article outlines the basic principles of molecular imaging as applied in oncology with both established and emerging techniques. It provides examples of the advantages that current molecular imaging techniques offer for improving clinical cancer care as well as drug development. It also discusses the importance of molecular imaging for the emerging field of theranostics and offers a vision of how molecular imaging may one day be integrated with other diagnostic techniques to dramatically increase the efficiency and effectiveness of cancer care.

  11. Flexible Substrate-Based Devices for Point-of-Care Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Wang, ShuQi; Chinnasamy, Thiruppathiraja; Lifson, Mark A; Inci, Fatih; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-11-01

    Point-of-care (POC) diagnostics play an important role in delivering healthcare, particularly for clinical management and disease surveillance in both developed and developing countries. Currently, the majority of POC diagnostics utilize paper substrates owing to affordability, disposability, and mass production capability. Recently, flexible polymer substrates have been investigated due to their enhanced physicochemical properties, potential to be integrated into wearable devices with wireless communications for personalized health monitoring, and ability to be customized for POC diagnostics. Here, we focus on the latest advances in developing flexible substrate-based diagnostic devices, including paper and polymers, and their clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cancer care management through a mobile phone health approach: key considerations.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza; Rahimi, Azin

    2013-01-01

    Greater use of mobile phone devices seems inevitable because the health industry and cancer care are facing challenges such as resource constraints, rising care costs, the need for immediate access to healthcare data of types such as audio video texts for early detection and treatment of patients and increasing remote aids in telemedicine. Physicians, in order to study the causes of cancer, detect cancer earlier, act in prevention measures, determine the effectiveness of treatment and specify the reasons for the treatment ineffectiveness, need to access accurate, comprehensive and timely cancer data. Mobile devices provide opportunities and can play an important role in consulting, diagnosis, treatment, and quick access to health information. There easy carriage make them perfect tools for healthcare providers in cancer care management. Key factors in cancer care management systems through a mobile phone health approach must be considered such as human resources, confidentiality and privacy, legal and ethical issues, appropriate ICT and provider infrastructure and costs in general aspects and interoperability, human relationships, types of mobile devices and telecommunication related points in specific aspects. The successful implementation of mobile-based systems in cancer care management will constantly face many challenges. Hence, in applying mobile cancer care, involvement of users and considering their needs in all phases of project, providing adequate bandwidth, preparation of standard tools that provide maximum mobility and flexibility for users, decreasing obstacles to interrupt network communications, and using suitable communication protocols are essential. It is obvious that identifying and reducing barriers and strengthening the positive points will have a significant role in appropriate planning and promoting the achievements of mobile cancer care systems. The aim of this article is to explain key points which should be considered in designing

  13. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines.

    PubMed

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Erb, Nicole L; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer K; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cannady, Rachel S; Wong, Sandra L; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April L; Stein, Kevin D; Sharpe, Katherine B; Brooks, Durado D; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women and second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined in the United States (US). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years after diagnosis. Considering the recent decline in both incidence and mortality, the prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with the increase in rates of CRC screening, further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the US population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short-term and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns after treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The guidelines in this article are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy.

  14. [Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients. The Italian Association of Medical Oncologists published in 2013 the update of the first edition of the Psychosocial Guidelines for the care of cancer patients. The guidelines, produced by a multidisciplinary group (medical doctors, nurses, oncologists, psychologists and patients) aim at recognizing the importance of psychosocial care in helping the patients and their relatives to overcome the effects of the diagnosis and the treatments on mental health and emotional wellbeing. In some cases the evidences available are not as hard as those supporting drug treatments: many outcomes such as the effectiveness of educational interventions, the patients' wellbeing, thrust, perception of support, for their nature and complexity require both quantitative and qualitative measurements. Lack of robust evidences such as those obtained from clinical trials, does not necessarily correspond to lack of effectiveness of the intervention nor should make us forget that patients' rights (to good care, information and support) should be guaranteed.

  15. Childhood cancer survivor care: development of the Passport for Care

    PubMed Central

    Poplack, David G.; Fordis, Michael; Landier, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita; Hudson, Melissa M.; Horowitz, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    Survivors of childhood cancer are at risk of long-term adverse effects and late effects of the disease and/or its treatment. In response to national recommendations to improve evidence-based follow-up care, a web-based support system for clinical decision making, the Passport for Care (PFC), was developed for use at the point of care to produce screening recommendations individualized to the survivor. To date, the PFC has been implemented in over half of the nearly 200 clinics affiliated with the Children's Oncology Group across the USA. Most clinician users report that the PFC has been integrated into clinic workflows, and that it fosters improved conversations with survivors about the potential late effects a survivor might experience and about the screening and/or behavioural interventions recommended to improve health status. Furthermore, clinicians using the PFC have indicated that they adhered more closely to follow-up care guidelines. Perspectives on the challenges encountered and lessons learned during the development and deployment of the PFC are reviewed and contrasted with other nationwide approaches to the provision of guidance on survivor follow-up care; furthermore, the implications for the care of childhood cancer survivors are discussed. PMID:25348788

  16. Childhood cancer survivor care: development of the Passport for Care.

    PubMed

    Poplack, David G; Fordis, Michael; Landier, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita; Hudson, Melissa M; Horowitz, Marc E

    2014-12-01

    Survivors of childhood cancer are at risk of long-term adverse effects and late effects of the disease and/or its treatment. In response to national recommendations to improve evidence-based follow-up care, a web-based support system for clinical decision making, the Passport for Care (PFC), was developed for use at the point of care to produce screening recommendations individualized to the survivor. To date, the PFC has been implemented in over half of the nearly 200 clinics affiliated with the Children's Oncology Group across the USA. Most clinician users report that the PFC has been integrated into clinic workflows, and that it fosters improved conversations with survivors about the potential late effects a survivor might experience and about the screening and/or behavioural interventions recommended to improve health status. Furthermore, clinicians using the PFC have indicated that they adhered more closely to follow-up care guidelines. Perspectives on the challenges encountered and lessons learned during the development and deployment of the PFC are reviewed and contrasted with other nationwide approaches to the provision of guidance on survivor follow-up care; furthermore, the implications for the care of childhood cancer survivors are discussed.

  17. Preventive care in older cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, Lisa M; Ouellet, Jennifer Andreozzi; Dale, William; Fan, Lin; Gupta Mohile, Supriya

    2015-03-01

    To study factors that influence receipt of preventive care in older cancer survivors. We analyzed a nationally representative sample of 12,458 older adults from the 2003 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. Factors associated with non-receipt of preventive care were explored among cancer and non-cancer survivors, using logistic regression. Among the cancer survivors, 1883 were diagnosed >1 year at survey completion. A cancer history was independently associated with receipt of mammogram (AOR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.34-1.85), flu shot (AOR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.16-1.53), measurement of total cholesterol in the previous six months (AOR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.07-1.34), pneumonia vaccination (AOR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.18-1.49), bone mineral density (BMD) testing (AOR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.21-1.56), and lower endoscopy (AOR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.29-1.65). However, receipt of preventive care was not optimal among older cancer survivors with only 51.2% of the female cancer survivors received a mammogram, 63.8% of all the cancer survivors received colonoscopy, and 42.5% had BMD testing. Among the cancer survivors, factors associated with non-receipt of mammogram included age ≥85 years (AOR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.26-0.74), and scoring ≥three points on the Vulnerable Elders Survey-13 (AOR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.80-1.00). Factors associated with non-receipt of colonoscopy included low education (AOR= 0.43, 95% CI = 0.27-0.68) and rural residence (AOR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.34-0.77). Factors associated with non-receipt of BMD testing included age ≥70 (AOR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.39-0.90), African American race (AOR = 0.51, 95% CI= 0.27-0.95), low education (AOR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.14-0.38), and rural residence (AOR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.27-0.70). Although older cancer survivors are more likely to receive preventive care services than other older adults, factors other than health status considerations (e.g., education, rural residence) are associated with non-receipt of preventive care services. Copyright © 2014

  18. Ethical climate and missed nursing care in cancer care units.

    PubMed

    Vryonides, Stavros; Papastavrou, Evridiki; Charalambous, Andreas; Andreou, Panayiota; Eleftheriou, Christos; Merkouris, Anastasios

    2016-09-27

    Previous research has linked missed nursing care to nurses' work environment. Ethical climate is a part of work environment, but the relationship of missed care to different types of ethical climate is unknown. To describe the types of ethical climate in adult in-patient cancer care settings, and their relationship to missed nursing care. A descriptive correlation design was used. Data were collected using the Ethical Climate Questionnaire and the MISSCARE survey tool, and analyzed with descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation and analysis of variance. All nurses from relevant units in the Republic of Cyprus were invited to participate. The research protocol has been approved according to national legislation, all licenses have been obtained, and respondents participated voluntarily after they have received all necessary information. Response rate was 91.8%. Five types identified were as follows: caring (M = 3.18, standard deviation = 1.39); law and code (M = 3.18, standard deviation = 0.96); rules (M = 3.17, standard deviation = 0.73); instrumental (M = 2.88, standard deviation = 1.34); and independence (M = 2.74, standard deviation = 0.94). Reported overall missed care (range: 1-5) was M = 2.51 (standard deviation = 0.90), and this was positively (p < 0.05) related to instrumental (r = 0.612) and independence (r = 0.461) types and negatively (p < 0.05) related to caring (r = -0.695), rules (r = -0.367), and law and code (r = -0.487). The reported levels of missed care and the types of ethical climates present similarities and differences with the relevant literature. All types of ethical climate were related to the reported missed care. Efforts to reduce the influence of instrumental and independence types and fostering caring, law and code, and rules types might decrease missed nursing care. However, more robust evidence is needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Policy statement on multidisciplinary cancer care.

    PubMed

    Borras, Josep M; Albreht, Tit; Audisio, Riccardo; Briers, Erik; Casali, Paolo; Esperou, Hélène; Grube, Birgitte; Hamoir, Marc; Henning, Geoffrey; Kelly, Joan; Knox, Susan; Nabal, Maria; Pierotti, Marco; Lombardo, Claudio; van Harten, Wim; Poston, Graeme; Prades, Joan; Sant, Milena; Travado, Luzia; Valentini, Vincenzo; van de Velde, Cornelis; van den Bogaert, Saskia; van den Bulcke, Marc; van Hoof, Elke; van den Neucker, Ingrid; Wilson, Robin

    2014-02-01

    Cancer care is undergoing an important paradigm shift from a disease-focused management to a patient-centred approach, in which increasingly more attention is paid to psychosocial aspects, quality of life, patients' rights and empowerment and survivorship. In this context, multidisciplinary teams emerge as a practical necessity for optimal coordination among health professionals and clear communication with patients. The European Partnership for Action Against Cancer (EPAAC), an initiative launched by the European Commission in 2009, addressed the multidisciplinary care from a policy perspective in order to define the core elements that all tumour-based multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) should include. To that effect, a working group conference was held in January 2013 within the EPAAC Work Package 7 (on Healthcare) framework. The consensus group consisted of high-level representatives from the following European scientific societies, patient associations and stakeholders: European CanCer Organisation (ECCO), European SocieTy for Radiology & Oncology (ESTRO), European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG), European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC), European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS), International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS),European Cancer Patient Coalition (ECPC), EuropaColon, Europa Donna - The European Breast Cancer Coalition, Association of European Cancer Leagues (ECL), Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI), EUSOMA - European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists, European Hospital and Healthcare Federation (HOPE) and EPAAC Work Packages 5 (Health promotion and prevention), 7, 8 (Research), 9 (Information systems) and 10 (Cancer plans). A background document with a list of 26 core issues drawn from a systematic review of the literature was used to guide the discussion. Five areas related to MDTs were covered: care objectives, organisation

  20. Palliative care for children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Elisha; Wolfe, Joanne

    2013-02-01

    Over the past two decades, paediatric palliative care has emerged as both a primary approach and as its own medical subspecialty, the overall aim of which is to ease suffering for children with life-threatening illness and their families through a concurrent model of care. However, most discussions have been focused on the transition to palliative care when no realistic hope for cure exists. We believe that, because the course of cancer is so unpredictable, this idea is misleading. Indeed, palliative care is increasingly being recognized as being about not just how to cope with the process of dying, but also about how to engage in living when faced with a life-threatening illness. This article will examine our current understanding of several areas of palliative care, with the ultimate message that palliative care is simply a novel term for the total care of a child and family, an approach that should be applied consistently and concurrently regardless of disease status. By improving familiarity with palliative care and building relationships with palliative care specialists, the paediatric oncology clinician will ensure that the best care possible for children and families is provided, regardless of outcome.

  1. Interpretive flexibility in mobile health: lessons from a government-sponsored home care program.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jeppe Agger; Mathiassen, Lars

    2013-10-30

    Mobile technologies have emerged as important tools that health care personnel can use to gain easy access to client data anywhere. This is particularly useful for nurses and care workers in home health care as they provide services to clients in many different settings. Although a growing body of evidence supports the use of mobile technologies, the diverse implications of mobile health have yet to be fully documented. Our objective was to examine a large-scale government-sponsored mobile health implementation program in the Danish home care sector and to understand how the technology was used differently across home care agencies. We chose to perform a longitudinal case study with embedded units of analysis. We included multiple data sources, such as written materials, a survey to managers across all 98 Danish municipalities, and semistructured interviews with managers, care workers, and nurses in three selected home care agencies. We used process models of change to help analyze the overall implementation process from a longitudinal perspective and to identify antecedent conditions, key events, and practical outcomes. Strong collaboration between major stakeholders in the Danish home care sector (government bodies, vendors, consultants, interest organizations, and managers) helped initiate and energize the change process, and government funding supported quick and widespread technology adoption. However, although supported by the same government-sponsored program, mobile technology proved to have considerable interpretive flexibility with variation in perceived nature of technology, technology strategy, and technology use between agencies. What was first seen as a very promising innovation across the Danish home care sector subsequently became the topic of debate as technology use arrangements ran counter to existing norms and values in individual agencies. Government-sponsored programs can have both positive and negative results, and managers need to be aware

  2. Printed multifunctional flexible device with an integrated motion sensor for health care monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Harada, Shingo; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Honda, Wataru; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2016-11-01

    Real-time health care monitoring may enable prediction and prevention of disease or improve treatment by diagnosing illnesses in the early stages. Wearable, comfortable, sensing devices are required to allow continuous monitoring of a person's health; other important considerations for this technology are device flexibility, low-cost components and processing, and multifunctionality. To address these criteria, we present a flexible, multifunctional printed health care sensor equipped with a three-axis acceleration sensor to monitor physical movement and motion. Because the device is designed to be attached directly onto the skin, it has a modular design with two detachable components: One device component is nondisposable, whereas the other one is disposable and designed to be worn in contact with the skin. The design of this disposable sensing sheet takes into account hygiene concerns and low-cost materials and fabrication methods as well as features integrated, printed sensors to monitor for temperature, acceleration, electrocardiograms, and a kirigami structure, which allows for stretching on skin. The reusable component of the device contains more expensive device components, features an ultraviolet light sensor that is controlled by carbon nanotube thin-film transistors, and has a mechanically flexible and stable liquid metal contact for connection to the disposable sensing sheet. After characterizing the electrical properties of the transistors and flexible sensors, we demonstrate a proof-of-concept device that is capable of health care monitoring combined with detection of physical activity, showing that this device provides an excellent platform for the development of commercially viable, wearable health care monitors.

  3. Printed multifunctional flexible device with an integrated motion sensor for health care monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Harada, Shingo; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Honda, Wataru; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2016-01-01

    Real-time health care monitoring may enable prediction and prevention of disease or improve treatment by diagnosing illnesses in the early stages. Wearable, comfortable, sensing devices are required to allow continuous monitoring of a person’s health; other important considerations for this technology are device flexibility, low-cost components and processing, and multifunctionality. To address these criteria, we present a flexible, multifunctional printed health care sensor equipped with a three-axis acceleration sensor to monitor physical movement and motion. Because the device is designed to be attached directly onto the skin, it has a modular design with two detachable components: One device component is nondisposable, whereas the other one is disposable and designed to be worn in contact with the skin. The design of this disposable sensing sheet takes into account hygiene concerns and low-cost materials and fabrication methods as well as features integrated, printed sensors to monitor for temperature, acceleration, electrocardiograms, and a kirigami structure, which allows for stretching on skin. The reusable component of the device contains more expensive device components, features an ultraviolet light sensor that is controlled by carbon nanotube thin-film transistors, and has a mechanically flexible and stable liquid metal contact for connection to the disposable sensing sheet. After characterizing the electrical properties of the transistors and flexible sensors, we demonstrate a proof-of-concept device that is capable of health care monitoring combined with detection of physical activity, showing that this device provides an excellent platform for the development of commercially viable, wearable health care monitors. PMID:28138532

  4. CancerLinQ and the future of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W; Miller, Robert S; Hauser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Patients, health care providers, and payers all have a similar interest in a health care system that is both efficient and intelligent. The attributes of such a system are widely recognized: we want a system that provides widespread access to consistently high-quality, science-based medical care; we want that system to be efficient, avoiding unnecessary waste, while delivering the right treatments to the right patients in a timely fashion; we want a system that allows us to both learn from our experience and generate new knowledge that will inform future treatment options; and we want a system that is compassionate and caring. What we want from a health care system often runs up against real-life obstacles and challenges: a fragmented delivery system, varying levels (or lack of) insurance, a growing burden of regulation and paperwork, and an increasingly complex understanding of tumor biology and the therapeutic approaches derived from this biology. New challenges are on the horizon-emerging genomic and imaging technology, with their enormous cognitive and data burdens, and a looming demographic challenge, where inadequate personnel resources face an aging population and an explosion of new treatments. Not all problems have technologic solutions, but many of the issues described above have potential solutions related to information technology. ASCO's CancerLinQ, described in this article, is an evolving attempt by the Society to improve the quality and efficiency of cancer care, while supporting education and research in the cancer field.

  5. Facilitators of Survivorship Care Among Underserved Breast Cancer Survivors: a Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Ustjanauskas, Amy E; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Pan, Tonya M; Rivera, Maria; Vázquez-Otero, Coralia; Ung, Danielle; Roetzheim, Richard G; Laronga, Christine; Johnson, Kenneth; Norton, Marilyn; Carrizosa, Claudia; Muñoz, Dariana; Goldenstein, Marissa; Nuhaily, Sumayah; Wells, Kristen J

    2016-07-07

    Research investigating facilitators of survivorship care among underserved breast cancer survivors (BCS) is sparse. This study aimed to explore facilitators of survivorship care among underserved BCS within the first 5 years following chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery for breast cancer. In-depth interviews were conducted, using a semi-structured interview guide, with underserved BCS exploring survivorship care experiences. Content analysis of the verbatim transcripts was applied, and results were summarized according to themes related to facilitators of breast cancer survivorship care. Interviews were conducted with 25 BCS. Eight main themes were identified: coordination of care; positive perceptions of health care providers; communication between patient and health care providers; financial and insurance facilitators; information, classes, and programs provided; assistance provided by organizations and health care professionals; transportation facilitators; and job flexibility. This study provides a comprehensive look at facilitators of survivorship care among underserved BCS. BCS endorsed several facilitators of their survivorship care, mainly at the interpersonal, organizational, and societal level. This study adds to the research literature on catalysts of care among underserved BCS. Results from this study are currently being used to inform a patient navigation intervention to facilitate care among this population.

  6. Proteomic contributions to personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Koomen, John M; Haura, Eric B; Bepler, Gerold; Sutphen, Rebecca; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R; Benson, Kaaron; Hussein, Mohamad; Hazlehurst, Lori A; Yeatman, Timothy J; Hildreth, Lynne T; Sellers, Thomas A; Jacobsen, Paul B; Fenstermacher, David A; Dalton, William S

    2008-10-01

    Cancer impacts each patient and family differently. Our current understanding of the disease is primarily limited to clinical hallmarks of cancer, but many specific molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Genetic markers can be used to determine predisposition to tumor development, but molecularly targeted treatment strategies that improve patient prognosis are not widely available for most cancers. Individualized care plans, also described as personalized medicine, still must be developed by understanding and implementing basic science research into clinical treatment. Proteomics holds great promise in contributing to the prevention and cure of cancer because it provides unique tools for discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. As such, proteomics can help translate basic science discoveries into the clinical practice of personalized medicine. Here we describe how biological mass spectrometry and proteome analysis interact with other major patient care and research initiatives and present vignettes illustrating efforts in discovery of diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, development of treatment strategies in lung cancer, and monitoring prognosis and relapse in multiple myeloma patients.

  7. Antidepressant prescribing in community cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ashbury, Fredrick D; Madlensky, Lisa; Raich, Peter; Thompson, Mark; Whitney, Geoff; Hotz, Ken; Kralj, Boris; Edell, William S

    2003-05-01

    To describe patterns of antidepressant (ADs) prescribing in community oncology practice. Data were collected using an electronic medical record on all staged breast, colon, and lung cancer patients in three community-based oncology practices. The data were analyzed retrospectively, using descriptive and bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression modeling. There were 850 breast, 299 colon, and 473 lung cancer patients identified in this analysis. Overall, 19.2% of breast, 11% of colon, and 13.7% of lung cancer patients had been prescribed ADs during the 2-year period. The clinic in which cancer treatment was received predicted AD prescribing. The relationship between AD administration and age proved to be nonlinear; the pattern exhibited an "inverted U" shape. Patients with comorbidities and on pain medications were more likely to be administered ADs. Colon cancer patients on pain medications were five times more likely to be administered ADs than those not on pain medications. While some predictors of AD prescribing appear to be consistent with other studies, such as being on pain medication, there is still a great amount of variability in prescribing patterns across community practices, age groups, and cancer diagnoses. This study demonstrates that prescriptions of ADs seem to be influenced by parameters other than psychopathology. Given the importance of major depression in oncology care, diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and prescription patterns of psychotropics should be part of the routine monitoring and quality management in oncology patient care.

  8. Proteomic Contributions to Personalized Cancer Care*

    PubMed Central

    Koomen, John M.; Haura, Eric B.; Bepler, Gerold; Sutphen, Rebecca; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R.; Benson, Kaaron; Hussein, Mohamad; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Yeatman, Timothy J.; Hildreth, Lynne T.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Fenstermacher, David A.; Dalton, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer impacts each patient and family differently. Our current understanding of the disease is primarily limited to clinical hallmarks of cancer, but many specific molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Genetic markers can be used to determine predisposition to tumor development, but molecularly targeted treatment strategies that improve patient prognosis are not widely available for most cancers. Individualized care plans, also described as personalized medicine, still must be developed by understanding and implementing basic science research into clinical treatment. Proteomics holds great promise in contributing to the prevention and cure of cancer because it provides unique tools for discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. As such, proteomics can help translate basic science discoveries into the clinical practice of personalized medicine. Here we describe how biological mass spectrometry and proteome analysis interact with other major patient care and research initiatives and present vignettes illustrating efforts in discovery of diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, development of treatment strategies in lung cancer, and monitoring prognosis and relapse in multiple myeloma patients. PMID:18664563

  9. Nursing care and treatment of patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, B

    Bladder cancer is the second most common urological cancer after prostate cancer in the UK. This article aims to update nurses knowledge about the disease, focusing on diagnosis, treatment and nursing care.

  10. A doctor close at hand: How GPs view their role in cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, May-Lill; Holtedahl, Knut Arne; Rudebeck, Carl Edvard

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore GPs’ own views on their role in cancer care. Design Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews. Setting Norwegian primary care. Methods The stories of 14 GPs concerning 18 patients were analyzed for core content and abstracted into general ideas, to create a broader sense of the experienced professional role. Results The GPs claimed to have an important role in cancer care. In our analysis, three main aspects of GPs’ work emerged: first, as a flexible mediator, e.g. between the patient and the clinic, interpreting and translating; second, as an efficient “handyman”, solving practical problems locally; and third, as a personal companion for the patient throughout the illness. Conclusion The interviewed GPs see their place in cancer care as being close to their patients. In their many tasks we found three main aspects: the mediating, the practical, and the personal. PMID:20950124

  11. Paradoxes in cancer patients' advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Lamont, E B; Siegler, M

    2000-01-01

    To determine the frequency of advance care planning (ACP) in hospitalized cancer patients and to assess their reactions to a proposed policy in which medical housestaff would offer to discuss ACP at the time of hospital admission. Structured interviews with 111 consecutively admitted cancer patients on the oncology inpatient service of a tertiary care medical center. We found that 69% (77/111) of patients had discussed their advance care preferences with someone, usually a family member, and 33% (37/111) had completed at least one formal advance directive (e.g., a living will or durable power of attorney for health care); 32% (36/111) had done both; and 30% (33/111) had done neither. However, only 9% (10/111) of patients reported having discussed their advance care preferences with their clinic oncologists and only 23% (23/101) of the remaining patients stated that they wished to do so. By contrast, 58% (64/110) of patients supported a policy in which medical housestaff would offer to discuss these advance care preferences as a part of the admission history. Our data suggest that while oncology inpatients frequently have ACPs that they discuss with family and/or document in formal advance directives, they rarely discuss or wish to discuss these ACPs with clinic oncologists. We also show that most of the reticent patients would nevertheless consider discussing the same ACPs with admitting housestaff on the day of hospital admission.

  12. Accountable care organizations: the case for flexible partnerships between health plans and providers.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Under the Affordable Care Act, the new Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation will guide a number of experimental programs in health care payment and delivery. Among the most ambitious of the reform models is the accountable care organization (ACO), which will offer providers economic rewards if they can reduce Medicare's cost growth in their communities. However, the dismal history of provider-led attempts to manage costs suggests that this program is unlikely to accomplish its objectives. What's more, if ACOs foster more market concentration among providers, they have the potential to shift costs onto private insurers. This paper proposes a more flexible payment model for providers and private insurers that would divide health care services into three categories: long-term, low-intensity primary care; unscheduled care, including unscheduled emergency services; and major clinical interventions that usually involve hospitalization or organized outpatient care. Each category of care would be paid for differently, with each containing different elements of financial risk for the providers. Health plans would then be encouraged to provide logistical and analytic support to providers in managing health costs in these categories.

  13. Role of massage therapy in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nancy C; Sumler, Sat-Siri; Beinhorn, Curtiss M; Frenkel, Moshe A

    2008-03-01

    The care of patients with cancer not only involves dealing with its symptoms but also with complicated information and uncertainty; isolation; and fear of disease progression, disease recurrence, and death. Patients whose treatments require them to go without human contact can find a lack of touch to be an especially distressing factor. Massage therapy is often used to address these patients' need for human contact, and findings support the positive value of massage in cancer care. Several reviews of the scientific literature have attributed numerous positive effects to massage, including improvements in the quality of patients' relaxation, sleep, and immune system responses and in the relief of their fatigue, pain, anxiety, and nausea. On the basis of these reviews, some large cancer centers in the United States have started to integrate massage therapy into conventional settings. In this paper, we recognize the importance of touch, review findings regarding massage for cancer patients, describe the massage therapy program in one of these centers, and outline future challenges and implications for the effective integration of massage therapy in large and small cancer centers.

  14. Risk of colorectal cancer seven years after flexible sigmoidoscopy screening: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Geir; Grotmol, Tom; Skovlund, Eva; Bretthauer, Michael

    2009-05-29

    To determine the risk of colorectal cancer after screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy. Randomised controlled trial. Population based screening in two areas in Norway-city of Oslo and Telemark county (urban and mixed urban and rural populations). 55 736 men and women aged 55-64 years. Once only flexible sigmoidoscopy screening with or without a single round of faecal occult blood testing (n=13 823) compared with no screening (n=41 913). Planned end points were cumulative incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer after 5, 10, and 15 years. This first report from the study presents cumulative incidence after 7 years of follow-up and hazard ratio for mortality after 6 years. No difference was found in the 7 year cumulative incidence of colorectal cancer between the screening and control groups (134.5 v 131.9 cases per 100 000 person years). In intention to screen analysis, a trend towards reduced colorectal cancer mortality was found (hazard ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 1.13, P=0.16). For attenders compared with controls, a statistically significant reduction in mortality was apparent for both total colorectal cancer (hazard ratio 0.41, 0.21 to 0.82, P=0.011) and rectosigmoidal cancer (0.24, 0.08 to 0.76, P=0.016). A reduction in incidence of colorectal cancer with flexible sigmoidoscopy screening could not be shown after 7 years' follow-up. Mortality from colorectal cancer was not significantly reduced in the screening group but seemed to be lower for attenders, with a reduction of 59% for any location of colorectal cancer and 76% for rectosigmoidal cancer in per protocol analysis, an analysis prone to selection bias. Clinical trials NCT00119912.

  15. Models of cancer survivorship health care: moving forward.

    PubMed

    Oeffinger, Kevin C; Argenbright, Keith E; Levitt, Gill A; McCabe, Mary S; Anderson, Paula R; Berry, Emily; Maher, Jane; Merrill, Janette; Wollins, Dana S

    2014-01-01

    The population of cancer survivors in the United States and worldwide is rapidly increasing. Many survivors will develop health conditions as a direct or indirect consequence of their cancer therapy. Thus, models to deliver high-quality care for cancer survivors are evolving. We provide examples of three different models of survivorship care from a cancer center, a community setting, and a country-wide health care system, followed by a description of the ASCO Cancer Survivorship Compendium, a tool to help providers understand the various models of survivorship care available and integrate survivorship care into their practices in a way that fits their unique needs.

  16. Barriers to follow-up care among survivors of adolescent and young adult cancer.

    PubMed

    Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Kaul, Sapna; Zamora, Eduardo R; Wu, Yelena P; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2017-02-01

    Though the need for risk-based follow-up care for survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer has been documented, survivors often report forgoing recommended care due to cost. We sought to understand whether additional barriers to follow-up care exist for AYA survivors. We recruited survivors who were diagnosed with cancer between the ages of 15 and 39 using the Utah Cancer Registry (UCR). Overall, 28 survivors participated in 6 focus groups held between March and May 2015 in Salt Lake City and St. George, UT. Focus group discussions focused on the reasons survivors may or may not attend recommended medical visits after completing therapy. Survivors reported myriad barriers to follow-up medical visits, including lack of clear provider recommendation, fear of recurrent cancer diagnosis, wishing to move on with life, competing life responsibilities due to work and children, and not perceiving the need for a visit due to lack of symptoms. Though cost likely plays a major part in follow-up care adherence for survivors of AYA cancer, in our focus groups, participants indicated there were many other psychosocial and logistic barriers to care. Such factors play an important role in the day-to-day lives of survivors and are critical in medical decision-making. Several factors impede follow-up care adherence for survivors of AYA cancer that are amenable to interventions, including clearer provider recommendations, flexible appointment times, and childcare availability in clinics.

  17. The intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the causes of cancer, early detection, prevention or treatment need accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The clinical laboratory provides important cancer information needed for physicians which influence clinical decisions regarding treatment, diagnosis and patient monitoring. Poor communication between health care providers and clinical laboratory personnel can lead to medical errors and wrong decisions in providing cancer care. Because of the key impact of laboratory information on cancer diagnosis and treatment the quality of the tests, lab reports, and appropriate lab management are very important. A laboratory information management system (LIMS) can have an important role in diagnosis, fast and effective access to cancer data, decrease redundancy and costs, and facilitate the integration and collection of data from different types of instruments and systems. In spite of significant advantages LIMS is limited by factors such as problems in adaption to new instruments that may change existing work processes. Applications of intelligent software simultaneously with existing information systems, in addition to remove these restrictions, have important benefits including adding additional non-laboratory-generated information to the reports, facilitating decision making, and improving quality and productivity of cancer care services. Laboratory systems must have flexibility to change and have the capability to develop and benefit from intelligent devices. Intelligent laboratory information management systems need to benefit from informatics tools and latest technologies like open sources. The aim of this commentary is to survey application, opportunities and necessity of intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

  18. The financial burden of cancer: Estimates from patients undergoing cancer care in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The emotional burden associated with the diagnosis of cancer is sometimes overshadowed by financial burden sustained by patient and the family. This is especially relevant for a developing country as there is limited state support for cancer treatment. We conducted this study to estimate the cost of cancer care for two major types of cancer and to assess the perception of patients and families regarding the burden of the cost for undergoing cancer treatment at a private tertiary care hospital. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at day care and radiotherapy unit of Aga Khan University, Hospital (AKUH) Karachi, Pakistan. All adult patients with breast and head & neck cancers diagnosed for 3 months or more were included. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire and analysed using SPSS. Results Sixty seven patients were interviewed during the study period. The mean and median monthly income of these patients was 996.4 USD and 562.5 USD respectively. Comparatively the mean and median monthly cost of cancer care was 1093.13 USD and 946.42 USD respectively. The cost of the treatment either fully or partially was borne by the family in most cases (94%). The financial burden of cancer was perceived as significant by 28 (42%) patients and unmanageable by 18 (27%) patients. This perceived level of burden was associated significantly with average monthly income (p = <0.001). Conclusion Our study indicates that the financial burden of cancer care is substantial and can be overwhelming. There is a desperate need for treatment support programs either by the government or other welfare organisations to support individuals and families who are already facing a difficult and challenging situation. PMID:23061477

  19. Improving the safety and quality of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Burke, Harry B

    2017-02-15

    The cancer community is increasingly interested in improving its safety and quality. Improvement will be driven by the expansion of safety and quality research and by a commitment to publish studies that advance high-quality, safe cancer care. Cancer 2017;123:549-550. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  20. Flexible sigmoidoscopy versus faecal occult blood testing for colorectal cancer screening in asymptomatic individuals.

    PubMed

    Holme, Øyvind; Bretthauer, Michael; Fretheim, Atle; Odgaard-Jensen, Jan; Hoff, Geir

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequent cancer in the world. As the sojourn time for this cancer is several years and a good prognosis is associated with early stage diagnosis, screening has been implemented in a number of countries. Both screening with faecal occult blood test and flexible sigmoidoscopy have been shown to reduce mortality from colorectal cancer in randomised controlled trials. The comparative effectiveness of these tests on colorectal cancer mortality has, however, never been evaluated, and controversies exist over which test to choose. To compare the effectiveness of screening for colorectal cancer with flexible sigmoidoscopy to faecal occult blood testing. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE (November 16, 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 11) and reference lists for eligible studies. Randomised controlled trials comparing screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy or faecal occult blood testing to each other or to no screening. Only studies reporting mortality from colorectal cancer were included. Faecal occult blood testing had to be repeated (annually or biennially). Data retrieval and assessment of risk of bias were performed independently by two review authors. Standard meta-analyses using a random-effects model were conducted for flexible sigmoidoscopy and faecal occult blood testing (FOBT) separately and we calculated relative risks with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We used a Bayesian approach (a contrast-based network meta-analysis method) for indirect analyses and presented the results as posterior median relative risk with 95% credibility intervals. We assessed the quality of evidence using GRADE. We identified nine studies comprising 338,467 individuals randomised to screening and 405,919 individuals to the control groups. Five studies compared flexible sigmoidoscopy to no screening and four studies compared repetitive guaiac-based FOBT (annually and biennially) to no screening. We did not

  1. Canid mating systems, social behavior, parental care and ontogeny: are they flexible?

    PubMed

    Kleiman, Devra G

    2011-11-01

    Benson Ginsburg's early studies of canid socialization and wolf social and reproductive behavior were focused, in part, on the degree to which there was flexibility in social development and specifically whether there was a critical period during development after which wolf pups could not be socialized to humans. My focus was the degree to which differences in canid ecology and social structure were correlated with differences in the plasticity of social and reproductive behavior, including development. Canid species are unusual among the Mammalia in being primarily monogamous. Males may play an indirect or direct role in parental care, depending on a species degree of sociality. Canid species also differ in developmental parameters, and reproductive suppression is common in the group-living pack hunters. I review comparative studies of the social and reproductive behavior of three South American canids which vary in their degree of sociality and explore the degree to which the species are ecologically and socially flexible.

  2. Patients’ experiences with continuity of cancer care in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Manca, Donna P.; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore patient perspectives on and experiences with the coordination and continuity of cancer care. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants Thirty-eight breast and colorectal cancer survivors 1 to 4 years after diagnosis. Methods Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with the participants. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and proofread. Transcripts were reviewed to create a focused coding scheme that was used to develop categories for participants’ experiences. Main findings Although this study focused on the continuity of cancer care, patients described their experiences with cancer care in general, concentrating predominantly on their relationships with individual health care providers (HCPs). Based on patients’ experiences, several themes were identified as the core components of providing good continuity and well coordinated care. The most important overarching theme was communication, which overlapped with 4 other themes: patient-HCP relationships, the role of HCPs, lack of access to care, and timely and tailored information. Conclusion Patients believed that good communication between HCPs and patients was key to improving the overall continuity of cancer care. Continuity of care is an important theoretical concept in cancer care, but it is not easily recognized by patients. They perceive the cancer care continuum and continuity of care as cancer care in general, which is typically framed by the individual relationships with their HCPs. Future research and interventions need to focus on finding and testing ways to improve communication to enhance continuity of cancer care. PMID:27737982

  3. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  4. Once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy screening in prevention of colorectal cancer: a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Wendy S; Edwards, Rob; Kralj-Hans, Ines; Wooldrage, Kate; Hart, Andrew R; Northover, John M A; Parkin, D Max; Wardle, Jane; Duffy, Stephen W; Cuzick, Jack

    2010-05-08

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide and has a high mortality rate. We tested the hypothesis that only one flexible sigmoidoscopy screening between 55 and 64 years of age can substantially reduce colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. This randomised controlled trial was undertaken in 14 UK centres. 170 432 eligible men and women, who had indicated on a previous questionnaire that they would accept an invitation for screening, were randomly allocated to the intervention group (offered flexible sigmoidoscopy screening) or the control group (not contacted). Randomisation by sequential number generation was done centrally in blocks of 12, with stratification by trial centre, general practice, and household type. The primary outcomes were the incidence of colorectal cancer, including prevalent cases detected at screening, and mortality from colorectal cancer. Analyses were intention to treat and per protocol. The trial is registered, number ISRCTN28352761. 113 195 people were assigned to the control group and 57 237 to the intervention group, of whom 112 939 and 57 099, respectively, were included in the final analyses. 40 674 (71%) people underwent flexible sigmoidoscopy. During screening and median follow-up of 11.2 years (IQR 10.7-11.9), 2524 participants were diagnosed with colorectal cancer (1818 in control group vs 706 in intervention group) and 20 543 died (13 768 vs 6775; 727 certified from colorectal cancer [538 vs 189]). In intention-to-treat analyses, colorectal cancer incidence in the intervention group was reduced by 23% (hazard ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.70-0.84) and mortality by 31% (0.69, 0.59-0.82). In per-protocol analyses, adjusting for self-selection bias in the intervention group, incidence of colorectal cancer in people attending screening was reduced by 33% (0.67, 0.60-0.76) and mortality by 43% (0.57, 0.45-0.72). Incidence of distal colorectal cancer (rectum and sigmoid colon) was reduced by 50% (0.50, 0.42-0.59; secondary

  5. Organized colorectal cancer screening in integrated health care systems.

    PubMed

    Levin, Theodore R; Jamieson, Laura; Burley, Daniel A; Reyes, Juan; Oehrli, Michael; Caldwell, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an ideal target for early detection and prevention through screening. Noninvasive screening options are the guaiac fecal occult blood test and the fecal immunochemical test. Organized screening offers the promise of uniformly delivering screening to all members of a population who are eligible and due. Organized screening is defined as an explicit policy with defined age categories, method, and interval for screening in a defined target population with a defined implementation and quality assurance structure, and tracking of cancer in the population. The UK National Health Service; the Ontario, Canada Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care; and the US Veteran's Health Administration have used varied organized approaches to deliver guaiac fecal occult blood test screening to their populations. Kaiser Permanente Northern California began CRC screening in the 1960s, initially using flexible sigmoidoscopy. Implementation of organized fecal immunochemical test outreach was associated with improved Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set CRC screening rates between 2005 and 2010 from 37% to 69% and from 41% to 78% in the commercial and Medicare populations, respectively. Organized fecal immunochemical test screening has been associated with an increase in annually detected CRCs, almost entirely because of increased detection of localized-stage cancers.

  6. Breaking significant news: The experience of clinical nurse specialists in cancer and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Mishelmovich, Nina; Arber, Anne; Odelius, Anki

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the research was to explore specialist cancer and palliative care nurses experience of delivering significant news to patients with advanced cancer. A qualitative phenomenological research study was conducted to capture nurses' experiences with the aim of understanding how cancer and palliative care clinical nurse specialists work towards disclosure of advanced and terminal cancer. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 10 clinical nurse specialists working in one acute NHS trust. Clinical nurse specialists were recruited from the following specialities: lung cancer, breast cancer, gynaecological cancer, upper and lower gastrointestinal cancer and palliative care. Four themes emerged from the data: importance of relationships; perspective taking; ways to break significant news; feeling prepared and putting yourself forward. The findings revealed that highly experienced clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) felt confident in their skills in delivering significant news and they report using patient centred communication to build a trusting relationship so significant news was easier to share with patients. CNSs were aware of guidelines and protocols for breaking significant and bad news but reported that they used guidelines flexibly and it was their years of clinical experience that enabled them to be effective in disclosing significant news. Some areas of disclosure were found to be challenging in particular news of a terminal prognosis to patients who were of a younger age. CNSs have become more directly involved in breaking significant news to those with advanced cancer by putting themselves forward and feeling confident in their skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Surbone, Antonella

    2008-03-01

    Cultural competence in oncology requires the acquisition of specific knowledge, clinical skills, and attitudes that facilitate effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting, thus, leading to improved therapeutic outcomes and decreased disparities in cancer care. Cultural competence in oncology entails a basic knowledge of different cultural attitudes and practices of communication of the truth and of decision-making styles throughout the world. Cultural competence always presupposes oncology professionals' awareness of their own cultural beliefs and values. To be able to communicate with cancer patients in culturally sensitive ways, oncologists should have knowledge of the concept of culture in its complexity and of the risks of racism, classism, sexism, ageism, and stereotyping that must be avoided in clinical practice. Oncologists should develop a sense of appreciation for differences in health care values, based on the recognition that no culture can claim hegemony over others and that cultures are evolving under their reciprocal influence on each other. Medical schools and oncology training can teach communication skills and cultural competence, while fostering in all students and young doctors those attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity, and awareness that are needed to deliver effective and culturally sensitive cancer care.

  8. Palliative care in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all cancers and has the highest annual rate of mortality in men and women. The overall aim is cure or prolongation of life without evidence of disease. Almost 60% of patients at the moment of diagnosis are not eligible for radical treatment. Therefore soothing and supportive treatment is the only treatment of choice. Patients with lung cancer who have symptoms of dyspnea, chronic cough, severe pain, exhaustion and cachexia syndrome, fear and depression and significantly reduced physical and intellectual activities are qualified for inpatient or home palliative care. Knowledge about various methods used in palliative treatment allows one to alleviate symptoms that occur in an advanced stage of disease with an expected short survival period. Methods of oncological treatment that are often used in patients with advanced lung cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drawing attention to the earlier implementation of palliative care is an objective of research carried out during recent years. Advances in surgical and conservative treatment of these patients have contributed to better outcomes and longer survival time. PMID:24596508

  9. Temporal changes in loss of life expectancy due to cancer in Australia: a flexible parametric approach.

    PubMed

    Baade, Peter D; Youlden, Danny R; Andersson, Therese M; Youl, Philippa H; Walpole, Euan T; Kimlin, Michael G; Aitken, Joanne F; Biggar, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate changes in cancer mortality burden over time by assessing temporal trends in life expectation for Australian residents diagnosed with cancer. The study cohort consisted of all people diagnosed with cancer in the period 1990-2000 and aged 15-89 years (n = 1,275,978), with mortality follow-up to 31 December 2010. Flexible parametric survival models incorporating background age-sex-year-specific population mortality rates were applied to generate the observed survival curves for all cancers combined and selected major cancer types. Predicted values of loss of life expectancy (LOLE) in years were generated and then averaged across calendar year and age group (15-49, 50-69 and 70-89 years) or spread of disease (localized, regional, distant, unknown). The greatest LOLE burden was for lung cancer (14.3 years per diagnosis) and lowest for melanoma (2.5 years). There was a significant decrease in LOLE over time (-0.13 LOLE per year) for all cancers combined. Decreases were also observed for female breast cancer (-0.21), prostate cancer (-0.17), colorectal cancer (-0.08), melanoma (-0.07) and stomach cancer (-0.02), with slight increases for lung cancer (+0.04). When restricted to the sub-cohort from New South Wales with spread of disease information, these decreases in LOLE were primarily among cancers categorized as localized or regional spread at diagnosis. In Australia, persons diagnosed with cancer have a steadily improving outlook that exceeds that expected by general improvement in population life expectancy. The overall improvement is observed in persons with localized or regional cancers but not in those with advanced cancers, findings which encourage earlier diagnosis.

  10. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Erb, Nicole L.; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L.; Cannady, Rachel; Wong, Sandra L.; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April; Stein, Kevin; Sharpe, Katherine; Brooks, Durado D.; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant disease in the United States (U.S.). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years following diagnosis. The prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the U.S. population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns following treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The following guidelines are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy. PMID:26348643

  11. Race and colorectal cancer disparities: health-care utilization vs different cancer susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Doubeni, Chyke; Pinsky, Paul F; Doria-Rose, V Paul; Bresalier, Robert; Lamerato, Lois E; Crawford, E David; Kvale, Paul; Fouad, Mona; Hickey, Thomas; Riley, Thomas; Weissfeld, Joel; Schoen, Robert E; Marcus, Pamela M; Prorok, Philip C; Berg, Christine D

    2010-04-21

    It is unclear whether the disproportionately higher incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer among blacks compared with whites reflect differences in health-care utilization or colorectal cancer susceptibility. A total of 60, 572 non-Hispanic white and black participants in the ongoing Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial underwent trial-sponsored screening flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSG) without biopsy at baseline in 10 geographically dispersed centers from November 1993 to July 2001. Subjects with polyps or mass lesions detected by FSG were referred to their physicians for diagnostic workup, the cost of which was not covered by PLCO. The records of follow-up evaluations were collected and reviewed. We used log binomial modeling with adjustment for age, education, sex, body mass index, smoking, family history of colorectal cancer, colon examination within previous 3 years, personal history of polyps, and screening center to examine whether utilization of diagnostic colonoscopy and yield of neoplasia differed by race. Among 57 561 whites and 3011 blacks who underwent FSG, 13,743 (23.9%) and 767 (25.5%) had abnormal examinations, respectively. A total of 9944 (72.4%) whites and 480 (62.6%) blacks had diagnostic colonoscopy within 1 year following the abnormal FSG screening. When compared with whites, blacks were less likely to undergo diagnostic evaluation (adjusted risk ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval = 0.83 to 0.93). Overall, among subjects with diagnostic colonoscopy (n = 10 424), there was no statistically significant difference by race in the prevalence of adenoma, advanced adenoma, advanced pathology in small adenomas (high-grade dysplasia or villous histology in adenomas <10 mm), or colorectal cancer. We observed a lower follow-up for screen-detected abnormalities among blacks when compared with whites but little difference in the yield of colorectal neoplasia. Health-care utilization may be playing more of a role in

  12. Navigating the Transition From Cancer Care to Primary Care: Assistance of a Survivorship Care Plan.

    PubMed

    Brant, Jeannine M; Blaseg, Karyl; Aders, Kathy; Oliver, Dona; Gray, Evan; Dudley, William N

    2016-11-01

    To examine symptom and quality-of-life (QOL) trajectories in breast cancer and lymphoma survivors enrolled in a survivorship navigation intervention and to explore patient, caregiver, and primary care provider (PCP) satisfaction with receipt of a survivorship care plan (SCP). 
. Prospective, cohort, longitudinal.
. The Billings Clinic, an integrated cancer center in Montana. 
. 67 patients with breast cancer or lymphoma who recently completed cancer treatment, along with 39 of their caregivers and 23 PCPs. 
. Data collection at one, three, and six months by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General and satisfaction surveys.
. Symptoms, QOL, and satisfaction with the survivorship navigator and the SCP.
. Symptoms persisted six months following treatment. Symptoms and QOL indicators with worst intensity were energy, sleep, coping, and satisfaction with sex life. Patients with more comorbidities reported worse QOL, telephoned the survivorship navigator more often, and were more satisfied with the SCP. Patients with lymphoma reported higher QOL, but it was not significantly different from patients with breast cancer. Patients were significantly more satisfied than caregivers with the SCP at time 1. PCPs were highly satisfied with the SCP.
. Some symptoms persist, even when cancer treatment has ended. Patients with comorbidities are at higher risk for more severe symptoms and worse QOL and may benefit from ongoing support. SCPs can facilitate patients' transition to primary care following cancer treatment. 
. Healthcare professionals who care for breast cancer survivors need to routinely assess them for the presence of comorbid conditions. Obese breast cancer survivors may benefit from weight reduction interventions to possibly decrease their risk of developing lymphedema and improve their overall health status.

  13. Interpretive Flexibility in Mobile Health: Lessons From a Government-Sponsored Home Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Mathiassen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile technologies have emerged as important tools that health care personnel can use to gain easy access to client data anywhere. This is particularly useful for nurses and care workers in home health care as they provide services to clients in many different settings. Although a growing body of evidence supports the use of mobile technologies, the diverse implications of mobile health have yet to be fully documented. Objective Our objective was to examine a large-scale government-sponsored mobile health implementation program in the Danish home care sector and to understand how the technology was used differently across home care agencies. Methods We chose to perform a longitudinal case study with embedded units of analysis. We included multiple data sources, such as written materials, a survey to managers across all 98 Danish municipalities, and semistructured interviews with managers, care workers, and nurses in three selected home care agencies. We used process models of change to help analyze the overall implementation process from a longitudinal perspective and to identify antecedent conditions, key events, and practical outcomes. Results Strong collaboration between major stakeholders in the Danish home care sector (government bodies, vendors, consultants, interest organizations, and managers) helped initiate and energize the change process, and government funding supported quick and widespread technology adoption. However, although supported by the same government-sponsored program, mobile technology proved to have considerable interpretive flexibility with variation in perceived nature of technology, technology strategy, and technology use between agencies. What was first seen as a very promising innovation across the Danish home care sector subsequently became the topic of debate as technology use arrangements ran counter to existing norms and values in individual agencies. Conclusions Government-sponsored programs can have both positive and

  14. Flexible monitoring in the management of patient care processes: one year after the pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jones, C; Gordon, G

    2001-01-01

    A pilot study at a large metropolitan hospital in Auckland identified a specific group of patients that can be safely monitored outside the Coronary Care Unit using Flexible Monitoring technology. This article describes the project management processes used to further develop the remote monitoring system into a hospital network of remote monitoring. The educational and staff support resources required throughout the project are described as are the strategies adopted to meet those needs including the utilization of online learning. Outcomes from the introduction of the system include improved electrokardiogram interpretation by nursing staff and improved ECG resource allocation.

  15. The Value of Continuity between Primary Care and Surgical Care in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving continuity between primary care and cancer care is critical for improving cancer outcomes and curbing cancer costs. A dimension of continuity, we investigated how regularly patients receive their primary care and surgical care for colon cancer from the same hospital and whether this affects mortality and costs. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Registry (SEER)-Medicare data, we performed a retrospective cohort study of stage I-III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. There were 23,305 stage I-III colon cancer patients who received primary care in the year prior to diagnosis and underwent operative care for colon cancer. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their surgery and to their primary care provider’s main hospital, and then classified according to whether these two hospitals were same or different. Outcomes examined were hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazard for colon cancer specific mortality, and generalized linear estimate for costs at 12 months, from propensity score matched models. Results Fifty-two percent of stage I-III colon patients received primary care and surgical care from the same hospital. Primary care and surgical care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality, but was associated with lower inpatient, outpatient, and total costs of care. Total cost difference was $8,836 (95% CI $2,746–$14,577), a 20% reduction in total median cost of care at 12 months. Conclusions Receiving primary care and surgical care at the same hospital, compared to different hospitals, was associated with lower costs but still similar survival among stage I-III colon cancer patients. Nonetheless, health care policy which encourages further integration between primary care and cancer care in order to improve outcomes and decrease costs will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving health care

  16. Effect of flexible sigmoidoscopy screening on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Holme, Øyvind; Løberg, Magnus; Kalager, Mette; Bretthauer, Michael; Hernán, Miguel A; Aas, Eline; Eide, Tor J; Skovlund, Eva; Schneede, Jørn; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Hoff, Geir

    2014-08-13

    Colorectal cancer is a major health burden. Screening is recommended in many countries. To estimate the effectiveness of flexible sigmoidoscopy screening on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in a population-based trial. Randomized clinical trial of 100,210 individuals aged 50 to 64 years, identified from the population of Oslo city and Telemark County, Norway. Screening was performed in 1999-2000 (55-64-year age group) and in 2001 (50-54-year age group), with follow-up ending December 31, 2011. Of those selected, 1415 were excluded due to prior colorectal cancer, emigration, or death, and 3 could not be traced in the population registry. Participants randomized to the screening group were invited to undergo screening. Within the screening group, participants were randomized 1:1 to receive once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy or combination of once-only flexible sigmoidoscopy and fecal occult blood testing (FOBT). Participants with positive screening test results (cancer, adenoma, polyp ≥10 mm, or positive FOBT) were offered colonoscopy. The control group received no intervention. Colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. A total of 98,792 participants were included in the intention-to-screen analyses, of whom 78,220 comprised the control group and 20,572 comprised the screening group (10,283 randomized to receive a flexible sigmoidoscopy and 10,289 to receive flexible sigmoidoscopy and FOBT). Adherence with screening was 63%. After a median of 10.9 years, 71 participants died of colorectal cancer in the screening group vs 330 in the control group (31.4 vs 43.1 deaths per 100,000 person-years; absolute rate difference, 11.7 [95% CI, 3.0-20.4]; hazard ratio [HR], 0.73 [95% CI, 0.56-0.94]). Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 253 participants in the screening group vs 1086 in the control group (112.6 vs 141.0 cases per 100,000 person-years; absolute rate difference, 28.4 [95% CI, 12.1-44.7]; HR, 0.80 [95% CI, 0.70-0.92]). Colorectal cancer incidence was reduced

  17. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Surbone, A

    2006-01-01

    Cancer is increasing in incidence and prevalence worldwide, and the WHO has recently included cancer and its treatments as a health priority in developed and developing countries. The cultural diversity of oncology patients is bound to increase, and cultural sensitivity and competence are now required of all oncology professionals. A culturally competent cancer care leads to improved therapeutic outcome and it may decrease disparities in medical care. Cultural competence in medicine is a complex multilayered accomplishment, requiring knowledge, skills and attitudes whose acquisition is needed for effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting. Effective cultural competence is based on knowledge of the notion of culture; on awareness of possible biases and prejudices related to stereotyping, racism, classism, sexism; on nurturing appreciation for differences in health care values; and on fostering the attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity and awareness. Cultural competence in healthcare relates to individual professionals, but also to organizations and systems. A culturally competent healthcare system must consider in their separateness and yet in there reciprocal influences social, racial and cultural factors. By providing a framework of reference to interpret the external world and relate to it, culture affects patients' perceptions of disease, disability and suffering; degrees and expressions of concern about them; their responses to treatments and their relationship to individual physicians and to the healthcare system. Culture also influences the interpretation of ethical norms and principles, and especially of individual autonomy, which can be perceived either as synonymous with freedom or with isolation depending on the cultural context. This, in turn, determines the variability of truth-telling attitudes and practices worldwide as well as the different roles of family in the information and decision-making process of

  18. Implementing a survivorship care plan for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rita

    2008-06-01

    The growing number of cancer survivors challenges healthcare organizations to develop programs that support survivors' transition from active treatments to survivorship care. Many individuals and families continue to face complicated care issues resulting from cancer diagnosis and side effects long after completion of their treatments. This article describes a model of a survivorship care plan, Cancer Treatment Summary and Follow-Up Care Plan, piloted in an outpatient clinical setting in a community hospital for patients with breast cancer. The plan can be expanded to include other cancer types. The intent of the survivorship care plan is to strengthen the care connections and coordination of services for survivors of breast cancer to ensure that continuing care needs are met during the survivorship phase of the cancer trajectory. The survivorship care plan is a unique opportunity for oncology nurses to be catalysts for the interdisciplinary interactions that are required to develop survivorship care plans and to implement a change in oncology nursing practice. The intervention shifts the paradigm of cancer survivorship care from an acute care medical model to a wellness model for cancer survivors in the clinical setting.

  19. Improving supportive and palliative care for adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Alison

    Although many patients with cancer report positively on their experience of care, others claim they are not receiving the information and support they need at different stages of their care pathway. The national cancer patient survey (Department of Health, 2002), for example, showed wide variations in the quality of care delivered across the country.

  20. Determinants of Anti-Cancer Effect of Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Inhibitors: Bioenergetic Profile and Metabolic Flexibility of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Urra, Félix A; Weiss-López, Boris; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence highlights that energy requirements of cancer cells vary greatly from normal cells and they exhibit different metabolic phenotypes with variable participation of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Interestingly, mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) has been identified as an essential component in bioenergetics, biosynthesis and redox control during proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. This dependence converts ETC of cancer cells in a promising target to design small molecules with anti-cancer actions. Several small molecules have been described as ETC inhibitors with different consequences on mitochondrial bioenergetics, viability and proliferation of cancer cells, when the substrate availability is controlled to favor either the glycolytic or OXPHOS pathway. These ETC inhibitors can be grouped as 1) inhibitors of a respiratory complex (e.g. rotenoids, vanilloids, alkaloids, biguanides and polyphenols), 2) inhibitors of several respiratory complexes (e.g. capsaicin, ME-344 and epigallocatechin-3 gallate) and 3) inhibitors of ETC activity (e.g. elesclomol and VLX600). Although pharmacological ETC inhibition may produce cell death and a decrease of proliferation of cancer cells, factors such as degree of inhibition of ETC activity by small molecules, bioenergetic profile and metabolic flexibility of different cancer types or subpopulations of cells in a particular cancer type, can affect the impact of the anti-cancer actions. Particularly interesting are the adaptive mechanisms induced by ETC inhibition, such as induction of glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation, which may offer a strategy to sensitize cancer cells to inhibitors of glutamine metabolism.

  1. Breast cancer detection using high-density flexible electrode arrays and electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Matthew S; Barbre, Curtis; Chola, Aditya; Cunningham, Gisselle; Woods, Virginia; Viventi, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    While mammography remains the gold standard for breast cancer screening, additional adjunctive tools for early detection of breast cancer are needed especially for young women, women with dense breast tissue and those at increased risk due to genetic factors. These patient populations, along with those populations for whom mammography is not readily available, require alternative technologies capable of effectively detecting breast cancer. One such adjunctive modality for breast cancer detection is Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). It is a non-invasive technique that measures tissue conductivity by injecting a small current through a surface electrode while measuring electrode voltage(s). The surface measurements are then used to reconstruct a conductivity mapping of the tissue. The difference in conductivities between healthy tissue and that of carcinoma enable EIT to detect cancer. Electrical Impedance Tomography does not subject the patient to ionizing radiation, and offers significant potential for detecting very small tumors in early stages of development at a low cost. While prior systems have demonstrated success using EIT for breast cancer detection, the resolution of the reconstructed image was limited by the spatial resolution of the sensing electrode array. Here, we report the use of higher density (3mm spacing) flexible micro-electrode arrays to obtain tissue impedance maps. Accurate EIT reconstruction is highly dependent on the spatial resolution and fidelity of the surface measurements. High-density, flexible arrays that conform to the breast surface can offer great potential in reconstructing higher resolution conductivity maps than have been previously achieved.

  2. Views of cancer care reviews in primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Eike; Boulton, Mary; Rose, Peter; Lund, Susi; Richardson, Alison; Wilson, Sue; Watson, Eila

    2011-01-01

    Background The Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) provides an incentive for practices to establish a cancer register and conduct a review with cancer patients within 6 months of diagnosis, but implementation is unknown. Aim To describe: (1) implementation of the QOF cancer care review; (2) patients' experiences of primary care over the first 3 years following a cancer diagnosis; (3) patients' views on optimal care; and (4) the views of primary care professionals regarding their cancer care. Design of study Qualitative study using thematic analysis and a framework approach. Setting Six general practices in the Thames Valley area. Method Semi-structured interviews with cancer patients and focus groups with primary care teams. Results Thirty-eight adults with 12 different cancer types were interviewed. Seventy-one primary care team members took part in focus groups. Most cancer care reviews are conducted opportunistically. Thirty-five patients had had a review; only two could recall this. Patients saw acknowledgement of their diagnosis and provision of general support as important and not always adequately provided. An active approach and specific review appointment would legitimise the raising of concerns. Primary care teams considered cancer care to be part of their role. GPs emphasised the importance of being able to respond to individual patients' needs and closer links with secondary care to facilitate a more involved role. Conclusion Patients and primary care teams believe primary care has an important role to play in cancer care. Cancer care reviews in their current format are not helpful, with considerable scope for improving practice in this area. An invitation to attend a specific appointment at the end of active treatment may aid transition from secondary care and improve satisfaction with follow-up in primary care. PMID:21439175

  3. Monitoring the delivery of cancer care: Commission on Cancer and National Cancer Data Base.

    PubMed

    Williams, Richelle T; Stewart, Andrew K; Winchester, David P

    2012-07-01

    The primary objective of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) is to ensure the delivery of comprehensive, high-quality care that improves survival while maintaining quality of life for patients with cancer. This article examines the initiatives of the CoC toward achieving this goal, utilizing data from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to monitor treatment patterns and outcomes, to develop quality measures, and to benchmark hospital performance. The article also highlights how these initiatives align with the Institute of Medicine's recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care and briefly explores future projects of the CoC and NCDB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    PubMed

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  5. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  6. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  7. Healing environments in cancer treatment and care. Relations of space and practice in hematological cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Høybye, Mette Terp

    2013-02-01

    Given the growing attention to the importance of design in shaping healing hospital environments this study extends the understanding of healing environments, beyond causal links between environmental exposure and health outcome by elucidating how environments and practices interrelate. The study was conducted as an ethnographic fieldwork from March 2011 to September 2011 at the Department of Haematology at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, systematically using participant observation and interviews as research strategies. It included 20 patients, four of who were followed closely over an extended time period. Through thematic analysis five key concepts emerged about the social dynamics of hospital environments: practices of self; creating personal space; social recognition; negotiating space; and ambiguity of space and care. Through these concepts, the study demonstrates how the hospital environment is a flow of relations between space and practice that changes and challenges a structural idea of design and healing. Patients' sense of healing changes with the experience of progression in treatment and the capacity of the hospital space to incite an experience of homeliness and care. Furthermore, cancer patients continuously challenge the use and limits of space by individual objects and practices of privacy and home. Healing environments are complex relations between practices, space and care, where recognition of the individual patient's needs, values and experiences is key to developing the environment to support the patient quality of life. The present study holds implications for practice to inform design of future hospital environments for cancer treatment. The study points to the importance for being attentive to the need for flexible spaces in hospitals that recognize the dynamics of healing, by providing individualized care, relating to the particular and changing needs of patients supporting their potential and their challenged condition with the best

  8. International cancer care: what is the role of oncology nursing?

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy

    2010-10-01

    Comprehensive cancer care continues to improve in the United States, but many developing countries carry a high cancer burden. With limited resources, nurses in such countries often are unable to improve cancer detection and treatment or relieve patient suffering. The Oncology Nursing Society has developed collaborative relationships with many international organizations to educate nurses around the world. Global partnerships have the potential to improve cancer care internationally and encourage more oncology nurses to use their expertise and become "citizens of the world."

  9. Proposal of a flexible structural-organizing model for the Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Iapichino, G; Radrizzani, D; Rossi, C; Pezzi, A; Anghileri, A; Boffelli, S; Giardino, M; Mistraletti, G; Bertolini, G

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the capability of the Italian Group for the Evaluation of Intervention in Intensive Care Medicine (Gruppo Italiano Valutazione Interventi in Terapia Intensiva, GiViTI) Intensive Care Units (ICUs) in providing high level care (HLC) and to develop a flexible organiziational model, allowing for different levels of care in each ICU. Once the number of active beds, personnel and technology of each ICU were determined, we computed whether the available bed number and all available resources could provide HLC according to international standards. For ICUs lacking staff or equipment for safe HLC in all declared beds, we calculated the best combination between HLC and observation/monitoring beds with less need for nurses and technology (low level of care, LLC) in order to optimise the utilization of each bed. We also investigated the work organisation of physicians and nurses in these units. There are 2 070 available beds in the 293 GiViTI ICUs. To provide HLC according to international criteria, the beds would decrease to 80.9%, because 144 ICUs do not have nurses or equipment to provide HLC in each bed. In order to maximize the suitable use of available resources, these ICUs would have to reduce the HLC bed number using the regained nurse workload for LLC. Because of this, the total number of HLC beds would further decrease to 65.9% of all declared beds. During Sundays and holidays, the bed/doctor and the bed/nurse ratios increase in most ICUs. To maximize the staff and equipment resources available, the bed numbers of a general ICU providing HLC must vary, even daily, according to the level of care provided. This level is not always high for all patients present. Applying this organizing model to each ICU, we could have enough flexibility to face the different demands for assistance if the ICU is built as a large open space to achieve the best clinical model and use of resources.

  10. Diagnosis of extent of early gastric cancer using flexible spectral imaging color enhancement.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hironori; Miura, Yoshimasa; Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sunada, Keijiro; Satoh, Kiichi; Sugano, Kentaro

    2012-08-16

    The demarcation line between the cancerous lesion and the surrounding area could be easily recognized with flexible spectral imaging color enhancement (FICE) system compared with conventional white light images. The characteristic finding of depressed-type early gastric cancer (EGC) in most cases was revealed as reddish lesions distinct from the surrounding yellowish non-cancerous area without magnification. Conventional endoscopic images provide little information regarding depressed lesions located in the tangential line, but FICE produces higher color contrast of such cancers. Histological findings in depressed area with reddish color changes show a high density of glandular structure and an apparently irregular microvessel in intervening parts between crypts, resulting in the higher color contrast of FICE image between cancer and surrounding area. Some depressed cancers are shown as whitish lesion by conventional endoscopy. FICE also can produce higher color contrast between whitish cancerous lesions and surrounding atrophic mucosa. For nearly flat cancer, FICE can produce an irregular structural pattern of cancer distinct from that of the surrounding mucosa, leading to a clear demarcation. Most elevated-type EGCs are detected easily as yellowish lesions with clearly contrasting demarcation. In some cases, a partially reddish change is accompanied on the tumor surface similar to depressed type cancer. In addition, the FICE system is quite useful for the detection of minute gastric cancer, even without magnification. These new contrasting images with the FICE system may have the potential to increase the rate of detection of gastric cancers and screen for them more effectively as well as to determine the extent of EGC.

  11. Diagnosis of extent of early gastric cancer using flexible spectral imaging color enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hironori; Miura, Yoshimasa; Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sunada, Keijiro; Satoh, Kiichi; Sugano, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The demarcation line between the cancerous lesion and the surrounding area could be easily recognized with flexible spectral imaging color enhancement (FICE) system compared with conventional white light images. The characteristic finding of depressed-type early gastric cancer (EGC) in most cases was revealed as reddish lesions distinct from the surrounding yellowish non-cancerous area without magnification. Conventional endoscopic images provide little information regarding depressed lesions located in the tangential line, but FICE produces higher color contrast of such cancers. Histological findings in depressed area with reddish color changes show a high density of glandular structure and an apparently irregular microvessel in intervening parts between crypts, resulting in the higher color contrast of FICE image between cancer and surrounding area. Some depressed cancers are shown as whitish lesion by conventional endoscopy. FICE also can produce higher color contrast between whitish cancerous lesions and surrounding atrophic mucosa. For nearly flat cancer, FICE can produce an irregular structural pattern of cancer distinct from that of the surrounding mucosa, leading to a clear demarcation. Most elevated-type EGCs are detected easily as yellowish lesions with clearly contrasting demarcation. In some cases, a partially reddish change is accompanied on the tumor surface similar to depressed type cancer. In addition, the FICE system is quite useful for the detection of minute gastric cancer, even without magnification. These new contrasting images with the FICE system may have the potential to increase the rate of detection of gastric cancers and screen for them more effectively as well as to determine the extent of EGC. PMID:22912909

  12. Primary Health Care and Cervical Cancer Mortality Rates in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; da Silva, Núbia Cristina; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Queiroz, Rejane Christine de Sousa; de Souza, Marta Rovery; Lein, Adriana; Alvares, Viviane; de Almeida, Dante Grapiuna; Barbosa, Allan Claudius Queiroz; Thumé, Elaine; Staton, Catherine; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a common neoplasm that is responsible for nearly 230 000 deaths annually in Brazil. Despite this burden, cervical cancer is considered preventable with appropriate care. We conducted a longitudinal ecological study from 2002 to 2012 to examine the relationship between the delivery of preventive primary care and cervical cancer mortality rates in Brazil. Brazilian states and the federal district were the unit of analysis (N = 27). Results suggest that primary health care has contributed to reducing cervical cancer mortality rates in Brazil; however, the full potential of preventive care has yet to be realized. PMID:28252500

  13. Love, money, or flexibility: what motivates people to work in consumer-directed home care?

    PubMed

    Howes, Candace

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of wages and benefits (relative to other jobs available to workers), controlling for personal characteristics, on the recruitment and retention of providers working in a consumer-directed home care program. I used the results of focus groups to design a survey that was administered to 2,260 workers stratified by ethnicity and working in eight California counties that represented the range of wage and benefit packages available. I used logistic regression to measure the effect of wage and benefit levels, controlling for covariates, on home care workers' stated reason for entering and remaining in the job. Two thirds of respondents reported that commitment to their consumer was the most important reason why they took the job and flexibility was the second most important reason, regardless of wages and benefits and personal characteristics. However, in the county in which very part-time workers were eligible, health insurance was the most important reason for retention. Wage levels above $9 an hour mattered somewhat, especially where the increase was recent. Family providers responded to wage and benefit incentives similarly to non-family providers. To improve recruitment and retention of consumer-directed home care workers, jobs should be flexible and provide affordable health insurance for part-time workers. The effect of wages suggests that recruitment might be improved with higher wages, but only when they reach the $9 to $10 range (in 2004 dollars). Finally, policy must recognize that family caregivers have financial needs similar to non-family caregivers.

  14. Preparing for an epidemic: cancer care in an aging population.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population was charged with evaluating and proposing recommendations on how to improve the quality of cancer care, with a specific focus on the aging population. Based on their findings, the IOM committee recently released a report highlighting their 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care. Based on those recommendations, this article highlights ways to improve evidence-based care and addresses rising costs in health care for older adults with cancer. The IOM highlighted three recommendations to address the current research gaps in providing evidence-based care in older adults with cancer, which included (1) studying populations which match the age and health-risk profile of the population with the disease, (2) legislative incentives for companies to include patients that are older or with multiple morbidities in new cancer drug trials, and (3) expansion of research that contributes to the depth and breadth of data available for assessing interventions. The recommendations also highlighted the need to maintain affordable and accessible care for older adults with cancer, with an emphasis on finding creative solutions within both the care delivery system and payment models in order to balance costs while preserving quality of care. The implementation of the IOM's recommendations will be a key step in moving closer to the goal of providing accessible, affordable, evidence-based, high-quality care to all patients with cancer.

  15. Delivery of psychosocial care for cancer patients: a pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Durham, Morgan; Norton, Kelli; Anderson, James G

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial distress is common in cancer patients. Although common, psychosocial distress is frequently under-diagnosed and poorly managed in the U.S. health system. This paper describes 25 in-depth telephone interviews with health care professionals working within cancer care centers. Interview questions address perception of the psychosocial services offered within their cancer care organizations. Results indicate that access to psychosocial care is frequently dependent upon the subjective judgment of busy clinicians. Information technology could improve the delivery of psychosocial care by easing the administration of psychosocial assessments and increasing clinician contact with research evidence regarding distress management.

  16. Quality of cancer follow-up care: a focus on Latina breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ashing, Kimlin; Napoles, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Receiving quality cancer follow-up care influences survivorship outcomes. Among Latinas, breast cancer is the number one cause of cancer death; yet Latinas do not receive adequate follow-up care. This study examined quality of cancer follow-up care among Latina breast cancer survivors (BCS) and whether it differs by participant language and healthcare system variables (provider specialty, and medical setting). Methods Two hundred thirty-two (95 English-speaking Latina and 137 Spanish-speaking) Latina BCS were recruited from the California Cancer Registry, hospital cancer registries, and community agencies. Results English-speaking Latina BCS were more likely to report receiving cancer follow-up care at a doctor’s office (p<0.001). BCS without a regular place for cancer follow-up care were more likely to report not seeing a primary care provider (p<0.05) or cancer specialist (p<0.001) in the past 12 months. English-speaking Latina BCS (p<0.001), BCS who saw a cancer specialist in the past 12 months (p<0.001), and received follow-up care at a doctor’s office (p<0.05) reported higher quality of care. Speaking English, having seen a cancer specialist, and receiving follow-up care at a doctor’s office were independently associated with higher quality of care, explaining 44 % of the variance. Conclusions Our study findings suggest that examining the influence of ethnic and linguistic factors on quality of cancer follow-up care is necessary to address health disparities. Improved access to cancer follow-up care for Spanish-speaking Latina BCS is of particular concern. Implication of Cancer Survivors Identifying follow-up care needs of Latina BCS may contribute to providing high-quality care and improved survivorship outcomes. PMID:24563169

  17. Integrating Primary Care Providers in the Care of Cancer Survivors: Gaps in Evidence and Future Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; O’Malley, Denalee M.; Hudson, Shawna V.

    2017-01-01

    For over a decade since the release of the Institute of Medicine report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition, there has been a focus on providing coordinated, comprehensive care for cancer survivors that emphasized the role of primary care. Several models of care have been described which primarily focused on primary care providers (PCPs) as receivers of cancer survivors and specific types of information (e.g. survivorship care plans) from oncology based care, and not as active members of the cancer survivorship team. In this paper, we reviewed survivorship models that have been described in the literature, and specifically focused on strategies aiming to integrate primary care providers in caring for cancer survivors across different settings. We offer insights differentiating primary care providers’ level of expertise in cancer survivorship and how such expertise may be utilized. We provide recommendations for education, clinical practice, research and policy initiatives that may advance the integration of primary care providers in the care of cancer survivors in diverse clinical settings. PMID:28049575

  18. Delivering Flexible Education and Training to Health Professionals: Caring for Older Adults in Disasters.

    PubMed

    Altman, Brian A; Gulley, Kelly H; Rossi, Carlo; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Schor, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    The National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health (NCDMPH), in collaboration with over 20 subject matter experts, created a competency-based curriculum titled Caring for Older Adults in Disasters: A Curriculum for Health Professionals. Educators and trainers of health professionals are the target audience for this curriculum. The curriculum was designed to provide breadth of content yet flexibility for trainers to tailor lessons, or select particular lessons, for the needs of their learners and organizations. The curriculum covers conditions present in the older adult population that may affect their disaster preparedness, response, and recovery; issues related to specific types of disasters; considerations for the care of older adults throughout the disaster cycle; topics related to specific settings in which older adults receive care; and ethical and legal considerations. An excerpt of the final capstone lesson is included. These capstone activities can be used in conjunction with the curriculum or as part of stand-alone preparedness training. This article describes the development process, elements of each lesson, the content covered, and options for use of the curriculum in education and training for health professionals. The curriculum is freely available online at the NCDMPH website at http://ncdmph.usuhs.edu (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:633-637).

  19. Breast Cancer Screening in a Low Income Managed Care Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    to invasive beast cancer ratio, a pattern previously demonstrated for cervical cancer (9). This decline in the ratio of invasive to non- invasive...cervical carcinoma. Int. J Cancer 1978; 21:418-25. 10. Guzik DS. Efficacy of screening for cervical cancer : A review. Am J Public Health 1978; 68:125-34...and Cervical Cancer Screening in Low Income Managed Care Sample: The Efficacy of Physician Letters and Phone Calls. Am J of Public health. 85(6): 834

  20. Social media in cancer care: opportunities to improve care in locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Christine; Rajmohan, Yanchini; Poonja, Zia; Adilman, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    To examine the current data supporting use of social media in breast cancer clinical care. Although opportunities to utilize social media to increase knowledge have been commonly seized, the opportunity to improve communication among clinicians is lagging. Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) requires timely coordination of care among many specialists, and presents an excellent scenario for enhanced utilization of current IT strategies. A systematic review was conducted to assess the use of social media to enhance breast cancer care. In addition, a Web-based search using common search engines and publicly available social media was conducted to determine the prevalence of information and networking pages aimed at patients and clinicians. Over 400 articles were retrieved; 81% focused on delivery of information or online support to patients, 17% focused on delivery of information to physicians, and 1% focused on the use of social media to improve collaboration among clinicians. Web searches retrieved millions of hits, with very few hits relating to improving collaboration among clinicians. Although there is significant potential to utilize current technologies to improve care for patients and improve connectedness among clinicians, most of the currently available technologies focus solely on the delivery of information.

  1. Decreasing patient length of stay via new flexible exam room allocation policies in ambulatory care clinics.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Vahab; Griffin, Jacqueline; Stahl, James E

    2017-08-09

    To address prolonged lengths of stay (LOS) in ambulatory care clinics, we analyze the impact of implementing flexible and dynamic policies for assigning exam rooms to providers. In contrast to the traditional approaches of assigning specific rooms to each provider or pooling rooms among all practitioners, we characterize the impact of alternate compromise policies that have not been explored in previous studies. Since ambulatory care patients may encounter multiple different providers in a single visit, room allocation can be determined separately for each encounter accordingly. For the first phase of the visit, conducted by the medical assistant, we define a dynamic room allocation policy that adjusts room assignments based on the current state of the clinic. For the second phase of the visit, conducted by physicians, we define a series of room sharing policies which vary based on two dimensions, the number of shared rooms and the number of physicians sharing each room. Using a discrete event simulation model of an outpatient cardiovascular clinic, we analyze the benefits and costs associated with the proposed room allocation policies. Our findings show that it is not necessary to fully share rooms among providers in order to reduce patient LOS and physician idle time. Instead, most of the benefit of pooling can be achieved by implementation of a compromise room allocation approach, limiting the need for significant organizational changes within the clinic. Also, in order to achieve most of the benefits of room allocation policies, it is necessary to increase flexibility in the two dimensions simultaneously. These findings are shown to be consistent in settings with alternate patient scheduling and distinctions between physicians.

  2. Ten trends transforming cancer care and their effects on space planning for academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Mara; Markovitz, Sarah; Silverman, Susan; Yost, Carl

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to define the major trends currently affecting space needs for academic medical center (AMC) cancer centers. It will distinguish between the trends that promote the concentration of services with those that promote decentralization as well as identify opportunities for achieving greater effectiveness in cancer care space planning. Changes in cancer care-higher survival rates, increased clinical trials, new technology, and changing practice models-increasingly fill hospitals' and clinicians' schedules and strain clinical space resources. Conflicts among these trends are concentrating some services and dispersing others. As a result, AMCs must expand and renovate intelligently to continue providing state-of-the-art, compassionate care. Although the typical AMC cancer center can expect to utilize more space than it would have 10 years ago, a deeper understanding of the cancer center enterprise can lead to opportunities for more effectively using available facility resources. Each AMC must determine for itself the appropriate balance of patient volume, clinical activity, and services between its main hospital campus and satellite branches. As well, space allocation should be flexible, as care trends, medical technology, and the provider's own priorities shift over time. The goal isn't necessarily more space-it's better space. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Skin cancer: increasing awareness and screening in primary care.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Randy

    2014-05-12

    Skin cancer screening (SCS) promotes early detection and improves treatment. Primary care providers are strategically positioned to provide screenings, yet the frequency is low. Strategies to improve SCS include increasing skin cancer awareness, targeting high-risk patient populations, and advocating for primary care providers to conduct screenings.

  4. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Effective cancer communication between the health care team, cancer patients, and their family is important. Learn about communication skills that support a patient-centered practice and how to talk with adults and children about their diagnosis, prognosis, and transition to end-of-life care in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. Cancer Survivors Gain from Web-Based Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163535.html Cancer Survivors Gain From Web-Based Health Care But some patients reported missing face-to-face ... 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Online- and phone-based health care offers a number of benefits for cancer survivors, ...

  6. Primary care physicians' cancer screening recommendation practices and perceptions of cancer risk of Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Harry T; Ma, Grace X; Gold, Robert S; Atkinson, Nancy L; Wang, Min Qi

    2013-01-01

    Asian Americans experience disproportionate incidence and mortality rates of certain cancers, compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Primary care physicians are a critical source for cancer screening recommendations and play a significant role in increasing cancer screening of their patients. This study assessed primary care physicians' perceptions of cancer risk in Asians and screening recommendation practices. Primary care physicians practicing in New Jersey and New York City (n=100) completed a 30-question survey on medical practice characteristics, Asian patient communication, cancer screening guidelines, and Asian cancer risk. Liver cancer and stomach cancer were perceived as higher cancer risks among Asian Americans than among the general population, and breast and prostate cancer were perceived as lower risks. Physicians are integral public health liaisons who can be both influential and resourceful toward educating Asian Americans about specific cancer awareness and screening information.

  7. Comparisons of patient and physician expectations for cancer survivorship care.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Winson Y; Neville, Bridget A; Cameron, Danielle B; Cook, E Francis; Earle, Craig C

    2009-05-20

    To compare expectations for cancer survivorship care between patients and their physicians and between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncologists. Survivors and their physicians were surveyed to evaluate for expectations regarding physician participation in primary cancer follow-up, screening for other cancers, general preventive health, and management of comorbidities. Of 992 eligible survivors and 607 physicians surveyed, 535 (54%) and 378 (62%) were assessable, respectively. Among physician respondents, 255 (67%) were PCPs and 123 (33%) were oncologists. Comparing patients with their oncologists, expectations were highly discrepant for screening for cancers other than the index one (agreement rate, 29%), with patients anticipating significantly more oncologist involvement. Between patients and their PCPs, expectations were most incongruent for primary cancer follow-up (agreement rate, 35%), with PCPs indicating they should contribute a much greater part to this aspect of care. Expectations between patients and their PCPs were generally more concordant than between patients and their oncologists. PCPs and oncologists showed high discordances in perceptions of their own roles for primary cancer follow-up, cancer screening, and general preventive health (agreement rates of 3%, 44%, and 51%, respectively). In the case of primary cancer follow-up, both PCPs and oncologists indicated they should carry substantial responsibility for this task. Patients and physicians have discordant expectations with respect to the roles of PCPs and oncologists in cancer survivorship care. Uncertainties around physician roles and responsibilities can lead to deficiencies in care, supporting the need to make survivorship care planning a standard component in cancer management.

  8. [Cystoscopy in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: when and how (rigid or flexible)].

    PubMed

    Cicione, Antonio; Cantiello, Francesco; Damiano, Rocco

    2013-01-01

    Cystoscopy is a common procedure in the urological practice due to its ability to survey the bladder for a variety of indications. It is the principal means of diagnosis and surveillance of bladder tumors. Hematuria is the most common finding of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), as a consequence of that it is one of the most frequent reasons to perform cystoscopy. The follow-up of patients treated for NMIBC is of great importance because of the high incidence of recurrence and progression of the disease, whereby patients with NMIBC undergo cystoscopy repeatedly (every three months generally). At present, the schedule and methods of follow-up is a sign of patient's progression and recurrence risk, which has to be rated for each patient when follow-up begins. Moreover, before the development of flexible cystoscopy, patients underwent rigid cystoscopy with greater discomfort. The advance of flexible cystoscopy has significantly decreased the pain and discomfort associated with the procedure, and the flexible instrument is currently considered the standard tool to perform cystoscopy. However, controversies exist about the use of anesthetic gel during cystoscopy. The aim of this study is to report some short evidence about cystoscopy in particularly about the follow-up timing for NMIBC and the use of rigid or flexible cystoscopy.

  9. Programmable bio-nano-chip system: a flexible point-of-care platform for bioscience and clinical measurements

    PubMed Central

    McRae, Michael. P.; Simmons, Glennon. W.; Wong, Jorge; Shadfan, Basil; Gopalkrishnan, Sanjiv; Christodoulides, Nicolaos

    2015-01-01

    The development of integrated instrumentation for universal bioassay systems serves as a key goal for the lab-on-a-chip community. The programmable bio-nano-chip (p-BNC) system is a versatile multiplexed and multiclass chemical- and bio-sensing system for bioscience and clinical measurements. The system is comprised of two main components, a disposable cartridge and a portable analyzer. The customizable single-use plastic cartridges, which now can be manufactured in high volumes using injection molding, are designed for analytical performance, ease of use, reproducibility, and low cost. These labcard devices implement high surface area nano-structured biomarker capture elements that enable high performance signaling and are index matched to real-world biological specimens. This detection modality, along with the convenience of on-chip fluid storage in blisters and self-contained waste, represents a standard process to digitize biological signatures at the point-of-care. A companion portable analyzer prototype has been developed to integrate fluid motivation, optical detection, and automated data analysis, and it serves as the human interface for complete assay automation. In this report, we provide a systems-level perspective of the p-BNC universal biosensing platform with an emphasis on flow control, device integration, and automation. To demonstrate the flexibility of the p-BNC, we distinguish diseased and non-case patients across three significant disease applications: prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and acute myocardial infarction. Progress towards developing a rapid 7 minute myoglobin assay is presented using the fully automated p-BNC system. PMID:26308851

  10. Programmable bio-nano-chip system: a flexible point-of-care platform for bioscience and clinical measurements.

    PubMed

    McRae, Michael P; Simmons, Glennon W; Wong, Jorge; Shadfan, Basil; Gopalkrishnan, Sanjiv; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; McDevitt, John T

    2015-10-21

    The development of integrated instrumentation for universal bioassay systems serves as a key goal for the lab-on-a-chip community. The programmable bio-nano-chip (p-BNC) system is a versatile multiplexed and multiclass chemical- and bio-sensing system for bioscience and clinical measurements. The system is comprised of two main components, a disposable cartridge and a portable analyzer. The customizable single-use plastic cartridges, which now can be manufactured in high volumes using injection molding, are designed for analytical performance, ease of use, reproducibility, and low cost. These labcard devices implement high surface area nano-structured biomarker capture elements that enable high performance signaling and are index-matched to real-world biological specimens. This detection modality, along with the convenience of on-chip fluid storage in blisters and self-contained waste, represents a standard process to digitize biological signatures at the point-of-care. A companion portable analyzer prototype has been developed to integrate fluid motivation, optical detection, and automated data analysis, and it serves as the human interface for complete assay automation. In this report, we provide a systems-level perspective of the p-BNC universal biosensing platform with an emphasis on flow control, device integration, and automation. To demonstrate the flexibility of the p-BNC, we distinguish diseased and non-case patients across three significant disease applications: prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and acute myocardial infarction. Progress towards developing a rapid 7 minute myoglobin assay is presented using the fully automated p-BNC system.

  11. Health Reforms as Examples of Multilevel Interventions in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Mary L.; Devers, Kelly J.

    2012-01-01

    To increase access and improve system quality and efficiency, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act with sweeping changes to the nation’s health-care system. Although not intended to be specific to cancer, the act's implementation will profoundly impact cancer care. Its components will influence multiple levels of the health-care environment including states, communities, health-care organizations, and individuals seeking care. To illustrate these influences, two reforms are considered: 1) accountable care organizations and 2) insurance-based reforms to gather evidence about effectiveness. We discuss these reforms using three facets of multilevel interventions: 1) their intended and unintended consequences, 2) the importance of timing, and 3) their implications for cancer. The success of complex health reforms requires understanding the scientific basis and evidence for carrying out such multilevel interventions. Conversely and equally important, successful implementation of multilevel interventions depends on understanding the political setting and goals of health-care reform. PMID:22623600

  12. Health reforms as examples of multilevel interventions in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Flood, Ann B; Fennell, Mary L; Devers, Kelly J

    2012-05-01

    To increase access and improve system quality and efficiency, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act with sweeping changes to the nation's health-care system. Although not intended to be specific to cancer, the act's implementation will profoundly impact cancer care. Its components will influence multiple levels of the health-care environment including states, communities, health-care organizations, and individuals seeking care. To illustrate these influences, two reforms are considered: 1) accountable care organizations and 2) insurance-based reforms to gather evidence about effectiveness. We discuss these reforms using three facets of multilevel interventions: 1) their intended and unintended consequences, 2) the importance of timing, and 3) their implications for cancer. The success of complex health reforms requires understanding the scientific basis and evidence for carrying out such multilevel interventions. Conversely and equally important, successful implementation of multilevel interventions depends on understanding the political setting and goals of health-care reform.

  13. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Ruth C.; Simon, Melissa A.; Madden, Debra L.; Gradishar, William J.; Benson, Al B.; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Weiss, Elisa S.; Gareen, Ilana F.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Khan, Seema A.; Bunce, Mikele M.; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. We examined challenges faced by a patient with early-stage breast cancer that resulted from difficulties in understanding and managing task interdependence across clinical domains involved in this patient’s care. We used team science supported by the project management discipline to discuss how various task interdependence aspects can be recognized, deliberately designed, and systematically managed to prevent care breakdowns. This case highlights how effective task interdependence management facilitated by project management methods could markedly improve the course of a patient’s care. This work informs efforts of cancer centers and practices to redesign cancer care delivery through innovative, practical, and patient-centered approaches to management of task interdependence in cancer care. Future patient-reported outcomes research will help to determine optimal ways to engage patients, including those who are medically underserved, in managing task interdependence in their own care. PMID:27577619

  14. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Trosman, Julia R; Carlos, Ruth C; Simon, Melissa A; Madden, Debra L; Gradishar, William J; Benson, Al B; Rapkin, Bruce D; Weiss, Elisa S; Gareen, Ilana F; Wagner, Lynne I; Khan, Seema A; Bunce, Mikele M; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B

    2016-11-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. We examined challenges faced by a patient with early-stage breast cancer that resulted from difficulties in understanding and managing task interdependence across clinical domains involved in this patient's care. We used team science supported by the project management discipline to discuss how various task interdependence aspects can be recognized, deliberately designed, and systematically managed to prevent care breakdowns. This case highlights how effective task interdependence management facilitated by project management methods could markedly improve the course of a patient's care. This work informs efforts of cancer centers and practices to redesign cancer care delivery through innovative, practical, and patient-centered approaches to management of task interdependence in cancer care. Future patient-reported outcomes research will help to determine optimal ways to engage patients, including those who are medically underserved, in managing task interdependence in their own care.

  15. Area-level variations in cancer care and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Keating, Nancy L; Landrum, Mary Beth; Lamont, Elizabeth B; Bozeman, Samuel R; McNeil, Barbara J

    2012-05-01

    : Substantial regional variations in health-care spending exist across the United States; yet, care and outcomes are not better in higher-spending areas. Most studies have focused on care in fee-for-service Medicare; whether spillover effects exist in settings without financial incentives for more care is unknown. : We studied care for cancer patients in fee-for-service Medicare and the Veterans Health Administration (VA) to understand whether processes and outcomes of care vary with area-level Medicare spending. : An observational study using logistic regression to assess care by area-level measures of Medicare spending. : Patients with lung, colorectal, or prostate cancers diagnosed during 2001-2004 in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) areas or the VA. The SEER cohort included fee-for-service Medicare patients aged older than 65 years. : Recommended and preference-sensitive cancer care and mortality. : In fee-for-service Medicare, higher-spending areas had higher rates of recommended care (curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer and chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer) and preference-sensitive care (chemotherapy for stage IV lung and colon cancer and primary treatment of local/regional prostate cancer) and had lower lung cancer mortality. In the VA, we observed minimal variation in care by area-level Medicare spending. : Our findings suggest that intensity of care for Medicare beneficiaries is not driving variations in VA care, despite some overlap in physician networks. Although the Dartmouth Atlas work has been of unprecedented importance in demonstrating variations in Medicare spending, new measures may be needed to better understand variations in other populations.

  16. The evolving paradigm of adult cancer survivor care.

    PubMed

    Grant, Marcia; Economou, Denice

    2008-04-01

    As a result of earlier diagnosis and improved treatment, the number of cancer survivors is steadily increasing, with over 11 million in the US today. These survivors face a multitude of long-term and late effects as a result of their cancer and its treatment. It is increasingly recognized that this group has complex and ongoing needs for medical care education, surveillance, screening, and support. Many organizations have helped to advance survivorship care; key among them are the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, the Institute of Medicine, the Lance Armstrong Foundation, and the Office of Cancer Survivorship of the National Cancer Institute. Important reports have defined goals of care; identified interventions to improve outcomes among survivors; and recognized the need for posttreatment surveillance, healthy lifestyle behaviors, and continued research in all of these areas. With these advances, survivorship care is emerging as a distinct component of the continuum of care in oncology.

  17. PALLIATIVE CARE AND SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT IN OLDER CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Older cancer patients are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with Palliative Care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of the cancer patient with an emphasis on quality of life. In this article, we discuss the evaluation and management of pain and other common non-pain symptoms that occur in the elderly cancer patient, as well as end of life care. PMID:26614860

  18. Palliative Care and Symptom Management in Older Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    Older patients with cancer are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with palliative care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of patients with cancer with an emphasis on quality of life. This article discusses the evaluation and management of pain and other common nonpain symptoms that occur in elderly patients with cancer, as well as end-of-life care.

  19. Impact of health care reform on the cancer patient: a view from cancer executives.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Linda W; Farber, Matthew; Guidi, Teri Ursin; Laffey, William J

    2010-01-01

    Cancer leaders assess the impact on the cancer patient of the historic passage of Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (HR 3590) (PPACA). The Association of Cancer Executives, a national organization for leadership development of oncology executives and improvements in patient care delivery, and the Association of Community Cancer Centers, a leading education and advocacy organization for the cancer team, weigh in on the impact of PPACA. Oncology leaders assess the impact of PPACA on cancer patients and families, cancer programs in the United States, and provider relations. The provisions of PPACA most impacting cancer patients are reviewed, including reimbursement changes, expansion of prevention and screening services, the development of accountable care organizations, physician relations, and the implementation of integrated electronic health records. Cancer executives prepare their programs for PPACA by changing the care delivery model to ensure the economic survival of private practices and hospital-based programs.

  20. [Integration of nutritional care into cancer treatment: need for improvement].

    PubMed

    Joly, Caroline; Jacqueline-Ravel, Nathalie; Pugliesi-Rinaldi, Angela; Bigler-Perrotin, Lucienne; Chikhi, Marinette; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Dulguerov, Pavel; Miralbell, Raymond; Picard-Kossovsky, Michel; Seium, Yodit; Thériault, Michel; Pichard, Claude

    2011-11-16

    Progresses in cancer treatment transformed cancer into a chronic disease associated with growing nutritional problems. Poor nutritional status of cancer patients worsens morbidity, mortality, overall cost of care and decreases patients' quality of life, oncologic treatments tolerance and efficacy. These adverse effects lead to treatment modifications or interruptions, reducing the chances to control or cure cancer. Implementation of an interdisciplinary and longitudinal integration of nutritional care and nutritional information into cancer treatment (The OncoNut Program) could prevent or treat poor nutritional status and its adversely side effects.

  1. Detecting cancer: Pearls for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Simon B; Montero, Alberto J

    2016-07-01

    Five-year survival rates have improved over the past 40 years for nearly all types of cancer, partially thanks to early detection and prevention. Since patients typically present to their primary care physician with initial symptoms, it is vital for primary care physicians to accurately diagnose common cancers and to recognize unusual presentations of highly curable cancers such as Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancers, for which the 5-year overall survival rates are greater than 85%. This paper reviews these cancers and provides clinically relevant pearls from an oncologic perspective for physicians who are the first point of contact. Copyright © 2016 Cleveland Clinic.

  2. Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0540 TITLE: Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nina Bickell CONTRACTING...11-1-0540 Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care 5b. GRANT NUMBER PC101939 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have completed all the milestones for the study. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quality indicators, locally advanced prostate cancer

  3. Palliative care in cancer: managing patients' expectations.

    PubMed

    Ghandourh, Wsam A

    2016-12-01

    Advanced cancer patients commonly have misunderstandings about the intentions of treatment and their overall prognosis. Several studies have shown that large numbers of patients receiving palliative radiation or chemotherapy hold unrealistic hopes of their cancer being cured by such therapies, which can affect their ability to make well-informed decisions about treatment options. This review aimed to explore this discrepancy between patients' and physicians' expectations by investigating three primary issues: (1) the factors associated with patients developing unrealistic expectations; (2) the implications of having unrealistic hopes and the effects of raising patients' awareness about prognosis; and (3) patients' and caregivers' perspective on disclosure and their preferences for communication styles. Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic databases including Pubmed, EMBASE and ScienceDirect using multiple combinations of keywords, which yielded a total of 65 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The discrepancy between patients' and doctors' expectations was associated with many factors including doctors' reluctance to disclose terminal prognoses and patients' ability to understand or accept such information. The majority of patients and caregivers expressed a desire for detailed prognostic information; however, varied responses have been reported on the preferred style of conveying such information. Communication styles have profound effects on patients' experience and treatment choices. Patients' views on disclosure are influenced by many cultural, psychological and illness-related factors, therefore individuals' needs must be considered when conveying prognostic information. More research is needed to identify communication barriers and the interventions that could be used to increase patients' satisfaction with palliative care.

  4. Cancer Core Europe: a consortium to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum challenge.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, Alexander M M; Caldas, Carlos; Ringborg, Ulrik; Medema, René; Tabernero, Josep; Wiestler, Otmar

    2014-11-01

    European cancer research for a transformative initiative by creating a consortium of six leading excellent comprehensive cancer centres that will work together to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum. Prerequisites for joint translational and clinical research programs are very demanding. These require the creation of a virtual single 'e-hospital' and a powerful translational platform, inter-compatible clinical molecular profiling laboratories with a robust underlying computational biology pipeline, standardised functional and molecular imaging, commonly agreed Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for liquid and tissue biopsy procurement, storage and processing, for molecular diagnostics, 'omics', functional genetics, immune-monitoring and other assessments. Importantly also it requires a culture of data collection and data storage that provides complete longitudinal data sets to allow for: effective data sharing and common database building, and to achieve a level of completeness of data that is required for conducting outcome research, taking into account our current understanding of cancers as communities of evolving clones. Cutting edge basic research and technology development serve as an important driving force for innovative translational and clinical studies. Given the excellent track records of the six participants in these areas, Cancer Core Europe will be able to support the full spectrum of research required to address the cancer research- cancer care continuum. Cancer Core Europe also constitutes a unique environment to train the next generation of talents in innovative translational and clinical oncology.

  5. Risk-Based Health Care, the Cancer Survivor, the Oncologist and the Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Mary S.; Partridge, Ann; Grunfeld, Eva; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face substantial risks for morbidity, reduced quality of life, and premature mortality related to the cancer itself and/or the interventions undertaken to control cancer. Risk-based care that involves a personalized systematic plan of periodic screening, surveillance, and prevention relevant to the cancer experience is recommended to address the comprehensive health needs of the growing population of cancer survivors. Risk-based care and coordination between oncology and primary care providers have been identified as important metrics of quality cancer survivorship care. Various models of survivorship care, treatment summaries and survivorship care plans have been promoted as methods to facilitate communication among providers across care transitions and improve survivor access to quality survivorship care. However, research supporting the feasibility of implementing these practices and their effectiveness in enhancing health outcomes is limited. This article reviews key concepts underpinning clinical and research initiatives endeavoring to improve access to quality care among long-term survivors and summarizes results of intervention studies implementing these elements in transitioning survivors from oncology to primary care providers for long-term follow-up care. PMID:24331199

  6. A flexible cold microplasma jet using biocompatible dielectric tubes for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-O; Wei Yanzhang; Li Jinhua

    2010-05-17

    This paper describes a flexible microplasma jet device using a Tygon S-54-HL tube as a biocompatible tube and its potential in developing cancer therapies. The optical and physical properties of the plasma jets and preliminary apoptosis data of cultured murine tumor cells and nontumor fibroblast cells treated with these plasma jets are presented. Microplasma jets were observed to induce apoptosis in cultured murine cells in a dose-dependent manner. The murine melanoma tumor cells were more sensitive to plasma treatment than fibroblast cells. These features allow the direct and precise application of this microplasma jet device to tumor cells.

  7. A flexible cold microplasma jet using biocompatible dielectric tubes for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-O.; Wei, Yanzhang; Li, Jinhua

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes a flexible microplasma jet device using a Tygon® S-54-HL tube as a biocompatible tube and its potential in developing cancer therapies. The optical and physical properties of the plasma jets and preliminary apoptosis data of cultured murine tumor cells and nontumor fibroblast cells treated with these plasma jets are presented. Microplasma jets were observed to induce apoptosis in cultured murine cells in a dose-dependent manner. The murine melanoma tumor cells were more sensitive to plasma treatment than fibroblast cells. These features allow the direct and precise application of this microplasma jet device to tumor cells.

  8. Delivering High-Quality and Affordable Care Throughout the Cancer Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Ganz, Patricia A.; Aberle, Denise; Abernethy, Amy; Bekelman, Justin; Brawley, Otis; Goodwin, James S.; Hu, Jim C.; Schrag, Deborah; Temel, Jennifer S.; Schnipper, Lowell

    2013-01-01

    The national cost of cancer care is projected to reach $173 billion by 2020, increasing from $125 billion in 2010. This steep upward cost trajectory has placed enormous an financial burden on patients, their families, and society as a whole and raised major concern about the ability of the health care system to provide and sustain high-quality cancer care. To better understand the cost drivers of cancer care and explore approaches that will mitigate the problem, the National Cancer Policy Forum of the Institute of Medicine held a workshop entitled “Delivering Affordable Cancer Care in the 21st Century” in October 2012. Workshop participants included bioethicists, health economists, primary care physicians, and medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists, from both academic and community settings. All speakers expressed a sense of urgency about the affordability of cancer care resulting from the future demographic trend as well as the high cost of emerging cancer therapies and rapid diffusion of new technologies in the absence to evidence indicating improved outcomes for patients. This article is our summary of presentations at the workshop that highlighted the overuse and underuse of screening, treatments, and technologies throughout the cancer care continuum in oncology practice in the United States. PMID:24127450

  9. Vietnam: integrating palliative care into HIV/AIDS and cancer care.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, Eric L; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Minh; Green, Kimberly; Van Kham, Le; Khue, Luong Ngoc

    2007-05-01

    Vietnam is struggling to meet the growing need for both disease-modifying and palliative care for people with life-threatening chronic diseases such as HIV/AIDS and cancer. Recently, Vietnam initiated rapid development of a national palliative care program for HIV/AIDS and cancer patients that builds on existing palliative care programs and experience and integrates palliative care into standard HIV/AIDS and cancer care. National palliative care guidelines have been issued by the Ministry of Health based on a rapid situation analysis. Plans now call for review and revision of opioid laws and regulations to increase availability of opioids for medical use, training in palliative care for clinicians throughout the country, and development of palliative care programs both in the community and in inpatient referral centers.

  10. The terminal care of patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Twycross, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest form of malignant disease seen at St Christopher's Hospice. More than 35% of the male and about 8% of the female cancer patients are admitted with this diagnosis. This means that each year approximately 100 patients with lung cancer are amitted and cared for at the hospice. The more common symptoms experienced by 185 consecutive terminal lung cancer patients admitted to St Christopher's Hospice are listed in Table 1. PMID:4132166

  11. Mortality of patients with cancer admitted to intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A; González-Herrera, María O; Herrera-Gómez, Angel

    2013-03-01

    Outcomes of critically ill cancer patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) had improved; it could be associated with medical advances in critical care, introduction of new anticancer treatments, and better supportive care. Recent reports have described ICU mortality for critically ill cancer patients ranged from 15.9% to 32%. During the period 2007 to 2011, a total of 1418 critically ill cancer patients were admitted to our ICU with a mortality rate lower (17.5%) than that reported by other centers. The ICUs around the world should consider the improvement in the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients who require critical care and they should not be denied ICU admission only on the basis of a patient having cancer.

  12. Using a supportive care framework to understand and improve palliative care among cancer patients in Africa.

    PubMed

    Busolo, David S; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2016-06-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality are increasing in Africa, which is leading to greater demands for palliative care. There has been little progress in terms of research, pain management, and policies related to palliative care. Palliative care in Africa is scarce and scattered, with most African nations lacking the basic services. To address these needs, a guiding framework that identifies care needs and directs palliative care services could be utilized. Therefore, using the supportive care framework developed by Fitch (Fitch, 2009), we here review the literature on palliative care for patients diagnosed with cancer in Africa and make recommendations for improvement. The PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, Embase, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index, and Medline databases were searched. Some 25 English articles on research from African countries published between 2004 and 2014 were selected and reviewed. The reviewed literature was analyzed and presented using the domains of the supportive care framework. Palliative care patients with cancer in Africa, their families, and caregivers experience increasing psychological, physical, social, spiritual, emotional, informational, and practical needs. Care needs are often inadequately addressed because of a lack of awareness as well as deficient and scattered palliative care services and resources. In addition, there is sparse research, education, and policies that address the dire situation in palliative care. Our review findings add to the existing body of knowledge demonstrating that palliative care patients with cancer in Africa experience disturbing care needs in all domains of the supportive care framework. To better assess and address these needs, holistic palliative care that is multidomain and multi-professional could be utilized. This approach needs to be individualized and to offer better access to services and information. In addition, research, education, and policies around palliative care for cancer

  13. Health care professionals' perspectives of the experiences of family caregivers during in-patient cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ekstedt, Mirjam; Stenberg, Una; Olsson, Mariann; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-11-01

    Being a family member of a patient who is being treated in an acute care setting for cancer often involves a number of challenges. Our study describes Norwegian cancer care health professionals' perceptions of family members who served as family caregivers (FCs) and their need for support during the in-hospital cancer treatment of their ill family member. Focus group discussions were conducted with a multidisciplinary team of 24 experienced social workers, physicians, and nurses who were closely involved in the patients' in-hospital cancer treatment and care. Drawing on qualitative hermeneutic analysis, four main themes describe health professionals' perceptions of FCs during the patient's in-hospital cancer care: an asset and additional burden, infinitely strong and struggling with helplessness, being an outsider in the center of care, and being in different temporalities. We conclude that it is a challenge for health care professionals to support the family and create room for FC's needs in acute cancer care. System changes are needed in health care, so that the patient/FC dyad is viewed as a unit of care in a dual process of caregiving, which would enable FCs to be given space and inclusion in care, with their own needs simultaneously considered alongside those of the patient.

  14. Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force (USPSTF). Most doctors recommend colonoscopy to screen for colon cancer because colonoscopy shows the entire colon and can remove colon polyps. However, preparing for and performing a flexible sigmoidoscopy may take less time and you may ...

  15. Personalized prostate cancer care: from screening to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Conran, Carly A; Brendler, Charles B; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Unprecedented progress has been made in genomic personalized medicine in the last several years, allowing for more individualized healthcare assessments and recommendations than ever before. However, most of this progress in prostate cancer (PCa) care has focused on developing and selecting therapies for late-stage disease. To address this issue of limited focus, we propose a model for incorporating genomic-based personalized medicine into all levels of PCa care, from prevention and screening to diagnosis, and ultimately to the treatment of both early-stage and late-stage cancers. We have termed this strategy the “Pyramid Model” of personalized cancer care. In this perspective paper, our objective is to demonstrate the potential application of the Pyramid Model to PCa care. This proactive and comprehensive personalized cancer care approach has the potential to achieve three important medical goals: reducing mortality, improving quality of life and decreasing both individual and societal healthcare costs. PMID:27184548

  16. Patient Satisfaction With Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Brian L.; Dittus, Kim L.; Pace, Claire M.; Dulko, Dorothy; Pollack, Lori A.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Geller, Berta M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face several challenges following the completion of active treatment, including uncertainty about late effects of treatment and confusion about coordination of follow-up care. The authors evaluated patient satisfaction with personalized survivorship care plans designed to clarify those issues. The authors enrolled 48 patients with breast cancer and 10 patients with colorectal cancer who had completed treatment in the previous two months from an urban academic medical center and a rural community hospital. Patient satisfaction with the care plan was assessed by telephone interview. Overall, about 80% of patients were very or completely satisfied with the care plan, and 90% or more agreed that it was useful, it was easy to understand, and the length was appropriate. Most patients reported that the care plan was very or critically important to understanding an array of survivorship issues. However, only about half felt that it helped them better understand the roles of primary care providers and oncologists in survivorship care. The results provide evidence that patients with cancer find high value in personalized survivorship care plans, but the plans do not eliminate confusion regarding the coordination of follow-up care. Future efforts to improve care plans should focus on better descriptions of how survivorship care will be coordinated. PMID:23722604

  17. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, illness understanding, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We also discuss how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available.

  18. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We end by discussing how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available. PMID:26598947

  19. Educating Health Care Professionals to Provide Institutional Changes in Cancer Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Uman, Gwen

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2006 report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition (In M. Hewitt, S. Greenfield and E. Stovall (Eds.), (pp. 9–186). Washington DC: The National Academies Press, 2006) identifies the key components of care that contribute to quality of life for the cancer survivor. As cancer survivorship care becomes an important part of quality cancer care oncology professionals need education to prepare themselves to provide this care. Survivorship care requires a varied approach depending on the survivor population, treatment regimens and care settings. The goal of this program was to encourage institutional changes that would integrate survivorship care into participating centers. An NCI-funded educational program: Survivorship Education for Quality Cancer Care provided multidiscipline two-person teams an opportunity to gain this important knowledge using a goal-directed, team approach. Educational programs were funded for yearly courses from 2006 to 2009. Survivorship care curriculum was developed using the Quality of Life Model as the core around the IOM recommendations. Baseline data was collected for all participants. Teams were followed-up at 6, 12 and 18 months postcourse for goal achievement and institutional evaluations. Comparison data from baseline to 18 months provided information on the 204 multidiscipline teams that participated over 4 years. Teams attended including administrators, social workers, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, physicians and others. Participating centers included primarily community cancer centers and academic centers followed by pediatric centers, ambulatory/physician offices and free standing cancer centers. Statistically significant changes at p=<0.05 levels were seen by 12 months postcourse related to the effectiveness, receptiveness and comfort of survivorship care in participant settings. Institutional assessments found improvement in seven domains of care that related to

  20. Palliative care -- an essential component of cancer control

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, N

    1998-01-01

    Unlike in other nations, in Canada palliative care has its origins in university hospitals. It has subsequently developed in a few Canadian schools as an academic discipline closely linked with oncology programs. Although this model is successful, other faculties of medicine and cancer centres have been slow to emulate it. Today, the situation is rapidly changing, and both palliative care and oncology professionals are re-examining the manifest need for collaborative efforts in patient care, research and education. Palliative care must be regarded as an essential component of cancer care, its principles must be applied throughout the course of the illness and, as in other phases of cancer control, palliative care should be regarded as an exercise in prevention--prevention of suffering. This article discusses practical applications that flow from acceptance of these concepts. PMID:9676548

  1. Analysis of cancer patients admitted to intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Yakup; Kaydu, Ayhan; Sahin, Omer Fatih; Kacar, Cem Kivilcim

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study is an analysis of cancer patients who received follow-up treatment for either cancer-related complications or treatment-associated side effects while hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: Records of cancer patients treated at Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital ICU between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic data and type of cancer were recorded in prepared forms and subsequently analyzed. RESULTS: Among 2240 ICU patients treated and hospitalized between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012, 482 cancer patients were identified and included in the study. Percentage of cancer patients in ICU was 23.9%. Male to female ratio was determined to be 1.55. First 3 most common cancers found were colorectal (19.7%), lung (15.7%), and stomach cancers (11.6%). Mortality rate of cancer patients hospitalized in ICU was 46.6%. Larynx, lung, urinary bladder, skin, rectosigmoid, hematological, and kidney cancer were more prevalent in male patients, whereas esophageal cancer was seen in more female patients than male patients. Incidence of stomach, brain, and pancreatic cancers, as well as unclassified tumors, was found to be unrelated to gender. CONCLUSION: Rectosigmoid cancer was most common type of cancer observed in our ICU. Esophageal cancer was observed in more females than males, while larynx cancer was more frequently present in males. PMID:28275754

  2. Integrating dietary supplements into cancer care.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe; Abrams, Donald I; Ladas, Elena J; Deng, Gary; Hardy, Mary; Capodice, Jillian L; Winegardner, Mary F; Gubili, J K; Yeung, K Simon; Kussmann, Heidi; Block, Keith I

    2013-09-01

    Many studies confirm that a majority of patients undergoing cancer therapy use self-selected forms of complementary therapies, mainly dietary supplements. Unfortunately, patients often do not report their use of supplements to their providers. The failure of physicians to communicate effectively with patients on this use may result in a loss of trust within the therapeutic relationship and in the selection by patients of harmful, useless, or ineffective and costly nonconventional therapies when effective integrative interventions may exist. Poor communication may also lead to diminishment of patient autonomy and self-efficacy and thereby interfere with the healing response. To be open to the patient's perspective, and sensitive to his or her need for autonomy and empowerment, physicians may need a shift in their own perspectives. Perhaps the optimal approach is to discuss both the facts and the uncertainty with the patient, in order to reach a mutually informed decision. Today's informed patients truly value physicians who appreciate them as equal participants in making their own health care choices. To reach a mutually informed decision about the use of these supplements, the Clinical Practice Committee of The Society of Integrative Oncology undertook the challenge of providing basic information to physicians who wish to discuss these issues with their patients. A list of leading supplements that have the best suggestions of benefit was constructed by leading researchers and clinicians who have experience in using these supplements. This list includes curcumin, glutamine, vitamin D, Maitake mushrooms, fish oil, green tea, milk thistle, Astragalus, melatonin, and probiotics. The list includes basic information on each supplement, such as evidence on effectiveness and clinical trials, adverse effects, and interactions with medications. The information was constructed to provide an up-to-date base of knowledge, so that physicians and other health care providers would

  3. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlin, Kathy L.; Long, Margaret E.; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. Methods: This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Results: Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. Conclusions: A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health. PMID:26208166

  4. The Impact of a Flexible Care Area on Throughput Measures in an Academic Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Jayne; LeGare, Anne; Hermanson, Leigh; Repplinger, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Crowding in emergency departments is a multifaceted problem. We hypothesized that implementing an on-call “Flexible Care Area” (FCA), utilizing multiple front-end throughput solutions, would reduce emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS). Methods This retrospective study evaluates the impact of an FCA on ED throughput at one hospital over a two-year period (2011–2012). The average arrival-to-room time, arrival-to-physician time, LOS, number of inpatient admissions, and number of discharges during FCA hours were collected, comparing days with and without FCA functionality. Results The FCA was open 165 days in 2011 and 252 days in 2012. The mean daily ED census as well as number of ED visits and inpatient admissions during FCA hours were higher on days with FCA functionality than without. Total ED LOS was shorter for Emergency Severity Index (ESI) 3 patients on days with FCA than days without it in 2011, but this finding was not repeated in 2012. ESI 4 patients had shorter LOS on FCA days in both years. The arrival-to-room and arrival-to-physician times showed variable improvement for ESI 3 and 4 patients over the study period. There was no statistically significant difference for these measures when evaluating ESI levels 2 and 5. Discussion Implementing upfront throughput solutions through use of the FCA correlated with reduced ED LOS for all ESI 3–4 patients, not just those who were seen in FCA. PMID:26296717

  5. Racial and ethnic differences in beliefs about lung cancer care.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, Sirisha; Lin, Jenny J; Nelson, Judith E; Powell, Charles A; Salazar-Schicchi, John; Berman, Andrew R; Keller, Steven M; Smith, Cardinale B; Lurslurchachai, Linda; Halm, Ethan A; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2012-11-01

    Disparities in lung cancer treatment and palliative care are well documented. However,the mechanisms underlying these disparities are not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated racial and ethnic differences in beliefs and attitudes about lung cancer treatment and palliative care among patients receiving a new diagnosis of lung cancer. Patients were recruited from four medical centers in New York City and surveyed about their beliefs regarding lung cancer care, including disease-directed treatments, palliative and end-of-life care, and fatalistic and spiritual beliefs. We used univariate and multiple regression analyses to compare the distribution of beliefs among minority (black and Hispanic) and nonminority patients. Of the 335 patients, 21% were black, 20% were Hispanic, and 59% were nonminority. Beliefs about chemotherapy and radiotherapy were similar across the three groups ( P > .05),whereas black patients were more likely to believe that surgery might cause lung cancer to spread( P =.008). Fatalistic beliefs potentially affecting cancer treatment were more common among both minority groups ( P ≤ .02). No signifi cant differences were found in attitudes toward clinician communication about cancer prognosis ( P > .05). However, both blacks and Hispanics were more likely to have misconceptions about advance directives and hospice care ( P ≤ .02). Similarities and differences in beliefs about disease-directed treatment were observed between minority and nonminority patients with lung cancer. Minority patients hold more fatalistic views about the disease and misperceptions about advance care planning and hospice care. Further research is needed to assess the impact of these beliefs on decisions about lung cancer care and patient outcomes.

  6. End-of-Life Care at a Community Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Cowall, David E.; Yu, Bennett W.; Heineken, Sandra L.; Lewis, Elizabeth N.; Chaudhry, Vishal; Daugherty, Joan M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The evidence-based use of resources for cancer care at end of life (EOL) has the potential to relieve suffering, reduce health care costs, and extend life. Internal benchmarks need to be established within communities to achieve these goals. The purpose for this study was to evaluate data within our community to determine our EOL cancer practices. Methods: A random sample of 390 patients was obtained from the 942 cancer deaths in Wicomico County, Maryland, for calendar years 2004 to 2008. General demographic, clinical event, and survival data were obtained from that sample using cancer registry and hospice databases as well as manual medical record reviews. In addition, the intensity of EOL cancer care was assessed using previously proposed indicator benchmarks. The significance of potential relationships between variables was explored using χ2 analyses. Results: Mean age at death was 70 years; 52% of patients were male; 34% died as a result of lung cancer. Median survival from diagnosis to death was 8.4 months with hospice admission and 5.8 months without hospice (P = .11). Four of eight intensity-of-care indicators (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission within last month of life, > one hospitalization within last month of life, hospital death, and hospice referral < 3 days before death) all significantly exceeded the referenced benchmarks. Hospice versus nonhospice admissions were associated (P < .001) with ICU admissions (2% v 13%) and hospital deaths (2% v 54%). Conclusion: These data suggest opportunities to improve community cancer center EOL care. PMID:23180997

  7. End-of-life care at a community cancer center.

    PubMed

    Cowall, David E; Yu, Bennett W; Heineken, Sandra L; Lewis, Elizabeth N; Chaudhry, Vishal; Daugherty, Joan M

    2012-07-01

    The evidence-based use of resources for cancer care at end of life (EOL) has the potential to relieve suffering, reduce health care costs, and extend life. Internal benchmarks need to be established within communities to achieve these goals. The purpose for this study was to evaluate data within our community to determine our EOL cancer practices. A random sample of 390 patients was obtained from the 942 cancer deaths in Wicomico County, Maryland, for calendar years 2004 to 2008. General demographic, clinical event, and survival data were obtained from that sample using cancer registry and hospice databases as well as manual medical record reviews. In addition, the intensity of EOL cancer care was assessed using previously proposed indicator benchmarks. The significance of potential relationships between variables was explored using χ(2) analyses. Mean age at death was 70 years; 52% of patients were male; 34% died as a result of lung cancer. Median survival from diagnosis to death was 8.4 months with hospice admission and 5.8 months without hospice (P = .11). Four of eight intensity-of-care indicators (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission within last month of life, > one hospitalization within last month of life, hospital death, and hospice referral < 3 days before death) all significantly exceeded the referenced benchmarks. Hospice versus nonhospice admissions were associated (P < .001) with ICU admissions (2% v 13%) and hospital deaths (2% v 54%). These data suggest opportunities to improve community cancer center EOL care.

  8. Lung cancer physicians' referral practices for palliative care consultation.

    PubMed

    Smith, C B; Nelson, J E; Berman, A R; Powell, C A; Fleischman, J; Salazar-Schicchi, J; Wisnivesky, J P

    2012-02-01

    Integration of palliative care with standard oncologic care improves quality of life and survival of lung cancer patients. We surveyed physicians to identify factors influencing their decisions for referral to palliative care. We provided a self-administered questionnaire to physicians caring for lung cancer patients at five medical centers. The questionnaire asked about practices and views with respect to palliative care referral. We used multiple regression analysis to identify predictors of low referral rates (<25%). Of 155 physicians who returned survey responses, 75 (48%) reported referring <25% of patients for palliative care consultation. Multivariate analysis, controlling for provider characteristics, found that low referral rates were associated with physicians' concerns that palliative care referral would alarm patients and families [odds ratio (OR) 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21-0.98], while the belief that palliative care specialists have more time to discuss complex issues (OR 3.07, 95% CI 1.56-6.02) was associated with higher rates of referral. Although palliative care consultation is increasingly available and recommended throughout the trajectory of lung cancer, our data indicate it is underutilized. Understanding factors influencing decisions to refer can be used to improve integration of palliative care as part of lung cancer management.

  9. Learning the landscape: implementation challenges of primary care innovators around cancer survivorship care.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Denalee; Hudson, Shawna V; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Howard, Jenna; Rubinstein, Ellen; Lee, Heather S; Overholser, Linda S; Shaw, Amy; Givens, Sarah; Burton, Jay S; Grunfeld, Eva; Parry, Carly; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2017-02-01

    This study describes the experiences of early implementers of primary care-focused cancer survivorship delivery models. Snowball sampling was used to identify innovators. Twelve participants (five cancer survivorship primary care innovators and seven content experts) attended a working conference focused on cancer survivorship population strategies and primary care transformation. Data included meeting discussion transcripts/field notes, transcribed in-depth innovator interviews, and innovators' summaries of care models. We used a multistep immersion/crystallization analytic approach, guided by a primary care organizational change model. Innovative practice models included: (1) a consultative model in a primary care setting; (2) a primary care physician (PCP)-led, blended consultative/panel-based model in an oncology setting; (3) an oncology nurse navigator in a primary care practice; and (4) two subspecialty models where PCPs in a general medical practice dedicated part of their patient panel to cancer survivors. Implementation challenges included (1) lack of key stakeholder buy-in; (2) practice resources allocated to competing (non-survivorship) change efforts; and (3) competition with higher priority initiatives incentivized by payers. Cancer survivorship delivery models are potentially feasible in primary care; however, significant barriers to widespread implementation exist. Implementation efforts would benefit from increasing the awareness and potential value-add of primary care-focused strategies to address survivors' needs. Current models of primary care-based cancer survivorship care may not be sustainable. Innovative strategies to provide quality care to this growing population of survivors need to be developed and integrated into primary care settings.

  10. Advancing survivorship care through the National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center: developing American Cancer Society guidelines for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca; Sharpe, Katherine; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi; Willis, Anne; Gansler, Ted; Ganz, Patricia A; Edge, Stephen B; McCabe, Mary S; Stein, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    The National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center (The Survivorship Center) began in 2010 as a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the George Washington University Cancer Institute and was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Survivorship Center aims to improve the overall health and quality of life of posttreatment cancer survivors. One key to addressing the needs of this ever-growing population is to develop clinical follow-up care guidelines that emphasize not only the importance of surveillance for cancer recurrence, but also address the assessment and management of the physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects that may result from having cancer and undergoing cancer treatment as well as highlight the importance of healthy behaviors that can reduce the risk of cancer recurrence, second primary cancers, and other chronic diseases. Currently, The Survivorship Center is coordinating the work of experts in oncology, primary care, and other health care professions to develop follow-up care guidelines for 10 priority cancer sites.

  11. Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program: impact on patterns of terminal cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Bruera, E; Neumann, C M; Gagnon, B; Brenneis, C; Kneisler, P; Selmser, P; Hanson, J

    1999-01-01

    The Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program was established in July 1995 to measure the access of patients with terminal cancer to palliative care services, decrease the number of cancer-related deaths in acute care facilities and increase the participation of family physicians in the care of terminally ill patients. In this retrospective study the authors compared the pattern of care and site of deaths before establishment of the program (1992/93) and during its second year of operation (1996/97). Significantly more cancer-related deaths occurred in acute care facilities in 1992/93 than in 1996/97 (86% [1119/1304] v. 49% [633/1279]) (p < or = 0.001). The number of inpatient days decreased, from 24,566 in 1992/93 to 6960 in 1996/97. More cancer patients saw a palliative care consult team in 1996/97 than in 1992/93 (82% v. 22%). The shift from deaths in acute care facilities to palliative hospices suggests that the establishment of an integrated palliative care program has increased access of patients with terminal cancer to palliative care. PMID:10463053

  12. Comorbid condition care quality in cancer survivors: role of primary care and specialty providers and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Claire F; Frick, Kevin D; Herbert, Robert J; Blackford, Amanda L; Neville, Bridget A; Lemke, Klaus W; Carducci, Michael A; Wolff, Antonio C; Earle, Craig C

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate provider specialty, care coordination, and cancer survivors' comorbid condition care. This retrospective cross-sectional Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare study included cancer survivors diagnosed in 2004, 2-3 years post-cancer diagnosis, in fee-for-service Medicare. We examined (1) provider specialties (primary care providers (PCPs), oncology specialists, other specialists) visited post-hospitalization, (2) role of provider specialties in chronic and acute condition management, and (3) an ambulatory care coordination measure. Outcome measures covered (1) visits post-hospitalization for nine conditions, (2) chronic disease management (lipid profile, diabetic eye exam, diabetic monitoring), and (3) acute condition management (electrocardiogram (EKG) for congestive heart failure (CHF), imaging for CHF, EKG for transient ischemic attack, cholecystectomy, hip fracture repair). Among 8661 cancer survivors, patients were more likely to visit PCPs than oncologists or other specialists following hospitalizations for 8/9 conditions. Patients visiting a PCP (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care for 3/3 chronic and 1/5 acute condition indicators. Patients visiting a nother specialist (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care for 3/3 chronic and 2/5 acute condition indicators. Patients visiting an oncology specialist (vs. not) were more likely to receive recommended care on 2/3 chronic indicators and less likely to receive recommended care on 1/5 acute indicators. Patients at greatest risk for poor coordination were more likely to receive appropriate care on 4/6 indicators. PCPs are central to cancer survivors' non-cancer comorbid condition care quality. Implications for Cancer Survivors PCP involvement in cancer survivors' care should be promoted.

  13. Space-time variation of respiratory cancers in South Carolina: a flexible multivariate mixture modeling approach to risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Rachel; Lawson, Andrew B; Kirby, Russell S; Faes, Christel; Aregay, Mehreteab; Watjou, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Many types of cancer have an underlying spatiotemporal distribution. Spatiotemporal mixture modeling can offer a flexible approach to risk estimation via the inclusion of latent variables. In this article, we examine the application and benefits of using four different spatiotemporal mixture modeling methods in the modeling of cancer of the lung and bronchus as well as "other" respiratory cancer incidences in the state of South Carolina. Of the methods tested, no single method outperforms the other methods; which method is best depends on the cancer under consideration. The lung and bronchus cancer incidence outcome is best described by the univariate modeling formulation, whereas the "other" respiratory cancer incidence outcome is best described by the multivariate modeling formulation. Spatiotemporal multivariate mixture methods can aid in the modeling of cancers with small and sparse incidences when including information from a related, more common type of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Duman-Lubberding, Sanne; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-10-21

    Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors' needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals' perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients' perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but indicated that it should be incorporated in the

  15. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors’ needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals’ perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Methods Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Results Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients’ perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but

  16. Ensuring Quality Cancer Care: A Follow-Up Review of the Institute of Medicine’s Ten Recommendations for Improving the Quality of Cancer Care in America

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, Tracy; Albright, Heidi W.; Feeley, Thomas W.; Walters, Ron; Burke, Thomas W.; Aloia, Thomas; Bruera, Eduardo; Buzdar, Aman; Foxhall, Lewis; Hui, David; Summers, Barbara; Rodriguez, Alma; DuBois, Raymond; Shine, Kenneth I.

    2011-01-01

    Responding to growing concerns regarding the safety, quality, and efficacy of cancer care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences commissioned a comprehensive review of cancer care delivery in the US healthcare system in the late 1990s. The National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), a twenty-member board with broad representation, performed this review. In its review, the NCPB focused on the state of cancer care delivery at that time, its shortcomings, and ways to measure and improve the quality of cancer care. The NCPB described an ideal cancer care system, where patients would have equitable access to coordinated, guideline-based care and novel therapies throughout the course of their disease. In 1999, the IOM published the results of this review in its influential report, Ensuring Quality Cancer Care. This report outlined ten recommendations, which, when implemented, would: 1) improve the quality of cancer care; 2) increase our understanding of quality cancer care; and, 3) reduce or eliminate access barriers to quality cancer care. Despite the fervor generated by this report, there are lingering doubts regarding the safety and quality of cancer care in the United States today. Increased awareness of medical errors and barriers to quality care, coupled with escalating healthcare costs, has prompted national efforts to reform the healthcare system. These efforts by healthcare providers and policymakers should bridge the gap between the ideal state described in Ensuring Quality Cancer Care and the current state of cancer care in the United States. PMID:22045610

  17. The Organization of Multidisciplinary Care Teams: Modeling Internal and External Influences on Cancer Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu Das, Irene; Clauser, Steven; Petrelli, Nicholas; Salner, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Quality cancer treatment depends upon careful coordination between multiple treatments and treatment providers, the exchange of technical information, and regular communication between all providers and physician disciplines involved in treatment. This article will examine a particular type of organizational structure purported to regularize and streamline the communication between multiple specialists and support services involved in cancer treatment: the multidisciplinary treatment care (MDC) team. We present a targeted review of what is known about various types of MDC team structures and their impact on the quality of treatment care, and we outline a conceptual model of the connections between team context, structure, process, and performance and their subsequent effects on cancer treatment care processes and patient outcomes. Finally, we will discuss future research directions to understand how MDC teams improve patient outcomes and how characteristics of team structure, culture, leadership, and context (organizational setting and local environment) contribute to optimal multidisciplinary cancer care. PMID:20386055

  18. The organization of multidisciplinary care teams: modeling internal and external influences on cancer care quality.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Mary L; Das, Irene Prabhu; Clauser, Steven; Petrelli, Nicholas; Salner, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Quality cancer treatment depends upon careful coordination between multiple treatments and treatment providers, the exchange of technical information, and regular communication between all providers and physician disciplines involved in treatment. This article will examine a particular type of organizational structure purported to regularize and streamline the communication between multiple specialists and support services involved in cancer treatment: the multidisciplinary treatment care (MDC) team. We present a targeted review of what is known about various types of MDC team structures and their impact on the quality of treatment care, and we outline a conceptual model of the connections between team context, structure, process, and performance and their subsequent effects on cancer treatment care processes and patient outcomes. Finally, we will discuss future research directions to understand how MDC teams improve patient outcomes and how characteristics of team structure, culture, leadership, and context (organizational setting and local environment) contribute to optimal multidisciplinary cancer care.

  19. Oncologists' perspectives on post-cancer treatment communication and care coordination with primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, C N; Haggstrom, D; Kahn, K L; Gray, S W; Kim, B; Liu, B; Eisenstein, J; Keating, N L

    2017-01-10

    Post-treatment cancer care is often fragmented and of suboptimal quality. We explored factors that may affect cancer survivors' post-treatment care coordination, including oncologists' use of electronic technologies such as e-mail and integrated electronic health records (EHRs) to communicate with primary care physicians (PCPs). We used data from a survey (357 respondents; participation rate 52.9%) conducted in 2012-2013 among medical oncologists caring for patients in a large US study of cancer care delivery and outcomes. Oncologists reported their frequency and mode of communication with PCPs, and role in providing post-treatment care. Seventy-five per cent said that they directly communicated with PCPs about post-treatment status and care recommendations for all/most patients. Among those directly communicating with PCPs, 70% always/usually used written correspondence, while 36% always/usually used integrated EHRs; telephone and e-mail were less used. Eighty per cent reported co-managing with PCPs at least one post-treatment general medical care need. In multivariate-adjusted analyses, neither communication mode nor intensity were associated with co-managing survivors' care. Oncologists' reliance on written correspondence to communicate with PCPs may be a barrier to care coordination. We discuss new research directions for enhancing communication and care coordination between oncologists and PCPs, and to better meet the needs of cancer survivors post-treatment.

  20. EPICC study: evaluation of pharmaceutical intervention in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Vantard, N; Ranchon, F; Schwiertz, V; Gourc, C; Gauthier, N; Guedat, M-G; He, S; Kiouris, E; Alloux, C; You, B; Souquet, P-J; Freyer, G; Salles, G; Trillet-Lenoir, V; Rioufol, C

    2015-04-01

    In cancer care, clinical pharmacists contribute to improving prevention and management of drug-related problems (DRPs). The 3-year EPICC study (Evaluation of Pharmaceutical Intervention in Cancer Care) aimed to collect and analyse pharmaceutical interventions (PIs) in oncology. The free online version of the French Society of Clinical Pharmacy (SFPC) coding system, ACT-IP, was used, supplemented by a standardized dedicated cancer-care decision tree. A total of 29,589 medication orders (77,004 anticancer drug preparations) were analysed. Eight hundred and ninety-four PIs were recorded. ACT-IP identified 54·1% of DRPs as concerning over- or underdosage. The standardized dedicated cancer-care decision tree identified the three principal causes of dosage problems: 50·2% due to miscalculation, 20% to omission of dose adjustment and 12% to poor choice of antineoplastic regimen. About 13·8% of DRPs were adverse effects and 3·9% were drug-drug interactions. The decision tree showed that 22% of adverse events could be circumvented by a switch within the same drug family and 72% of drug-drug interactions would have led to increased neoplastic toxicity. Pharmaceutical analysis of prescription forms contributes to medication safety in cancer care, and the present dedicated decision tree highlights additional information about DRPs and PIs. The DRP rate (3% of prescriptions) was consistent with the literature. The pharmacist has a role to play in optimizing the management of patients with cancer in terms of dose adjustment, drug toxicity management, improvement of administration and drug-drug interactions. This study, highlighting PIs in cancer care, is the first of this scale in terms of number of prescriptions analysed (nearly 30 000). Results demonstrated the specificity of DRPs and PIs for patients with cancer and the value of a dedicated coding system in cancer care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. An innovative path to improving cancer care in Indian country.

    PubMed Central

    Burhansstipanov, L.; Gilbert, A.; LaMarca, K.; Krebs, L. U.

    2001-01-01

    The Native American Cancer Survivors' Support Network is an innovative public health program designed to improve survival from cancer and the quality of life after a cancer diagnosis for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Canadian Aboriginal patients and their loved ones. The Network, initiated in 1999, now has more than 300 survivors enrolled as members. This article briefly describes the process that led to its formation and preliminary findings, primarily for breast cancer survivors, of ongoing qualitative and quantitative research. Network data show patterns of cancer care that are partially responsible for poor survivorship outcomes. PMID:12042607

  2. Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    0802 TITLE: Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Alfred I. Neugut, MD, PhD...Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0802 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...increasingly available. There has been very little research on the use of palliative treatments. Our team has developed the tools/methods for

  3. Value of cancer care: ethical considerations for the practicing oncologist.

    PubMed

    Jagsi, Reshma; Sulmasy, Daniel P; Moy, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    The value of cancer care has emerged at the center of a national discourse on fiscal responsibility and resource allocation. The cost of cancer care is rising at a higher pace than any other area of health care. As we struggle to address this unsustainable rise in cancer expenditures, oncology providers are forced to examine our practice patterns and our contributions to the overall health care cost burden. This article provides an oncologist-centered examination of our duties to individual patients and how they may seem at odds with our duties to society. It also discusses how oncology providers can do their part to contain health care costs while honoring their professional obligation to do their best for each patient.

  4. Corruption in health-care systems and its effect on cancer care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Saskia; Njuguna, Festus; Olbara, Gilbert; Sindano, Solomon; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Supriyadi, Eddy; Kaspers, Gertjan

    2015-08-01

    At the government, hospital, and health-care provider level, corruption plays a major role in health-care systems in Africa. The returns on health investments of international financial institutions, health organisations, and donors might be very low when mismanagement and dysfunctional structures of health-care systems are not addressed. More funding might even aggravate corruption. We discuss corruption and its effects on cancer care within the African health-care system in a sociocultural context. The contribution of high-income countries in stimulating corruption is also described. Corrupt African governments cannot be expected to take the initiative to eradicate corruption. Therefore, international financial institutions, health organisations, and financial donors should use their power to demand policy reforms of health-care systems in Africa troubled by the issue of corruption. These modifications will ameliorate the access and quality of cancer care for patients across the continent, and ultimately improve the outcome of health care to all patients.

  5. Caring for dying cancer patients in the Chinese cultural context: A qualitative study from the perspectives of physicians and nurses.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fengqi; Zheng, Ruishuang; Chen, Xuelei; Wang, Yanhui; Zhou, Hongyuan; Sun, Rong

    2016-04-01

    To explore the experiences of Chinese physicians and nurses who care for dying cancer patients in their practical work. This was a qualitative study using semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Fifteen physicians and 22 nurses were recruited from a cancer center in mainland China. The data were analyzed by qualitative thematic analysis. Disclosure of information on death and cancer to dying cancer patients is taboo in traditional Chinese culture, which greatly decreases the physicians' and nurses' effective communication with dying patients in end-of-life (EOL) care. Both physicians and nurses described strong ambitions to give dying cancer patients high-quality care, and they emphasized the importance of maintaining dying patients' hopes in the death-denying cultural context. However, the nurses were more concerned with dying patients' physical comfort and wish fulfillment, while the physicians placed greatest emphasis on patients' rights and symptom management. Both physicians and nurses suffered whilst also benefitting from taking care of dying patients which helped with their personal growth and allowed greater insight into themselves and their clinical practice. Our results also indicated that Chinese physicians and nurses require improved methods of communication on EOL care, as well as needing more support to provide quality EOL care. Chinese physicians and nurses experience a challenge when caring for dying cancer patients in the Chinese cultural context. Flexible and specific education and training in EOL cancer care are required to meet the needs of Chinese physicians and nurses at the cancer center studied. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Delivery of affordable and equitable cancer care in India.

    PubMed

    Pramesh, C S; Badwe, Rajendra A; Borthakur, Bibhuti B; Chandra, Madhu; Raj, Elluswami Hemanth; Kannan, T; Kalwar, Ashok; Kapoor, Sanjay; Malhotra, Hemant; Nayak, Sukdev; Rath, Goura K; Sagar, T G; Sebastian, Paul; Sarin, Rajiv; Shanta, V; Sharma, Suresh C; Shukla, Shilin; Vijayakumar, Manavalan; Vijaykumar, D K; Aggarwal, Ajay; Purushotham, Arnie; Sullivan, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The delivery of affordable and equitable cancer care is one of India's greatest public health challenges. Public expenditure on cancer in India remains below US$10 per person (compared with more than US$100 per person in high-income countries), and overall public expenditure on health care is still only slightly above 1% of gross domestic product. Out-of-pocket payments, which account for more than three-quarters of cancer expenditures in India, are one of the greatest threats to patients and families, and a cancer diagnosis is increasingly responsible for catastrophic expenditures that negatively affect not only the patient but also the welfare and education of several generations of their family. We explore the complex nature of cancer care systems across India, from state to government levels, and address the crucial issues of infrastructure, manpower shortages, and the pressing need to develop cross-state solutions to prevention and early detection of cancer, in addition to governance of the largely unregulated private sector and the cost of new technologies and drugs. We discuss the role of public insurance schemes, the need to develop new political mandates and authority to set priorities, the necessity to greatly improve the quality of care, and the drive to understand and deliver cost-effective cancer care programmes.

  7. NCCN Task Force Report: Bone Health In Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Gralow, Julie R; Biermann, J Sybil; Farooki, Azeez; Fornier, Monica N; Gagel, Robert F; Kumar, Rashmi; Litsas, Georgia; McKay, Rana; Podoloff, Donald A; Srinivas, Sandy; Van Poznak, Catherine H

    2013-08-01

    Bone health and maintenance of bone integrity are important components of comprehensive cancer care. Many patients with cancer are at risk for therapy-induced bone loss, with resultant osteoporotic fractures, or skeletal metastases, which may result in pathologic fractures, hypercalcemia, bone pain, and decline in motility and performance status. Effective screening and timely interventions are essential for reducing bone-related morbidity. Management of long-term bone health requires a broad knowledge base. A multidisciplinary health care team may be needed for optimal assessment and treatment of bone-related issues in patients with cancer. Since publication of the previous NCCN Task Force Report: Bone Health in Cancer Care in 2009, new data have emerged on bone health and treatment, prompting NCCN to convene this multidisciplinary task force to discuss the progress made in optimizing bone health in patients with cancer. In December 2012, the panel members provided didactic presentations on various topics, integrating expert judgment with a review of the key literature. This report summarizes issues surrounding bone health in cancer care presented and discussed during this NCCN Bone Health in Cancer Care Task Force meeting.

  8. Managed Care Market Share and Primary Treatment for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Nancy L; Landrum, Mary Beth; Meara, Ellen; Ganz, Patricia A; Guadagnoli, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Objective Increases in the market share of managed care are associated with decreases in expenditures in the fee-for-service sector. To understand utilization patterns responsible for such savings, we assessed whether increases in managed care market share were related to increases in receipt of equally effective but less costly primary cancer therapies. Data Sources Cancer registry data linked to Medicare administrative data for a population-based sample of fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries 66 years and older who were diagnosed with breast or prostate cancer during 1993–1999. Study Design We used fixed-effects regression models to assess whether county-level increases in the market share of managed care were associated with differences in receipt of cancer therapies that are similar in effectiveness but vary in cost. Principal Findings Increases in the market share of managed care were not associated with differences in the receipt of mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery with radiation for women with early stage breast cancer (p = .47) or with the receipt of conservative therapy (versus surgery or radiation therapy) for men with local or regional prostate cancer (p = .30). Conclusions Increases in the market share of managed care do not appear to influence the receipt of equally effective primary treatments for cancer in the fee-for-service sector. PMID:16430598

  9. The American Cancer Society and the American Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Otis W

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is in critical condition. Costs are rising to the point that the high price of health care is a threat to the U.S. economy. In 2010, health care was more than 17% of the gross domestic product, and if it continues to rise at current rates, health care will become more than 25% of the overall U.S. economy. This growth rate is not sustainable. While U.S. per capita costs are the highest of any country worldwide, quality is varied. Indeed, American health care outcomes for cancer and other diseases are inferior to several European countries with far lower per capita costs. The truth is many Americans cannot afford adequate health care, and health care is rationed in the U.S. While many do not get the health care they need, some are actually harmed by overconsumption of unnecessary health care. These Americans are treated outside of established guidelines and get unnecessary procedures and take unnecessary medications. A substantial number of Americans are supportive of health care reform with the goal of getting needed, high-quality health care to those Americans who currently do not get it. The American Cancer Society is committed to using the established scientific methods of epidemiology to define the problems and identify possible solutions. We are committed proponents of the rational, evidence-based use of health care to avoid the wasteful and inefficient rationing of health care.

  10. The American Cancer Society and the American Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is in critical condition. Costs are rising to the point that the high price of health care is a threat to the U.S. economy. In 2010, health care was more than 17% of the gross domestic product, and if it continues to rise at current rates, health care will become more than 25% of the overall U.S. economy. This growth rate is not sustainable. While U.S. per capita costs are the highest of any country worldwide, quality is varied. Indeed, American health care outcomes for cancer and other diseases are inferior to several European countries with far lower per capita costs. The truth is many Americans cannot afford adequate health care, and health care is rationed in the U.S. While many do not get the health care they need, some are actually harmed by overconsumption of unnecessary health care. These Americans are treated outside of established guidelines and get unnecessary procedures and take unnecessary medications. A substantial number of Americans are supportive of health care reform with the goal of getting needed, high-quality health care to those Americans who currently do not get it. The American Cancer Society is committed to using the established scientific methods of epidemiology to define the problems and identify possible solutions. We are committed proponents of the rational, evidence-based use of health care to avoid the wasteful and inefficient rationing of health care. PMID:21804069

  11. The Role of Mobile Technologies in Health Care Processes: The Case of Cancer Supportive Care

    PubMed Central

    Cucciniello, Maria; Guerrazzi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care systems are gradually moving toward new models of care based on integrated care processes shared by different care givers and on an empowered role of the patient. Mobile technologies are assuming an emerging role in this scenario. This is particularly true in care processes where the patient has a particularly enhanced role, as is the case of cancer supportive care. Objective This paper aims to review existing studies on the actual role and use of mobile technology during the different stages of care processes, with particular reference to cancer supportive care. Methods We carried out a review of literature with the aim of identifying studies related to the use of mHealth in cancer care and cancer supportive care. The final sample size consists of 106 records. Results There is scant literature concerning the use of mHealth in cancer supportive care. Looking more generally at cancer care, we found that mHealth is mainly used for self-management activities carried out by patients. The main tools used are mobile devices like mobile phones and tablets, but remote monitoring devices also play an important role. Text messaging technologies (short message service, SMS) have a minor role, with the exception of middle income countries where text messaging plays a major role. Telehealth technologies are still rarely used in cancer care processes. If we look at the different stages of health care processes, we can see that mHealth is mainly used during the treatment of patients, especially for self-management activities. It is also used for prevention and diagnosis, although to a lesser extent, whereas it appears rarely used for decision-making and follow-up activities. Conclusions Since mHealth seems to be employed only for limited uses and during limited phases of the care process, it is unlikely that it can really contribute to the creation of new care models. This under-utilization may depend on many issues, including the need for it to be embedded

  12. Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care: A Metropolitan Area Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cowen, Virginia S; Miccio, Robin Streit; Parikh, Bijal

    2017-01-01

    Massage offers cancer patients general quality of life benefits as well as alleviation of cancer-related symptoms/cancer-treatment-related symptoms including pain, anxiety, and fatigue. Little is known about whether massage is accessible to cancer patients who receive treatment in the outpatient setting and how massage is incorporated into the overall cancer treatment plan. Outpatient cancer centers (n = 78) in a single metropolitan area were included this mixed-methods project that included a systematic analysis of website information and a telephone survey. Massage was offered at only 40 centers (51.3% of total). A range of massage modalities were represented, with energy-based therapies (Reiki and Therapeutic Touch) most frequently provided. Although massage therapists are licensed health care providers in the states included in this analysis, massage was also provided by nurses, physical therapists, and other health care professionals.

  13. Follow-up care in cancer: adjusting for referral targets and extending choice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kate; Lydon, Anne; Amir, Ziv

    2013-03-01

    Over recent years, several initiatives have impacted on the referral of patients to secondary care, most notably targets for urgent referral in suspected cancer and the patient choice agenda. At the same time, improved long-term survival in cancer has increased numbers attending follow-up, doubts about the effectiveness of specialist follow-up have emerged, and alternative models of follow-up have been tested. The aim of the study was to explore patient and carer perspectives on the flexibility and responsiveness of cancer services. This article focuses on findings relating to referral, subsequent outpatient appointments and cessation of outpatient follow-up. Issues were explored in a qualitative study using face-to-face interviews with a purposive sample of 54 people affected by cancer. Data were analysed concurrently with data collection, using qualitative analysis software. The study gave rise to a number of salient themes. Links were identified between three of these: choice and responsiveness during referral; the flexibility and responsiveness of outpatient appointment systems; and negotiating cessation of follow-up. It appeared that policy on urgent referrals might be adversely affecting practice relating to appointment systems and the continuance of follow-up. Hospital-based cancer follow-up is being given decreasing priority because of doubts about effectiveness and a target-driven focus on referral. This is impacting on patients, who may value outpatient follow-up as a 'safety net' but have difficulties in obtaining appointments, and may be discharged without negotiation or adequate support. For these reasons, new forms of flexible/responsive aftercare are urgently needed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Follow‐up care in cancer: adjusting for referral targets and extending choice

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kate; Lydon, Anne; Amir, Ziv

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  Over recent years, several initiatives have impacted on the referral of patients to secondary care, most notably targets for urgent referral in suspected cancer and the patient choice agenda. At the same time, improved long‐term survival in cancer has increased numbers attending follow‐up, doubts about the effectiveness of specialist follow‐up have emerged, and alternative models of follow‐up have been tested. Aim  The aim of the study was to explore patient and carer perspectives on the flexibility and responsiveness of cancer services. This article focuses on findings relating to referral, subsequent outpatient appointments and cessation of outpatient follow‐up. Methods  Issues were explored in a qualitative study using face‐to‐face interviews with a purposive sample of 54 people affected by cancer. Data were analysed concurrently with data collection, using qualitative analysis software. Findings  The study gave rise to a number of salient themes. Links were identified between three of these: choice and responsiveness during referral; the flexibility and responsiveness of outpatient appointment systems; and negotiating cessation of follow‐up. It appeared that policy on urgent referrals might be adversely affecting practice relating to appointment systems and the continuance of follow‐up. Discussion and conclusions  Hospital‐based cancer follow‐up is being given decreasing priority because of doubts about effectiveness and a target‐driven focus on referral. This is impacting on patients, who may value outpatient follow‐up as a ‘safety net’ but have difficulties in obtaining appointments, and may be discharged without negotiation or adequate support. For these reasons, new forms of flexible/responsive aftercare are urgently needed. PMID:21615642

  15. Fragmentation in specialist care and stage III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Veenstra, Christine M.; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with cancer frequently transition between different types of specialists and across care settings. We explored how frequently the medical and surgical oncologic care of stage III colon cancer patients occurs across more than one hospital and whether this is associated with mortality and costs. Methods This is a retrospective SEER-Medicare cohort study of 9,075 stage III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 receiving both surgical and medical oncologic care within one year of diagnosis. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their cancer surgery and to their oncologist's primary hospital, and then characterized according to whether these hospitals were same or different. Outcomes included all-cause mortality, subhazards for colon cancer specific mortality, and cost of care at 12 months. Results 37% of patients received their surgical and medical oncologic care from different hospitals. Rural patients were less likely than urban patients to receive medical oncologic care from the same hospital (OR 0.62, 95%CI 0.43-0.90). Care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality but resulted in lower costs at 12 months (dollars saved $5493, 95%CI $1799, $9525), 8% of median cost. Conclusions Delivery of surgical and medical oncology care at the same hospital was associated with lower costs; however, reforms which seek to improve outcomes and cost through integrating complex care will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving care across more than one hospital. PMID:26043368

  16. CARE Track for Advanced Cancer: Impact and Timing of an Outpatient Palliative Care Clinic.

    PubMed

    Blackhall, Leslie J; Read, Paul; Stukenborg, George; Dillon, Patrick; Barclay, Joshua; Romano, Andrew; Harrison, James

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest that outpatient palliative care can reduce hospitalization and increase hospice utilization for patients with cancer, however there are insufficient resources to provide palliative care to all patients from time of diagnosis. It is also unclear whether inpatient consultation alone provides similar benefits. A better understanding of the timing, setting, and impact of palliative care for patients with cancer is needed. The purpose of this study was to measure timing of referral to outpatient palliative care and impact on end-of-life (EOL) care. The Comprehensive Assessment with Rapid Evaluation and Treatment (CARE Track) program is a phased intervention integrating outpatient palliative care into cancer care. In Year 1 patients were referred at the discretion of their oncologist. Academic medical center. We compared EOL hospitalization, hospice utilization, and costs of care for CARE Track patients compared to those never seen by palliative care or seen only in hospital. Patients were referred a median of 72.5 days prior to death. CARE Track patients had few hospitalizations at end of life, were less likely to die in hospital, had increased hospice utilization, and decreased costs of care; these results were significant even after controlling for differences between groups. Inpatient consultation alone did not impact these variables. However, only approximately half of patients with incurable cancers were referred to this program. Referral outpatient palliative care within 3 months of death improved EOL care and reduced costs, benefits not seen with inpatient care only. However, many patients were never referred, and methods of systematically identifying appropriate patients are needed.

  17. CARE Track for Advanced Cancer: Impact and Timing of an Outpatient Palliative Care Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Read, Paul; Stukenborg, George; Dillon, Patrick; Barclay, Joshua; Romano, Andrew; Harrison, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Studies suggest that outpatient palliative care can reduce hospitalization and increase hospice utilization for patients with cancer, however there are insufficient resources to provide palliative care to all patients from time of diagnosis. It is also unclear whether inpatient consultation alone provides similar benefits. A better understanding of the timing, setting, and impact of palliative care for patients with cancer is needed. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure timing of referral to outpatient palliative care and impact on end-of-life (EOL) care. Design: The Comprehensive Assessment with Rapid Evaluation and Treatment (CARE Track) program is a phased intervention integrating outpatient palliative care into cancer care. In Year 1 patients were referred at the discretion of their oncologist. Setting: Academic medical center. Measurements: We compared EOL hospitalization, hospice utilization, and costs of care for CARE Track patients compared to those never seen by palliative care or seen only in hospital. Results: Patients were referred a median of 72.5 days prior to death. CARE Track patients had few hospitalizations at end of life, were less likely to die in hospital, had increased hospice utilization, and decreased costs of care; these results were significant even after controlling for differences between groups. Inpatient consultation alone did not impact these variables. However, only approximately half of patients with incurable cancers were referred to this program. Conclusion: Referral outpatient palliative care within 3 months of death improved EOL care and reduced costs, benefits not seen with inpatient care only. However, many patients were never referred, and methods of systematically identifying appropriate patients are needed. PMID:26624851

  18. African Americans’ and Hispanics’ Information Needs About Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Ung, Danielle; Montiel-Ishino, F. Alejandro; Nelson, Alison; Canales, Jorge; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have reported on African American and Hispanic (AA and H) populations’ informational needs when seeking cancer care at an institution that offers clinical trials. Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) sought to identify and examine the decision making process, the perceptions, and the preferred channels of communication about cancer care services for AA and H communities in order to develop a list of marketing recommendations. Five focus groups (N=45) consisting of two AA and three H were conducted in four counties of the MCC catchment area in Tampa, FL. Participants were asked about their perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer care and MCC. Focus groups were audio-recorded and verbatim transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Similarities in responses were found between AA and H participants. Participants received general health and cancer information from media sources and word of mouth and preferred to hear patient testimonials. There were concerns about costs, insurance coverage, and the actual geographic location of the cancer center. In general, H participants were not opposed to participating in cancer clinical trials/research, whereas, AA participants were more hesitant. A majority of participants highly favored an institution that offered standard care and clinical trials. AA and H participants shared similar concerns and preferences in communication channels, but each group had specific informational needs. The perceptions and preferences of AA and H must be explored in order to successfully and efficiently increase cancer clinical trial participation. PMID:25189798

  19. African Americans' and Hispanics' information needs about cancer care.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Ung, Danielle; Montiel-Ishino, F Alejandro; Nelson, Alison; Canales, Jorge; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have reported on African American and Hispanic (AA and H) populations' informational needs when seeking cancer care at an institution that offers clinical trials. Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) sought to identify and examine the decision making process, the perceptions, and the preferred channels of communication about cancer care services for AA and H communities in order to develop a list of marketing recommendations. Five focus groups (N = 45) consisting of two AA and three H were conducted in four counties of the MCC catchment area in Tampa, FL. Participants were asked about their perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer care and MCC. Focus groups were audio-recorded and verbatim transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Similarities in responses were found between AA and H participants. Participants received general health and cancer information from media sources and word of mouth and preferred to hear patient testimonials. There were concerns about costs, insurance coverage, and the actual geographic location of the cancer center. In general, H participants were not opposed to participating in cancer clinical trials/research, whereas, AA participants were more hesitant. A majority of participants highly favored an institution that offered standard care and clinical trials. AA and H participants shared similar concerns and preferences in communication channels, but each group had specific informational needs. The perceptions and preferences of AA and H must be explored in order to successfully and efficiently increase cancer clinical trial participation.

  20. Communication in cancer care: discussing complementary and alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe; Ben-Arye, Eran; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among people with cancer. Many are looking for informed advice and desire communication with their physicians about CAM use. Communication is crucial in establishing trust with patients, gathering information, addressing patient emotions, and assisting patients in decisions about care. The quality of communication in cancer care has been shown to affect patient satisfaction, decision making, patient distress and well-being, compliance, and even malpractice litigation. Communication is now recognized as a core clinical skill in medicine, including cancer care, and is important to the delivery of high-quality care. A communication approach that fosters a collaborative relationship that includes adequate information exchange, responds to emotional needs, and manages uncertainty can lead to informed decisions about CAM use. This type of communication can help facilitate an open discussion with cancer patients and their families about integrating CAM use into their care and help physicians fulfill their roles in caring, comforting, and healing, even when cure is not possible. In this article, the authors discuss a possible model of effective patient-physician communication about CAM use in cancer care based on a comprehensive overview of the literature.

  1. Value-Based Care in the Worldwide Battle Against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Christobel M

    2017-01-01

    Globally, an increasing and aging population is contributing to the prevalence of cancer. To be effective, cancer care needs to involve the coordination of multidisciplinary specialties, and also needs to be affordable, accessible, and capable of producing optimal patient outcomes. Porter and Teisberg (2006) have postulated that shifting current healthcare strategies from volume-based to patient-centric care redirects economic competition to providing treatments which promote the best patient outcomes while driving down costs. Therefore, the value in value-based healthcare (VBH) is defined as patient outcome per currency spent on providing care. Based on the experiences of healthcare organizations currently transitioning to the value-based system, this review details actionable guidelines to transition current cancer care practices to the value-based system in four main steps: by defining universal clinical and patient-reported measures, creating cancer-specific units that provide the full care cycle, establishing a data capture model to routinely determine the value of the care delivered, and continually improving treatment strategies through research. As healthcare providers in more developed countries move to value-based care, those located in less developed countries should also be assisted in their transition to relieve the cancer burden globally. PMID:28357171

  2. Integration of palliative medicine into comprehensive cancer care.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth; Walsh, Declan

    2005-04-01

    Because of the advent of disease-modifying agents for patients with malignancies, cancer is now a chronic illness. However, most cancer patients will experience significant symptoms and complications during the course of their illness or its treatment. In addition to their physical symptoms, patient and families are burdened with psychological, social, and spiritual difficulties. Palliative medicine addresses all these issues and complements attempts to cure the disease; it is an essential part of modern comprehensive cancer care.

  3. Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Supportive and palliative care research includes studies to prevent or treat the acute and chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer and its treatment, and to examine the effects of cancer and its treatment on quality of life and psychosocial issues and treatment strategies at the end of life. Active Projects can range from caregiver issues to geriatrics, physical functioning to cognitive dysfunction. | Examining symptoms and morbidities related to cancer, its treatment, quality of life and end of life.

  4. Cancer screening and preventative care among long-term cancer survivors in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Khan, N F; Carpenter, L; Watson, E; Rose, P W

    2010-01-01

    Background: Long-term cancer survivors in the United Kingdom are mostly followed up in a primary care setting by their general practitioner; however, there is little research on the use of services. This study examines whether cancer survivors receive adequate screening and preventative care in UK primary care. Patients and methods: We identified a cohort of long-term survivors of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer with at least a 5-year survival using the General Practice Research Database, with controls matched for age, gender and practice. We compared adherence with cancer screening and the use of preventative care between cancer survivors and controls. Results: The cancer survivors' cohort consisted of 18 612 breast, 5764 colorectal and 4868 prostate cancer survivors. Most cancer survivors receive cancer screening at the same levels as controls, except for breast cancer survivors who were less likely to receive a mammogram than controls (OR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.66–0.92). Long-term cancer survivors received comparable levels of influenza vaccinations and cholesterol tests, but breast (OR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74–0.87) and prostate cancer survivors (OR=0.70, 95% CI: 0.57–0.87) were less likely to receive a blood pressure test. All survivors were more likely to receive bone densitometry. Conclusion: The provision and uptake of preventive care in a primary care setting in the United Kingdom is comparable between the survivors of three common cancers and those who have not had cancer. However, long-term breast cancer survivors in this cohort were less likely to receive a mammogram. PMID:20234361

  5. Safety hazards in cancer care: findings using three different methods.

    PubMed

    Lipczak, Henriette; Knudsen, Janne Lehmann; Nissen, Aase

    2011-12-01

    Patients with cancer are at risk of injury during treatment. Some injuries are preventable, but prevention requires knowledge about the hazards. Aims To identify hazards and injuries relating to Danish patients with cancer (types and severity) and to test three different methods of identifying cancer-specific hazards. Adverse events in cancer care were identified through reports from healthcare staff to the Danish Patient Safety Database, a retrospective chart review using the Global Trigger Tool, and reports to the Danish Cancer Society from patients with cancer and their relatives. Events were typed using the draft International Classification for Patient Safety. Severity was assessed by Safety Assessment Coding, the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP) and qualitative assessment. 2429 cancer-related adverse event reports were found on the Danish Patient Safety Database, 260 adverse events were identified using the Global Trigger Tool, and 151 safety events were reported by patients and their relatives. Cancer-specific adverse events and general safety problems were identified. In most cases injury to patients was temporary but severe and permanent injury occurred with a relatively high frequency. Patients with cancer are at risk of injury from cancer treatment procedures and as a consequence of problems related to administrative processes and communication. Types of identified events varied according to the methods used, and each method added new information. Further research on patient safety in cancer care and safety-enhancing activities is needed.

  6. Estimating the loss in expectation of life due to cancer using flexible parametric survival models.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Therese M-L; Dickman, Paul W; Eloranta, Sandra; Lambe, Mats; Lambert, Paul C

    2013-12-30

    A useful summary measure for survival data is the expectation of life, which is calculated by obtaining the area under a survival curve. The loss in expectation of life due to a certain type of cancer is the difference between the expectation of life in the general population and the expectation of life among the cancer patients. This measure is used little in practice as its estimation generally requires extrapolation of both the expected and observed survival. A parametric distribution can be used for extrapolation of the observed survival, but it is difficult to find a distribution that captures the underlying shape of the survival function after the end of follow-up. In this paper, we base our extrapolation on relative survival, because it is more stable and reliable. Relative survival is defined as the observed survival divided by the expected survival, and the mortality analogue is excess mortality. Approaches have been suggested for extrapolation of relative survival within life-table data, by assuming that the excess mortality has reached zero (statistical cure) or has stabilized to a constant. We propose the use of flexible parametric survival models for relative survival, which enables estimating the loss in expectation of life on individual level data by making these assumptions or by extrapolating the estimated linear trend at the end of follow-up. We have evaluated the extrapolation from this model using data on four types of cancer, and the results agree well with observed data.

  7. Key elements of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Maex, E; De Valck, C

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter the "communication compass" is introduced. It defines the key elements of communication and provides a language with which to communicate about communication in cancer care. The communication compass consists of two axes. One axis defines the associated perspectives of the clinician and the patient, the other axis the content of information and emotional experience. "Two lovers sat on a park bench with their bodies touching each other, holding hands in the moonlight. There was silence between them. So profound was their love for each other, they needed no words to express it." (Samuel Johnson). Sometimes communication just flows. There are these special moments, as fleeting as they are intense. Often communication is stuck. It is as if we speak another language and never manage to understand one another. The lovers on the park bench need no words to express what they feel, neither do they need words to speak about communication. Where communication gets stuck, we need a suitable language to speak about communication. Professional communication cannot be learned from a cookbook. Most of all it implies a readiness to communicate, which means openness to the other. The old adage that it is impossible not to communicate is only true if no criterion of quality is applied. As soon as some mutual understanding is implied in the definition of communication, the fact that it is at all possible to communicate becomes a miracle. Since there is an important gap between theory and practice, we created a tool that aims to bridge that gap. We call it the communication compass. It does not propose a model of "ideal communication," but provides a language with which to examine and analyze specific situations and to determine what the pitfalls and possibilities are. It is useful as a tool for identifying communicational difficulties in daily clinical practice and it can serve as a model for training basic communication skills.

  8. Nano-engineered flexible pH sensor for point-of-care urease detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardarinejad, A.; Maurya, D. K.; Tay, C. Y.; Marshall, B. J.; Alameh, K.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate pH monitoring is crucial for many applications, such as, water quality monitoring, blood monitoring, chemical and biological analyses, environmental monitoring and clinical diagnostic. The most common technique for pH measurement is based on the use of conventional glass pH electrodes. Glass electrodes have several limitations, such as mechanical fragility, large size, limited shapes and high cost, making them impractical for implementation as Lab-onchips and pH sensor capsules. Various metal oxides, such as RuO2, IrO2, TiO2, SnO2, Ta2O5 and PdO have recently been proposed for the realization of pH sensing electrodes. Specifically, ruthenium oxide exhibits unique properties including thermal stability, excellent corrosion resistance, low hysteresis high sensitivity, and low resistivity. In this paper, we demonstrate the concept of a miniaturized ion selective electrode (ISE) based pH sensor for point-of-care urease monitoring. The sensor comprises a thin film RuO2 on platinum sensing electrode, deposited using E-beam and R.F. magnetron sputtering, in conjunction with an integrated Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The performance and characterization of the developed pH/urea sensors in terms of sensitivity, resolution, reversibility and hysteresis are investigated. Experimental results show a linear potential-versus-urea-concentration response for urea concentrations in the range 0 - 180 mg/ml. Experimental results demonstrate super-Nernstian slopes in the range of 64.33 mV/pH - 73.83 mV/pH for RF sputtered RuO2 on platinum sensing electrode using a 80%:20% Ar:O2 gas ratio. The RuO2 sensor exhibits stable operation and fast dynamic response, making it attractive for in vivo use, wearable and flexible biomedical sensing applications.

  9. Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care: improvements on colorectal cancer quality of care indicators during a 3-year interval.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Erin M; Jacobsen, Paul B; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Malafa, Mokenge; Fulp, William; Fletcher, Michelle; Smith, Jesusa Corazon R; Brown, Richard; Levine, Richard; Cartwright, Thomas; Abesada-Terk, Guillermo; Kim, George; Alemany, Carlos; Faig, Douglas; Sharp, Philip; Markham, Merry-Jennifer; Shibata, David

    2014-01-01

    The quality of cancer care has become a national priority; however, there are few ongoing efforts to assist medical oncology practices in identifying areas for improvement. The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care is a consortium of 11 medical oncology practices that evaluates the quality of cancer care across Florida. Within this practice-based system of self-assessment, we determined adherence to colorectal cancer quality of care indicators (QCIs) in 2006, disseminated results to each practice and reassessed adherence in 2009. The current report focuses on evaluating the direction and magnitude of change in adherence to QCIs for colorectal cancer patients between the 2 assessments. Medical records were reviewed for all colorectal cancer patients seen by a medical oncologist in 2006 (n = 489) and 2009 (n = 511) at 10 participating practices. Thirty-five indicators were evaluated individually and changes in QCI adherence over time and by site were examined. Significant improvements were noted from 2006 to 2009, with large gains in surgical/pathological QCIs (eg, documenting rectal radial margin status, lymphovascular invasion, and the review of ≥ 12 lymph nodes) and medical oncology QCIs (documenting planned treatment regimen and providing recommended neoadjuvant regimens). Documentation of perineural invasion and radial margins significantly improved; however, adherence remained low (47% and 71%, respectively). There was significant variability in adherence for some QCIs across institutions at follow-up. The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care practices conducted self-directed quality-improvement efforts during a 3-year interval and overall adherence to QCIs improved. However, adherence remained low for several indicators, suggesting that organized improvement efforts might be needed for QCIs that remained consistently low over time. Findings demonstrate how efforts such as the Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care are useful for evaluating and

  10. A Mobile Breast Cancer Survivorship Care App: Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Baseman, Janet; Revere, Debra; Baldwin, Laura-Mae

    2017-09-26

    Cancer survivors living in rural areas experience unique challenges due to additional burdens, such as travel and limited access to specialists. Rural survivors of breast cancer have reported poorer outcomes, poorer mental health and physical functioning, and lower-than-average quality of life compared to urban survivors. To explore the feasibility and acceptability of developing a mobile health survivorship care app to facilitate care coordination; support medical, psychosocial, and practical needs; and improve survivors' long-term health outcomes. An interactive prototype app, SmartSurvivor, was developed that included recommended survivorship care plan components. The prototype's feasibility and acceptability were tested by a sample of breast cancer survivors (n=6), primary care providers (n=4), and an oncologist (n=1). Overall, both survivors and providers felt that SmartSurvivor was a potentially valuable tool to support long-term survivorship care plan objectives. Portability, accessibility, and having one place for all contact, treatment, symptom tracking, and medication summaries was highly valued. Our pilot study indicates that SmartSurvivor is a feasible and acceptable approach to meeting survivorship care objectives and the needs of both breast cancer survivors and their health care providers. Exploration of mobile health options for supporting survivorship care plan needs is a promising area of research.

  11. The potential consequences for cancer care and cancer research of Brexit.

    PubMed

    Selby, Peter; Lawler, Mark; Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Johnston, Patrick; Nurse, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Following the UK "Brexit" vote in June 2016, there are many uncertainties and risks for cancer research and cancer care in the UK. These are summarised and the importance of sustained engagement and influence from the cancer community on UK governments is emphasised.

  12. The potential consequences for cancer care and cancer research of Brexit

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Peter; Lawler, Mark; Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Johnston, Patrick; Nurse, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Following the UK “Brexit” vote in June 2016, there are many uncertainties and risks for cancer research and cancer care in the UK. These are summarised and the importance of sustained engagement and influence from the cancer community on UK governments is emphasised. PMID:28275394

  13. Spiritual care by nurses in curative cancer care: Protocol for a national, multicentre, mixed method study.

    PubMed

    Groot, Marieke; Ebenau, Anne F; Koning, Helen; Visser, Anja; Leget, Carlo; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; van Leeuwen, René; Ruben, Riet; Wulp, Marijke; Garssen, Bert

    2017-09-01

    To gain insight into the quantity and quality of spiritual care provided by nurses in curative cancer care, from the perspectives of both patients and nurses. Cancer causes patients to suffer from diverse symptoms related to their illness. Nurses play an important role in the care for people with cancer. Next to paying attention to physical and psychosocial needs, caring for spiritual needs of patients also belongs to good nursing. Most of the research concerning spirituality and spiritual care in relation to cancer has focused on palliative care. A mixed methods design will be used in two sub-phases. First, we will conduct semi-structured interviews with 72-90 patients coming from nine hospitals. Subsequently, approximately the same number of nurses working on oncology wards of these hospitals will be interviewed. We meticulously composed both interview guides so that only near the end of the interview explicit terms like spirituality and spiritual care are explicitly mentioned. Until that point, we will use other words to define the concepts. Next to the interviews, demographics, answers to some statements and several questionnaires will be gathered. Content analysis supported by DEDOOSE will be used to answer the research questions. The insight we will gain in this study enables us to compare experiences from the perspective of both patients and nurses. This can also provide us with suggestions for the improvement of nursing care for people with cancer who are treated with curative intent, a topic until now hardly addressed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Financial Burden of Cancer Care | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  15. A Subacute Care Intervention for Short Stay Cancer Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    entry into the formal health care system for adjuvant therapy . Data were collected by a one hour telephone interview with the participant which was...women were using complementary therapies in addition to customary medical care . We realize that CT use is becoming more common practice among cancer...their care with CTs since they had the highest proportion using one or more therapies . This higher use may be an attempt to supplement conventional

  16. Myths and realities in cancer care: another point of view.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Lee N

    2014-10-01

    Cancer care is advancing, and the cancer community is right to celebrate that progress. Simultaneously, however, the cost of cancer therapy is rising along with all medical costs. In a matter of just a few years, the cost of health coverage is projected to reach heights that are simply unsustainable for most American families, overshadowing every other daily expense. Such an overwhelming burden will continue to undermine the progress made in developing new, more effective treatment and care for cancer patients. There cannot be a celebration of discoveries if there is no way to pay for them. It is from that perspective that I react and respond here to the commentary of Dana Goldman and Tomas Philipson, who debunk five myths in cancer care. I concur with the authors' assessment of the value and impact of progress in cancer care. However, I also argue that researchers and policy makers must pay more attention to the impact of cost on patients' adherence and experience and the speed with which new treatment and care are being developed. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  17. Clarifying perspectives: Ethics case reflection sessions in childhood cancer care.

    PubMed

    Bartholdson, Cecilia; Lützén, Kim; Blomgren, Klas; Pergert, Pernilla

    2016-06-01

    Childhood cancer care involves many ethical concerns. Deciding on treatment levels and providing care that infringes on the child's growing autonomy are known ethical concerns that involve the whole professional team around the child's care. The purpose of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' experiences of participating in ethics case reflection sessions in childhood cancer care. Data collection by observations, individual interviews, and individual encounters. Data analysis were conducted following grounded theory methodology. Healthcare professionals working at a publicly funded children's hospital in Sweden participated in ethics case reflection sessions in which ethical issues concerning clinical cases were reflected on. The children's and their parents' integrity was preserved through measures taken to protect patient identity during ethics case reflection sessions. The study was approved by a regional ethical review board. Consolidating care by clarifying perspectives emerged. Consolidating care entails striving for common care goals and creating a shared view of care and the ethical concern in the specific case. The inter-professional perspectives on the ethical aspects of care are clarified by the participants' articulated views on the case. Different approaches for deliberating ethics are used during the sessions including raising values and making sense, leading to unifying interactions. The findings indicate that ethical concerns could be eased by implementing ethics case reflection sessions. Conflicting perspectives can be turned into unifying interactions in the healthcare professional team with the common aim to achieve good pediatric care. Ethics case reflection sessions is valuable as it permits the discussion of values in healthcare-related issues in childhood cancer care. Clarifying perspectives, on the ethical concerns, enables healthcare professionals to reflect on the most reasonable and ethically defensible care for the child

  18. Flexible Positions, Managed Hopes: The Promissory Bioeconomy of a Whole Genome Sequencing Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Rachel; Michie, Marsha; Skinner, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Genomic research has rapidly expanded its scope and ambition over the past decade, promoted by both public and private sectors as having the potential to revolutionize clinical medicine. This promissory bioeconomy of genomic research and technology is generated by, and in turn generates, the hopes and expectations shared by investors, researchers and clinicians, patients, and the general public alike. Examinations of such bioeconomies have often focused on the public discourse, media representations, and capital investments that fuel these “regimes of hope,” but also crucial are the more intimate contexts of small-scale medical research, and the private hopes, dreams, and disappointments of those involved. Here we examine one local site of production in a university-based clinical research project that sought to identify novel cancer predisposition genes through whole genome sequencing in individuals at high risk for cancer. In-depth interviews with 24 adults who donated samples to the study revealed an ability to shift flexibly between positioning themselves as research participants on the one hand, and as patients or as family members of patients, on the other. Similarly, interviews with members of the research team highlighted the dual nature of their positions as researchers and as clinicians. For both parties, this dual positioning shaped their investment in the project and valuing of its possible outcomes. In their narratives, all parties shifted between these different relational positions as they managed hopes and expectations for the research project. We suggest that this flexibility facilitated study implementation and participation in the face of potential and probable disappointment on one or more fronts, and acted as a key element in the resilience of this local promissory bioeconomy. We conclude that these multiple dimensions of relationality and positionality are inherent and essential in the creation of any complex economy, “bio” or

  19. Design and fabrication of a flexible MEMS-based electromechanical sensor array for breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Hardik J; Park, Kihan; Desai, Jaydev P

    2015-06-23

    The use of flexible micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based device provides a unique opportunity in bio-medical robotics such as characterization of normal and malignant tissues. This paper reports on design and development of a flexible MEMS-based sensor array integrating mechanical and electrical sensors on the same platform to enable the study of the change in electro-mechanical properties of the benign and cancerous breast tissues. In this work, we present the analysis for the electrical characterization of the tissue specimens and also demonstrate the feasibility of using the sensor for mechanical characterization of the tissue specimens. Eight strain gauges acting as mechanical sensors were fabricated using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conducting polymer on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as the substrate material. Eight electrical sensors were fabricated using SU-8 pillars on gold (Au) pads which were patterned on the strain gauges separated by a thin insulator (SiO2 1.0μm). These pillars were coated with gold to make it conducting. The electromechanical sensors are integrated on the same substrate. The sensor array covers 180μm × 180μm area and the size of the complete device is 20mm in diameter. The diameter of each breast tissue core used in the present study was 1mm and the thickness was 8μm. The region of interest was 200μm × 200μm. Microindentation technique was used to characterize the mechanical properties of the breast tissues. The sensor is integrated with conducting SU-8 pillars to study the electrical property of the tissue. Through electro-mechanical characterization studies using this MEMS-based sensor, we were able to measure the accuracy of the fabricated device and ascertain the difference between benign and cancer breast tissue specimens.

  20. Visible ink: A flexible and individually tailored writing intervention for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    CORNER, GEOFFREY W.; JHANWAR, SABRINA M.; KELMAN, JUDITH; PESSIN, HAYLEY; STEIN, EMMA; BREITBART, WILLIAM

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Subjective reports on the effectiveness of and satisfaction with writing interventions in medical populations have indicated that they can have a profound impact on patients. Further, past research on these programs has demonstrated that they can lead to a number of different positive outcomes depending on the personal characteristics of the participating patients and the type of writing with which they are tasked. For this reason, a flexible and individually tailored writing intervention may be particularly effective for patients, molding its approach to their desires and backgrounds. This paper examines Visible Ink, a writing program for cancer patients at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) that follows this model. Methods At Visible Ink’s First Fall Writing Festival in November 2012, an optional survey was provided to all program participants in attendance, capturing both quantitative and qualitative information on patient experiences in the program. Twenty-nine surveys were completed. Results The program appears to have a variety of positive effects, including fostering personal growth and providing a positive distraction. Respondents reported that they write in a number of different genres on topics both related and not related to their illnesses, which supports the flexible model of the program. All respondents indicated that they would recommend the program to others, and satisfaction with the program’s general approach (i.e., individualized work with a writing coach) was unanimous. A few areas for potential improvement were also identified, most of which involved expanding the services and events offered by the program. Significance of results Despite the limitations of this survey (e.g., small sample size and low response rate), its results support the promise of the Visible Ink model and demonstrate participants’ satisfaction with the program. Future research can more thoroughly examine Visible Ink’s effectiveness, and

  1. Visible ink: A flexible and individually tailored writing intervention for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Corner, Geoffrey W; Jhanwar, Sabrina M; Kelman, Judith; Pessin, Hayley; Stein, Emma; Breitbart, William

    2015-04-01

    Subjective reports on the effectiveness of and satisfaction with writing interventions in medical populations have indicated that they can have a profound impact on patients. Further, past research on these programs has demonstrated that they can lead to a number of different positive outcomes depending on the personal characteristics of the participating patients and the type of writing with which they are tasked. For this reason, a flexible and individually tailored writing intervention may be particularly effective for patients, molding its approach to their desires and backgrounds. This paper examines Visible Ink, a writing program for cancer patients at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) that follows this model. At Visible Ink's First Fall Writing Festival in November 2012, an optional survey was provided to all program participants in attendance, capturing both quantitative and qualitative information on patient experiences in the program. Twenty-nine surveys were completed. The program appears to have a variety of positive effects, including fostering personal growth and providing a positive distraction. Respondents reported that they write in a number of different genres on topics both related and not related to their illnesses, which supports the flexible model of the program. All respondents indicated that they would recommend the program to others, and satisfaction with the program's general approach (i.e., individualized work with a writing coach) was unanimous. A few areas for potential improvement were also identified, most of which involved expanding the services and events offered by the program. Despite the limitations of this survey (e.g., small sample size and low response rate), its results support the promise of the Visible Ink model and demonstrate participants' satisfaction with the program. Future research can more thoroughly examine Visible Ink's effectiveness, and additional resources could enable the program to expand.

  2. Multidisciplinary care and management selection in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Aizer, Ayal A; Paly, Jonathan J; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2013-07-01

    The management of prostate cancer is complicated by the multitude of treatment options, the lack of proven superiority of one modality of management, and the presence of physician bias. Care at a multidisciplinary prostate cancer clinic offers patients the relative convenience of consultation with physicians of multiple specialties within the confines of a single visit and appears to serve as a venue in which patients can be counseled regarding the risks and benefits of available therapies in an open and interactive environment. Physician bias may be minimized in such an environment, and patient satisfaction rates are high. Available data suggest that low-risk patients who are seen at a multidisciplinary prostate cancer clinic appear to select active surveillance in greater proportion. However, relatively few studies have investigated the other added value that multidisciplinary clinics provide to the patient or health care system, and therefore, additional studies assessing the impact of multidisciplinary care in the management of patients with prostate cancer are needed.

  3. Cancer education among primary care physicians in an underserved community.

    PubMed

    Sheinfeld Gorin, S; Gemson, D; Ashford, A; Bloch, S; Lantigua, R; Ahsan, H; Neugut, A

    2000-07-01

    Urban minority groups, such as those living in north Manhattan, are generally underserved with regard to cancer prevention and screening practices. Primary care physicians are in a critical position to counsel their patients on these subjects and to order screening tests for their patients. Eighty-four primary care physicians in two intervention communities who received educational visits about cancer screening and prevention were compared with 38 physicians in a nearby community who received no intervention. With pre- and post-test interviews over an 18-month period, the physicians were asked about their attitudes toward, knowledge of (relative to American Cancer Society guidelines), and likelihood of counseling and screening for breast, cervical, colorectal, and prostate cancers. Comparison of the two surveys of physicians indicated no statistically significant differences in knowledge of cancer prevention or screening. At post-test, however, intervention group physicians identified significantly fewer barriers to practice than control physicians (p<0.05). While overall, the educational visits to inner-city primary care physicians did not appear to significantly alter cancer prevention practices, there was a positive dose-response relationship among the subgroup of participants who received three or more project contacts. We uncovered significant changes in attitude due to academic detailing among urban primary care physicians practicing in north Manhattan. A significant pre-test sensitization effect and small numbers may have masked overall changes in cancer prevention and screening behaviors among physicians due to the intervention.

  4. Cancer Survivors' Reported Discussions with Health Care Providers About Follow-Up Care and Receipt of Written Care Plans.

    PubMed

    Reed, Sarah C; Walker, Rod; Ziebell, Rebecca; Rabin, Borsika; Nutt, Stephanie; Chubak, Jessica; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2017-05-08

    Prior studies reveal gaps in cancer survivors' discussions with health care providers about follow-up care and receipt of care plans; however, whether survivorship care planning may vary by cancer type is not known. We surveyed 615 survivors of breast, colorectal, prostate, lung cancer, and melanoma enrolled in three health plans to examine cancer survivors' self-reported discussions of follow-up care, including the need for surveillance, late and long-term effects, emotional needs, and health behaviors. We assessed whether cancer survivors received a written treatment summary and post-treatment care instructions. Most (92%) survivors reported having a discussion about the need for surveillance; 75%, late and long-term effects; 69%, lifestyle and health behaviors; and 53%, emotional and social needs. Most (88%) reported receiving post-treatment care instructions and 47%, a treatment summary. While there was little difference among survivors' receipt of surveillance or health behavior recommendations by cancer type (p = 0.85 and p = 0.66, respectively), discussions of late and long-term effects occurred among 82% of prostate, 78% of breast, 73% of melanoma, 72% of colorectal, and 67% of lung survivors (p = 0.06). Approximately half of survivors reported discussions of emotional needs, with modest differences by cancer type (p = 0.08). Our findings indicate that most patient-provider discussions cover information on surveillance, with less emphasis on late and long-term effects, lifestyle and health behaviors, and substantially less focusing on emotional and social needs. No or modest differences in discussions occurred by cancer type. Whether tailoring information to individual cancer survivor needs is beneficial should be examined.

  5. The global state of palliative care-progress and challenges in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Reville, Barbara; Foxwell, Anessa M

    2014-07-01

    All persons have a right to palliative care during cancer treatment and at the end-of-life. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines palliative care as a medical specialty that addresses physical, psychological, social, legal, and spiritual domains of care by an interdisciplinary team of professional and lay health care providers. Widespread adoption of this universal definition will aid policy development and educational initiatives on a national level. The need for palliative care is expanding due to the aging of the world's population and the increase in the rate of cancer in both developed and developing countries. However, in one third of the world there is no access to palliative care for persons with serious or terminal illness. Palliative care improves symptoms, most frequently pain, and improves quality of life for patients and their families, especially in the terminal disease phase. Accessibility to palliative care services, adequately trained health care professionals, availability of essential medicines, and gaps in education vary greatly throughout the world. Pain management is an integral concept in the practice of palliative care; however, opioiphobia, insufficient supply of opioids, and regulatory restrictions contribute to undue suffering for millions. Ongoing advocacy efforts call for increased awareness, palliative care integration with cancer care, and public and professional education. Enacting necessary change will require the engagement of health ministries and the recognition of the unique needs and resources of each country. The aim of this review is to examine progress in palliative care development and explore some of the barriers influencing cancer care across the globe.

  6. Indonesia: status of cancer pain and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Soebadi, R D; Tejawinata, S

    1996-08-01

    Indonesia is a large archipelago with an estimated 203,000-365,400 new cancer cases a year. Most cases present in the advanced stage. Pain is the chief complaint in 89% of the patients of the palliative care unit at Dr. Soetomo hospital. The program is a community-based, family-oriented, and culturally adapted home care, widely applicable throughout the country. The service and medication should be affordable, simple, and available. The WHO three-step ladder has been adopted as the method of choice in cancer pain relief. Facilities supportive for the program are the existing health-care delivery system and non-formal support system (Indonesian Cancer Foundation and Organization for Family Welfare Promotion, PKK). The chief constraints for program implementation are the geographical and population problems, lack of resources and funding for the training of health-care workers, and limited availability of oral morphine.

  7. Palliative Care in Iran: Moving Toward the Development of Palliative Care for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rassouli, Maryam; Sajjadi, Moosa

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is the third leading cause of death in Iran and its incidence has been increasing in recent years. Patients' quality of life is altered rather enormously due to cancer, which doubles the importance of and the need for providing palliative care in Iran. Although many steps have been taken toward the development and providing of palliative care in Iran, there is still a large gap between the status quo and the desirable state. This study presents the current state of palliative care for cancer patients and discusses the barriers, challenges and outlook of palliative care in Iran. If infrastructural projects that have recently been launched prove successful, proper advancement toward the providing of palliative care services in Iran will then not far on the horizon. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. [Update on current care guidelines: ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Leminen, Arto; Auranen, Annika; Bützow, Ralf; Hietanen, Sakari; Komulainen, Marja; Kuoppala, Tapio; Mäenpää, Johanna; Puistola, Ulla; Vuento, Maarit; Vuorela, Piia; Yliskoski, Merja

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. It appears that seemingly ovarian or primary peritoneal carcinomas, in fact, originate from fimbriae. BRCA1/2 mutation carriers are recommended for the removal of ovaries and fimbriae, to reduce the risk of cancer. Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer is based on the combination of surgery and chemotherapy. The residual tumour volume at the primary operation is the most important predictive factor of survival. The best response at the primary treatment is observed with combination chemotherapy with taxane and platinum. Adding bevacitzumab to first line chemotherapy may improve survival.

  9. “Being Flexible and Creative”: A Qualitative Study on Maternity Care Assistants' Experiences with Non-Western Immigrant Women

    PubMed Central

    Boerleider, Agatha W.; Francke, Anneke L.; van de Reep, Merle; Manniën, Judith; Wiegers, Therese A.; Devillé, Walter L. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies conducted in developed countries have explored postnatal care professionals' experiences with non-western women. These studies reported different cultural practices, lack of knowledge of the maternity care system, communication difficulties, and the important role of the baby's grandmother as care-giver in the postnatal period. However, not much attention has been paid in existing literature to postnatal care professionals' approaches to these issues. Our main objective was to gain insight into how Dutch postnatal care providers - ‘maternity care assistants’ (MCA) - address issues encountered when providing care for non-western women. Methods A generic qualitative research approach was used. Two researchers interviewed fifteen MCAs individually, analysing the interview material separately and then comparing and discussing their results. Analytical codes were organised into main themes and subthemes. Results MCAs perceive caring for non-western women as interesting and challenging, but sometimes difficult too. To guarantee the health and safety of mother and baby, they have adopted flexible and creative approaches to address issues concerning traditional practices, socioeconomic status and communication. Furthermore, they employ several other strategies to establish relationships with non-western clients and their families, improve women's knowledge of the maternity care system and give health education. Conclusion Provision of postnatal care to non-western clients may require special skills and measures. The quality of care for non-western clients might be improved by including these skills in education and retraining programmes for postnatal care providers on top of factual knowledge about traditional practices. PMID:24622576

  10. Lack of Needs Assessment in Cancer Survivorship Care and Rehabilitation in Hospitals and Primary Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Handberg, Charlotte; Jensen, Charlotte Maria; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Formalized and systematic assessment of survivorship care and rehabilitation needs is prerequisite for ensuring cancer patients sufficient help and support through their cancer trajectory. Patients are often uncertain as to how to express and address their survivorship care and rehabilitation needs, and little is known about specific, unmet needs and the plans necessary to meet them. There is a call for both ensuring survivorship care and rehabilitation for cancer patients in need and further for documenting the specific needs related to the cancer disease and its treatment. Thus the aim of this study was to describe specific survivorship care and rehabilitation needs and plans as stated by patients with cancer at hospitals when diagnosed and when primary care survivorship care and rehabilitation begins. Needs assessment forms from cancer patients at two hospitals and two primary care settings were analyzed. The forms included stated needs and survivorship care and rehabilitation plans. All data were categorized using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Eighty-nine patients at hospitals and 99 in primary care, stated their needs. Around 50% of the patients completed a survivorship care and rehabilitation plan. In total, 666 (mean 7.5) needs were stated by hospital patients and 836 (mean 8.0) by those in primary care. The needs stated were primarily within the ICF component "body functions and structure", and the most frequent needs were (hospitals/primary care) fatigue (57%/67%), reduced muscle strength (55%/67%) and being worried (37%/36%). The results underpin an urgent need for a systematic procedure to assess needs in clinical practice where cancer patients are being left without survivorship care and rehabilitation needs assessment. Gaining knowledge on needs assessment and the detailed description of needs and plans can facilitate targeted interventions. The findings indicate an urgent need to change the practice

  11. Nursing care dependence in the experiences of advanced cancer inpatients.

    PubMed

    Piredda, Michela; Bartiromo, Chiara; Capuzzo, Maria Teresa; Matarese, Maria; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Increasing burden of cancer in Europe and socio-demographic trends imply that more cancer patients will face high levels of dependency. Care dependency is often perceived as a distressing experience by cancer patients who are concerned about becoming a burden to others. The experience of care dependence has been scarcely investigated in advanced cancer patients, especially in the hospital setting. This study aimed at describing advanced cancer patients' experiences of care dependence in hospital and of the factors perceived by them as contributing to decrease or increase this dependence. The study used a descriptive phenomenological approach based on Husserl's (1913) life world perspective. Data collection and analysis followed Giorgi's (1997) five basic methodological steps. Data were gathered by semi-structured interviews with thirteen advanced cancer adult inpatients of a teaching hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded and the recordings transcribed word for word. Three themes emerged: 'dependency discovers new meanings of life', 'active coping with dependency' and 'the care cures the dependent person'. The essential meaning of care dependency was the possibility to become aware of being a person as both an object and subject of care. Dependence appears as an experience with strong relational connotations, which enable patients to see differently their life, themselves, the world and others. Dependency is revealed as a natural experience, only partly in accordance with previous studies. Deeper insight into the meaning patients attach to care dependency can enable nurses to better meet the patient's needs, e.g. by improving caring relationships with patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Are primary care providers implementing evidence-based care for breast cancer survivors?

    PubMed Central

    Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Aiken, Alice; McColl, Mary Ann; Tranmer, Joan; Langley, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the implementation of key best practice guideline recommendations for posttreatment breast cancer survivorship care by primary care providers (PCPs). Design Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Setting Southeastern Ontario. Participants Eighty-two PCPs: 62 family physicians (FPs) and 20 primary health care nurse practitioners (PHCNPs). Main outcome measures Twenty-one “need-to-know” breast cancer survivorship care guideline recommendations rated by participants as “implemented routinely,” “aware of guideline recommendation but not implemented routinely,” or “not aware of guideline recommendation.” Results Overall, FPs and PHCNPs in our sample reported similar practice patterns in terms of implementation of breast cancer survivorship guideline recommendations. The PCPs reported routinely implementing approximately half (46.4%, 9.7 of 21) of the key guideline recommendations with breast cancer survivors in their practices. Implementation rates were higher for recommendations related to prevention and surveillance aspects of survivorship care, such as mammography and weight management. Knowledge and practice gaps were highest for recommendations related to screening for and management of long-term effects such as fatigue and distress. There were only a few minor differences reported between FPs and PHCNPs. Conclusion There are knowledge and practice gaps related to implementation of the key guideline recommendations for breast cancer survivorship care in the primary care setting that could be targeted for improvement through educational or other interventions. PMID:26889509

  13. Are primary care providers implementing evidence-based care for breast cancer survivors?

    PubMed

    Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Aiken, Alice; McColl, Mary Ann; Tranmer, Joan; Langley, Hugh

    2015-11-01

    To describe the implementation of key best practice guideline recommendations for posttreatment breast cancer survivorship care by primary care providers (PCPs). Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Southeastern Ontario. Eighty-two PCPs: 62 family physicians (FPs) and 20 primary health care nurse practitioners (PHCNPs). Twenty-one “need-to-know” breast cancer survivorship care guideline recommendations rated by participants as “implemented routinely,” “aware of guideline recommendation but not implemented routinely,” or “not aware of guideline recommendation.” Overall, FPs and PHCNPs in our sample reported similar practice patterns in terms of implementation of breast cancer survivorship guideline recommendations. The PCPs reported routinely implementing approximately half (46.4%, 9.7 of 21) of the key guideline recommendations with breast cancer survivors in their practices. Implementation rates were higher for recommendations related to prevention and surveillance aspects of survivorship care, such as mammography and weight management. Knowledge and practice gaps were highest for recommendations related to screening for and management of long-term effects such as fatigue and distress. There were only a few minor differences reported between FPs and PHCNPs. There are knowledge and practice gaps related to implementation of the key guideline recommendations for breast cancer survivorship care in the primary care setting that could be targeted for improvement through educational or other interventions.

  14. End-of-Life Place of Care, Health Care Settings, and Health Care Transitions Among Cancer Patients: Impact of an Integrated Cancer Palliative Care Plan.

    PubMed

    Casotto, Veronica; Rolfini, Maria; Ferroni, Eliana; Savioli, Valentina; Gennaro, Nicola; Avossa, Francesco; Cancian, Maurizio; Figoli, Franco; Mantoan, Domenico; Brambilla, Antonio; Ghiotto, Maria Cristina; Fedeli, Ugo; Saugo, Mario

    2017-08-01

    Frequent end-of-life health care setting transitions can lead to an increased risk of fragmented care and exposure to unnecessary treatments. We assessed the relationship between the presence and the intensity of an Integrated Cancer Palliative Care (ICPC) plan and the occurrence of multiple transitions during the last month of life. Decedents of cancer aged 18-85 years residents in two regions of Italy were investigated accessing their integrated administrative data (death certificates, hospital discharges, hospice, and home care records). The principal outcome was defined as having 3+ health care setting transitions during the last month of life. The ICPC plans instituted 90-31 days before death represented the main exposure of interest. Of the 17,604 patients, 6698 included in an ICPC, although spending in hospital a median number of only two days (interquartile range 1-2), experienced 1+ (59.8%), 2+ (21.1%), or 3+ (5.9%) health care transitions. Among the latter group, the most common trajectory of care is home-hospital-home-hospital (36.0%). The intensity of the ICPC plan showed a marked protective effect toward the event of 3+ health care setting transitions; the effect is already evident from an intensity of at least one home visit/week (odds ratio 0.73; 95% confidence interval 0.62-0.87). A well-integrated palliative care approach can be effective in further reducing the percentage of patients who spent many days in hospital and/or undergo frequent and inopportune changes of their care setting during their last month of life. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ensuring quality cancer care: a follow-up review of the Institute of Medicine's 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care in America.

    PubMed

    Spinks, Tracy; Albright, Heidi W; Feeley, Thomas W; Walters, Ron; Burke, Thomas W; Aloia, Thomas; Bruera, Eduardo; Buzdar, Aman; Foxhall, Lewis; Hui, David; Summers, Barbara; Rodriguez, Alma; Dubois, Raymond; Shine, Kenneth I

    2012-05-15

    Responding to growing concerns regarding the safety, quality, and efficacy of cancer care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences commissioned a comprehensive review of cancer care delivery in the US health care system in the late 1990s. The National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), a 20-member board with broad representation, performed this review. In its review, the NCPB focused on the state of cancer care delivery at that time, its shortcomings, and ways to measure and improve the quality of cancer care. The NCPB described an ideal cancer care system in which patients would have equitable access to coordinated, guideline-based care and novel therapies throughout the course of their disease. In 1999, the IOM published the results of this review in its influential report, Ensuring Quality Cancer Care. The report outlined 10 recommendations, which, when implemented, would: 1) improve the quality of cancer care, 2) increase the current understanding of quality cancer care, and 3) reduce or eliminate access barriers to quality cancer care. Despite the fervor generated by this report, there are lingering doubts regarding the safety and quality of cancer care in the United States today. Increased awareness of medical errors and barriers to quality care, coupled with escalating health care costs, has prompted national efforts to reform the health care system. These efforts by health care providers and policymakers should bridge the gap between the ideal state described in Ensuring Quality Cancer Care and the current state of cancer care in the United States.

  16. Development of the cancer survivorship care plan: what's next? Life after cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jody M; Scheid, Kathy; Rolnick, Sharon J

    2013-06-01

    Long-term information needs are increasingly important as more people are diagnosed with cancer and living well beyond initial diagnosis and treatment. Consequently, cancer is joining the ranks of chronic conditions (e.g., asthma, diabetes) for which ongoing, long-term surveillance and management should be the model of care. However, the post-treatment period is fraught with uncertainty for patients and care providers. The "who, what, and when" of follow-up care, in particular, can be complex and confusing. Therefore, survivorship care plans (SCPs) are recommended. The Minnesota Cancer Alliance, a coalition working to improve quality of life for cancer survivors, developed a patient-focused SCP. This user-friendly SCP could be considered for use in patient care--particularly by nurses, who are well suited and positioned to implement SCPs.

  17. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists: Importance of communication.

    PubMed

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C; Manca, Donna P; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-10-01

    To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Canada. A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still exist. This can lead to serious consequences that affect clinical decision making

  18. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  19. Conceptual Models for Integrating Palliative Care at Cancer Centers

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Palliative care programs are rapidly evolving in acute care facilities. Increased and earlier access has been advocated for patients with life-threatening illnesses. Existing programs would need major growth to accommodate the increased utilization. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the current structures, processes, and outcomes of the Supportive and Palliative Care Program at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (UTMDACC), and to use the update as a platform to discuss the challenges and opportunities in integrating palliative and supportive services in a tertiary care cancer center. Our interprofessional program consists of a mobile consultation team, an acute palliative care unit, and an outpatient supportive care clinic. We will discuss various metrics including symptom outcomes, quality of end-of-life care, program growth, and financial issues. Despite the growing evidence to support early palliative care involvement, referral to palliative care remains heterogeneous and delayed. To address this issue, we will discuss various conceptual models and practical recommendations to optimize palliative care access. PMID:22925157

  20. Primary Care Physician Perceptions of Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Jody L.; Perkins, Susan M.; Haggstrom, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing cure rates for childhood cancers have resulted in a population of adult childhood cancer survivors (CCS) that are at risk for late effects of cancer-directed therapy. Our objective was to identify facilitators and barriers to primary care physicians (PCPs) providing late effects screening and evaluate information tools PCPs perceive as useful. We analyzed surveys from 351 practicing internal medicine and family practice physicians nationwide. A minority of PCPs perceived that their medical training was adequate to recognize late effects of chemotherapy (27.6%), cancer surgery (36.6%), and radiation therapy (38.1%). Most PCPs (93%) had never used Children’s Oncology Group guidelines, but 86% would follow their recommendations. Most (84–86%) PCPs stated that they had never received a cancer treatment summary or survivorship care plan but (>90%) thought these documents would be useful. PCPs have a low level of awareness and receive inadequate training to recognize late effects. Overall, PCPs infrequently utilize guidelines, cancer treatment summaries, and survivorship care plans, although they perceive such tools as useful. We have identified gaps to address when providing care for CCS in routine general medical practice. PMID:24309612

  1. Prostate Cancer Mortality-To-Incidence Ratios Are Associated with Cancer Care Disparities in 35 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sung-Lang; Wang, Shao-Chuan; Ho, Cheng-Ju; Kao, Yu-Lin; Hsieh, Tzuo-Yi; Chen, Wen-Jung; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Pei-Ru; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Lee, Huei; Sung, Wen-Wei

    2017-01-01

    The variation in mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs) among countries reflects the clinical outcomes and the available interventions for colorectal cancer treatments. The association between MIR of prostate cancer and cancer care disparities among countries is an interesting issue that is rarely investigated. For the present study, cancer incidence and mortality rates were obtained from the GLOBOCAN 2012 database. The rankings and total expenditures on health of various countries were obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO). The association between variables was analyzed by linear regression analyses. In this study, we estimated the role of MIRs from 35 countries that had a prostate cancer incidence greater than 5,000 cases per year. As expected, high prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates were observed in more developed regions, such as Europe and the Americas. However, the MIRs were 2.5 times higher in the less developed regions. Regarding the association between MIR and cancer care disparities, countries with good WHO ranking and high total expenditures on health/gross domestic product (GDP) were significant correlated with low MIR. The MIR variation for prostate cancer correlates with cancer care disparities among countries further support the role of cancer care disparities in clinical outcome. PMID:28051150

  2. Providing Coordinated Cancer Care-A Qualitative Study of Norwegian Cancer Coordinators' Experiences of Their Role.

    PubMed

    Lie, Nataskja-Elena Kersting; Hauken, May Aasebø; Solvang, Per Koren

    2017-05-23

    There is a growing need for strategies to improve coordinated, tailored services in cancer care to meet the comprehensive needs of cancer patients. In Norway, cancer coordinators (CCs) have been established to improve coordination and patient-centeredness of services. Little is known about how CCs engage to provide patients with the needed services and support throughout the treatment. The aim of this study was to explore how Norwegian CCs experience their role and how they enact it in order to enhance coordinated cancer care. The study encompasses a qualitative, hermeneutic approach, conducting semistructured in-depth interviews of 26 Norwegian CCs. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis and discussed in the light of the salutogenic theory. Cancer coordinators take a holistic approach to patient care, including both patient- and system-level activities. "Providing coordinated cancer care" emerged as an overarching topic for their role. This topic was elaborated by 3 main themes: (1) finding their place and creating their function, (2) meeting the needs of cancer patients and helping them cope, (3) promoting well-functioning cancer care systems. Cancer coordinators evolved diversely, in adaption to the local context and patients' needs. The functions' diversity challenged the implementation and external role recognition. Cancer coordinators seemed to apply a salutogenic, resource-focused orientation in order to support a positive development at both the patient and the system levels. The findings reinforce the call for holistic, patient-centered services in cancer care. Cancer coordinators need appropriate support from the local management to establish the role and local collaborations.

  3. Preparing professional staff to care for cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Bhatia, Smita

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Oncology health care professionals frequently lack the background to implement needed survivorship activities and follow-up care. The purpose of this project is to assist providers in the clarification and initiation of potentially durable changes in survivorship care by developing a health professional curriculum, recruiting participants, implementing the course, conducting course evaluation and following participants’ defined goals over time. Materials and methods The curriculum was developed based on recommendations from the Institute of Medicine Report-From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor—Lost in Transition. Three concepts were used to structure the course: cancer survivorship quality of life, changing practice via performance improvement, and principles of adult education. Expert faculty designed and implemented the curriculum and teaching methods using adult learning principles and an interactive approach. Competitively-selected, two-person interdisciplinary teams for the first course (July 12–15, 2006, Pasadena, California) were selected based on stated interests, three projected goals, and letters of commitment from administrators. Results Participants represented 52 cancer care settings from 28 states. Teams included Nurses (48.1%), Social Workers (20.7%), Physicians (18.8%), Directors/Administrators (6.6%), Psychologists (2.8%), and others (3%). The institutional barriers identified by teams were lack of survivorship knowledge (94 %), financial constraints (61%), lack of administrative support (6%), and staff philosophy that excluded survivorship (15%). Evaluation of content from the first course was consistently positive. Conclusions Dissemination of survivorship education for health care professionals stimulates participants to define and begin to implement goals for improving survivors’ care. Implications for cancer survivors A training program such as the one described provides professional knowledge regarding survivorship that

  4. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee Report.

    PubMed

    Zweigenhaft, Burt; Bosserman, Linda; Kenney, James T; Lawless, Grant D; Marsland, Thomas A; Deligdish, Craig K; Burgoyne, Douglas S; Knopf, Kevin B; Long, Douglas M; McKercher, Patrick; Owens, Gary M; Hennessy, John E; Lang, James R; Malin, Jennifer; Natelson, Leonard; Palmgren, Matthew C; Slotnik, Jayson; Shockney, Lillie D; Vogenberg, F Randy

    2013-07-01

    The AVBCC Annual Meeting experiences exponential growth in attendance and participation as oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, patient advocates, and drug manufacturers convened in Hollywood, FL, on May 2-5, 2013, for the Third Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The conference presented an all-inclusive open forum for stakeholder dialogue and integration across the cancer care continuum, facilitating an open dialogue among the various healthcare stakeholders to align their perspectives around the urgent need to address value in cancer care, costs, patient education, safety, outcomes, and quality. The AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee was held on the first day of the conference to define value in cancer care. The committee was divided into 7 groups, each representing a key stakeholder in oncology. The goal of the Steering Committee was to define value from the particular point of view of each of the stakeholder groups and to suggest how that particular perspective can contribute to the value proposition in oncology, by balancing cost, quality, and access to care to improve overall patient outcomes. The following summary highlights the major points addressed by each group.

  5. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee Report

    PubMed Central

    Zweigenhaft, Burt; Bosserman, Linda; Kenney, James T.; Lawless, Grant D.; Marsland, Thomas A.; Deligdish, Craig K.; Burgoyne, Douglas S.; Knopf, Kevin B.; Long, Douglas M.; McKercher, Patrick; Owens, Gary M.; Hennessy, John E.; Lang, James R.; Malin, Jennifer; Natelson, Leonard; Palmgren, Matthew C.; Slotnik, Jayson; Shockney, Lillie D.; Vogenberg, F. Randy

    2013-01-01

    The AVBCC Annual Meeting experiences exponential growth in attendance and participation as oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, patient advocates, and drug manufacturers convened in Hollywood, FL, on May 2–5, 2013, for the Third Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The conference presented an all-inclusive open forum for stakeholder dialogue and integration across the cancer care continuum, facilitating an open dialogue among the various healthcare stakeholders to align their perspectives around the urgent need to address value in cancer care, costs, patient education, safety, outcomes, and quality. The AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee was held on the first day of the conference to define value in cancer care. The committee was divided into 7 groups, each representing a key stakeholder in oncology. The goal of the Steering Committee was to define value from the particular point of view of each of the stakeholder groups and to suggest how that particular perspective can contribute to the value proposition in oncology, by balancing cost, quality, and access to care to improve overall patient outcomes. The following summary highlights the major points addressed by each group. PMID:24991360

  6. Quality of Breast Cancer Care: Perception Versus Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bickell, Nina A.; Neuman, Jennifer; Fei, Kezhen; Franco, Rebeca; Joseph, Kathie-Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Because insurers use performance and quality metrics to inform reimbursement, identifying remediable causes of poor-quality cancer care is imperative. We undertook this descriptive cohort study to assess key predictors of women's perceived quality of their breast cancer care and actual guideline-concordant quality of care received. Patients and Methods We surveyed inner-city women with newly diagnosed and surgically treated early-stage breast cancer requiring adjuvant treatment who were enrolled onto a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of patient assistance to reduce disparities in care. We assessed women's perceived quality of care and perceived quality of the process of getting care, such as getting referrals, test results, and treatments; we abstracted records to determine the actual quality of care. Results Of the 374 new patients with early-stage breast cancer enrolled onto the RCT, only a slight majority of women (55%) perceived their quality of care as excellent; 88% actually received good-quality, guideline-concordant care. Excellent perceived quality (P < .001) was significantly associated with patients' perception of the quality of the process of getting care (adjusted relative risk [RR], 1.78; 95% CI, 1.65 to 1.87). Also associated with perceived quality—and mediated by race—were trust in one's physician (adjusted RR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.64) and perceived racism, which affected black women more than women of other races/ethnicities (black race–adjusted RR for perceived racism, 0.33 [95% CI, 0.10 to 0.87]; black race–adjusted RR for trust, 1.61 [95% CI, 0.97 to 1.90]; c = 0.82 for the model; P < .001). Actual quality of care provided did not affect perceived quality of care received. Conclusion Patients' perceived quality of care differs from their receipt of high-quality care. Mutable targets to improve perceived quality of care include the processes of getting care and trusting their physician. PMID:22493417

  7. Primary care and communication in shared cancer care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sada, Yvonne; Street, Richard L.; Singh, Hardeep; Shada, Rachel; Naik, Aanand D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore perceptions of primary care physicians’ (PCPs) and oncologists’ roles, responsibilities, and patterns of communication related to shared cancer care in three integrated health systems that used electronic health records (EHRs). Study design Qualitative study. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with ten early stage colorectal cancer patients and fourteen oncologists and PCPs. Sample sizes were determined by thematic saturation. Dominant themes and codes were identified and subsequently applied to all transcripts. Results Physicians reported that EHRs improved communication within integrated systems, but communication with physicians outside their system was still difficult. PCPs expressed uncertainty about their role during cancer care, even though medical oncologists emphasized the importance of co-morbidity control during cancer treatment. Both patients and physicians described additional roles for PCPs, including psychological distress support and behavior modification. Conclusions Integrated systems that use EHRs likely facilitate shared cancer care through improved PCP-oncologist communication. However, strategies to facilitate a more active role for PCPs in managing co-morbidities, psychological distress and behavior modification, as well as to overcome communication challenges between physicians not practicing within the same integrated system, are still needed to improve shared cancer care. PMID:21615196

  8. Barriers to cancer care, perceived social support, and patient navigation services for Korean breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Won

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the relationships among barriers to cancer care, perceived social support, and patient navigation services (PNS) for Korean breast cancer patients. For Korean breast cancer patients, PNS are comprised of five services, including emotional, financial, information, transportation, and disease management. The study findings demonstrated that transportation and disease management barriers were directly associated with PNS, whereas emotional and financial barriers were indirectly associated with PNS through perceived social support. The current study provides a preliminary Korean patient navigation model to identify how barriers to cancer care can be reduced through social support and PNS.

  9. [Breast care nurse. A new specialist in the multidisciplinary care of breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Tóth, László; Sávolt, Akos; Péley, Gábor; Tínusz, Anikó; Palla, Eva; Bartal, Alexandra; Horti, Ildikó; Kásler, Miklós

    2012-09-01

    The uniform European structure and professional standards for high quality breast cancer care were established in conjunction with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment, the European Society of Mastology and the European Breast Cancer Coalition with the support of the European Parliament. Well-prepared professional teams including a new member called the breast care nurse serve as ground for special breast cancer centers with international accreditation that provide modern, evidence based, patient centered multidisciplinary oncological care. The responsibilities of the new qualified professional staff member include the psycho-social support of the patient and carers from the moment of diagnosis throughout the whole oncological treatment, the fostering of delivering information and communication between patients and specialists. As a result of the curriculum founded by the European Oncology Nursing Society, breast care nurses have become key members of the practice of holistic breast cancer care in countries where the European recommendations have already been implemented. Considering the expected rearrangement of national oncological care, the new sub-specialty is outlined for the first time in the light of the experiences gained at the National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, a comprehensive cancer center.

  10. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  11. 77 FR 64340 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge AGENCY... Cancer Care Video Challenge is an opportunity for members of the public to create short, erin.poetter@hhs... ability manage care. The Cancer Care Video Challenge is an ] opportunity for members of the public...

  12. 75 FR 9913 - Request for Measures of Patient Experiences of Cancer Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Cancer Care AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. ACTION: Notice of request. SUMMARY... respondents to assess the care delivered by cancer care providers. AHRQ is seeking these items and measures from researchers, survey firms, cancer care providers, patient advocacy groups, individual...

  13. Raising the standard of brain cancer care.

    PubMed

    Mason, Mary-Claire

    2015-04-15

    Survival rates for people with brain cancer are poor, and some patients do not receive the specialist support they need. Nurse specialist Ingela Oberg calls for earlier diagnosis and improved access to nurse-led clinics and rehabilitation services.

  14. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Sherri G.; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy. PMID:26258794

  15. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention.

    PubMed

    Homan, Sherri G; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R; Armer, Jane M

    2015-08-06

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups' questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy.

  16. Did Pre-Affordable Care Act Medicaid Expansion Increase Access to Surgical Cancer Care?

    PubMed

    Al-Refaie, Waddah B; Zheng, Chaoyi; Jindal, Manila; Clements, Michele Lee; Toye, Patryce; Johnson, Lynt B; Xiao, David; Westmoreland, Timothy; DeLeire, Thomas; Shara, Nawar

    2017-04-01

    Although the Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded Medicaid access, it is unknown whether this has led to greater access to complex surgical care. Evidence on the effect of Medicaid expansion on access to surgical cancer care, a proxy for complex care, is sparse. Using New York's 2001 statewide Medicaid expansion as a natural experiment, we investigated how expansion affected use of surgical cancer care among beneficiaries overall and among racial minorities. From the New York State Inpatient Database (1997 to 2006), we identified 67,685 nonelderly adults (18 to 64 years of age) who underwent cancer surgery. Estimated effects of 2001 Medicaid expansion on access were measured on payer mix, overall use of surgical cancer care, and percent use by racial/ethnic minorities. Measures were calculated quarterly, adjusted for covariates when appropriate, and then analyzed using interrupted time series. The proportion of cancer operations paid by Medicaid increased from 8.9% to 15.1% in the 5 years after the expansion. The percentage of uninsured patients dropped by 21.3% immediately after the expansion (p = 0.01). Although the expansion was associated with a 24-case/year increase in the net Medicaid case volume (p < 0.0001), the overall all-payer net case volume remained unchanged. In addition, the adjusted percentage of ethnic minorities among Medicaid recipients of cancer surgery was unaffected by the expansion. Pre-ACA Medicaid expansion did not increase the overall use or change the racial composition of beneficiaries of surgical cancer care. However, it successfully shifted the financial burden away from patient/hospital to Medicaid. These results might suggest similar effects in the post-ACA Medicaid expansion. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Oncologists' perspectives on concurrent palliative care in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center.

    PubMed

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T; Ahles, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand oncology clinicians' perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. This was a qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: (1) treating the whole patient, (2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, (3) “some patients just want to fight,” and (4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists' views on the complementary role of palliative care: (1) “refer early and often,” (2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals “hospice”; “Heme patients are different,” (3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, (4) palliative care “shares the load,” and (5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care.

  18. Estimating and modelling cure in population-based cancer studies within the framework of flexible parametric survival models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background When the mortality among a cancer patient group returns to the same level as in the general population, that is, the patients no longer experience excess mortality, the patients still alive are considered "statistically cured". Cure models can be used to estimate the cure proportion as well as the survival function of the "uncured". One limitation of parametric cure models is that the functional form of the survival of the "uncured" has to be specified. It can sometimes be hard to find a survival function flexible enough to fit the observed data, for example, when there is high excess hazard within a few months from diagnosis, which is common among older age groups. This has led to the exclusion of older age groups in population-based cancer studies using cure models. Methods Here we have extended the flexible parametric survival model to incorporate cure as a special case to estimate the cure proportion and the survival of the "uncured". Flexible parametric survival models use splines to model the underlying hazard function, and therefore no parametric distribution has to be specified. Results We have compared the fit from standard cure models to our flexible cure model, using data on colon cancer patients in Finland. This new method gives similar results to a standard cure model, when it is reliable, and better fit when the standard cure model gives biased estimates. Conclusions Cure models within the framework of flexible parametric models enables cure modelling when standard models give biased estimates. These flexible cure models enable inclusion of older age groups and can give stage-specific estimates, which is not always possible from parametric cure models. PMID:21696598

  19. [Development of Spiritual Care in Cancer Treatment in Japan].

    PubMed

    Shimazono, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Spiritual care started worldwide in the late 1960s with the development of the hospice movement and death studies. Why did spiritual care start duringthis time in history ? In some Christian societies, of that time,"pastoral care" evolved into an interfaith "spiritual care" where in the caretaker was the main agent instead of the caregiver. On the other hand, the importance of palliative care for cancer patients was gradually acknowledged. In addition, this progress was accompanied by the academic development of "death studies" which is called "death and life studies" in Japan. The Japanese hospice care and death studies movement started in the late 1970s. In the precedingperiod, the spiritual quest of cancer patients facingdeath was already gaining public attention. A scholar of religious studies, Hideo Kishimoto of the University of Tokyo, was diagnosed with cancer in 1954; he survived many operations until his death in 1964. Duringthose years, he wrote about his personal experience of acceptinghis approachingdeath. Although he did not believe in any specific faith, he had studied various religious teachings. It is important to understand his perception of his own death. His book, On Facing Death, was published immediately after his death. Therefore, it provided a prominent discourse on copingwith spiritual pain of approachingdeath even before the growth of spiritual care in Japan.

  20. [Palliative care in patients without cancer: Impact of the end-of-life care team].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Mitsunori; Yokoe, Yuriko; Kubokawa, Naomi; Hukuda, Koji; Hattori, Hideyuki; Hong, Young-Jae; Miura, Hisayuki; Shibasaki, Masataka; Endo, Hidetoshi; Takeda, Jun; Odate, Mitsuru; Senda, Kazuyoshi; Nakashima, Kazumitsu

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing problems associated with life-threatening illnesses by promoting the prevention and relief of suffering. Palliative care in Japan has been developed mainly for cancer patients. At the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, an end-of-life care team (EOLCT) has been developed to promote palliative care for patients without cancer. In the first 6 months of its operation, 109 requests were received by the team, 40% of which were for patients without cancer or related disease, including dementia, frailty due to advanced age, chronic respiratory failure, chronic heart failure, and intractable neurologic diseases. The main purpose of the EOLCT is to alleviate suffering. The relevant activities of the team include the use of opioids, providing family care, and giving support in decision-making (advance care planning) regarding withholding; enforcement; and withdrawal of mechanical ventilators, gastric feeding tubes, and artificial alimentation. The EOLCT is also involved in ongoing discussions of ethical problems. The team is actively engaged in the activities of the Japanese Geriatric Society and contributes to the development of decision-making guidelines for end-of-life by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The EOLCT can be helpful in promoting palliative care for patients with diseases other than cancer. The team offers support during times of difficulty and decision-making.

  1. Family Perspectives on Hospice Care Experiences of Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pallavi; Wright, Alexi A; Hatfield, Laura A; Temel, Jennifer S; Keating, Nancy L

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To determine whether hospice use by patients with cancer is associated with their families' perceptions of patients' symptoms, goal attainment, and quality of end-of-life (EOL) care. Methods We interviewed 2,307 families of deceased patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer who were enrolled in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance study (a multiregional, prospective, observational study) and died by 2011. We used propensity-score matching to compare family-reported outcomes for patients who did and did not receive hospice care, including the presence and relief of common symptoms (ie, pain, dyspnea), concordance with patients' wishes for EOL care and place of death, and quality of EOL care. We also examined associations between hospice length of stay and these outcomes among hospice enrollees. Results In a propensity-score-matched sample of 1,970 individuals, families of patients enrolled in hospice reported more pain in their patient compared with those not enrolled in hospice. However, families of patients enrolled in hospice more often reported that patients received "just the right amount" of pain medicine (80% v 73%; adjusted difference, 7 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1 to 12 percentage points) and help with dyspnea (78% v 70%; adjusted difference, 8 percentage points; 95% CI, 2 to 13 percentage points). Families of patients enrolled in hospice also more often reported that patients' EOL wishes were followed (80% v 74%; adjusted difference, 6 percentage points; 95% CI, 2 to 11 percentage points) and "excellent" quality EOL care (57% v 42%; adjusted difference, 15 percentage points; 95% CI, 11 to 20). Families of patients who received > 30 days of hospice care reported the highest quality EOL outcomes. Conclusion Hospice care is associated with better symptom relief, patient-goal attainment, and quality of EOL care. Encouraging earlier and increased hospice enrollment may improve EOL experiences for patients with

  2. Cancer Care Ontario Colonoscopy Standards: Standards and evidentiary base

    PubMed Central

    Rabeneck, L; Rumble, RB; Axler, J; Smith, A; Armstrong, D; Vinden, C; Belliveau, P; Rhodes, K; Zwaal, C; Mai, V; Dixon, P

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cause of non-tobacco-related cancer deaths in Canadian men and women, accounting for 10% of all cancer deaths. An estimated 7800 men and women will be diagnosed with CRC, and 3250 will die from the disease in Ontario in 2007. Given that CRC incidence and mortality rates in Ontario are among the highest in the world, the best opportunity to reduce this burden of disease would be through screening. The present report describes the findings and recommendations of Cancer Care Ontario’s Colonoscopy Standards Expert Panel, which was convened in March 2006 by the Program in Evidence-Based Care. The recommendations will form the basis of the quality assurance program for colonoscopy delivered in support of Ontario’s CRC screening program. PMID:18026582

  3. An Action Plan for Translating Cancer Survivorship Research Into Care

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tenbroeck; de Moor, Janet S.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Khoury, Muin J.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Stein, Kevin D.; Rechis, Ruth; Parry,, Carla; Leach, Corinne R.; Padgett, Lynne; Rowland, Julia H.

    2014-01-01

    To meet the complex needs of a growing number of cancer survivors, it is essential to accelerate the translation of survivorship research into evidence-based interventions and, as appropriate, recommendations for care that may be implemented in a wide variety of settings. Current progress in translating research into care is stymied, with results of many studies un- or underutilized. To better understand this problem and identify strategies to encourage the translation of survivorship research findings into practice, four agencies (American Cancer Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, LIVE STRONG Foundation, National Cancer Institute) hosted a meeting in June, 2012, titled: “Biennial Cancer Survivorship Research Conference: Translating Science to Care.” Meeting participants concluded that accelerating science into care will require a coordinated, collaborative effort by individuals from diverse settings, including researchers and clinicians, survivors and families, public health professionals, and policy makers. This commentary describes an approach stemming from that meeting to facilitate translating research into care by changing the process of conducting research—improving communication, collaboration, evaluation, and feedback through true and ongoing partnerships. We apply the T0-T4 translational process model to survivorship research and provide illustrations of its use. The resultant framework is intended to orient stakeholders to the role of their work in the translational process and facilitate the transdisciplinary collaboration needed to translate basic discoveries into best practices regarding clinical care, self-care/management, and community programs for cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss barriers to implementing translational survivorship science identified at the meeting, along with future directions to accelerate this process. PMID:25249551

  4. An action plan for translating cancer survivorship research into care.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Catherine M; Smith, Tenbroeck; de Moor, Janet S; Glasgow, Russell E; Khoury, Muin J; Hawkins, Nikki A; Stein, Kevin D; Rechis, Ruth; Parry, Carla; Leach, Corinne R; Padgett, Lynne; Rowland, Julia H

    2014-11-01

    To meet the complex needs of a growing number of cancer survivors, it is essential to accelerate the translation of survivorship research into evidence-based interventions and, as appropriate, recommendations for care that may be implemented in a wide variety of settings. Current progress in translating research into care is stymied, with results of many studies un- or underutilized. To better understand this problem and identify strategies to encourage the translation of survivorship research findings into practice, four agencies (American Cancer Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, LIVE STRONG: Foundation, National Cancer Institute) hosted a meeting in June, 2012, titled: "Biennial Cancer Survivorship Research Conference: Translating Science to Care." Meeting participants concluded that accelerating science into care will require a coordinated, collaborative effort by individuals from diverse settings, including researchers and clinicians, survivors and families, public health professionals, and policy makers. This commentary describes an approach stemming from that meeting to facilitate translating research into care by changing the process of conducting research-improving communication, collaboration, evaluation, and feedback through true and ongoing partnerships. We apply the T0-T4 translational process model to survivorship research and provide illustrations of its use. The resultant framework is intended to orient stakeholders to the role of their work in the translational process and facilitate the transdisciplinary collaboration needed to translate basic discoveries into best practices regarding clinical care, self-care/management, and community programs for cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss barriers to implementing translational survivorship science identified at the meeting, along with future directions to accelerate this process. Published by Oxford University Press 2014.

  5. Preparing professional staff to care for cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Grant, Marcia; Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Bhatia, Smita

    2007-03-01

    Oncology health care professionals frequently lack the background to implement needed survivorship activities and follow-up care. The purpose of this project is to assist providers in the clarification and initiation of potentially durable changes in survivorship care by developing a health professional curriculum, recruiting participants, implementing the course, conducting course evaluation and following participants' defined goals over time. The curriculum was developed based on recommendations from the Institute of Medicine Report-From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor--Lost in Transition. Three concepts were used to structure the course: cancer survivorship quality of life, changing practice via performance improvement, and principles of adult education. Expert faculty designed and implemented the curriculum and teaching methods using adult learning principles and an interactive approach. Competitively-selected, two-person interdisciplinary teams for the first course (July 12-15, 2006, Pasadena, California) were selected based on stated interests, three projected goals, and letters of commitment from administrators. Participants represented 52 cancer care settings from 28 states. Teams included Nurses (48.1%), Social Workers (20.7%), Physicians (18.8%), Directors/Administrators (6.6%), Psychologists (2.8%), and others (3%). The institutional barriers identified by teams were lack of survivorship knowledge (94 %), financial constraints (61%), lack of administrative support (6%), and staff philosophy that excluded survivorship (15%). Evaluation of content from the first course was consistently positive. Dissemination of survivorship education for health care professionals stimulates participants to define and begin to implement goals for improving survivors' care. A training program such as the one described provides professional knowledge regarding survivorship that has the potential to facilitate change in the health care that cancer survivors receive thus

  6. Financial Toxicity of Cancer Care: It's Time to Intervene.

    PubMed

    Zafar, S Yousuf

    2016-05-01

    Evidence suggests that a considerably large proportion of cancer patients are affected by treatment-related financial harm. As medical debt grows for some with cancer, the downstream effects can be catastrophic, with a recent study suggesting a link between extreme financial distress and worse mortality. At least three factors might explain the relationship between extreme financial distress and greater risk of mortality: 1) overall poorer well-being, 2) impaired health-related quality of life, and 3) sub-par quality of care. While research has described the financial harm associated with cancer treatment, little has been done to effectively intervene on the problem. Long-term solutions must focus on policy changes to reduce unsustainable drug prices and promote innovative insurance models. In the mean time, patients continue to struggle with high out-of-pocket costs. For more immediate solutions, we should look to the oncologist and patient. Oncologists should focus on the value of care delivered, encourage patient engagement on the topic of costs, and be better educated on financial resources available to patients. For their part, patients need improved cost-related health literacy so they are aware of potential costs and resources, and research should focus on how patients define high-value care. With a growing list of financial side effects induced by cancer treatment, the time has come to intervene on the "financial toxicity" of cancer care.

  7. The supportive care needs for prostate cancer patients in Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Whye Lian; Ling, Ngok Chuo; Chang, Kam Hock

    2016-02-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of unmet supportive care needs among prostate cancer patients. The cross-sectional study was conducted among all prostate cancer patients at the Sarawak General Hospital. Interview was done using the Supportive Care Needs Survey-Short Form (SCNS-SF) and the Health Service Utilization Questionnaires (HSUQ). Data were analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 20. A total of ninety-five patients participated, with majority were aged 65 and above and of primary educational level. The two most frequently reported unmet supportive care needs were "informed about cancer which is under control or diminishing" and "informed about things you can do to help yourself to get well" under the domain Health System and Information. Respondents who were older (65 years and above) had significant lower unmet needs in psychology (P<0.01), and sexuality compared to the younger group below 65 years (P<0.01). Except for physical and daily living, respondents with primary school level had significant lower unmet needs in all domains compared to secondary school level. Respondents with known stages of cancer had higher unmet needs in all domains compared to those who did not know. Healthcare providers should provide more responsive, emotionally sensitive and client-centered care to patients with prostate cancer, particularly in the area of Health System and Information, and psychological support.

  8. [Women's experiences and care practices in the cancer treatment process].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pricilla Emmanuelly; Guimarães, Sílvia Maria Ferreira

    2015-07-01

    This article seeks to understand the viewpoint of cancer patients about the disease process and the therapeutic procedures that they experience. Cancer treatments provoke a series of physical and emotional consequences in patients. Thus, patients undergo a restructuring of life and establish mechanisms to "take care of themselves." The methodology used was an ethnographic approach through interviews, field notes and participant observation. The ethnographic approach revealed how these women being given conventional treatment in a given hospital create shared care technologies based on sociability.

  9. Pharmacopuncture for cancer care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Lee, In-Seon; Cho, Seung-Hun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyangsook

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture's effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-1.44). The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12-2.89). Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation.

  10. Pharmacopuncture for Cancer Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Lee, In-Seon; Cho, Seung-Hun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyangsook

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture's effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14–1.44). The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12–2.89). Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation. PMID:24899911

  11. Smarter palliative care for cancer: Use of smartphone applications

    PubMed Central

    Jamwal, Nisha Rani; Kumar, Senthil P

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones are technologically advanced mobile phone devices which use software similar to computer-based devices as a user-friendly interface. This review article is aimed to inform the palliative care professionals, cancer patients and their caregivers about the role of smartphone applications (apps) in the delivery of palliative care services, through a brief review of existing literature on the development, feasibility, analysis, and effectiveness of such apps. There is a dearth need for sincere palliative care clinicians to work together with software professionals to develop the suitable smartphone apps in accordance with the family/caregivers’ necessities and patients’ biopsychosocial characteristics that influence the technology driven evidence informed palliative cancer care. PMID:26962291

  12. Benefit finding through caring: the cancer caregiver experience.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Tony

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore benefit finding in cancer carers taking account of timeline and care recipient, in relation to burden of care, perceived stress, optimism, resilience, self efficacy, perceived support and psychological distress. A cohort sequential survey was conducted with a group of 842 female cancer carers who were caring for a spouse, a parent or a child. A stress-coping model of benefit finding was proposed and tested. Analysis supported the stress-coping model for global benefit finding and also the multidimensional model of benefit finding and identified important differences on outcome measures depending on care recipient and timeline. This study concludes that a focus on benefit finding interventions may be useful in the area, but that a developmental approach taking into account the relationship between carer and the carer recipient is required.

  13. Adolescent and young adult cancer: principles of care

    PubMed Central

    Ramphal, R.; Aubin, S.; Czaykowski, P.; De Pauw, S.; Johnson, A.; McKillop, S.; Szwajcer, D.; Wilkins, K.; Rogers, P.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (ayas) with cancer in active treatment face a number of barriers to optimal care. In the present article, we focus on the 3 critical domains of care for ayas—medical, psychosocial, and research—and how changes to the system could overcome barriers. We summarize the current literature, outline recommended principles of care, raise awareness of barriers to optimal care, and suggest specific changes to the system to overcome those barriers in the Canadian context. Many of the recommendations can nevertheless be applied universally. These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Task Force on Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer and build on outcomes from two international workshops held by that group. PMID:27330350

  14. Models of Cancer Survivorship Care for Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kinahan, Karen E.; Sanford, Stacy; Sadak, Karim T.; Salsman, John M.; Danner-Koptik, Karina; Didwania, Aarati

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature on adolescent and young adult (AYA) oncology, discuss survivorship models of care, and focus on the unique needs of AYA patients with transition of care from treatment to survivorship. Data Sources Peer-reviewed literature, workshop summaries, clinical practice guidelines. Conclusion Advancements have been made for AYAs with regard to identifying risk factors from cancer treatment and the need for ongoing follow-up care. Survivors face several unique care transitions. Several models of survivorship care are available for AYAs. Implications for Nursing Practice The responsibilities of survivorship care for AYA patients fall on clinical providers, researchers, the government, advocacy groups as well as the survivors and families themselves. Nurses must remain cognizant and educated on AYA survivorship issues. PMID:26210203

  15. Implications of New Colorectal Cancer Screening Technologies for Primary Care Practice

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Ann G.; Levin, Theodore R; Jaffe, C. Carl; Galen, Barbara A.; Ransohoff, David F.; Brown, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening reduces the risk of CRC mortality but is currently not well utilized, with adherence only 50% in the eligible U.S. population and rates that lag behind those for breast and cervical cancer. The primary care physician has the pivotal role of facilitating patient adherence to CRC screening by informed choice of the screening tests, follow up of positive tests, and coordination of medical resources when diagnostic intervention is required. Consequently, the primary care setting is where significant improvements can be made in CRC screening adherence. This article provides a summary of the newer CRC screening technologies that can be used by primary care physicians in shared decision making with their patients. There are now multiple CRC screening tests which vary in their ability to detect the different stages in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence. Current guidelines of the Multi-Society (Gastroenterology) Task Force (1997, 2003, 2006, 2008), the American Cancer Society (2001, 2003, 2007, 2008), and the United States Preventive Services Task Force (2002) recommend a menu of CRC screening options, including fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) (Hemoccult II, Hemoccult SENSA, fecal immunochemical tests (FIT)), double contrast barium enema (DCBE), flexible sigmoidoscopy with or without annual FOBT’s, and colonoscopy. In this report, we assess the options of fecal immunochemical tests, colonoscopy, CT-colonography (CTC or virtual colonoscopy), and fecal DNA tests. The tests are discussed with respect to the evidence in support of their use and within the context of how they could be managed and implemented in primary care practice. Primary care physicians will want to understand the tradeoffs among accuracy, costs, and patient preferences for the current and emerging CRC tests. PMID:18725826

  16. Health care experiences among women diagnosed with gestational breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hammarberg, K; Sullivan, E; Javid, N; Duncombe, G; Halliday, L; Boyle, F; Saunders, C; Ives, A; Dickinson, J E; Fisher, J

    2017-03-24

    Gestational breast cancer (GBC) presents many challenges for women and the clinicians who care for them. The aim of this study was to explore the health care experiences of women diagnosed with GBC to inform and improve clinical care of women in this predicament. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 women who had been diagnosed with GBC in the previous 5 years. The overarching themes for perceived quality of care were "communication" and "comprehensive care." "Communication" had two sub themes: "interdisciplinary communication" (the way health professionals from different disciplines communicated with each other about the management of the woman's care) and "patient communication" (how they communicated this to the woman). The "comprehensive care" theme incorporated three sub themes: "the spirit" (psychological care); "the mind" (information provision); and "the body" (management of treatment side effects). Women's own accounts of positive and negative experiences of GBC care provide unique and specific insights which improve understanding of their concerns and needs. The findings can inform advances in quality and efficacy of clinical care; offer guidance for obstetricians, oncologists and allied health professionals about the needs of women diagnosed with GBC and how care can be optimised; and inform the development of resources to assist women and their families.

  17. Hospital and medical care days in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Casey A; Branch, Daniel W; Sheffield, Kristin M; Han, Yimei; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S; Riall, Taylor S

    2012-08-01

    Little is known about resource utilization (number of days in the hospital or medical care) between diagnosis and death in patients with pancreatic cancer. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked data, we identified 25,476 patients with pancreatic cancer (1992-2005). Hospital and medical care days per person-month from the time of diagnosis were described, stratified by stage, treatment, and survival duration. Hospital/medical care days vary by length of survival and treatment strategy in patients with pancreatic cancer. For all stages, patients were in the hospital a mean of 6.4 days and received medical care a total of 9.0 days in the first month after diagnosis, decreasing to 1.7 and 3.7 days per month, respectively, by the end of the first year. Hospital/medical care days per month of life were higher in patients with shorter survival but increased sharply at the end of life in all patients, regardless of duration of survival. In patients with locoregional disease, resection was associated with a higher number of hospital/medical care days during the first 4 months after diagnosis, but fewer at the end of the first year. For distant disease, hospital days were similar but days in medical care were higher for patients receiving chemotherapy, increasing especially at the end of life. This study is the first to quantify hospital/medical care days in patients with pancreatic cancer by stage, treatment, and survival. This information will provide realistic expectations and allow for treatment decisions based on patient preferences.

  18. Five myths about cancer care in America.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Dana P; Philipson, Tomas

    2014-10-01

    In this commentary we debunk a number of the most common misconceptions about cancer treatment, such as claims that the war on cancer has been a failure and that treatment costs are unsustainable. In addition, there is good evidence that patients value these treatments more highly than traditional cost-effectiveness analysis would indicate. We argue that coverage policies placing undue burden on patients are socially wasteful and will likely discourage further innovation. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  19. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  20. Exploring aspects of physiotherapy care valued by breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pidlyskyj, K; Roddam, H; Rawlinson, G; Selfe, J

    2014-06-01

    To explore the reported value of physiotherapy care received by patients who had accessed a Specialist Breast Care Physiotherapy Service. Exploratory qualitative study using in-depth interviews to explore aspects of physiotherapy care valued by breast cancer patients. Thematic network analysis was used to interpret the data and bring together the different experiences of the participants and identify common themes. Physiotherapy Department at a NHS Foundation Trust Teaching Hospital. Nineteen participants were recruited and three were selected to take part in the in-depth interviews. All participants had received physiotherapy care from a Specialist Breast Care Physiotherapy Service and had been discharged within the last six months. Participants valued a patient-centred holistic approach to care and access to a Specialist Service with an experienced clinician. In particular the importance of the therapeutic alliance and the value of psychological, emotional and educational support emerged, with the participants feeling empowered in their recovery. Participants reported an overall positive experience of their physiotherapy care. This study supports the need for service providers to evaluate their current physiotherapy provision and subsequently develop Specialised Services to meet the physiotherapy needs of breast cancer patients throughout all stages of their treatment pathway from the delivery of pre-operative care through to post-treatment follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of change in unmet supportive care needs in cancer.

    PubMed

    McDowell, M E; Occhipinti, S; Ferguson, M; Dunn, J; Chambers, S K

    2010-05-01

    Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) assessments can assist health professionals to tailor their health practices to the individual needs of patients and improve patient care over time. The present study assessed prospective predictors of unmet supportive care needs in cancer patients over a six-month period. Participants were recruited from a regional cancer treatment centre in Australia and completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS) at recruitment (n=439; 61.4% response rate) and six months follow-up (n=396). Hierarchical logistic regression was used to identify predictors of change in unmet needs across each supportive care domain. Predictor variables were socio-demographic, treatment and psychosocial factors including depression, anxiety, social support, and patient satisfaction. Unmet needs were reported by approximately two-thirds of patients at baseline and half of patients at six months follow-up. Having unmet needs at baseline was the strongest predictor of unmet needs at six months. Longer time since diagnosis was a consistent predictor of greater unmet needs, associated with change in physical/daily living, psychological and health system and information unmet needs over time. By contrast, a complex relationship was found in that patient satisfaction, psychosocial and treatment characteristics predicted higher needs in some domains and lower needs in others. Unmet supportive care needs persist over time and psychological needs may emerge later in the illness continuum. Interventions to meet the needs of longer term cancer survivors are needed and should closely articulate with reported supportive care needs. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Evolving Paradigms in Research and Care in Ovarian Cancers.

    PubMed

    Karlan, Beth Y; Alvarez, Ronald D; Strauss, Jerome F

    2016-10-01

    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened an expert committee to examine and summarize the state of the science in ovarian cancer research. An Executive Summary of the recently released report describing the key findings and specific recommendations to reduce the incidence of and morbidity and mortality from ovarian cancers is presented. Highlights include the recognition that ovarian cancer is not just one disease, but rather a constellation of distinct cancer types, some of which originate outside of the ovary. Furthermore, it was noted that our incomplete understanding of the basic biology of each subtype of ovarian cancer is an impediment to advances in prevention, screening, early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care.

  3. Beyond precision surgery: Molecularly motivated precision care for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y Y; Cheong, J-H

    2017-03-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite the high disease prevalence, gastric cancer research has not gained much attention. Recently, genome-scale technology has made it possible to explore the characteristics of gastric cancer at the molecular level. Accordingly, gastric cancer can be classified into molecular subtypes that convey more detailed information of tumor than histopathological characteristics, and these subtypes are associated with clinical outcomes. Furthermore, this molecular knowledge helps to identify new actionable targets and develop novel therapeutic strategies. To advance the concept of precision patient care in the clinic, patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models have recently been developed. PDX models not only represent histology and genomic features, but also predict responsiveness to investigational drugs in patient tumors. Molecularly curated PDX cohorts will be instrumental in hypothesis generation, biomarker discovery, and drug screening and testing in proof-of-concept preclinical trials for precision therapy. In the era of precision medicine, molecularly tailored therapeutic strategies should be individualized for cancer patients. To improve the overall clinical outcome, a multimodal approach is indispensable for advanced cancer patients. Careful, oncological principle-based surgery, combined with a molecularly guided multidisciplinary approach, will open new horizons in surgical oncology.

  4. Cancer Care in Africa: An Overview of Resources

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose According to predictions from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, over the next 5 years, the annual number of new cases of cancer in Africa will grow to more than one million. Together with the immense loss in human life, there is a considerable economic setback attached to this number. However, most African nations are far from adequately scaling up their capacity to control cancer. Methods This study reviews the published data on the existing cancer control resources in Africa. It is, to our knowledge, the first combined effort looking at all resources available on the continent regarding cancer care. Results The total number of 102 cancer treatment centers, including general oncology centers, gynecologic oncology or other single-organ malignancy units, and pediatric oncology and palliative care establishments, is not sufficient to cover the increasing needs of the African population affected by cancer. In addition, the continental average total health expenditure per capita amounts to only US$82. Conclusion This review could serve as a starting point for devising realistic solutions meant to improve the prevention and management of malignant disease on the African continent. PMID:28804769

  5. Patients' expectations and preferences regarding cancer follow-up care.

    PubMed

    Brandenbarg, D; Berendsen, A J; de Bock, G H

    2017-07-05

    Most survivors of cancer enter a follow-up routine after their treatment, the aim of which is to detect recurrence, provide psychological support, monitor treatment-related side-effects, and to evaluate care. Due to rising numbers of people with cancer and better survival of these patients, current follow-up routines are under pressure. We reviewed the literature on patients' expectations and preferences regarding this care. We systematically searched the databases of Pubmed, CINAHL, and PsychInfo. Studies were screened and data extraction was double performed by three authors. Data were collected from quantitative and qualitative studies and described thematically. After screening, 12 full-text articles were included, comprising 849 patients aged from 28 to 90 years. Patients expect follow-up visits to detect recurrence of cancer. They want to undergo extensive testing to get reassurance. Furthermore, patients expect relevant information to be provided and to get advice about different aspects of their illness. Psychosocial support is also expected. Patients express a desire for consistency of care as well as continuity of care, and prefer long and intensive follow-up. After cancer, patients appear to lose confidence in their bodies and fear cancer recurrence after the end of treatment, which may lead to intensive screening wishes. This is not desirable, since care for cancer is already under pressure due to rising numbers of survivors. We have to ensure that follow-up routines are sustainable and effective. Patients should receive good information about the need for follow-up tests. Doctors should be trained to give this information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Shared Decision Making in Cancer Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butow, Phyllis; Tattersall, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Cancer treatment outcomes have improved over the past 20 years, but treatment decision making in this context remains complex. There are often a number of reasonable treatment alternatives, including no treatment in some circumstances. Patients and doctors often have to weigh up uncertain benefits against uncertain costs. Shared decision making…

  7. Shared Decision Making in Cancer Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butow, Phyllis; Tattersall, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Cancer treatment outcomes have improved over the past 20 years, but treatment decision making in this context remains complex. There are often a number of reasonable treatment alternatives, including no treatment in some circumstances. Patients and doctors often have to weigh up uncertain benefits against uncertain costs. Shared decision making…

  8. Follow-up Care After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems they are experiencing, such as anxiety or depression Any changes in their family medical history , including any new cancers It is ... is completed? It is common to experience stress, depression, and ... with family and friends, health professionals, other patients, members of ...

  9. Supporting models to transition breast cancer survivors to primary care: formative evaluation of a cancer care Ontario initiative.

    PubMed

    Grant, Maria; De Rossi, Stefanie; Sussman, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Many breast cancer (BC) survivors continue to be seen by specialists for routine follow-up care despite growing evidence that transitioning appropriate BC survivors to primary care is safe and effective. We describe the formative evaluation of an initiative involving the development and implementation of sustainable models of follow-up care for BC survivors across 14 Regional Cancer Centers (RCC) in Ontario, Canada. After extensive consultation, each RCC received catalyst funding for the initiative. Detailed work plans were developed locally and submitted to Cancer Care Ontario. Each region had a designated lead and support from primary care. Funding could be used to develop any aspect of the model. Formative evaluation of each model was conducted with descriptive analysis of the model created, including summative description of how resources were used, the number of survivors transitioned, and preliminary results from patient surveys of experience at transition. Each region developed a unique model that included clearly identified structures and processes of care. All regions used survivorship care plans and patient education materials. Three main models of follow-up care were developed: (1) direct to primary care, (2) transition clinic, and (3) shared care. A total of 3,418 BC survivors transitioned between March 2012 and September 2013. Patient experience surveys were distributed by 12 regions, gathering responses from 752 BC survivors, with 85% reporting that they felt adequately prepared for the transition. Using the approach described, wide-scale transition of appropriate BC survivors from oncology-led practice is feasible over a fairly short timeframe. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Psychosocial oncology: supportive care for the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Kash, Kathryn M; Mago, Rajnish; Kunkel, Elisabeth J S

    2005-04-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the emotional and psychosocial needs of cancer patients. As a result of huge advances in early detection and in treatment modalities, there now are millions of cancer survivors in the United States. There has been a realization that cancer survivors have distinct psychosocial needs. As cancer survivors live longer, reduction of psychological distress has been recognized as being an important part of having an improved quality of life. There have been numerous changes in the field of psychosocial oncology since it first began 25 years ago. Guidelines now exist for the definition of distress and decision trees are available for making the appropriate referrals. Advances in pharmacologic treatment for depression and anxiety have made it possible to decrease distress and increase coping in cancer patients undergoing treatment as well as in cancer survivors. Numerous individual and group therapies have demonstrated effectiveness in improving mood and quality of life in cancer patients and those at high risk for developing cancer. Due to the forthright efforts of cancer patients, there are now many organizations and list serves (e-mailing lists) that cancer survivors can turn to for help before, during, and after cancer treatment. Finally, with the rapid expansion of the internet not only are there websites available as resources, but also the creation of interactive online support is becoming a reality. One of the most important issues in providing supportive care to cancer patients in the future is to meet the individual needs of patients and provide the type of psychological therapy that will work best for them.

  11. The Edinburgh Malawi Cancer Partnership: helping to establish multidisciplinary cancer care in Blantyre, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Brown, E; Gorman, D; Knowles, G; Taylor, F; Jere, Y; Bates, J; Masamba, L

    2016-03-01

    In response to the growing incidence of cancer in Malawi, a new oncology unit was established at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre. The unit opened in 2010, the first in the country, and is led by a single consultant oncologist. In 2012, a healthcare partnership was formed between the oncology and palliative care unit at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital and the Edinburgh Cancer Centre, UK. The principal objective of the partnership is to help develop high quality multidisciplinary cancer care in Malawi. Methods A needs assessment identified three priority areas for further improvement of cancer services: nurse-led treatment delivery; management of clinical data; and multidisciplinary working. The partnership received grant funding from the Scottish Government Malawi Development Programme in 2013 and a three year project plan was implemented. This has been conducted through a series of reciprocal training visits. Results Key achievements have been completion of a programme of oncology nursing education attended by 32 oncology nurses and other healthcare professionals, which has resulted in increased experience in cancer practice and standardisation of chemotherapy delivery procedures; development of a clinical database that enables prospective collection of data of all new patients with cancer and which links to the Malawi Cancer Registry; development of weekly multidisciplinary meetings involving oncology, gynaecology and surgery that has enabled a cross-specialty approach to patient care. Conclusion The Edinburgh Malawi Cancer Partnership is supporting nursing education, data use and cross-specialty collaboration that we are confident will improve cancer care in Malawi. Future work will focus on the further development of multidisciplinary breast cancer care and the development of a radiotherapy service for patients in Malawi.

  12. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    It is important to talk to your doctor about your cancer diagnosis, goals of treatment, plan of care, and what to expect over time. Learn how good communication between patients, families, caregivers and doctors can improve the patient's quality of life in this expert-reviewed summary.

  13. Finding the Right Care | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Trained as a registered nurse and with a doctoral degree in public health, Jane D. is no stranger to the U.S. health care system. But, when she found herself facing a diagnosis of anal cancer in 2013, she felt adrift.

  14. Assessing patients' experiences with communication across the cancer care continuum.

    PubMed

    Mazor, Kathleen M; Street, Richard L; Sue, Valerie M; Williams, Andrew E; Rabin, Borsika A; Arora, Neeraj K

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the relevance, performance and potential usefulness of the Patient Assessment of cancer Communication Experiences (PACE) items. Items focusing on specific communication goals related to exchanging information, fostering healing relationships, responding to emotions, making decisions, enabling self-management, and managing uncertainty were tested via a retrospective, cross-sectional survey of adults who had been diagnosed with cancer. Analyses examined response frequencies, inter-item correlations, and coefficient alpha. A total of 366 adults were included in the analyses. Relatively few selected Does Not Apply, suggesting that items tap relevant communication experiences. Ratings of whether specific communication goals were achieved were strongly correlated with overall ratings of communication, suggesting item content reflects important aspects of communication. Coefficient alpha was ≥.90 for each item set, indicating excellent reliability. Variations in the percentage of respondents selecting the most positive response across items suggest results can identify strengths and weaknesses. The PACE items tap relevant, important aspects of communication during cancer care, and may be useful to cancer care teams desiring detailed feedback. The PACE is a new tool for eliciting patients' perspectives on communication during cancer care. It is freely available online for practitioners, researchers and others. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Receipt of Appropriate Surgical Care for Medicare Beneficiaries with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Caprice C.; Lipsitz, Stuart; Neville, Bridget; In, Haejin; Hevelone, Nathanael; Porter, Stacy; Weeks, Christine; Jha, Ashish; Gawande, Atul; Schrag, Deborah; Weeks, Jane C.

    2011-01-01

    Context Appropriate care is often not defined and when defined, is often not uniformly provided across institutions or demographic populations in the current American healthcare system. Objective We sought to investigate receipt of appropriate surgical care in Medicare beneficiaries with cancer. Design and Setting Retrospective cohort study using national Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry linked to Medicare claims data. Patients Fee-for-service Medicare patients aged 65 years or older who underwent a definitive surgical resection for breast, colon, gastric, rectal, or thyroid cancers that were diagnosed between 2000 and 2005. Claims data were available from 1999 through 2007. Main Outcome Measures Receipt of care concordant with established practice guidelines in surgical oncology in the aggregate and by hospital. Results Concordance with guidelines was > 90% for seven of eleven measures. All guidelines regarding adjuvant therapy had concordance rates >90%. Only two of five measures for nodal management had concordance rates >90%. At least 50% of hospitals provided guideline-concordant care to 100% of their patients for 6 of 11 guidelines. Patients receiving appropriate care tended to be younger, healthier, white, more affluent, have less advanced disease, and live in the midwest. Conclusions We found a high level of concordance with guidelines in some domains of surgical oncology care, but far less so in others, particularly for gastric and colon nodal management. Given the current national focus on improving the quality of healthcare, surgeons must focus on generating data to define appropriate care and translating that data into everyday practice. PMID:21690439

  16. Receipt of appropriate surgical care for Medicare beneficiaries with cancer.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Caprice C; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Neville, Bridget; In, Haejin; Hevelone, Nathanael; Porter, Stacy A; Weeks, Christine; Jha, Ashish K; Gawande, Atul A; Schrag, Deborah; Weeks, Jane C

    2011-10-01

    To investigate receipt of appropriate surgical care in Medicare beneficiaries with cancer. Retrospective cohort study. National Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare claims data. Fee-for-service Medicare patients aged 65 years or older who underwent a definitive surgical resection for breast, colon, gastric, rectal, or thyroid cancer diagnosed between January 2000 and December 2005. Claims data were available from January 1999 through December 2007. Receipt of care concordant with established practice guidelines in surgical oncology in the aggregate and by hospital. Concordance with guidelines was greater than 90% for 7 of 11 measures. All guidelines regarding adjuvant therapy had concordance rates greater than 90%. Only 2 of 5 measures for nodal management had concordance rates greater than 90%. At least 50% of hospitals provided guideline-concordant care to 100% of their patients for 6 of 11 guidelines. Patients receiving appropriate care tended to be younger, healthier, white, and more affluent, to have less advanced disease, and to live in the Midwest. We found a high level of concordance with guidelines in some domains of surgical oncology care but far less so in others, particularly for gastric and colon nodal management. Given the current national focus on improving the quality of health care, surgeons must focus on generating data to define appropriate care and translating those data into everyday practice.

  17. The cost-effectiveness of training US primary care physicians to conduct colorectal cancer screening in family medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Edwardson, Nicholas; Bolin, Jane N; McClellan, David A; Nash, Philip P; Helduser, Janet W

    2016-04-01

    Demand for a wide array of colorectal cancer screening strategies continues to outpace supply. One strategy to reduce this deficit is to dramatically increase the number of primary care physicians who are trained and supportive of performing office-based colonoscopies or flexible sigmoidoscopies. This study evaluates the clinical and economic implications of training primary care physicians via family medicine residency programs to offer colorectal cancer screening services as an in-office procedure. Using previously established clinical and economic assumptions from existing literature and budget data from a local grant (2013), incremental cost-effectiveness ratios are calculated that incorporate the costs of a proposed national training program and subsequent improvements in patient compliance. Sensitivity analyses are also conducted. Baseline assumptions suggest that the intervention would produce 2394 newly trained residents who could perform 71,820 additional colonoscopies or 119,700 additional flexible sigmoidoscopies after ten years. Despite high costs associated with the national training program, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios remain well below standard willingness-to-pay thresholds under base case assumptions. Interestingly, the status quo hierarchy of preferred screening strategies is disrupted by the proposed intervention. A national overhaul of family medicine residency programs offering training for colorectal cancer screening yields satisfactory incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. However, the model places high expectations on primary care physicians to improve current compliance levels in the US. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Supportive care for children and young people during cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Breen, Maggie; Coombes, Lucy; Bradbourne, Charlotte

    2009-09-01

    Children, young people and their families come into contact with a large number of health and social care professionals within hospital, education and community settings following a cancer diagnosis. The multiprofessional team best supports these families through an open and communicative approach to care. The side effects of cancer treatment include fever, infection, gastrointestinal upset, altered body image and psychological impact on children, young people and their families. Debate continues as to how children, young people, their siblings and parents cope with childhood cancer and its treatment due to its impact on family quality of life. It is considered that the short- and long-term wellbeing of children, young people and their families during treatment is best supported by continuing routine daily activities, such as attending nursery, school or college.

  19. [Cancer nursing care education programs: the effectiveness of different teaching methods].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yun-Ju; Kao, Yu-Hsiu

    2012-10-01

    In-service education affects the quality of cancer care directly. Using classroom teaching to deliver in-service education is often ineffective due to participants' large workload and shift requirements. This study evaluated the learning effectiveness of different teaching methods in the dimensions of knowledge, attitude, and learning satisfaction. This study used a quasi-experimental study design. Participants were cancer ward nurses working at one medical center in northern Taiwan. Participants were divided into an experimental group and control group. The experimental group took an e-learning course and the control group took a standard classroom course using the same basic course material. Researchers evaluated the learning efficacy of each group using a questionnaire based on the quality of cancer nursing care learning effectiveness scale. All participants answered the questionnaire once before and once after completing the course. (1) Post-test "knowledge" scores for both groups were significantly higher than pre-test scores for both groups. Post-test "attitude" scores were significantly higher for the control group, while the experimental group reported no significant change. (2) after a covariance analysis of the pre-test scores for both groups, the post-test score for the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group in the knowledge dimension. Post-test scores did not differ significantly from pre-test scores for either group in the attitude dimension. (3) Post-test satisfaction scores between the two groups did not differ significantly with regard to teaching methods. The e-learning method, however, was demonstrated as more flexible than the classroom teaching method. Study results demonstrate the importance of employing a variety of teaching methods to instruct clinical nursing staff. We suggest that both classroom teaching and e-learning instruction methods be used to enhance the quality of cancer nursing care education programs. We

  20. The effect of multidisciplinary team care on cancer management.

    PubMed

    Abdulrahman, Ganiy Opeyemi

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the multidisciplinary team management of many medical conditions especially cancers has increasingly taken a prominent role in patient management in many hospitals and medical centres in the developed countries. In the United Kingdom, it began to gain prominence following the Calman-Heine report in 1995 which suggested that each Cancer Unit in a hospital should have in place arrangements for non-surgical oncological input into services, with a role for a non-surgical oncologist. The report further suggested that a lead clinician with a well established interest in cancer care should be appointed to organise and coordinate the whole range of cancer services provided within the Cancer Unit. Many people have argued that the multidisciplinary team management of patients has resulted in better care and improved survival. However, there are barriers to the optimal effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team. This paper aims to review various studies on the effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team in the management of cancer patients and also discuss some of the barriers to the multidisciplinary team.

  1. Free-standing cancer centers: rationale for improving cancer care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J J; Silvers, S; Brereton, H; Byfield, J; Bick, R

    1989-10-01

    Free-standing cancer centers (FSCC) represent a growing trend in cancer care delivery within community practice. The critical components to FSCC are multidisciplinary cancer care, a complete menu of direct care and support services, a commitment to clinical trials and clinical investigation, and a comprehensive program for quality assurance. The advantages of FSCC to the community, to hospital programs, to the practicing surgical, medical, and radiation oncologists, and to the third-party carriers, including health maintenance organizations, are detailed. The development of an FSCC depends on the resolution of issues of (a) competition (between hospitals, hospitals and physicians, therapeutic disciplines, regional comprehensive cancer centers and FSCCs) and (b) concerns about conflict of interest. The ideal model of FSCC may well be represented by the joint venture of community hospital(s) and the community oncologists.

  2. Early palliative care for adults with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Haun, Markus W; Estel, Stephanie; Rücker, Gerta; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Villalobos, Matthias; Thomas, Michael; Hartmann, Mechthild

    2017-06-12

    Incurable cancer, which often constitutes an enormous challenge for patients, their families, and medical professionals, profoundly affects the patient's physical and psychosocial well-being. In standard cancer care, palliative measures generally are initiated when it is evident that disease-modifying treatments have been unsuccessful, no treatments can be offered, or death is anticipated. In contrast, early palliative care is initiated much earlier in the disease trajectory and closer to the diagnosis of incurable cancer. To compare effects of early palliative care interventions versus treatment as usual/standard cancer care on health-related quality of life, depression, symptom intensity, and survival among adults with a diagnosis of advanced cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, OpenGrey (a database for grey literature), and three clinical trial registers to October 2016. We checked reference lists, searched citations, and contacted study authors to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-randomised controlled trials (cRCTs) on professional palliative care services that provided or co-ordinated comprehensive care for adults at early advanced stages of cancer. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by Cochrane. We assessed risk of bias, extracted data, and collected information on adverse events. For quantitative synthesis, we combined respective results on our primary outcomes of health-related quality of life, survival (death hazard ratio), depression, and symptom intensity across studies in meta-analyses using an inverse variance random-effects model. We expressed pooled effects as standardised mean differences (SMDs, or Hedges' adjusted g). We assessed certainty of evidence at the outcome level using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and

  3. [Care for skin cancer in Germany : Provision and providers].

    PubMed

    Augustin, M; Anastasiadou, Z; Schaarschmidt, M L; Krensel, M; Schäfer, I; Reusch, M

    2016-07-01

    Treatment for skin cancer is a major component of dermatological care in western countries. The purpose of this work is to analyze health care provision and providers for skin cancer care in Germany. From the complete claims data set from 2007-2009 of the German statutory health insurance DAK (approximately 6.1 million insured persons), insurees with skin cancer and melanocytic naevi were extracted by ICD-10 codes. Surgical procedures and physician specialties were identified by specific codes. Data from the German statistical agency (Destatis) were derived from public domain for the years 2008-2010. Among the annual ambulatory surgical treatments (n = 6695) for melanoma, 83.6 % were conducted by dermatologists, followed by general surgeons (11.1 %), and facial surgeons (3.0 %). In melanocytic naevi (n = 51,659), 79.1 % were treated by dermatologists, followed by general surgeons (15.5 %), facial surgeons (3.6 %), and general practitioners (1.1 %), while in epithelial cancers (ICD-10 C44), 76.4 % were operated by dermatologists, followed by general surgeons (12.7 %) and facial surgeons (7.9 %). Overall, related to Germany, about 830,000 ambulatory operations for skin cancer were conducted in 2009 which is about 40 % more than in 2007. In hospitalized patients, 79,448 out of 195,558 inpatient cases (45.5 %) were treated in dermatological departments in the year 2012. Average annual growth rates of the inpatient cases in the DAK between 2007 and 2010 were 8.9 % for MM and 11.1 % for SCC/BCC. Skin cancer is associated with a significant and still growing need for surgical care in which dermatology has a leading role in Germany. Thus, there is an increasing need for dermato-surgical specialist training.

  4. Ethnic disparities in adherence to breast cancer survivorship surveillance care.

    PubMed

    Advani, Pragati S; Ying, Jun; Theriault, Richard; Melhem-Bertrand, Amal; Moulder, Stacy; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Tereffe, Welela; Black, Shon; Pini, Tunghi May; Brewster, Abenaa M

    2014-03-15

    Adherence to guidelines for surveillance mammography and clinic visits is an important component of breast cancer survivorship care. Identifying ethnic disparities in adherence may lead to improved care delivery and outcomes. Records were evaluated for 4535 patients who were treated for stage I, II, or III breast cancer at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, cancer center between January 1997 and December 2006. Generalized estimating equations and Cox proportional hazards analyses were used to evaluate ethnic differences in missed mammograms and clinic visits up to 4 years of follow-up and the impact of those differences on overall survival. Nonadherence to guidelines for mammography (P = .0002) and clinic visits (P < .0001) increased over time. Hispanic and black patients were more likely to be nonadherent to guidelines for mammography (odds ratio [OR] = 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10-1.65; OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.11-1.66, respectively) and clinic visits (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.27-2.06; OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.13-1.86, respectively) than white patients. There was an interaction between Hispanic ethnicity and endocrine therapy on nonadherence to mammography guidelines (P = .001). Nonadherence to mammography and clinic visit guidelines was not associated with overall survival. Withdrawal from breast cancer survivorship care increases over time, and black and Hispanic patients are more likely to be nonadherent. An understanding of the reasons for ethnic disparities in adherence to guidelines for mammography and clinic visits is needed to improve retention in survivorship care. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  5. Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Palliative Care for the Lung Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Virginia; Koczywas, Marianna; Kim, Jae; Raz, Dan; Hurria, Arti; Hayter, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation, as a quality of life intervention, has a role to play in palliative care for lung cancer patients. Combining the art and skills of clinical care, physiological, and behavioral tools, pulmonary rehabilitation can serve to rebuild the functional capacity of patients limited by breathlessness and deconditioning. Exercise programs are the primary tool used to restore and rebuild the patient's endurance by challenging the entire pathway of oxygen transport and improving gas exchange. Other tools of pulmonary rehabilitation include breathing retraining, self-management skills, airway clearance techniques, bronchodilitation, smoking cessation and oxygen therapy. Pulmonary rehabilitation is now becoming a part of supportive care for patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The ability to be more active without suffering the consequences of dyspnea on exertion boosts the patient's self-efficacy and allows for an improved quality of life, so that lung cancer patients can participate in their family lives during this therapeutic challenge. PMID:26709350

  6. [Foci of infection and oral supportive care in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Stokman, M A; Vissink, A; Spijkervet, F K L

    2008-04-01

    Radiation therapy in the head and neck area and treatment with high dose chemotherapy entail damage to healthy tissue in the mouth. In order to reduce to a minimum the chances of these side effects of cancer treatment developing, it is necessary to carry out oral foci tests prior to oncological therapy. In addition supplementary oral and dental care measures seem to be important in order to limit the side effects of oncological therapy on the teeth, salivary glands and jaw as much as possible. This supportive oral care is not only necessary during, but also for years after the oncology treatment. Therefore not only dental professionals affiliated to oncology teams will have to take care of cancer patients, but also family dentists and dental hygienists.

  7. [Update of breast cancer in primary care (IV/V)].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Hernández, C; Brusint, B; Vich, P; Díaz-García, N; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Hernández-García, M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians must thoroughly understand this pathology in order to optimize the health care services and make the best use of available resources, for these patients. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. This fourth article deals with the treatment of the disease, the role of the primary care physician, and management of major complications. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to support their patients and care for them throughout their illness.

  8. Forgoing Medical Care because of Cost: Assessing Disparities in Health Care Access among Cancer Survivors living in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Kathryn E.; Rowland, Julia H.; Bellizzi, Keith M.; Aziz, Noreen M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Many US cancer survivors live years after diagnosis, emphasizing the importance of health care access for survivors. It is not known if having cancer might impact disparities in health care access that are present in the general population. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of forgoing care due to financial concern in a representative sample of US adults to determine if cancer history and race/ethnicity are associated with likelihood of forgoing medical care. Method The US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)- 2003–2006 was used to identify 6,602 adult cancer survivors and 104,364 individuals with no history of cancer. We examined self-report of forgoing medical care services because of cost by cancer history and race/ethnicity using multivariate logistic regression. Results The prevalence of forgoing care due to cost among cancer survivors was 7.8% for medical care, 9.9% for prescription medications, 11.3% for dental care, and 2.7% for mental health care. Cancer survivors under the age of 65 years were more likely to delay or forgo all types of medical care when compared to adults without a history of cancer. Hispanic and black cancer survivors were more likely to forgo prescription medications and dental care than white survivors. Disparities among cancer survivors were largely reflective of those in the general adult population. Conclusions More than two million US cancer survivors did not get one or more needed medical services because of financial concerns. Future research needs to examine the impact of forgoing care on survivors’ quality of life and survival. PMID:20549763

  9. Primary care practice organization influences colorectal cancer screening performance.

    PubMed

    Yano, Elizabeth M; Soban, Lynn M; Parkerton, Patricia H; Etzioni, David A

    2007-06-01

    To identify primary care practice characteristics associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening performance, controlling for patient-level factors. Primary care director survey (1999-2000) of 155 VA primary care clinics linked with 38,818 eligible patients' sociodemographics, utilization, and CRC screening experience using centralized administrative and chart-review data (2001). Practices were characterized by degrees of centralization (e.g., authority over operations, staffing, outside-practice influence); resources (e.g., sufficiency of nonphysician staffing, space, clinical support arrangements); and complexity (e.g., facility size, academic status, managed care penetration), adjusting for patient-level covariates and contextual factors. Chart-based evidence of CRC screening through direct colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, or consecutive fecal occult blood tests, eliminating cases with documented histories of CRC, polyps, or inflammatory bowel disease. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and health care utilization, patients were significantly more likely to be screened for CRC if their primary care practices had greater autonomy over the internal structure of care delivery (p<.04), more clinical support arrangements (p<.03), and smaller size (p<.001). Deficits in primary care clinical support arrangements and local autonomy over operational management and referral procedures are associated with significantly lower CRC screening performance. Competition with hospital resource demands may impinge on the degree of internal organization of their affiliated primary care practices.

  10. Complementary medicine in palliative care and cancer symptom management.

    PubMed

    Mansky, Patrick J; Wallerstedt, Dawn B

    2006-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients varies according to geographical area, gender, and disease diagnosis. The prevalence of CAM use among cancer patients in the United States has been estimated to be between 7% and 54%. Most cancer patients use CAM with the hope of boosting the immune system, relieving pain, and controlling side effects related to disease or treatment. Only a minority of patients include CAM in the treatment plan with curative intent. This review article focuses on practices belonging to the CAM domains of mind-body medicine, CAM botanicals, manipulative practices, and energy medicine, because they are widely used as complementary approaches to palliative cancer care and cancer symptom management. In the area of cancer symptom management, auricular acupuncture, therapeutic touch, and hypnosis may help to manage cancer pain. Music therapy, massage, and hypnosis may have an effect on anxiety, and both acupuncture and massage may have a therapeutic role in cancer fatigue. Acupuncture and selected botanicals may reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis, and hypnosis and guided imagery may be beneficial in anticipatory nausea and vomiting. Transcendental meditation and the mindfulness-based stress reduction can play a role in the management of depressed mood and anxiety. Black cohosh and phytoestrogen-rich foods may reduce vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women. Most CAM approaches to the treatment of cancer are safe when used by a CAM practitioner experienced in the treatment of cancer patients. The potential for many commonly used botanical to interact with prescription drugs continues to be a concern. Botanicals should be used with caution by cancer patients and only under the guidance of an oncologist knowledgeable in their use.

  11. Managing Cancer Care: a psycho-educational intervention to improve knowledge of care options and breast cancer self-management.

    PubMed

    Schulman-Green, Dena; Jeon, Sangchoon

    2017-02-01

    We tested the feasibility and acceptability of a psycho-educational self-management intervention, Managing Cancer Care: A Personal Guide (MCC), to improve knowledge of care options (curative, palliative, and hospice care) among a range of breast cancer self-management skills. We conducted a one-group, pre-post-test study among women with non-metastatic breast cancer (n = 105). We gave participants the printed, self-guided, seven-module intervention following enrollment. At baseline and 2  months, we measured knowledge of care options, desired and actual role in self-management, medical communication skills, experience and management of transitions, anxiety, depression, uncertainty, and self-efficacy. We conducted interviews to obtain module ratings and qualitative data on strengths and limitations of MCC. Knowledge of care options (δ = 0.40 (1.11), p = 0.0005) and desired role in self-management (δ = -0.28 (1.08), p = 0.0177) significantly improved. Less skilled medical communicators significantly improved their communication (δ = 3.47, standard deviation = 6.58, p = 0.0449). Multivariate modeling showed that changes in our primary outcomes of medical communication and management of transitions seemed to drive positive changes in our secondary outcomes of anxiety, depression, uncertainty, and self-efficacy. Participants highly rated MCC and reported the importance of understanding care options despite non-metastatic disease. MCC is a feasible and acceptable means of improving knowledge of care options and other aspects of breast cancer self-management. The combination of modules offered in MCC appears to have beneficial interactive effects. We are currently testing MCC more rigorously in a randomized controlled trial to explore mediating and moderating relationships. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-20

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  13. An evaluation of nursing care in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Karadeniz, G; Yanikkerem, E; Altiparmak, S; Sevil, U; Ertem, G; Esen, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify what hospitalized cancer patients expect from nurses in terms of the care they receive. The specific aims of this study were: (i) to identify those individuals to whom the patients felt closest in the hospital setting and (ii) to evaluate nurses' management of cancer patients during their stay in the hospital. The sample included patients hospitalized at Ege University Hospital and Suat Seren District Hospital, Izmir, Turkey. We found significant differences between the scores of satisfaction and dissatisfaction and gender age, education, occupation, type of cancer and the mode of treatment (p < 0.05). The majority of the cancer patients reported that nursing management was unsatisfactory. Some demographic factors such as cultural and social status affected patients' expectations.

  14. Breast cancer in young women: special considerations in multidisciplinary care

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, Chantal; Lee, Marie Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in females, and 5%–7% of breast cancer cases occur in women under 40 years of age. Breast cancer in the young has gained increased attention with an attempt to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Young patients tend to have different epidemiology, presenting with later stages and more aggressive phenotypes. Diagnostic imaging is also more difficult in this age group. Multidisciplinary care generally encompasses surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and social workers. Other special considerations include reconstruction options, fertility, genetics, and psychosocial issues. These concerns enlarge the already diverse multidisciplinary team to incorporate new expertise, such as reproductive specialists and genetic counselors. This review encompasses an overview of the current multimodal treatment regimens and the unique challenges in treating this special population. Integration of diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues should be addressed and understood by each member in the interdisciplinary team in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25300196

  15. Barriers and Facilitators to Implementing Cancer Survivorship Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Dulko, Dorothy; Pace, Claire M.; Dittus, Kim L.; Sprague, Brian L.; Pollack, Lori A.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Geller, Berta M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To evaluate the process of survivorship care plan (SCP) completion and to survey oncology staff and primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding challenges of implementing SCPs. Design Descriptive pilot study. Setting Two facilities in Vermont, an urban academic medical center and a rural community academic cancer center. Sample 17 oncology clinical staff created SCPs, 39 PCPs completed surveys, and 58 patients (breast or colorectal cancer) participated in a telephone survey. Methods Using Journey Forward tools, SCPs were created and presented to patients. PCPs received the SCP with a survey assessing its usefulness and barriers to delivery. Oncology staff were interviewed to assess perceived challenges and benefits of SCPs. Qualitative and quantitative data were used to identify challenges to the development and implementation process as well as patient perceptions of the SCP visit. Main Research Variables SCP, healthcare provider perception of barriers to completion and implementation, and patient perception of SCP visit. Findings Oncology staff cited the time required to obtain information for SCPs as a challenge. Completing SCPs 3–6 months after treatment ended was optimal. All participants felt advanced practice professionals should complete and review SCPs with patients. The most common challenge for PCPs to implement SCP recommendations was insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues. Most patients found the care plan visit very useful, particularly within six months of diagnosis. Conclusions Creation time may be a barrier to widespread SCP implementation. Cancer survivors find SCPs useful, but PCPs feel insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues is a barrier to providing best follow-up care. Incorporating SCPs in electronic medical records may facilitate patient identification, appropriate staff scheduling, and timely SCP creation. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurse practitioners are well positioned to create and deliver

  16. The Effect of Care Setting in the Delivery of High-Value Colon Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Veenstra, Christine M.; Epstein, Andrew J.; Liao, Kaijun; Morris, Arden M.; Pollack, Craig E.; Armstrong, Katrina A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effect of care setting on value of colon cancer care is unknown. METHODS A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort study of 6544 patients aged ≥66 years with stage IV colon cancer (based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system) who were diagnosed between 1996 and 2005 was performed. All patients were followed through December 31, 2007. Using outpatient and carrier claims, patients were assigned to a treating hospital based on the hospital affiliation of the primary oncologist. Hospitals were classified academic or nonacademic using the SEER-Medicare National Cancer Institute Hospital File. RESULTS Of the 6544 patients, 1605 (25%) received care from providers affiliated with academic medical centers. The unadjusted median cancer-specific survival was 16.0 months at academic medical centers versus 13.9 months at nonacademic medical centers (P<.001). After adjustment, treatment at academic hospitals remained significantly associated with a reduced risk of death from cancer (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.82–0.93 [P<.001]). Adjusted mean 12-month Medicare spending was $8571 higher at academic medical centers (95% CI, $2340–$14,802; P =.007). The adjusted median cost was $1559 higher at academic medical centers; this difference was not found to be statistically significant (95% CI, −$5239 to $2122; P =.41). A small percentage of patients who received very expensive care skewed the difference in mean cost; the only statistically significant difference in adjusted costs in quantile regressions was at the 99.9th percentile of costs (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS Among Medicare beneficiaries with stage IV colon cancer, treatment by a provider affiliated with an academic medical center was associated with a 2 month improvement in overall survival. Except for patients in the 99.9th percentile of the cost distribution, costs at academic medical centers were not found to be significantly

  17. Cancer patients with oral mucositis: challenges for nursing care1

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sarah Nilkece Mesquita; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; da Silva, Grazielle Roberta Freitas; Andrade, Elaine Maria Leite Rangel; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; Moura, Renata Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze nursing care provided to cancer patients with oral mucositis based on the Nursing Process (NP). METHOD: this exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted with 213 patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in two cancer facilities: one philanthropic and one private service. RESULTS: the participants were mainly female, aged 45.8 years old on average, with up to 11 years of schooling and income of up to one times the minimum wage. Severe mucositis was related to chemotherapy associated with radiotherapy. Only 25.3% of the patients reported having received guidance from nurses during their treatment concerning self-care. The perceptions of patients regarding quality of care did not significantly differ between the private and public facilities. The basic human needs mainly affected were comfort, eating, and hygiene. Based on this finding, one NP was established listing the diagnoses, interventions and expected results to establish an ideal, though individualized, standard of nursing care to be provided to these patients. CONCLUSION: to understand oral mucositis is crucial to establish nursing care that includes prevention based on the implementation of an oral care plan. PMID:26039297

  18. Implementation of a performance improvement initiative in colorectal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John L; Cartwright, Thomas H; Berry, Carolyn A; Stowell, Stephanie A; Miller, Sara C

    2012-09-01

    In the United States, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer after breast and prostate cancer. Numerous improvement programs have been implemented to increase CRC screening rates, but few have focused on improving the care and management of patients with a diagnosis of this malignancy. As national medical organizations focus on quality of care, efforts are necessary to provide clinicians the opportunity for self-assessment and methods for practice improvement. With this goal in mind, a national continuing medical education-certified performance improvement initiative was conceived. THE INITIATIVE CONSISTED OF THREE STAGES: First, participants self-assessed their performance of predetermined topic measures through a review of patient charts. The topic areas included patient safety and supportive care, evidence-based surveillance, and evidenced-based treatment and were derived from current guidelines and other successful quality-improvement initiatives. Second, an actionable plan for practice improvement was developed in at least one of the three topic areas. Third, after a period of self-improvement, participants reassessed their performance of the same topic measures to determine tangible changes in patient care. A total of 540 patient charts were reviewed by 27 clinicians. Notable results showed large gains in areas of supportive care, such as quantitative pain assessments and emotional well-being evaluations, which traditionally have been a minor focus of other quality-improvement initiatives. Participants also showed tangible improvements in the performance of leading measures of quality care. These findings support the need for continued efforts toward performance improvement in both established and emerging areas of CRC patient care.

  19. Increasing Access to Dental and Medical Care by Allowing Greater Flexibility in Scope of Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Diane; Rowthorn, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advocates for increasing access to medical and oral health care have argued for expanding the scope of practice of dentists and physicians. Although this idea may have merit, significant legal and other barriers stand in the way of allowing dentists to do more primary health care, physicians to do more oral health care, and both professions to collaborate. State practice acts, standards of care, and professional school curricula all support the historical separation between the 2 professions. Current laws do not contemplate working across professional boundaries, leaving providers who try vulnerable to legal penalties. Here we examine the legal, regulatory, and training barriers to dental and medical professionals performing services outside their traditional scope of practice. PMID:26180970

  20. [Current Status and Effectiveness of Perioperative Oral Health Care Management for Lung Cancer and Esophageal Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Nishino, Takeshi; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Takahiro; Inui, Tomohiro; Takasugi, Haruka; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Kawakita, Naoya; Inoue, Seiya; Sakiyama, Shoji; Tangoku, Akira; Azuma, Masayuki; Yamamura, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of perioperative oral health care management to decrease the risk of postoperative pneumonia have been reported lately. Since 2014, we introduced perioperative oral health care management for lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients. We report current status and effectiveness of perioperative oral health care management for lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients. Every 100 cases of lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients treated by surgery were classified 2 group with or without perioperative oral health care management and compared about postoperative complications retrospectively. In the lung cancer patients, the group with oral health care management could prevent postoperative pneumonia significantly and had shorter length of hospital stay than the group without oral health care management. In the esophageal cancer patients, there was little occurrence of postoperative pneumonia without significant difference between both group with or without oral health care management. A large number of esophageal cancer patients received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and some patients developed oral mucositis and received oral care treatment before surgery. Treatment for oral mucositis probably improved oral environment and affected prevention of postoperative pneumonia. Perioperative oral health care management can prevent postoperative pneumonia of lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients by improvement of oral hygiene.

  1. Colorectal cancer: Quality of surgical care in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Kanters, Arielle; Mullard, Andrew J; Arambula, Jennifer; Fasbinder, Laurie; Krapohl, Greta; Wong, Sandra L; Campbell, Darrell A; Hendren, Samantha

    2017-03-01

    Surgery remains the cornerstone therapy for colorectal cancer (CRC). This study assesses CRC quality measures for surgical cases in Michigan. In this retrospective cohort study, processes of care and outcomes for CRC resection cases were abstracted in 30 hospitals in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative (2014-2015). Measures were case-mix and reliability adjusted, using logistic regression models. For 871 cases (640 colon cancer, 231 rectal cancer), adjusted morbidity (27.4%) and mortality rates (1.5%) were low. Adjusted process measures showed gaps in quality of care. Mesorectal excision was documented in 59.4% of rectal cancer (RC) cases, 65% of RC cases had sphincter preserving surgery, 18.7% of cases had < 12 lymph nodes examined, 7.9% had a positive margin, 52.1% of stage II/III RC cases had neoadjuvant therapy, and 36% of ostomy cases had site marking. This study finds gaps in quality of care measures for CRC, suggesting opportunity for regional quality improvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Medical care utilization and costs on end-of-life cancer patients: The role of hospice care.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Chen, Chun-Ku; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tsai, Shu-Lin; Cheng, Shao-Yi; Chiu, Tai-Yuan; Tsai, Shih-Tzu; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2016-11-01

    Although there are 3 hospice care programs for terminal cancer patients in Taiwan, the medical utilization and expenses for these patients by programs have not been well-explored. The aim of this study was to examine the medical utilization and expenses of terminal cancer patients under different programs of hospice care in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life.This was a retrospective observational study by secondary data analysis. By using the National Health Insurance claim database and Hospice Shared Care Databases. We identified cancer descents from these databases and classified them into nonhospice care and hospice care groups based on different combination of hospice care received. We then analyzed medical utilization including inpatient care, outpatient care, emergency room visits, and medical expenses by patient groups in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life.Among 118,376 cancer descents, 46.9% ever received hospice care. Patients had ever received hospice care had significantly lower average medical utilization and expenses in their last 90, 30, and 14 days of life (all P < 0.001) compared to nonhospice care group. Each hospice care group had significantly less medical utilization and expenses in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life (all P < 0.01).Different kinds of hospice care program have different effects on medical care utilization reduction and cost-saving at different stage of the end of life of terminal cancer patients.

  3. Reduced incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer with flexible-sigmoidoscopy screening: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Jennifer; Thosani, Nirav; Batra, Sachin; Singh, Harminder; Guha, Sushovan

    2014-12-28

    To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of published population-based randomized controlled trials (RCTs). RCTs evaluating the difference in mortality and incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) between a screening flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) group and control group (not assigned to screening FS) with a minimum 5 years median follow-up were identified by a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials through August 2013. Random effects model was used for meta-analysis. Four RCTs with a total of 165659 patients in the FS group and 249707 patients in the control group were included in meta-analysis. Intention-to-treat analysis showed that there was a 22% risk reduction in total incidence of CRC (RR = 0.78, 95%CI: 0.74-0.83), 31% in distal CRC incidence (RR = 0.69, 95%CI: 0.63-0.75), and 9% in proximal CRC incidence (RR = 0.91, 95%CI: 0.83-0.99). Those who underwent screening FS were 18% less likely to be diagnosed with advanced CRC (OR = 0.82, 95%CI: 0.71-0.94). There was a 28% risk reduction in overall CRC mortality (RR = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.65-0.80) and 43% in distal CRC mortality (RR = 0.57, 95%CI: 0.45-0.72). This meta-analysis suggests that screening FS can reduce the incidence of proximal and distal CRC and mortality from distal CRC along with reduction in diagnosis of advanced CRC.

  4. Acceptance of flexible sigmoidoscopy as a screening examination for colorectal cancer in an outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Gölder, S; Vogt, W; Lichti, H; Rath, H C; Kullmann, A; Schölmerich, J; Kullmann, F

    2007-04-01

    Flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) is a feasible examination technique and a suitable tool for population-based screening, but very little is known about determinants of endoscopic screening participation. The aim of this study was to determine the acceptance rate and the factors influencing the decision of participating in a screening program for patients in an outpatient clinic. In this prospective study, a colorectal cancer screening by FS was offered to 631 patients older than 40 years. Three strategies were available, (1) to have the endoscopy on the same day, (2) to make an appointment for another day, or (3) to take time to think about if they wanted the procedure. The reasons for refusal of the FS were documented. 419 of the 631 (66.4%) patients had no interest to take part in the screening program during their outpatient visit. Two hundred twelve (33.6%) patients were primarily interested on FS, but only 110 of them were finally examined. In total, 102 patients did not make an appointment for FS or did not appear for the endoscopy. The participation rate was therefore 17.4% (110/631) of all patients. Of the patients who agreed to receive an on-site examination, 78.3% were examined compared to 18.8% of patients who fixed the appointment for another day or after taking time to reflect upon the FS procedure. More male than female patients accepted the FS screening. Recommended colonoscopy was finally performed in 76%. Thirty-three polyps were found during the screening program of which 18 were larger than 0.5 cm. No CRC was detected. All patients agreed to repeat the FS every 5 years. This study demonstrates that a screening examination will be most likely performed if it is done as an on-site examination. In contrast, the participation rate is low if the patient has to make an appointment by himself. Acceptance of FS screening is also dependent on the patient's gender and family history of cancer. Additional strategies are needed to further improve participation.

  5. Colorectal cancer: complexities and challenges in managed care.

    PubMed

    Minkoff, Neil B

    2007-08-01

    Managed care weighs advances and associated costs to determine whether the combination of longer life at sometimes significantly increased cost represents value. The price of treatment is only 1 factor. To review treatment decision processes for oncologic agents in managed care environments. Price can be exceptionally high for individuals. But if the population size is low, the per-member-per-month (PMPM) impact can be almost negligible, unlike treatments that have moderate costs but are used ubiquitously. Cancer therapies have, for the most part, escaped managed care's notice. For 2007, the national Cancer Institute projects that antineoplastic agents will consume almost a quarter of the overall drug spend. The Medicare population is a unique concern with regard to cancer. Traditionally, Medicare reimbursement of chemotherapeutic agents was based on average wholesale price (AWP) discounting, not the oncologist's purchasing cost. This allowed oncologists to use reimbursement for infusions to support their medical practices. The proposed plan of the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to use average sales price (ASP) plus 6% to reimburse for drugs used in the office setting leads to significant problems. Pharmacy and therapeutics committees will also face challenges: fewer data are available for some agents because they have become available through the U.S. Food and drug administration's Fast Track, Priority review, or accelerated approval processes. Oncology disease management programs must reach out to patients and not necessarily deal with oncology issues directly, but address tangential issues that impact care, especially depression and pain management.

  6. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Symptom Management in Cancer Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Vincent C.H.; Wu, Xinyin; Lu, Ping; Hui, Edwin P.; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Anthony L.; Lau, Alexander Y.L.; Zhao, Junkai; Fan, Min; Ziea, Eric T.C.; Ng, Bacon F.L.; Wong, Samuel Y.S.; Wu, Justin C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Use of Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) in symptom management for cancer palliative care is very common in Chinese populations but clinical evidence on their effectiveness is yet to be synthesized. To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis to summarize results from CHM randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on symptoms that are undertreated in conventional cancer palliative care. Five international and 3 Chinese databases were searched. RCTs evaluating CHM, either in combination with conventional treatments or used alone, in managing cancer-related symptoms were considered eligible. Effectiveness was quantified by using weighted mean difference (WMD) using random effect model meta-analysis. Fourteen RCTs were included. Compared with conventional intervention alone, meta-analysis showed that combined CHM and conventional treatment significantly reduced pain (3 studies, pooled WMD: −0.90, 95% CI: −1.69 to −0.11). Six trials comparing CHM with conventional medications demonstrated similar effect in reducing constipation. One RCT showed significant positive effect of CHM plus chemotherapy for managing fatigue, but not in the remaining 3 RCTs. The additional use of CHM to chemotherapy does not improve anorexia when compared to chemotherapy alone, but the result was concluded from 2 small trials only. Adverse events were infrequent and mild. CHM may be considered as an add-on to conventional care in the management of pain in cancer patients. CHM could also be considered as an alternative to conventional care for reducing constipation. Evidence on the use of CHM for treating anorexia and fatigue in cancer patients is uncertain, warranting further research. PMID:26886628

  7. Evaluation of the impact of interdisciplinarity in cancer care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Teamwork is a key component of the health care renewal strategy emphasized in Quebec, elsewhere in Canada and in other countries to enhance the quality of oncology services. While this innovation would appear beneficial in theory, empirical evidences of its impact are limited. Current efforts in Quebec to encourage the development of local interdisciplinary teams in all hospitals offer a unique opportunity to assess the anticipated benefits. These teams working in hospital outpatient clinics are responsible for treatment, follow-up and patient support. The study objective is to assess the impact of interdisciplinarity on cancer patients and health professionals. Methods/Design This is a quasi-experimental study with three comparison groups distinguished by intensity of interdisciplinarity: strong, moderate and weak. The study will use a random sample of 12 local teams in Quebec, stratified by intensity of interdisciplinarity. The instrument to measure the intensity of the interdisciplinarity, developed in collaboration with experts, encompasses five dimensions referring to aspects of team structure and process. Self-administered questionnaires will be used to measure the impact of interdisciplinarity on patients (health care utilization, continuity of care and cancer services responsiveness) and on professionals (professional well-being, assessment of teamwork and perception of teamwork climate). Approximately 100 health professionals working on the selected teams and 2000 patients will be recruited. Statistical analyses will include descriptive statistics and comparative analysis of the impact observed according to the strata of interdisciplinarity. Fixed and random multivariate statistical models (multilevel analyses) will also be used. Discussion This study will pinpoint to what extent interdisciplinarity is linked to quality of care and meets the complex and varied needs of cancer patients. It will ascertain to what extent interdisciplinary teamwork

  8. Evaluation of the impact of interdisciplinarity in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Dominique; Roberge, Danièle; Cazale, Linda; Touati, Nassera; Maunsell, Elizabeth; Latreille, Jean; Lemaire, Jacques

    2011-06-03

    Teamwork is a key component of the health care renewal strategy emphasized in Quebec, elsewhere in Canada and in other countries to enhance the quality of oncology services. While this innovation would appear beneficial in theory, empirical evidences of its impact are limited. Current efforts in Quebec to encourage the development of local interdisciplinary teams in all hospitals offer a unique opportunity to assess the anticipated benefits. These teams working in hospital outpatient clinics are responsible for treatment, follow-up and patient support. The study objective is to assess the impact of interdisciplinarity on cancer patients and health professionals. This is a quasi-experimental study with three comparison groups distinguished by intensity of interdisciplinarity: strong, moderate and weak. The study will use a random sample of 12 local teams in Quebec, stratified by intensity of interdisciplinarity. The instrument to measure the intensity of the interdisciplinarity, developed in collaboration with experts, encompasses five dimensions referring to aspects of team structure and process. Self-administered questionnaires will be used to measure the impact of interdisciplinarity on patients (health care utilization, continuity of care and cancer services responsiveness) and on professionals (professional well-being, assessment of teamwork and perception of teamwork climate). Approximately 100 health professionals working on the selected teams and 2000 patients will be recruited. Statistical analyses will include descriptive statistics and comparative analysis of the impact observed according to the strata of interdisciplinarity. Fixed and random multivariate statistical models (multilevel analyses) will also be used. This study will pinpoint to what extent interdisciplinarity is linked to quality of care and meets the complex and varied needs of cancer patients. It will ascertain to what extent interdisciplinary teamwork facilitated the work of professionals

  9. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: the impact on urologic cancer care.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Kirk A; Penson, David F

    2013-10-01

    In March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as well as its amendments were signed into law. This sweeping legislation was aimed at controlling spiraling healthcare costs and redressing significant disparities in healthcare access and quality. Cancer diagnoses and their treatments constitute a large component of rising healthcare expenditures and, not surprisingly, the legislation will have a significant influence on cancer care in the USA. Because genitourinary malignancies represent an impressive 25% of all cancer diagnoses per year, this legislation could have a profound impact on urologic oncology. To this end, we will present key components of this landmark legislation, including the proposed expansion to Medicaid coverage, the projected role of Accountable Care Organizations, the expected creation of quality reporting systems, the formation of an independent Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and enhanced regulation on physician-owned practices. We will specifically address the anticipated effect of these changes on urologic cancer care. Briefly, the legal ramifications and current barriers to the statutes will be examined. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: The Impact on Urologic Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Kirk A.; Penson, David F.

    2012-01-01

    In March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as well as its amendments were signed into law. This sweeping legislation was aimed at controlling spiraling healthcare costs and redressing significant disparities in healthcare access and quality. Cancer diagnoses and their treatments constitute a large component of rising healthcare expenditures and, not surprisingly, the legislation will have a significant influence on cancer care in the United States. Because genitourinary malignancies represent an impressive 25% of all cancer diagnoses per year, this legislation could have a profound impact on urologic oncology. To this end, we will present key components of this landmark legislation, including the proposed expansion to Medicaid coverage, the projected role of Accountable Care Organizations, the expected creation of quality reporting systems, the formation of an independent Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and enhanced regulation on physician-owned practices. We will specifically address the anticipated effect of these changes on urological cancer care. Briefly, the legal ramifications and current barriers to the statutes will be examined. PMID:22819697

  11. Tobacco-Related Health Disparities Across the Cancer Care Continuum.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Pineiro, Barbara; Hooper, Monica Webb; Gray, Jhanelle E; Brandon, Thomas H

    2016-10-01

    Use of tobacco is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Racial/ethnic minorities and individuals of low socioeconomic status disproportionately experience tobacco-related disease and illness. Unique challenges and circumstances exist at each point in the cancer care continuum that may contribute to the greater cancer burden experienced by these groups. We reviewed tobacco-related disparities from cancer prevention to cancer survivorship. We also describe research that seeks to reduce tobacco-related disparities. Racial/ethnic minorities and low-income individuals experience unique social and environmental contextual challenges such as greater environmental cues to smoke and greater levels of perceived stress and social discrimination. Clinical practice guidelines support the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy and behavioral counseling for racial and ethnic minorities, yet smoking cessation rates are lower in this group when compared with non-Hispanic whites. Superior efficacy for culturally adapted interventions has not yet been established. To reduce health disparities in this population, a comprehensive strategy is needed with efforts directed at each point along the cancer care continuum. Strategies are needed to reduce the impact of contextual factors such as targeted tobacco marketing and social discrimination on smoking initiation and maintenance. Future efforts should focus on increasing the use of evidence-based cessation treatment methods and studying its effectiveness in these populations. Attention must also be focused on improving treatment outcomes by reducing smoking in diverse racial and ethnic patient populations.

  12. Cancer Portal Project: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Cancer Care Among Hispanic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gany, Francesca; Ramirez, Julia; Nierodzick, Mary Lynn; McNish, Thelma; Lobach, Iryna; Leng, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the impact of a multilingual, multidisciplinary team targeting social and economic determinants of cancer treatment adherence among at-risk Hispanic immigrants. Methods: Patients were recruited at 10 hospital-based cancer clinics in New York City between December 2008 and November 2009. This is a nested cohort study of Hispanic patients and their sociodemographic characteristics, areas of needed assistance, and reported impact of meeting service needs on keeping appointments. At the core of the intervention is the trained, bilingual Portal Access Facilitator, who assesses needs and synchronizes an individualized set of transdisciplinary services for each patient. Results: A total of 328 Hispanic patients participated in the study. Of these, 89% preferred to speak Spanish in the health care setting, and 17% had no health insurance. The most common cancer diagnosis among participants was breast cancer (35%) followed by GI (17%) and gynecologic (16%) cancers. Patients most commonly requested financial support (59%), food support (37%), transportation assistance (21%), social work services (14%), psychosocial support (6%), help with health insurance issues (5%), and legal services (5%). In a follow-up assessment of high-need patients in urgent need of financial support, 86% reported that portal services helped them attend cancer care and treatment appointments, and 72% reported that portal services decreased worry about their care. Conclusion: Most patients reported that financial, social, and logistical support would help them attend their appointments for cancer care and treatment. Further multidisciplinary interventions should be implemented and evaluated to address social and economic determinants in cancer care for this population. PMID:21532808

  13. Effect of hospital volume on processes of breast cancer care: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    PubMed

    Yen, Tina W F; Pezzin, Liliana E; Li, Jianing; Sparapani, Rodney; Laud, Purushuttom W; Nattinger, Ann B

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine variations in delivery of several breast cancer processes of care that are correlated with lower mortality and disease recurrence, and to determine the extent to which hospital volume explains this variation. Women who were diagnosed with stage I-III unilateral breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 were identified within the National Cancer Data Base. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to determine whether hospital volume was independently associated with each of 10 individual process of care measures addressing diagnosis and treatment, and 2 composite measures assessing appropriateness of systemic treatment (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) and locoregional treatment (margin status and radiation therapy). Among 573,571 women treated at 1755 different hospitals, 38%, 51%, and 10% were treated at high-, medium-, and low-volume hospitals, respectively. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient sociodemographic characteristics, treatment year and geographic location, hospital volume was a significant predictor for cancer diagnosis by initial biopsy (medium volume: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.25; high volume: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14-1.49), negative surgical margins (medium volume: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24; high volume: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.44), and appropriate locoregional treatment (medium volume: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17; high volume: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.24). Diagnosis of breast cancer before initial surgery, negative surgical margins and appropriate use of radiation therapy may partially explain the volume-survival relationship. Dissemination of these processes of care to a broader group of hospitals could potentially improve the overall quality of care and outcomes of breast cancer survivors. Cancer 2017;123:957-66. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  14. Cancer pain in palliative care: why is management so difficult?

    PubMed

    Hemming, Laureen; Maher, David

    2005-08-01

    Pain is the major source of anxiety and distress at the end of life, particularly in cases of end-stage cancer. However, pain management is not always effective or effectively implemented. This article identifies several barriers to effective pain relief in terminal cancer--the complexity of pain; difficulties in physical, emotional and spiritual assessment; difficulties in the delivery of medication--that challenge the skills of all professionals involved in palliative care. There are no simple answers, but awareness of the breadth of the issues may help focus nurses' minds on the patient in every encounter.

  15. Identification of Underserved Areas for Urologic Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Mossanen, Matthew; Izard, Jason; Wright, Jonathan L.; Harper, Jonathan D.; Porter, Michael P.; Daratha, Kenn B.; Holt, Sarah K.; Gore, John L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The delivery of urologic oncology care is susceptible to regional variation. In the current study, the authors sought to define patterns of care for patients undergoing genitourinary cancer surgery to identify underserved areas for urologic cancer care in Washington State. METHODS The authors accessed the Washington State Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System from 2003 through 2007. They identified patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, radical cystectomy (RC), partial nephrectomy (PN), radical nephrectomy, and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). TURP was included for comparison as a reference procedure indicative of access to urologic care. Hospital service areas (HSAs) are where the majority of local patients are hospitalized; hospital referral regions (HRR) are where most patients receive tertiary care. The authors created multivariate hierarchical logistic regression models to examine patient and HSA characteristics associated with the receipt of urologic oncology care out of the HRR for each procedure RESULTS Greater than one-half of patients went out of their HRR in 7 HSAs (11%) for radical prostatectomy, 3 HSAs (5%) for radical nephrectomy, 10 HSAs (15%) for PN, and 14 HSAs (22%) for RC. No HSAs had high export rates for TURP. Few patient factors were found to be associated with surgical care out of the HRR. High-export HSAs for PN and RC exhibited lower socioeconomic characteristics than low-export HSAs, adjusting for HSA population, race, and HSA procedure rates for PN and RC. CONCLUSIONS Patients living in areas with lower socioeconomic status have a greater need to travel for complex urologic surgery. Consideration of geographic delineation in the delivery of urologic oncology care may aid in regional quality improvement initiatives. PMID:24523042

  16. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the older cancer patient: coming of age in clinical cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Cynthia; Berger, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer care at the extremes of life, in the young and the old, is characterized by unique issues associated with pediatrics and geriatric medicine, accentuated by the special vulnerabilities of these groups. In response to these needs, the field of pediatric oncology has been well honed to deal with the special problems associated with juvenile cancer patients. While most adult oncologists consider themselves well prepared to deal with older cancer patients, the current expansion of the geriatric population – their variable levels of fitness, frailty and vulnerability, the fact that cancer is primarily a disease of older adults, the significant expansion of agents and approaches to treat cancer, as well as their resultant toxicities and complications – has led to the development of specialized geriatric oncologists. Moreover, the special characteristics and needs of these patients have led to the evolution of new guidelines for evaluation, management and the conduct of research in older patients with cancer. PMID:25642321

  17. Revisiting Prostate Cancer Screening Practices Among Vermont Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Laura; Sternberg, Kevan M; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Plante, Mark K; Perrapato, Scott D

    2017-06-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the prostate cancer screening practices of Vermont primary care physicians and compare them with a prior study in 2001. An electronic survey was created and emailed to all currently practicing primary care physicians in Vermont. Data was stratified by practice length, practice location, university affiliation, and internal medicine versus family practice. Surveys were received from 123 (27.2%) primary care physicians. 27.7% of physicians in practice <10 years recommended prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, compared with 55.9% of those practicing ≥10 years (p = 0.006). Of those who modified their recommendations in the past 5 years, 96.1% reported that the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) 2012 statement influenced them. Respondents who continued to use PSA testing were less likely to stop screening after age 80 compared with those surveyed in 2001 (51% in 2014 vs. 74% in 2001; p <0.001). Primary care physicians in practice for 10 or more years were more likely to recommend PSA-based screening than those in practice for less time. The USPSTF statement discouraging PSA-based screening for prostate cancer has had significant penetrance among Vermont primary care physicians.

  18. Modeling Intercellular Communication as a Survival Strategy of Cancer Cells: An In Silico Approach on a Flexible Bioinformatics Framework.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-García, Maura; González-Pérez, Pedro P; Montagna, Sara; Cortés, Oscar Sánchez; Caballero, Elena Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is very important for cell development and allows a group of cells to survive as a population. Cancer cells have a similar behavior, presenting the same mechanisms and characteristics of tissue formation. In this article, we model and simulate the formation of different communication channels that allow an interaction between two cells. This is a first step in order to simulate in the future processes that occur in healthy tissue when normal cells surround a cancer cell and to interrupt the communication, thus preventing the spread of malignancy into these cells. The purpose of this study is to propose key molecules, which can be targeted to allow us to break the communication between cancer cells and surrounding normal cells. The simulation is carried out using a flexible bioinformatics platform that we developed, which is itself based on the metaphor chemistry-based model.

  19. Modeling Intercellular Communication as a Survival Strategy of Cancer Cells: An In Silico Approach on a Flexible Bioinformatics Framework

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-García, Maura; González-Pérez, Pedro P.; Montagna, Sara; Cortés, Oscar Sánchez; Caballero, Elena Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is very important for cell development and allows a group of cells to survive as a population. Cancer cells have a similar behavior, presenting the same mechanisms and characteristics of tissue formation. In this article, we model and simulate the formation of different communication channels that allow an interaction between two cells. This is a first step in order to simulate in the future processes that occur in healthy tissue when normal cells surround a cancer cell and to interrupt the communication, thus preventing the spread of malignancy into these cells. The purpose of this study is to propose key molecules, which can be targeted to allow us to break the communication between cancer cells and surrounding normal cells. The simulation is carried out using a flexible bioinformatics platform that we developed, which is itself based on the metaphor chemistry-based model. PMID:26997867

  20. Improving Cancer Care Through Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K

    2015-09-01

    Nursing research and nurse researchers have been an integral and significant part of the Oncology Nursing Society's (ONS's) history, as evidenced by the development of the Nursing Research Committee within a few years of ONS's establishment. Ruth McCorkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, was the committee's first chairperson in 1979. This was followed by the creation of the Advanced Nursing Research Special Interest Group in 1989 under the leadership of Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN. ONS also began to recognize nurse researchers in 1994 by creating the annual ONS Distinguished Researcher Award to recognize the contributions of a member who has conducted or promoted research that has enhanced the science and practice of oncology nursing. The list of recipients and of their work is impressive and reflects the wide range of our practice areas (see http://bit.ly/1MTC5cp for the recipient list). In addition, the ONS Foundation began funding research in 1981 and has distributed more than $24 million in research grants, research fellowships, and other scholarships, lectures, public education projects, and career development awards (ONS Foundation, 2015). And, in 2006, the Putting Evidence Into Practice resource was unveiled, which provides evidence-based intervention reviews for the 20 most common problems experienced by patients with cancer and their caregivers (www.ons
.org/practice-resources/pep)
.

  1. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects.

  2. Screening or Symptoms? How Do We Detect Colorectal Cancer in an Equal Access Health Care System?

    PubMed

    Hatch, Quinton M; Kniery, Kevin R; Johnson, Eric K; Flores, Shelly A; Moeil, David L; Thompson, John J; Maykel, Justin A; Steele, Scott R

    2016-02-01

    Detection of colorectal cancer ideally occurs at an early stage through proper screening. We sought to establish methods by which colorectal cancers are diagnosed within an equal access military health care population and evaluate the correlation between TNM stage at colorectal cancer diagnosis and diagnostic modality (i.e., symptomatic detection vs screen detection). A retrospective chart review of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients from January 2007 to August 2014 was conducted at the authors' equal access military institution. We evaluated TNM stage relative to diagnosis by screen detection (fecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoidoscopy, CT colonography, colonoscopy) or symptomatic evaluation (diagnostic colonoscopy or surgery). Of 197 colorectal cancers diagnosed (59 % male; mean age 62 years), 50 (25 %) had stage I, 47 (24 %) had stage II, 70 (36 %) had stage III, and 30 (15 %) had stage IV disease. Twenty-five percent of colorectal cancers were detected via screen detection (3 % by fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), 0.5 % by screening CT colonography, 17 % by screening colonoscopy, and 5 % by surveillance colonoscopy). One hundred forty-eight (75 %) were diagnosed after onset of signs or symptoms. The preponderance of these was advanced-stage disease (stages III-IV), although >50 % of stage I-II disease also had signs or symptoms at diagnosis. The most common symptoms were rectal bleeding (45 %), abdominal pain (35 %), and change in stool caliber (27 %). The most common overall sign was anemia (60 %). Screening FOBT (odds ratio (OR) 8.7, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.0-78.3; P = 0.05) independently predicted early diagnosis with stage I-II disease. Patient gender and ethnicity were not associated with cancer stage at diagnosis. Despite equal access to colorectal cancer screening, diagnosis after development of symptomatic cancer remains more common. Fecal occult blood screen detection is associated with early stage at

  3. What are the barriers of quality survivorship care for haematology cancer patients? Qualitative insights from cancer nurses.

    PubMed

    Langbecker, Danette; Ekberg, Stuart; Yates, Patsy; Chan, Alexandre; Chan, Raymond Javan

    2016-02-01

    Many haematological cancer survivors report long-term physiological and psychosocial effects beyond treatment completion. These survivors continue to experience impaired quality of life (QoL) as a result of their disease and aggressive treatment. As key members of the multidisciplinary team, the purpose of this study is to examine the insights of cancer nurses to inform future developments in survivorship care provision. Open text qualitative responses from two prospective Australian cross-sectional surveys of nurses (n = 136) caring for patients with haematological cancer. Data were analysed thematically, using an inductive approach to identify themes. This study has identified a number of issues that nurses perceive as barriers to quality survivorship care provision. Two main themes were identified: the first relating to the challenges nurses face in providing care ('care challenges') and the second relating to the challenges of providing survivorship care within contemporary health care systems ('system challenges'). Cancer nurses perceive the nature of haematological cancer and its treatment and of the health care system itself, as barriers to the provision of quality survivorship care. Care challenges such as the lack of a standard treatment path and the relapsing or remitting nature of haematological cancers may be somewhat intractable, but system challenges relating to clearly defining and delineating professional responsibilities and exchanging information with other clinicians are not. Addressing the issues identified will facilitate cancer nurses' provision of survivorship care and help address haematological survivors' needs with regard to the physical and psychosocial consequences of their cancer and treatment.

  4. Colorectal cancer care in elderly patients: Unsolved issues.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Thomas; Pamoukdjian, Frederic; Quero, Laurent; Manfredi, Sylvain; Wind, Philippe; Paillaud, Elena

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancers are common in elderly patients. However, cancer screening is poorly used after 75. Elderly patients form a heterogeneous population with specific characteristics. Standards of care cannot therefore be transposed from young to elderly patients. Tumour resection is frequently performed but adjuvant chemotherapy is rarely prescribed as there are no clearly established standards of care. In a metastatic setting, recent phase III studies have demonstrated that doublet front-line chemotherapy provided no survival benefit. Moreover, several studies have established the benefit of bevacizumab in association with chemotherapy. There is a lack of evidence for the efficacy of anti-epidermal growth factor antibodies in elderly patients. Geriatric assessments could help to select the adequate treatment strategy for individual patients. Geriatric oncology is now the challenge we have to face, and more specific trials are needed.

  5. [Update of breast cancer in Primary Care (II/V)].

    PubMed

    Brusint, B; Vich, P; Ávarez-Hernández, C; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Díaz-García, N; Redondo-Margüello, E

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family doctors need to thoroughly understand this disease in order to optimize the health care services for these patients, making the best use of available resources. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. The second one deals with population screening and its controversies, screening in high-risk women, and the current recommendations. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors, and helping them to be able to care for their patients for their benefit throughout their illness.

  6. Defining Practice: Flexibility, Legitimacy, and the Nature of Systems of Care and Wraparound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruns, Eric J.; Walker, Janet S.

    2010-01-01

    In human services, clear definition of key concepts and strategies is critical to facilitating training, implementation, and research. This article reflects on methods undertaken to specify the wraparound process for children and families, and considers lessons that may be relevant to defining the system of care concept.

  7. Love, Money, or Flexibility: What Motivates People to Work in Consumer-Directed Home Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Candace

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of wages and benefits (relative to other jobs available to workers), controlling for personal characteristics, on the recruitment and retention of providers working in a consumer-directed home care program. Design and Methods: I used the results of focus groups to design a survey…

  8. Defining practice: flexibility, legitimacy, and the nature of systems of care and wraparound.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Eric J; Walker, Janet S

    2010-02-01

    In human services, clear definition of key concepts and strategies is critical to facilitating training, implementation, and research. This article reflects on methods undertaken to specify the wraparound process for children and families, and considers lessons that may be relevant to defining the system of care concept.

  9. Defining Practice: Flexibility, Legitimacy, and the Nature of Systems of Care and Wraparound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruns, Eric J.; Walker, Janet S.

    2010-01-01

    In human services, clear definition of key concepts and strategies is critical to facilitating training, implementation, and research. This article reflects on methods undertaken to specify the wraparound process for children and families, and considers lessons that may be relevant to defining the system of care concept.

  10. Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Klein, Penelope

    2017-01-12

    Background: The purpose of this discussion is to explore the theory, evidence base, and practice of Qigong for individuals with cancer. Questions addressed are: What is qigong? How does it work? What evidence exists supporting its practice in integrative oncology? What barriers to wide-spread programming access exist? Methods: Sources for this discussion include a review of scholarly texts, the Internet, PubMed, field observations, and expert opinion. Results: Qigong is a gentle, mind/body exercise integral within Chinese medicine. Theoretical foundations include Chinese medicine energy theory, psychoneuroimmunology, the relaxation response, the meditation effect, and epigenetics. Research supports positive effects on quality of life (QOL), fatigue, immune function and cortisol levels, and cognition for individuals with cancer. There is indirect, scientific evidence suggesting that qigong practice may positively influence cancer prevention and survival. No one Qigong exercise regimen has been established as superior. Effective protocols do have common elements: slow mindful exercise, easy to learn, breath regulation, meditation, emphasis on relaxation, and energy cultivation including mental intent and self-massage. Conclusions: Regular practice of Qigong exercise therapy has the potential to improve cancer-related QOL and is indirectly linked to cancer prevention and survival. Wide-spread access to quality Qigong in cancer care programming may be challenged by the availability of existing programming and work force capacity.

  11. Recent advances in palliative cancer care at a regional hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Terui, Takeshi; Koike, Kazuhiko; Hirayama, Yasuo; Kusakabe, Toshiro; Ono, Kaoru; Mihara, Hiroyoshi; Kobayashi, Kenji; Takahashi, Yuji; Nakajima, Nobuhisa; Kato, Junji; Ishitani, Kunihiko

    2014-11-01

    More than 30 years have passed since the introduction of the concept of palliative care in cancer care in Japan. However, the majority of the estimated three million cancer patients in Japan do not receive palliative care. Higashi Sapporo Hospital was established in 1983 as a hospital specialized in cancer care. The palliative care unit of our hospital currently consists of 58 beds. Our hospital is one of the largest hospitals in Japan in terms of the number of palliative care beds. On admission to our hospital, all patients are evaluated for palliative care by a multi-disciplinary team and some patients who undergo anticancer therapy receive palliative care when necessary. There are about 65 patients on average (28.3%) who are receiving only palliative care. In 2011, 793 patients died of cancer while admitted at our hospital. This number of cancer deaths accounted for 15% of the 5,324 cancer deaths in Sapporo City in the same year. Our hospital has played an active role according to the philosophy that "palliative cancer care is part of cancer medical care". We here report the current status of the contribution of our hospital to overcoming problems in palliative care and cancer care in Japan.

  12. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, D.I.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  13. Latin American Cancer Research Coalition. Community primary care/academic partnership model for cancer control.

    PubMed

    Kreling, Barbara A; Cañar, Janet; Catipon, Ericson; Goodman, Michelle; Pallesen, Nancy; Pomeroy, Jyl; Rodriguez, Yosselyn; Romagoza, Juan; Sheppard, Vanessa B; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Huerta, Elmer E

    2006-10-15

    The Latin American Cancer Research Coalition (LACRC) was funded by NCI as a Special Populations Network to 1) provide training to clinic staff in cancer control and foster development of Latino faculty training, 2) conduct a needs assessment with the community clinics, 3) enhance the ability of the clinics to promote healthy lifestyles, 4) collaborate on research projects to improve use of early detection, and 5) explore partnerships to increase access to culturally competent cancer care. The LACRC developed a model for cancer control focused on community-based clinics as the focal point for in-reach and community outreach targeted to Latinos to reduce cancer disparities. This framework was designed to link the community to local hospitals and academic centers, build capacity, and promote diffusion of innovations directly into delivery systems. Eight research projects submitted by junior investigator/clinic teams have been funded by NCI. These research projects range from recruiting for clinical trials to prevention to survivorship. The LACRC has trained 6 cancer control coordinators from partner sites and educated 59 undergraduate minority student interns in aspects of cancer control research. Central to LACRC's success to date has been the creation and maintenance of an infrastructure of trusting relationships, especially those developed between clinician/investigators and individuals within the greater Latino community. Community clinics can be effective agents for cancer control among Latinos. Latinos are likely to participate in research conducted by culturally representative teams of researchers using culturally appropriate recruiting strategies. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  14. Primary Care-Based Skin Cancer Screening in a Veterans Affairs Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Swetter, Susan M; Chang, Julia; Shaub, Amanda R; Weinstock, Martin A; Lewis, Eleanor T; Asch, Steven M

    2017-08-01

    Skin cancer screening may improve melanoma outcomes and keratinocyte carcinoma morbidity, but little is known about the feasibility of skin cancer training and clinical skin examination (CSE) by primary care practitioners (PCPs) in large health care systems. To assess the association of skin cancer training and screening by PCPs with dermatology referral patterns and rates of skin biopsies. In this pilot interventional study performed at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, patients 35 years or older scheduled for an annual health habits screen in the PCP general medicine clinics were studied. Six PCPs underwent Internet Curriculum for Melanoma Early Detection (INFORMED) training in May 2015, and 5 screened patients during the following 14 months. Proportion of dermatology referrals, subsequent skin biopsies, and PCP diagnostic accuracy for skin cancer or precancer compared with dermatologist diagnosis were assessed in screened patients 14 months before the intervention (February 18, 2014, through April 30, 2015) and after the intervention (June 18, 2015, through August 30, 2016). Among 258 patients offered screening (median age, 70 years; age range, 35-94 years; 255 [98.8%] male), 189 (73.3%) received CSE and 69 (26.7%) declined. A total of 62 of 189 patients (32.8%) were referred to a dermatologist after intervention: 33 (53.2%) for presumptive skin cancers and 15 (24.2%) for precancers. Nine of 50 patients (18.0%) evaluated in dermatology clinic underwent biopsy to exclude skin cancer. Correct diagnoses were made by PCPs in 13 of 38 patients (34.2%; 4 of 27 patients [14.8%] diagnosed with skin cancers and 5 of 11 patients [45.5%] diagnosed with actinic keratoses). Comparison of all outpatient visits for the 5 main participating PCPs before vs after intervention revealed no significant differences in dermatology referrals overall and those for presumptive skin cancer or actinic keratoses, skin biopsies, or PCP diagnostic accuracy with the exception

  15. Radiology as the Point of Cancer Patient and Care Team Engagement: Applying the 4R Model at a Patient's Breast Cancer Care Initiation.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Christine B; Friedewald, Sarah M; Kulkarni, Swati A; Simon, Melissa A; Carlos, Ruth C; Strauss, Jonathan B; Bunce, Mikele M; Small, Art; Trosman, Julia R

    2016-12-01

    Radiologists aspire to improve patient experience and engagement, as part of the Triple Aim of health reform. Patient engagement requires active partnerships among health providers and patients, and rigorous teamwork provides a mechanism for this. Patient and care team engagement are crucial at the time of cancer diagnosis and care initiation but are complicated by the necessity to orchestrate many interdependent consultations and care events in a short time. Radiology often serves as the patient entry point into the cancer care system, especially for breast cancer. It is uniquely positioned to play the value-adding role of facilitating patient and team engagement during cancer care initiation. The 4R approach (Right Information and Right Care to the Right Patient at the Right Time), previously proposed for optimizing teamwork and care delivery during cancer treatment, could be applied at the time of diagnosis. The 4R approach considers care for every patient with cancer as a project, using project management to plan and manage care interdependencies, assign clear responsibilities, and designate a quarterback function. The authors propose that radiology assume the quarterback function during breast cancer care initiation, developing the care initiation sequence, as a project care plan for newly diagnosed patients, and engaging patients and their care teams in timely, coordinated activities. After initial consultations and treatment plan development, the quarterback function is transitioned to surgery or medical oncology. This model provides radiologists with opportunities to offer value-added services and solidifies radiology's relevance in the evolving health care environment. To implement 4R at cancer care initiation, it will be necessary to change the radiology practice model to incorporate patient interaction and teamwork, develop 4R content and local adaption approaches, and enrich radiology training with relevant clinical knowledge, patient interaction

  16. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer: The Danish Palliative Care Trial.

    PubMed

    Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern; Nielsen, Jan Bjoern; Pedersen, Lise; Sjøgren, Per; Strömgren, Annette Sand; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn; Gluud, Christian; Lindschou, Jane; Fayers, Peter; Higginson, Irene J; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2017-10-01

    Beneficial effects of early palliative care have been found in advanced cancer, but the evidence is not unequivocal. To investigate the effect of early specialist palliative care among advanced cancer patients identified in oncology departments. The Danish Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients with advanced cancer were screened for palliative needs. Patients with scores exceeding a predefined threshold for problems with physical, emotional or role function, or nausea/vomiting, pain, dyspnoea or lack of appetite according to the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) were eligible. The primary outcome was the change in each patient's primary need (the most severe of the seven QLQ-C30 scales) at 3- and 8-week follow-up (0-100 scale). Five sensitivity analyses were conducted. Secondary outcomes were change in the seven QLQ-C30 scales and survival. Totally 145 patients were randomised to early specialist palliative care versus 152 to standard care. Early specialist palliative care showed no effect on the primary outcome of change in primary need (-4.9 points (95% confidence interval -11.3 to +1.5 points); p = 0.14). The sensitivity analyses showed similar results. Analyses of the secondary outcomes, including survival, also showed no differences, maybe with the exception of nausea/vomiting where early specialist palliative care might have had a beneficial effect. We did not observe beneficial or harmful effects of early specialist palliative care, but important beneficial effects cannot be excluded.

  17. Collaboration Around Research and Education (CARE) in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15 . SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME...faculty mentors to facilitate opportunities to study prostate cancer. CARE was marketed by Bennett to freshman and sophomore students who had...from a pool of 8 applicants. Three students were completing their sophomore year, and one student was completing her freshman year. Two alternates

  18. Self-Care in Women with Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    cognitive styles that lead to illnesses. The results of learned helplessness was the withdrawing from manageable obstacles and succumbing to everyday problems... parental , and social roles, and 3) most people (80 %) indicated that changes had not occurred in their sex lives. 42 Summary Breast cancer in women is a...information seeking style , credible authority, access/cost of care, and social support. Instruments relevant to this secondary analysis included 54 1) the SCS

  19. Ethnic Disparities in Adherence to Breast Cancer Survivorship Surveillance Care

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Pragati S.; Ying, Jun; Theriault, Richard; Melhem-Bertrand, Amal; Moulder, Stacy; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Tereffe, Welela; Black, Shon; Pini, Tunghi May; Brewster, Abenaa M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adherence to guidelines for surveillance mammography and clinic visits is an important component of breast cancer survivorship care. Identifying ethnic disparities in adherence may lead to improved care delivery and outcomes. Methods We evaluated records of 4,535 patients treated for stage I, II, or III breast cancer at our cancer center between January 1997 and December 2006. We used generalized estimating equations and Cox proportional hazards analyses to evaluate ethnic differences in missed mammograms and clinic visits up to 4 years of follow-up and the impact of those differences on overall survival. Results Nonadherence to guidelines for mammography (P = .0002) and clinic visits (P < .0001) increased over time. Hispanic and black patients were more likely to be nonadherent to guidelines for mammography (odds ratio [OR] = 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10 to 1.65], OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.11 to 1.66, respectively) and clinic visits (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.27 to 2.06, OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.86, respectively) than white patients. There was an interaction between Hispanic ethnicity and endocrine therapy on nonadherence to mammography guidelines (P = .001). Nonadherence to mammography and clinic visit guidelines was not associated with overall survival. Conclusions Withdrawal from breast cancer survivorship care increases over time, and black and Hispanic patients are more likely to be nonadherent. An understanding of the reasons for ethnic disparities in adherence to guidelines for mammography and clinic visits is needed to improve retention in survivorship care. PMID:24258799

  20. Partitioning of excess mortality in population-based cancer patient survival studies using flexible parametric survival models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Relative survival is commonly used for studying survival of cancer patients as it captures both the direct and indirect contribution of a cancer diagnosis on mortality by comparing the observed survival of the patients to the expected survival in a comparable cancer-free population. However, existing methods do not allow estimation of the impact of isolated conditions (e.g., excess cardiovascular mortality) on the total excess mortality. For this purpose we extend flexible parametric survival models for relative survival, which use restricted cubic splines for the baseline cumulative excess hazard and for any time-dependent effects. Methods In the extended model we partition the excess mortality associated with a diagnosis of cancer through estimating a separate baseline excess hazard function for the outcomes under investigation. This is done by incorporating mutually exclusive background mortality rates, stratified by the underlying causes of death reported in the Swedish population, and by introducing cause of death as a time-dependent effect in the extended model. This approach thereby enables modeling of temporal trends in e.g., excess cardiovascular mortality and remaining cancer excess mortality simultaneously. Furthermore, we illustrate how the results from the proposed model can be used to derive crude probabilities of death due to the component parts, i.e., probabilities estimated in the presence of competing causes of death. Results The method is illustrated with examples where the total excess mortality experienced by patients diagnosed with breast cancer is partitioned into excess cardiovascular mortality and remaining cancer excess mortality. Conclusions The proposed method can be used to simultaneously study disease patterns and temporal trends for various causes of cancer-consequent deaths. Such information should be of interest for patients and clinicians as one way of improving prognosis after cancer is through adapting treatment

  1. [Update of breast cancer in primary care (I/V)].

    PubMed

    Vich, P; Brusint, B; Alvarez-Hernández, C; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Diaz-García, N; Redondo-Margüello, E

    2014-09-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of the patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians should have a thorough knowledge of this disease in order to optimize the health care services for these patients, and making the best use of available resources. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. The first article reviews the epidemiology, risk factors, and protective factors in this disease This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review on breast cancer, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to support the patients for their benefit throughout their illness.

  2. Helsinn: 20 years in primary cancer supportive care.

    PubMed

    Cantoreggi, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    Sergio Cantoreggi speaks to Henry Ireland, Commissioning Editor: Sergio Cantoreggi, PhD, is the Chief Scientific Officer and Global Head of Research and Development of the Helsinn Group, a mid-sized pharmaceutical company headquartered in Lugano, Switzerland, and focused on providing cancer supportive care solutions to oncology patients worldwide. Dr Cantoreggi has overall responsibility for all R&D activities of the Helsinn Group and has contributed to six major regulatory approvals of cancer supportive care agents in the USA, Europe and Japan. Dr Cantoreggi joined Helsinn Healthcare in 2000 as drug development scientist and was appointed Head of R&D in 2005. In 2010, he was promoted to his current role. From 1994 to 2000 he worked as toxicologist and regulatory scientist for Du Pont, Sandoz and Novartis. Prior to joining industry, Dr Cantoreggi completed a postdoctoral fellowship and earned a Master of Science degree in chemistry and a Doctoral degree in natural sciences with a thesis on the mechanism of chemical carcinogenesis from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich, Switzerland. Sergio Cantoreggi discusses Helsinn's role in cancer supportive care, describing current treatment options for patients, the company's pipeline and Helsinn's work in supporting the field as a whole.

  3. Double-Edged Sword: Women with Breast Cancer Caring for a Spouse with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rottenberg, Yakir; Baider, Lea; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Peretz, Tamar; Goldzweig, Gil

    2016-12-01

    Experiences in caregiving may affect further coping with illness. The aim of this study was to assess mortality risk among women diagnosed with breast cancer while caring for a male spouse who had been diagnosed with cancer before or at the time of their own diagnosis. We used a historical prospective study of a nationally representative cohort that was assessed by the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics 1995 census and followed until 2011. The study population was divided into 2 × 2 groups (according to a positive/negative cancer history of the male spouse before the time of breast cancer diagnosis of the women X spouse alive/dead). The analyses were adjusted for age, ethnicity, breast cancer staging, and time of diagnosis. A total of 14,429 cases of breast cancer and 3,400 deaths were reported during the study period. Mortality was not mediated by the spouse's survival at the time of breast cancer diagnosis of the women. However, decreased risk of death was seen in women with a positive spouse history of cancer when the spouse was alive at the time of diagnosis in women who were diagnosed with breast cancer stages II and III (hazard ratio = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.59-0.98). Among a subset of women diagnosed with breast cancer, there is evidence of a significant protective association between a history of caregiving for cancer of a spouse who is alive at the time of self-diagnosis and subsequent survival. Our findings support hypotheses concerning a positive experience of caregiving and emphasize the need to define the patient and the caregiver as an integrative "unit of care."

  4. Integrative cancer care in a US academic cancer centre: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Experience.

    PubMed

    Deng, G

    2008-08-01

    Various surveys show that interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high among cancer patients. Patients want to explore all options that may help their treatment. Many CAM modalities offer patients an active role in their self-care, and the resulting sense of empowerment is very appealing. On the other hand, many unscrupulous marketeers promote alternative cancer "cures," targeting cancer patients who are particularly vulnerable. Some alternative therapies can hurt patients by delaying effective treatment or by causing adverse effects or detrimental interactions with other medications. It is not in the best interest of cancer patients if they cannot get appropriate guidance on the use of CAM from the health care professionals who are part of their cancer care team. The Integrative Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York was established in 1999 to address patient interest in cam, to incorporate helpful complementary therapies into each patient's overall treatment management, to guide patients in avoiding harmful alternative therapies, and to develop prospective research to evaluate the efficacy of CAM modalities.

  5. Integrative Cancer Care in a US Academic Cancer Centre: The Memorial Sloan–Kettering Experience

    PubMed Central

    Deng, G.

    2008-01-01

    Various surveys show that interest in complementary and alternative medicine (cam) is high among cancer patients. Patients want to explore all options that may help their treatment. Many cam modalities offer patients an active role in their self-care, and the resulting sense of empowerment is very appealing. On the other hand, many unscrupulous marketeers promote alternative cancer “cures,” targeting cancer patients who are particularly vulnerable. Some alternative therapies can hurt patients by delaying effective treatment or by causing adverse effects or detrimental interactions with other medications. It is not in the best interest of cancer patients if they cannot get appropriate guidance on the use of cam from the health care professionals who are part of their cancer care team. The Integrative Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center in New York was established in 1999 to address patient interest in cam, to incorporate helpful complementary therapies into each patient’s overall treatment management, to guide patients in avoiding harmful alternative therapies, and to develop prospective research to evaluate the efficacy of cam modalities. PMID:18769574

  6. Caring and curing: paediatric cancer services since 1960.

    PubMed

    Barnes, E

    2005-09-01

    This paper traces the history of the specialist meanings of 'cure' in paediatric oncology in the UK, how they have changed with increasing organization of the discipline, ever-rising survival rates for all childhood cancers, and with feedback from patients and families. It examines the differing ways in which those involved in researching, treating, and raising funds for work on childhood cancers have understood and used the language of cure, and speculates as to why talking about the 'cure' of survivors of childhood cancers is so problematic. The paper discusses the particular importance of holistic care in the development of paediatric oncology. Psychosocial support is delivered alongside surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The focus for support is the patient's whole family, building a tenet of palliative care into curative treatment. The concept of the 'truly cured child' is argued to have been crucial in the discipline's decision in the 1970s and 1980s to make the psychosocial needs of patients and their families central in the programme of curing children with cancer.

  7. Racial Disparities in Cancer Care in the Veterans Affairs Health Care System and the Role of Site of Care

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Cleo A.; Landrum, Mary Beth; McNeil, Barbara J.; Bozeman, Samuel R.; Williams, Christina D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed cancer care disparities within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system and whether between-hospital differences explained disparities. Methods. We linked VA cancer registry data with VA and Medicare administrative data and examined 20 cancer-related quality measures among Black and White veterans diagnosed with colorectal (n = 12 897), lung (n = 25 608), or prostate (n = 38 202) cancer from 2001 to 2004. We used logistic regression to assess racial disparities for each measure and hospital fixed-effects models to determine whether disparities were attributable to between- or within-hospital differences. Results. Compared with Whites, Blacks had lower rates of early-stage colon cancer diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.72, 0.90), curative surgery for stage I, II, or III rectal cancer (AOR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.41, 0.78), 3-year survival for colon cancer (AOR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.62, 0.89) and rectal cancer (AOR = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.42, 0.87), curative surgery for early-stage lung cancer (AOR = 0.50; 95% CI = 0.41, 0.60), 3-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated radiation (3-D CRT/IMRT; AOR = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.47, 0.59), and potent antiemetics for highly emetogenic chemotherapy (AOR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.78, 0.98). Adjustment for hospital fixed-effects minimally influenced racial gaps except for 3-D CRT/IMRT (AOR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.65, 0.87) and potent antiemetics (AOR = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.82, 1.10). Conclusions. Disparities in VA cancer care were observed for 7 of 20 measures and were primarily attributable to within-hospital differences. PMID:25100422

  8. Palliative Care Improves Survival, Quality of Life in Advanced Lung Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Results from the first randomized clinical trial of its kind have revealed a surprising and welcome benefit of early palliative care for patients with advanced lung cancer—longer median survival. Although several researchers said that the finding needs to be confirmed in other trials of patients with other cancer types, they were cautiously optimistic that the trial results could influence oncologists’ perceptions and use of palliative care. |

  9. Perceptions of lung cancer and potential impacts on funding and patient care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kim; Delicaet, Kendra; Tang, Theresa; Ashley, Leslie Beard; Morra, Dante; Abrams, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore health-care professionals', health administrators', and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives' perceptions of lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and the perceived impacts on funding and patient care. This is a qualitative descriptive study using semi-structured interviews, which was conducted in Ontario, Canada. Seventy-four individuals from medical oncology, radiation oncology, thoracic surgery, respirology, pathology, radiology, primary care, palliative care, nursing, pharmacy, social work, genetics, health administration, and not-for-profit cancer organizations participated in this study. Participants described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and its negative impact on patients' psychological health, lung cancer funding, and patient care. The feeling of guilt and shame experienced by lung cancer patients as a result of the stigma associated with the disease was described. In terms of lung cancer funding, stigma was described as a reason lung cancer receives significantly less research funding compared to other cancers. In terms of patient care, lung cancer-related nihilism was credited with negatively impacting physician referral patterns with the belief that lung cancer patients were less likely to receive referrals for medical treatment. Health-care professionals, health administrators, and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism with far-reaching consequences. Further work is needed to increase education and awareness about lung cancer to reduce the stigma and nihilism associated with the disease.

  10. Improving outcomes in lung cancer: the value of the multidisciplinary health care team

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Eve; Conron, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major worldwide health burden, with high disease-related morbidity and mortality. Unlike other major cancers, there has been little improvement in lung cancer outcomes over the past few decades, and survival remains disturbingly low. Multidisciplinary care is the cornerstone of lung cancer treatment in the developed world, despite a relative lack of evidence that this model of care improves outcomes. In this article, the available literature concerning the impact of multidisciplinary care on key measures of lung cancer outcomes is reviewed. This includes the limited observational data supporting improved survival with multidisciplinary care. The impact of multidisciplinary care on other benchmark measures of quality lung cancer treatment is also examined, including staging accuracy, access to diagnostic investigations, improvements in clinical decision making, better utilization of radiotherapy and palliative care services, and improved quality of life for patients. Health service research suggests that multidisciplinary care improves care coordination, leading to a better patient experience, and reduces variation in care, a problem in lung cancer management that has been identified worldwide. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the multidisciplinary model of care overcomes barriers to treatment, promotes standardized treatment through adherence to guidelines, and allows audit of clinical services and for these reasons is more likely to provide quality care for lung cancer patients. While there is strengthening evidence suggesting that the multidisciplinary model of care contributes to improvements in lung cancer outcomes, more quality studies are needed. PMID:27099511

  11. Improving outcomes in lung cancer: the value of the multidisciplinary health care team.

    PubMed

    Denton, Eve; Conron, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major worldwide health burden, with high disease-related morbidity and mortality. Unlike other major cancers, there has been little improvement in lung cancer outcomes over the past few decades, and survival remains disturbingly low. Multidisciplinary care is the cornerstone of lung cancer treatment in the developed world, despite a relative lack of evidence that this model of care improves outcomes. In this article, the available literature concerning the impact of multidisciplinary care on key measures of lung cancer outcomes is reviewed. This includes the limited observational data supporting improved survival with multidisciplinary care. The impact of multidisciplinary care on other benchmark measures of quality lung cancer treatment is also examined, including staging accuracy, access to diagnostic investigations, improvements in clinical decision making, better utilization of radiotherapy and palliative care services, and improved quality of life for patients. Health service research suggests that multidisciplinary care improves care coordination, leading to a better patient experience, and reduces variation in care, a problem in lung cancer management that has been identified worldwide. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the multidisciplinary model of care overcomes barriers to treatment, promotes standardized treatment through adherence to guidelines, and allows audit of clinical services and for these reasons is more likely to provide quality care for lung cancer patients. While there is strengthening evidence suggesting that the multidisciplinary model of care contributes to improvements in lung cancer outcomes, more quality studies are needed.

  12. Perceptions of Primary Care Among Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Shawna V.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Bator, Alicja; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A.; Somer, Robert A.; Ferrante, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obese breast cancer survivors (BCSs) are impacted by diminished quality of life (QOL), multiple comorbid conditions, and poor disease outcomes. Despite national guidelines recommending a healthy weight to improve QOL and outcomes posttreatment, support and education are not routinely provided to BCSs in primary care. To fill this gap, we assessed perceptions of primary care received among BCSs by weight status. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys were administered to early-stage BCSs (N = 188) from 2 New Jersey cancer centers between May 2012 and July 2013. Sociodemographics, medical history, functional health status, perceived satisfaction with one’s primary care provider (PCP), and PCP involvement in follow-up care were assessed. Results: In total, 82% of overweight BCSs and 30% of obese BCSs reported not being told by their doctor that they were overweight or obese, despite these conditions being highly prevalent (35% and 35%, respectively). Obese BCSs were more likely than healthy weight BCSs to be African American, have a higher comorbidity score, poorer functional health, and greater satisfaction with their PCPs. Conclusion: The PCP–patient encounter may represent an opportunity for PCPs to correct misperceptions and promote weight reduction efforts among BCSs, thus improving QOL and disease outcomes. PMID:26120589

  13. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns of psychological symptoms between trajectories. This naturalistic study focused on 241 cancer patients receiving psychological care at psycho-oncology institutions. Data were collected before the initiation of psychological care, and 3 and 9 months thereafter. Latent class growth analysis was applied to identify personal control trajectories. Three personal control trajectories were identified: enduring improvement (41%), temporary improvement (50%), and deterioration (9%). Education and baseline physical symptoms distinguished these trajectories. In the whole group, improvements in personal control were associated with improvements in psychological symptoms. Patients at distinct trajectories reported different levels of psychological symptoms, but did not differ in their courses of psychological symptoms. Patients in the enduring and temporary control improvement groups experienced significant psychological symptoms reductions over time, whereas patients in the control deterioration group maintained high psychological symptoms. Improvements in personal control seem to depend on initial control level: those who start with the highest control levels show subsequent improvements, whereas those with the lowest control levels show subsequent deterioration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. ECCO Essential Requirements for Quality Cancer Care: Colorectal Cancer. A critical review.

    PubMed

    Beets, Geerard; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Andritsch, Elisabeth; Arnold, Dirk; Beishon, Marc; Crul, Mirjam; Dekker, Jan Willem; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Fléjou, Jean-François; Grisold, Wolfgang; Henning, Geoffrey; Laghi, Andrea; Lovey, Jozsef; Negrouk, Anastassia; Pereira, Philippe; Roca, Pierre; Saarto, Tiina; Seufferlein, Thomas; Taylor, Claire; Ugolini, Giampaolo; Velde, Cornelis van de; Herck, Bert van; Yared, Wendy; Costa, Alberto; Naredi, Peter

    2017-02-01

    ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care (ERQCC) are checklists and explanations of organisation and actions that are necessary to give high-quality care to patients who have a specific tumour type. They are written by European experts representing all disciplines involved in cancer care. ERQCC papers give oncology teams, patients, policymakers and managers an overview of the elements needed in any healthcare system to provide high quality of care throughout the patient journey. References are made to clinical guidelines and other resources where appropriate, and the focus is on care in Europe. Colorectal cancer: essential requirements for quality care CONCLUSION: Taken together, the information presented in this paper provides a comprehensive description of the essential requirements for establishing a high-quality CRC service. The ECCO expert group is aware that it is not possible to propose a 'one size fits all' system for all countries, but urges that access to multidisciplinary units or centres must be guaranteed for all those with CRC. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Caring for a child with cancer: impact on mother's health.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Forugh; Oskouie, Fatemeh; Shoghi, Mahnaz

    2014-01-01

    The life of a mother undergoes a dramatic change after a child is diagnosed with cancer. The present study aimed to determine effects on the everyday life process and health status of mothers with children suffering from leukemia. This qualitative study was based on a grounded theory approach with sixteen mothers. The results indicate that after onset of disease in their children, they marginalized their own health and tied their identities to taking care of the child and keeping the child healthy by ignoring themselves, becoming imprisoned in a taking-care-of-the-child position, and trying very hard for seek balance and stability Enduring physical pressures on the one hand, and constantly attempting to achieve balance and stability in family processes on the other hand, gradually cause exhaustion. It seems that health care providers and nurses should pay much more attention to the health status of this group of mothers.

  16. Health Insurance for Cancer Care in Asia: Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Pittayapan, Pongpak

    2016-01-01

    Thailand has a universal multi-payer system with two main types of health insurance: National Health Security Office or public health insurance and private insurance. National health insurance is designed for people who are not eligible to be members of any employment-based health insurance program. Although private health insurance is also available, all Thai citizens are required to be enrolled in either national health insurance or employees’ health insurance. There are many differences between the public health insurance and private insurance. Public health insurance, therefore, initiates programs that offer many sets of benefit packages for high-cost care. For cancer care, cover screening, curative treatment such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiation together with supportive and palliative care. PMID:27981139

  17. GPs' assessment of cooperation with other health care providers involved in cancer care-a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Koné, I; Klein, G; Siebenhofer, A; Dahlhaus, A; Güthlin, C

    2017-10-06

    Cancer is a complex disease requiring the involvement of several health care providers. A possible constant in the cancer care process is the general practitioner (GP). The aim of this project was to evaluate GPs' satisfaction with cooperation with other health care providers in the cancer care process of their patients and to explore which variables are associated with higher satisfaction with cooperation with other health care providers. We considered the following health care providers: outpatient oncology specialists, physicians in relatively small hospitals (≤400 beds), physicians in relatively large hospitals (>400 beds), home care services, outpatient psycho(onco)logists/psychotherapists, hospice/palliative care units and specialised palliative home care. The cross-sectional study was carried out as a postal survey all over Germany. Data were analysed descriptively and by means of logistic regression. Overall satisfaction with cooperation with other health care providers involved in cancer care was rather high. Only cooperation with outpatient psycho(onco)logists/psychotherapists was rated as not assessable/irrelevant by a majority of GPs. For all other health care providers under review, both communication and the transfer of sufficient information in good time were associated with overall satisfaction with cooperation. Little association was found between GP and practice variables and overall satisfaction with cooperation with the considered health care providers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effectiveness of a primary care practice intervention for increasing colorectal cancer screening in Appalachian Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Dignan, Mark; Shelton, Brent; Slone, Stacey A; Tolle, Cheri; Mohammad, Sohail; Schoenberg, Nancy; Pearce, Kevin; Van Meter, Emily; Ely, Gretchen

    2014-01-01

    This report describes findings from a randomized controlled trial of an intervention to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in primary care practices in Appalachian Kentucky. Sixty-six primary care practices were randomized to early or delayed intervention groups. The intervention was provided at practices using academic detailing, a method of education where providers receive information on a specific topic through personal contact. Data were collected in cross-sectional surveys of medical records at baseline and six months post-intervention. A total of 3844 medical records were reviewed at baseline and 3751 at the six-month follow-up. At baselines, colonoscopy was recommended more frequently (43.4%) than any other screening modality, followed by fecal occult blood testing (18.0%), flexible sigmoidoscopy (0.4%), and double-contrast barium enema (0.3%). Rates of documented screening results were higher for all practices at the six-month follow-up for colonoscopy (31.8% vs 29.6%) and fecal occult blood testing (12.2% vs 11.2%). For early intervention practices that recommended screening, colonoscopy rates increased by 15.7% at six months compared to an increase of 2.4% in the delayed intervention practices (p=.01). Using academic detailing to reach rural primary care providers with a CRC screening intervention was associated with an increase in colonoscopy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Cancer incidence in a Cancer Care Unit of the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) in Toluca, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Villanueva, Angel; Chacón Sánchez, Jesús; Santillán Arreygue, Leopoldo; Sánchez González, Yolanda; Romero-Figueroa, María del Socorro

    2014-01-01

    In 2000, malignant tumors were responsible for 12% of nearly 56 million deaths that occurred in the world from all causes. To determine the incidence of cancer in a Cancer Care Unit of IMSS in Toluca, Mexico. Prospective cross-sectional study; we identified the primary tumor, age, family history of cancer, comorbidities, risk factors, and ECOG in patients with newly diagnosed cancer. We identified 446 cases, 66.1% were women. The age group of age 50 to 59 had the highest number of cases (98). The most common cancers in women are breast, cervical, and ovarian cancer, and in men, testicular, prostate, and colorectal cancer. The most common cancers in both sexes were breast cancer, cervical cancer, colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, and testicular cancer.

  20. Influences and Practices in Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Health Care Providers Serving Northern Plains American Indians, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Walaszek, Anne; Perdue, David G.; Rhodes, Kristine L.; Haverkamp, Donald; Forster, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The epidemiology of colorectal cancer, including incidence, mortality, age of onset, stage of diagnosis, and screening, varies regionally among American Indians. The objective of the Improving Northern Plains American Indian Colorectal Cancer Screening study was to improve understanding of colorectal cancer screening among health care providers serving Northern Plains American Indians. Methods Data were collected, in person, from a sample of 145 health care providers at 27 health clinics across the Northern Plains from May 2011 through September 2012. Participants completed a 32-question, self-administered assessment designed to assess provider practices, screening perceptions, and knowledge. Results The proportion of providers who ordered or performed at least 1 colorectal cancer screening test for an asymptomatic, average-risk patient in the previous month was 95.9% (139 of 145). Of these 139 providers, 97.1% ordered colonoscopies, 12.9% ordered flexible sigmoidoscopies, 73.4% ordered 3-card, guaiac-based, fecal occult blood tests, and 21.6% ordered fecal immunochemical tests. Nearly two-thirds (64.7%) reported performing in-office guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests using digital rectal examination specimens. Providers who reported receiving a formal update on colorectal cancer screening during the previous 24 months were more likely to screen using digital rectal exam specimens than providers who had received a formal update on colorectal cancer screening more than 24 months prior (73.9% vs 56.9%, respectively, χ2 = 4.29, P = .04). Conclusion Despite recommendations cautioning against the use of digital rectal examination specimens for colorectal cancer screening, the practice is common among providers serving Northern Plains American Indian populations. Accurate up-to-date, ongoing education for patients, the community, and health care providers is needed. PMID:27978410

  1. Influences and Practices in Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Health Care Providers Serving Northern Plains American Indians, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Melanie; Walaszek, Anne; Perdue, David G; Rhodes, Kristine L; Haverkamp, Donald; Forster, Jean

    2016-12-15

    The epidemiology of colorectal cancer, including incidence, mortality, age of onset, stage of diagnosis, and screening, varies regionally among American Indians. The objective of the Improving Northern Plains American Indian Colorectal Cancer Screening study was to improve understanding of colorectal cancer screening among health care providers serving Northern Plains American Indians. Data were collected, in person, from a sample of 145 health care providers at 27 health clinics across the Northern Plains from May 2011 through September 2012. Participants completed a 32-question, self-administered assessment designed to assess provider practices, screening perceptions, and knowledge. The proportion of providers who ordered or performed at least 1 colorectal cancer screening test for an asymptomatic, average-risk patient in the previous month was 95.9% (139 of 145). Of these 139 providers, 97.1% ordered colonoscopies, 12.9% ordered flexible sigmoidoscopies, 73.4% ordered 3-card, guaiac-based, fecal occult blood tests, and 21.6% ordered fecal immunochemical tests. Nearly two-thirds (64.7%) reported performing in-office guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests using digital rectal examination specimens. Providers who reported receiving a formal update on colorectal cancer screening during the previous 24 months were more likely to screen using digital rectal exam specimens than providers who had received a formal update on colorectal cancer screening more than 24 months prior (73.9% vs 56.9%, respectively, χ(2) = 4.29, P = .04). Despite recommendations cautioning against the use of digital rectal examination specimens for colorectal cancer screening, the practice is common among providers serving Northern Plains American Indian populations. Accurate up-to-date, ongoing education for patients, the community, and health care providers is needed.

  2. Promoting Patient and Caregiver Engagement to Care in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Emanuela; Acquati, Chiara; Molgora, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The positive outcomes associated with Patient Engagement (PE) have been strongly supported by the recent literature. However, this concept has been marginally addressed in the context of cancer. Limited attention has also received the role of informal caregivers in promoting physical and psychological well-being of patients, as well as the interdependence of dyads. The Cancer Dyads Group Intervention (CDGI) is a couple-based psychosocial intervention developed to promote engagement in management behaviors, positive health outcomes, and the quality of the relationship between cancer patients and their informal caregivers. The article examines the ability of the CDGI to promote adaptive coping behaviors and the perceived level of closeness by comparing cancer patients participating in the intervention and patients receiving psychosocial care at usual. Results indicate that individuals diagnosed with cancer attending the CDGI present significant increases in Fighting Spirit and Avoidance, while reporting also reduced levels of Fatalism and Anxious Preoccupation. Initial indications suggest that the intervention may contribute to strengthening the relationship with the primary support person. PMID:27826279

  3. New analysis reexamines the value of cancer care in the United States compared to Western Europe.

    PubMed

    Soneji, Samir; Yang, JaeWon

    2015-03-01

    Despite sharp increases in spending on cancer treatment since 1970 in the United States compared to Western Europe, US cancer mortality rates have decreased only modestly. This has raised questions about the additional value of US cancer care derived from this additional spending. We calculated the number of US cancer deaths averted, compared to the situation in Western Europe, between 1982 and 2010 for twelve cancer types. We also assessed the value of US cancer care, compared to that in Western Europe, by estimating the ratio of additional spending on cancer to the number of quality-adjusted life-years saved. Compared to Western Europe, for three of the four costliest US cancers-breast, colorectal, and prostate-there were approximately 67,000, 265,000, and 60,000 averted US deaths, respectively, and for lung cancer there were roughly 1,120,000 excess deaths in the study period. The ratio of incremental cost to quality-adjusted life-years saved equaled $402,000 for breast cancer, $110,000 for colorectal cancer, and $1,979,000 for prostate cancer-amounts that exceed most accepted thresholds for cost-effective medical care. The United States lost quality-adjusted life-years despite additional spending for lung cancer: -$19,000 per quality-adjusted life-year saved. Our results suggest that cancer care in the United States may provide less value than corresponding cancer care in Western Europe for many leading cancers.

  4. The Inclusion of the Care of the Cancer Survivor in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietmann, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    As the number of individuals surviving cancer continues to rise, short and long term effects of cancer and its treatment that result in physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs unique to the care of the cancer survivor has not been addressed in nursing curricula. The Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2005) recommends that all health care providers…

  5. The Inclusion of the Care of the Cancer Survivor in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietmann, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    As the number of individuals surviving cancer continues to rise, short and long term effects of cancer and its treatment that result in physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs unique to the care of the cancer survivor has not been addressed in nursing curricula. The Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2005) recommends that all health care providers…

  6. Virtual reality for the palliative care of cancer.

    PubMed

    Oyama, H

    1997-01-01

    We have been developing a VR system to provide patients with emotional support and to encourage them to assume an active life against cancer, since patients with an active lifestyle survive longer than those with a passive lifestyle. A possible explanation for this latter fact is that psychological stimulation may also activate the endocrine system and the immune system. Both systems may be able to rapidly repair tissue damaged by cancer and change the characteristics of the cancer itself. Although microelectrical analysis and molecular and genetic analyses are rapidly solving the riddles of the relationship between the brain and thought, we think that our VR research for palliative medicine may also play an important role in this area with regard to the development of new tools for treatment and support. This notion is based on the hypothesis that the brain can reorganize itself to compensate for irrationality or inappropriateness through pharmacological adaptation and/or anatomical regeneration of synapses. Another reason why VR research in palliative medicine is useful is that VR techniques represent not only an enhanced human-machine interface, but also an enhanced human communication technology. VR technology may also be used to help patients accept their disease. The mental state of a patient in the terminal stage of cancer changes step by step from denial of cancer, hope for a new treatment for cancer, suspicion of medical treatment, uneasiness regarding their future life, irritation, depression, and acceptance or despair. We plan to develop a new type of counseling system in medical cyberspace to provide mental care. It can also be used for group therapy or humor therapy to reduce loneliness. In summary, we conclude that VR technology can be applied to palliative medicine (1) to support communication between the patient and others, (2) to provide psychological support to treat neurosis and help to stabilize the patient's mental state, and (3) to actually

  7. Geography and the Burden of Care in Pediatric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Fluchel, Mark N.; Kirchhoff, Anne C.; Bodson, Julia; Sweeney, Carol; Edwards, Sandra L.; Ding, Qian; Stoddard, Gregory J.; Kinney, Anita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood cancers typically require rigorous treatment at specialized centers in urban areas, which can create substantial challenges for families residing in remote communities. We evaluated the impact of residence and travel time on the burden of care for families of childhood cancer patients. Procedure We conducted a cross-sectional, self-administered survey of 354 caregivers of pediatric cancer patients at a children’s hospital serving a seven state area. Measures included the impact of cancer treatment on relocation, employment, schooling and finances. We evaluated these domains by rural/urban residence and travel time (>1 hour and >2 hours) to the hospital in multivariable regression models. Results Of the 29% of caregivers who reported moving residences since their child was diagnosed, 33% reported that the move was due to their child’s cancer. Rural and remote (e.g., >1 hour travel time) caregivers missed more days of work during the first month after diagnosis than did urban and local caregivers, however, these differences did not persist over the first six months of therapy. One-third of caregivers reported quitting or changing jobs as a direct result of their child being diagnosed with cancer. Rural respondents had greater out-of-pocket travel expenses and reported a significantly greater perceived financial burden. Rural patients missed more school days and were at an increased risk of having to repeat a grade. Conclusions Childhood cancer has an appreciable impact on the lives of patients and caregivers. The burden is greater for those living far from a treatment center. PMID:25131518

  8. Geography and the burden of care in pediatric cancers.

    PubMed

    Fluchel, Mark N; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Bodson, Julia; Sweeney, Carol; Edwards, Sandra L; Ding, Qian; Stoddard, Gregory J; Kinney, Anita Y

    2014-11-01

    Childhood cancers typically require rigorous treatment at specialized centers in urban areas, which can create substantial challenges for families residing in remote communities. We evaluated the impact of residence and travel time on the burden of care for families of childhood cancer patients. We conducted a cross-sectional, self-administered survey of 354 caregivers of pediatric cancer patients at a children's hospital serving a seven state area. Measures included the impact of cancer treatment on relocation, employment, schooling, and finances. We evaluated these domains by rural/urban residence and travel time (>1 hour and >2 hours) to the hospital in multivariable regression models. Of the 29% of caregivers who reported moving residences as their child was diagnosed, 33% reported that the move was due to their child's cancer. Rural and remote (e.g., >1 hour travel time) caregivers missed more days of work during the first month after diagnosis than did urban and local caregivers, however, these differences did not persist over the first 6 months of therapy. One-third of caregivers reported quitting or changing jobs as a direct result of their child being diagnosed with cancer. Rural respondents had greater out-of-pocket travel expenses and reported a significantly greater perceived financial burden. Rural patients missed more school days and were at an increased risk of having to repeat a grade. Childhood cancer has an appreciable impact on the lives of patients and caregivers. The burden is greater for those living far from a treatment center. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effect of patient navigation on satisfaction with cancer-related care

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Paul C.; Jean-Pierre, Pascal; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Post, Douglas; Van Duyn, Mary Ann S.; Fiscella, Kevin; Darnell, Julie; Freund, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite growing popularity of patient navigation (PN) as a means to improve cancer care quality and reduce cancer-related disparities, there are few well-designed controlled trials assessing the impact of PN on patient outcomes like satisfaction with care. The present controlled study examined effect of PN on satisfaction with cancer-related care. Methods Patients who presented with a symptom or abnormal screening test (n=1788) or definitive diagnosis (n=445) of breast, cervical, colorectal, or prostate cancer from eight Patient Navigator Research Program sites were included in one of two groups: intervention (PN) or comparison (usual care or usual care plus cancer educational materials). Trained patient navigators met with intervention group participants to help them assess and identify resources to address barriers to cancer diagnostic or treatment care. Using a validated instrument, we assessed participants' satisfaction with their cancer diagnostic or treatment care up to 3 months after diagnostic resolution of a cancer-related abnormality or within 3 months of initiation of cancer treatment. Results Overall, patients reported high satisfaction with diagnostic care and cancer treatment. There were no statistically significant differences between PN and control groups in satisfaction with cancer-related care (p>0.05). Hispanic and African American participants were less likely to report high satisfaction with cancer care when compared to White patients. Middle-aged participants with higher education, higher household income, private insurance, owning their own home, working full-time, and those whose primary language is English had higher satisfaction with cancer-related diagnostic care. Conclusions PN had no statistically significant effect on patients' satisfaction with cancer-related care. Further research is needed to define the patient populations who might benefit from PN, content of PN that is most useful, and services that might enhance PN. PMID

  10. Effect of patient navigation on satisfaction with cancer-related care.

    PubMed

    Wells, Kristen J; Winters, Paul C; Jean-Pierre, Pascal; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Post, Douglas; Van Duyn, Mary Ann S; Fiscella, Kevin; Darnell, Julie; Freund, Karen M

    2016-04-01

    Despite growing popularity of patient navigation (PN) as a means to improve cancer care quality and reduce cancer-related disparities, there are few well-designed controlled trials assessing the impact of PN on patient outcomes like satisfaction with care. The present controlled study examined effect of PN on satisfaction with cancer-related care. Patients who presented with a symptom or abnormal screening test (n = 1788) or definitive diagnosis (n = 445) of breast, cervical, colorectal, or prostate cancer from eight Patient Navigator Research Program sites were included in one of two groups: intervention (PN) or comparison (usual care or usual care plus cancer educational materials). Trained patient navigators met with intervention group participants to help them assess and identify resources to address barriers to cancer diagnostic or treatment care. Using a validated instrument, we assessed participants' satisfaction with their cancer diagnostic or treatment care up to 3 months after diagnostic resolution of a cancer-related abnormality or within 3 months of initiation of cancer treatment. Overall, patients reported high satisfaction with diagnostic care and cancer treatment. There were no statistically significant differences between PN and control groups in satisfaction with cancer-related care (p > 0.05). Hispanic and African American participants were less likely to report high satisfaction with cancer care when compared to White patients. Middle-aged participants with higher education, higher household income, private insurance, owning their own home, working full-time, and those whose primary language is English had higher satisfaction with cancer-related diagnostic care. PN had no statistically significant effect on patients' satisfaction with cancer-related care. Further research is needed to define the patient populations who might benefit from PN, content of PN that is most useful, and services that might enhance PN. clinicaltrials

  11. Perceptions of Cancer Care and Clinical Trials in the Black Community: Implications for Care Coordination Between Oncology and Primary Care Teams.

    PubMed

    Sprague Martinez, Linda; Freeman, Elmer R; Winkfield, Karen M

    2017-09-01

    Despite efforts to ameliorate disparities in cancer care and clinical trials, barriers persist. As part of a multiphase community-engaged assessment, an exploratory community-engaged research partnership, forged between an academic hospital and a community-based organization, set out to explore perceptions of cancer care and cancer clinical trials by black Bostonians. Key informant interviews with health care providers and patient advocates in community health centers (CHCs), organizers from grassroots coalitions focused on cancer, informed the development of a focus group protocol. Six focus groups were conducted with black residents in Boston, including groups of cancer survivors and family members. Transcripts were coded thematically and a code-based report was generated and analyzed by community and academic stakeholders. While some participants identified clinical trials as beneficial, overall perceptions conjured feelings of fear and exploitation. Participants describe barriers to clinical trial participation in the context of cancer care experiences, which included negative interactions with providers and mistrust. Primary care physicians (PCPs) reported being levied as a trusted resource for patients undergoing care, but lamented the absence of a mechanism by which to gain information about cancer care and clinical trials. Confusion about cancer care and clinical trials persists, even among individuals who have undergone treatment for cancer. Greater coordination between PCPs and CHC care teams and oncology care teams may improve patient experiences with cancer care, while also serving as a mechanism to disseminate information about treatment options and clinical trials. Inequities in cancer care and clinical trial participation persist. The findings of this study indicate that greater coordination with primary care physicians (PCPs) and community health center (CHC) providers may be an important step for both improving the quality of cancer care in

  12. Cancer-related psychosocial research: what are the perspectives of cancer care centre users on participation?

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Julie; Robertson, Ann R R; Jhunjhunwala, Anita; Jarvis, Glyn C; McVittie, Chris

    2011-07-01

    To explore the perspectives of cancer care centre users on participation in psychosocial research to inform research design and ethics. The study is based on a qualitative research design. Fourteen semistructured interviews were carried in people diagnosed with cancer and carers. The interview included four main questions about practical barriers to participation, types of research design, motivating factors and the conduct of research in a cancer care support setting. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Interviewees demonstrated a willingness to participate in psychosocial research within certain circumstances. There were no practical barriers identified, although they considered payment for research-related travel important. The most acceptable research design was the face-to-face interview and the least preferred was the randomised control trial. The factors that motivated participation were altruism, valuing research, and making a contribution to the centre. Interviewees supported the conduct of research in cancer care support centres conditional upon delaying recruitment during the initial months of users' visits and its need to be discreet to avoid deterring visitors from accessing the centre. The study concludes that the personal interaction between participants and researchers is the most important feature of decision-making by patients/carers to join studies. Taking into account the perspectives of people affected by cancer during the early stages of research design may enhance recruitment and retention and can contribute to the development of research protocols and ethics.

  13. Associations among survivorship care plans, experiences of survivorship care, and functioning in older breast cancer survivors: CALGB/Alliance 369901

    PubMed Central

    Luta, Gheorghe; Sheppard, Vanessa; Isaacs, Claudine; Cohen, Harvey J.; Muss, Hyman B.; Yung, Rachel; Clapp, Jonathan D.; Winer, Eric; Hudis, Clifford; Tallarico, Michelle; Wang, Julhy; Barry, William T.; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Survivorship care plans (SCP) are recommended for all cancer patients and could be especially useful to survivors 65 years and over (“older”). This study examined receipt of SCPs among older breast cancer survivors and whether SCPs were associated with improved patient-reported outcomes. Methods Three hundred and twenty-eight older women diagnosed with invasive, nonmetastatic breast cancer between 2007–2011 were recruited from 78 cooperative-group sites. Participants completed telephone interviews at baseline and 1-year posttreatment. Regression analyses examined SCP receipt (yes/no) and functioning (EORTC-QLQ-C30), cancer worry, and experiences of survivorship care (care coordination, knowledge). Results Only 35 % of women received SCPs. For each 1-year increase in age, there was a 5 % lower odds of receiving an SCP (odds ratio (OR)=0.94, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.91–0.98, p=0.007). Besides age, no other factor predicted SCPs. SCP receipt was associated with greater knowledge and understanding of requisite follow-up care (p<0.05); however, functioning was not significantly different among those with vs. without SCPs. Conclusions Receipt of care plans was limited. SCPs improved understanding of breast cancer follow-up care among older survivors, but did not impact functioning one year post-treatment. Implications for Cancer Survivors To impact functioning and salient needs of the growing cohort of older survivors, survivorship care plans likely should be tailored to geriatric-specific issues. To improve functioning, SCP content should expand to include exercise, nutrition, polypharmacy, social support and management of symptom burden from cancer, and other comorbid conditions. To improve follow-up care for cancer survivors, SCPs should delineate shared care roles between oncology and primary care in managing recurrence surveillance, screening, and cancer sequelae. PMID:24917307

  14. Primary care physician use across the breast cancer care continuum: CanIMPACT study using Canadian administrative data.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Lofters, Aisha; Moineddin, Rahim; Decker, Kathleen; Groome, Patti; Kendell, Cynthia; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Li, Dongdong; McBride, Mary L; Mittmann, Nicole; Porter, Geoff; Turner, Donna; Urquhart, Robin; Winget, Marcy; Zhang, Yang; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-10-01

    To describe primary care physician (PCP) use and continuity of PCP care across the breast cancer care continuum. Population-based, retrospective cohort study using provincial cancer registries linked to health administrative databases. British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. All women with incident invasive breast cancer from 2007 to 2012 in Manitoba and Ontario and from 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia. The number and proportions of visits to PCPs were determined. Continuity of care was measured using the Usual Provider of Care index calculated as the proportion of visits to the most-often-visited PCP in the 6 to 30 months before a breast cancer diagnosis (baseline) and from 1 to 3 years following a breast cancer diagnosis (survivorship). More than three-quarters of patients visited their PCPs 2 or more times during the breast cancer diagnostic period, and more than 80% of patients had at least 1 PCP visit during breast cancer adjuvant treatment. Contact with the PCP decreased over time during breast cancer survivorship. Of the 3 phases, women appeared to be most likely to not have PCP contact during adjuvant treatment, with 10.7% (Ontario) to 18.7% (British Columbia) of women having no PCP visits during this phase. However, a sizable minority of women had at least monthly visits during the treatment phase, particularly in Manitoba and Ontario, where approximately a quarter of women saw a PCP at least monthly. We observed higher continuity of care with PCPs in survivorship (compared with baseline) in all provinces. Primary care physicians were generally involved throughout the breast cancer care continuum, but the level of involvement varied across care phases and by province. Future interventions will aim to further integrate primary and oncology care. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  15. A standardised graphic method for describing data privacy frameworks in primary care research using a flexible zone model.

    PubMed

    Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Ohmann, Christian; Verheij, Robert A; van Veen, Evert-Ben; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Taweel, Adel; Delaney, Brendan C

    2014-12-01

    To develop a model describing core concepts and principles of data flow, data privacy and confidentiality, in a simple and flexible way, using concise process descriptions and a diagrammatic notation applied to research workflow processes. The model should help to generate robust data privacy frameworks for research done with patient data. Based on an exploration of EU legal requirements for data protection and privacy, data access policies, and existing privacy frameworks of research projects, basic concepts and common processes were extracted, described and incorporated into a model with a formal graphical representation and a standardised notation. The Unified Modelling Language (UML) notation was enriched by workflow and own symbols to enable the representation of extended data flow requirements, data privacy and data security requirements, privacy enhancing techniques (PET) and to allow privacy threat analysis for research scenarios. Our model is built upon the concept of three privacy zones (Care Zone, Non-care Zone and Research Zone) containing databases, data transformation operators, such as data linkers and privacy filters. Using these model components, a risk gradient for moving data from a zone of high risk for patient identification to a zone of low risk can be described. The model was applied to the analysis of data flows in several general clinical research use cases and two research scenarios from the TRANSFoRm project (e.g., finding patients for clinical research and linkage of databases). The model was validated by representing research done with the NIVEL Primary Care Database in the Netherlands. The model allows analysis of data privacy and confidentiality issues for research with patient data in a structured way and provides a framework to specify a privacy compliant data flow, to communicate privacy requirements and to identify weak points for an adequate implementation of data privacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  16. Unpacking cancer patients' preferences for information about their care.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Erin M; Varner, Ashley

    2017-08-08

    Patient-centered decision making requires cancer patients beactively involvedand feel sufficiently informed about their care, but patients'preferences for information are often unrecognizedor unmet by their oncologist, particularly for more distressing topics. This study examined cancer patients' preferences for information about three care-related topics: 1) diagnostic information, 2) treatment costs, and 3) prognosis. We tested whether factors known to influence information preferences (psychological distress, control preferences, and financial distress) were differently associated with information preferences for each topic. Cancer patients (N = 176) receiving ongoing treatment completed a questionnaire that assessed their out-of-pocket treatment costs, psychological distress, preferences for control over their medical decisions, and the amount of information they desired and received from their oncologists about the three topics. Patients' preferences were less often met for treatment cost information than for the other topics, p< .001, with half wanting more cost information than they received.One-third of patientsalso wanted more prognosticinformation than they received.Patients' preferences for diagnostic information did not differ as a function of financial burden, distress, or control preferences, ps> .05. Preferences for cost information were greater among patients who preferredmore control over their medical decisions, p = .016. Patients' preferences for prognostic information were greater among those desiring more control and with lower distress, ps< .05. Financial burden was not associated with information preferences. Appreciating the variability in information preferences across topics and patients may aid efforts to meet patients' information needs and improve outcomes.

  17. Impact of Curriculum Content on Resident Attitudes Towards Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Lycan, Thomas; Hansen, Kristopher; Miller, David

    2017-06-01

    Residents' clinical and educational experiences affect their views of patient care and their ability to estimate prognosis. We conducted a randomized pilot study to determine if an educational session could influence internal medicine (IM) residents' interest in oncology and their ability to accurately determine the prognosis of cancer patients. We randomized 29 IM residents to attend either a traditional American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) oncology review lecture focusing on cancer complications or a lecture reviewing landmark studies that are the basis of common cancer treatments and prognoses. On the post-lecture questionnaire, residents' interest in oncology and their overall performance on knowledge assessments were similar. However, more residents attending the traditional ABIM lecture inappropriately withdrew care for patients with potentially treatable conditions. Prognostication is an important skill for IM residents, and inaccurate negative biases could potentially lead to serious errors in clinical judgment. Further study is needed with a larger sample size and a more extensive academic curriculum to further assess and improve this skill.

  18. [Multidisciplinary health care needs of psychologically distressed cancer patients in a Comprehensive Cancer Center].

    PubMed

    Schiel, R O; Brechtel, A; Hartmann, M; Taubert, A; Walther, J; Wiskemann, J; Rötzer, I; Becker, N; Jäger, D; Herzog, W; Friederich, H-C

    2014-03-01

    Considering the prolonged life-expectancies and the resulting demands that are placed on cancer patients and their relatives, the importance of specific counseling and support services including psycho-oncology, social services, nutritional, and exercise counseling has profoundly increased. The main focus of the current study was to evaluate the multidisciplinary health care needs of emotionally distressed cancer patients whoe were treated in a Comprehensive Cancer Center. METHODS AND STUDYGROUP: 831 out-patients were evaluated with regard to their psychological distress level and their multidisciplinary health care needs for specialist services of psycho-oncology, social services, nutritional, and exercise counseling using a tablet-PC assisted screening questionnaire. Separate analyses were completed for patients with and without psychological distress. One third of the screened patients showed clinically relevant psychological distress. Health care needs for all specialist services were significantly greater among these patients compared to patients without psychological distress (all p-values < 0.005). The higher needs were foremost presented by the number of needed specialist services (p < 0.001): two thirds of the psychologically distressed patients demonstrated, besides the need for a psycho-oncological service, a need for two or three further specialist services, whereas among patients without psychological distress more than 70% showed a need for at most one specialist service. Multidisciplinary health care needs of psychologically distressed cancer patients should be systematically addressed in a Comprehensive Cancer Center, and patients should be offered a coordinated and integrated health care program. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Transportation: a vehicle or roadblock to cancer care for VA patients with colorectal cancer?

    PubMed

    Zullig, Leah L; Jackson, George L; Provenzale, Dawn; Griffin, Joan M; Phelan, Sean; van Ryn, Michelle

    2012-03-01

    Patients must have transportation to the treatment site before they can access appropriate cancer care. This article describes factors associated with patients experiencing transportation-related barriers to accessing cancer care. The Cancer Care Assessment & Responsive Evaluation Studies (C-CARES) questionnaire was mailed to Veterans Affairs (VA) patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) during the fall of 2009. Eligible patients were diagnosed at any VA facility in 2008, they were men, and alive at the time of the mailing. A total of 1409 surveys were returned (approximately 67% response rate). To assess transportation barriers, patients were asked how often it was difficult to get transportation to or from treatment. Symptoms were assessed using validated Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) scales for fatigue, pain, and depression. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine determinants of transportation barriers. A minority of respondents (19%) reported transportation barriers. Patients experiencing pain (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.06) had greater odds of transportation barriers than patients without this symptom. Patients who reported no primary social support (OR, 6.13; 95% CI, 3.10-12.14) or nonspousal support (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.40-2.87) were more likely to experience transportation barriers than patients whose spouses provided social support. Patients with uncontrolled pain or less social support have greater odds of transportation barriers. The directional association between social support, symptoms, and transportation cannot be determined in this data. Inquiring about accessible transportation should become a routine part of cancer